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Sample records for mechanical folding kinetics

  1. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  2. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  3. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms, and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J

    2014-12-31

    RNA hairpins play a pivotal role in a diverse range of cellular functions, and are integral components of ribozymes, mRNA, and riboswitches. However, the mechanistic and kinetic details of RNA hairpin folding, which are key determinants of most of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic detail. Our results show that the potential energy landscapes have a distinct funnel-like bias toward the folded hairpin state, consistent with efficient structure-seeking properties. Mechanistic and kinetic information is analyzed in terms of kinetic transition networks. We find microsecond folding times, consistent with temperature jump experiments, for hairpin folding initiated from relatively compact unfolded states. This process is essentially driven by an initial collapse, followed by rapid zippering of the helix stem in the final phase. Much lower folding rates are predicted when the folding is initiated from extended chains, which undergo longer excursions on the energy landscape before nucleation events can occur. Our work therefore explains recent experiments and coarse-grained simulations, where the folding kinetics exhibit precisely this dependency on the initial conditions.

  4. Statistical mechanics of kinetic proofreading in protein folding in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gulukota, K; Wolynes, P G

    1994-01-01

    The statistical energy landscape picture of protein folding has led to the understanding that the energy landscape must have guiding forces leading to a protein folding funnel in order to avoid the Levinthal paradox in vitro. Since folding in vivo often requires the action of chaperone molecules and ATP hydrolysis, we must ask whether folding in a system maintained away from equilibrium can avoid the Levinthal paradox in other ways. We describe a model of the action of chaperone molecules in protein folding in vivo on the basis of a repetitive cycle of binding and unbinding, allowing the possibility of kinetic proofreading. We also study models in which chaperone binding is locally biased, depending on the similarity of the conformation to the native one. We show that while kinetic proofreading can modestly facilitate folding, it is insufficient by itself to overcome the Levinthal paradox. On the other hand, such kinetic proofreading with biasing can provide the nonequilibrium analog of a folding funnel and greatly enhance folding yields and speed up folding. PMID:7937758

  5. Translation Initiation is Controlled by RNA Folding Kinetics via a Ribosome Drafting Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Salis, Howard M

    2016-06-01

    RNA folding plays an important role in controlling protein synthesis as well as other cellular processes. Existing models have focused on how RNA folding energetics control translation initiation rate under equilibrium conditions but have largely ignored the effects of nonequilibrium RNA folding. We introduce a new mechanism, called "ribosome drafting", that explains how a mRNA's folding kinetics and the ribosome's binding rate collectively control its translation initiation rate. During cycles of translation, ribosome drafting emerges whenever successive ribosomes bind to a mRNA faster than the mRNA can refold, maintaining it in a nonequilibrium state with an acceleration of protein synthesis. Using computational design, time-correlated single photon counting, and expression measurements, we demonstrate that slow-folding and fast-folding RNA structures with equivalent folding energetics can vary protein synthesis rates by 1000-fold. We determine the necessary conditions for ribosome drafting by characterizing mRNAs with rationally designed ribosome binding rates, folding kinetics, and folding energetics, confirming the predictions of a nonequilibrium Markov model of translation. Our results have widespread implications, illustrating how competitive folding and assembly kinetics can shape the gene expression machinery's sequence-structure-function relationship inside cells. PMID:27199273

  6. Kinetic Intermediates in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarrinkar, Patrick P.; Williamson, James R.

    1994-08-01

    The folding pathways of large, highly structured RNA molecules are largely unexplored. Insight into both the kinetics of folding and the presence of intermediates was provided in a study of the Mg2+-induced folding of the Tetrahymena ribozyme by hybridization of complementary oligodeoxynucleotide probes. This RNA folds via a complex mechanism involving both Mg2+-dependent and Mg2+-independent steps. A hierarchical model for the folding pathway is proposed in which formation of one helical domain (P4-P6) precedes that of a second helical domain (P3-P7). The overall rate-limiting step is formation of P3-P7, and takes place with an observed rate constant of 0.72 ± 0.14 minute-1. The folding mechanism of large RNAs appears similar to that of many multidomain proteins in that formation of independently stable substructures precedes their association into the final conformation.

  7. Fast protein folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  8. Folding mechanism of reduced cytochrome c: Equilibrium and kinetic properties in the presence of carbon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Latypov, Ramil F.; Maki, Kosuke; Cheng, Hong; Luck, Stanley D.; Roder, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Despite close structural similarity, the ferric and ferrous forms of cytochrome c (cyt c) differ greatly in terms of their ligand binding properties, stability, folding and dynamics. The reduced heme iron binds diatomic ligands such as CO only under destabilizing conditions that promote weakening or disruption of the native methionine-iron linkage. This makes CO a useful conformational probe for detecting partially structured states that cannot be observed in the absence of endogenous ligands. Heme absorbance, circular dichroism and NMR were used to characterize the denaturant-induced unfolding equilibrium of Fe2+ cyt c in the presence and absence of CO. In addition to the native state (N), which does not bind CO, and the unfolded CO-complex (U-CO), a structurally distinct CO-bound form (M-CO) accumulates to high levels (~75% of the population) at intermediate guanidine hydrochloride concentrations. Comparison of the unfolding transition for different conformational probes reveals that M-CO is a compact state containing a native-like helical core and regions of local disorder in the segment containing the native Met80 ligand and adjacent loops. Kinetic measurements of CO binding and dissociation under native, partially denaturing and fully unfolded conditions indicate that a state, M, that is structurally analogous to M-CO is populated even in the absence of CO. The binding energy of the CO ligand lowers the free energy of this high-energy state to such an extent that it accumulates even under mildly denaturing equilibrium conditions. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters obtained in this study provide a fully self-consistent description of the linked unfolding/CO-binding equilibria of reduced cyt c. PMID:18761351

  9. RNA under tension: Folding Landscapes, Kinetic partitioning Mechanism, and Molecular Tensegrity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jong-Chin; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2012-11-19

    Non-coding RNA sequences play a great role in controlling a number of cellular functions, thus raising the need to understand their complex conformational dynamics in quantitative detail. In this perspective, we first show that single molecule pulling when combined with with theory and simulations can be used to quantitatively explore the folding landscape of nucleic acid hairpins, and riboswitches with tertiary interactions. Applications to riboswitches, which are non-coding RNA elements that control gene expression by undergoing dynamical conformational changes in response to binding of metabolites, lead to an organization principle that assembly of RNA is determined by the stability of isolated helices. We also point out the limitations of single molecule pulling experiments, with molecular extension as the only accessible parameter, in extracting key parameters of the folding landscapes of RNA molecules. PMID:23336034

  10. Kinetic partitioning mechanism governs the folding of the third FnIII domain of tenascin-C: evidence at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; Fang, Jie; Wang, Meijia; Li, Hongbin

    2011-09-30

    Statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations proposed that the folding of proteins can follow multiple parallel pathways on a rugged energy landscape from unfolded state en route to their folded native states. Kinetic partitioning mechanism is one of the possible mechanisms underlying such complex folding dynamics. Here, we use single-molecule atomic force microscopy technique to directly probe the multiplicity of the folding pathways of the third fibronectin type III domain from the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C (TNfn3). By stretching individual (TNfn3)(8) molecules, we forced TNfn3 domains to undergo mechanical unfolding and refolding cycles, allowing us to directly observe the folding pathways of TNfn3. We found that, after being mechanically unraveled and then relaxed to zero force, TNfn3 follows multiple parallel pathways to fold into their native states. The majority of TNfn3 fold into the native state in a simple two-state fashion, while a small percentage of TNfn3 were found to be trapped into kinetically stable folding intermediate states with well-defined three-dimensional structures. Furthermore, the folding of TNfn3 was also influenced by its neighboring TNfn3 domains. Complex misfolded states of TNfn3 were observed, possibly due to the formation of domain-swapped dimeric structures. Our studies revealed the ruggedness of the folding energy landscape of TNfn3 and provided direct experimental evidence that the folding dynamics of TNfn3 are governed by the kinetic partitioning mechanism. Our results demonstrated the unique capability of single-molecule AFM to probe the folding dynamics of proteins at the single-molecule level.

  11. Kinetics of Peptide Folding in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Smith-Dupont, Kathryn B.; Markiewicz, Beatrice N.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive understanding of water-soluble protein folding kinetics, much less is known about the folding dynamics and mechanisms of membrane proteins. However, recent studies have shown that for relatively simple systems, such as peptides that form a transmembrane α-helix, helical dimer, or helix-turn-helix, it is possible to assess the kinetics of several important steps, including peptide binding to the membrane from aqueous solution, peptide folding on the membrane surface, helix insertion into the membrane, and helix-helix association inside the membrane. Herein, we provide a brief review of these studies and also suggest new initiation and probing methods that could lead to improved temporal and structural resolution in future experiments. PMID:25808575

  12. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Almeida, Zaida L; Vaz, Daniela C; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M

    2016-08-31

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo.

  13. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Catarina S H; Almeida, Zaida L; Vaz, Daniela C; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  14. A New Folding Kinetic Mechanism for Human Transthyretin and the Influence of the Amyloidogenic V30M Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Catarina S. H.; Almeida, Zaida L.; Vaz, Daniela C.; Faria, Tiago Q.; Brito, Rui M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, chief among them Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Although caused by different proteins, these pathologies share some basic molecular mechanisms with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a rare hereditary neuropathy caused by amyloid formation and deposition by transthyretin (TTR) in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. Among the amyloidogenic TTR mutations known, V30M-TTR is the most common in FAP. TTR amyloidogenesis (ATTR) is triggered by tetramer dissociation, followed by partial unfolding and aggregation of the low conformational stability monomers formed. Thus, tetramer dissociation kinetics, monomer conformational stability and competition between refolding and aggregation pathways do play a critical role in ATTR. Here, we propose a new model to analyze the refolding kinetics of WT-TTR and V30M-TTR, showing that at pH and protein concentrations close to physiological, a two-step mechanism with a unimolecular first step followed by a second-order second step adjusts well to the experimental data. Interestingly, although sharing the same kinetic mechanism, V30M-TTR refolds at a much slower rate than WT-TTR, a feature that may favor the formation of transient species leading to kinetic partition into amyloidogenic pathways and, thus, significantly increasing the probability of amyloid formation in vivo. PMID:27589730

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Protein Folding Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Zhou, Xin; Liaw, Chih Young; Koh, Chan Ghee

    Based on two-dimensional square lattice models of proteins, the relation between folding time and temperature is studied by Monte Carlo simulation. The results can be represented by a kinetic model with three states — random coil, molten globule, and native state. The folding process is composed of nonspecific collapse and final searching for the native state. At high temperature, it is easy to escape from local traps in the folding process. With decreasing temperature, because of the trapping in local traps, the final searching speed decreases. Then the folding shows chevron rollover. Through the analysis of the fitted parameters of the kinetic model, it is found that the main difference between the energy landscapes of the HP model and the Go model is that the number of local minima of the Go model is less than that of the HP model.

  16. Length dependent folding kinetics of phenylacetylene oligomers: Structural characterization of a kinetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, Sidney P.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2005-03-01

    Using simulation to study the folding kinetics of 20-mer poly-phenylacetylene (pPA) oligomers, we find a long time scale trapped kinetic phase in the cumulative folding time distribution. This is demonstrated using molecular dynamics to simulate an ensemble of over 100 folding trajectories. The simulation data are fit to a four-state kinetic model which includes the typical folded and unfolded states, along with an intermediate state, and most surprisingly, a kinetically trapped state. Topologically diverse conformations reminiscent of α helices, β turns, and sheets in proteins are observed, along with unique structures in the form of knots. The nonhelical conformations are implicated, on the basis of structural correlations to kinetic parameters, to contribute to the trapped kinetic behavior. The strong solvophobic forces which mediate the folding process and produce a stable helical folded state also serve to overstabilize the nonhelical conformations, ultimately trapping them. From our simulations, the folding time is predicted to be on the order of 2.5-12.5 μs in the presence of the trapped kinetic phase. The folding mechanism for these 20-mer chains is compared with the previously reported folding mechanism for the pPA 12-mer chains. A linear scaling relationship between the chain length and the mean first passage time is predicted in the absence of the trapped kinetic phase. We discuss the major implications of this discovery in the design of self-assembling nanostructures.

  17. Fast, Approximate Kinetics of RNA Folding

    PubMed Central

    Senter, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we introduce the software suite Hermes, which provides fast, novel algorithms for RNA secondary structure kinetics. Using the fast Fourier transform to efficiently compute the Boltzmann probability that a secondary structure S of a given RNA sequence has base pair distance x (resp. y) from reference structure A (resp. B), Hermes computes the exact kinetics of folding from A to B in this coarse-grained model. In particular, Hermes computes the mean first passage time from the transition probability matrix by using matrix inversion, and also computes the equilibrium time from the rate matrix by using spectral decomposition. Due to the model granularity and the speed of Hermes, it is capable of determining secondary structure refolding kinetics for large RNA sequences, beyond the range of other methods. Comparative benchmarking of Hermes with other methods indicates that Hermes provides refolding kinetics of accuracy suitable for use in the computational design of RNA, an important area of synthetic biology. Source code and documentation for Hermes are available. PMID:25684201

  18. Stretched versus compressed exponential kinetics in α-helix folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter; Helbing, Jan; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2006-03-01

    In a recent paper (J. Bredenbeck, J. Helbing, J.R. Kumita, G.A. Woolley, P. Hamm, α-helix formation in a photoswitchable peptide tracked from picoseconds to microseconds by time resolved IR spectroscopy, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 102 (2005) 2379), we have investigated the folding of a photo-switchable α-helix with a kinetics that could be fit by a stretched exponential function exp(-( t/ τ) β). The stretching factor β became smaller as the temperature was lowered, a result which has been interpreted in terms of activated diffusion on a rugged energy surface. In the present paper, we discuss under which conditions diffusion problems occur with stretched exponential kinetics ( β < 1) and under which compressed exponential kinetics is obtained ( β > 1). We show that diffusion problems do have a strong tendency to yield stretched exponential kinetics, yet, that there are conditions (strong perturbation from equilibrium, performing the experiment in the folding direction) under which compressed exponential kinetics would be expected instead. We discuss the kinetics on free energy surfaces predicted by simple initiation-propagation models (zipper models) of α-helix folding, as well as by folding funnel models. We show that our recent experiment has been performed under condition for which models with strong downhill driving force, such as the zipper model, would predict compressed, rather than stretched exponential kinetics, in disagreement with the experimental observation. We therefore propose that the free energy surface along a reaction coordinate that governs the folding kinetics must be relatively flat and has a shape similar to a 1D golf course. We discuss how this conclusion can be unified with the thermodynamically well established zipper model by introducing an additional kinetic reaction coordinate.

  19. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein.

    PubMed

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A

    2008-12-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein--the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models--a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 10(5) possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 10(5) microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models.

  20. Chemical, physical, and theoretical kinetics of an ultrafast folding protein

    PubMed Central

    Kubelka, Jan; Henry, Eric R.; Cellmer, Troy; Hofrichter, James; Eaton, William A.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive set of equilibrium and kinetic data is presented and analyzed for an ultrafast folding protein—the villin subdomain. The equilibrium data consist of the excess heat capacity, tryptophan fluorescence quantum yield, and natural circular-dichroism spectrum as a function of temperature, and the kinetic data consist of time courses of the quantum yield from nanosecond-laser temperature-jump experiments. The data are well fit with three kinds of models—a three-state chemical-kinetics model, a physical-kinetics model, and an Ising-like theoretical model that considers 105 possible conformations (microstates). In both the physical-kinetics and theoretical models, folding is described as diffusion on a one-dimensional free-energy surface. In the physical-kinetics model the reaction coordinate is unspecified, whereas in the theoretical model, order parameters, either the fraction of native contacts or the number of native residues, are used as reaction coordinates. The validity of these two reaction coordinates is demonstrated from calculation of the splitting probability from the rate matrix of the master equation for all 105 microstates. The analysis of the data on site-directed mutants using the chemical-kinetics model provides information on the structure of the transition-state ensemble; the physical-kinetics model allows an estimate of the height of the free-energy barrier separating the folded and unfolded states; and the theoretical model provides a detailed picture of the free-energy surface and a residue-by-residue description of the evolution of the folded structure, yet contains many fewer adjustable parameters than either the chemical- or physical-kinetics models. PMID:19033473

  1. Oxidative folding of peptides with cystine-knot architectures: kinetic studies and optimization of folding conditions.

    PubMed

    Reinwarth, Michael; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Tomaszowski, Michael; Fabritz, Sebastian; Avrutina, Olga; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive peptides often contain several disulfide bonds that provide the main contribution to conformational rigidity and structural, thermal, or biological stability. Among them, cystine-knot peptides-commonly named "knottins"-make up a subclass with several thousand natural members. Hence, they are considered promising frameworks for peptide-based pharmaceuticals. Although cystine-knot peptides are available through chemical and recombinant synthetic routes, oxidative folding to afford the bioactive isomers still remains a crucial step. We therefore investigated the oxidative folding of ten protease-inhibiting peptides from two knottin families, as well as that of an HIV entry inhibitor and of aprotinin, under two conventional sets of folding conditions and by a newly developed procedure. Kinetic studies identified folding conditions that resulted in correctly folded miniproteins with high rates of conversion even for highly hydrophobic and aggregation-prone peptides in concentrated solutions. PMID:23229141

  2. The primary dynamics in protein folding: the earliest kinetic steps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    1996-03-01

    A novel laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) of 20 C or more is used to initiate the unfolding process of peptides and proteins on the picosecond time scale, and amide I time-resolved infrared absorbance transients are used to characterize the resulting kinetics. We have used this method to study the kinetics of folding and unfolding of a small 21 residue alanine based peptide and molten globule and native states of apomyoglobin, models for the helix which is an basic motif found in proteins. An essential result of our study is that the folding kinetics of a short length of peptide can occur within a few tens of nanoseconds which is much shorter than the time scale of the formation of intramolecular tertiary contacts from one point of a polypeptide chain to another. Furthermore, we observed that helices stabilized by tertiary contact formation unfold slower than helices surrounded by solvent by three orders of magnitude. These results bear directly on the protein folding problem, that is how do proteins fold from a large number of heterogeneous unfolded states to find the specific biologically active folded state on biologically relevent time scales, by suggesting that secondary structure forms first followed by tertiary structure. This work is a collaborative effort with R. GILMANSHIN at City College and S. WILLIAMS, R. B. DYER, and W. H. WOODRUFF at CST-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  3. Effects of mutation, truncation, and temperature on the folding kinetics of a WW domain.

    PubMed

    Maisuradze, Gia G; Zhou, Rui; Liwo, Adam; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A

    2012-07-20

    The purpose of this work is to show how mutation, truncation, and change of temperature can influence the folding kinetics of a protein. This is accomplished by principal component analysis of molecular-dynamics-generated folding trajectories of the triple β-strand WW domain from formin binding protein 28 (FBP28) (Protein Data Bank ID: 1E0L) and its full-size, and singly- and doubly-truncated mutants at temperatures below and very close to the melting point. The reasons for biphasic folding kinetics [i.e., coexistence of slow (three-state) and fast (two-state) phases], including the involvement of a solvent-exposed hydrophobic cluster and another delocalized hydrophobic core in the folding kinetics, are discussed. New folding pathways are identified in free-energy landscapes determined in terms of principal components for full-size mutants. Three-state folding is found to be a main mechanism for folding the FBP28 WW domain and most of the full-size and truncated mutants. The results from the theoretical analysis are compared to those from experiment. Agreements and discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental results are discussed. Because of its importance in understanding protein kinetics and function, the diffusive mechanism by which the FBP28 WW domain and its full-size and truncated mutants explore their conformational space is examined in terms of the mean-square displacement and principal component analysis eigenvalue spectrum analyses. Subdiffusive behavior is observed for all studied systems. PMID:22560992

  4. Protein Folding and Mechanisms of Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Villanueva, José Fernando; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; García-González, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Highly sophisticated mechanisms that modulate protein structure and function, which involve synthesis and degradation, have evolved to maintain cellular homeostasis. Perturbations in these mechanisms can lead to protein dysfunction as well as deleterious cell processes. Therefore in recent years the etiology of a great number of diseases has been attributed to failures in mechanisms that modulate protein structure. Interconnections among metabolic and cell signaling pathways are critical for homeostasis to converge on mechanisms associated with protein folding as well as for the preservation of the native structure of proteins. For instance, imbalances in secretory protein synthesis pathways lead to a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which elicits the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR). Therefore, taking this into consideration, a key part of this paper is developed around the protein folding phenomenon, and cellular mechanisms which support this pivotal condition. We provide an overview of chaperone protein function, UPR via, spatial compartmentalization of protein folding, proteasome role, autophagy, as well as the intertwining between these processes. Several diseases are known to have a molecular etiology in the malfunction of mechanisms responsible for protein folding and in the shielding of native structure, phenomena which ultimately lead to misfolded protein accumulation. This review centers on our current knowledge about pathways that modulate protein folding, and cell responses involved in protein homeostasis. PMID:26225966

  5. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  6. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-21

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  7. Periodic and stochastic thermal modulation of protein folding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkov, Max; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Chemical reactions are usually observed either by relaxation of a bulk sample after applying a sudden external perturbation, or by intrinsic fluctuations of a few molecules. Here we show that the two ideas can be combined to measure protein folding kinetics, either by periodic thermal modulation, or by creating artificial thermal noise that greatly exceeds natural thermal fluctuations. We study the folding reaction of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase driven by periodic temperature waveforms. As the temperature waveform unfolds and refolds the protein, its fluorescence color changes due to FRET (Förster resonant Energy Transfer) of two donor/acceptor fluorophores labeling the protein. We adapt a simple model of periodically driven kinetics that nicely fits the data at all temperatures and driving frequencies: The phase shifts of the periodic donor and acceptor fluorescence signals as a function of driving frequency reveal reaction rates. We also drive the reaction with stochastic temperature waveforms that produce thermal fluctuations much greater than natural fluctuations in the bulk. Such artificial thermal noise allows the recovery of weak underlying signals due to protein folding kinetics. This opens up the possibility for future detection of a stochastic resonance for protein folding subject to noise with controllable amplitude.

  8. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    DOEpatents

    Markley, Finley W.

    1976-01-01

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  9. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2003-06-25

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  10. Microsecond Microfluidic Mixing for Investigation of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D E; Santiago, J G; Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We have developed and characterized a mixer to study the reaction kinetics of protein folding on a microsecond timescale. The mixer uses hydrodynamic focusing of pressure-driven flow in a microfluidic channel to reduce diffusion times as first demonstrated by Knight et al.[1]. Features of the mixer include 1 {micro}s mixing times, sample consumptions of order 1 nl/s, loading sample volumes on the order of microliters, and the ability to manufacture in fused silica for compatibility with most spectroscopic methods.

  11. A combined kinetic push and thermodynamic pull as driving forces for outer membrane protein sorting and folding in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Karen G.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro folding studies of outer membrane beta-barrels have been invaluable in revealing the lipid effects on folding rates and efficiencies as well as folding free energies. Here, the biophysical results are summarized, and these kinetic and thermodynamic findings are considered in terms of the requirements for folding in the context of the cellular environment. Because the periplasm lacks an external energy source the only driving forces for sorting and folding available within this compartment are binding or folding free energies and their associated rates. These values define functions for periplasmic chaperones and suggest a biophysical mechanism for the BAM complex. PMID:26370938

  12. Dynamics of protein folding: probing the kinetic network of folding-unfolding transitions with experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Ginka S; Murphy, Ronan D; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kubelka, Jan

    2011-08-01

    The problem of spontaneous folding of amino acid chains into highly organized, biologically functional three-dimensional protein structures continues to challenge the modern science. Understanding how proteins fold requires characterization of the underlying energy landscapes as well as the dynamics of the polypeptide chains in all stages of the folding process. In recent years, important advances toward these goals have been achieved owing to the rapidly growing interdisciplinary interest and significant progress in both experimental techniques and theoretical methods. Improvements in the experimental time resolution led to determination of the timescales of the important elementary events in folding, such as formation of secondary structure and tertiary contacts. Sensitive single molecule methods made possible probing the distributions of the unfolded and folded states and following the folding reaction of individual protein molecules. Discovery of proteins that fold in microseconds opened the possibility of atomic-level theoretical simulations of folding and their direct comparisons with experimental data, as well as of direct experimental observation of the barrier-less folding transition. The ultra-fast folding also brought new questions, concerning the intrinsic limits of the folding rates and experimental signatures of barrier-less "downhill" folding. These problems will require novel approaches for even more detailed experimental investigations of the folding dynamics as well as for the analysis of the folding kinetic data. For theoretical simulations of folding, a main challenge is how to extract the relevant information from overwhelmingly detailed atomistic trajectories. New theoretical methods have been devised to allow a systematic approach towards a quantitative analysis of the kinetic network of folding-unfolding transitions between various configuration states of a protein, revealing the transition states and the associated folding pathways at

  13. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico. All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats. PMID:27574021

  14. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats. PMID:27574021

  15. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  16. Cellular Mechanisms of Membrane Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Skach, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The membrane protein folding problem can be articulated by two central questions. How is protein topology established by selective peptide transport to opposite sides of the cellular membrane? And how are transmembrane segments inserted, integrated and folded within the lipid bilayer? In eukaryotes, this process usually takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) coincident with protein synthesis, and is facilitated by the translating Ribosome and the Sec61 Translocon Complex (RTC). At its core, the RTC forms a dynamic pathway through which the elongating nascent polypeptide moves as it is delivered into cytosolic, lumenal and lipid compartments. This perspective will focus on emerging evidence that the RTC functions as a protein folding machine that restricts conformational space by establishing transmembrane topology and yet provides a permissive environment that enables nascent transmembrane domains to efficiently progress down their folding energy landscape. PMID:19491932

  17. Statistical Mechanical Model for pH-Induced Protein Folding: Application to Apomyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Takuya; Sakuma, Yosuke; Maki, Kosuke

    2016-09-01

    Despite the major role of pH in protein folding and stability, a quantitative understanding of the pH-induced protein folding mechanism remains elusive. Two conventional models, the Monod-Wyman-Changeux and Linderstrøm-Lang smeared charge models, respectively, have been used to analyze the formation/disruption of specific native structures and fluctuating non-native states. However, there are only a few models that can represent the overall kinetic events of folding/unfolding independent of the properties of relevant molecular species, which has hampered the efforts to systematically analyze pH-induced folding. Here, we constructed a statistical mechanical model that incorporates the protonation mechanism of conventional models along with a combined manual search and least-squares fitting procedure, which was used to investigate the folding of horse apomyoglobin over a wide pH range (2.2-6.7), with a time window ranging from ∼40 μs to ∼100 s, using continuous-/stopped-flow fluorescence at 8 °C. Quantitative analysis assuming a five-state sequential scheme indicated that (1) pH-induced folding/unfolding is represented by both specific binding and Coulombic interactions; (2) kinetic folding/unfolding intermediates share kinetic mechanisms with the equilibrium intermediate, indicating their equivalence; and (3) native-like properties are acquired successively during folding by intermediates and in transition states. This model could also be applied to a variety of association/dissociation processes. PMID:27491483

  18. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale.

  19. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale. PMID:25777154

  20. Folding kinetics of WW domains with the united residue force field for bridging microscopic motions and experimental measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Suñol, David; Todorovski, Toni; Macias, Maria J.; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the utility of the coarse-grained united-residue (UNRES) force field to compare experimental and computed kinetic data for folding proteins, we have performed long-time millisecond-timescale canonical Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of the triple β-strand from the Formin binding protein 28 WW domain and six nonnatural variants, using UNRES. The results have been compared with available experimental data in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Complexities of the folding pathways, which cannot be determined experimentally, were revealed. The folding mechanisms obtained from the simulated folding kinetics are in agreement with experimental results, with a few discrepancies for which we have accounted. The origins of single- and double-exponential kinetics and their correlations with two- and three-state folding scenarios are shown to be related to the relative barrier heights between the various states. The rate constants obtained from time profiles of the fractions of the native, intermediate, and unfolded structures, and the kinetic equations fitted to them, correlate with the experimental values; however, they are about three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones for most of the systems. These differences are in agreement with the timescale extension derived by scaling down the friction of water and averaging out the fast degrees of freedom when passing from all-atom to a coarse-grained representation. Our results indicate that the UNRES force field can provide accurate predictions of folding kinetics of these WW domains, often used as models for the study of the mechanisms of proein folding. PMID:25489078

  1. Configuration-dependent diffusion can shift the kinetic transition state and barrier height of protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Jorge; Oliveira, Ronaldo J.; Leite, Vitor B. P.; Wang, Jin

    2007-01-01

    We show that diffusion can play an important role in protein-folding kinetics. We explicitly calculate the diffusion coefficient of protein folding in a lattice model. We found that diffusion typically is configuration- or reaction coordinate-dependent. The diffusion coefficient is found to be decreasing with respect to the progression of folding toward the native state, which is caused by the collapse to a compact state constraining the configurational space for exploration. The configuration- or position-dependent diffusion coefficient has a significant contribution to the kinetics in addition to the thermodynamic free-energy barrier. It effectively changes (increases in this case) the kinetic barrier height as well as the position of the corresponding transition state and therefore modifies the folding kinetic rates as well as the kinetic routes. The resulting folding time, by considering both kinetic diffusion and the thermodynamic folding free-energy profile, thus is slower than the estimation from the thermodynamic free-energy barrier with constant diffusion but is consistent with the results from kinetic simulations. The configuration- or coordinate-dependent diffusion is especially important with respect to fast folding, when there is a small or no free-energy barrier and kinetics is controlled by diffusion. Including the configurational dependence will challenge the transition state theory of protein folding. The classical transition state theory will have to be modified to be consistent. The more detailed folding mechanistic studies involving phi value analysis based on the classical transition state theory also will have to be modified quantitatively. PMID:17804812

  2. Computational design of RNA parts, devices, and transcripts with kinetic folding algorithms implemented on multiprocessor clusters.

    PubMed

    Thimmaiah, Tim; Voje, William E; Carothers, James M

    2015-01-01

    With progress toward inexpensive, large-scale DNA assembly, the demand for simulation tools that allow the rapid construction of synthetic biological devices with predictable behaviors continues to increase. By combining engineered transcript components, such as ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, ligand-binding aptamers, catalytic ribozymes, and aptamer-controlled ribozymes (aptazymes), gene expression in bacteria can be fine-tuned, with many corollaries and applications in yeast and mammalian cells. The successful design of genetic constructs that implement these kinds of RNA-based control mechanisms requires modeling and analyzing kinetically determined co-transcriptional folding pathways. Transcript design methods using stochastic kinetic folding simulations to search spacer sequence libraries for motifs enabling the assembly of RNA component parts into static ribozyme- and dynamic aptazyme-regulated expression devices with quantitatively predictable functions (rREDs and aREDs, respectively) have been described (Carothers et al., Science 334:1716-1719, 2011). Here, we provide a detailed practical procedure for computational transcript design by illustrating a high throughput, multiprocessor approach for evaluating spacer sequences and generating functional rREDs. This chapter is written as a tutorial, complete with pseudo-code and step-by-step instructions for setting up a computational cluster with an Amazon, Inc. web server and performing the large numbers of kinefold-based stochastic kinetic co-transcriptional folding simulations needed to design functional rREDs and aREDs. The method described here should be broadly applicable for designing and analyzing a variety of synthetic RNA parts, devices and transcripts.

  3. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of denaturation and renaturation of barstar in the folding transition zone.

    PubMed Central

    Shastry, M. C.; Agashe, V. R.; Udgaonkar, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The fluorescence-monitored kinetics of folding and unfolding of barstar by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) in the folding transition zone, at pH 7, 25 degrees C, have been quantitatively analyzed using a 3-state mechanism: U(S)<-->UF<-->N. U(S) and UF are slow-refolding and fast-refolding unfolded forms of barstar, and N is the native protein. U(S) and UF probably differ in possessing trans and cis conformations, respectively, of the Tyr 47-Pro 48 bond. The 3-state model could be used because the kinetics of folding and unfolding of barstar show 2 phases, a fast phase and a slow phase, and because the relative amplitudes of the 2 phases depend only on the final refolding conditions and not on the initial conditions. Analysis of the observed kinetics according to the 3-state model yields the values of the 4 microscopic rate constants that describe the transitions between the 3 states at different concentrations of GdnHCl. The value of the equilibrium unfolded ratio U(S):UF (K21) and the values of the rate constants of the U(S)-->UF and UF-->U(S) reactions, k12 and k21, respectively, are shown to be independent of the concentration of GdnHCl. K21 has a value of 2.1 +/- 0.1, and k12 and k21 have values of 5.3 x 10(-3) s-1 and 11.2 x 10(-3) s-1, respectively. Double-jump experiments that monitor reactions that are silent to fluorescence monitoring were used to confirm the values of K21, k12, and k21 obtained from the 3-state analysis and thereby the validity of the 3-state model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7833803

  4. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  5. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  6. Solvent-Exposed Salt Bridges Influence the Kinetics of α-Helix Folding and Unfolding.

    PubMed

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Tros, Martijn; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; van Dijk, Chris N; Vreede, Jocelyne; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-03-01

    Salt bridges are known to play an essential role in the thermodynamic stability of the folded conformation of many proteins, but their influence on the kinetics of folding remains largely unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of Glu-Arg salt bridges on the kinetics of α-helix folding using temperature-jump transient-infrared spectroscopy and steady-state UV circular dichroism. We find that geometrically optimized salt bridges (Glu(-) and Arg(+) are spaced four peptide units apart, and the Glu/Arg order is such that the side-chain rotameric preferences favor salt-bridge formation) significantly speed up folding and slow down unfolding, whereas salt bridges with unfavorable geometry slow down folding and slightly speed up unfolding. Our observations suggest a possible explanation for the surprising fact that many biologically active proteins contain salt bridges that do not stabilize the native conformation: these salt bridges might have a kinetic rather than a thermodynamic function.

  7. Mechanics of large folds in thin interfacial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2014-10-01

    A thin film confined to a liquid interface responds to uniaxial compression by wrinkling, and then by folding, that has been solved exactly before self-contact. Here, we address the mechanics of large folds, i.e., folds that absorb a length much larger than the wrinkle wavelength. With scaling arguments and numerical simulations, we show that the antisymmetric fold is energetically favorable and can absorb any excess length at zero pressure. Then, motivated by puzzles arising in the comparison of this simple model to experiments on lipid monolayers or capillary rafts, we discuss how to incorporate film weight, self-adhesion, or energy dissipation.

  8. Trigger factor slows co-translational folding through kinetic trapping while sterically protecting the nascent chain from aberrant cytosolic interactions.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edward P; Christodoulou, John; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M

    2012-07-01

    The E. coli chaperone trigger factor (TF) interacts directly with nascent polypeptide chains as they emerge from the ribosome exit tunnel. Small protein domains can fold under the cradle created by TF, but the co-translational folding of larger proteins is slowed down by its presence. Because of the great experimental challenges in achieving high spatial and time resolution, it is not yet known whether or not TF alters the folding properties of small proteins and if the reduced rate of folding of larger proteins is the result of kinetic or thermodynamic effects. We show, by molecular simulations employing a coarse-grained model of a series of ribosome nascent-chain complexes, that TF does not alter significantly the co-translational folding process of a small protein G domain but delays that of a large β-galactosidase domain as a result of kinetic trapping of its unfolded ensemble. We demonstrate that this trapping occurs through a combination of three distinct mechanisms: a decrease in the rate of structural rearrangements within the nascent chain, an increase in the effective exit tunnel length due to folding outside the cradle, and entanglement of the nascent chain with TF. We present evidence that this TF-induced trapping represents a trade-off between promoting co-translational folding and sterically shielding the nascent chain from aberrant cytosolic interactions that could lead to its aggregation or degradation. PMID:22680285

  9. $\\cN$-FOLD SUPERSYMMETRY IN QUANTUM MECHANICAL MATRIX MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    We formulate Ņ-fold supersymmetry in quantum mechanical matrix models. As an example, we construct general two-by-two Hermitian matrix two-fold supersymmetric quantum mechanical systems. We find that there are two inequivalent such systems, both of which are characterized by two arbitrary scalar functions, and one of which does not reduce to the scalar system. The obtained systems are all weakly quasi-solvable.

  10. The equilibrium properties and folding kinetics of an all-atom Go model of the Trp-cage.

    PubMed

    Linhananta, Apichart; Boer, Jesse; MacKay, Ian

    2005-03-15

    The ultrafast-folding 20-residue Trp-cage protein is quickly becoming a new benchmark for molecular dynamics studies. Already several all-atom simulations have probed its equilibrium and kinetic properties. In this work an all-atom Go model is used to accurately represent the side-chain packing and native atomic contacts of the Trp-cage. The model reproduces the hallmark thermodynamics cooperativity of small proteins. Folding simulations observe that in the fast-folding dominant pathway, partial alpha-helical structure forms before hydrophobic core collapse. In the slow-folding secondary pathway, partial core collapse occurs before helical structure. The slow-folding rate of the secondary pathway is attributed to the loss of side-chain rotational freedom, due to the early core collapse, which impedes the helix formation. A major finding is the observation of a low-temperature kinetic intermediate stabilized by a salt bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16. Similar observations [R. Zhou, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 13280 (2003)] were reported in a recent study using an all-atom model of the Trp-cage in explicit water, in which the salt-bridge stabilized intermediate was hypothesized to be the origin of the ultrafast-folding mechanism. A theoretical mutation that eliminates the Asp-9-Arg-16 salt bridge, but leaves the residues intact, is performed. Folding simulations of the mutant Trp-cage observe a two-state free-energy landscape with no kinetic intermediate and a significant decrease in the folding rate, in support of the hypothesis.

  11. Using Kinetic Network Models To Probe Non-Native Salt-Bridge Effects on α-Helix Folding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangfeng; Voelz, Vincent A

    2016-02-11

    Salt-bridge interactions play an important role in stabilizing many protein structures, and have been shown to be designable features for protein design. In this work, we study the effects of non-native salt bridges on the folding of a soluble alanine-based peptide (Fs peptide) using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations performed on the Folding@home distributed computing platform. Using Markov State Models, we show how non-native salt-bridges affect the folding kinetics of Fs peptide by perturbing specific conformational states. Furthermore, we present methods for the automatic detection and analysis of such states. These results provide insight into helix folding mechanisms and useful information to guide simulation-based computational protein design.

  12. Isoprene: a photochemical kinetic mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Killus, J.P.; Whitten, G.Z.

    1984-03-01

    A computer-modeling study has produced a photochemical kinetic mechanism for the atmospheric chemistry of isoprene, a naturally occurring common constituent of the troposphere. The kinetic mechnism is ready for use in atmospheric models because the reactions described are shown to adequately reproduce the results of a series of outdoor smog chamber experiments which encompass a wide range of precursor conditions of isoprene and NO/sub x/. Isoprene is a very reactive molecule that can contribute as much as 50% of the overall reactivity of rural air even though isoprene might be only 6% of the ambient hydrocarbon level. The major intermediate products of the atmospheric oxidation of isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, methylglyoxal, and formaldehyde are also highly reactive. 25 references.

  13. Protein Folding Mechanism of the Dimeric AmphiphysinII/Bin1 N-BAR Domain

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Tobias; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The human AmphyphisinII/Bin1 N-BAR domain belongs to the BAR domain superfamily, whose members sense and generate membrane curvatures. The N-BAR domain is a 57 kDa homodimeric protein comprising a six helix bundle. Here we report the protein folding mechanism of this protein as a representative of this protein superfamily. The concentration dependent thermodynamic stability was studied by urea equilibrium transition curves followed by fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopy. Kinetic unfolding and refolding experiments, including rapid double and triple mixing techniques, allowed to unravel the complex folding behavior of N-BAR. The equilibrium unfolding transition curve can be described by a two-state process, while the folding kinetics show four refolding phases, an additional burst reaction and two unfolding phases. All fast refolding phases show a rollover in the chevron plot but only one of these phases depends on the protein concentration reporting the dimerization step. Secondary structure formation occurs during the three fast refolding phases. The slowest phase can be assigned to a proline isomerization. All kinetic experiments were also followed by fluorescence anisotropy detection to verify the assignment of the dimerization step to the respective folding phase. Based on these experiments we propose for N-BAR two parallel folding pathways towards the homodimeric native state depending on the proline conformation in the unfolded state. PMID:26368922

  14. Macromolecular Crowding Modulates Folding Mechanism of α/β Protein Apoflavodoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homouz, D.; Stagg, L.; Wittungstafshede, P.; Cheung, M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein dynamics in cells may be different from that in dilute solutions in vitro since the environment in cells is highly concentrated with other macromolecules. This volume exclusion due to macromolecular crowding is predicted to affect both equilibrium and kinetic processes involving protein conformational changes. To quantify macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding mechanisms, here we have investigated the folding energy landscape of an alpha/beta protein, apoflavodoxin, in the presence of inert macromolecular crowding agents using in silico and in vitro approaches. By coarse-grained molecular simulations and topology-based potential interactions, we probed the effects of increased volume fraction of crowding agents (phi_c) as well as of crowding agent geometry (sphere or spherocylinder) at high phi_c. Parallel kinetic folding experiments with purified Desulfovibro desulfuricans apoflavodoxin in vitro were performed in the presence of Ficoll (sphere) and Dextran (spherocylinder) synthetic crowding agents. In conclusion, we have identified in silico crowding conditions that best enhance protein stability and discovered that upon manipulation of the crowding conditions, folding routes experiencing topological frustrations can be either enhanced or relieved. The test-tube experiments confirmed that apoflavodoxin's time-resolved folding path is modulated by crowding agent geometry. We propose that macromolecular crowding effects may be a tool for manipulation of protein folding and function in living cells.

  15. The X-38 V-201 Fin Fold Actuation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, Christian; Robertson, Brandan; Gafka, George

    2004-01-01

    The X-38 Vehicle 201 (V-201) is a space flight prototype lifting body vehicle that was designed to launch to orbit in the Space Shuttle orbiter payload bay. Although the project was cancelled in May 2003, many of the systems were nearly complete. This paper will describe the fin folding actuation mechanism flight subsystems and development units as well as lessons learned in the design, assembly, development testing, and qualification testing. The two vertical tail fins must be stowed (folded inboard) to allow the orbiter payload bay doors to close. The fin folding actuation mechanism is a remotely or extravehicular activity (EVA) actuated single fault tolerant system consisting of seven subsystems capable of repeatedly deploying or stowing the fins.

  16. Mechanics, Structure and Dynamics of Metaphase Chromosome Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John F.

    2014-03-01

    During cell division, eukaryote chromosomes are restructured from a relatively dispersed interphase form, into a relatively compact folded metaphase form. I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing the folding scheme of metaphase chromosomes, where mechanical response and biochemical perturbation are used as tools for diagnosing structure. Experiments with nucleases reveal that the continuity of the metaphase chromosome depends on DNA, i.e., that the metaphase chromosome can be considered to be a ``chromatin gel.'' Experiments with topoisomerases indicate that chromatin entanglements play an appreciable role in determining chromosome mechanical properties, suggesting that they may play a structural role. We further show that perturbation of condensin complexes dramatically changes metaphase chromosome mechanics. Finally we report results of fluorescence visualization of distributions of condensin I and II along metaphase chromosomes. Supported by NSF Grants MCB-1022117 and DMR-1206868, and by NIH Grants 1U54CA143869-01, 1U54HD076188 and 1R01GM105847-01.

  17. Diffusion-collision of foldons elucidates the kinetic effects of point mutations and suggests control strategies of the folding process of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Compiani, Mario

    2006-07-01

    In this article we use mutation studies as a benchmark for a minimal model of the folding process of helical proteins. The model ascribes a pivotal role to the collisional dynamics of a few crucial residues (foldons) and predicts the folding rates by exploiting information drawn from the protein sequence. We show that our model rationalizes the effects of point mutations on the kinetics of folding. The folding times of two proteins and their mutants are predicted. Stability and location of foldons have a critical role as the determinants of protein folding. This allows us to elucidate two main mechanisms for the kinetic effects of mutations. First, it turns out that the mutations eliciting the most notable effects alter protein stability through stabilization or destabilization of the foldons. Secondly, the folding rate is affected via a modification of the foldon topology by those mutations that lead to the birth or death of foldons. The few mispredicted folding rates of some mutants hint at the limits of the current version of the folding model proposed in the present article. The performance of our folding model declines in case the mutated residues are subject to strong long-range forces. That foldons are the critical targets of mutation studies has notable implications for design strategies and is of particular interest to address the issue of the kinetic regulation of single proteins in the general context of the overall dynamics of the interactome.

  18. Statistical mechanics of simple models of protein folding and design.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    It is now believed that the primary equilibrium aspects of simple models of protein folding are understood theoretically. However, current theories often resort to rather heavy mathematics to overcome some technical difficulties inherent in the problem or start from a phenomenological model. To this end, we take a new approach in this pedagogical review of the statistical mechanics of protein folding. The benefit of our approach is a drastic mathematical simplification of the theory, without resort to any new approximations or phenomenological prescriptions. Indeed, the results we obtain agree precisely with previous calculations. Because of this simplification, we are able to present here a thorough and self contained treatment of the problem. Topics discussed include the statistical mechanics of the random energy model (REM), tests of the validity of REM as a model for heteropolymer freezing, freezing transition of random sequences, phase diagram of designed ("minimally frustrated") sequences, and the degree to which errors in the interactions employed in simulations of either folding and design can still lead to correct folding behavior. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9414231

  19. Analyzing complicated protein folding kinetics rapidly by analytical Laplace inversion using a Tikhonov regularization variant.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Hadley, Kevin Charles; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic experiments provide much information about protein folding mechanisms. Time-resolved signals are often best described by expressions with many exponential terms, but this hinders the extraction of rate constants by nonlinear least squares (NLS) fitting. Numerical inverse Laplace transformation, which converts a time-resolved dataset into a spectrum of amplitudes as a function of rate constant, allows easy estimation of the rate constants, amplitudes, and number of processes underlying the data. Here, we present a Tikhonov regularization-based method that converts a dataset into a rate spectrum, subject to regularization constraints, without requiring an iterative search of parameter space. This allows more rapid generation of rate spectra as well as analysis of datasets too noisy to process by existing iterative search algorithms. This method's simplicity also permits highly objective, largely automatic analysis with minimal human guidance. We show that this regularization method reproduces results previously obtained by NLS fitting and that it is effective for analyzing datasets too complex for traditional fitting methods. This method's reliability and speed, as well as its potential for objective, model-free analysis, make it extremely useful as a first step in analysis of complicated noisy datasets and an excellent guide for subsequent NLS analysis.

  20. Kinetic folding design of aptazyme-regulated expression devices as riboswitches for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Sparkman-Yager, David; Correa-Rojas, Rodrigo A; Carothers, James M

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have opened the doors for the microbial production of biofuels and other valuable organic compounds. There remain, however, significant metabolic hurdles to the production of these compounds in cost-effective quantities. This is due, in part, to mismatches between the metabolic engineer's desire for high yields and the microbe's desire to survive. Many valuable compounds, or the intermediates necessary for their biosynthesis, prove deleterious at the desired production concentrations. One potential solution to these toxicity-related issues is the implementation of nonnative dynamic genetic control mechanisms that sense excessively high concentrations of metabolic intermediates and respond accordingly to alleviate their impact. One potential class of dynamic regulator is the riboswitch: cis-acting RNA elements that regulate the expression of downstream genes based on the presence of an effector molecule. Here, we present combined methods for constructing aptazyme-regulated expression devices (aREDs) through computational cotranscriptional kinetic folding design and experimental validation. These approaches can be used to engineer aREDs within novel genetic contexts for the predictable, dynamic regulation of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25605393

  1. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  2. A probabilistic approach to the effect of water hydrogen bonds on the kinetics of protein folding and protein denaturation.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2010-02-26

    Previously, we presented a review of our kinetic models for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding and for the protein thermal denaturation in a barrierless way. A protein was treated as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and neutral beads. As a crucial idea of the model, an overall potential around the cluster of native residues wherein a residue performs a chaotic motion was considered as the combination of the average dihedral, effective pairwise, and confining potentials. The overall potential as a function of the distance from the cluster has a double well shape. This allowed one to develop kinetic models for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding (NMPF) and barrierless protein denaturation (BPD) by using the mean first passage time analysis. In the original models, however, hydrogen bonding effects were taken into account only indirectly which affected the accuracy of the models because hydrogen bonding does play a crucial role in the folding, stability, and denaturation of proteins. To improve the NMPF and BPD models and explicitly take into account the hydrogen bonding "water-water" and "water-protein residue", we have developed a probabilistic hydrogen bond (PHB) model for the effect of hydrogen bond networks of water molecules around two solute particles (immersed in water) on their interaction, and have then combined the PHB model with the NMPF and BPD models. In this paper, that can be regarded as sequel of our previous review, we analyze the modified NMPF and BPD models that explicitly take into account the effect of water-water hydrogen bonding on these processes. As expected, the application of the modified models to the folding/unfolding of two model proteins (one short, consisting of 124 residues and the other large, consisting of 2500 residues) demonstrate that the hydrogen bond networks play a very important role in the protein folding/unfolding phenomena.

  3. Deconstructing time-resolved optical rotatory dispersion kinetic measurements of cytochrome c folding: from molten globule to the native state.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eefei; Kliger, David S

    2012-01-01

    The far-UV time-resolved optical rotatory dispersion (TRORD) technique has contributed significantly to our understanding of nanosecond secondary structure kinetics in protein folding and function reactions. For reduced cytochrome c, protein folding kinetics have been probed largely from the unfolded to the native state. Here we provide details about sample preparation and the TRORD apparatus and measurements for studying folding from a partly unfolded state to the native secondary structure conformation of reduced cytochrome c. PMID:22760330

  4. The initial step of DNA hairpin folding: a kinetic analysis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Doose, Sören; Neuweiler, Hannes; Sauer, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Conformational fluctuations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotides were studied in aqueous solution by monitoring contact-induced fluorescence quenching of the oxazine fluorophore MR121 by intrinsic guanosine residues (dG). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze kinetics of DNA hairpin folding. We first characterized the reporter system by investigating bimolecular quenching interactions between MR121 and guanosine monophosphate in aqueous solution estimating rate constants, efficiency and stability for formation of quenched complexes. We then studied the kinetics of complex formation between MR121 and dG residues site-specifically incorporated in DNA hairpins. To uncover the initial steps of DNA hairpin folding we investigated complex formation in ssDNA carrying one or two complementary base pairs (dC–dG pairs) that could hybridize to form a short stem. Our data show that incorporation of a single dC–dG pair leads to non-exponential decays for opening and closing kinetics and reduces rate constants by one to two orders of magnitude. We found positive activation enthalpies independent of the number of dC–dG pairs. These results imply that the rate limiting step of DNA hairpin folding is not determined by loop dynamics, or by mismatches in the stem, but rather by interactions between stem and loop nucleotides. PMID:16687657

  5. ETNA: equilibrium transitions network and Arrhenius equation for extracting folding kinetics from REMD simulations.

    PubMed

    Muff, S; Caflisch, A

    2009-03-12

    It is difficult to investigate folding kinetics by conventional atomistic simulations of proteins. The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation technique enhances conformational sampling at the expenses of reduced kinetic information, which in REMD is directly available only for very short time scales. Here, we propose a procedure for obtaining kinetic data from REMD by making use of the equilibrium transitions network (ETN) sampled at the temperature of interest. This information is supplemented by mean folding times extracted from ETNs at higher REMD temperatures and scaled according to the Arrhenius equation. The procedure is applied to a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide which has a very heterogeneous denatured state with a broad entropic basin and several enthalpic traps. Despite the complexity of the system and the REMD exchange time of only 0.1 ns, the procedure is able to estimate folding times (ranging from about 0.1 micros at the melting temperature of 330 K to about 8 micros at 286 K) as well as transition times from individual non-native basins to the native state.

  6. Simulating the peptide folding kinetic related spectra based on the Markov State Model.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Zhuang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopic tools are used to monitor protein folding/unfolding dynamics after a fast triggering such as the laser induced temperature jump. These techniques provide new opportunities for comparison between theory and simulations and atom-level understanding protein folding mechanism. However, the direct comparison still face two main challenges: a gap between folding relevant timescales (microseconds or above) and length of molecular dynamics simulations (typically tens to hundreds of nanoseconds), and difficulty in directly calculating spectroscopic observables from simulation configurations. Markov State Model (MSM) approach is one of the most powerful means which can increase simulations timescale up to microsecond or even millisecond. We address progress on modeling infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic signals of temperature jump induced unfolding dynamics for a few small proteins. The harmoniousness between experiment and theoretical can both improve our understanding of protein folding mechanisms and provide direct validation of those theoretical models. PMID:24446363

  7. Kinetic barriers to the folding of horse cytochrome C in the reduced state.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Abani K; Kumar, Rajesh

    2002-10-22

    To determine the kinetic barrier in the folding of horse cytochrome c, a CO-liganded derivative of cytochrome c, called carbonmonoxycytochrome c, has been prepared by exploiting the thermodynamic reversibility of ferrocytochrome c unfolding induced by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl), pH 7. The CO binding properties of unfolded ferrocytochrome c, studied by 13C NMR and optical spectroscopy, are remarkably similar to those of native myoglobin and isolated chains of human hemoglobin. Equilibrium unfolding transitions of ferrocytochrome c in the presence and the absence of CO observed by both excitation energy transfer from the lone tryptophan to the ferrous heme and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicate no accumulation of structural intermediates to a detectable level. Values of thermodynamic parameters obtained by two-state analysis of fluorescence transitions are DeltaG(H2O) = 11.65(+/-1.13) kcal x mol(-1) and C(m) = 3.9(+/-0.1) M GdnHCl in the presence of CO, and DeltaG(H2O)=19.3(+/-0.5) kcal x mol(-1) and C(m) = 5.1(+/-0.1) M GdnHCl in the absence of CO, indicating destabilization of ferrocytochrome c by approximately 7.65 kcal x mol(-1) due to CO binding. The native states of ferrocytochrome c and carbonmonoxycytochrome c are nearly identical in terms of structure and conformation except for the Fe2+-M80 --> Fe2+-CO replacement. Folding and unfolding kinetics as a function of GdnHCl, studied by stopped-flow fluorescence, are significantly different for the two proteins. Both refold fast, but carbonmonoxycytochrome c refolds 2-fold faster (tau = 1092 micros at 10 degrees C) than ferrocytochrome c. Linear extrapolation of the folding rates to the ordinate of the chevron plot projects this value of tau to 407 micros. The unfolding rate of the former in water, estimated by extrapolation, is faster by more than 10 orders of magnitude. Significant differences are also observed in rate-denaturant gradients in the chevron. Formation and disruption of the Fe2+-M80

  8. Universality and diversity of folding mechanics for three-helix bundle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae Shick; Wallin, Stefan; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we evaluate, at full atomic detail, the folding processes of two small helical proteins, the B domain of protein A and the Villin headpiece. Folding kinetics are studied by performing a large number of ab initio Monte Carlo folding simulations using a single transferable all-atom potential. Using these trajectories, we examine the relaxation behavior, secondary structure formation, and transition-state ensembles (TSEs) of the two proteins and compare our results with experimental data and previous computational studies. To obtain a detailed structural information on the folding dynamics viewed as an ensemble process, we perform a clustering analysis procedure based on graph theory. Moreover, rigorous pfold analysis is used to obtain representative samples of the TSEs and a good quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated Φ values is obtained for protein A. Φ values for Villin also are obtained and left as predictions to be tested by future experiments. Our analysis shows that the two-helix hairpin is a common partially stable structural motif that gets formed before entering the TSE in the studied proteins. These results together with our earlier study of Engrailed Homeodomain and recent experimental studies provide a comprehensive, atomic-level picture of folding mechanics of three-helix bundle proteins. PMID:18195374

  9. Role of mechanical factors in cortical folding development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Xiao; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Deciphering mysteries of the structure-function relationship in cortical folding has emerged as the cynosure of recent research on brain. Understanding the mechanism of convolution patterns can provide useful insight into the normal and pathological brain function. However, despite decades of speculation and endeavors the underlying mechanism of the brain folding process remains poorly understood. This paper focuses on the three-dimensional morphological patterns of a developing brain under different tissue specification assumptions via theoretical analyses, computational modeling, and experiment verifications. The living human brain is modeled with a soft structure having outer cortex and inner core to investigate the brain development. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into the critical growth ratio for instability and crease formation of the developing brain followed by computational modeling as a way to offer clues for brain's postbuckling morphology. Especially, tissue geometry, growth ratio, and material properties of the cortex are explored as the most determinant parameters to control the morphogenesis of a growing brain model. As indicated in results, compressive residual stresses caused by the sufficient growth trigger instability and the brain forms highly convoluted patterns wherein its gyrification degree is specified with the cortex thickness. Morphological patterns of the developing brain predicted from the computational modeling are consistent with our neuroimaging observations, thereby clarifying, in part, the reason of some classical malformation in a developing brain.

  10. Estimating free-energy barrier heights for an ultrafast folding protein from calorimetric and kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Henry, Eric R; Kubelka, Jan; Hofrichter, James; Muñoz, Victor; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Eaton, William A

    2008-05-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the temperature dependence of the absolute heat capacity of the 35-residue subdomain of the villin headpiece, a protein that folds in 5 mus and is therefore assumed to have a small free-energy barrier separating folded and unfolded states. To obtain an estimate of the barrier height from the calorimetric data, two models, a variable-barrier model and an Ising-like model, were used to fit the heat capacity in excess of the folded state over the temperature range 15-125 degrees C. The variable-barrier model is based on an empirical mathematical form for the density of states, with four adjustable parameters and the enthalpy (H) as a reaction coordinate. The Ising-like model is based on the inter-residue contact map of the X-ray structure with exact enumeration of approximately 10(5) possible conformations, with two adjustable parameters in the partition function, and either the fraction of native contacts (Q) or the number of ordered residues (P) as reaction coordinates. The variable-barrier model provides an excellent fit to the data and yields a barrier height at the folding temperature ranging from 0.4 to 1.1 kcal mol(-1), while the Ising-like model provides a less good fit and yields barrier heights of 2.3 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) and 2.1 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1) for the Q and P reaction coordinates, respectively. In both models, the barrier to folding increases with increasing temperature. Assuming a sufficiently large activation energy for diffusion on the free-energy surfaces, both models are consistent with the observation of a temperature-independent folding rate in previously published laser temperature-jump experiments. Analysis of this kinetic data, using an approximate form for the pre-exponential factor of Kramers theory and the 70 ns relaxation time for the fast phase that precedes the unfolding/refolding relaxation to determine the diffusion coefficient, results in a barrier height of 1.6 +/- 0.3 kcal mol

  11. Hg(II) binding to a weakly associated coiled coil nucleates an encoded metalloprotein fold: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Brian T; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2003-04-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of metal encapsulation by a de novo-designed protein is described. The kinetic mechanism of Hg(II) encapsulation in the three-stranded coiled coil formed by the peptide CH(3)CO-G LKALEEK CKALEEK LKALEEK G-NH(2) (Baby L9C) is derived by global analysis. The mechanism involves rapid initial collapse of two peptides by Hg(II) forming Hg(Baby L9C(-H))(2) with a linear thiolato Hg(II) bound to the cysteine sulfur atoms. Here, Baby L9C(-H) denotes Baby L9C with the cysteine thiol deprotonated. Addition of the third peptide, forming the three-stranded coiled coil, is the rate-determining step and results in an intermediate state involving two separate species. One of the species, termed the properly folded intermediate, undergoes rapid deprotonation of the third cysteine thiol, yielding the desired three-stranded coiled coil with an encapsulated trigonal thiolato Hg(II). The other species, termed the misfolded intermediate, rearranges in an experimentally distinguishable step to the properly folded intermediate. The order of the reaction involving the addition of the third peptide with respect to the concentration of Baby L9C indicates that addition of the third helix only occurs through reaction of Hg(Baby L9C(-H))(2) and Baby L9C that is unassociated with a coiled coil. Temperature dependence of the reaction afforded activation parameters for both the addition of the third helix (deltaH = 20(2) kcalmol; deltaS= 40(5) calmol K) and the rearrangement of the misfolded intermediate steps (deltaH = 23(2) kcalmol; deltaS= 27(5) calmol K). The mechanism is discussed with regard to metalloprotein folding and metalloprotein design.

  12. Development of a Fast Microfluidic Mixer for Studies of Protein Folding KineticsFinal Report Cover Page

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O

    2005-02-10

    We designed and fabricated mixing devices that will help us elucidate the mechanisms of protein folding through measurements of folding reaction rates. These devices can be used in studying of other biological systems and are compatible with various spectroscopic observation methods. The project involved development of fabrication processes and setup of a laboratory for assembly and characterization of microfluidic devices, as well as measurements of protein folding kinetics. We produced three variants of the mixer: (1) The ultra fast mixer for Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer measurements (described by Anal. Chem. Article UCRL-JRNL-206676) and MicroTAS Conference Proceedings article (UCRL-JC-153057 ) included in the report; (2) The ultra fast mixer for UV measurements (described by the poster presented at MicroTAS conference (UCRL-POST-207476) included in the report); and (3) The mixer for single molecule measurements (described by the Science article UCRL-JC-153057) included in the report. In these mixers, the channels are narrow, ranging from a few to hundreds of {micro}m, so that the flow is laminar and all of the mixing is achieved through diffusion. Our goal is to develop robust microfluidic mixer with at least 100 times lower consumption rate, shorter dead time and time resolution than commercially available mixers that would be compatible with most commonly used spectroscopic methods. We are also developing mixers that can be used in combination with single molecule spectroscopy. The mixers are used to study kinetics of fast protein folding reactions using bulk fluorescence and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. Capabilities for microfluidic have been developed at BSNL that will be useful for studies of interactions of DNA with proteins and other projects such as the single molecule detector for detection of low concentration of toxins.

  13. Kinetic Dissection of the Pre-existing Conformational Equilibrium in the Trypsin Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Chakraborty, Pradipta; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology has recently documented the conformational plasticity of the trypsin fold for both the protease and zymogen in terms of a pre-existing equilibrium between closed (E*) and open (E) forms of the active site region. How such plasticity is manifested in solution and affects ligand recognition by the protease and zymogen is poorly understood in quantitative terms. Here we dissect the E*-E equilibrium with stopped-flow kinetics in the presence of excess ligand or macromolecule. Using the clotting protease thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 as relevant models we resolve the relative distribution of the E* and E forms and the underlying kinetic rates for their interconversion. In the case of thrombin, the E* and E forms are distributed in a 1:4 ratio and interconvert on a time scale of 45 ms. In the case of prethrombin-2, the equilibrium is shifted strongly (10:1 ratio) in favor of the closed E* form and unfolds over a faster time scale of 4.5 ms. The distribution of E* and E forms observed for thrombin and prethrombin-2 indicates that zymogen activation is linked to a significant shift in the pre-existing equilibrium between closed and open conformations that facilitates ligand binding to the active site. These findings broaden our mechanistic understanding of how conformational transitions control ligand recognition by thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 and have direct relevance to other members of the trypsin fold. PMID:26216877

  14. Kinetic Definition of Protein Folding Transition State Ensembles and Reaction Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Christopher D.; Rhee, Young Min; Pande, Vijay S.

    2006-01-01

    Using distributed molecular dynamics simulations we located four distinct folding transitions for a 39-residue ββαβ protein fold. To characterize the nature of each room temperature transition, we calculated the probability of transmission for 500 points along each free energy barrier. We introduced a method for determining transition states by employing the transmission probability, Ptrans, and determined which conformations were transition state ensemble members (Ptrans ≈ 0.5). The transmission probability may be used to characterize the barrier in several ways. For example, we ran simulations at 82°C, determined the change in Ptrans with temperature for all 2,000 conformations, and quantified Hammond behavior directly using Ptrans correlation. Additionally, we propose that diffusion along Ptrans may provide the configurational diffusion rate at the top of the barrier. Specifically, given a transition state conformation x0 with estimated Ptrans = 0.5, we selected a large set of subsequent conformations from independent trajectories, each exactly a small time δt after x0 (250 ps). Calculating Ptrans for the new trial conformations, we generated the P(Ptrans|δt = 250 ps) distribution that reflected diffusion. This approach provides a novel perspective on the diffusive nature of a protein folding transition and provides a framework for a quantitative study of activated relaxation kinetics. PMID:16617068

  15. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF SOIL BIOGEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of kinetic studies to soil chemistry is useful to determine reaction mechanisms and fate of nutrients and environmental contaminants. How deeply one wishes to query the mechanism depends on the detail sought. Reactions that involve chemical species in more than on...

  16. Concordant Exploration of the Kinetics of RNA Folding from Global and Local Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok,L.; Scherbakova, I.; Lamb, J.; Park, H.; Andresen, K.; Smith, H.; Brenowitz, M.; Pollack, L.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with millisecond time-resolution reveals two discrete phases of global compaction upon Mg{sup 2+}-mediated folding of the Tetrahymena thermophila ribozyme. Electrostatic relaxation of the RNA occurs rapidly and dominates the first phase of compaction during which the observed radius of gyration (R{sub g}) decreases from 75 Angstroms to 55 Angstroms. A further decrease in R{sub g} to 45 Angstroms occurs in a well-defined second phase. An analysis of mutant ribozymes shows that the latter phase depends upon the formation of long-range tertiary contacts within the P4-P6 domain of the ribozyme; disruption of the three remaining long-range contacts linking the peripheral helices has no effect on the 55-45 Angstroms compaction transition. A better understanding of the role of specific tertiary contacts in compaction was obtained by concordant time-resolved hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) analyses that report local changes in the solvent accessibility of the RNA backbone. Comparison of the global and local measures of folding shows that formation of a subset of native tertiary contacts (i.e. those defining the ribozyme core) can occur within a highly compact ensemble whose R{sub g} is close to that of the fully folded ribozyme. Analyses of additional ribozyme mutants and reaction conditions establish the generality of the rapid formation of a partially collapsed state with little to no detectable tertiary structure. These studies directly link global RNA compaction with formation of tertiary structure as the molecule acquires its biologically active structure, and underscore the strong dependence on salt of both local and global measures of folding kinetics.

  17. Mechanism of Coupled Folding and Binding in the siRNA-PAZ Complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Feng

    2008-08-01

    The PAZ domain plays a key role in gene silencing pathway. The PAZ domain binds with siRNAs to form the multimeric RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC identifies mRNAs homologous to the siRNAs and promotes their degradation. It was found that binding with siRNA significantly enhances apo-PAZ folding. However, the mechanism by which folding is coupled to binding is poorly understood. Thus, the coupling relationship between binding and folding is very important for understanding the function of gene silencing. We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) of both bound and apo-PAZ to study the coupling mechanism between binding and folding in the siRNA-PAZ complex. Room-temperature MD simulations suggest that both PAZ and siRNA become more rigid and stable upon siRNA binding. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature MD simulations shows that both bound and apo-PAZ unfold via a two-state process. The unfolding pathways are different between bound and apo-PAZ: the order of helix III and helices I & II unfolding is switched. Furthermore, transition probability was used to determine the transition state ensemble for both bound and apo-PAZ. It was found that the transition state of bound PAZ is more compact than that of apo-PAZ. The predicted Φ-values suggest that the Φ-values of helix III and sheets of β3-β7 for bound PAZ are more native-like than those of apo-PAZ upon the binding of siRNA. The results can help us to understand the mechanism of gene silencing.

  18. The equilibrium properties and folding kinetics of an all-atom Go xAF model of the Trp-cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhananta, Apichart; Boer, Jesse; MacKay, Ian

    2005-03-01

    The ultrafast-folding 20-residue Trp-cage protein is quickly becoming a new benchmark for molecular dynamics studies. Already several all-atom simulations have probed its equilibrium and kinetic properties. In this work an all-atom Go ¯ model is used to accurately represent the side-chain packing and native atomic contacts of the Trp-cage. The model reproduces the hallmark thermodynamics cooperativity of small proteins. Folding simulations observe that in the fast-folding dominant pathway, partial α-helical structure forms before hydrophobic core collapse. In the slow-folding secondary pathway, partial core collapse occurs before helical structure. The slow-folding rate of the secondary pathway is attributed to the loss of side-chain rotational freedom, due to the early core collapse, which impedes the helix formation. A major finding is the observation of a low-temperature kinetic intermediate stabilized by a salt bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16. Similar observations [R. Zhou, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 13280 (2003)] were reported in a recent study using an all-atom model of the Trp-cage in explicit water, in which the salt-bridge stabilized intermediate was hypothesized to be the origin of the ultrafast-folding mechanism. A theoretical mutation that eliminates the Asp-9-Arg-16 salt bridge, but leaves the residues intact, is performed. Folding simulations of the mutant Trp-cage observe a two-state free-energy landscape with no kinetic intermediate and a significant decrease in the folding rate, in support of the hypothesis.

  19. Comparative analysis of the folding dynamics and kinetics of an engineered knotted protein and its variants derived from HP0242 of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Wei; Liu, Yu-Nan; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Jackson, Sophie E.; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which a polypeptide chain thread itself spontaneously to attain a knotted conformation has been a major challenge in the field of protein folding. HP0242 is a homodimeric protein from Helicobacter pylori with intertwined helices to form a unique pseudo-knotted folding topology. A tandem HP0242 repeat has been constructed to become the first engineered trefoil-knotted protein. Its small size renders it a model system for computational analyses to examine its folding and knotting pathways. Here we report a multi-parametric study on the folding stability and kinetics of a library of HP0242 variants, including the trefoil-knotted tandem HP0242 repeat, using far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Equilibrium chemical denaturation of HP0242 variants shows the presence of highly populated dimeric and structurally heterogeneous folding intermediates. Such equilibrium folding intermediates retain significant amount of helical structures except those at the N- and C-terminal regions in the native structure. Stopped-flow fluorescence measurements of HP0242 variants show that spontaneous refolding into knotted structures can be achieved within seconds, which is several orders of magnitude faster than previously observed for other knotted proteins. Nevertheless, the complex chevron plots indicate that HP0242 variants are prone to misfold into kinetic traps, leading to severely rolled-over refolding arms. The experimental observations are in general agreement with the previously reported molecular dynamics simulations. Based on our results, kinetic folding pathways are proposed to qualitatively describe the complex folding processes of HP0242 variants.

  20. The E. coli thioredoxin folding mechanism: the key role of the C-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Diego S; Sánchez, Ignacio E; Garrote, Ana; Sica, Mauricio P; Santos, Javier

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the unfolding mechanism of oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (EcTRX) was investigated experimentally and computationally. We characterized seven point mutants distributed along the C-terminal α-helix (CTH) and the preceding loop. The mutations destabilized the protein against global unfolding while leaving the native structure unchanged. Global analysis of the unfolding kinetics of all variants revealed a linear unfolding route with a high-energy on-pathway intermediate state flanked by two transition state ensembles TSE1 and TSE2. The experiments show that CTH is mainly unfolded in TSE1 and the intermediate and becomes structured in TSE2. Structure-based molecular dynamics are in agreement with these experiments and provide protein-wide structural information on transient states. In our model, EcTRX folding starts with structure formation in the β-sheet, while the protein helices coalesce later. As a whole, our results indicate that the CTH is a critical module in the folding process, restraining a heterogeneous intermediate ensemble into a biologically active native state and providing the native protein with thermodynamic and kinetic stability.

  1. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica

    2007-08-01

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  2. Alpha/Beta-hydrolase fold enzymes: structures, functions and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha/beta-hydrolase fold family of enzymes is rapidly becoming one of the largest group of structurally related enzymes with diverse catalytic functions. Members in this family include acetylcholinesterase, dienelactone hydrolase, lipase, thioesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, proline iminopeptidase, proline oligopeptidase, haloalkane dehalogenase, haloperoxidase, epoxide hydrolase, hydroxynitrile lyase and others. The enzymes all have a Nucleophile-His-Acid catalytic triad evolved to efficiently operate on substrates with different chemical composition or physicochemical properties and in various biological contexts. For example, acetylcholine esterase catalyzes the cleavage of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, at a rate close to the limits of diffusion of substrate to the active site of the enzyme. Dienelactone hydrolase uses substrate-assisted catalysis to degrade aromatic compounds. Lipases act adsorbed at the water/lipid interface of their neutral water-insoluble ester substrates. Most lipases have their active site buried under secondary structure elements, a flap, which must change conformation to allow substrate to access the active site. Thioesterases are involved in a multitude of biochemical processes including bioluminiscence, fatty acid- and polyketide biosynthesis and metabolism. Serine carboxypeptidases recognize the negatively charged carboxylate terminus of their peptide substrates. Haloalkane dehalogenase is a detoxifying enzyme that converts halogenated aliphatics to the corresponding alcohols, while haloperoxidase catalyzes the halogenation of organic compounds. Hydroxynitrile lyase cleaves carbon-carbon bonds in cyanohydrins with concomitant hydrogen cyanide formation as a defense mechanism in plants. This paper gives an overview of catalytic activities reported for this family of enzymes by discussing selected examples. The current state of knowledge of the molecular basis for catalysis and substrate specificity is outlined

  3. Entanglement in correlated random spin chains, RNA folding and kinetic roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Santalla, Silvia N.; Ramírez, Giovanni; Sierra, Germán

    2016-07-01

    Average block entanglement in the 1D XX-model with uncorrelated random couplings is known to grow as the logarithm of the block size, in similarity to conformal systems. In this work we study random spin chains whose couplings present long range correlations, generated as gaussian fields with a power-law spectral function. Ground states are always planar valence bond states, and their statistical ensembles are characterized in terms of their block entropy and their bond-length distribution, which follow power-laws. We conjecture the existence of a critical value for the spectral exponent, below which the system behavior is identical to the case of uncorrelated couplings. Above that critical value, the entanglement entropy violates the area law and grows as a power law of the block size, with an exponent which increases from zero to one. Interestingly, we show that XXZ models with positive anisotropy present the opposite behavior, and strong correlations in the couplings lead to lower entropies. Similar planar bond structures are also found in statistical models of RNA folding and kinetic roughening, and we trace an analogy between them and quantum valence bond states. Using an inverse renormalization procedure we determine the optimal spin-chain couplings which give rise to a given planar bond structure, and study the statistical properties of the couplings whose bond structures mimic those found in RNA folding.

  4. Mechanisms for folding of high-grade rocks in extensional tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Lyal B.; Koyi, Hemin A.; Fossen, Haakon

    2002-11-01

    This review of structures developed in extensional high-grade terrains, combined with results of centrifuge analogue modelling, illustrates the range of fold styles and mechanisms for folding of amphibolite to granulite facies rocks during rifting or the collapse of a thrust-thickened orogen. Several extensional fold mechanisms (such as folding within detachment shear zones) are similar to those in contractional settings. The metamorphic P- T- t path, and not fold style or mode of formation, is therefore required to determine the tectonic setting in which some folds developed. Other mechanisms such as rollover above and folding between listric normal shear zones, and folding due to isostatic adjustments during crustal thinning, are unique to extensional tectonic settings. Several mechanisms for folding during crustal extension produce structures that could easily be misinterpreted as implying regional contraction and hence lead to errors in their tectonic interpretation. It is shown that isoclinal recumbent folds refolded by open, upright folds may develop during regional extension in the deep crust. Folds with a thrust sense of asymmetry can develop due to high shear strains within an extensional detachment, or from enhanced back-rotation of layers between normal shear zones. During back-rotation folding, layers rotated into the shortening field undergo further buckle folding, and all may rotate towards orthogonality to the maximum shortening direction. This mechanism explains the presence of many transposed folds, folds with axial planar pegmatites and folds with opposite vergence in extensional terrains. Examples of folds in high-grade rocks interpreted as forming during regional extension included in this paper are from the Grenville Province of Canada, Norwegian Caledonides, Albany Mobile Belt and Leeuwin Complex of Western Australia, Ruby Mountains in the Basin and Range Province of Nevada, the Atâ Sund area of Greenland, the Napier Complex of Enderby Land

  5. Quantum Mechanical Methods for Enzyme Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2002-10-01

    This review discusses methods for the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects into enzyme kinetics simulations in which the enzyme is an explicit part of the model. We emphasize three aspects: (a) use of quantum mechanical electronic structure methods such as molecular orbital theory and density functional theory, usually in conjunction with molecular mechanics; (b) treating vibrational motions quantum mechanically, either in an instantaneous harmonic approximation, or by path integrals, or by a three-dimensional wave function coupled to classical nuclear motion; (c) incorporation of multidimensional tunneling approximations into reaction rate calculations.

  6. The Fast-Folding Mechanism of Villin Headpiece Subdomain Studied by Multiscale Distributed Computing.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2012-01-10

    The fast-folding mechanism of a 35-residue mini-protein, villin headpiece subdomain (HP35), was investigated using folding free energy landscape analysis with the multiscale free energy landscape calculation method (MSFEL). A major and a minor folding pathway were deduced from the folding free energy landscape. In the major folding pathway, the formation of helices II and III was the rate-limiting step in the transition to an intermediate state, triggered by the folding of the PLWK motif. HP35 then folds into the native structure through the formation of the hydrophobic core located at the center of the three-helix bundle. Mutations in the motif and hydrophobic core that suppressed folding into the native state drastically changed the folding free energy landscape compared to the wild type protein. In the minor folding pathway, nucleation of the hydrophobic core preceded formation of the motif.

  7. Mechanisms of protein-folding diseases at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Valastyan, Julie S.; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    For a protein to function appropriately, it must first achieve its proper conformation and location within the crowded environment inside the cell. Multiple chaperone systems are required to fold proteins correctly. In addition, degradation pathways participate by destroying improperly folded proteins. The intricacy of this multisystem process provides many opportunities for error. Furthermore, mutations cause misfolded, nonfunctional forms of proteins to accumulate. As a result, many pathological conditions are fundamentally rooted in the protein-folding problem that all cells must solve to maintain their function and integrity. Here, to illustrate the breadth of this phenomenon, we describe five examples of protein-misfolding events that can lead to disease: improper degradation, mislocalization, dominant-negative mutations, structural alterations that establish novel toxic functions, and amyloid accumulation. In each case, we will highlight current therapeutic options for battling such diseases. PMID:24396149

  8. Statistical mechanics of RNA folding: Importance of alphabet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan; Emberly, Eldon; Tang, Chao; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2003-10-01

    We construct a base-stacking model of RNA secondary-structure formation and use it to study the mapping from sequence to structure. There are strong, qualitative differences between two-letter and four- or six-letter alphabets. With only two kinds of bases, most sequences have many alternative folding configurations and are consequently thermally unstable. Stable ground states are found only for a small set of structures of high designability, i.e., total number of associated sequences. In contrast, sequences made from four bases, as found in nature, or six bases have far fewer competing folding configurations, resulting in a much greater average stability of the ground state.

  9. Mechanical Modeling and Computer Simulation of Protein Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Scott, Gregory E.; Denos, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, science education and modern technology are bridged to teach students at the high school and undergraduate levels about protein folding and to strengthen their model building skills. Students are guided from a textbook picture of a protein as a rigid crystal structure to a more realistic view: proteins are highly dynamic…

  10. Multiple-probe analysis of folding and unfolding pathways of human serum albumin. Evidence for a framework mechanism of folding.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Banerjee, Abhijit; Krishnakumar, Shyam Sundar; Rahaman, Obaidur; Panda, Dulal

    2004-05-01

    The changes in the far-UV CD signal, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and bilirubin absorbance showed that the guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), followed a two-state process. However, using environment sensitive Nile red fluorescence, the unfolding and folding pathways of HSA were found to follow a three-state process and an intermediate was detected in the range 0.25-1.5 m GdnHCl. The intermediate state displayed 45% higher fluorescence intensity than that of the native state. The increase in the Nile red fluorescence was found to be due to an increase in the quantum yield of the HSA-bound Nile red. Low concentrations of GdnHCl neither altered the binding affinity of Nile red to HSA nor induced the aggregation of HSA. In addition, the secondary structure of HSA was not perturbed during the first unfolding transition (<1.5 m GdnHCl); however, the secondary structure was completely lost during the second transition. The data together showed that the half maximal loss of the tertiary structure occurred at a lower GdnHCl concentration than the loss of the secondary structure. Further kinetic studies of the refolding process of HSA using multiple spectroscopic techniques showed that the folding occurred in two phases, a burst phase followed by a slow phase. An intermediate with native-like secondary structure but only a partial tertiary structure was found to form in the burst phase of refolding. Then, the intermediate slowly folded into the native state. An analysis of the refolding data suggested that the folding of HSA could be best explained by the framework model.

  11. Structural analysis of kinetic folding intermediates for a TIM barrel protein, indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase, by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry and Gō model simulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Rao, Maithreyi K; Forsyth, William R; Finke, John M; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-11-23

    The structures of partially folded states appearing during the folding of a (betaalpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, the indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS), was assessed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) and Gō model simulations. HX-MS analysis of the peptic peptides derived from the pulse-labeled product of the sub-millisecond folding reaction from the urea-denatured state revealed strong protection in the (betaalpha)(4) region, modest protection in the neighboring (betaalpha)(1-3) and (betaalpha)(5)beta(6) segments and no significant protection in the remaining N and C-terminal segments. These results demonstrate that this species is not a collapsed form of the unfolded state under native-favoring conditions nor is it the native state formed via fast-track folding. However, the striking contrast of these results with the strong protection observed in the (betaalpha)(2-5)beta(6) region after 5 s of folding demonstrates that these species represent kinetically distinct folding intermediates that are not identical as previously thought. A re-examination of the kinetic folding mechanism by chevron analysis of fluorescence data confirmed distinct roles for these two species: the burst-phase intermediate is predicted to be a misfolded, off-pathway intermediate, while the subsequent 5 s intermediate corresponds to an on-pathway equilibrium intermediate. Comparison with the predictions using a C(alpha) Gō model simulation of the kinetic folding reaction for sIGPS shows good agreement with the core of the structure offering protection against exchange in the on-pathway intermediate(s). Because the native-centric Gō model simulations do not explicitly include sequence-specific information, the simulation results support the hypothesis that the topology of TIM barrel proteins is a primary determinant of the folding free energy surface for the productive folding reaction. The early misfolding reaction must involve aspects of

  12. Evolution of ribonuclease in relation to polypeptide folding mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, E. A.; Cohen, M. S.; Gold, M. H.; Kim, J.-K.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of the N-terminal region of pancreatic RNAase in seven species are presented, taking into account cow, bison, deer, rat, pig, kangaroo, and turtle. The available limited evidence on hypervariable regions indicates that there is still an evolutionary constraint on them. It is proposed that there is a selection pressure acting on all regions of a protein sequence in evolution. Mutations that tend to obstruct the folding process can lead to various intensities of selection pressure.

  13. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Studies of the Human Telomerase RNA Pseudoknot: Temperature-/Urea-Dependent Folding Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein telomerase is an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase that catalyzes the repetitive addition of a short, species-specific, DNA sequence to the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. The single RNA component of telomerase contains both the template sequence for DNA synthesis and a functionally critical pseudoknot motif, which can also exist as a less stable hairpin. Here we use a minimal version of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot to study this hairpin–pseudoknot structural equilibrium using temperature-controlled single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments. The urea dependence of these experiments aids in determination of the folding kinetics and thermodynamics. The wild-type pseudoknot behavior is compared and contrasted to a mutant pseudoknot sequence implicated in a genetic disorder–dyskeratosis congenita. These findings clearly identify that this 2nt noncomplementary mutation destabilizes the folding of the wild-type pseudoknot by substantially reducing the folding rate constant (≈ 400-fold) while only nominally increasing the unfolding rate constant (≈ 5-fold). Furthermore, the urea dependence of the equilibrium and rate constants is used to develop a free energy landscape for this unimolecular equilibrium and propose details about the structure of the transition state. Finally, the urea-dependent folding experiments provide valuable physical insights into the mechanism for destabilization of RNA pseudoknots by such chemical denaturants. PMID:24617561

  14. From mechanical folding trajectories to intrinsic energy landscapes of biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Hinczewski, Michael; Gebhardt, J. Christof M.; Rief, Matthias; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-01-01

    In single-molecule laser optical tweezer (LOT) pulling experiments, a protein or RNA is juxtaposed between DNA handles that are attached to beads in optical traps. The LOT generates folding trajectories under force in terms of time-dependent changes in the distance between the beads. How to construct the full intrinsic folding landscape (without the handles and beads) from the measured time series is a major unsolved problem. By using rigorous theoretical methods—which account for fluctuations of the DNA handles, rotation of the optical beads, variations in applied tension due to finite trap stiffness, as well as environmental noise and limited bandwidth of the apparatus—we provide a tractable method to derive intrinsic free-energy profiles. We validate the method by showing that the exactly calculable intrinsic free-energy profile for a generalized Rouse model, which mimics the two-state behavior in nucleic acid hairpins, can be accurately extracted from simulated time series in a LOT setup regardless of the stiffness of the handles. We next apply the approach to trajectories from coarse-grained LOT molecular simulations of a coiled-coil protein based on the GCN4 leucine zipper and obtain a free-energy landscape that is in quantitative agreement with simulations performed without the beads and handles. Finally, we extract the intrinsic free-energy landscape from experimental LOT measurements for the leucine zipper. PMID:23487746

  15. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Abdelrahman, Maha M; Ali, Nouruddin W; Magdy, Maimana A; Abdelkawy, M

    2014-11-11

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol. PMID:24892546

  16. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  17. Critical taper wedge mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus - Initial results from Magellan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppe, John; Connors, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Examples of fold-and-thrust belts from a variety of tectonic settings on Venus are introduced. Predictions for the mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus are examined on the basis of wedge theory, rock mechanics data, and currently known conditions on Venus. The theoretical predictions are then compared with new Magellan data.

  18. Using D-amino acids to delineate the mechanism of protein folding: Application to Trp-cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culik, Robert M.; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Nanda, Vikas; Gai, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Using the miniprotein Trp-cage as a model, we show that D-amino acids can be used to facilitate the delineation of protein folding mechanism. Specifically, we study the folding-unfolding kinetics of three Trp-cage mutants where the native glycine residue near the C-terminus of the α-helix is replaced by a D-amino acid. A previous study showed that these mutations increase the Trp-cage stability, due to a terminal capping effect. Our results show that the stabilizing effect of D-asparagine and D-glutamine originates almost exclusively from a decrease in the unfolding rate, while the D-alanine mutation results in a similar decrease in the unfolding rate, but it also increases the folding rate. Together, these results support a folding mechanism wherein the α-helix formation in the transition state is nucleated at the N-terminus, whereas those long-range native interactions stabilizing this helix are developed at the downhill side of the folding free energy barrier.

  19. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  20. Numerical impact simulation of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer has the potential to break up folded protein structures resulting in cytotoxic brain tissue edema.

    PubMed

    von Holst, Hans; Li, Xiaogai

    2013-07-01

    Although the consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its treatment have been improved, there is still a substantial lack of understanding the mechanisms. Numerical simulation of the impact can throw further lights on site and mechanism of action. A finite element model of the human head and brain tissue was used to simulate TBI. The consequences of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer was analyzed by evaluating the impact intracranial pressure (ICP), strain level, and their potential influences on binding forces in folded protein structures. The gradually increased kinetic energy was found to have the potential to break apart bonds of Van der Waals in all impacts and hydrogen bonds at simulated impacts from 6 m/s and higher, thereby superseding the energy in folded protein structures. Further, impacts below 6 m/s showed none or very slight increase in impact ICP and strain levels, whereas impacts of 6 m/s or higher showed a gradual increase of the impact ICP and strain levels reaching over 1000 KPa and over 30%, respectively. The present simulation study shows that the free kinetic energy transfer, impact ICP, and strain levels all have the potential to initiate cytotoxic brain tissue edema by unfolding protein structures. The definition of mild, moderate, and severe TBI should thus be looked upon as the same condition and separated only by a gradual severity of impact.

  1. Direct observation of an ensemble of stable collapsed states in the mechanical folding of ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Dougan, Lorna; Badilla, Carmen L.; Brujić, Jasna; Fernández, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Statistical theories of protein folding have long predicted plausible mechanisms for reducing the vast conformational space through distinct ensembles of structures. However, these predictions have remained untested by bulk techniques, because the conformational diversity of folding molecules has been experimentally unapproachable. Owing to recent advances in single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy, we are now able to probe the structure and dynamics of the small protein ubiquitin by measuring its length and mechanical stability during each stage of folding. Here, we discover that upon hydrophobic collapse, the protein rapidly selects a subset of minimum energy structures that are mechanically weak and essential precursors of the native fold. From this much reduced ensemble, the native state is acquired through a barrier-limited transition. Our results support the validity of statistical mechanics models in describing the folding of a small protein on biological timescales. PMID:19541635

  2. Connecting thermal and mechanical protein (un)folding landscapes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Noel, Jeffrey K; Sulkowska, Joanna I; Levine, Herbert; Onuchic, José N

    2014-12-16

    Molecular dynamics simulations supplement single-molecule pulling experiments by providing the possibility of examining the full free energy landscape using many coordinates. Here, we use an all-atom structure-based model to study the force and temperature dependence of the unfolding of the protein filamin by applying force at both termini. The unfolding time-force relation τ(F) indicates that the force-induced unfolding behavior of filamin can be characterized into three regimes: barrier-limited low- and intermediate-force regimes, and a barrierless high-force regime. Slope changes of τ(F) separate the three regimes. We show that the behavior of τ(F) can be understood from a two-dimensional free energy landscape projected onto the extension X and the fraction of native contacts Q. In the low-force regime, the unfolding rate is roughly force-independent due to the small (even negative) separation in X between the native ensemble and transition state ensemble (TSE). In the intermediate-force regime, force sufficiently separates the TSE from the native ensemble such that τ(F) roughly follows an exponential relation. This regime is typically explored by pulling experiments. While X may fail to resolve the TSE due to overlap with the unfolded ensemble just below the folding temperature, the overlap is minimal at lower temperatures where experiments are likely to be conducted. The TSE becomes increasingly structured with force, whereas the average order of structural events during unfolding remains roughly unchanged. The high-force regime is characterized by barrierless unfolding, and the unfolding time approaches a limit of ∼10 μs for the highest forces we studied. Finally, a combination of X and Q is shown to be a good reaction coordinate for almost the entire force range. PMID:25517160

  3. Protein folding in the cytosol: chaperonin-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Netzer, W J; Hartl, F U

    1998-02-01

    Recent findings suggest that a combination of chaperonin-assisted and unassisted mechanisms operate in protein folding in the cytosol. While nascent chain-binding chaperones, such as Hsp70, could have a general role in maintaining the folding competence of translating polypeptide chains, the contribution of the cylindrical chaperonin complexes to overall folding is limited to a subset of aggregation-sensitive polypeptides. The majority of bacterial proteins are relatively small and they are synthesized rapidly and folded independently of the chaperonin GroEL in a posttranslational manner. Eukaryotes have a proportionally larger number of multi-domain proteins than bacteria. The individual domains of these proteins can be folded cotranslationally and sequentially. The use of this mechanism explains how large proteins fold independently of a chaperonin and could have been crucial in the evolution of a wide array of modular polypeptides in eukaryotes.

  4. Analysis of the pH-dependent thermodynamic stability, local motions, and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-09-15

    This paper analyzes the effect of pH on thermodynamic stability, low-frequency local motions and microsecond folding kinetics of carbonmonoxycytochrome c (Cyt-CO) all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of protein. Thermodynamic analysis of urea-induced unfolding transitions of Cyt-CO measured between pH 6 and pH 11.9 reveals that Cyt-CO is maximally stable at pH∼9.5. Dilution of unfolded Cyt-CO into refolding medium forms a native-like compact state (NCO-state), where Fe(2+)-CO interaction persists. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters measured for slow thermally-driven CO dissociation (NCO→N+CO) and association (N+CO→NCO) reactions between pH 6.5 and pH 13 reveal that the thermal-motions of M80-containing Ω-loop are decreased in subdenaturing limit of alkaline pH. Laser photolysis of Fe(2+)-CO bond in NCO-state triggers the microsecond folding (NCO→N). The microsecond kinetics measured all across the alkaline pH-unfolding transition of Cyt-CO produce rate rollover in the refolding limb of chevron plot, which suggests a glass transition of NCO en route to N. Between pH 7 and pH 11.9, the natural logarithm of the microsecond folding rate varies by < 1.5 units while the natural logarithm of apparent equilibrium constant varies by 11.8 units. This finding indicates that the pH-dependent ionic-interactions greatly affect the global stability of protein but have very small effect on folding kinetics. PMID:27424489

  5. Thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding on the ribosome: Alteration in energy landscapes, denatured state, and transition state ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Edward; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    In vitro experiments examining cotranslational folding utilize ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs) in which the nascent chain is stalled at different points of its biosynthesis on the ribosome. We investigate the thermodynamics, kinetics, and structural properties of RNCs containing five different globular and repeat proteins stalled at ten different nascent chain lengths using coarse grained replica exchange simulations. We find that when the proteins are stalled near the ribosome exit tunnel opening they exhibit altered folding coopserativity, quantified by the van't Hoff enthalpy criterion; a significantly altered denatured state ensemble, in terms of Rg and shape parameters (Rg tensor); and the appearance of partially folded intermediates during cotranslation, evidenced by the appearance of a third basin in the free energy profile. These trends are due in part to excluded volume (crowding) interactions between the ribosome and nascent chain. We perform in silico temperature-jump experiments on the RNCs and examine nascent chain folding kinetics and structural changes in the transition state ensemble at various stall lengths.

  6. Efficient Numerical Reconstruction of Protein Folding Kinetics with Partial Path Sampling and Pathlike Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juraszek, J.; Saladino, G.; van Erp, T. S.; Gervasio, F. L.

    2013-03-01

    Numerically predicting rate constants of protein folding and other relevant biological events is still a significant challenge. We show that the combination of partial path transition interface sampling with the optimal interfaces and free-energy profiles provided by path collective variables makes the rate calculation for practical biological applications feasible and efficient. This methodology can reproduce the experimental rate constant of Trp-cage miniprotein folding with the same level of accuracy as transition path sampling at a fraction of the cost.

  7. A Two-step Mechanism for the Folding of Actin by the Yeast Cytosolic Chaperonin

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Sarah F.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Willison, Keith R.

    2011-01-01

    Actin requires the chaperonin containing TCP1 (CCT), a hexadecameric ATPase essential for cell viability in eukaryotes, to fold to its native state. Following binding of unfolded actin to CCT, the cavity of the chaperone closes and actin is folded and released in an ATP-dependent folding cycle. In yeast, CCT forms a ternary complex with the phosducin-like protein PLP2p to fold actin, and together they can return nascent or chemically denatured actin to its native state in a pure in vitro folding assay. The complexity of the CCT-actin system makes the study of the actin folding mechanism technically challenging. We have established a novel spectroscopic assay through selectively labeling the C terminus of yeast actin with acrylodan and observe significant changes in the acrylodan fluorescence emission spectrum as actin is chemically unfolded and then refolded by the chaperonin. The variation in the polarity of the environment surrounding the fluorescent probe during the unfolding/folding processes has allowed us to monitor actin as it folds on CCT. The rate of actin folding at a range of temperatures and ATP concentrations has been determined for both wild type CCT and a mutant CCT, CCT4anc2, defective in folding actin in vivo. Binding of the non-hydrolysable ATP analog adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imino)triphosphate to the ternary complex leads to 3-fold faster release of actin from CCT following addition of ATP, suggesting a two-step folding process with a conformational change occurring upon closure of the cavity and a subsequent final folding step involving packing of the C terminus to the native-like state. PMID:21056978

  8. Effect of hydrogen bond networks on the nucleation mechanism of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djikaev, Y. S.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2009-12-01

    We have recently developed a kinetic model for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding (NMPF) in terms of ternary nucleation by using the first passage time analysis. A protein was considered as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic, hydrophilic (some of which are negatively or positively ionizable), and neutral beads. The main idea of the NMPF model consisted of averaging the dihedral potential in which a selected residue is involved over all possible configurations of all neighboring residues along the protein chain. The combination of the average dihedral, effective pairwise (due to Lennard-Jones-type and electrostatic interactions), and confining (due to the polymer connectivity constraint) potentials gives rise to an overall potential around the cluster that, as a function of the distance from the cluster center, has a double-well shape. This allows one to evaluate the protein folding time. In the original NMPF model hydrogen bonding was not taken into account explicitly. To improve the NMPF model and make it more realistic, in this paper we modify our (previously developed) probabilistic hydrogen bond model and combine it with the former. Thus, a contribution due to the disruption of hydrogen bond networks around the interacting particles (cluster of native residues and residue in the protein unfolded part) appears in the overall potential field around a cluster. The modified model is applied to the folding of the same model proteins that were examined in the original model: a short protein consisting of 124 residues (roughly mimicking bovine pancreatic ribonuclease) and a long one consisting of 2500 residues (as a representative of large proteins with superlong polypeptide chains), at pH=8.3 , 7.3, and 6.3. The hydrogen bond contribution now plays a dominant role in the total potential field around the cluster (except for very short distances thereto where the repulsive energy tends to infinity). It is by an order of magnitude stronger for

  9. Lithological Controls on 3D Fold Geometry in Mechanically Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, M. A.; Jones, R. R.; Rock, G.

    2010-12-01

    Folding and thrusting are key processes in accommodating shortening in evolving orogens. In the outer parts of mountain belts, the combination of tectonism and sedimentation often leads to viable petroleum systems where folds trap migrating hydrocarbons. A key aspect of the success of these traps is the 3D fold geometry, which must prevent up-plunge hydrocarbon escape. Fold shapes in a multilayered system are governed by the fold mechanism, and the rheology of the layers. In sedimentary environments where laterally heterogeneous thicknesses of interbedded carbonates, clastics, and evaporates may be present, predicting the sub-surface geometry of structures is challenging. We present field data combined with satellite and seismic interpretation from the Zagros fold and thrust belt of SE Turkey where Neogene shortening has affected an Ordovician to Miocene aged sedimentary pile comprising shales, sandstones, carbonates and minor evaporites. Miocene carbonates capping the sequence allow 3D fold geometries to be ascertained at surface with a high degree of confidence, whilst the underlying ~1km of shales and mudstones allows folds to develop that depart substantially from standard “text-book” geometries. Beneath these incompetent units a further 1.7km of carbonates and clastics overlie Ordovician shales up to 1.5km thick. In relatively low strain sections asymmetric, angular, kink-like folds form long wavelength structures and thrust faults rarely reach the surface. With increasing strain, the wavelength/amplitude ratio decreases and thrusts cut through the fold limbs. Folds are interpreted to detach above a thick sequence of Ordovician shales. They originate by buckling of the competent units within the two weaker horizons, with initial perturbations probably provided by sedimentary heterogeneities. As the folds amplify, thrusts form in the more competent units above the shale. These then propagate upwards with fold amplification dominated by fault-tip

  10. Kinetic mechanism of the fastest motor protein, Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Kashiyama, Taku; Mogami, Toshifumi; Kon, Takahide; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2007-07-01

    Chara corallina class XI myosin is by far the fastest molecular motor. To investigate the molecular mechanism of this fast movement, we performed a kinetic analysis of a recombinant motor domain of Chara myosin. We estimated the time spent in the strongly bound state with actin by measuring rate constants of ADP dissociation from actin.motor domain complex and ATP-induced dissociation of the motor domain from actin. The rate constant of ADP dissociation from acto-motor domain was >2800 s(-1), and the rate constant of ATP-induced dissociation of the motor domain from actin at physiological ATP concentration was 2200 s(-1). From these data, the time spent in the strongly bound state with actin was estimated to be <0.82 ms. This value is the shortest among known values for various myosins and yields the duty ratio of <0.3 with a V(max) value of the actin-activated ATPase activity of 390 s(-1). The addition of the long neck domain of myosin Va to the Chara motor domain largely increased the velocity of the motility without increasing the ATP hydrolysis cycle rate, consistent with the swinging lever model. In addition, this study reveals some striking kinetic features of Chara myosin that are suited for the fast movement: a dramatic acceleration of ADP release by actin (1000-fold) and extremely fast ATP binding rate.

  11. Mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, Kafui A.; Coudert, Francois-Xavier; Boutin, Anne

    2008-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the mechanism and kinetics of hydrated electron diffusion. The electron center of mass is found to exhibit Brownian-type behavior with a diffusion coefficient considerably greater than that of the solvent. As previously postulated by both experimental and theoretical works, the instantaneous response of the electron to the librational motions of surrounding water molecules constitutes the principal mode of motion. The diffusive mechanism can be understood within the traditional framework of transfer diffusion processes, where the diffusive step is akin to the exchange of an extramolecular electron between neighboring water molecules. This is a second-order process with a computed rate constant of 5.0 ps{sup -1} at 298 K. In agreement with experiment the electron diffusion exhibits Arrhenius behavior over the temperature range of 298-400 K. We compute an activation energy of 8.9 kJ mol{sup -1}. Through analysis of Arrhenius plots and the application of a simple random walk model it is demonstrated that the computed rate constant for exchange of an excess electron is indeed the phenomenological rate constant associated with the diffusive process.

  12. Architecture and Folding Mechanism of the Azoarcus Group I Pre-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan,P.; Masquida, B.; Westhof, E.; Woodson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Self-splicing RNAs must evolve to function in their specific exon context. The conformation of a group I pre-tRNA{sup ile} from the bacterium Azoarcus was probed by ribonuclease T1 and hydroxyl radical cleavage, and by native gel electrophoresis. Biochemical data and three-dimensional models of the pre-tRNA showed that the tRNA is folded, and that the tRNA and intron sequences form separate tertiary domains. Models of the active site before steps 1 and 2 of the splicing reaction predict that exchange of the external G-cofactor and the 3{prime}-terminal G is accomplished by a slight conformational change in P9.0 of the Azoarcus group I intron. Kinetic assays showed that the pre-tRNA folds in minutes, much more slowly than the intron alone. The dependence of the folding kinetics on Mg{sup 2+} and the concentration of urea, and RNase T1 experiments showed that formation of native pre-tRNA is delayed by misfolding of P3-P9, including mispairing between residues in P9 and the tRNA. Thus, although the intron and tRNA sequences form separate domains in the native pre-tRNA, their folding is coupled via metastable non-native base-pairs. This could help prevent premature processing of the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of unspliced pre-tRNA.

  13. Reaction Mechanism Generator: Automatic construction of chemical kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Connie W.; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.; West, Richard H.

    2016-06-01

    Reaction Mechanism Generator (RMG) constructs kinetic models composed of elementary chemical reaction steps using a general understanding of how molecules react. Species thermochemistry is estimated through Benson group additivity and reaction rate coefficients are estimated using a database of known rate rules and reaction templates. At its core, RMG relies on two fundamental data structures: graphs and trees. Graphs are used to represent chemical structures, and trees are used to represent thermodynamic and kinetic data. Models are generated using a rate-based algorithm which excludes species from the model based on reaction fluxes. RMG can generate reaction mechanisms for species involving carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen. It also has capabilities for estimating transport and solvation properties, and it automatically computes pressure-dependent rate coefficients and identifies chemically-activated reaction paths. RMG is an object-oriented program written in Python, which provides a stable, robust programming architecture for developing an extensible and modular code base with a large suite of unit tests. Computationally intensive functions are cythonized for speed improvements.

  14. Understanding the Mechanism of Prosegment-catalyzed Folding by Solution NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenlin; Horimoto, Yasumi; Dee, Derek R.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2014-01-01

    Multidomain protein folding is often more complex than a two-state process, which leads to the spontaneous folding of the native state. Pepsin, a zymogen-derived enzyme, without its prosegment (PS), is irreversibly denatured and folds to a thermodynamically stable, non-native conformation, termed refolded pepsin, which is separated from native pepsin by a large activation barrier. While it is known that PS binds refolded pepsin and catalyzes its conversion to the native form, little structural details are known regarding this conversion. In this study, solution NMR was used to elucidate the PS-catalyzed folding mechanism by examining the key equilibrium states, e.g. native and refolded pepsin, both in the free and PS-bound states, and pepsinogen, the zymogen form of pepsin. Refolded pepsin was found to be partially structured and lacked the correct domain-domain structure and active-site cleft formed in the native state. Analysis of chemical shift data revealed that upon PS binding refolded pepsin folds into a state more similar to that of pepsinogen than to native pepsin. Comparison of pepsin folding by wild-type and mutant PSs, including a double mutant PS, indicated that hydrophobic interactions between residues of prosegment and refolded pepsin lower the folding activation barrier. A mechanism is proposed for the binding of PS to refolded pepsin and how the formation of the native structure is mediated. PMID:24265313

  15. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Nanosilver Oxysulfidation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Pennell, Kelly G.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Among the many new engineered nanomaterials, nanosilver is one of the highest priority cases for environmental risk assessment. Recent analysis of field samples from water treatment facilities suggests that silver is converted to silver sulfide, whose very low solubility may limit the bioavailability and adverse impact of silver in the environment. The present study demonstrates that silver nanoparticles react with dissolved sulfide species (HS−, S2−) under relevant but controlled laboratory conditions to produce silver sulfide nanostructures similar to those observed in the field. The reaction is tracked by time-resolved sulfide depletion measurements to yield quantitative reaction rates and stoichiometries. The reaction requires dissolved oxygen, and it is sensitive to pH and natural organic matter. Focusedion-beam analysis of surface films reveals an irregular coarse-grained sulfide phase that allows deep (> 1 μm) conversion of silver surfaces without passivation. At high sulfide concentrations, nanosilver oxysulfidation occurs by a direct particle-fluid reaction. At low sulfide concentration, quantitative kinetic analysis suggests a mechanistic switch to an oxidative dissolution/precipitation mechanism, in which the biologically active Ag+ ion is generated as an intermediate. The environmental transformation pathways for nanosilver will vary depending on the media-specific competing rates of oxidative dissolution and direct oxysulfidation. PMID:21770469

  16. Statistical mechanical modeling of RNA folding: from free energy landscape to tertiary structural prediction

    PubMed Central

    CAO, Song; CHEN, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the success of computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structure, the problem of predicting RNA tertiary structure folding remains. Low-resolution structural models show promise as they allow for rigorous statistical mechanical computation for the conformational entropies, free energies, and the coarse-grained structures of tertiary folds. Molecular dynamics refinement of coarse-grained structures leads to all-atom 3D structures. Modeling based on statistical mechanics principles also has the unique advantage of predicting the full free energy landscape, including local minima and the global free energy minimum. The energy landscapes combined with the 3D structures form the basis for quantitative predictions of RNA functions. In this chapter, we present an overview of statistical mechanical models for RNA folding and then focus on a recently developed RNA statistical mechanical model -- the Vfold model. The main emphasis is placed on the physics underpinning the models, the computational strategies, and the connections to RNA biology. PMID:27293312

  17. Effect of hydrophobic interactions on the folding mechanism of β-hairpins.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Wu, Ling; Keiderling, Timothy A; Hauser, Karin

    2014-12-11

    Hydrophobic interactions are essential in stabilizing protein structures. How they affect the folding pathway and kinetics, however, is less clear. We used time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to study the dynamics of hydrophobic interactions of β-hairpin variants of the sequence Trpzip2 (SWTWENGKWTWK-NH2) that is stabilized by two cross-strand Trp-Trp pairs. The hydrophobicity strength was varied by substituting the tryptophans pairwise by either tyrosines or valines. Relaxation dynamics were induced by a laser-excited temperature jump, which separately probed for the loss of the cross-strand β-hairpin interaction and the rise of the disordered structure. All substitutions tested result in reduced thermal stability, lower transition temperatures, and faster dynamics compared to Trpzip2. However, the changes in folding dynamics depend on the amino acid substituted for Trp. The aromatic substitution of Tyr for Trp results in the same kinetics for the unfolding of sheet and growth of disorder, with similar activation energies, independent of the substitution position. Substitution of Trp with a solely hydrophobic Val results in even faster kinetics than substitution with Tyr but is additionally site-dependent. If the hairpin has a Val pair close to its termini, the rate constants for loss of sheet and gain of disorder are the same, but if the pair is close to the turn, the sheet and disorder components show different relaxation kinetics. The Trp → Val substitutions reveal that hydrophobic interactions alone weakly stabilize the hairpin structure, but adding edge-to-face aromatic interaction strengthens it, and both modify the complex folding process.

  18. KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF NOx - CHAR REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1998-06-19

    This study was undertaken in order to improve understanding of several aspects of the NO-carbon reaction. This reaction is of practical importance in combustion systems, but its close examination also provides some fundamental insight into oxidizing gas-carbon reactions. As part of this study, a comprehensive literature review of earlier work on this reaction has been published (Aarna and Suuberg, Fuel, 1997, 76, 475-491). It has been thought for some time that the kinetics of the NO-carbon reaction are unusual, in that they often show a two-regime Arrhenius behavior. It has, however, turned out during this work that NO is not alone in this regard. In this laboratory, we also uncovered evidence of two kinetic regime behavior in CO{sub 2} gasification. In another laboratory, a former colleague has identified the same behavior in N{sub 2}O. The low temperature reaction regime always shows an activation energy which is lower than that in the high temperature regime, leaving little doubt that a shift in mechanism, as opposed to transport limitations, dictates the behavior. The activation energy of the low temperature regime of these reactions is typically less than 100 kJ/mol, and the activation energy of the high temperature regime is generally considerably in excess of this value. In this study, we have resolved some apparent inconsistencies in the explanation of the low temperature regime, whose rate has generally been ascribed to desorption-controlled processes. Part of the problem in characterization of the different temperature regimes is that they overlap to a high degree. It is difficult to probe the low temperature regime experimentally, because of slow relaxation of the surface oxides in that regime. Using careful experimental techniques, we were able to demonstrate that the low temperature regime is indeed characterized by zero order in NO, as it must be. A separate study is being carried out to model the behavior in this regime in NO and in other gases, and

  19. Neutralization of adenoviruses: kinetics, stoichiometry, and mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic curves for neutralization of adenovirus type 2 with anti-hexon serum revealed no lag periods even when the serum was highly diluted or when the temperature was lowered to 4 degrees C, thus indicating a single-hit mechanism. Multiplicity curves determined with anti-hexon serum displayed a linear correlation between the degree of neutralization and dilution of antiserum. Neutralization values experimentally obtained under steady-state conditions fully fitted a single-hit model based on Poisson calculations. Quantitation of the amount of 125I-labeled type-specific anti-hexon antibodies needed for full neutralization of adenovirus showed that 1.4 antibodies were attached per virion under such conditions. Virions already attached to HeLa cells at 4 degrees C were, to a large extent, neutralizable by anti-hexon serum, whereas anti-fiber and anti-penton base antisera were negative. It is suggested that adenovirus may be neutralized by two pathways: aggregation of the virions (extracellular neutralization) as performed by anti-fiber antibodies and blocking of virion entrance from the acidic endosomes into the cytoplasm (intracellular neutralization). The latter effect could be obtained by (i) covering of the penton bases, as performed by anti-penton base antibodies, thereby preventing interaction between the penton bases and the endosomal membrane, which results in trapping of virions within endosomes, and (ii) inhibition of the low-pH-induced conformational change of the viral capsid, which seems to occur in the endosomes and is necessary for proper exposure of the penton bases, as performed by anti-hexon antibodies. Images PMID:3373570

  20. Temperature dependence of the folding and unfolding kinetics of the GCN4 leucine zipper via 13C(alpha)-NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzer, M E; Bretthorst, G L; d'Avignon, D A; Angeletti, R H; Mints, L; Holtzer, A

    2001-01-01

    Studies by one-dimensional NMR are reported on the interconversion of folded and unfolded forms of the GCN4 leucine zipper in neutral saline buffer. The peptide bears 99% 13C(alpha) labels at three sites: V9, L12, and G31. Time-domain 13C(alpha)-NMR spectra are interpreted by global Bayesian lineshape analysis to extract the rate constants for both unfolding and folding as functions of temperature in the range 47-71 degrees C. The data are well fit by the assumption that the same rate constants apply at each labeled site, confirming that only two conformational states need be considered. Results show that 1) both processes require a free energy of activation; 2) unfolding is kinetically enthalpy-opposed and entropy-driven, while folding is the opposite; and 3) the transition state dimer ensemble averages approximately 40% helical. The activation parameters for unfolding, derived from NMR data at the elevated temperatures where both conformations are populated, lead to estimates of the rate constant at low temperatures (5-15 degrees C) that agree with extant values determined by stopped-flow CD via dilution from denaturing media. However, the corresponding estimated values for the folding rate constant are larger by two to three orders of magnitude than those obtained by stopped flow. We propose that this apparent disagreement is caused by the necessity, in the stopped-flow experiment, for initiation of new helices as the highly denaturant-unfolded molecule adjusts to the newly created benign solvent conditions. This must reduce the success rate of collisions in producing the folded molecule. In the NMR determinations, however, the unfolded chains always have a small, but essential, helix content that makes such initiation unnecessary. Support for this hypothesis is adduced from recent extant experiments on the helix-coil transition in single-chain helical peptides and from demonstration that the folding rate constants for coiled coils, as obtained by stopped flow

  1. Mechanisms for GroEL/GroES-mediated folding of a large 86-kDa fusion polypeptide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Chuang, D T

    1999-04-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms for GroEL/GroES-assisted protein folding to date has been derived mostly from studies with small proteins. Little is known concerning the interaction of these chaperonins with large multidomain polypeptides during folding. In the present study, we investigated chaperonin-dependent folding of a large 86-kDa fusion polypeptide, in which the mature maltose-binding protein (MBP) sequence was linked to the N terminus of the alpha subunit of the decarboxylase (E1) component of the human mitochondrial branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. The fusion polypeptide, MBP-alpha, when co-expressed with the beta subunit of E1, produced a chimeric protein MBP-E1 with an (MBP-alpha)2beta2 structure, similar to the alpha2 beta2 structure in native E1. Reactivation of MBP-E1 denatured in 8 M urea was absolutely dependent on GroEL/GroES and Mg2+-ATP, and exhibited strikingly slow kinetics with a rate constant of 376 M-1 s-1, analogous to denatured untagged E1. Chaperonin-mediated refolding of the MBP-alpha fusion polypeptide showed that the folding of the MBP moiety was about 7-fold faster than that of the alpha moiety on the same chain with rate constants of 1.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and 2.95 x 10(-4) s-1, respectively. This explained the occurrence of an MBP-alpha. GroEL binary complex that was isolated with amylose resin from the refolding mixture and transformed Escherichia coli lysates. The data support the thesis that distinct functional sequences in a large polypeptide exhibit different folding characteristics on the same GroEL scaffold. Moreover, we show that when the alpha.GroEL complex (molar ratio 1:1) was incubated with GroES, the latter was capable of capping either the very ring that harbored the 48-kDa (His)6-alpha polypeptide (in cis) or the opposite unoccupied cavity (in trans). In contrast, the MBP-alpha.GroEL (1:1) complex was capped by GroES exclusively in the trans configuration. These findings suggest that the productive

  2. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  3. Surface folding in metals: a mechanism for delamination wear in sliding

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Anirban; Guo, Yang; Sundaram, Narayan K.; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution, in situ imaging of a hard, wedge-shaped model asperity sliding against a metal surface, we demonstrate a new mechanism for particle formation and delamination wear. Damage to the residual surface is caused by the occurrence of folds on the free surface of the prow-shaped region ahead of the wedge. This damage manifests itself as shallow crack-like features and surface tears, which are inclined at very acute angles to the surface. The transformation of folds into cracks, tears and particles is directly captured. Notably, a single sliding pass is sufficient to damage the surface, and subsequent passes result in the generation of platelet-like wear particles. Tracking the folding process at every stage from surface bumps to folds to cracks/tears/particles ensures that there is no ambiguity in capturing the mechanism of wear. Because fold formation and consequent delamination are quite general, our findings have broad applicability beyond wear itself, including implications for design of surface generation and conditioning processes. PMID:25197251

  4. Early Events in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, D.; Lee, Namkyung; Woodson, Sarah A.; Klimov, Dk

    2001-10-01

    We describe a conceptual framework for understanding the way large RNA molecules fold based on the notion that their free-energy landscape is rugged. A key prediction of our theory is that RNA folding can be described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism (KPM). According to KPM a small fraction of molecules folds rapidly to the native state whereas the remaining fraction is kinetically trapped in a low free-energy non-native state. This model provides a unified description of the way RNA and proteins fold. Single-molecule experiments on Tetrahymena ribozyme, which directly validate our theory, are analyzed using KPM. We also describe the earliest events that occur on microsecond time scales in RNA folding. These must involve collapse of RNA molecules that are mediated by counterion-condensation. Estimates of time scales for the initial events in RNA folding are provided for the Tetrahymena ribozyme.

  5. A 3-fold "butterfly valve" in command of the encapsulation's kinetic stability. Molecular baskets at work.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Yu; Bao, Xiaoguang; Yan, Zhiqing; Maslak, Veselin; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2008-11-12

    Molecular basket 1, composed of a semirigid tris-norbornadiene framework and three revolving pyridine-based gates at the rim, has been built to "dynamically" enclose space and as such regulate molecular encapsulation. The gates were shown to fold via intramolecular hydrogen bonding and thereby form a C3nu symmetrical receptor: the 1H NMR resonance for the amide N-H protons of the pyridine gates appeared downfield (delta= 10.98 ppm), and the N-H vibrational stretch (IR) was observed at 3176 cm(-1). Accordingly, density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP) investigations revealed for the closed conformers of 1 to be energetically the most stable and dominant. The gearing of the pyridine "gates", about their axis, led to the interconversion of two dynamic enantiomers 1A and 1B comprising the clockwise and counterclockwise seam of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopic measurements and line-shape simulations suggested that the energy barrier of 10.0 kcal/mol (DeltaG++(A/B), 298 K) is required for the 1A/B interconversion, when CCl4 occupies the cavity of 1. Likewise, the activation free energy for CCl4 departing the basket was found to be 13.1 kcal/mol (DeltaG++, 298 K), whereas the thermodynamic stability of 1:CCl4 complex was -2.7 kcal/mol (DeltaGdegrees, 298 K). In view of that, CCl4 (but also (CH3)3CBr) was proposed to escape from, and a molecule of solvent to enter, the basket when the gates rotate about their axis: the exit of CCl4 requires the activation energy of 12.7 kcal/mol (DeltaG++(A/B) + DeltaGdegrees), similar to the experimentally found 13.1 kcal/mol (DeltaG++). PMID:18937455

  6. Self-catalyzed growth of S layers via an amorphous-to-crystalline transition limited by folding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sungwook; Shin, Seong-Ho; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of nonclassical, multistage crystallization pathways is increasingly evident from theoretical studies on colloidal systems and experimental investigations of proteins and biomineral phases. Although theoretical predictions suggest that proteins follow these pathways as a result of fluctuations that create unstable dense-liquid states, microscopic studies indicate these states are long-lived. Using in situ atomic force microscopy to follow 2D assembly of S-layer proteins on supported lipid bilayers, we have obtained a molecular-scale picture of multistage protein crystallization that reveals the importance of conformational transformations in directing the pathway of assembly. We find that monomers with an extended conformation first form a mobile adsorbed phase, from which they condense into amorphous clusters. These clusters undergo a phase transition through S-layer folding into crystalline clusters composed of compact tetramers. Growth then proceeds by formation of new tetramers exclusively at cluster edges, implying tetramer formation is autocatalytic. Analysis of the growth kinetics leads to a quantitative model in which tetramer creation is rate limiting. However, the estimated barrier is much smaller than expected for folding of isolated S-layer proteins, suggesting an energetic rationale for this multistage pathway. PMID:20823255

  7. Single-Molecule Chemo-Mechanical Spectroscopy Provides Structural Identity of Folding Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Hesam N; Toptygin, Dmitri; Kaiser, Christian M; Hilser, Vincent J

    2016-03-29

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the folding of biological macromolecules. Mechanical manipulation has revealed a wealth of mechanistic information on transient and intermediate states. To date, the majority of state assignment of intermediates has relied on empirical demarcation. However, performing such experiments in the presence of different osmolytes provides an alternative approach that reports on the structural properties of intermediates. Here, we analyze the folding and unfolding of T4 lysozyme with optical tweezers under a chemo-mechanical perturbation by adding osmolytes. We find that two unrelated protective osmolytes, sorbitol and trimethylamine-n-oxide, function by marginally decelerating unfolding rates and specifically modulating early events in the folding process, stabilizing formation of an on-pathway intermediate. The chemo-mechanical perturbation provides access to two independent metrics of the relevant states during folding trajectories, the contour length, and the solvent-accessible surface area. We demonstrate that the dependence of the population of the intermediate in different osmolytes, in conjunction with its measured contour length, provides the ability to discriminate between potential structural models of intermediate states. Our study represents a general strategy that may be employed in the structural modeling of equilibrium intermediate states observed in single-molecule experiments. PMID:27028638

  8. Redesigning the type II' β-turn in green fluorescent protein to type I': implications for folding kinetics and stability.

    PubMed

    Madan, Bharat; Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-10-01

    Both Type I' and Type II' β-turns have the same sense of the β-turn twist that is compatible with the β-sheet twist. They occur predominantly in two residue β-hairpins, but the occurrence of Type I' β-turns is two times higher than Type II' β-turns. This suggests that Type I' β-turns may be more stable than Type II' β-turns, and Type I' β-turn sequence and structure can be more favorable for protein folding than Type II' β-turns. Here, we redesigned the native Type II' β-turn in GFP to Type I' β-turn, and investigated its effect on protein folding and stability. The Type I' β-turns were designed based on the statistical analysis of residues in natural Type I' β-turns. The substitution of the native "GD" sequence of i+1 and i+2 residues with Type I' preferred "(N/D)G" sequence motif increased the folding rate by 50% and slightly improved the thermodynamic stability. Despite the enhancement of in vitro refolding kinetics and stability of the redesigned mutants, they showed poor soluble expression level compared to wild type. To overcome this problem, i and i + 3 residues of the designed Type I' β-turn were further engineered. The mutation of Thr to Lys at i + 3 could restore the in vivo soluble expression of the Type I' mutant. This study indicates that Type II' β-turns in natural β-hairpins can be further optimized by converting the sequence to Type I'.

  9. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins influence the mechanism of binding and folding

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Munehito; Sugase, Kenji; Dyson, H. Jane; Wright, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) frequently function in protein interaction networks that regulate crucial cellular signaling pathways. Many IDPs undergo transitions from disordered conformational ensembles to folded structures upon binding to their cellular targets. Several possible binding mechanisms for coupled folding and binding have been identified: folding of the IDP after association with the target (“induced fit”), or binding of a prefolded state in the conformational ensemble of the IDP to the target protein (“conformational selection”), or some combination of these two extremes. The interaction of the intrinsically disordered phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain (pKID) of the cAMP-response element binding (CREB) protein with the KIX domain of a general transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) provides an example of the induced-fit mechanism. Here we show by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments that a different intrinsically disordered ligand, the transactivation domain of the transcription factor c-Myb, interacts with KIX at the same site as pKID but via a different binding mechanism that involves elements of conformational selection and induced fit. In contrast to pKID, the c-Myb activation domain has a strong propensity for spontaneous helix formation in its N-terminal region, which binds to KIX in a predominantly folded conformation. The C-terminal region of c-Myb exhibits a much smaller helical propensity and likely folds via an induced-fit process after binding to KIX. We propose that the intrinsic secondary structure propensities of pKID and c-Myb determine their binding mechanisms, consistent with their functions as inducible and constitutive transcriptional activators. PMID:26195786

  10. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins influence the mechanism of binding and folding.

    PubMed

    Arai, Munehito; Sugase, Kenji; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) frequently function in protein interaction networks that regulate crucial cellular signaling pathways. Many IDPs undergo transitions from disordered conformational ensembles to folded structures upon binding to their cellular targets. Several possible binding mechanisms for coupled folding and binding have been identified: folding of the IDP after association with the target ("induced fit"), or binding of a prefolded state in the conformational ensemble of the IDP to the target protein ("conformational selection"), or some combination of these two extremes. The interaction of the intrinsically disordered phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain (pKID) of the cAMP-response element binding (CREB) protein with the KIX domain of a general transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) provides an example of the induced-fit mechanism. Here we show by NMR relaxation dispersion experiments that a different intrinsically disordered ligand, the transactivation domain of the transcription factor c-Myb, interacts with KIX at the same site as pKID but via a different binding mechanism that involves elements of conformational selection and induced fit. In contrast to pKID, the c-Myb activation domain has a strong propensity for spontaneous helix formation in its N-terminal region, which binds to KIX in a predominantly folded conformation. The C-terminal region of c-Myb exhibits a much smaller helical propensity and likely folds via an induced-fit process after binding to KIX. We propose that the intrinsic secondary structure propensities of pKID and c-Myb determine their binding mechanisms, consistent with their functions as inducible and constitutive transcriptional activators.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of olefin catalytic hydroalumination by organoaluminum compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koledina, K. F.; Gubaidullin, I. M.

    2016-05-01

    The complex reaction mechanism of α-olefin catalytic hydroalumination by alkylalanes is investigated via mathematical modeling that involves plotting the kinetic models for the individual reactions that make up a complex system and a separate study of their principles. Kinetic parameters of olefin catalytic hydroalumination are estimated. Activation energies of the possible steps of the schemes of complex reaction mechanisms are compared and possible reaction pathways are determined.

  12. Toluene and benzyl decomposition mechanisms: elementary reactions and kinetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Derudi, Marco; Polino, Daniela; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2011-12-28

    The high temperature decomposition kinetics of toluene and benzyl were investigated by combining a kinetic analysis with the ab initio/master equation study of new reaction channels. It was found that similarly to toluene, which decomposes to benzyl and phenyl losing atomic hydrogen and methyl, also benzyl decomposition proceeds through two channels with similar products. The first leads to the formation of fulvenallene and hydrogen and has already been investigated in detail in recent publications. In this work it is proposed that benzyl can decompose also through a second decomposition channel to form benzyne and methyl. The channel specific kinetic constants of benzyl decomposition were determined by integrating the RRKM/master equation over the C(7)H(7) potential energy surface. The energies of wells and saddle points were determined at the CCSD(T) level on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) structures. A kinetic mechanism was then formulated, which comprises the benzyl and toluene decomposition reactions together with a recently proposed fulvenallene decomposition mechanism, the decomposition kinetics of the fulvenallenyl radical, and some reactions describing the secondary chemistry originated by the decomposition products. The kinetic mechanism so obtained was used to simulate the production of H atoms measured in a wide pressure and temperature range using different experimental setups. The calculated and experimental data are in good agreement. Kinetic constants of the new reaction channels here examined are reported as a function of temperature at different pressures. The mechanism here proposed is not compatible with the assumption often used in literature kinetic mechanisms that benzyl decomposition can be effectively described through a lumped reaction whose products are the cyclopentadienyl radical and acetylene.

  13. Local Kinetic Measures of Macromolecular Structure Reveal Partitioning Among Multiple Parallel Pathways from the Earliest Steps in the Folding of a Large RNA Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Laederach,A.; Shcherbakova, I.; Liang, M.; Brenowitz, M.; Altman, R.

    2006-01-01

    At the heart of the RNA folding problem is the number, structures, and relationships among the intermediates that populate the folding pathways of most large RNA molecules. Unique insight into the structural dynamics of these intermediates can be gleaned from the time-dependent changes in local probes of macromolecular conformation (e.g. reports on individual nucleotide solvent accessibility offered by hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) footprinting). Local measures distributed around a macromolecule individually illuminate the ensemble of separate changes that constitute a folding reaction. Folding pathway reconstruction from a multitude of these individual measures is daunting due to the combinatorial explosion of possible kinetic models as the number of independent local measures increases. Fortunately, clustering of time progress curves sufficiently reduces the dimensionality of the data so as to make reconstruction computationally tractable. The most likely folding topology and intermediates can then be identified by exhaustively enumerating all possible kinetic models on a super-computer grid. The folding pathways and measures of the relative flux through them were determined for Mg{sup 2+} and Na{sup +}-mediated folding of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron using this combined experimental and computational approach. The flux during Mg{sup 2+}-mediated folding is divided among numerous parallel pathways. In contrast, the flux during the Na{sup +}-mediated reaction is predominantly restricted through three pathways, one of which is without detectable passage through intermediates. Under both conditions, the folding reaction is highly parallel with no single pathway accounting for more than 50% of the molecular flux. This suggests that RNA folding is non-sequential under a variety of different experimental conditions even at the earliest stages of folding. This study provides a template for the systematic analysis of the time-evolution of RNA structure

  14. Kinetic cooperativity of tyrosinase. A general mechanism.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Jose Luis; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Varon, Ramón; Tudela, Jose; Garcia-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, Jose N

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosinase shows kinetic cooperativity in its action on o-diphenols, but not when it acts on monophenols, confirming that the slow step is the hydroxylation of monophenols to o-diphenols. This model can be generalised to a wide range of substrates; for example, type S(A) substrates, which give rise to a stable product as the o-quinone evolves by means of a first or pseudo first order reaction (α-methyl dopa, dopa methyl ester, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, α-methyl-tyrosine, tyrosine methyl ester, tyramine, 4-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), type S(B) substrates, which include those whose o-quinone evolves with no clear stoichiometry (catechol, 4-methylcatechol, phenol and p-cresol) and, lastly, type S(C) substrates, which give rise to stable o-quinones (4-tert-butylcatechol/4-tert-butylphenol).

  15. Kinetics of α-Globin Binding to α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein (AHSP) Indicate Preferential Stabilization of Hemichrome Folding Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Mollan, Todd L.; Khandros, Eugene; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Olson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Human α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a conserved mammalian erythroid protein that facilitates the production of Hemoglobin A by stabilizing free α-globin. AHSP rapidly binds to ferrous α with association (k′AHSP) and dissociation (kAHSP) rate constants of ≈10 μm−1 s−1 and 0.2 s−1, respectively, at pH 7.4 at 22 °C. A small slow phase was observed when AHSP binds to excess ferrous αCO. This slow phase appears to be due to cis to trans prolyl isomerization of the Asp29-Pro30 peptide bond in wild-type AHSP because it was absent when αCO was mixed with P30A and P30W AHSP, which are fixed in the trans conformation. This slow phase was also absent when met(Fe3+)-α reacted with wild-type AHSP, suggesting that met-α is capable of rapidly binding to either Pro30 conformer. Both wild-type and Pro30-substituted AHSPs drive the formation of a met-α hemichrome conformation following binding to either met- or oxy(Fe2+)-α. The dissociation rate of the met-α·AHSP complex (kAHSP ≈ 0.002 s−1) is ∼100-fold slower than that for ferrous α·AHSP complexes, resulting in a much higher affinity of AHSP for met-α. Thus, in vivo, AHSP acts as a molecular chaperone by rapidly binding and stabilizing met-α hemichrome folding intermediates. The low rate of met-α dissociation also allows AHSP to have a quality control function by kinetically trapping ferric α and preventing its incorporation into less stable mixed valence Hemoglobin A tetramers. Reduction of AHSP-bound met-α allows more rapid release to β subunits to form stable fully, reduced hemoglobin dimers and tetramers. PMID:22298770

  16. Optical measurements of vocal fold tensile properties: implications for phonatory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Jordan E; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W; Henslee, Erin A

    2011-06-01

    In voice research, in vitro tensile stretch experiments of vocal fold tissues are commonly employed to determine the tissue biomechanical properties. In the standard stretch-release protocol, tissue deformation is computed from displacements applied to sutures inserted through the thyroid and arytenoid cartilages, with the cartilages assumed to be rigid. Here, a non-contact optical method was employed to determine the actual tissue deformation of vocal fold lamina propria specimens from three excised human larynges in uniaxial tensile tests. Specimen deformation was found to consist not only of deformation of the tissue itself, but also deformation of the cartilages, as well as suture alignment and tightening. Stress-stretch curves of a representative load cycle were characterized by an incompressible Ogden model. The initial longitudinal elastic modulus was found to be considerably higher if determined based on optical displacement measurements than typical values reported in the literature. The present findings could change the understanding of the mechanics underlying vocal fold vibration. Given the high longitudinal elastic modulus the lamina propria appeared to demonstrate a substantial level of anisotropy. Consequently, transverse shear could play a significant role in vocal fold vibration, and fundamental frequencies of phonation should be predicted by beam theories accounting for such effects.

  17. The development of a simplified Fin Folding Mechanism for a future space transportation vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian; Heinrich, Beat; Sutter, Guido; Spycher, Peter; Urmston, Peter

    2005-07-01

    In the time when the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) was being considered as a follow on joint venture between ESA and NASA, Contraves Space AG was being considered as the sub-contractor for the Fin Folding Mechanism. Although due to the lack of funding in the USA, the CRV programme was stopped, ESTEC decided to continue the development of the Fin Folding Mechanism (FFM) for a "future Space Transportation Vehicle" (STV) for launch and re-entry. Contraves Space was subsequently awarded with a contract to develop a simplified mechanism to replace the mechanism that was designed for CRV. The function of the FFM is to fold the Vehicle Fin inboard so that any future STV can be accommodated in today's launchers. The FFM must be able to support the fin during launch, deploy the fin and then support the fin in the deployed position during re-entry. Contraves Space reviewed the functionality of the old CRV design, with its' different mechanisms for each of the functions, and a synchronisation system, and established a novel design where one mechanism can be used to perform all three functions. The final design utilises a four bar link mechanism, driven over-centre in both of the end positions, driven by a high-torque drive unit comprising a Harmonic Drive, a conventional gearbox and a 3 Phase DC motor. To protect the high-torque drive system against stall, a clutch has been utilised based on spring and rotating ball technology. These devices are used seldom in space, but as surviving stall is often a problem for mechanisms, the results from the test programme will be interesting with respect to the use of such devices in future space mechanisms. The design of the mechanism consists of three almost identical nodes, one of which has been built and is undergoing "qualification" testing at Contraves Space. The mechanism will be subjected to the full range of tests including, functional tests, random vibration tests, thermal vacuum tests and a static load test. This paper will detail

  18. Molecular mechanism of a hotdog-fold acyl-CoA thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Cantu, David C; Ardèvol, Albert; Rovira, Carme; Reilly, Peter J

    2014-07-14

    Thioesterases are enzymes that hydrolyze thioester bonds between a carbonyl group and a sulfur atom. They catalyze key steps in fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolism, as well as polyketide biosynthesis. The reaction molecular mechanism of most hotdog-fold acyl-CoA thioesterases remains unknown, but several hypotheses have been put forward in structural and biochemical investigations. The reaction of a human thioesterase (hTHEM2), representing a thioesterase family with a hotdog fold where a coenzyme A moiety is cleaved, was simulated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics techniques to elucidate atomic and electronic details of its mechanism, its transition-state conformation, and the free energy landscape of the process. A single-displacement acid-base-like mechanism, in which a nucleophilic water molecule is activated by an aspartate residue acting as a base, was found, confirming previous experimental proposals. The results provide unambiguous evidence of the formation of a tetrahedral-like transition state. They also explain the roles of other conserved active-site residues during the reaction, especially that of a nearby histidine/serine pair that protonates the thioester sulfur atom, the participation of which could not be elucidated from mutation analyses alone. PMID:24894958

  19. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the conformational folding process of SS-reduced bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A using a selenoxide reagent with high oxidizing ability.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kenta; Kumakura, Fumio; Iwaoka, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Redox-coupled folding pathways of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) with four intramolecular disulfide (SS) bonds comprise three phases: (I) SS formation to generate partially oxidized intermediate ensembles with no rigid folded structure; (II) SS rearrangement from the three SS intermediate ensemble (3S) to the des intermediates having three native SS linkages; (III) final oxidation of the last native SS linkage to generate native RNase A. We previously demonstrated that DHS(ox), a water-soluble selenoxide reagent for rapid and quantitative SS formation, allows clear separation of the three folding phases. In this study, the main conformational folding phase (phase II) has been extensively analyzed at pH 8.0 under a wide range of temperatures (5-45 °C), and thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the four des intermediates were determined. The free-energy differences (ΔG) as a function of temperature suggested that the each SS linkage has different thermodynamic and kinetic roles in stability of the native structure. On the other hand, comparison of the rate constants and the activation energies for 3S → des with those reported for the conformational folding of SS-intact RNase A suggested that unfolded des species (desU) having three native SS linkages but not yet being folded are involved in very small amounts (<1%) in the 3S intermediate ensemble and the desU species would gain the native-like structures via X-Pro isomerization like SS-intact RNase A. It was revealed that DHS(ox) is useful for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the conformational folding process on the oxidative folding pathways of SS-reduced proteins.

  20. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  1. Evidence for a Shared Mechanism in the Formation of Urea-Induced Kinetic and Equilibrium Intermediates of Horse Apomyoglobin from Ultrarapid Mixing Experiments.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Takuya; Abe, Yukiko; Maki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the equivalence of the kinetic mechanisms of the formation of urea-induced kinetic folding intermediates and non-native equilibrium states was investigated in apomyoglobin. Despite having similar structural properties, equilibrium and kinetic intermediates accumulate under different conditions and via different mechanisms, and it remains unknown whether their formation involves shared or distinct kinetic mechanisms. To investigate the potential mechanisms of formation, the refolding and unfolding kinetics of horse apomyoglobin were measured by continuous- and stopped-flow fluorescence over a time range from approximately 100 μs to 10 s, along with equilibrium unfolding transitions, as a function of urea concentration at pH 6.0 and 8°C. The formation of a kinetic intermediate was observed over a wider range of urea concentrations (0-2.2 M) than the formation of the native state (0-1.6 M). Additionally, the kinetic intermediate remained populated as the predominant equilibrium state under conditions where the native and unfolded states were unstable (at ~0.7-2 M urea). A continuous shift from the kinetic to the equilibrium intermediate was observed as urea concentrations increased from 0 M to ~2 M, which indicates that these states share a common kinetic folding mechanism. This finding supports the conclusion that these intermediates are equivalent. Our results in turn suggest that the regions of the protein that resist denaturant perturbations form during the earlier stages of folding, which further supports the structural equivalence of transient and equilibrium intermediates. An additional folding intermediate accumulated within ~140 μs of refolding and an unfolding intermediate accumulated in <1 ms of unfolding. Finally, by using quantitative modeling, we showed that a five-state sequential scheme appropriately describes the folding mechanism of horse apomyoglobin.

  2. Evidence for a Shared Mechanism in the Formation of Urea-Induced Kinetic and Equilibrium Intermediates of Horse Apomyoglobin from Ultrarapid Mixing Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Takuya; Abe, Yukiko; Maki, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the equivalence of the kinetic mechanisms of the formation of urea-induced kinetic folding intermediates and non-native equilibrium states was investigated in apomyoglobin. Despite having similar structural properties, equilibrium and kinetic intermediates accumulate under different conditions and via different mechanisms, and it remains unknown whether their formation involves shared or distinct kinetic mechanisms. To investigate the potential mechanisms of formation, the refolding and unfolding kinetics of horse apomyoglobin were measured by continuous- and stopped-flow fluorescence over a time range from approximately 100 μs to 10 s, along with equilibrium unfolding transitions, as a function of urea concentration at pH 6.0 and 8°C. The formation of a kinetic intermediate was observed over a wider range of urea concentrations (0–2.2 M) than the formation of the native state (0–1.6 M). Additionally, the kinetic intermediate remained populated as the predominant equilibrium state under conditions where the native and unfolded states were unstable (at ~0.7–2 M urea). A continuous shift from the kinetic to the equilibrium intermediate was observed as urea concentrations increased from 0 M to ~2 M, which indicates that these states share a common kinetic folding mechanism. This finding supports the conclusion that these intermediates are equivalent. Our results in turn suggest that the regions of the protein that resist denaturant perturbations form during the earlier stages of folding, which further supports the structural equivalence of transient and equilibrium intermediates. An additional folding intermediate accumulated within ~140 μs of refolding and an unfolding intermediate accumulated in <1 ms of unfolding. Finally, by using quantitative modeling, we showed that a five-state sequential scheme appropriately describes the folding mechanism of horse apomyoglobin. PMID:26244984

  3. Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Wet CO Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Rogg, B.; Williams, F. A.

    Although deflagrations of dry mixtures of carbon monoxide and oxygen can occur at sufficiently high pressures, under practical conditions there are large enough amounts of hydrogen-containing species present for the step OH + CO → CO2 + H to dominate hydrogen-free steps. Thus, there is practical interest in investigating deflagrations in wet CO mixtures. Moreover, at low hydrogen content the hydrogen-containing species may be expected to achieve steady states and, thereby, produce a one-step reduced mechanism that describes the flame propagation with high accuracy. This great degree of simplification is not anticipated for the other reactant mixtures considered in the present volume. Therefore, the wet CO flames addressed here offer a unique testing ground for reduced mechanisms.

  4. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  5. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of cell membrane electrofusion.

    PubMed Central

    Abidor, I G; Sowers, A E

    1992-01-01

    A new quantitative approach to study cell membrane electrofusion has been developed. Erythrocyte ghosts were brought into close contact using dielectrophoresis and then treated with one square or even exponentially decaying fusogenic pulse. Individual fusion events were followed by lateral diffusion of the fluorescent lipid analogue 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) from originally labeled to unlabeled adjacent ghosts. It was found that ghost fusion can be described as a first-order rate process with corresponding rate constants; a true fusion rate constant, k(f), for the square waveform pulse and an effective fusion rate constant, k(ef), for the exponential pulse. Compared with the fusion yield, the fusion rate constants are more fundamental characteristics of the fusion process and have implications for its mechanisms. Values of k(f) for rabbit and human erythrocyte ghosts were obtained at different electric field strength and temperatures. Arrhenius k(f) plots revealed that the activation energy of ghost electrofusion is in the range of 6-10 kT. Measurements were also made with the rabbit erythrocyte ghosts exposed to 42 degrees C for 10 min (to disrupt the spectrin network) or 0.1-1.0 mM uranyl acetate (to stabilize the bilayer lipid matrix of membranes). A correlation between the dependence of the fusion and previously published pore-formation rate constants for all experimental conditions suggests that the cell membrane electrofusion process involve pores formed during reversible electrical breakdown. A statistical analysis of fusion products (a) further supports the idea that electrofusion is a stochastic process and (b) shows that the probability of ghost electrofusion is independent of the presence of Dil as a label as well as the number of fused ghosts. PMID:1617138

  7. A three-dimensional statistical mechanical model of folding double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2001-05-01

    Based on a graphical representation of intrachain contacts, we have developed a new three-dimensional model for the statistical mechanics of double-stranded chain molecules. The theory has been tested and validated for the cubic lattice chain conformations. The statistical mechanical model can be applied to the equilibrium folding thermodynamics of a large class of chain molecules, including protein β-hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures. The application of a previously developed two-dimensional model to RNA secondary structure folding thermodynamics generally overestimates the breadth of the melting curves [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 646 (2000)], suggesting an underestimation for the sharpness of the conformational transitions. In this work, we show that the new three-dimensional model gives much sharper melting curves than the two-dimensional model. We believe that the new three-dimensional model may give much improved predictions for the thermodynamic properties of RNA conformational changes than the previous two-dimensional model.

  8. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Piers; *Morse, John W.

    2010-11-15

    1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.

  9. Origami mechanical metamaterials based on the Miura-derivative fold patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Zang, Shixi; You, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two new types of origami-inspired mechanical metamaterials based on the Miura-derivative fold patterns that consist of non-identical parallelogram facets. The analytical models to predict dimension changes and deformation kinematics of the proposed metamaterials are developed. Furthermore, by modelling the creases as revolute hinges with certain rotational spring constants, we derived analytical models for stretching and bulk moduli. The analytical models are validated through finite-element simulation results. Numerical examples reveal that the proposed metamaterials possess some intriguing properties, including negative Poisson's ratios and bulk modulus. The work presented in this paper can provide a highly flexible framework for the design of versatile tunable mechanical metamaterials.

  10. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  11. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  12. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C. Q.

    2016-09-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson’s ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering.

  13. Folding to Curved Surfaces: A Generalized Design Method and Mechanics of Origami-based Cylindrical Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Gong, Haoran; Chen, Xi; Chen, C Q

    2016-01-01

    Origami structures enrich the field of mechanical metamaterials with the ability to convert morphologically and systematically between two-dimensional (2D) thin sheets and three-dimensional (3D) spatial structures. In this study, an in-plane design method is proposed to approximate curved surfaces of interest with generalized Miura-ori units. Using this method, two combination types of crease lines are unified in one reprogrammable procedure, generating multiple types of cylindrical structures. Structural completeness conditions of the finite-thickness counterparts to the two types are also proposed. As an example of the design method, the kinematics and elastic properties of an origami-based circular cylindrical shell are analysed. The concept of Poisson's ratio is extended to the cylindrical structures, demonstrating their auxetic property. An analytical model of rigid plates linked by elastic hinges, consistent with numerical simulations, is employed to describe the mechanical response of the structures. Under particular load patterns, the circular shells display novel mechanical behaviour such as snap-through and limiting folding positions. By analysing the geometry and mechanics of the origami structures, we extend the design space of mechanical metamaterials and provide a basis for their practical applications in science and engineering. PMID:27624892

  14. Kinetic and thermodynamic framework for P4-P6 RNA reveals tertiary motif modularity and modulation of the folding preferred pathway.

    PubMed

    Bisaria, Namita; Greenfeld, Max; Limouse, Charles; Pavlichin, Dmitri S; Mabuchi, Hideo; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-08-23

    The past decade has seen a wealth of 3D structural information about complex structured RNAs and identification of functional intermediates. Nevertheless, developing a complete and predictive understanding of the folding and function of these RNAs in biology will require connection of individual rate and equilibrium constants to structural changes that occur in individual folding steps and further relating these steps to the properties and behavior of isolated, simplified systems. To accomplish these goals we used the considerable structural knowledge of the folded, unfolded, and intermediate states of P4-P6 RNA. We enumerated structural states and possible folding transitions and determined rate and equilibrium constants for the transitions between these states using single-molecule FRET with a series of mutant P4-P6 variants. Comparisons with simplified constructs containing an isolated tertiary contact suggest that a given tertiary interaction has a stereotyped rate for breaking that may help identify structural transitions within complex RNAs and simplify the prediction of folding kinetics and thermodynamics for structured RNAs from their parts. The preferred folding pathway involves initial formation of the proximal tertiary contact. However, this preference was only ∼10 fold and could be reversed by a single point mutation, indicating that a model akin to a protein-folding contact order model will not suffice to describe RNA folding. Instead, our results suggest a strong analogy with a modified RNA diffusion-collision model in which tertiary elements within preformed secondary structures collide, with the success of these collisions dependent on whether the tertiary elements are in their rare binding-competent conformations. PMID:27493222

  15. Role of five-fold twin boundary on the enhanced mechanical properties of fcc Fe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Y; Nagao, S; He, J Y; Zhang, Z L

    2011-12-14

    The role of 5-fold twin boundary on the structural and mechanical properties of fcc Fe nanowire under tension is explored by classical molecular dynamics. Twin-stabilized fcc nanowire with various diameters (6-24 nm) are examined by tension tests at several temperatures ranging from 0.01 to 1100 K. Significant increase in the Young's modulus of the smaller nanowires is revealed to originate from the central area of quinquefoliolate-like stress-distribution over the 5-fold twin, rather than from the surface tension that is often considered as the main source of such size-effects found in nanostructures. Because of the excess compressive stress caused by crossing twin-boundaries, the atoms in the center behave stiffer than those in bulk and even expand laterally under axial tension, providing locally negative Poisson's ratio. The yield strength of nanowire is also enhanced by the twin boundary that suppresses dislocation nucleation within a fcc twin-domain; therefore, the plasticity of nanowire is initiated by strain-induced fcc→bcc phase transformation that destroys the twin structure. After the yield, the nucleated bcc phase immediately spreads to the entire area, and forms a multigrain structure to realize ductile deformation followed by necking. As temperature elevated close to the critical temperature between bcc and fcc phases, the increased stability of fcc phase competes with the phase transformation under tension, and hence dislocation nucleations in fcc phase are observed exclusively at the highest temperature in our study.

  16. Reduced alphabet for protein folding prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-04-01

    What are the key building blocks that would have been needed to construct complex protein folds? This is an important issue for understanding protein folding mechanism and guiding de novo protein design. Twenty naturally occurring amino acids and eight secondary structures consist of a 28-letter alphabet to determine folding kinetics and mechanism. Here we predict folding kinetic rates of proteins from many reduced alphabets. We find that a reduced alphabet of 10 letters achieves good correlation with folding rates, close to the one achieved by full 28-letter alphabet. Many other reduced alphabets are not significantly correlated to folding rates. The finding suggests that not all amino acids and secondary structures are equally important for protein folding. The foldable sequence of a protein could be designed using at least 10 folding units, which can either promote or inhibit protein folding. Reducing alphabet cardinality without losing key folding kinetic information opens the door to potentially faster machine learning and data mining applications in protein structure prediction, sequence alignment and protein design.

  17. Purification and kinetic mechanism of the major glutathione S-transferase from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Young, P R; Briedis, A V

    1989-01-01

    The major glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme from bovine brain was isolated and purified approx. 500-fold. The enzyme has a pI of 7.39 +/- 0.02 and consists of two non-identical subunits having apparent Mr values of 22,000 and 24,000. The enzyme is uniformly distributed in brain, and kinetic data at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate suggest a random rapid-equilibrium mechanism. The kinetics of inhibition by product, by GSH analogues and by NADH are consistent with the suggested mechanism and require inhibitor binding to several different enzyme forms. Long-chain fatty acids are excellent inhibitors of the enzyme, and values of 1nKi for hexanoic acid, octanoic acid, decanoic acid and lauric acid form a linear series when plotted as a function of alkyl chain length. A free-energy change of -1900 J/mol (-455 cal/mol) per CH2 unit is calculated for the contribution of hydrophobic binding energy to the inhibition constants. The turnover number of the purified enzyme dimer is approx. 3400/min. When compared with the second-order rate constant for the reaction between CDNB and GSH, the enzyme is providing a rate acceleration of about 1000-fold. The role of entropic contributions to this small rate acceleration is discussed. PMID:2930465

  18. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  19. Rapid three-dimensional microfluidic mixer for high viscosity solutions to unravel earlier folding kinetics of G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Peng; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Rapid mixing of highly viscous solutions is a great challenge, which helps to analyze the reaction kinetics in viscous liquid phase, particularly to discover the folding kinetics of macromolecules under molecular crowding conditions mimicking the conditions inside cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel microfluidic mixer based on Dean flows with three-dimensional (3D) microchannel configuration for fast mixing of high-viscosity fluids. The main structure contained three consecutive subunits, each consisting of a "U"-type channel followed by a chamber with different width and height. Thus, the two solutions injected from the two inlets would undergo a mixing in the first "U"-type channel due to the Dean flow effect, and simultaneous vortices expansions in both horizontal and vertical directions in the following chamber. Numerical simulations and experimental characterizations confirmed that the micromixer could achieve a mixing time of 122.4μs for solutions with viscosities about 33.6 times that of pure water. It was the fastest micromixer for high viscosity solutions compared with previous reports. With this highly efficient 3D microfluidic mixer, we further characterized the early folding kinetics of human telomere G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions, and unravelled a new folding process within 550μs. PMID:26717836

  20. Rapid three-dimensional microfluidic mixer for high viscosity solutions to unravel earlier folding kinetics of G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Peng; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Rapid mixing of highly viscous solutions is a great challenge, which helps to analyze the reaction kinetics in viscous liquid phase, particularly to discover the folding kinetics of macromolecules under molecular crowding conditions mimicking the conditions inside cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel microfluidic mixer based on Dean flows with three-dimensional (3D) microchannel configuration for fast mixing of high-viscosity fluids. The main structure contained three consecutive subunits, each consisting of a "U"-type channel followed by a chamber with different width and height. Thus, the two solutions injected from the two inlets would undergo a mixing in the first "U"-type channel due to the Dean flow effect, and simultaneous vortices expansions in both horizontal and vertical directions in the following chamber. Numerical simulations and experimental characterizations confirmed that the micromixer could achieve a mixing time of 122.4μs for solutions with viscosities about 33.6 times that of pure water. It was the fastest micromixer for high viscosity solutions compared with previous reports. With this highly efficient 3D microfluidic mixer, we further characterized the early folding kinetics of human telomere G-quadruplex under molecular crowding conditions, and unravelled a new folding process within 550μs.

  1. Constraints on bed scale fracture chronology with a FEM mechanical model of folding: The case of Split Mountain (Utah, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, W.; Guiton, M. L. E.; Leroy, Y. M.; Daniel, J.-M.; Callot, J.-P.

    2012-11-01

    A technique is presented for improving the structural analysis of natural fractures development in large scale fold structures. A 3D restoration of a fold provides the external displacement loading conditions to solve, by the finite element method, the forward mechanical problem of an idealized rock material with a stress-strain relationship based on the activation of pervasive fracture sets. In this elasto-plasticity constitutive law, any activated fracture set contributes to the total plastic strain by either an opening or a sliding mode of rock failure. Inherited versus syn-folding fracture sets development can be studied using this mechanical model. The workflow of this methodology was applied to the Weber sandstone formation deformed by forced folding at Split Mountain Anticline, Utah for which the different fracture sets were created and developed successively during the Sevier and the syn-folding Laramide orogenic phases. The field observations at the top stratigraphic surface of the Weber sandstone lead to classify the fracture sets into a pre-fold WNW-ESE fracture set, and a NE-SW fracture set post-dating the former. The development and relative chronology of the fracture sets are discussed based on the geomechanical modeling results. Starting with a 3D restoration of the Split Mountain Anticline, three fold-fracture development models were generated, alternately assuming that the WNW-ESE fracture set is either present or absent prior to folding process. Depending on the initial fracture configuration, the calculated fracture patterns are markedly different, showing that assuming a WNW-ESE joint set to predate the fold best correlates with field observations. This study is a first step addressing the complex problem of identification of fold-related fracturing events using an elementary concept of rock mechanics. When tight to complementary field observations, including petrography, diagenesis and burial history, the approach can be used to better

  2. Students' misconceptions about heat transfer mechanisms and elementary kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathare, S. R.; Pradhan, H. C.

    2010-11-01

    Heat and thermodynamics is a conceptually rich area of undergraduate physics. In the Indian context in particular there has been little work done in this area from the point of view of misconceptions. This prompted us to undertake a study in this area. We present a study of students' misconceptions about heat transfer mechanisms, i.e. conduction, convection and radiation, and about elementary kinetic theory.

  3. Kinetics and mechanisms of some atomic oxygen reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cvetanovic, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms and kinetics of some reactions of the ground state of oxygen atoms, O(3P), are briefly summarized. Attention is given to reactions of oxygen atoms with several different types of organic and inorganic compounds such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and some oxygen, nitrogen, halogen and sulfur derivatives of these compounds. References to some recent compilations and critical evaluations of reaction rate constants are given.

  4. The carbon-bond mechanism: a condensed kinetic mechanism for photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, G.Z.; Hog, H.; Killus, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    Efforts to develop a model that can simulate photochemical smog with kinetic mechanisms are discussed. The carbon-bond mechanism is a set of generalized reactions that can be used to model photochemical oxidant formation. The theoretical framework of carbon-bond mechanism is outlined. Chemical variables that are incorporated into the carbon-bond mechanism model are described. Further work that is needed on the carbon-bond mechanism model is considered. (1 diagram, 13 graphs, 30 references, 2 tables)

  5. Kinetic Mechanism of Protein N-terminal Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stacie L.; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L.; Huang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  6. Influence of Glu/Arg, Asp/Arg, and Glu/Lys Salt Bridges on α-Helical Stability and Folding Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Vreede, Jocelyne; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Using a combination of ultraviolet circular dichroism, temperature-jump transient-infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of salt bridges between different types of charged amino-acid residue pairs on α-helix folding. We determine the stability and the folding and unfolding rates of 12 alanine-based α-helical peptides, each of which has a nearly identical composition containing three pairs of positively and negatively charged residues (either Glu(-)/Arg(+), Asp(-)/Arg(+), or Glu(-)/Lys(+)). Within each set of peptides, the distance and order of the oppositely charged residues in the peptide sequence differ, such that they have different capabilities of forming salt bridges. Our results indicate that stabilizing salt bridges (in which the interacting residues are spaced and ordered such that they favor helix formation) speed up α-helix formation by up to 50% and slow down the unfolding of the α-helix, whereas salt bridges with an unfavorable geometry have the opposite effect. Comparing the peptides with different types of charge pairs, we observe that salt bridges between side chains of Glu(-) and Arg(+) are most favorable for the speed of folding, probably because of the larger conformational space of the salt-bridging Glu(-)/Arg(+) rotamer pairs compared to Asp(-)/Arg(+) and Glu(-)/Lys(+). We speculate that the observed impact of salt bridges on the folding kinetics might explain why some proteins contain salt bridges that do not stabilize the final, folded conformation. PMID:27276251

  7. Influence of Glu/Arg, Asp/Arg, and Glu/Lys Salt Bridges on α-Helical Stability and Folding Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Vreede, Jocelyne; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Using a combination of ultraviolet circular dichroism, temperature-jump transient-infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of salt bridges between different types of charged amino-acid residue pairs on α-helix folding. We determine the stability and the folding and unfolding rates of 12 alanine-based α-helical peptides, each of which has a nearly identical composition containing three pairs of positively and negatively charged residues (either Glu(-)/Arg(+), Asp(-)/Arg(+), or Glu(-)/Lys(+)). Within each set of peptides, the distance and order of the oppositely charged residues in the peptide sequence differ, such that they have different capabilities of forming salt bridges. Our results indicate that stabilizing salt bridges (in which the interacting residues are spaced and ordered such that they favor helix formation) speed up α-helix formation by up to 50% and slow down the unfolding of the α-helix, whereas salt bridges with an unfavorable geometry have the opposite effect. Comparing the peptides with different types of charge pairs, we observe that salt bridges between side chains of Glu(-) and Arg(+) are most favorable for the speed of folding, probably because of the larger conformational space of the salt-bridging Glu(-)/Arg(+) rotamer pairs compared to Asp(-)/Arg(+) and Glu(-)/Lys(+). We speculate that the observed impact of salt bridges on the folding kinetics might explain why some proteins contain salt bridges that do not stabilize the final, folded conformation.

  8. Atomic-level description of ubiquitin folding

    PubMed Central

    Piana, Stefano; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Shaw, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, in which proteins spontaneously and repeatedly fold and unfold, have recently been used to help elucidate the mechanistic principles that underlie the folding of fast-folding proteins. The extent to which the conclusions drawn from the analysis of such proteins, which fold on the microsecond timescale, apply to the millisecond or slower folding of naturally occurring proteins is, however, unclear. As a first attempt to address this outstanding issue, we examine here the folding of ubiquitin, a 76-residue-long protein found in all eukaryotes that is known experimentally to fold on a millisecond timescale. Ubiquitin folding has been the subject of many experimental studies, but its slow folding rate has made it difficult to observe and characterize the folding process through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Here we determine the mechanism, thermodynamics, and kinetics of ubiquitin folding through equilibrium atomistic simulations. The picture emerging from the simulations is in agreement with a view of ubiquitin folding suggested from previous experiments. Our findings related to the folding of ubiquitin are also consistent, for the most part, with the folding principles derived from the simulation of fast-folding proteins, suggesting that these principles may be applicable to a wider range of proteins. PMID:23503848

  9. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  10. Network measures for protein folding state discrimination.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, Giulia; Fariselli, Piero; Remondini, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fold using a two-state or multi-state kinetic mechanisms, but up to now there is not a first-principle model to explain this different behavior. We exploit the network properties of protein structures by introducing novel observables to address the problem of classifying the different types of folding kinetics. These observables display a plain physical meaning, in terms of vibrational modes, possible configurations compatible with the native protein structure, and folding cooperativity. The relevance of these observables is supported by a classification performance up to 90%, even with simple classifiers such as discriminant analysis. PMID:27464796

  11. Mechanism of Protein Kinetic Stabilization by Engineered Disulfide Crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Romero, Inmaculada; Ariza, Antonio; Wilson, Keith S.; Skjøt, Michael; Vind, Jesper; De Maria, Leonardo; Skov, Lars K.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of disulfide bonds on protein stability goes beyond simple equilibrium thermodynamics effects associated with the conformational entropy of the unfolded state. Indeed, disulfide crosslinks may play a role in the prevention of dysfunctional association and strongly affect the rates of irreversible enzyme inactivation, highly relevant in biotechnological applications. While these kinetic-stability effects remain poorly understood, by analogy with proposed mechanisms for processes of protein aggregation and fibrillogenesis, we propose that they may be determined by the properties of sparsely-populated, partially-unfolded intermediates. Here we report the successful design, on the basis of high temperature molecular-dynamics simulations, of six thermodynamically and kinetically stabilized variants of phytase from Citrobacter braakii (a biotechnologically important enzyme) with one, two or three engineered disulfides. Activity measurements and 3D crystal structure determination demonstrate that the engineered crosslinks do not cause dramatic alterations in the native structure. The inactivation kinetics for all the variants displays a strongly non-Arrhenius temperature dependence, with the time-scale for the irreversible denaturation process reaching a minimum at a given temperature within the range of the denaturation transition. We show this striking feature to be a signature of a key role played by a partially unfolded, intermediate state/ensemble. Energetic and mutational analyses confirm that the intermediate is highly unfolded (akin to a proposed critical intermediate in the misfolding of the prion protein), a result that explains the observed kinetic stabilization. Our results provide a rationale for the kinetic-stability consequences of disulfide-crosslink engineering and an experimental methodology to arrive at energetic/structural descriptions of the sparsely populated and elusive intermediates that play key roles in irreversible protein

  12. Structure, Kinetic, and Chemical Mechanism of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Quartararo, Christine E.; Hazra, Saugata; Hadi, Timin; Blanchard, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death due to a bacterial infection. The success of the Mtb pathogen has largely been attributed to the nonreplicating, persistence phase of the life cycle, for which the glyoxylate shunt is required. In Escherichia coli flux through the shunt is controlled by regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). In Mtb, the mechanism of regulation is unknown, and currently there is no mechanistic or structural information on ICDH. We optimized expression and purification to a yield high enough to perform the first detailed kinetic and structural studies for Mtb ICDH-1. A large solvent kinetic isotope effect (D2OV = 3.0 ± 0.2, D2O[V/Kisocitrate] = 1.5 ± 0.3) and a smaller primary kinetic isotope effect (DV = 1.3 ± 0.1, D[V/K[2R-2H]isocitrate] = 1.5 ± 0.2) allowed us to perform the first multiple kinetic isotope effect studies on any ICDH and suggest a chemical mechanism. In this mechanism, protonation of the enolate to form product α-ketoglutarate is the rate-limiting step. We report the first structure of Mtb ICDH-1 to 2.18 Å by X-ray crystallography with NADPH and Mn2+ bound. It is a homodimer in which each subunit has a Rossmann fold, and a common top domain of interlocking beta sheets. Mtb ICDH-1 is most structurally similar to the R132H mutant human ICDH found in glioblastomas. Similar to human R132H ICDH, Mtb ICDH-1 also catalyses the formation of α-hydroxyglutarate. Our data suggest that regulation of Mtb ICDH-1 is novel. PMID:23409873

  13. Reaction route graphs. III. Non-minimal kinetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fishtik, Ilie; Callaghan, Caitlin A; Datta, Ravindra

    2005-02-24

    The concept of reaction route (RR) graphs introduced recently by us for kinetic mechanisms that produce minimal graphs is extended to the problem of non-minimal kinetic mechanisms for the case of a single overall reaction (OR). A RR graph is said to be minimal if all of the stoichiometric numbers in all direct RRs of the mechanism are equal to +/-1 and non-minimal if at least one stoichiometric number in a direct RR is non-unity, e.g., equal to +/-2. For a given mechanism, four unique topological characteristics of RR graphs are defined and enumerated, namely, direct full routes (FRs), empty routes (ERs), intermediate nodes (INs), and terminal nodes (TNs). These are further utilized to construct the RR graphs. One algorithm involves viewing each IN as a central node in a RR sub-graph. As a result, the construction and enumeration of RR graphs are reduced to the problem of balancing the peripheral nodes in the RR sub-graphs according to the list of FRs, ERs, INs, and TNs. An alternate method involves using an independent set of RRs to draw the RR graph while satisfying the INs and TNs. Three examples are presented to illustrate the application of non-minimal RR graph theory.

  14. Optimal automatic reaction and species elimination in kinetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsos, A.

    2008-10-15

    A known challenge for the simulation of reacting flow systems is that detailed chemical mechanisms contain hundreds to thousands of species and thousands of reactions, leading to high CPU requirements despite the use of state-of-the-art solvers. For specific conditions of interest (temperature, pressure, and composition), smaller mechanisms can predict the chemistry relatively accurately. One possibility for obtaining such mechanisms is species elimination from a detailed mechanism. Here, an automatic method for kinetic model reduction by simultaneous reaction and species elimination is proposed, based on an integer linear program (ILP) formulation. The solution of the ILP is an optimally reduced kinetic mechanism that reproduces the predictions of a reference mechanism within prespecified tolerances for finitely many reference points in the state space. The method is applied to generate optimally reduced models for isobaric, adiabatic homogeneous combustion. Case studies are presented for the combustion of n-heptane. Comparisons between the full and reduced models are shown and the tradeoff between species and reaction elimination is discussed. Tolerances in the ILP formulation control the error introduced by the model reduction. For increasing acceptable error, more species and/or reactions are eliminated. A method of quantifying this tradeoff between approximation error and reduction achieved is proposed, based on multiobjective optimization, and demonstrated in a case study. The effect of variable initial conditions is investigated. The mechanisms generated achieve significant reduction in the CPU requirement and can accurately predict the trajectories of the state variables (species mass fractions and temperature), as well as other metrics of interest, such as ignition time delay. (author)

  15. Simplified jet-A kinetic mechanism for combustor application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Kundu, Krishna; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Successful modeling of combustion and emissions in gas turbine engine combustors requires an adequate description of the reaction mechanism. For hydrocarbon oxidation, detailed mechanisms are only available for the simplest types of hydrocarbons such as methane, ethane, acetylene, and propane. These detailed mechanisms contain a large number of chemical species participating simultaneously in many elementary kinetic steps. Current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must include fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, chemical reactions, and complicated boundary geometries. To simulate these conditions a very sophisticated computer model is required, which requires large computer memory capacity and long run times. Therefore, gas turbine combustion modeling has frequently been simplified by using global reaction mechanisms, which can predict only the quantities of interest: heat release rates, flame temperature, and emissions. Jet fuels are wide-boiling-range hydrocarbons with ranges extending through those of gasoline and kerosene. These fuels are chemically complex, often containing more than 300 components. Jet fuel typically can be characterized as containing 70 vol pct paraffin compounds and 25 vol pct aromatic compounds. A five-step Jet-A fuel mechanism which involves pyrolysis and subsequent oxidation of paraffin and aromatic compounds is presented here. This mechanism is verified by comparing with Jet-A fuel ignition delay time experimental data, and species concentrations obtained from flametube experiments. This five-step mechanism appears to be better than the current one- and two-step mechanisms.

  16. Structural insights into a unique cellulase fold and mechanism of cellulose hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Brás, Joana L. A.; Cartmell, Alan; Carvalho, Ana Luísa M.; Verzé, Genny; Bayer, Edward A.; Vazana, Yael; Correia, Márcia A. S.; Prates, José A. M.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Boraston, Alisdair B.; Romão, Maria J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a well-characterized cellulose-degrading microorganism. The genome sequence of C. thermocellum encodes a number of proteins that contain type I dockerin domains, which implies that they are components of the cellulose-degrading apparatus, but display no significant sequence similarity to known plant cell wall–degrading enzymes. Here, we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of one of these proteins, designated CtCel124. The protein was shown to be an endo-acting cellulase that displays a single displacement mechanism and acts in synergy with Cel48S, the major cellulosomal exo-cellulase. The crystal structure of CtCel124 in complex with two cellotriose molecules, determined to 1.5 Å, displays a superhelical fold in which a constellation of α-helices encircle a central helix that houses the catalytic apparatus. The catalytic acid, Glu96, is located at the C-terminus of the central helix, but there is no candidate catalytic base. The substrate-binding cleft can be divided into two discrete topographical domains in which the bound cellotriose molecules display twisted and linear conformations, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme may target the interface between crystalline and disordered regions of cellulose. PMID:21393568

  17. High temperature heterogeneous reaction kinetics and mechanisms of tungsten oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabourin, Justin L.

    Tungsten, which is a material used in many high temperature applications, is limited by its susceptibility to oxidation at elevated temperatures. Although tungsten has the highest melting temperature of any metal, at much lower temperatures volatile oxides are formed during oxidation with oxygen containing species. This differs from many heterogeneous oxidation reactions involving metals since most reactions form very stable oxides that have higher melting or boiling points than the pure metal (e.g., aluminum, iron). Understanding heterogeneous oxidation and vaporization processes may allow for the expansion and improvement of high temperature tungsten applications. In order to increase understanding of the oxidation processes of tungsten, there is a need to develop reaction mechanisms and kinetics for oxidation processes involving oxidizers and environmental conditions of interest. Tungsten oxidation was thoroughly studied in the past, and today there is a good phenomenological understanding of these processes. However, as the design of large scale systems increasingly relies on computer modeling there becomes a need for improved descriptions of chemical reactions. With the increase in computing power over the last several decades, and the development of quantum chemistry and physics theories, heterogeneous systems can be modeled in detail at the molecular level. Thermochemical parameters that may not be measured experimentally may now be determined theoretically, a tool that was previously unavailable to scientists and engineers. Additionally, chemical kinetic modeling software is now available for both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. This study takes advantage of these new theoretical tools, as well as a thermogravimetric (TG) flow reactor developed as part of this study to learn about mechanisms and kinetics of tungsten oxidation. Oxidizers of interest are oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO 2), water (H2O), and other oxidizers present in combustion and

  18. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity.

    PubMed

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P

    2015-04-14

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding. PMID:25877595

  19. Modeling the effect of codon translation rates on co-translational protein folding mechanisms of arbitrary complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniparoli, Luca; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2015-04-01

    In a cell, the folding of a protein molecule into tertiary structure can begin while it is synthesized by the ribosome. The rate at which individual amino acids are incorporated into the elongating nascent chain has been shown to affect the likelihood that proteins will populate their folded state, indicating that co-translational protein folding is a far from equilibrium process. Developing a theoretical framework to accurately describe this process is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of how proteins acquire their functional conformation in living cells. Current state-of-the-art computational approaches, such as molecular dynamics simulations, are very demanding in terms of the required computer resources, making the simulation of co-translational protein folding difficult. Here, we overcome this limitation by introducing an efficient approach that predicts the effects that variable codon translation rates have on co-translational folding pathways. Our approach is based on Markov chains. By using as an input a relatively small number of molecular dynamics simulations, it allows for the computation of the probability that a nascent protein is in any state as a function of the translation rate of individual codons along a mRNA's open reading frame. Due to its computational efficiency and favorable scalability with the complexity of the folding mechanism, this approach could enable proteome-wide computational studies of the influence of translation dynamics on co-translational folding.

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of amaranth with hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Nadupalli, S; Koorbanally, N; Jonnalagadda, S B

    2011-07-14

    The reaction mechanism of the oxidation of Amaranth dye (2-hydroxy-1-(4-sulfonato-1-naphthylazo) naphthalene-3,6-disulfonate) with hypochlorite under varied pH conditions was elucidated by a kinetic approach. Under excess concentration of oxidant, the reaction followed pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to Amaranth, and the oxidation was found to occur through two competitive reactions, initiated by hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid. The reaction order with respect to both OCl(-) ion and HOCl was unity. While the latter reaction was fast, the significance of the oxidation paths depended on the relative concentration of the two oxidizing species, which was dictated by the reaction pH. The role of the H(+) ion in the reaction was established. For the hypochlorite ion and hypochlorous acid facilitated reactions, the second-order rate coefficients were 1.9 and 23.2 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The energy parameters were E(a) = 33.7 kJ mol(-1), ΔH(‡) = 31.2 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS(‡) = -190.6 J K(-1) mol(-1) for the OCl(-) ion-driven oxidation, and E(a) = 26.9 kJ mol(-1), ΔH(‡) = 24.3 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS(‡) = -222.8 J K(-1) mol(-1) for the reaction with HOCl-initiated oxidation. The major oxidation products for both the pathways were 3,4-dihydroxy naphthalene-2,7-disulfonic sodium salt (P(1)), dichloro-1,4-naphthoquione (P(2)) and naphtha(2,3)oxirene-2, 3-dione (P(3)). On the basis of the primary salt effect and other kinetic data, the rate law for the overall reaction and probable reaction mechanism was elucidated. The proposed mechanism was validated by simulations using Simkine-2.

  1. Growth Kinetics and Mechanics of Hydrate Films by Interfacial Rheology.

    PubMed

    Leopércio, Bruna C; de Souza Mendes, Paulo R; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to study and understand the kinetics and mechanical properties of hydrates by interfacial rheology is presented. This is made possible using a "double wall ring" interfacial rheology cell that has been designed to provide the necessary temperature control. Cyclopentane and water are used to form hydrates, and this model system forms these structures at ambient pressures. Different temperature and water/hydrocarbon contact protocols are explored. Of particular interest is the importance of first contacting the hydrocarbon against ice crystals in order to initiate hydrate formation. Indeed, this is found to be the case, even though the hydrates may be created at temperatures above the melting point of ice. Once hydrates completely populate the hydrocarbon/water interface, strain sweeps of the interfacial elastic and viscous moduli are conducted to interrogate the mechanical response and fragility of the hydrate films. The dependence on temperature, Tf, by the kinetics of formation and the mechanical properties is reported, and the cyclopentane hydrate dissociation temperature was found to be between 6 and 7 °C. The formation time (measured from the moment when cyclopentane first contacts ice crystals) as well as the elastic modulus and the yield strain increase as Tf increases. PMID:27076092

  2. Methods for detecting formation mechanisms and determining a final strain value for different scales of folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Fedor L.

    2012-03-01

    Linear folding, developing in fold and thrust belts, is treated as a hierarchic system, at each level of which objects are described by special kinematic models. Geometric parameters of natural folded structures are determined by a combination of various mechanisms incorporated in the model, and a value of finite strain. Several case studies demonstrate how such data enables one to solve structural and geodynamic problems for natural objects of different size. Shortening value of two morphological types of folds is determined based on the geometry of competent layers. Application of the method to analyze the folds of the Vorontsov nappe (Greater Caucasus) determines its gravitational origin. Structural cross-sections though several tectonic zones are subdivided into relatively small domains, the geometry of which, particularly in thin-bedded flysch deposits, making it possible to identify the mechanisms of formation of both local and large structures, and also to reconstruct the pre-folded state of each domain and of the entire cross-sections. By aggregation of tectonic domains into large modules and determination of the value of shortening, we have constructed for the first time a 3D model of the present-day structure of the northwestern Caucasus, which is balanced for the whole sedimentary cover. The geometry of large structures makes it possible to validate geodynamic models.

  3. Scanning Single-Molecule Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Enables Kinetics Study of DNA Hairpin Folding with a Time Window from Microseconds to Seconds.

    PubMed

    Bi, Huimin; Yin, Yandong; Pan, Bailong; Li, Geng; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2016-05-19

    Single-molecule fluorescence measurements have been widely used to explore kinetics and dynamics of biological systems. Among them, single-molecule imaging (SMI) is good at tracking processes slower than tens of milliseconds, whereas fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is good at probing processes faster than submilliseconds. However, there is still shortage of simple yet effective single-molecule fluorescence method to cover the time-scale between submilliseconds and tens of milliseconds. To effectively bridge this millisecond gap, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (smFCS) method that works on surface-immobilized single molecules through surface scanning. We validated it by monitoring the classical DNA hairpin folding process. With a wide time window from microseconds to seconds, the experimental data are well fitted to the two-state folding model. All relevant molecular parameters, including the relative fluorescence brightness, equilibrium constant, and reaction rate constants, were uniquely determined.

  4. Can an electro-kinetic mechanism explain artificial earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Guillaume; Glover, Paul; Novikov, Victor

    2010-05-01

    Researchers of the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences have carried out a large number of current injection experiments using a 4.2 km long dipole at the Bishkek Research Station in the Chu valley area of the Kyrgyz mountains (northern Tien Shan). The current is generated using Pulsed Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) generators that can produce 2800 amperes at 1350 volts for up to 12.1 seconds. They have found that the number of earthquakes in the region within 150 km of the injection site increased by over 10 standard deviations of the background seismicity. The probability of this occurring by chance is only one in every thousand million million (10^15) measurements. It is certain, therefore, that we can generate earthquakes by current injection. However, no satisfactory physical mechanism for it currently exists. Paul Glover has suggested that an electro-kinetic mechanism may be the missing causal link. In his theory the injected current creates a three-dimensional electric field in the subsurface. The electro-kinetic mechanism uses the electric field to move the pore fluid at depth. If the pore fluid flows into a fault zone it may accumulate and transiently raise the pore fluid pressure within the fault zone. It is known that increases of pore fluid pressure within fault zones more than a critical pressure of 0.05 MPa are sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault has sufficient accumulated strain. Earthquakes are therefore possible while the pore fluid pressure is over the critical pressure. While the electro-kinetic drive has been well studied around the world, it is uncertain if the mechanism can provide fluid pressures sufficient to trigger earthquakes up to 150 km from the injection point. In this work we present two dimensional numerical modelling of the proposed coupled mechanism using a finite element approach and using the software package Comsol Multiphysics. The initial results are promising and indicate that (i

  5. A Hooke׳s law-based approach to protein folding rate.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Prieto, Pablo J; Salgado, Jesús; García, Yamila; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M

    2015-01-01

    Kinetics is a key aspect of the renowned protein folding problem. Here, we propose a comprehensive approach to folding kinetics where a polypeptide chain is assumed to behave as an elastic material described by the Hooke׳s law. A novel parameter called elastic-folding constant results from our model and is suggested to distinguish between protein with two-state and multi-state folding pathways. A contact-free descriptor, named folding degree, is introduced as a suitable structural feature to study protein-folding kinetics. This approach generalizes the observed correlations between varieties of structural descriptors with the folding rate constant. Additionally several comparisons among structural classes and folding mechanisms were carried out showing the good performance of our model with proteins of different types. The present model constitutes a simple rationale for the structural and energetic factors involved in protein folding kinetics. PMID:25245368

  6. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  7. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, Brian P

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  8. The experimental folding landscape of monomeric lactose repressor, a large two-domain protein, involves two kinetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Das, Payel; Clementi, Cecilia; Matthews, Kathleen S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2005-10-11

    To probe the experimental folding behavior of a large protein with complex topology, we created a monomeric variant of the lactose repressor protein (MLAc), a well characterized tetrameric protein that regulates transcription of the lac operon. Purified MLAc is folded, fully functional, and binds the inducer isopropyl beta-d-thiogalactoside with the same affinity as wild-type LacI. Equilibrium unfolding of MLAc induced by the chemical denaturant urea is a reversible, apparent two-state process (pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). However, time-resolved experiments demonstrate that unfolding is single-exponential, whereas refolding data indicate two transient intermediates. The data reveal the initial formation of a burst-phase (tau < ms) intermediate that corresponds to approximately 50% of the total secondary-structure content. This step is followed by a rearrangement reaction that is rate-limited by an unfolding process (tau approximately 3 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C) and results in a second intermediate. This MLAc intermediate converts to the native structure (tau approximately 30 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). Remarkably, the experimental folding-energy landscape for MLAc is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using a simple topology-based C(alpha)-model as presented in a companion article in this issue. PMID:16203983

  9. Multipixel spectral imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in COS-7 cells: folding kinetics and chromophore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Lior; Rothmann, Chana; Hanania, Judith; Malik, Zvi

    2000-12-01

    Spectrally resolved imaging of Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed in living COS-7 kidney cells distinguished the subcellular localization and demarcated the processes of protein folding and chromophore formation. COS-7 kidney cells were transfected by a plasmid pEGFP-N1 plasmid followed by incubation for 15 hours for gen expression. At different intervals the cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed by a spectral imaging system. After 7 hours, GFP was detected in the cytoplasm, concentrated in a localized form. Spectra of the initial GFP evinced several components that belong both tot he typical fluorescent signal as well as to unspecific fingerprints. At 10 and 15 hours, GFP was seen spread in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus, and the specific spectra of the GFP were dominant at the later time. The typical GFP spectral fingerprint is the result of protein folding and chromophore formation following internal oxidation reactions. This folding and chromophore formation process, up to final conformation, was detected by spectral imaging as localized in the nucleus rather than in the cytosol. Thus, the method of fluorescence microscopy combined with multiplex spectral imaging demonstrates distinct biochemical pathways leading to GFP conformation.

  10. Distinguishing between sequential and nonsequentially folded proteins: implications for folding and misfolding.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Maizel, J. V.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here an algorithm for distinguishing sequential from nonsequentially folding proteins. Several experiments have recently suggested that most of the proteins that are synthesized in the eukaryotic cell may fold sequentially. This proposed folding mechanism in vivo is particularly advantageous to the organism. In the absence of chaperones, the probability that a sequentially folding protein will misfold is reduced significantly. The problem we address here is devising a procedure that would differentiate between the two types of folding patterns. Footprints of sequential folding may be found in structures where consecutive fragments of the chain interact with each other. In such cases, the folding complexity may be viewed as being lower. On the other hand, higher folding complexity suggests that at least a portion of the polypeptide backbone folds back upon itself to form three-dimensional (3D) interactions with noncontiguous portion(s) of the chain. Hence, we look at the mechanism of folding of the molecule via analysis of its complexity, that is, through the 3D interactions formed by contiguous segments on the polypeptide chain. To computationally splice the structure into consecutively interacting fragments, we either cut it into compact hydrophobic folding units or into a set of hypothetical, transient, highly populated, contiguous fragments ("building blocks" of the structure). In sequential folding, successive building blocks interact with each other from the amino to the carboxy terminus of the polypeptide chain. Consequently, the results of the parsing differentiate between sequentially vs. nonsequentially folded chains. The automated assessment of the folding complexity provides insight into both the likelihood of misfolding and the kinetic folding rate of the given protein. In terms of the funnel free energy landscape theory, a protein that truly follows the mechanism of sequential folding, in principle, encounters smoother free energy barriers

  11. Actin kinetics shapes cortical network structure and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Kruse, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    The actin cortex of animal cells is the main determinant of cellular mechanics. The continuous turnover of cortical actin filaments enables cells to quickly respond to stimuli. Recent work has shown that most of the cortical actin is generated by only two actin nucleators, the Arp2/3 complex and the formin Diaph1. However, our understanding of their interplay, their kinetics, and the length distribution of the filaments that they nucleate within living cells is poor. Such knowledge is necessary for a thorough comprehension of cellular processes and cell mechanics from basic polymer physics principles. We determined cortical assembly rates in living cells by using single-molecule fluorescence imaging in combination with stochastic simulations. We find that formin-nucleated filaments are, on average, 10 times longer than Arp2/3-nucleated filaments. Although formin-generated filaments represent less than 10% of all actin filaments, mechanical measurements indicate that they are important determinants of cortical elasticity. Tuning the activity of actin nucleators to alter filament length distribution may thus be a mechanism allowing cells to adjust their macroscopic mechanical properties to their physiological needs. PMID:27152338

  12. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K.; Cheong, S. A.

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with α helix and β hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  13. Kinetic and Mechanical Analysis of Live Tube Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheshire, Alan M.; Kerman, Bilal E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Spector, Alexander A.; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2008-01-01

    Ribbon is a nuclear BTB-domain protein required for morphogenesis of the salivary gland and trachea. We recently showed that ribbon mutants exhibit decreased Crumbs and Rab11-coincident apical vesicles and increased apical Moesin activity and microvillar structure during tube elongation. To learn how these molecular and morphological changes affect the dynamics of tubulogenesis, we optimized an advanced two-photon microscope to enable high-resolution live imaging of the salivary gland and trachea. Live imaging revealed that ribbon mutant tissues exhibit slowed and incomplete lumenal morphogenesis, consistent with previously described apical defects. Since Moesin activity correlates with cortical stiffness, we hypothesize that ribbon mutants suffer from increased apical stiffness during morphogenesis. We develop this hypothesis through mechanical analysis, using the advantages of live imaging to construct computational elastic and analytical viscoelastic models of tube elongation, which suggest that ribbon mutant tubes exhibit three- to five-fold increased apical stiffness and two-fold increased effective apical viscosity. PMID:18816822

  14. Significance of first-order faults in folding mechanically isotropic layers: evidence from the Sudbury Basin, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Martin; Riller, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Sudbury Basin in Canada is a fold basin demarcated by the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC). Folding of the SIC is particularly notable due to its petrographically distinct but mechanically similar layers that are hardly strained when compared to folded strata in other deformed terranes. The Sudbury Basin has three ranges, the North Range, the South Range, and the East Range. The East Range differs from the other ranges by inclosing a remarkably shorter SIC segment with a strong concave curvature. Lacking significant mechanical anisotropy and solid-state strain within the SIC brings to question how the SIC in the East Range acquired its curvature. To address this question, we analyzed the orientation of prominent km-scale faults and their slip vectors. These faults transect the SIC at low angles and mimic its plan view curvature suggesting that the faults were folded along with the SIC. We have developed a G.I.S.-based workflow to address this problem that harnesses high-resolution LiDAR data to generate near surface fault geometries, and combines these geometries with local fault-slip inversions of slickensides to identify slip vectors of prominent curved faults. Analysis of slip vectors along curved faults yields clusters of slip vectors with normal and reverse slip motion in the northern and southern fault segments, respectively. The variation in slip vectors is interpreted to be non-primary and thus shows a temporal relationship between faulting and folding of the SIC. Therefore, prominent curved faults in the East Range must have occurred as a pre-folding brittle response to horizontal shortening. These faults later assumed the role of mechanical anisotropic elements necessary for folding of the SIC layers to occur. This interpretation is corroborated by two sets of principal strain axes inferred from fault-slip inversions. The first set is characterized by its principal axis of shortening oriented NW-SE, comparable in orientation to regional shortening as

  15. Statistical mechanics of a correlated energy landscape model for protein folding funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Steven S.; Wang, Jin; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1997-02-01

    In heteropolymers, energetic correlations exist due to polymeric constraints and the locality of interactions. Pair correlations in conjunction with the a priori specification of the existence of a particularly low energy state provide a method of introducing the aspect of minimal frustration to the energy landscapes of random heteropolymers. The resulting funneled landscape exhibits both a phase transition from a molten globule to a folded state, and the heteropolymeric glass transition in the globular state. We model the folding transition in the self-averaging regime, which together with a simple theory of collapse allows us to depict folding as a double-well free energy surface in terms of suitable reaction coordinates. Observed trends in barrier positions and heights with protein sequence length and thermodynamic conditions are discussed within the context of the model. We also discuss the new physics which arises from the introduction of explicitly cooperative many-body interactions, as might arise from sidechain packing and nonadditive hydrophobic forces.

  16. A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Tarrazo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Sanz, Mario; Sánchez, Antonio L.; Williams, Forman A.

    2016-07-01

    A multipurpose reduced chemical-kinetic mechanism for methanol combustion comprising 8 overall reactions and 11 reacting chemical species is presented. The development starts by investigating the minimum set of elementary reactions needed to describe methanol combustion with reasonable accuracy over a range of conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition of interest in combustion. Starting from a 27-step mechanism that has been previously tested and found to give accurate predictions of ignition processes for these conditions, it is determined that the addition of 11 elementary reactions taken from its basis (San Diego) mechanism extends the validity of the description to premixed-flame propagation, strain-induced extinction of non-premixed flames, and equilibrium composition and temperatures, giving results that compare favourably with experimental measurements and also with computations using the 247-step detailed San Diego mechanism involving 50 reactive species. Specifically, premixed-flame propagation velocities and extinction strain rates for non-premixed counterflow flames calculated with the 38-step mechanism show departures from experimental measurements and detailed-chemistry computations that are roughly on the order of 10%, comparable with expected experimental uncertainties. Similar accuracy is found in comparisons of autoignition times over the range considered, except at very high temperatures, under which conditions the computations tend to overpredict induction times for all of the chemistry descriptions tested. From this 38-step mechanism, the simplification is continued by introducing steady-state approximations for the intermediate species CH3, CH4, HCO, CH3O, CH2OH, and O, leading to an 8-step reduced mechanism that provides satisfactory accuracy for all conditions tested. The flame computations indicate that thermal diffusion has a negligible influence on methanol combustion in all cases considered and that a mixture-average species

  17. Real time microscopy, kinetics, and mechanism of giant fullerene evaporation.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y; Ding, Feng; Jiao, Kun; Yakobson, Boris I

    2007-10-26

    We report in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observing the shrinkage of single-layer giant fullerenes (GF). At temperatures approximately 2000 degrees C, the GF volume reduces by greater than one 100-fold while the fullerene shell remains intact, evolving from a slightly polygonized to a nearly spherical shape with a smaller diameter. The number of carbon atoms in the GF decreases linearly with time until the small subbuckyball cage opens and rapidly disappears. Theoretical modeling indicates that carbon atoms are removed predominantly from the weakest binding energy sites, i.e., the pentagons, leading to the constant evaporation rate. The fullerene cage integrity is attributed to the collective behavior of interacting defects. These results constitute the first experimental evidence for the "shrink-wrapping" and "hot-giant" fullerene formation mechanisms.

  18. Mechanism and kinetics of sulfamethoxazole photocatalytic ozonation in water.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Fernando J; Aguinaco, Almudena; García-Araya, Juan F

    2009-03-01

    The photocatalytic ozonation of sulfamethoxazole (SMT) has been studied in water under different experimental conditions. The effect of gas flow rate, initial concentration of ozone, SMT and TiO2 has been investigated to establish the importance of mass transfer and chemical reaction. Under the conditions investigated the process is chemically controlled. Both, SMT and TOC kinetics have been considered. Fast and slow kinetic regime of ozone reactions have been observed for SMT and TOC oxidation, respectively. Application of different inhibitors allows for the establishment of reaction mechanism involving direct ozonation, direct photolysis, hydroxyl radical reactions and photocatalytic reactions. Rate constants of the direct reaction between ozone and protonated, non-protonated and anionic SMT species have been determined to be 1.71 x 10(5), 3.24 x 10(5) and 4.18 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. SMT quantum yield at 313 nm was found to be 0.012 moles per Einstein at pH 5 and 0.003 moles per Einstein at pHs 7 and 9. Main contributions to SMT removal were direct ozone reaction, positive hole oxidation and hydroxyl radical reactions. For TOC removal, main contributions were due to positive hole oxidation and hydroxyl radical reactions. PMID:19117589

  19. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena. PMID:17988794

  20. Integration of kinetic isotope effect analyses to elucidate ribonuclease mechanism.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael E; Piccirilli, Joseph A; York, Darrin M

    2015-11-01

    The well-studied mechanism of ribonuclease A is believed to involve concerted general acid-base catalysis by two histidine residues, His12 and His119. The basic features of this mechanism are often cited to explain rate enhancement by both protein and RNA enzymes that catalyze RNA 2'-O-transphosphorylation. Recent kinetic isotope effect analyses and computational studies are providing a more chemically detailed description of the mechanism of RNase A and the rate limiting transition state. Overall, the results support an asynchronous mechanism for both solution and ribonuclease catalyzed reactions in which breakdown of a transient dianoinic phosphorane intermediate by 5'OP bond cleavage is rate limiting. Relative to non-enzymatic reactions catalyzed by specific base, a smaller KIE on the 5'O leaving group and a less negative βLG are observed for RNase A catalysis. Quantum mechanical calculations consistent with these data support a model in which electrostatic and H-bonding interactions with the non-bridging oxygens and proton transfer from His119 render departure of the 5'O less advanced and stabilize charge buildup in the transition state. Both experiment and computation indicate advanced 2'OP bond formation in the rate limiting transition state. However, this feature makes it difficult to resolve the chemical steps involved in 2'O activation. Thus, modeling the transition state for RNase A catalysis underscores those elements of its chemical mechanism that are well resolved, as well as highlighting those where ambiguity remains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  1. Three-dimensional geometry, strain rates and basement deformation mechanisms of thrust-bend folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibberley, Christopher A. J.

    1997-03-01

    Models for thrust-bend folding of an isotropic medium are used to predict initial basement thrust sheet geometries and sub-surface thrust fault shapes from final basement thrust sheet structure. Predicted strains and strain rates from these models are compared with data on deformation fabrics in an example of a basement thrustbend fold in order to characterise the deformation response to thrust-bend folding. The Glencoul thrust sheet in the Moine Thrust Zone of north-west Scotland is restored to an initial thrust sheet geometry. Spatial and orientation distribution data of syn-emplacement fractures and cataclastic fault zones from within the Glencoul thrust sheet are then compared with the strain and strain rate histories predicted by thrust-bend folding models. A different set of cataclastic fault seams is demonstrated to have been generated at each frontal thrust bend. Cataclastic failure is restricted to portions of the thrust sheet that have moved over frontal bends with smaller radii of curvature. From model thrust-bend geometries and an assumed slip rate of 1 x 10 -10 ms -1, estimated minimum (critical) strain rates required for fracture failure of the Lewisian basement are 10 -11 to 10 -14 s -1 for shear strain rates and 10 -12 to 10 -15 s -1 for extensional strain rates.

  2. Kinetic mechanism of phenylalanine hydroxylase: intrinsic binding and rate constants from single-turnover experiments.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Pavon, Jorge Alex; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) catalyzes the key step in the catabolism of dietary phenylalanine, its hydroxylation to tyrosine using tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and O(2). A complete kinetic mechanism for PheH was determined by global analysis of single-turnover data in the reaction of PheHΔ117, a truncated form of the enzyme lacking the N-terminal regulatory domain. Formation of the productive PheHΔ117-BH(4)-phenylalanine complex begins with the rapid binding of BH(4) (K(d) = 65 μM). Subsequent addition of phenylalanine to the binary complex to form the productive ternary complex (K(d) = 130 μM) is approximately 10-fold slower. Both substrates can also bind to the free enzyme to form inhibitory binary complexes. O(2) rapidly binds to the productive ternary complex; this is followed by formation of an unidentified intermediate, which can be detected as a decrease in absorbance at 340 nm, with a rate constant of 140 s(-1). Formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin and Fe(IV)O intermediates is 10-fold slower and is followed by the rapid hydroxylation of the amino acid. Product release is the rate-determining step and largely determines k(cat). Similar reactions using 6-methyltetrahydropterin indicate a preference for the physiological pterin during hydroxylation.

  3. Kinetic mechanism for the interaction of Hirulog with thrombin.

    PubMed

    Parry, M A; Maraganore, J M; Stone, S R

    1994-12-13

    Hirulog (D-FPRPGGGGDGDFEEIPEEYL) is a bivalent inhibitor of thrombin consisting of a moiety (D-FPRP) that binds to the active-site cleft and a hirudin-like C-terminal region (DGDFEEIPEEYL) that binds to the positively charged surface groove of thrombin known as the anion-binding exosite. The formation of the thrombin-Hirulog complex was studied using steady-state and rapid kinetics at 37 degrees C. The inhibition constant for Hirulog was found to be 1.9 nM. Hirulog was slowly degraded by thrombin with a kcat value of 0.01 s-1. The formation of the complex resulted in an enhancement of 44% in the intrinsic fluorescence of thrombin. The kinetics of the increase in thrombin fluorescence were described by a double-exponential decay. The dependence of the rate constant for the fast phase on the concentration of Hirulog could be described by the Michaelis-Menten equation with Km and kmax values of 0.75 +/- 0.12 microM and 325 +/- 17 s-1. The data were consistent with a mechanism in which the C-terminal region of Hirulog binds to the anion-binding exosite with a dissociation constant of 0.75 microM in the first step, followed by two intramolecular steps with rate constants of about 300 and 30 s-1. A C-terminal fragment of hirudin was found to compete in the first step confirming that this process corresponded to the binding of the hirudin-like C-terminus of Hirulog to the anion-binding exosite.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7993908

  4. A steady-state kinetic analysis of the prolyl-4-hydroxylase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Soskel, N T; Kuby, S A

    1981-01-01

    Published kinetic data by Kivirikko, et al. on the prolyl-4-hydroxylase reaction have been re-evaluated using the overall steady-state velocity equation in the forward and reverse directions for an ordered ter ter kinetic mechanism. Qualitatively, the published data for prolyl-4-hydroxylase appear to fit the predicted patterns for this kinetic mechanism. More kinetic data are needed to confirm these results and to quantitate the kinetic parameters but, tentatively, the order of substrate addition would appear to be alpha-ketoglutarate, oxygen, and peptide; and the order of product release would be hydroxylated peptide (or collagen), carbon dioxide, and succinate.

  5. Mechanisms, kinetics, impurities and defects: consequences in macromolecular crystallization

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Yurii G.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of protein, nucleic acid and virus crystals from solution are functions of underlying kinetic and thermodynamic parameters that govern the process, and these are all supersaturation-dependent. While the mechanisms of macromolecular crystal growth are essentially the same as for conventional crystals, the underlying parameters are vastly different, in some cases orders of magnitude lower, and this produces very different crystallization processes. Numerous physical features of macromolecular crystals are of serious interest to X-ray diffractionists; the resolution limit and mosaicity, for example, reflect the degree of molecular and lattice order. The defect structure of crystals has an impact on their response to flash-cooling, and terminal crystal size is dependent on impurity absorption and incorporation. The variety and extent of these issues are further unique to crystals of biological macromolecules. All of these features are amenable to study using atomic force microscopy, which provides direct images at the nanoscale level. Some of those images are presented here. PMID:24699728

  6. Reaction kinetics and mechanism of magnetic field effects in cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Solov'yov, Ilia A; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-26

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and birds have an intriguing sixth sense that allows them to orient themselves in the Earth's magnetic field. Despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically sensitive radical pair reactions occurring in the retina, the light-sensitive part of animal eyes. A photoreceptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to endow birds with magnetoreceptive abilities as the protein has been shown to exhibit the biophysical properties required for an animal magnetoreceptor to operate properly. Here, we propose a theoretical analysis method for identifying cryptochrome's signaling reactions involving comparison of measured and calculated reaction kinetics in cryptochrome. Application of the method yields an exemplary light-driven reaction cycle, supported through transient absorption and electron-spin-resonance observations together with known facts on avian magnetoreception. The reaction cycle permits one to predict magnetic field effects on cryptochrome activation and deactivation. The suggested analysis method gives insight into structural and dynamic design features required for optimal detection of the geomagnetic field by cryptochrome and suggests further experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:22171949

  7. Role of folded anisotropic fabric in the failure mode of gneiss: new insights from mechanical, microseismic and microstructural laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Zanchetta, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of the mechanical behaviour of rocks in a variety of geological settings and on different timescales. However, the effects of inherited, tectonically folded anisotropic fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of foliated metamorphic rocks is yet to be fully understood. Data from laboratory uniaxial compression tests on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014, Tectonophysics) recently showed that the brittle failure mode of this rock type depends on the arrangement of two distinct anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial plane anisotropy), and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Here we investigate the effects of confining pressure on this behaviour by performing triaxial compression experiments with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and analyse resulting fracture mechanisms and their microfabric controls using high resolution microanalysis techniques. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Austroalpine Bernina nappe, Central Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content, compositional layering folded at the cm-scale, and absence of a well-developed axial plane foliation. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (diameter: 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. We instrumented the specimens with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. We performed tests at confining pressures of 40 MPa and constant axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1, measuring acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities by three wideband (350-1000 kHz) piezoelectric transceivers with 40 dB preamps, mounted in the compression platens. We carried out post-failure microscale observation of fracture mechanisms, microcrack patterns and related fabric controls on resin-impregnated samples, using X-ray MicroCT (resolution: 9 μm), optical microscopy and SEM. Samples

  8. The 69 kDa Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase does not get encapsulated underneath GroES and folds through trans mechanism during GroEL/GroES-assisted folding.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subhankar; Singh, Chanpreet; Mishra, Saroj; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2007-09-01

    Escherichia coli chaperonin GroEL and GroES assist in folding of a wide variety of substrate proteins in the molecular mass range of approximately 50 kDa, using cis mechanism, but limited information is available on how they assist in folding of larger proteins. Considering that the central cavity of GroEL can accommodate a non-native protein of approximately 60 kDa, it is important to study the GroEL-GroES-assisted folding of substrate proteins that are large enough for cis encapsulation. In this study, we have reported the mechanism of GroEL/GroES-assisted in vivo and in vitro folding of a 69 kDa monomeric E. coli protein maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ). Coexpression of GroEL and GroES in E. coli causes a 2-fold enhancement of exogenous MalZ activity in vivo. In vitro, GroEL and GroES in the presence of ATP give rise to a 7-fold enhancement in MalZ refolding. Neither GroEL nor single ring GroEL (SR1) in the presence or absence of ATP could enhance the in vitro folding of MalZ. GroES could not encapsulate GroEL-bound MalZ. All these experimental findings suggested that GroEL/GroES-assisted folding of MalZ followed trans mechanism, whereas denatured MalZ and GroES bound to the opposite rings of a GroEL molecule.

  9. Self-oscillating Vocal Fold Model Mechanics: Healthy, Diseased, and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiubler, Elizabeth P.; Pollok, Lucas F. E.; Apostoli, Adam G.; Hancock, Adrienne B.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Voice disorders have been estimated to have a substantial economic impact of 2.5 billion annually. Approximately 30% of people will suffer from a voice disorder at some point in their lives. Life-sized, self-oscillating, synthetic vocal fold (VF) models are fabricated to exhibit material properties representative of human VFs. These models are created both with and without a polyp-like structure, a pathology that has been shown to produce rich viscous flow structures not normally observed for healthy VFs during normal phonation. Pressure measurements are acquired upstream of the VFs and high-speed images are captured at varying flow rates during VF oscillation to facilitate an understanding of the characteristics of healthy and diseased VFs. The images are analyzed using a videokymography line-scan technique. Clinically-relevant parameters calculated from the volume-velocity output of a circumferentially-vented mask (Rothenberg mask) are compared to human data collected from two groups of males aged 18-30 and 60-80. This study extends the use of synthetic VF models by assessing their ability to replicate behaviors observed in human subject data to advance a means of investigating changes associated with normal, pathological, and the aging voice. Supported by the GWU Institute for Biomedical Engineering (GWIBE) and GWU Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  10. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency. PMID:14719252

  11. [Kinetics and mechanism of removing Microcystis aeruginosa using clay flocculation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Mingming; Yan, Hai; Zou, Hua; Chen, Hao

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-six natural clays were studied for their kinetics of flocculating and removing algal cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. According to the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies and removal rates at a clay-loading of 0.7 g.L-1, all the 26 clays were classified into three categories. Type-I clay, which includes talc, ferric oxide, sepiolite, ferroferric oxide, and kaolinite, has an equilibrium removal efficiency greater than 90%, a t50 (time needed to remove 50% of the algae) of less than 30 min, and a t80 (time needed to remove 80% of the algae) of less than 2.5 h. Type-II clay, which includes argillanceous rocks, attapulgite, rectorite, illite, and argil, etc., has an equilibrium removal efficiency of 50%-80%, a t50 of less than 2.5 h, and a t80 of more than 5 h. Type-III clay consists of 14 minerals, including laterite, zeolite, mica, clinoptilolite, pumice, tripoli, feldspar and quartz, etc. with the removal efficiency less than 50%, and t50 > > 8 h. When the clay loading was decreased to 0.1-0.2 g.L-1, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiencies for 25 clays declined to below 60%, except for sepiolite, a Type-I clay, which maintained around 90%. After the sepiolite was modified with Fe3+ to increase its surface charge (Zeta potential from -24.0 mV to +0.43 mV at pH 7.4), the initial removal rate was increased remarkably although its 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency was not improved substantially. As a comparison, the 8 h equilibrium removal efficiency of PAC was no greater than 40% at loadings of 0.02-0.2 g.L-1. Following the analysis of the flocculation mechanism it was concluded that the effect of bridging and netting may play a key role in the clay-algae flocculation processes, which may be important for selecting and modifying clays to improve significantly the removal efficiency.

  12. Analyses of simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins in comparison with a simplified statistical mechanical model of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Abe, H; Wako, H

    2006-07-01

    Folding and unfolding simulations of three-dimensional lattice proteins were analyzed using a simplified statistical mechanical model in which their amino acid sequences and native conformations were incorporated explicitly. Using this statistical mechanical model, under the assumption that only interactions between amino acid residues within a local structure in a native state are considered, the partition function of the system can be calculated for a given native conformation without any adjustable parameter. The simulations were carried out for two different native conformations, for each of which two foldable amino acid sequences were considered. The native and non-native contacts between amino acid residues occurring in the simulations were examined in detail and compared with the results derived from the theoretical model. The equilibrium thermodynamic quantities (free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and the probability of each amino acid residue being in the native state) at various temperatures obtained from the simulations and the theoretical model were also examined in order to characterize the folding processes that depend on the native conformations and the amino acid sequences. Finally, the free energy landscapes were discussed based on these analyses.

  13. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching.…

  14. Renormalizing the Kinetic Energy Operator in Elementary Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutinho, F. A. B.; Amaku, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider solutions to the three-dimensional Schrodinger equation of the form [psi](r) = u(r)/r, where u(0) [is not equal to] 0. The expectation value of the kinetic energy operator for such wavefunctions diverges. We show that it is possible to introduce a potential energy with an expectation value that also diverges, exactly…

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this work was on kinetic modeling. The specific objectives were: detailed modeling of soot formation in premixed flames, elucidation of the effects of fuel structure on the pathway to soot, and the development of a numerical technique for accurate modeling of soot particle coagulation and surface growth. Those tasks were successfully completed and are briefly summarized.

  16. How the folding rates of two- and multistate proteins depend on the amino acid properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jitao T; Huang, Wei; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Proteins fold by either two-state or multistate kinetic mechanism. We observe that amino acids play different roles in different mechanism. Many residues that are easy to form regular secondary structures (α helices, β sheets and turns) can promote the two-state folding reactions of small proteins. Most of hydrophilic residues can speed up the multistate folding reactions of large proteins. Folding rates of large proteins are equally responsive to the flexibility of partial amino acids. Other properties of amino acids (including volume, polarity, accessible surface, exposure degree, isoelectric point, and phase transfer energy) have contributed little to folding kinetics of the proteins. Cysteine is a special residue, it triggers two-state folding reaction and but inhibits multistate folding reaction. These findings not only provide a new insight into protein structure prediction, but also could be used to direct the point mutations that can change folding rate.

  17. Kinetic mechanisms in morpholino-DNA surface hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao; Levicky, Rastislav

    2011-08-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or "probe", species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e., duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  18. Kinetic Mechanisms in Morpholino-DNA Surface Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yatao; Irving, Damion; Qiao, Wanqiong; Ge, Dongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Morpholinos (MOs) are DNA analogues whose uncharged nature can bring fundamental advantages to surface hybridization technologies such as DNA microarrays, by using MOs as the immobilized, or “probe”, species. Advancement of MO-based diagnostics, however, is challenged by limited understanding of the surface organization of MO molecules and of how this organization impacts hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics. The present study focuses on hybridization kinetics between monolayers of MO probes and DNA targets as a function of the instantaneous extent of hybridization (i.e. duplex coverage), total probe coverage, and ionic strength. Intriguingly, these experiments reveal distinct kinetic stages, none of which are consistent with Langmuir kinetics. The initial stage, in which duplex coverage remains relatively sparse, indicates confluence of two effects: blockage of target access to unhybridized probes by previously formed duplexes, and deactivation of the solid support due to consumption of probe molecules. This interpretation is consistent with a surface organization in which unhybridized MO probes localize near the solid support, underneath a layer of MO-DNA duplexes. As duplex coverage builds, provided saturation is not reached first, the initial stage can transition to an unusual regime characterized by near independence of hybridization rate on duplex coverage, followed by a prolonged approach to equilibrium. The possible origins of these more complex latter behaviors are discussed. Comparison with published data for DNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes is carried out to look for universal trends in kinetics. This comparison reveals qualitative similarities when comparable surface organization of probes is expected. In addition, MO monolayers are found capable of a broad range of reactivities that span reported values for PNA and DNA probes. PMID:21699181

  19. Folding Beauties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Leah Wrenn

    2006-01-01

    This article has its genesis in an MAA mini-course on origami, where a way to get a parabola by folding paper was presented. This article discusses the methods and mathematics of other curves obtained by paper-folding.

  20. Effects of Knots on Protein Folding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Miguel A.; Faísca, Patrícia F. N.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the impact of knots, knot depth and motif of the threading terminus in protein folding properties (kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism) via extensive Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models. A knotted backbone has no effect on protein thermodynamic stability but it may affect key aspects of folding kinetics. In this regard, we found clear evidence for a functional advantage of knots: knots enhance kinetic stability because a knotted protein unfolds at a distinctively slower rate than its unknotted counterpart. However, an increase in knot deepness does not necessarily lead to more effective changes in folding properties. In this regard, a terminus with a non-trivial conformation (e.g. hairpin) can have a more dramatic effect in enhancing kinetic stability than knot depth. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the probability of the denatured ensemble to keep knotted is higher for proteins with deeper knots, indicating that knot depth plays a role in determining the topology of the denatured state. Refolding simulations starting from denatured knotted conformations show that not every knot is able to nucleate folding and further indicate that the formation of the knotting loop is a key event in the folding of knotted trefoils. They also show that there are specific native contacts within the knotted core that are crucial to keep a native knotting loop in denatured conformations which otherwise have no detectable structure. The study of the knotting mechanism reveals that the threading of the knotting loop generally occurs towards late folding in conformations that exhibit a significant degree of structural consolidation. PMID:24023962

  1. Malleability of the folding mechanism of the outer membrane protein PagP: parallel pathways and the effect of membrane elasticity.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, Gerard H M; Radford, Sheena E; Baldwin, Stephen A; Brockwell, David J

    2012-02-24

    Understanding the interactions between membrane proteins and the lipid bilayer is key to increasing our ability to predict and tailor the folding mechanism, structure and stability of membrane proteins. Here, we have investigated the effects of changing the membrane composition and the relative concentrations of protein and lipid on the folding mechanism of the bacterial outer membrane protein PagP. The folding pathway, monitored by tryptophan fluorescence, was found to be characterized by a burst phase, representing PagP adsorption to the liposome surface, followed by a time course that reflects the folding and insertion of the protein into the membrane. In 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (diC(12:0)PC) liposomes, the post-adsorption time course fits well to a single exponential at high lipid-to-protein ratios (LPRs), but at low LPRs, a second exponential phase with a slower folding rate constant is observed. Interrupted refolding assays demonstrated that the two exponential phases reflect the presence of parallel folding pathways. Partitioning between these pathways was found to be modulated by the elastic properties of the membrane. Folding into mixed 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine:diC(12:0)PC liposomes resulted in a decrease in PagP adsorption to the liposomes and a switch to the slower folding pathway. By contrast, inclusion of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine into diC(12:0)PC liposomes resulted in a decrease in the folding rate of the fast pathway. The results highlight the effect of lipid composition in tailoring the folding mechanism of a membrane protein, revealing that membrane proteins have access to multiple, competing folding routes to a unique native structure.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of DNA uptake into the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Salman, H.; Zbaida, D.; Rabin, Y.; Chatenay, D.; Elbaum, M.

    2001-01-01

    Gene transfer to eukaryotic cells requires the uptake of exogenous DNA into the cell nucleus. Except during mitosis, molecular access to the nuclear interior is limited to passage through the nuclear pores. Here we demonstrate the nuclear uptake of extended linear DNA molecules by a combination of fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule manipulation techniques, using the latter to follow uptake kinetics of individual molecules in real time. The assays were carried out on nuclei reconstituted in vitro from extracts of Xenopus eggs, which provide both a complete complement of biochemical factors involved in nuclear protein import, and unobstructed access to the nuclear pores. We find that uptake of DNA is independent of ATP or GTP hydrolysis, but is blocked by wheat germ agglutinin. The kinetics are much slower than would be expected from hydrodynamic considerations. A fit of the data to a simple model suggests femto-Newton forces and a large friction relevant to the uptake process. PMID:11390964

  3. Low temperature dry scrubbing reaction kinetics and mechanisms: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Sampson, K.J.; Visneski, M.J.; Reddy, S.N.; Ben-Said, L.; Maldei, M. )

    1992-03-01

    A resistance-in-series kinetic model for the low temperature reaction of sulfur dioxide with limestone is presented. The resistances considered are the gas-phase transport of sulfur dioxide, the liquid-phase diffusion of both the sulfur species and the calcium species and the solid-phase dissolution of limestone. The model uses film theory to predict the liquid concentrations of the dissolved species and assumes an instantaneous reaction between the sulfur species and calcium species. The kinetic model incorporates three rate equations for the removal of sulfur dioxide. When the rate of removal is limited by the diffusion of sulfur dioxide across the gas film surrounding the limestone particle, a gas-phase controlled rate equation is used. When the diffusion of the reacting species through the liquid film covering the limestone particle is the predominant resistance, a liquid-phase controlled rate equation is used. When the rate is limited by the dissolution of limestone, a solid-phase controlled rate equation is used. The kinetic model is incorporated into a flow model for the fixed-bed Limestone Emission Control (LEC) system. The LEC system employs a fixed-bed of standard quarry-sized limestone to remove sulfur dioxide from coal-fired boiler flue gases. The flow modeling equations for the fixed-bed LEC system, which include simultaneous heat and mass transfer as applied to water-phase evaporation and condensation are also presented. The combined kinetic and flow model is subjected to a parametric study and the modeling predictions are compared with experimental results.

  4. Mechanisms affecting kinetic energies of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R. |; Leboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Laser materials processing techniques are expected to have a dramatic impact on materials science and engineering in the near future and beyond. One of the main laser materials processing techniques is Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for thin film growth. While experimentalists search for optimal approaches for thin film growth with pulsed laser deposition (PLD), a systematic effort in theory and modeling of various processes during PLD is needed. The quality of film deposited depends critically on the range and profile of the kinetic energy and density of the ablated plume. While it is to the advantage of pulsed laser deposition to have high kinetic energy, plumes that are too energetic causes film damage. A dynamic source effect was found to accelerate the plume expansion velocity much higher than that from a conventional free expansion model. A self-similar theory and a hydrodynamic model are developed to study this effect, which may help to explain experimentally observed high front expansion velocity. Background gas can also affect the kinetic energies. High background gas may cause the ablated materials to go backward. Experimentally observed plume splitting is also discussed.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine dioxide-trithionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Cseko, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2012-03-22

    The trithionate-chlorine dioxide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in a slightly acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in acetate/acetic acid buffer monitoring the decay of chlorine dioxide at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M) adjusted by sodium perchlorate. We found that under our experimental conditions two limiting stoichiometries exist and the pH, the concentration of the reactants, and even the concentration of chloride ion affects the actual stoichiometry of the reaction that can be augmented by an appropriate linear combination of these limiting processes. It is also shown that although the formal kinetic order of trithionate is strictly one that of chlorine dioxide varies between 1 and 2, depending on the actual chlorine dioxide excess and the pH. Moreover, the otherwise sluggish chloride ion, which is also a product of the reaction, slightly accelerates the initial rate of chlorine dioxide consumption and may therefore act as an autocatalyst. In addition to that, overshoot-undershoot behavior is also observed in the [(·)ClO(2)]-time curves in the presence of chloride ion at chlorine dioxide excess. On the basis of the experiments, a 13-step kinetic model with 6 fitted kinetic parameter is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation.

  6. Extreme Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaine, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the mathematics and algorithms behind paper folding, and geometric folding in general, has increased dramatically over the past several years. These developments have found a surprisingly broad range of applications. In the art of origami, it has helped spur the technical origami revolution. In engineering and science, it has helped solve problems in areas such as manufacturing, robotics, graphics, and protein folding. On the recreational side, it has led to new kinds of folding puzzles and magic. I will give an overview of the mathematics and algorithms of folding, with a focus on new mathematics and sculpture.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of the synthesis of a novel protein-based plastic using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoez, Wael; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the intermolecular mechanism and kinetics of the synthesis of a novel biodegradable protein-based plastic from bovine serum albumin under subcritical water conditions using batch reactors. The reaction mechanism could be viewed as a chain reaction stabilized by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. The kinetic analysis was based on non-steady-state kinetics using a theoretical model developed in one of our previous works. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor were found to be 7.2 kJ/mol and 0.9 s-1, respectively. These low values signify that the reaction is relatively temperature-insensitive with some diffusion limitation.

  8. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Incineration of Organophosphorus and Fluoro-Organophosphorus Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P A; Melius, C; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2001-12-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed to describe incineration of the chemical warfare nerve agent sarin (GB), based on commonly used principles of bond additivity and hierarchical reaction mechanisms. The mechanism is based on previous kinetic models of organophosphorus compounds such as TMP, DMMP and DIMP that are often used as surrogates to predict incineration of GB. Kinetic models of the three surrogates and GB are then used to predict their consumption in a perfectly stirred reactor fueled by natural gas to simulate incineration of these chemicals. Computed results indicate that DIMP is the only one of these surrogates that adequately describes combustion of GB under comparable conditions. The kinetic pathways responsible for these differences in reactivity are identified and discussed. The most important reaction in GB and DIMP that makes them more reactive than TMP or DMMP is found to be a six-center molecular elimination reaction producing propene.

  9. Activation Barrier-Limited Folding and Conformational Sampling of a Dynamic Protein Domain.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Jakob; Toto, Angelo; Andersson, Eva; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-09-20

    Folding reaction mechanisms of globular protein domains have been extensively studied by both experiment and simulation and found to be highly concerted chemical reactions in which numerous noncovalent bonds form in an apparent two-state fashion. However, less is known regarding intrinsically disordered proteins because their folding can usually be studied only in conjunction with binding to a ligand. We have investigated by kinetics the folding mechanism of such a disordered protein domain, the nuclear coactivator-binding domain (NCBD) from CREB-binding protein. While a previous computational study suggested that NCBD folds without an activation free energy barrier, our experimental data demonstrate that NCBD, despite its highly dynamic structure, displays relatively slow folding (∼10 ms at 277 K) consistent with a barrier-limited process. Furthermore, the folding kinetics corroborate previous nuclear magnetic resonance data showing that NCBD exists in two folded conformations and one more denatured conformation at equilibrium and, thus, that the folding mechanism is a three-state mechanism. The refolding kinetics is limited by unfolding of the less populated folded conformation, suggesting that the major route for interconversion between the two folded states is via the denatured state. Because the two folded conformations have been suggested to bind distinct ligands, our results have mechanistic implications for conformational sampling in protein-protein interactions. PMID:27542287

  10. Low temperature dry scrubbing reaction kinetics and mechanisms, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Sampson, K.J.; Reddy, S.N.; Maldei, M.; Ben-Said, L. )

    1992-10-01

    Dry scrubbing that takes place after the air preheater (<350[degree]F) is the mode of operation that is of primary interest to this research project. At the relatively low temperatures that occur in this region of operation the rate of the gas-solid reaction that drives SO[sub 2] capture in the convective (800 to 1200[degree]F) and the combustion (1600 to 2400[degree]F) zones is too slow to be significant. The presence of significant amounts of either liquid-phase or vapor-phase water is required in order to mediate SO[sub 2] capture and to produce reasonable capture rates. A mathematical process model describing the cross-flow, moving-bed Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process has been formulated. This process model incorporates the resistance-in-series SO[sub 2] capture kinetic model described in the Project Year [number sign]1 final report. The kinetic model formulated during Project Year [number sign]1 pointed to limestone solubility and rate of solubilization as being key factors in determining the rate of SO[sub 2] capture in wetted limestone (LEC) scrubbing systems. In Project Year [number sign]2, limestone solubilities and rates of solubilization are being determined for a suite of Ohio limestones.

  11. Kinetic Ballooning Instability as a Substorm Onset Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z.Cheng

    1999-10-01

    A new scenario of substorm onset and current disruption and the corresponding physical processes are presented based on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observation and a kinetic ballooning instability theory. During the growth phase of substorms the plasma beta is larger than unity (20 greater than or equal to beta greater than or equal to 1). Toward the end of the late growth phase the plasma beta increases from 20 to greater than or equal to 50 in approximately 3 minutes and a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50 - 75 sec is excited and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the current disruption onset. At the onset, higher-frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field form a turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place to modify the ambient pressure profile so that the ambient magnetic field recovers from a tail-like geometry to a dipole-like geometry. A kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) theory is proposed to explain the low-frequency instability (frequency and growth rate) and its observed high beta threshold (beta subscript c is greater than or equal to 50). Based on the ideal-MHD theory beta subscript c, superscript MHD approximately equals 1 and the ballooning modes are predicted to be unstable during the growth phase, which is inconsistent with observation that no appreciable magnetic field fluctuation is observed. The enhancement beta subscript c over beta subscript c, superscript MHD is due to the kinetic effects of trapped electrons and finite ion-Larmor radii which provide a large stabilizing effect by producing a large parallel electric field and hence a parallel current that greatly enhances the stabilizing effect of field line tension. As a result, beta subscript c is greatly increased over beta subscript c, superscript MHD by a factor proportional to the ratio of the total electron density to the untrapped electron density (n subscript e divided by n subscript eu) which is greater than or equal to

  12. GroEL/ES chaperonin modulates the mechanism and accelerates the rate of TIM-barrel domain folding.

    PubMed

    Georgescauld, Florian; Popova, Kristina; Gupta, Amit J; Bracher, Andreas; Engen, John R; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    The GroEL/ES chaperonin system functions as a protein folding cage. Many obligate substrates of GroEL share the (βα)8 TIM-barrel fold, but how the chaperonin promotes folding of these proteins is not known. Here, we analyzed the folding of DapA at peptide resolution using hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry. During spontaneous folding, all elements of the DapA TIM barrel acquire structure simultaneously in a process associated with a long search time. In contrast, GroEL/ES accelerates folding more than 30-fold by catalyzing segmental structure formation in the TIM barrel. Segmental structure formation is also observed during the fast spontaneous folding of a structural homolog of DapA from a bacterium that lacks GroEL/ES. Thus, chaperonin independence correlates with folding properties otherwise enforced by protein confinement in the GroEL/ES cage. We suggest that folding catalysis by GroEL/ES is required by a set of proteins to reach native state at a biologically relevant timescale, avoiding aggregation or degradation.

  13. Solid State Kinetic Parameters and Chemical Mechanism of the Dehydration of CoCl2.6H2O.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribas, Joan; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents an experimental example illustrating the most common methods for the determination of kinetic parameters. Discusses the different theories and equations to be applied and the mechanism derived from the kinetic results. (CW)

  14. Reduced and Validated Kinetic Mechanisms for Hydrogen-CO-sir Combustion in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Yiguang Ju; Frederick Dryer

    2009-02-07

    Rigorous experimental, theoretical, and numerical investigation of various issues relevant to the development of reduced, validated kinetic mechanisms for synthetic gas combustion in gas turbines was carried out - including the construction of new radiation models for combusting flows, improvement of flame speed measurement techniques, measurements and chemical kinetic analysis of H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mixtures, revision of the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} kinetic model to improve flame speed prediction capabilities, and development of a multi-time scale algorithm to improve computational efficiency in reacting flow simulations.

  15. A Computer Generated Reduced Iso-Octane Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Applied to Simulation of HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Chen, J Y

    2002-08-12

    This paper shows how a computer can systematically remove non-essential chemical reactions from a large chemical kinetic mechanism. The computer removes the reactions based upon a single solution using a detailed mechanism. The resulting reduced chemical mechanism produces similar numerical predictions significantly faster than predictions that use the detailed mechanism. Specifically, a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for iso-octane has been derived from a detailed mechanism by eliminating unimportant reaction steps and species. The reduced mechanism has been developed for the specific purpose of fast and accurate prediction of ignition timing in an HCCI engine. The reduced mechanism contains 199 species and 383 reactions, while the detailed mechanism contains 859 species and 3606 reactions. Both mechanisms have been used in numerical simulation of HCCI combustion. The simulations show that the reduced mechanism predicts pressure traces and heat release with good accuracy, similar to the accuracy obtained with the detailed mechanism. As may be expected, emissions of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide are not as well predicted with the reduced mechanism as with the detailed mechanism, since the reduced mechanism was targeted for predicting HCCI ignition and not HC and CO emissions. Considering that the reduced mechanism requires about 25 times less computational time than the detailed mechanism (2 hours vs. 2 days), the ability to automatically generate a problem specific reduced mechanism is an important new tool for combustion research in general.

  16. A Comparison of Kinetic Energy and Momentum in Special Relativity and Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic energy and momentum are indispensable dynamical quantities in both the special theory of relativity and in classical mechanics. Although momentum and kinetic energy are central to understanding dynamics, the differences between their relativistic and classical notions have not always received adequate treatment in undergraduate teaching. It is shown that the contrast between these relativistic and classical quantities can be presented in a straightforward manner and with a minimal level of (undergraduate) mathematics.

  17. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of dimethoate chlorination during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; Liu, Wenjun; Guo, Guang; Qiang, Zhimin; Zhang, Can

    2014-05-01

    Dimethoate (DMT), a commonly used organophosphorus pesticide, is of great concern because of its toxicity and potentially harmful effects on water sources. The elimination of DMT as well as the toxicity and persistence of the byproducts formed during DMT degradation is most important for the safety of drinking water. This study first determined the reaction kinetics of DMT with free chlorine (FC) under typical water treatment conditions. The reaction between DMT and FC proceeded rapidly, exhibiting first-order with respect to each reactant. The degradation of DMT by FC was highly pH dependent, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant decreased obviously from 0.13 to 0.02 s(-1) with an increase in pH from 7.0 to 8.3. Bromide ion accelerated the reaction by acting as a catalyst, and the accelerated reaction rate was linearly proportional to the bromide concentration. As a ubiquitous component in natural waters, humic acid also increased the reaction rate. However, the presence of ammonium inhibited the degradation of DMT due to its rapid converting FC to chloramines. Omethoate (OMT) was identified as an important byproduct of DMT chlorination, but only accounted for ca. 28% of the DMT degraded; and other two organic byproducts were also identified. The acute toxicity of DMT solution increased after treatment with FC due to the formation of more toxic byproducts (e.g. OMT).

  19. Kinetics of baseball pitching with implications about injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, G S; Andrews, J R; Dillman, C J; Escamilla, R F

    1995-01-01

    Elbow and shoulder kinetics for 26 highly skilled, healthy adult pitchers were calculated using high-speed motion analysis. Two critical instants were 1) shortly before the arm reached maximum external rotation, when 67 N-m of shoulder internal rotation torque and 64 N-m of elbow varus torque were generated, and 2) shortly after ball release, when 1090 N of shoulder compressive force was produced. Inability to generate sufficient elbow varus torque may result in medial tension, lateral compression, or posteromedial impingement injury. At the glenohumeral joint, compressive force, joint laxity, and 380 N of anterior force during arm cocking can lead to anterior glenoid labral tear. Rapid internal rotation in combination with these forces can produce a grinding injury factor on the labrum. After ball release, 400 N of posterior force, 1090 N of compressive force, and 97 N-m of horizontal abduction torque are generated at the shoulder; contribution of rotator cuff muscles in generating these loads may result in cuff tensile failure. Horizontal adduction, internal rotation, and superior translation of the abducted humerus may cause subacromial impingement. Tension in the biceps tendon, due to muscle contraction for both elbow flexion torque and shoulder compressive force, may tear the anterosuperior labrum.

  20. Kinetics and mechanism of Dionaea muscipula trap closing.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Adesina, Tejumade; Markin, Vladislav S; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-02-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) possesses an active trapping mechanism to capture insects with one of the most rapid movements in the plant kingdom, as described by Darwin. This article presents a detailed experimental investigation of trap closure by mechanical and electrical stimuli and the mechanism of this process. Trap closure consists of three distinctive phases: a silent phase with no observable movement; an accelerated movement of the lobes; and the relaxation of the lobes in their closed state, resulting in a new equilibrium. Uncouplers and blockers of membrane channels were used to investigate the mechanisms of different phases of closing. Uncouplers increased trap closure delay and significantly decreased the speed of trap closure. Ion channel blockers and aquaporin inhibitors increased time of closing. Transmission of a single electrical charge between a lobe and the midrib causes closure of the trap and induces an electrical signal propagating between both lobes and midrib. The Venus flytrap can accumulate small subthreshold charges, and when the threshold value is reached, the trap closes. Repeated application of smaller charges demonstrates the summation of stimuli. The cumulative character of electrical stimuli points to the existence of electrical memory in the Venus flytrap. The observed fast movement can be explained by the hydroelastic curvature model without invoking buckling instability. The new hydroelastic curvature mechanism provides an accurate description of the authors' experimental data.

  1. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: A kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K.; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.

  2. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.

  3. Students' Misconceptions about Heat Transfer Mechanisms and Elementary Kinetic Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, S. R.; Pradhan, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Heat and thermodynamics is a conceptually rich area of undergraduate physics. In the Indian context in particular there has been little work done in this area from the point of view of misconceptions. This prompted us to undertake a study in this area. We present a study of students' misconceptions about heat transfer mechanisms, i.e. conduction,…

  4. Development of a surrogate kinetic mechanism for photochemical smog. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, J.A.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    A surrogate condensed chemical reaction mechanism for photochemical smog containing the latest available kinetic and mechanistic data is developed here and is extensively tested against experimental data from two smog-chamber facilities. In addition, a counter species analysis has shown that the prediction of the individual portions of the surrogate mechanism are in good agreement with those of a detailed explicit mechanism for photochemical smog. The new mechanism contains 20 non-steady-state species, making it compact enough for use in multidimensional grid models of urban air pollution. A major advantage of the new mechanism is the ease with which it can be modified to incorporate new kinetic or mechanistic information because of the straightforward manner in which the mechanism was formulated from the detailed explicit chemistry.

  5. Reaction Mechanism and Kinetics of Enargite Oxidation at Roasting Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Aracena, Alvaro; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2012-10-01

    Roasting of enargite (Cu3AsS4) in the temperature range of 648 K to 898 K (375 °C to 625 °C) in atmospheres containing variable amounts of oxygen has been studied by thermogravimetric methods. From the experimental results of weight loss/gain data and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of partially reacted samples, the reaction mechanism of the enargite oxidation was determined, which occurred in three sequential stages:

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of removal of methylene blue by adsorption onto perlite.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Mehmet; Alkan, Mahir; Türkyilmaz, Aydin; Ozdemir, Yasemin

    2004-06-18

    The kinetics and mechanism of methylene blue adsorption on perlite have been studied. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as initial dye concentration, temperature and pH on the adsorption rate were investigated. Adsorption measurements show that the process is very fast and physical in nature. The extent of the dye removal increased with increase in the initial concentration of the dye and the initial pH and temperature of solution. Adsorption data were modelled using the first and second-order kinetic equations, mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion models. It was shown that the second-order kinetic equation could best describe the sorption kinetics. The diffusion coefficient, D, was found to increase when the initial dye concentration, pH and temperature were raised. Thermodynamic activation parameters, such as DeltaG*, DeltaS* and DeltaH*, were calculated.

  7. Application of the second rule of transient-state kinetic isotope effects to an enzymatic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Harvey F; Maniscalco, Steven J; Tally, Jon; Tabanor, Kayann

    2009-12-29

    The transient-state kinetic approach reveals the formation and subsequent interconversions of intermediates in real time. Its potential for the mechanistic resolution of enzymatic and other complex chemical mechanisms has been severely limited however by the lack of a rigorous and applicable theoretical basis in contrast to that of the less direct but soundly based algebraic algorithms of the steady-state approach. Having recently established three rigorously derived fundamental "rules" of transient-state kinetics applicable to realistic multiple step reactions, we present here the successful application of the very counterintuitive "second rule" to the resolution of the mechanism of the l-phenylalanine dehydrogenase catalyzed reaction. PMID:19924903

  8. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  9. Mechanism and kinetics of COS-induced diethanolamine degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dawodu, O.F.; Meisen, A. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The degradation of aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) solutions by carbonyl sulfide was examined by using a 600-mL well-stirred reactor operating under the following conditions: DEA concentration 20--40 wt %, temperature 120--180 C, COS partial pressure 0.3--1.17 MPa. The reaction products were identified by GC/MS, and reaction mechanisms are developed which conform with experimental observations. The reaction rate constants are determined, and a mathematical model for estimating DEA degradation by COS is presented.

  10. Mechanics and kinetics of platinum heteroepitaxy on gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Anant

    adatoms from the pits to the mesas. This model, together with arguments that characterize NPG surface as kinetically 'rough', explains the observed Pt/NPG islanding morphology. The elastic properties of nanoporous gold thin films were also investigated, and a porosity-length-scale dependence in the effective Young's modulus of NPG was revealed. Further, a remarkably simple and inexpensive method to fabricate large single crystals in thick Au and AuAg alloy foils was discovered and is presented here. The surfaces of these crystals, made by exploiting surface energy driven abnormal grain growth, were examined in detail and were revealed to be of very high quality, comparable to those prepared using traditional approaches such as UHV deposition. Lastly, a self-ordering phenomenon in colloidal particles sitting atop surfaces with very shallow nanoscale corrugations was investigated and explained in terms of capillary effects; this work is discussed in the appendix.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of photopromoted oxidative dissolution of antimony trioxide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xingyun; Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2014-12-16

    Light (sunlight, ultraviolet, simulated sunlight) irradiation was used to initiate the dissolution of antimony trioxide (Sb2O3). Dissolution rate of Sb2O3 was accelerated and dissolved trivalent antimony (Sb(III)) was oxidized in the irradiation of light. The photopromoted oxidative dissolution mechanism of Sb2O3 was studied through experiments investigating the effects of pH, free radicals scavengers, dissolved oxygen removal and Sb2O3 dosage on the release rate of antimony from Sb2O3 under simulated sunlight irradiation. The key oxidative components were hydroxyl free radicals, photogenerated holes and superoxide free radicals; their contribution ratios were roughly estimated. In addition, a conceptual model of the photocatalytic oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 was proposed. The overall pH-dependent dissolution rate of Sb2O3 and the oxidation of Sb(III) under light irradiation were expressed by r = 0.08 ·[OH(-)](0.63) and rox = 0.10 ·[OH(-)](0.79). The present study on the mechanism of the photo-oxidation dissolution of Sb2O3 could help clarify the geochemical cycle and fate of Sb in the environment.

  12. Photochemistry of dipenylketyl radicals: spectroscopy, kinetics, and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, L.J.; Lougnot, D.J.; Wintgens, V.; Scaiano, J.C.

    1988-01-20

    The photochemistry of the diphenylketyl radical has been examined in nonpolar solutions. Transient studies using two-laser techniques yield an excited-state lifetime of 3.9 ns in toluene at room temperature, while for diphenylketyl-O-d the lifetime is 8.7 ns. Dye laser irradiation (515 nm) in the ketyl's visible absorption band leads to efficient photobleaching with Phi/sub bleach/ = 0.27 +/- 0.06 for the parent radical and 0.39 and 0.26 for the 4-methyl and 4-chloro derivatives, respectively. The photobleaching reaction involves the cleavage of the O-H ketyl bond to yield benzophenone and hydrogen atoms; in cyclohexane the latter abstract hydrogen from the solvent to produce molecular hydrogen which was characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In accordance with this mechanism, two-laser experiments produce lower yields of photoreduction products than the one-laser experiments in which the ketyls are not photobleached. When the ketyl radicals are generated by reaction of tert-butoxy radicals with benzhydrol, dye laser irradiation leads to a large increase in the yield of benzophenone (now a product), although the mechanism here is somewhat more complex due to the quenching of excited ketyl radicals by di-tert-butyl peroxide (k/sub q/ = 1.9 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/). Detailed studies of the fluorescence, isotope effects, temperature effects, and products are also included.

  13. Pleural liquid and kinetic friction coefficient of mesothelium after mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Bodega, Francesca; Sironi, Chiara; Porta, Cristina; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2015-01-15

    Volume and protein concentration of pleural liquid in anesthetized rabbits after 1 or 3h of mechanical ventilation, with alveolar pressure equal to atmospheric at end expiration, were compared to those occurring after spontaneous breathing. Moreover, coefficient of kinetic friction between samples of visceral and parietal pleura, obtained after spontaneous or mechanical ventilation, sliding in vitro at physiological velocity under physiological load, was determined. Volume of pleural liquid after mechanical ventilation was similar to that previously found during spontaneous ventilation. This finding is contrary to expectation of Moriondo et al. (2005), based on measurement of lymphatic and interstitial pressure. Protein concentration of pleural liquid after mechanical ventilation was also similar to that occurring after spontaneous ventilation. Coefficient of kinetic friction after mechanical ventilation was 0.023±0.001, similar to that obtained after spontaneous breathing.

  14. Reduced kinetic mechanism of ignition for nonpremixed hydrogen/air in a supersonic mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y.; Niioka, T. . Inst. of Fluid Science)

    1994-11-01

    Transient ignition processes in a two-dimensional spatially evolving supersonic mixing layer consisting of a parallel nonpremixed airstream and a hydrogen stream both with temperatures higher than 1,000 K were investigated numerically by using the full chemistry and its reduced chemistry. A phenomenon different from that examined in previous studies, in which ignition of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures was considered, was found in the nonpremixed case examined here. It was shown that the concentration of O was greater than that of OH before ignition, but became smaller with the development of ignition process. Fourteen important reactions for ignition were obtained and verified using sensitivity analyses of ignition delay time and radical concentrations. Several different four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were then deduced by introducing the steady-state approximation to different species. Comparison of these reduced kinetic mechanisms with the full chemistry showed that the steady-state approximation of O used in previous studies caused serious errors in the prediction of ignition delay time in supersonic flow, in which nonpremixed character is predominant and the transport phenomenon is important. Ignition locations predicted with the proper four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were within 5% and 20% of those predicted with the full chemistry. Finally, these two reduced mechanisms were used to evaluate the effect of viscous dissipation on ignition in the supersonic shear layer. Good agreements between the results of the present reduced kinetic mechanisms and those of the full chemistry were obtained.

  15. Influence of hydrogel mechanical properties and mesh size on vocal fold fibroblast extracellular matrix production and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Mariah S.; Liao, Huimin; Munoz-Pinto, Dany; Qu, Xin; Hou, Yaping; Grunlan, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Current clinical management of vocal fold (VF) scarring produces inconsistent and often suboptimal results. Researchers are investigating a number of alternative treatments for VF lamina propria (LP) scarring, including designer implant materials for functional LP regeneration. In the present study, we investigate the effects of the initial scaffold elastic modulus and mesh size on encapsulated VF fibroblast (VFF) extracellular matrix (ECM) production toward rational scaffold design. Polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels were selected for this study since their material properties, including mechanical properties, mesh size, degradation rate and bioactivity, can be tightly controlled and systematically modified. Porcine VFF were encapsulated in four PEGDA hydrogels with degradation half lives of ~25 days and initial elastic compressive moduli ranging from ~30 to 100 kPa and initial mesh sizes ranging from ~9 to 27 nm. After 30 days of static culture, VFF ECM production and phenotype in each formulation was assessed biochemically and histologically. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis increased in similar degree with both increasing initial modulus and decreasing initial mesh size. In contrast, elastin production decreased with increasing initial modulus but increased with decreasing initial mesh size. Both collagen deposition and the induction of a myofibroblastic phenotype depended strongly on initial mesh size but appeared largely unaffected by variations in initial modulus. The present results indicate that scaffold mesh size warrants further investigation as a critical regulator of VFF ECM synthesis. Furthermore, this study validates a systematic and controlled approach for analyzing VFF response to scaffold properties, which should aid in rational scaffold selection/design. PMID:18515199

  16. G2 chromatid aberrations: Kinetics and possible mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, P.E.; Slijepcevic, P. )

    1993-01-01

    Chromatid breaks and exchanges are induced by radiation in G2 mammalian cells. Breaks are at a maximum number at about 30 min after irradiation and decrease apparently exponentially with time between irradiation and sampling. Few breaks are observed immediately following exposure, probably as a result of selection of mitotic cells where chromosomes are condensed and there is consequently a lack of time for expression of damage. The change in frequency of breaks with time, from 30 min after radiation exposure and onwards, can be interpreted in two possible ways: either in terms of a repair process or in terms of a change in radiosensitivity through G2. However, the results with an inhibitor of repair of DNA double-strand breaks (ara A) and with [open quotes]transient hypothermia[close quotes] which extends the G2 phase, argue for an interpretation based on rejoining of chromatid breaks, possibly reflecting the repair of a subclass of dsb. Data from experiments with irradiated and restriction endonuclease treated radiosensitive mutant rodent lines indicate that enhanced levels of conversion of dsb into chromosomal aberrations may be largely independent of repair rates of bulk dsb. In CHO cells and in human lymphocytes exchanges initially increase rapidly with time and then remain at a constant frequency, supporting the notion of a uniform chromosomal radiosensitivity throughout most of G2 and providing further evidence that the mechanism for misjoining broken chromatids (leading to exchanges) is different from that for rejoining of chromatid breaks. Ratios of breaks to exchanges were found to vary in different cell lines and at different times during treatment with inhibitors or at altered temperatures, possibly (in different cell lines) indicating different levels of enzymes involved in misjoining, but suggesting that the mechanisms of chromosomal rejoining and misjoining are independent, at least to some degree. 19 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of the mercury(II)-assisted hydrolysis of methyl iodide.

    PubMed

    Celo, Valbona; Scott, Susannah L

    2005-04-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of aqueous Hg(II) with methyl iodide have been investigated. The overall reaction is best described as Hg(II)-assisted hydrolysis, resulting in quantitative formation of methanol and, in the presence of excess methyl iodide, ultimately, HgI2 via the intermediate HgI+. The kinetics are biexponential when methyl iodide is in excess. At 25 degrees C, the acceleration provided by Hg2+ is 7.5 times greater than that caused by HgI+, while assistance of hydrolysis was not observed for HgI2. Thus, the reactions are not catalytic in Hg(II). The kinetics are consistent with an SN2-M+ mechanism involving electrophilic attack at iodide. As expected, methylation of mercury is not a reaction pathway; traces of methylmercury(II) are artifacts of the extraction/preconcentration procedure used for methylmercury analysis.

  18. Kinetic mechanism and fidelity of nick sealing by Escherichia coli NAD+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA)

    PubMed Central

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli DNA ligase (EcoLigA) repairs 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks in duplex DNA via reaction of LigA with NAD+ to form a covalent LigA-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP intermediate (step 1); transfer of AMP to the nick 5′-PO4 to form an AppDNA intermediate (step 2); and attack of the nick 3′-OH on AppDNA to form a 3′-5′ phosphodiester (step 3). A distinctive feature of EcoLigA is its stimulation by ammonium ion. Here we used rapid mix-quench methods to analyze the kinetic mechanism of single-turnover nick sealing by EcoLigA–AMP. For substrates with correctly base-paired 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks, kstep2 was fast (6.8–27 s−1) and similar to kstep3 (8.3–42 s−1). Absent ammonium, kstep2 and kstep3 were 48-fold and 16-fold slower, respectively. EcoLigA was exquisitely sensitive to 3′-OH base mispairs and 3′ N:abasic lesions, which elicited 1000- to >20000-fold decrements in kstep2. The exception was the non-canonical 3′ A:oxoG configuration, which EcoLigA accepted as correctly paired for rapid sealing. These results underscore: (i) how EcoLigA requires proper positioning of the nick 3′ nucleoside for catalysis of 5′ adenylylation; and (ii) EcoLigA's potential to embed mutations during the repair of oxidative damage. EcoLigA was relatively tolerant of 5′-phosphate base mispairs and 5′ N:abasic lesions. PMID:26857547

  19. NMR analysis of partially folded states and persistent structure in the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase: implications for the equilibrium folding mechanism of a 29-kDa TIM barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Vadrevu, Ramakrishna; Wu, Ying; Matthews, C Robert

    2008-03-14

    Structural insights into the equilibrium folding mechanism of the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase (alpha TS) from Escherichia coli, a (beta alpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, were obtained with a pair of complementary nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques. The secondary structures of rare high-energy partially folded states were probed by native-state hydrogen-exchange NMR analysis of main-chain amide hydrogens. 2D heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR analysis of several (15)N-labeled nonpolar amino acids was used to probe the side chains involved in stabilizing a highly denatured intermediate that is devoid of secondary structure. The dynamic broadening of a subset of isoleucine and leucine side chains and the absence of protection against exchange showed that the highest energy folded state on the free-energy landscape is stabilized by a hydrophobic cluster lacking stable secondary structure. The core of this cluster, centered near the N-terminus of alpha TS, serves as a nucleus for the stabilization of what appears to be nonnative secondary structure in a marginally stable intermediate. The progressive decrease in protection against exchange from this nucleus toward both termini and from the N-termini to the C-termini of several beta-strands is best described by an ensemble of weakly coupled conformers. Comparison with previous data strongly suggests that this ensemble corresponds to a marginally stable off-pathway intermediate that arises in the first few milliseconds of folding and persists under equilibrium conditions. A second, more stable intermediate, which has an intact beta-barrel and a frayed alpha-helical shell, coexists with this marginally stable species. The conversion of the more stable intermediate to the native state of alpha TS entails the formation of a stable helical shell and completes the acquisition of the tertiary structure.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation from global fitting of kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Meisl, Georg; Kirkegaard, Julius B; Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C T; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-02-01

    The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which soluble proteins convert into their amyloid forms is a fundamental prerequisite for understanding and controlling disorders that are linked to protein aggregation, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, because of the complexity associated with aggregation reaction networks, the analysis of kinetic data of protein aggregation to obtain the underlying mechanisms represents a complex task. Here we describe a framework, using quantitative kinetic assays and global fitting, to determine and to verify a molecular mechanism for aggregation reactions that is compatible with experimental kinetic data. We implement this approach in a web-based software, AmyloFit. Our procedure starts from the results of kinetic experiments that measure the concentration of aggregate mass as a function of time. We illustrate the approach with results from the aggregation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides measured using thioflavin T, but the method is suitable for data from any similar kinetic experiment measuring the accumulation of aggregate mass as a function of time; the input data are in the form of a tab-separated text file. We also outline general experimental strategies and practical considerations for obtaining kinetic data of sufficient quality to draw detailed mechanistic conclusions, and the procedure starts with instructions for extensive data quality control. For the core part of the analysis, we provide an online platform (http://www.amylofit.ch.cam.ac.uk) that enables robust global analysis of kinetic data without the need for extensive programming or detailed mathematical knowledge. The software automates repetitive tasks and guides users through the key steps of kinetic analysis: determination of constraints to be placed on the aggregation mechanism based on the concentration dependence of the aggregation reaction, choosing from several fundamental models describing assembly into linear aggregates and

  1. On the estimation of cooperativity in ion channel kinetics: activation free energy and kinetic mechanism of Shaker K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, we have explored generic criteria of cooperative behavior in ion channel kinetics treating it on the same footing with multistate receptor-ligand binding in a compact theoretical framework. We have shown that the characterization of cooperativity of ion channels in terms of the Hill coefficient violates the standard Hill criteria defined for allosteric cooperativity of ligand binding. To resolve the issue, an alternative measure of cooperativity is proposed here in terms of the cooperativity index that sets a unified criteria for both the systems. More importantly, for ion channel this index can be very useful to describe the cooperative kinetics as it can be readily determined from the experimentally measured ionic current combined with theoretical modelling. We have analyzed the correlation between the voltage value and slope of the voltage-activation curve at the half-activation point and consequently determined the standard free energy of activation of the ion channel using two well-established mechanisms of cooperativity, namely, Koshland-Nemethy-Filmer (KNF) and Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models. Comparison of the theoretical results for both the models with appropriate experimental data of mutational perturbation of Shaker K(+) channel supports the experimental fact that the KNF model is more suitable to describe the cooperative behavior of this class of ion channels, whereas the performance of the MWC model is unsatisfactory. We have also estimated the mechanistic performance through standard free energy of channel activation for both the models and proposed a possible functional disadvantage in the MWC scheme.

  2. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  4. Albite [yields] jadeite + quartz transformation in rock: Mechanism and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlen, S.R.; Kirby, S.H. ); Hacker, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the calcite [yields] aragonite transformation using fully dense marble revealed significant differences from earlier experiments on powders and single-crystals. The reaction rate is retarded by a factor of > 1,000 and reaction mechanisms and resultant textures are considerably more complex. Stimulated by this, the authors conducted a study of the albite [yields] jadeite + quartz/coesite transformation in a fully dense albitite. Again the results are in marked contrast with previous powder-based studies of this archetypal metamorphic reaction. Solid cores of albitite were held at temperatures of 500-1,200 C and at pressure oversteps of 500 MPa into the jadeite + quartz stability field for 1--8 days in piston-cylinder apparatus. Samples that were dried in vacuum transformed appreciably only at temperatures in excess of 1,000 C. At all grain boundaries there is subequal transformation to micron-scale intergrowths of jadeite + quartz. Samples that were vacuum-impregnated with 1 wt% water contain jadeite + quartz to temperatures as low as 600 C. In contrast to the dried samples, transformation is much less homogeneous. The jadeite + quartz intergrowths do not form rows of subparallel crystals on grain boundaries, but rather are flower-shaped clusters that radiate outward from single nucleation sites at 3-grain edges and 4-grain corners. Compared to powders, pressure oversteps a factor of 10 greater are necessary to induce equivalent reaction in albitite. The sluggishness of this reaction has important implications for the evolution of the lower continental crust and subducting oceanic crust in terms of their (1) seismic velocity profiles, (2) petrological evolution, and (3) buoyancy forces, stresses and vertical crustal movements connected with densification and dilatational reactions.

  5. The kinetics and mechanism of nanoconfined molten salt reactions: trimerization of potassium and rubidium dicyanamide.

    PubMed

    Yancey, Benjamin; Vyazovkin, Sergey

    2015-04-21

    This study highlights the effect of the aggregate state of a reactant on the reaction kinetics under the conditions of nanoconfinement. Our previous work (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 11409) has demonstrated considerable deceleration of the solid state trimerization of sodium dicyanamide in organically modified silica nanopores. In the present study we use FTIR, NMR, pXRD, TGA and DSC to analyze the kinetics and mechanism of the liquid state trimerization of potassium and rubidium dicyanamide under similar conditions of nanoconfinement. It is found that nanoconfinement accelerates dramatically the kinetics of the liquid state trimerization, whereas it does not appear to affect the reaction mechanism. Kinetic analysis indicates that the acceleration is associated with an increase in the preexponential factor. Although nanoconfinement has the opposite effects on the respective kinetics of solid and liquid state trimerization, both effects are linked to a change in the preexponential factor. The results obtained are consistent with our hypothesis that the effects differ because nanoconfinement may promote disordering of the solid and ordering of the liquid reaction media.

  6. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  7. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater. PMID:25405224

  8. Folding Thermodynamics and Mechanism of Five Trp-Cage Variants from Replica-Exchange MD Simulations with RSFF2 Force Field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen-Yang; Jiang, Fan; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-11-10

    To test whether our recently developed residue-specific force field RSFF2 can reproduce the mutational effect on the thermal stability of Trp-cage mini-protein and decipher its detailed folding mechanism, we carried out long-time replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on five Trp-cage variants, including TC5b and TC10b. Initiated from their unfolded structures, the simulations not only well-reproduce their experimental structures but also their melting temperatures and folding enthalpies reasonably well. For each Trp-cage variant, the overall folding free energy landscape is apparently two-state, but some intermediate states can be observed when projected on more detailed coordinates. We also found different variants have the same major folding pathway, including the well formed PII-helix in the unfolded state, the formation of W6-P12/P18/P19 contacts and the α-helix before the transition state, the following formation of most native contacts, and the final native loop formation. The folding mechanism derived here is consistent with many previous simulations and experiments.

  9. A Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for the Ignition of Silane/Hydrogen Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Mclain, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the oxidation of silane/hydrogen mixtures is presented and discussed. Shock-tube ignition delay time data were used to evaluate and refine the mechanism. Good agreement between experimental results and the results predicted by the mechanism was obtained by adjusting the rate coefficient for the reaction SiH3 + O2 yields SiH2O + OH. The reaction mechanism was used to theoretically investigate the ignition characteristics of silane/hydrogen mixtures. The results revealed that over the entire range of temperature examined (800 K to 1200 K), substantial reduction in ignition delay times is obtained when silane is added to hydrogen.

  10. Folding by Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Paul; Damasceno, Pablo; Glotzer, Sharon

    2014-03-01

    A form of self-assembly, ``self-folding'' presents an alternative approach to the creation of reconfigurable, responsive materials with applications ranging from robotics to drug design. However, the complexity of interactions present in biological and engineered systems that undergo folding makes it challenging to isolate the main factors controlling their assembly and dis-assembly. Here we use computer simulations of simple, minimalistic self-foldable structures and investigate their stochastic folding process. By dynamically accessing all the states that lead to, or inhibit, successful folding, we show that the mechanisms by which general stochastic systems can achieve their ``native'' structures can be identified and used to design rules for optimized folding propensity. Research supported by the National Science Foundation, Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation Award # EFRI-1240264.

  11. Evaluating endoglucanase Cel7B-lignin interaction mechanisms and kinetics using quartz crystal microgravimetry.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Sorek, Hagit; Roche, Christine M; Strobel, Kathryn L; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of protein interactions with solid surfaces are important to fields as diverse as industrial biocatalysis, biomedical engineering, food science, and cell biology. The nonproductive adsorption of cellulase enzymes to lignin, a plant cell wall polymer, reduces their effectiveness in saccharifying biomass. Cellulase has been shown to interact with lignin, but the heterogeneity of lignin surfaces, challenges in measuring irreversible components of these interactions, and fast adsorption rates make quantifying the reaction kinetics difficult. This work employs quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) for real-time measurement of adsorbed mass on a flat lignin surface. We have developed a method for casting homogeneous lignin films that are chemically similar to lignin found in pretreated biomass, and used QCM-D to compare three models of reversible-irreversible binding behavior: a single-site transition model, a transition model with changing adsorbate footprint, and a two-site transition model. Of the three models tested, the two-site transition model provides the only kinetic mechanism able to describe the behavior of Cel7B binding to lignin. While the direct implications of lignin-cellulase interactions may be limited to biomass deconstruction for renewable energy and green chemistry, the analytical and experimental methods demonstrated in this work are relevant to any system in which the kinetics and reaction mechanism of reversible and irreversible protein adsorption at a solid-liquid interface are important. PMID:25994114

  12. Evaluating endoglucanase Cel7B-lignin interaction mechanisms and kinetics using quartz crystal microgravimetry.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Sorek, Hagit; Roche, Christine M; Strobel, Kathryn L; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of protein interactions with solid surfaces are important to fields as diverse as industrial biocatalysis, biomedical engineering, food science, and cell biology. The nonproductive adsorption of cellulase enzymes to lignin, a plant cell wall polymer, reduces their effectiveness in saccharifying biomass. Cellulase has been shown to interact with lignin, but the heterogeneity of lignin surfaces, challenges in measuring irreversible components of these interactions, and fast adsorption rates make quantifying the reaction kinetics difficult. This work employs quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) for real-time measurement of adsorbed mass on a flat lignin surface. We have developed a method for casting homogeneous lignin films that are chemically similar to lignin found in pretreated biomass, and used QCM-D to compare three models of reversible-irreversible binding behavior: a single-site transition model, a transition model with changing adsorbate footprint, and a two-site transition model. Of the three models tested, the two-site transition model provides the only kinetic mechanism able to describe the behavior of Cel7B binding to lignin. While the direct implications of lignin-cellulase interactions may be limited to biomass deconstruction for renewable energy and green chemistry, the analytical and experimental methods demonstrated in this work are relevant to any system in which the kinetics and reaction mechanism of reversible and irreversible protein adsorption at a solid-liquid interface are important.

  13. Regulatory motifs on ISWI chromatin remodelers: molecular mechanisms and kinetic proofreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brysbaert, Guillaume; Lensink, Marc F.; Blossey, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Recently, kinetic proofreading scenarios have been proposed for the regulation of chromatin remodeling, first on purely theoretical grounds (Blossey and Schiessel 2008 HFSP J. 2 167-70) and deduced from experiments on the ISWI/ACF system (Narlikar 2010 Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 14 660). In the kinetic proofreading scenario of chromatin remodeling, the combination of the recognition of a histone tail state and ATP-hydrolysis in the remodeler motor act together to select (i.e. proofread) a nucleosomal substrate. ISWI remodelers have recently been shown to have an additional level of regulation as they contain auto-inhibitory motifs which need to be inactivated through an interaction with the nucleosome. In this paper we show that the auto-regulatory effect enhances substrate recognition in kinetic proofreading. We further report some suggestive additional insights into the molecular mechanism underlying ISWI-autoregulation.

  14. Controlling Self-Assembly Kinetics of DNA-Functionalized Liposomes Using Toehold Exchange Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Lucia; Kotar, Jurij; Di Michele, Lorenzo; Mognetti, Bortolo M

    2016-02-23

    The selectivity of Watson-Crick base pairing has allowed the design of DNA-based functional materials bearing an unprecedented level of accuracy. Examples include DNA origami, made of tiles assembling into arbitrarily complex shapes, and DNA coated particles featuring rich phase behaviors. Frequently, the realization of conceptual DNA-nanotechnology designs has been hampered by the lack of strategies for effectively controlling relaxations. In this article, we address the problem of kinetic control on DNA-mediated interactions between Brownian objects. We design a kinetic pathway based on toehold-exchange mechanisms that enables rearrangement of DNA bonds without the need for thermal denaturation, and test it on suspensions of DNA-functionalized liposomes, demonstrating tunability of aggregation rates over more than 1 order of magnitude. While the possibility to design complex phase behaviors using DNA as a glue is already well recognized, our results demonstrate control also over the kinetics of such systems.

  15. New mechanism of kinetic exchange interaction induced by strong magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the kinetic exchange interaction between single-occupied magnetic orbitals (s-s) is always antiferromagnetic, while between single- and double-occupied orbitals (s-d) is always ferromagnetic and much weaker. Here we show that the exchange interaction between strongly anisotropic doublets of lanthanides, actinides and transition metal ions with unquenched orbital momentum contains a new s-d kinetic contribution equal in strength with the s-s one. In non-collinear magnetic systems, this s-d kinetic mechanism can cause an overall ferromagnetic exchange interaction which can become very strong for transition metal ions. These findings are fully confirmed by DFT based analysis of exchange interaction in several Ln3+ complexes. PMID:27098292

  16. Regulatory motifs on ISWI chromatin remodelers: molecular mechanisms and kinetic proofreading.

    PubMed

    Brysbaert, Guillaume; Lensink, Marc F; Blossey, Ralf

    2015-02-18

    Recently, kinetic proofreading scenarios have been proposed for the regulation of chromatin remodeling, first on purely theoretical grounds (Blossey and Schiessel 2008 HFSP J. 2 167-70) and deduced from experiments on the ISWI/ACF system (Narlikar 2010 Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 14 660). In the kinetic proofreading scenario of chromatin remodeling, the combination of the recognition of a histone tail state and ATP-hydrolysis in the remodeler motor act together to select (i.e. proofread) a nucleosomal substrate. ISWI remodelers have recently been shown to have an additional level of regulation as they contain auto-inhibitory motifs which need to be inactivated through an interaction with the nucleosome. In this paper we show that the auto-regulatory effect enhances substrate recognition in kinetic proofreading. We further report some suggestive additional insights into the molecular mechanism underlying ISWI-autoregulation. PMID:25563573

  17. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer

    The central feature of the Combustion Chemistry project at LLNL is the development, validation, and application of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of hydrocarbon and other types of chemical fuels. For the past 30 years, LLNL's Chemical Sciences Division has built hydrocarbon mechanisms for fuels from hydrogen and methane through much larger fuels including heptanes and octanes. Other classes of fuels for which models have been developed include flame suppressants such as halons and organophosphates, and air pollutants such as soot and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  18. The Role of Comprehensive Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms in Combustion Research

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-07-16

    Recent developments by the authors in the field of comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels are reviewed. Examples are given of how these mechanisms provide fundamental chemical insights into a range of combustion applications. Practical combustion consists primarily of chemical heat release from reactions between a fuel and an oxidizer, and computer simulations of practical combustion systems have become an essential tool of combustion research (Westbrook et al., 2005). At the heart of most combustion simulations, the chemical kinetic submodel frequently is the most detailed, complex and computationally costly part of a system model. Historically, the chemical submodel equations are solved using time-implicit numerical algorithms, due to the extreme stiffness of the coupled rate equations, with a computational cost that varies roughly with the cube of the number of chemical species in the model. While early mechanisms (c. 1980) for apparently simple fuels such as methane (Warnatz, 1980) or methanol (Westbrook and Dryer, 1979) included perhaps 25 species, current detailed mechanisms for much larger, more complex fuels such as hexadecane (Fournet et al., 2001; Ristori et al., 2001; Westbrook et al., 2008) or methyl ester methyl decanoate (Herbinet et al., 2008) have as many as 2000 or even 3000 species. Rapid growth in capabilities of modern computers has been an essential feature in this rapid growth in the size and complexity of chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms.

  19. Mutational, kinetic, and NMR studies of the mechanism of E. coli GDP-mannose mannosyl hydrolase, an unusual Nudix enzyme.

    PubMed

    Legler, Patricia M; Massiah, Michael A; Mildvan, Albert S

    2002-09-01

    GDP-mannose mannosyl hydrolase (GDPMH) is an unusual Nudix family member, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of GDP-alpha-D-mannose to GDP and the beta-sugar by nucleophilic substitution at carbon rather than at phosphorus (Legler, P. M., Massiah, M. A., Bessman, M. J., and Mildvan, A. S. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 8603-8608). Using the structure and mechanism of MutT, the prototypical Nudix enzyme as a guide, we detected six catalytic residues of GDPMH, three of which were unique to GDPMH, by the kinetic and structural effects of site-specific mutations. Glu-70 (corresponding to Glu-57 in MutT) provides a ligand to the essential divalent cation on the basis of the effects of the E70Q mutation which decreased kcat 10(2.2)-fold, increased the dissociation constant of Mn2+ from the ternary E-Mn2+-GDP complex 3-fold, increased the K(m)Mg2+ 20-fold, and decreased the paramagnetic effect of Mn2+ on 1/T1 of water protons, indicating a change in the coordination sphere of Mn2+. In the E70Q mutant, Gln-70 was shown to be very near the active site metal ion by large paramagnetic effects of Mn2+ on its side chain -NH2 group. With wild-type GDPMH, the effect of pH on log(kcat/K(m)GDPmann) at 37 degrees C showed an ascending limb of unit slope, followed by a plateau yielding a pK(a) of 6.4, which increased to 6.7 +/- 0.1 in the pH dependence of log(kcat). The general base catalyst was identified as a neutral His residue by the DeltaH(ionization) = 7.0 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, by the increase in pK(a) with ionic strength, and by mutation of each of the four histidine residues of GDPMH to Gln. Only the H124Q mutant showed the loss of the ascending limb in the pH versus log(kcat) rate profile, which was replaced by a weak dependence of rate on hydroxide concentration, as well as an overall 10(3.4)-fold decrease in kcat, indicating His-124 to be the general base, unlike MutT, which uses Glu-53 in this role. The H88Q mutant showed a 10(2.3)-fold decrease in kcat, a 4.4-fold increase in K

  20. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  1. The interplay of fold mechanisms and basement weaknesses at the transition between Laramide basement-involved arches, north-central Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Thomas G.; Erslev, Eric A.

    2009-09-01

    Horizontally-shortened, basement-involved foreland orogens commonly exhibit anastomosing networks of bifurcating basement highs (here called arches) whose structural culminations are linked by complex transition zones of diversely-oriented faults and folds. The 3D geometry and kinematics of the southern Beartooth arch transition zone of north-central Wyoming were studied to understand the fold mechanisms and control on basement-involved arches. Data from 1581 slickensided minor faults are consistent with a single regional shortening direction of 065°. Evidence for oblique-slip, vertical axis rotations and stress refraction at anomalously-oriented folds suggests formation over reactivated pre-existing weaknesses. Restorable cross-sections and 3D surfaces, constrained by surface, well, and seismic data, document blind, ENE-directed basement thrusting and associated thin-skinned backthrusting and folding along the Beartooth and Oregon Basin fault systems. Between these systems, the basement-cored Rattlesnake Mountain backthrust followed basement weaknesses and rotated a basement chip toward the basin before the ENE-directed Line Creek fault system broke through and connected the Beartooth and Oregon Basin fault systems. Slip was transferred at the terminations of the Rattlesnake Mountain fault block by pivoting to the north and tear faulting to the south. In summary, unidirectional Laramide compression and pre-existing basement weaknesses combined with fault-propagation and rotational fault-bend folding to create an irregular yet continuous basement arch transition.

  2. Structural origin of slow diffusion in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hoi Sung; Piana-Agostinetti, Stefano; Shaw, David E; Eaton, William A

    2015-09-25

    Experimental, theoretical, and computational studies of small proteins suggest that interresidue contacts not present in the folded structure play little or no role in the self-assembly mechanism. Non-native contacts can, however, influence folding kinetics by introducing additional local minima that slow diffusion over the global free-energy barrier between folded and unfolded states. Here, we combine single-molecule fluorescence with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to discover the structural origin for the slow diffusion that markedly decreases the folding rate for a designed α-helical protein. Our experimental determination of transition path times and our analysis of the simulations point to non-native salt bridges between helices as the source, which provides a quantitative glimpse of how specific intramolecular interactions influence protein folding rates by altering dynamics and not activation free energies.

  3. Identifying Kinetic Barriers to Mechanical Unfolding of the T. thermophila Ribozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoa, Bibiana; Dumont, Sophie; Liphardt, Jan; Smith, Steven B.; Tinoco, Ignacio; Bustamante, Carlos

    2003-03-01

    Mechanical unfolding trajectories for single molecules of the Tetrahymena thermophila ribozyme display eight intermediates corresponding to discrete kinetic barriers that oppose mechanical unfolding with lifetimes of seconds and rupture forces between 10 and 30 piconewtons. Barriers are magnesium dependent and correspond to known intra- and interdomain interactions. Several barrier structures are ``brittle,'' breakage requiring high forces but small (1 to 3 nanometers) deformations. Barrier crossing is stochastic, leading to variable unfolding paths. The response of complex RNA structures to locally applied mechanical forces may be analogous to the responses of RNA during translation, messenger RNA export from the nucleus, and viral replication.

  4. Kinetic mechanism of Nicotiana tabacum myosin-11 defines a new type of a processive motor.

    PubMed

    Diensthuber, Ralph P; Tominaga, Motoki; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K; Orii, Hidefumi; Chizhov, Igor; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The 175-kDa myosin-11 from Nicotiana tabacum (Nt(175kDa)myosin-11) is exceptional in its mechanical activity as it is the fastest known processive actin-based motor, moving 10 times faster than the structurally related class 5 myosins. Although this ability might be essential for long-range organelle transport within larger plant cells, the kinetic features underlying the fast processive movement of Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 still remain unexplored. To address this, we generated a single-headed motor domain construct and carried out a detailed kinetic analysis. The data demonstrate that Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 is a high duty ratio motor, which remains associated with actin most of its enzymatic cycle. However, different from other processive myosins that establish a high duty ratio on the basis of a rate-limiting ADP-release step, Nt(175kDa)myosin-11 achieves a high duty ratio by a prolonged duration of the ATP-induced isomerization of the actin-bound states and ADP release kinetics, both of which in terms of the corresponding time constants approach the total ATPase cycle time. Molecular modeling predicts that variations in the charge distribution of the actin binding interface might contribute to the thermodynamic fine-tuning of the kinetics of this myosin. Our study unravels a new type of a high duty ratio motor and provides important insights into the molecular mechanism of processive movement of higher plant myosins. PMID:25326536

  5. Interplay of Protein Binding Interactions, DNA Mechanics, and Entropy in DNA Looping Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Peter J; Chen, Yi-Ju; Phillips, Rob; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    DNA looping plays a key role in many fundamental biological processes, including gene regulation, recombination, and chromosomal organization. The looping of DNA is often mediated by proteins whose structural features and physical interactions can alter the length scale at which the looping occurs. Looping and unlooping processes are controlled by thermodynamic contributions associated with mechanical deformation of the DNA strand and entropy arising from thermal fluctuations of the conformation. To determine how these confounding effects influence DNA looping and unlooping kinetics, we present a theoretical model that incorporates the role of the protein interactions, DNA mechanics, and conformational entropy. We show that for shorter DNA strands the interaction distance affects the transition state, resulting in a complex relationship between the looped and unlooped state lifetimes and the physical properties of the looped DNA. We explore the range of behaviors that arise with varying interaction distance and DNA length. These results demonstrate how DNA deformation and entropy dictate the scaling of the looping and unlooping kinetics versus the J-factor, establishing the connection between kinetic and equilibrium behaviors. Our results show how the twist-and-bend elasticity of the DNA chain modulates the kinetics and how the influence of the interaction distance fades away at intermediate to longer chain lengths, in agreement with previous scaling predictions.

  6. Interplay of Protein Binding Interactions, DNA Mechanics, and Entropy in DNA Looping Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Peter J.; Chen, Yi-Ju; Phillips, Rob; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA looping plays a key role in many fundamental biological processes, including gene regulation, recombination, and chromosomal organization. The looping of DNA is often mediated by proteins whose structural features and physical interactions can alter the length scale at which the looping occurs. Looping and unlooping processes are controlled by thermodynamic contributions associated with mechanical deformation of the DNA strand and entropy arising from thermal fluctuations of the conformation. To determine how these confounding effects influence DNA looping and unlooping kinetics, we present a theoretical model that incorporates the role of the protein interactions, DNA mechanics, and conformational entropy. We show that for shorter DNA strands the interaction distance affects the transition state, resulting in a complex relationship between the looped and unlooped state lifetimes and the physical properties of the looped DNA. We explore the range of behaviors that arise with varying interaction distance and DNA length. These results demonstrate how DNA deformation and entropy dictate the scaling of the looping and unlooping kinetics versus the J-factor, establishing the connection between kinetic and equilibrium behaviors. Our results show how the twist-and-bend elasticity of the DNA chain modulates the kinetics and how the influence of the interaction distance fades away at intermediate to longer chain lengths, in agreement with previous scaling predictions. PMID:26244743

  7. A hybrid MD-kMC algorithm for folding proteins in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel Karl; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2014-04-14

    We present a novel hybrid MD-kMC algorithm that is capable of efficiently folding proteins in explicit solvent. We apply this algorithm to the folding of a small protein, Trp-Cage. Different kMC move sets that capture different possible rate limiting steps are implemented. The first uses secondary structure formation as a relevant rate event (a combination of dihedral rotations and hydrogen-bonding formation and breakage). The second uses tertiary structure formation events through formation of contacts via translational moves. Both methods fold the protein, but via different mechanisms and with different folding kinetics. The first method leads to folding via a structured helical state, with kinetics fit by a single exponential. The second method leads to folding via a collapsed loop, with kinetics poorly fit by single or double exponentials. In both cases, folding times are faster than experimentally reported values, The secondary and tertiary move sets are integrated in a third MD-kMC implementation, which now leads to folding of the protein via both pathways, with single and double-exponential fits to the rates, and to folding rates in good agreement with experimental values. The competition between secondary and tertiary structure leads to a longer search for the helix-rich intermediate in the case of the first pathway, and to the emergence of a kinetically trapped long-lived molten-globule collapsed state in the case of the second pathway. The algorithm presented not only captures experimentally observed folding intermediates and kinetics, but yields insights into the relative roles of local and global interactions in determining folding mechanisms and rates. PMID:24499973

  8. The Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of the Vibrio cholerae Sodium-dependent NADH Dehydrogenase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tuz, Karina; Mezic, Katherine G.; Xu, Tianhao; Barquera, Blanca; Juárez, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent NADH dehydrogenase (Na+-NQR) is the main ion transporter in Vibrio cholerae. Its activity is linked to the operation of the respiratory chain and is essential for the development of the pathogenic phenotype. Previous studies have described different aspects of the enzyme, including the electron transfer pathways, sodium pumping structures, cofactor and subunit composition, among others. However, the mechanism of the enzyme remains to be completely elucidated. In this work, we have studied the kinetic mechanism of Na+-NQR with the use of steady state kinetics and stopped flow analysis. Na+-NQR follows a hexa-uni ping-pong mechanism, in which NADH acts as the first substrate, reacts with the enzyme, and the oxidized NAD leaves the catalytic site. In this conformation, the enzyme is able to capture two sodium ions and transport them to the external side of the membrane. In the last step, ubiquinone is bound and reduced, and ubiquinol is released. Our data also demonstrate that the catalytic cycle involves two redox states, the three- and five-electron reduced forms. A model that gathers all available information is proposed to explain the kinetic mechanism of Na+-NQR. This model provides a background to understand the current structural and functional information. PMID:26004776

  9. An instrument for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay curves at picosecond resolution designed for ``double kinetics'' experiments: Application to fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer study of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishay, Eldad Ben; Hazan, Gershon; Rahamim, Gil; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2012-08-01

    The information obtained by studying fluorescence decay of labeled biopolymers is a major resource for understanding the dynamics of their conformations and interactions. The lifetime of the excited states of probes attached to macromolecules is in the nanosecond time regime, and hence, a series of snapshot decay curves of such probes might - in principle - yield details of fast changes of ensembles of labeled molecules down to sub-microsecond time resolution. Hence, a major current challenge is the development of instruments for the low noise detection of fluorescence decay curves within the shortest possible time intervals. Here, we report the development of an instrument, picosecond double kinetics apparatus, that enables recording of multiple fluorescence decay curves with picosecond excitation pulses over wide spectral range during microsecond data collection for each curve. The design is based on recording and averaging multiphoton pulses of fluorescence decay using a fast 13 GHz oscilloscope during microsecond time intervals at selected time points over the course of a chemical reaction or conformational transition. We tested this instrument in a double kinetics experiment using reference probes (N-acetyl-tryptophanamide). Very low stochastic noise level was attained, and reliable multi-parameter analysis such as derivation of distance distributions from time resolved FRET (fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer) measurements was achieved. The advantage of the pulse recording and averaging approach used here relative to double kinetics methods based on the established time correlated single photon counting method, is that in the pulse recording approach, averaging of substantially fewer kinetic experiments is sufficient for obtaining the data. This results in a major reduction in the consumption of labeled samples, which in many cases, enables the performance of important experiments that were not previously feasible.

  10. Single-Molecule Folding Mechanisms of the apo- and Mg2+-Bound States of Human Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Mohsin M.; Heidarsson, Pétur O.; Otazo, Mariela R.; Mossa, Alessandro; Kragelund, Birthe B.; Cecconi, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is the primordial member of a family of proteins responsible primarily for sensing changes in neuronal Ca2+ concentration. NCS-1 is a multispecific protein interacting with a number of binding partners in both calcium-dependent and independent manners, and acting in a variety of cellular processes in which it has been linked to a number of disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite extensive studies on the Ca2+-activated state of NCS proteins, little is known about the conformational dynamics of the Mg2+-bound and apo states, both of which are populated, at least transiently, at resting Ca2+ conditions. Here, we used optical tweezers to study the folding behavior of individual NCS-1 molecules in the presence of Mg2+ and in the absence of divalent ions. Under tension, the Mg2+-bound state of NCS-1 unfolds and refolds in a three-state process by populating one intermediate state consisting of a folded C-domain and an unfolded N-domain. The interconversion at equilibrium between the different molecular states populated by NCS-1 was monitored in real time through constant-force measurements and the energy landscapes underlying the observed transitions were reconstructed through hidden Markov model analysis. Unlike what has been observed with the Ca2+-bound state, the presence of Mg2+ allows both the N- and C-domain to fold through all-or-none transitions with similar refolding rates. In the absence of divalent ions, NCS-1 unfolds and refolds reversibly in a two-state reaction involving only the C-domain, whereas the N-domain has no detectable transitions. Overall, the results allowed us to trace the progression of NCS-1 folding along its energy landscapes and provided a solid platform for understanding the conformational dynamics of similar EF-hand proteins. PMID:26153708

  11. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  12. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  13. Kinetic mechanisms of inhibitor binding: relevance to the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, S; Oulianova, N; Berteloot, A

    1999-01-01

    Although phlorizin inhibition of Na+-glucose cotransport occurs within a few seconds, 3H-phlorizin binding to the sodium-coupled glucose transport protein(s) requires several minutes to reach equilibrium (the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm). Using kinetic models of arbitrary dimension that can be reduced to a two-state diagram according to Cha's formalism, we show that three basic mechanisms of inhibitor binding can be identified whereby the inhibitor binding step either (A) represents, (B) precedes, or (C) follows the rate-limiting step in a binding reaction. We demonstrate that each of mechanisms A-C is associated with a set of unique kinetic properties, and that the time scale over which one may expect to observe mechanism C is conditioned by the turnover number of the catalytic cycle. In contrast, mechanisms A and B may be relevant to either fast-acting or slow-binding inhibitors. However, slow-binding inhibition according to mechanism A may not be compatible with a fast-acting behavior on the steady-state time scale of a few seconds. We conclude that the recruitment hypothesis (mechanism C) cannot account for slow phlorizin binding to the sodium-coupled glucose transport protein(s), and that mechanism B is the only alternative that may explain the fast-acting slow-binding paradigm. PMID:10388748

  14. Quantifying the allosteric properties of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase: determination of thermodynamic linked-function parameters in an ordered kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Braxton, B L; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M; Reinhart, G D

    1992-03-01

    The effects of the allosteric ligands UMP, IMP, and ornithine on the partial reactions catalyzed by Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase have been examined. Both of these reactions, a HCO3(-)-dependent ATP synthesis reaction and a carbamyl phosphate-dependent ATP synthesis reaction, follow bimolecular ordered sequential kinetic mechanisms. In the ATPase reaction, MgATP binds before HCO3- as established previously for the overall reaction catalyzed by carbamyl phosphate synthetase [Raushel, F. M., Anderson, P. M., & Villafranca, J. J. (1978) Biochemistry 17, 5587-5591]. The initial velocity kinetics for the ATP synthesis reaction indicate that MgADP binds before carbamyl phosphate in an equilibrium ordered mechanism except in the presence of ornithine. Determination of true thermodynamic linked-function parameters describing the impact of allosteric ligands on the binding interactions of the first substrate to bind in an ordered mechanism requires experiments to be performed in which both substrates are varied even if only one is apparently affected by the allosteric ligands. In so doing, we have found that IMP has little effect on the overall reaction of either of these two partial reactions. UMP and ornithine, which have a pronounced effect on the apparent Km for MgATP in the overall reaction, both substantially change the thermodynamic dissociation constant for MgADP from the binary E-MgADP complex, Kia, in the ATP synthesis reaction, with UMP increasing Kia 15-fold and ornithine decreasing Kia by 18-fold. By contrast, only UMP substantially affects the Kia for MgATP in the ATPase reaction, increasing it by 5-fold.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1531767

  15. Exploring one-state downhill protein folding in single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianwei; Campos, Luis A.; Cerminara, Michele; Wang, Xiang; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; English, Douglas S.; Muñoz, Victor

    2012-01-01

    A one-state downhill protein folding process is barrierless at all conditions, resulting in gradual melting of native structure that permits resolving folding mechanisms step-by-step at atomic resolution. Experimental studies of one-state downhill folding have typically focused on the thermal denaturation of proteins that fold near the speed limit (ca. 106 s-1) at their unfolding temperature, thus being several orders of magnitude too fast for current single-molecule methods, such as single-molecule FRET. An important open question is whether one-state downhill folding kinetics can be slowed down to make them accessible to single-molecule approaches without turning the protein into a conventional activated folder. Here we address this question on the small helical protein BBL, a paradigm of one-state downhill thermal (un)folding. We decreased 200-fold the BBL folding-unfolding rate by combining chemical denaturation and low temperature, and carried out free-diffusion single-molecule FRET experiments with 50-μs resolution and maximal photoprotection using a recently developed Trolox-cysteamine cocktail. These experiments revealed a single conformational ensemble at all denaturing conditions. The chemical unfolding of BBL was then manifested by the gradual change of this unique ensemble, which shifts from high to low FRET efficiency and becomes broader at increasing denaturant. Furthermore, using detailed quantitative analysis, we could rule out the possibility that the BBL single-molecule data are produced by partly overlapping folded and unfolded peaks. Thus, our results demonstrate the one-state downhill folding regime at the single-molecule level and highlight that this folding scenario is not necessarily associated with ultrafast kinetics. PMID:22184219

  16. Kinetics of small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells measured with mechanical amplification

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yan; Shan, Xiaonan; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Measuring small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells is critical for understanding many cellular processes and for screening drugs. However, developing such a capability has been a difficult challenge. We show that molecular interactions with membrane proteins induce a mechanical deformation in the cellular membrane, and real-time monitoring of the deformation with subnanometer resolution allows quantitative analysis of small molecule–membrane protein interaction kinetics in single cells. This new strategy provides mechanical amplification of small binding signals, making it possible to detect small molecule interactions with membrane proteins. This capability, together with spatial resolution, also allows the study of the heterogeneous nature of cells by analyzing the interaction kinetics variability between different cells and between different regions of a single cell. PMID:26601298

  17. Darkening mechanism and kinetics of humification process in catechol-Maillard system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingchao; Yue, Dongbei; Ma, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Humic acids, products of humification process, are capable of interacting with contaminants and can be applied to environmental remediation. Browning mechanisms of humification is critical to understand and further control the process. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of abiotic humification by tracking the fate of the precursors in systems containing glucose, glycine, and various CT concentrations, which were promoted by MnO2. Results show that the N-containing organic molecules significantly contributed in controlling the darkening effect. Increasing CT promoted the formation of Fulvic-like acids (FLAs) and Humic-like acids (HLAs). The entire reaction could be divided into two steps following pseudo-second-order kinetics equation and pseudo-zero-order kinetics equation. Moreover, increasing CT contributed to the increase of the degree of unsaturation in HLAs. PMID:25770693

  18. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate.

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-21

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines.

  19. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of biodiesel fuels blend surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2010-05-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were developed and used to study the oxidation of two large unsaturated esters: methyl-5-decenoate and methyl-9-decenoate. These models were built from a previous methyl decanoate mechanism and were compared with rapeseed oil methyl esters oxidation experiments in a jet-stirred reactor. A comparative study of the reactivity of these three oxygenated compounds was performed and the differences in the distribution of the products of the reaction were highlighted showing the influence of the presence and the position of a double bond in the chain. Blend surrogates, containing methyl decanoate, methyl-5-decenoate, methyl-9-decenoate and n-alkanes, were tested against rapeseed oil methyl esters and methyl palmitate/n-decane experiments. These surrogate models are realistic kinetic tools allowing the study of the combustion of biodiesel fuels in diesel and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. (author)

  20. Tungsten solution kinetics and amorphization of nickel in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aning, A. O.; Wang, Z.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of solution of W, and the subsequent amorphization of Ni, in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys has been investigated. As W is a highly abrasive material in the energy intensive devices used for mechanical alloying, we studied the above reactions in different mills. One used hardened steel balls as the grinding media, and the other Al2O3. Abrasion is common to both mills, but Fe wear debris from the hardened steel enters into solution in the Ni rich phases whereas Al2O3 debris is present as small dispersoids. The kinetics of W solution and those of subsequent amorphization do not appear strongly affected by the Fe in solution or the Al2O3 dispersoid. Tungsten dissolves in crystalline Ni in amounts in excess of the equilibrium solubility during alloying. Amorphization of the Ni phase occurs if the W content in this phase exceeds ca. 28 at. pct.

  1. Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  3. The kinetic mechanism of wild-type and mutant mouse dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Thillet, J; Adams, J A; Benkovic, S J

    1990-05-29

    A kinetic mechanism is presented for mouse dihydrofolate reductase that predicts all the steady-state parameters and full time-course kinetics. This mechanism was derived from association and dissociation rate constants and pre-steady-state transients by using stopped-flow fluorescence and absorbance measurements. The major features of this kinetic mechanism are as follows: (1) the two native enzyme conformers, E1 and E2, bind ligands with varying affinities although only one conformer, E1, can support catalysis in the forward direction, (2) tetrahydrofolate dissociation is the rate-limiting step under steady-state turnover at low pH, and (3) the pH-independent rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate is fast (khyd = 9000 s-1) and favorable (Keq = 100). The overall mechanism is similar in form to the Escherichia coli kinetic scheme (Fierke et al., 1987), although several differences are observed: (1) substrates and products predominantly bind the same form of the E. coli enzyme, and (2) the hydride transfer rate from NADPH to either folate or dihydrofolate is considerably faster for the mouse enzyme. The role of Glu-30 (Asp-27 in E. coli) in mouse DHFR has also been examined by using site-directed mutagenesis as a potential source of these differences. While aspartic acid is strictly conserved in all bacterial DHFRs, glutamic acid is conserved in all known eucaryotes. The two major effects of substituting Asp for Glu-30 in the mouse enzyme are (1) a decreased rate of folate reduction and (2) an increased rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Isotope exchange at equilibrium indicates a steady state ordered kinetic mechanism for human sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Tyapochkin, Eduard; Cook, Paul F; Chen, Guangping

    2008-11-11

    Cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT)-catalyzed sulfation regulates biosignaling molecular biological activities and detoxifies hydroxyl-containing xenobiotics. The universal sulfuryl group donor for SULTcatalyzed sulfation is adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). The reaction products are a sulfated product and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate (PAP). Although the kinetics has been reported since the 1980s,SULT-catalyzed reaction mechanisms remain unclear. Human SULT1A1 catalyzes the sulfation of xenobiotic phenols and has very broad substrate specificity. It has been recognized as one of the most important phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding the kinetic mechanism of this isoform is important in understanding drug metabolism and xenobiotic detoxification. In this report, we investigated the SULT1A1-catalyzed phenol sulfation mechanism. The SULT1A1-catalyzed reaction was brought to equilibrium by varying substrate (1-naphthol) and PAPS initial concentrations. Equilibrium constants were determined. Two isotopic exchanges at equilibrium ([14C]1-naphthol <=>[14C]1-naphthyl sulfate and[35S]PAPS<=>[35S]1-naphthyl sulfate) were conducted. First-order kinetics, observed for all the is otopic exchange reactions studied over the entire time scale that was monitored, indicates that the system was truly at equilibrium prior to addition of an isotopic pulse. Complete suppression of the 35S isotopic exchange rate was observed with an increase in the levels of 1-naphthol and 1-naphthyl sulfate in a constant ratio,while no suppression of the 14C exchange rate was observed with an increase in the levels of PAPS and PAP in a constant ratio. Data are consistent with a steady state ordered kinetic mechanism with PAPS and PAP binding to the free enzyme.

  5. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Betti, R.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Bellei, C.; Amendt, P.; Landen, O.; Rygg, J. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Wilks, S.; Greenwood, A.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-05-19

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or ''exploding pushers,'' generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D3He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure 3He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important in the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations

  6. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; et al

    2014-05-19

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or ''exploding pushers,'' generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D3He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure 3He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important inmore » the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations« less

  7. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; et al

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore » arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  8. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung -Hyun

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  9. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  10. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites. PMID:25562780

  11. Mechanism of Folding and Activation of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P).

    PubMed

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Cendron, Laura; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2016-01-29

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P) is implicated in lipid homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, and lysosome biogenesis. The protease is further hijacked by highly pathogenic emerging viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P requires removal of an N-terminal prodomain, by a multistep process, generating the mature enzyme. Here, we uncover a modular structure of the human SKI-1/S1P prodomain and define its function in folding and activation. We provide evidence that the N-terminal AB fragment of the prodomain represents an autonomous structural and functional unit that is necessary and sufficient for folding and partial activation. In contrast, the C-terminal BC fragment lacks a defined structure but is crucial for autoprocessing and full catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sequence of the AB domain is highly conserved, whereas the BC fragment shows considerable variation and seems even absent in some species. Notably, SKI-1/S1P of arthropods, like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, contains a shorter prodomain comprised of full-length AB and truncated BC regions. Swapping the prodomain fragments between fly and human resulted in a fully mature and active SKI-1/S1P chimera. Our study suggests that primordial SKI-1/S1P likely contained a simpler prodomain consisting of the highly conserved AB fragment that represents an independent folding unit. The BC region appears as a later evolutionary acquisition, possibly allowing more subtle fine-tuning of the maturation process.

  12. Thermal dehydration of monohydrocalcite: overall kinetics and physico-geometrical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomoyasu; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2011-09-29

    Monohydrocalcite (CaCO(3)·H(2)O: MHC) is similar in composition and synthetic conditions to hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which is focused recently as a key intermediate compound of biomineralization and biomimetic mineralization of calcium carbonate polymorphs. Detailed comparisons of the physicochemical property and reactivity of those hydrated calcium carbonates are required for obtaining fundamental information on the relevancy of those compounds in the mineralization processes. In the present study, kinetics of the thermal dehydration of spherical particles of crystalline MHC was investigated in view of physico-geometrical mechanism. The reaction process was traced systematically by means of thermogravimetry under three different modes of temperature program. A distinguished induction period for the thermal dehydration and cracking of the surface product layer on the way of the established reaction were identified as the characteristic events of the reaction. By interpreting the kinetic results in association with the morphological changes of the reactant particles during the course of reaction, it was revealed that nucleation and crystal growth of calcite regulate the overall kinetics of the thermal dehydration of MHC. In comparison with the thermal dehydration of hydrated ACC, which produces anhydrous ACC as the solid product, the kinetic characteristics of the thermal dehydration of MHC were discussed from the viewpoint of physico-geometry of the component processes.

  13. Kinetic, Thermodynamic, and Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Phosphopantetheine Adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, Thomas J.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2012-05-29

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine (PhP) to form dephosphocoenzyme A. This reaction sits at the branch point between the de novo pathway and the salvage pathway, and has been shown to be a rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of CoA. Importantly, bacterial and mammalian PPATs share little sequence homology, making the enzyme a potential target for antibiotic development. A series of steady-state kinetic, product inhibition, and direct binding studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) was conducted and suggests that the enzyme utilizes a nonrapid-equilibrium random bi-bi mechanism. The kinetic response of MtPPAT to the binding of ATP was observed to be sigmoidal under fixed PhP concentrations, but substrate inhibition was observed at high PhP concentrations under subsaturating ATP concentrations, suggesting a preferred pathway to ternary complex formation. Negative cooperativity in the kinetic response of MtPPAT to PhP binding was observed under certain conditions and confirmed thermodynamically by isothermal titration calorimetry, suggesting the formation of an asymmetric quaternary structure during sequential ligation of substrates. Asymmetry in binding was also observed in isothermal titration calorimetry experiments with dephosphocoenzyme A and CoA. X-ray structures of MtPPAT in complex with PhP and the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue adenosine-5'-[({alpha},{beta})-methyleno]triphosphate were solved to 1.57 {angstrom} and 2.68 {angstrom}, respectively. These crystal structures reveal small conformational changes in enzyme structure upon ligand binding, which may play a role in the nonrapid-equilibrium mechanism. We suggest that the proposed kinetic mechanism and asymmetric character in MtPPAT ligand binding may provide a means of reaction and pathway regulation in addition to that of the

  14. A Novel ‘Roll-and-Slide’ Mechanism of DNA Folding in Chromatin. Implications for Nucleosome Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Colasanti, Andrew V.; McCandlish, David; Olson, Wilma K.; Zhurkin, Victor B.

    2007-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes encode the folding of DNA into nucleosomes and how this intrinsic organization of chromatin guides biological function are questions of wide interest. The physical basis of nucleosome positioning lies in the sequence-dependent propensity of DNA to adopt the tightly bent configuration imposed by the binding of the histone proteins. Traditionally, only DNA bending and twisting deformations are considered, while the effects of the lateral displacements of adjacent base pairs are neglected. We demonstrate, however, that these displacements play a much more important structural role than ever imagined. Specifically, the lateral Slide deformations observed at sites of local anisotropic bending of DNA define its superhelical trajectory in chromatin. Furthermore, the computed cost of deforming DNA on the nucleosome is sequence specific: in optimally positioned sequences the most easily deformed base-pair steps (CA:TG and TA) occur at sites of large positive Slide and negative Roll (where the DNA bends into the minor groove). These conclusions rest upon a treatment of DNA that goes beyond the conventional ribbon model, incorporating all essential degrees of freedom of ‘real’ duplexes in the estimation of DNA deformation energies. Indeed, only after lateral Slide displacements are considered, are we able to account for the sequence-specific folding of DNA found in nucleosome structures. The close correspondence between the predicted and observed nucleosome locations demonstrates the potential advantage of our 'structural' approach in the computer mapping of nucleosome positioning. PMID:17585938

  15. Solvent–amino acid interaction energies in three-dimensional-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of a model 27-mer protein: Folding thermodynamics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Kai; Prausnitz, John M.; Radke, Clayton J.

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid residue–solvent interactions are required for lattice Monte Carlo simulations of model proteins in water. In this study, we propose an interaction-energy scale that is based on the interaction scale by Miyazawa and Jernigan. It permits systematic variation of the amino acid–solvent interactions by introducing a contrast parameter for the hydrophobicity, Cs, and a mean attraction parameter for the amino acids, ω. Changes in the interaction energies strongly affect many protein properties. We present an optimized energy parameter set for best representing realistic behavior typical for many proteins (fast folding and high cooperativity for single chains). Our optimal parameters feature a much weaker hydrophobicity contrast and mean attraction than does the original interaction scale. The proposed interaction scale is designed for calculating the behavior of proteins in bulk and at interfaces as a function of solvent characteristics, as well as protein size and sequence. PMID:14739322

  16. Evolutionary optimization of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Debès, Cédric; Wang, Minglei; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, [Formula: see text]3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last [Formula: see text]1.5 billion years that began during the "big bang" of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions. PMID:23341762

  17. Rehabilitation of faulty kinetic determinations and misassigned glycoside hydrolase family of retaining mechanism β-xylosidases.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Vermillion, Karl E; Grigorescu, Arabela A; Braker, Jay D

    2013-09-15

    We obtained Cx1 from a commercial supplier, whose catalog listed it as a β-xylosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 43. NMR experiments indicate retention of anomeric configuration in its reaction stereochemistry, opposing the assignment of GH43, which follows an inverting mechanism. Partial protein sequencing indicates Cx1 is similar to but not identical to β-xylosidases of GH52, including Q09LZ0, that have retaining mechanisms. Q09LZ0 β-xylosidase had been characterized biochemically in kinetic reactions that contained Tris. We overproduced Q09LZ0 and demonstrated that Tris is a competitive inhibitor of the β-xylosidase. Also, the previous work used grossly incorrect extinction coefficients for product 4-nitrophenol. We redetermined kinetic parameters using reactions that omitted Tris and using correct extinction coefficients for 4-nitrophenol. Cx1 and Q09LZ0 β-xylosidases were thus shown to possess similar kinetic properties when acting on 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside and xylobiose. kcat pH profiles of Cx1 and Q09LZ0 acting on 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside and xylobiose have patterns containing two rate increases with increasing acidity, not reported before for glycoside hydrolases. The dexylosylation step of 4-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside hydrolysis mediated by Q09LZ0 is not rate determining for kcat(4NPX).

  18. Structural and kinetic insights into the mechanism of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-08-01

    The crystal structure of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from K. pneumoniae and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the native enzyme as well as several mutants provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme and the possible roles of the active-site residues. The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin has recently been demonstrated to proceed via two unstable intermediates and requires three separate enzymatic reactions. The second step of this reaction, the conversion of 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline, is catalyzed by HIU hydrolase (HIUH). The high-resolution crystal structure of HIUH from the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpHIUH) has been determined. KpHIUH is a homotetrameric protein that, based on sequence and structural similarity, belongs to the transthyretin-related protein family. In addition, the steady-state kinetic parameters for this enzyme and four active-site mutants have been measured. These data provide valuable insight into the functional roles of the active-site residues. Based upon the structural and kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed for the KpHIUH-catalyzed reaction.

  19. Mechanical disassembly of single virus particles reveals kinetic intermediates predicted by theory.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrillo, Pablo J P; de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2012-06-01

    New experimental approaches are required to detect the elusive transient intermediates predicted by simulations of virus assembly or disassembly. Here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to mechanically induce partial disassembly of single icosahedral T=1 capsids and virions of the minute virus of mice. The kinetic intermediates formed were imaged by AFM. The results revealed that induced disassembly of single minute-virus-of-mice particles is frequently initiated by loss of one of the 20 equivalent capsomers (trimers of capsid protein subunits) leading to a stable, nearly complete particle that does not readily lose further capsomers. With lower frequency, a fairly stable, three-fourths-complete capsid lacking one pentamer of capsomers and a free, stable pentamer were obtained. The intermediates most frequently identified (capsids missing one capsomer, capsids missing one pentamer of capsomers, and free pentamers of capsomers) had been predicted in theoretical studies of reversible capsid assembly based on thermodynamic-kinetic models, molecular dynamics, or oligomerization energies. We conclude that mechanical manipulation and imaging of simple virus particles by AFM can be used to experimentally identify kinetic intermediates predicted by simulations of assembly or disassembly.

  20. Modelling "reality" in tectonics: Simulation of the mechanical evolution of the Jura Mountains-Molasse Basin system, and routes to forward-inverse modelling of fold thrust belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, David; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate validation of any numerical model of any geological process comes when it can accurately forward model a case study from the geological record. However, as the example of the Jura-Molasse fold thrust belt demonstrates, geological information on even the most basic aspects of the present day state of such systems is highly incomplete and usually known only with large uncertainties. Fold thrust-belts are studied and understood by geologists in an iterative process of constructing their subsurface geometries and structures (folds, faults, bedding etc) based on limited subsurface information from boreholes, tunnels or seismic data where available, and surface information on outcrops of different layers and their dips. This data is usually processed through geometric models which involve conservation of line length of different beds over the length of an entire cross section. Constructing such sections is the art of cross section balancing. A balanced cross section can be easily restored to its pre-deformation state, assuming (usually) originally horizontal bedding to remove the effects of folding and faulting. Such a pre-deformation state can then form an initial condition for a forward mechanical model of the section. A mechanical model introduces new parameters into the system such as rock elasticity, cohesion, and frictional properties. However, a forward mechanical model can also potentially show the continuous evolution of a fold thrust belt, including dynamic quantities like stress. Moreover, a forward mechanical model, if correct in most aspects, should match in its final state, the present day geological cross section it is simulating. However, when attempting to achieve a match between geometric and mechanical models, it becomes clear that many more aspects of the geodynamic history of a fold thrust belt have to be taken into account. Erosion of the uppermost layers of an evolving thrust belt is the most obvious one of these. This can potentially

  1. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  2. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun -Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-26

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. Lastly, this study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.

  3. Mechano-chemical energy transduction in biological systems. The effect of mechanical stimulation on the polymerization of actin: a kinetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, A; Grazi, E

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation (forced circulation in narrow tubing) accelerates as much as 10-fold the rate of polymerization of actin. The increase in the rate is proportional to the intensity of the stimulation for flow rates between 0 and 3 cm/s. This supports the hypothesis that a statistical factor (the orientation of the flowing particles) is influenced by the flow. Comparison of the kinetics of the polymerization of resting and of mechanically stimulated actin solutions shows that both the nucleation and the elongation steps are accelerated. It is thus concluded that flow orients not only the oligomeric structures but also the actin monomers. The elongation reaction, also in the flow-stimulated samples, occurs always by the addition of ATP--G-actin (or ATP-containing oligomers) and not by the fusion of ADP-containing oligomeric structures. PMID:7138502

  4. Effect and kinetic mechanism of ultrasonic vibration on solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ripeng; Li, Xiaoqian; Chen, Pinghu; Li, Ruiqing; Zhang, Xue

    2014-07-01

    The work described in this paper dealt with the effect of ultrasonic vibration on the solidification of 7050 aluminum alloy. Two experiments were carried out through introducing ultrasound into the semi-continuous direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminum alloy and into alloy solidifying in a crucible, respectively. Results show that ultrasonic vibration can refine grains in the whole cross-section of a billet in the first experiment and is able to increase the cooling rate within the temperature range from 625 °C to 590 °C in the other one. The mechanism of particle resonance caused by ultrasonic vibration was illustrated on the basis of theoretical analysis of the kinetics and energy conversion during the solidification. It is demonstrated that the kinetic energy of resonant particles are mainly from the latent heat energy of solidification, which can shorten the cooling time, inhibit the crystal growth and then lead to the grain refinement.

  5. Structural and kinetic insights into the mechanism of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-07-19

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin has recently been demonstrated to proceed via two unstable intermediates and requires three separate enzymatic reactions. The second step of this reaction, the conversion of 5-hydroxyisourate (HIU) to 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline, is catalyzed by HIU hydrolase (HIUH). The high-resolution crystal structure of HIUH from the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpHIUH) has been determined. KpHIUH is a homotetrameric protein that, based on sequence and structural similarity, belongs to the transthyretin-related protein family. In addition, the steady-state kinetic parameters for this enzyme and four active-site mutants have been measured. These data provide valuable insight into the functional roles of the active-site residues. Based upon the structural and kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed for the KpHIUH-catalyzed reaction.

  6. Chemical reactions involved in penicillin allergy: kinetics and mechanism of penicillin aminolysis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, A; Yamana, T; Miyamoto, E; Kiya, E

    1975-08-01

    In view of the fundamental importance of the reaction of penicillins with amino groups of proteins to the penicillin allergy, the aminolysis of benzylpenicillin by various amines was kinetically investigated. The formation rate constants, kamide, of benzylpenicilloylamides were determined at 35 degrees, 45 degrees and 60 degrees (mu equals 0.5), and found to obey the general rate law: kamide equals k1[amine] + k2[amine H+] [amine] + k3[amine]2 + k4[amine]aoh. All of the amines exhibited the unassisted nucleophilic rate constant, k1. The relative importance of the other kinetic terms depends on the basicity and the chemical structure of amines. The reaction mechanism of penicillin aminolysis was discussed. Bronsted relations for k1, k2 and k3, except for hydrazines, were satisfactory.

  7. Proton-pumping mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase: a kinetic master-equation approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young C; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-04-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is an efficient energy transducer that reduces oxygen to water and converts the released chemical energy into an electrochemical membrane potential. As a true proton pump, cytochrome c oxidase translocates protons across the membrane against this potential. Based on a wealth of experiments and calculations, an increasingly detailed picture of the reaction intermediates in the redox cycle has emerged. However, the fundamental mechanism of proton pumping coupled to redox chemistry remains largely unresolved. Here we examine and extend a kinetic master-equation approach to gain insight into redox-coupled proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase. Basic principles of the cytochrome c oxidase proton pump emerge from an analysis of the simplest kinetic models that retain essential elements of the experimentally determined structure, energetics, and kinetics, and that satisfy fundamental physical principles. The master-equation models allow us to address the question of how pumping can be achieved in a system in which all reaction steps are reversible. Whereas proton pumping does not require the direct modulation of microscopic reaction barriers, such kinetic gating greatly increases the pumping efficiency. Further efficiency gains can be achieved by partially decoupling the proton uptake pathway from the active-site region. Such a mechanism is consistent with the proposed Glu valve, in which the side chain of a key glutamic acid shuttles between the D channel and the active-site region. We also show that the models predict only small proton leaks even in the absence of turnover. The design principles identified here for cytochrome c oxidase provide a blueprint for novel biology-inspired fuel cells, and the master-equation formulation should prove useful also for other molecular machines. . PMID:21946020

  8. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the -OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  9. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  10. Crystallization mechanism and kinetics of mayenite glass prepared by aerodynamic levitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jiao; Liu, Yan; Gu, Yanjing; Pan, Xiuhong; Zheng, Xiaojie; Wang, Wei; Yu, Huimei; Yu, Jianding

    2016-05-01

    The mayenite glass with a wide high-temperature stability (ΔT=131∘C) was innovatively synthesized by the aerodynamic levitation (ADL) containerless technique without conventional glass-forming addictives. The crystallization mechanism and kinetics of mayenite glass were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scaning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectra and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The crystallization mechanism study revealed that structure and morphology mainly evolved near the crystallization peak temperature by the networking process of isolated AlO4 tetrahedra units, resulting in the growth mechanism changing from “two-dimensional” to “three-dimensional”. Crystallization kinetics calculations based on the non-isothermal Matusita model indicated that the activation energy for the crystallization of mayenite glass was 844kJṡmol-1. The calculated growth morphology parameters (m and n) also confirmed the surface crystallization along with bulk crystallization mechanism for the mayenite glass. This present study supplied a thermal-physical understanding about the crystallization of mayenite glass, which could be further applied in the exploitation of glass/glass-ceramics in the CaO-Al2O3 binary system.

  11. Kinetic Isotope Effects Support the Twisted Amide Mechanism of Pin1 Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y.; Mullins, Ashley B.; Mason, Matthew D.; Xu, Guoyan G.; Mahoney, Brendan J.; Wang, Xingsheng; Peng, Jeffrey W.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2013-01-01

    The Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) catalyzes isomerization of pSer/pThr-Pro motifs in regulating the cell cycle. Peptide substrates, Ac–Phe–Phe–phosphoSer–Pro–Arg–p-nitroaniline, were synthesized in unlabeled form, and with deuterium labeled Ser-d3 and Pro-d7 amino acids. Kinetic data was collected as a function of Pin1 concentration to measure kinetic isotope effects (KIE) on catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The normal secondary (2°) KIE value measured for the Ser-d3 substrate (kH/kD = 1.6 ± 0.2) indicates that the serine carbonyl does not rehybridize from sp2 to sp3 in the rate-determining step, ruling out a nucleophilic addition mechanism. The normal 2° KIE can be explained by hyperconjugation between Ser α-C–H/D and C=O, and release of steric strain upon rotation of the amide bond from cis to syn-exo. The inverse 2° KIE value (kH/kD = 0.86 ± 0.08) measured for the Pro-d7 substrate indicates rehybridization of the prolyl nitrogen from sp2 to sp3 during the rate-limiting step of isomerization. No solvent kinetic isotope was measured by NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) (kH2O/kD2O = 0.92 ± 0.12), indicating little or no involvement of exchangeable protons in the mechanism. These results support the formation of a simple twisted-amide transition state as the mechanism for peptidyl prolyl isomerization catalyzed by Pin1. A model of the reaction mechanism is presented using crystal structures of Pin1 with ground state analogues and an inhibitor that resembles a twisted amide transition state. PMID:24116866

  12. Intermediates revealed in the kinetic mechanism for DNA unwinding by a monomeric helicase.

    PubMed

    Eoff, Robert L; Raney, Kevin D

    2006-03-01

    Helicases unwind dsDNA during replication, repair and recombination in an ATP-dependent reaction. The mechanism for helicase activity can be studied using oligonucleotide substrates to measure formation of single-stranded (ss) DNA from double-stranded (ds) DNA. This assay provides an 'all-or-nothing' readout because partially unwound intermediates are not detected. We have determined conditions under which an intermediate in the reaction cycle of Dda helicase can be detected by trapping a partially unwound substrate. The appearance of this intermediate supports a model in which each ssDNA product interacts with the helicase after unwinding has occurred. Kinetic analysis indicates that the intermediate appears during a slow step in the reaction cycle that is flanked by faster steps for unwinding. These observations demonstrate a complex mechanism containing nonuniform steps for a monomeric helicase. The potential biological significance of such a mechanism is discussed.

  13. Flexibility damps macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding dynamics: Application to the murine prion protein (121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the combined effects of protein flexibility and macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. It is found that the increase in stability and folding rate promoted by macromolecular crowding is damped for proteins with highly flexible native structures. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). It is found that the high flexibility of the native isoform of the murine prion protein (121-231) reduces the effects of macromolecular crowding on its folding dynamics. The relevance of these findings for the pathogenic mechanism are discussed.

  14. The Crystal Structure of Dehi Reveals a New A-Haloacid Dehalogenase Fold And Active Site Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidberger, J.W.; Wilce, J.A.; Weightman, A.J.; Whisstock, J.C.; Wilce, M.C.J.

    2009-05-27

    Haloacid dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from organic haloacids and are of interest for bioremediation and for their potential use in the synthesis of industrial chemicals. We present the crystal structure of the homodimer DehI from Pseudomonas putida strain PP3, the first structure of a group I {alpha}-haloacid dehalogenase that can process both L- and D-substrates. The structure shows that the DehI monomer consists of two domains of {approx}130 amino acids that have {approx}16% sequence identity yet adopt virtually identical and unique folds that form a pseudo-dimer. Analysis of the active site reveals the likely binding mode of both L- and D-substrates with respect to key catalytic residues. Asp189 is predicted to activate a water molecule for nucleophilic attack of the substrate chiral centre resulting in an inversion of configuration of either L- or D-substrates in contrast to D-only enzymes. These details will assist with future bioengineering of dehalogenases.

  15. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D’Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-07-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function.

  16. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D’Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function. PMID:27456546

  17. Kinetics and Mechanisms of γ‧ Reprecipitation in a Ni-based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, F.; Shahriari, D.; Jahazi, M.; Cormier, J.; Devaux, A.

    2016-06-01

    The reprecipitation mechanisms and kinetics of γ‧ particles during cooling from supersolvus and subsolvus temperatures were studied in AD730TM Ni-based superalloy using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The evolution in the morphology and distribution of reprecipitated γ‧ particles was investigated using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). Depending on the cooling rate, γ‧ particles showed multi or monomodal distribution. The irregularity growth characteristics observed at lower cooling rates were analyzed in the context of Mullins and Sekerka theory, and allowed the determination of a critical size of γ‧ particles above which morphological instability appears. Precipitation kinetics parameters were determined using a non-isothermal JMA model and DTA data. The Avrami exponent was determined to be in the 1.5–2.3 range, suggesting spherical or irregular growth. A methodology was developed to take into account the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient k(T) in the non-isothermal JMA equation. In that regard, a function for k(T) was developed. Based on the results obtained, reprecipitation kinetics models for low and high cooling rates are proposed to quantify and predict the volume fraction of reprecipitated γ‧ particles during the cooling process.

  18. Molecular-Level Investigations of Nucleation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Formation of Environmental Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Shin Jun; Glenn A. Waychunas

    2007-04-19

    Environmental nanoparticles are often poorly-crystalline or metastable structures, whose kinetics of formation and growth are poorly understood. Further, the sorption or growth of nanoparticles on mineral surfaces may control the mineral surface's reactivity and modify its ability to influence contaminant transport. Due to the characteristic length scale, a holistic understanding of the nucleation mechanisms and kinetics of nanoparticle formation on mineral surfaces is difficult to achieve with traditional methodology. In this work, our intent is to determine the molecular nature of nucleation on surfaces, the kinetics of surface nucleation and growth, and the effect of crystal surface topology using new synchrotron-based techniques. We have approached these objectives by: (1) combining state-of-the-art crystal-truncation rod diffraction (CTR) and grazing incidence x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GIXAS) techniques to investigate the three-dimensional molecular-scale geometry of silicate monomer sorption on the r-plane of hematite; and (2) developing a new grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) setup at SSRL (0.08 nm{sup -1} < q < 8 nm{sup -1}) to explore the initial development of environmental nanoparticles on various mineral surfaces. This study also includes complementary techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), bulk SAXS, dynamic light scattering (DLS), XRD, and TEM.

  19. Photodegradation mechanism and reaction kinetics of recombinant human interferon-alpha2a.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyong-Ha; Lee, Yun Mi; Suh, Jung-Keun; Song, Nam Woong

    2007-02-01

    The photodegradation mechanism of recombinant human interferon-alpha2a (IFNalpha2a) has been investigated using absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, and fluorescence photobleaching kinetics measurements under various conditions. After photobleaching, the absorption profile of aromatic amino acid residues in IFNalpha2a was almost absent, and an absorption profile showing a monotonic increase toward short wavelengths was observed. According to the CD spectrum analysis, partial unfolding of IFNalpha2a was accompanied by a complete loss of fluorescence. This unfolding was attributed to tryptophan-mediated photoinduced disulfide bond cleavage. Photooxygenation and photoionization of tryptophan (Trp) residues followed by subsequent radical reactions were the main photodegradation pathways of IFNalpha2a. Photobleaching kinetics was faster in acidic solution (pH 2.5) than in neutral solution (pH 7.4). The variation of photobleaching kinetics seemed to be caused by the structural differences in IFNalpha2a according to the solution pH. The relationship between the protein conformation and photobleaching rate could be explained based on the competition between excited state energy transfer and the photoionization process in Trp residues. PMID:17277841

  20. Kinetics and Mechanisms of γ′ Reprecipitation in a Ni-based Superalloy

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, F.; Shahriari, D.; Jahazi, M.; Cormier, J.; Devaux, A.

    2016-01-01

    The reprecipitation mechanisms and kinetics of γ′ particles during cooling from supersolvus and subsolvus temperatures were studied in AD730TM Ni-based superalloy using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The evolution in the morphology and distribution of reprecipitated γ′ particles was investigated using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). Depending on the cooling rate, γ′ particles showed multi or monomodal distribution. The irregularity growth characteristics observed at lower cooling rates were analyzed in the context of Mullins and Sekerka theory, and allowed the determination of a critical size of γ′ particles above which morphological instability appears. Precipitation kinetics parameters were determined using a non-isothermal JMA model and DTA data. The Avrami exponent was determined to be in the 1.5–2.3 range, suggesting spherical or irregular growth. A methodology was developed to take into account the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient k(T) in the non-isothermal JMA equation. In that regard, a function for k(T) was developed. Based on the results obtained, reprecipitation kinetics models for low and high cooling rates are proposed to quantify and predict the volume fraction of reprecipitated γ′ particles during the cooling process. PMID:27338868

  1. Kinetics and Mechanisms of γ' Reprecipitation in a Ni-based Superalloy.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, F; Shahriari, D; Jahazi, M; Cormier, J; Devaux, A

    2016-01-01

    The reprecipitation mechanisms and kinetics of γ' particles during cooling from supersolvus and subsolvus temperatures were studied in AD730(TM) Ni-based superalloy using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The evolution in the morphology and distribution of reprecipitated γ' particles was investigated using Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM). Depending on the cooling rate, γ' particles showed multi or monomodal distribution. The irregularity growth characteristics observed at lower cooling rates were analyzed in the context of Mullins and Sekerka theory, and allowed the determination of a critical size of γ' particles above which morphological instability appears. Precipitation kinetics parameters were determined using a non-isothermal JMA model and DTA data. The Avrami exponent was determined to be in the 1.5-2.3 range, suggesting spherical or irregular growth. A methodology was developed to take into account the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient k(T) in the non-isothermal JMA equation. In that regard, a function for k(T) was developed. Based on the results obtained, reprecipitation kinetics models for low and high cooling rates are proposed to quantify and predict the volume fraction of reprecipitated γ' particles during the cooling process. PMID:27338868

  2. Glucose and fructose decomposition in subcritical and supercritical water: Detailed reaction pathway, mechanisms, and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kabyemela, B.M.; Adschiri, T.; Malaluan, R.M.; Arai, K.

    1999-08-01

    The authors are developing a new catalyst-free process of cellulose decomposition in supercritical water. In their initial study on the cellulose decomposition in supercritical water, the main products of cellulose decomposition were found to be oligomers of glucose (cellobiose, cellotriose, etc.) and glucose at short residence times (400 C, 25 MPa, 0.05 s). The kinetics of glucose at these conditions can be useful in understanding the reaction pathways of cellulose. Experiments were performed on the products of glucose decomposition at short residence times to elucidate the reaction pathways and evaluate kinetics of glucose and fructose decomposition in sub- and supercritical water. The conditions were a temperature of 300--400 C and pressure of 25--40 MPa for extremely short residence times between 0.02 and 2 s. The products of glucose decomposition were fructose, a product of isomerization, 1,6-anhydroglucose, a product of dehydration, and erythrose and glyceraldehyde, products of C-C bond cleavage. Fructose underwent reactions similar to glucose except that it did not form 1,6-anhydroglucose and isomerization to glucose is negligible. The mechanism for the products formed from C-C bond cleavage could be explained by reverse aldol condensation and the double-bond rule of the respective enediols formed during the Lobry de Bruyn Alberda van Ekenstein transformation. The differential equations resulting from the proposed pathways were fit to experimental results to obtain the kinetic rate constants.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal degradation of pentose- and hexose-based carbohydrate polymers.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Jamshed; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Massey, Shazma; Masih, Rashid

    2012-10-15

    This work aims at study of thermal degradation kinetics and mechanism of pentose- and hexose-based carbohydrate polymers isolated from Plantago ovata (PO), Salvia aegyptiaca (SA) and Ocimum basilicum (OB). The analysis was performed by isoconversional method. The materials exhibited mainly two-stage degradation. The weight loss at ambient-115°C characterized by low activation energy corresponds to loss of moisture. The kinetic triplets consisting of E, A and g(α) model of the materials were determined. The major degradation stage represents a loss of high boiling volatile components. This stage is exothermic in nature. Above 340°C complete degradation takes place leaving a residue of 10-15%. The master plots of g(α) function clearly differentiated the degradation mechanism of hexose-based OB and SA polymers and pentose-based PO polymer. The pentose-based carbohydrate polymer showed D(4) type and the hexose-based polymers showed A(4) type degradation mechanism.

  4. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cadmium Carbonate Heteroepitaxial Growth at the Calcite (101¯4) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10-14) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  5. Transient-State Kinetic Analysis of the RNA Polymerase I Nucleotide Incorporation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Appling, Francis D; Lucius, Aaron L; Schneider, David A

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotes express three or more multisubunit nuclear RNA polymerases (Pols) referred to as Pols I, II, and III, each of which synthesizes a specific subset of RNAs. Consistent with the diversity of their target genes, eukaryotic cells have evolved divergent cohorts of transcription factors and enzymatic properties for each RNA polymerase system. Over the years, many trans-acting factors that orchestrate transcription by the individual Pols have been described; however, little effort has been devoted to characterizing the molecular mechanisms of Pol I activity. To begin to address this gap in our understanding of eukaryotic gene expression, here we establish transient-state kinetic approaches to characterize the nucleotide incorporation mechanism of Pol I. We collected time courses for single turnover nucleotide incorporation reactions over a range of substrate ATP concentrations that provide information on both Pol I's nucleotide addition and nuclease activities. The data were analyzed by model-independent and model-dependent approaches, resulting in, to our knowledge, the first minimal model for the nucleotide addition pathway for Pol I. Using a grid searching approach we provide rigorous bounds on estimated values of the individual elementary rate constants within the proposed model. This work reports the most detailed analysis of Pol I mechanism to date. Furthermore, in addition to their use in transient state kinetic analyses, the computational approaches applied here are broadly applicable to global optimization problems. PMID:26636949

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal degradation of pentose- and hexose-based carbohydrate polymers.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Jamshed; Iqbal, Mohammad S; Massey, Shazma; Masih, Rashid

    2012-10-15

    This work aims at study of thermal degradation kinetics and mechanism of pentose- and hexose-based carbohydrate polymers isolated from Plantago ovata (PO), Salvia aegyptiaca (SA) and Ocimum basilicum (OB). The analysis was performed by isoconversional method. The materials exhibited mainly two-stage degradation. The weight loss at ambient-115°C characterized by low activation energy corresponds to loss of moisture. The kinetic triplets consisting of E, A and g(α) model of the materials were determined. The major degradation stage represents a loss of high boiling volatile components. This stage is exothermic in nature. Above 340°C complete degradation takes place leaving a residue of 10-15%. The master plots of g(α) function clearly differentiated the degradation mechanism of hexose-based OB and SA polymers and pentose-based PO polymer. The pentose-based carbohydrate polymer showed D(4) type and the hexose-based polymers showed A(4) type degradation mechanism. PMID:22939355

  7. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  8. Drug Release Kinetics and Transport Mechanisms of Non-degradable and Degradable Polymeric Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yao; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field The advancement in material design and engineering has led to the rapid development of novel materials with increasing complexity and functions. Both non-degradable and degradable polymers have found wide applications in the controlled delivery field. Studies on drug release kinetics provide important information into the function of material systems. To elucidate the detailed transport mechanism and the structure-function relationship of a material system, it is critical to bridge the gap between the macroscopic data and the transport behavior at the molecular level. Areas covered in this review The structure and function information of selected non-degradable and degradable polymers have been collected and summarized from literatures published after 1990s. The release kinetics of selected drug compounds from various material systems will be discussed in case studies. Recent progresses in the mathematical models based on different transport mechanisms will be highlighted. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of structure-function relationships of selected non-degradable and degradable polymers as drug delivery matrices. Take home message Understanding the structure-function relationship of the material system is key to the successful design of a delivery system for a particular application. Moreover, developing complex polymeric matrices requires more robust mathematical models to elucidate the solute transport mechanisms. PMID:20331353

  9. Kinetics of the iodine- and bromine-mediated transport of halide ions: demonstration of an interfacial complexation mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, K H; Benz, R

    1993-01-01

    Stationary and kinetic experiments were performed on lipid bilayer membranes to study the mechanism of iodine- and bromine-mediated halide transport in detail. The stationary conductance data suggested that four different 1:1 complexes between I2 and Br2 and the halides I- and Br- were responsible for the observed conductance increase by iodine and bromine (I3-, I2Br-, Br2I-, and Br3-). Charge pulse experiments allowed the further elucidation of the transport mechanism. Only two of three exponential voltage relaxations predicted by the Läuger model could be resolved under all experimental conditions. This means that either the heterogeneous complexation reactions kR (association) and kD (dissociation) were too fast to be resolved or that the neutral carriers were always in equilibrium within the membrane. Experiments at different carrier and halide concentrations suggested that the translocation of the neutral carrier is much faster than the other processes involved in carrier-mediated ion transport. The model was modified accordingly. From the charge pulse data at different halide concentrations, the translocation rate constant of the complexed carriers, kAS, the dissociation constant, kD, and the total surface concentration of charged carriers, NAS, could be evaluated from one single charge pulse experiment. The association rate of the complex, kR, could be obtained in some cases from the plot of the stationary conductance data as a function of the halide concentration in the aqueous phase. The translocation rate constant, kAS, of the different complexes is a function of the image force and of the Born charging energy. It increases 5000-fold from Br3- to I3- because of an enlarged ion radius. PMID:8312500

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of organic sulfides by N-bromobenzamide

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, K.; Banerji, K.K. )

    1990-09-14

    Kinetics of oxidation of 34 organic sulfides by N-bromobenzamide (NBB), to yield the corresponding sulfoxides, have been studied. The reaction is first-order with respect to the sulfide, NBB, and hydrogen ions. There is no effect of added benzamide. Protonated NBB has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. Reactivity of the sulfides toward NBB was subjected to correlation analysis by using multiparametric equations. The polar reaction constants are negative. Steric effects play a minor inhibitory role. A mechanism involving formulation of a halogenosulfonium cation, in the rate-determining step, has been proposed.

  11. Advances in kinetic isotope effect measurement techniques for enzyme mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hong; Zhang, Shuming

    2013-08-02

    Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are a very powerful tool for investigating enzyme mechanisms. Precision of measurement is the most important factor for KIE determinations, especially for small heavy atom KIEs. Internal competition is commonly used to measure small KIEs on V/K. Several methods, including such as liquid scintillation counting, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and polarimetry have been used to determine KIEs. In this paper, which does not aspire to be an exhaustive review, we briefly review different experimental approaches for the measurement of KIEs on enzymatic reaction with an emphasis on newer techniques employing mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry as well as some corresponding examples.

  12. When Do Semi-crystalline Polymer Fold during Crystallization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Toshikazu; Hong, You-Lee

    2014-03-01

    Semi-crystalline polymers are crystallized as folded chains in thin lamellae of ca. 5-20 nm from random coils in the melt and solution states. Lauritzen-Hoffman theory implied the crystallization process is dominated by sequential stem deposition on the growth front. Conversely, Allegra proposed a bundle model in which aggregates of 10-20 stems are produced by folding in the pre-stage of crystallization. The pre-folded chains are kinetically deposited on the growth front and thus determine the morphology at different crystallization temperatures. The folded chains preserve their own chain-folding directions, numbers, and fractions as a function of concentrations and supercooling, which would provide detailed chain-folding mechanism. We recently developed a new strategy using 13C-13C double-quantum NMR to investigate chain-trajectory of 13C selectively labeled polymer in bulk crystals. Here, we report how re-entrance sites, fraction, and number of folded chains of isotactic poly(1-butene) in form III single crystals depends on supercooling conditions and solvent effects. On the basis of molecular level structures, we will discuss about chain-folding process of iPB1 in dilute solutions. DMR-1105829.

  13. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  14. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone.

  15. Kinetic method for differentiating mechanisms for ligand exchange reactions: application to test for substrate channeling in glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, X M; Gutfreund, H; Chock, P B

    1992-02-25

    We have derived analytical expressions for the kinetics of the two mechanisms involved in ligand substitution reactions. These mechanisms are (i) a dissociative mechanism in which the leaving ligand is first dissociated prior to the binding of the incoming ligand and (ii) an associative mechanism where a ternary complex is formed between the incoming ligand and the complex containing the leaving ligand. The equations obtained provide the theoretical basis for differentiating these two mechanisms on the basis of their kinetic patterns of the displacement reactions. Analysis of these equations shows that an associative mechanism can only generate an increasing kinetic pattern for the observed pseudo-first-ordered rate constants as a function of increasing concentration of the incoming ligand and plateaus, in most cases, at a value higher than the off-rate constant of the leaving ligand. However, a dissociative mechanism can generate either an increasing or a decreasing (kapp decreases with increasing concentrations of the incoming ligand) kinetic pattern, depending on the magnitudes of the individual rate constants involved, and, in either case, it will plateau at kapp equal to the koff of the leaving ligand. Therefore, the decreasing kinetic pattern is a hallmark for a dissociative mechanism. This general method was used to settle the dispute of whether NADH is transferred directly via the enzyme-enzyme complex between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; EC 1.1.1.8) and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1536852

  16. A mechanism for repression of class II gene transcription through specific binding of NC2 to TBP-promoter complexes via heterodimeric histone fold domains.

    PubMed Central

    Goppelt, A; Stelzer, G; Lottspeich, F; Meisterernst, M

    1996-01-01

    Negative co-factor 2 (NC2) regulates transcription of the class II genes through binding to TFIID and inhibition of pre-initiation complex formation. We have isolated and cloned NC2, and investigated the molecular mechanism underlying repression of transcription. NC2 consists of two subunits, termed NC2alpha and NC2beta, the latter of which is identical to Dr1. The NC2 subunits dimerize and bind to TATA binding protein (TBP)-promoter complexes via histone fold domains of the H2A-H2B type. Repression of basal transcription requires the histone fold and carboxy-terminal domains of the NC2 subunits. Several mechanisms probably contribute to transcriptional repression. Binding of NC2 inhibits association of TFIIB with TBP-promoter complexes. NC2 binds directly to DNA, and binding of NC2 to TBP-promoter complexes affects the conformation of DNA, which could be one cause for the inhibition of TFIIB. In addition, multimerization of repressor-TBP complexes on DNA might inhibit the assembly of the pre-initiation complex. We suggest that binding of the repressor to TRP-promoter complexes establishes a mechanism that controls the rate of transcription by RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:8670811

  17. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters. PMID:26852849

  18. Mechanisms of fusicoccin action: kinetic modification and inactivation of K(+) channels in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Blatt, M R; Clint, G M

    1989-12-01

    Fusicoccin commonly is thought to promote secondary solute transport via an increase in electrical driving force which follows the enhancement of primary, "electrogenic" H(+) extrusion by the plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, previous electrical studies ofVicia faba L. guard cells in FC (Blatt, 1988, Planta174, 187) demonstrated, in addition to a limited rise in pump current, appreciable declines in membrane conductance near and positive to the free-running membrane potential (V m). Much of the current at these potentials could have been carried by outward-rectifying K(+) channels which were progressively inactivated in FC. We have examined this possibility in electrical studies, using whole-cell currents measured under voltage clamp to quantitate steadystate and kinetic characteristics of the K(+) channels both before and during exposure to FC; channels block in tetraethylammonium chloride was exploited to assess changes in background 'leak' currents. The cells showed little evidence of primary pump activity, a fact which further simplified analyses. Under these conditions, outward-directed K(+) channel current contributed to charge balance maintainingV m, and adding 10 μM FC on average depolarized (positive-going)V m. Steady-state current-voltage relations revealed changes both in K(+) channel and in leak currents underlying the voltage response. Changes in the leak were variable, but on average the leak equilibrium potential was shifted (+)19 mV and leak conductance declined by 21% over 30-40 min in FC. Potassium currents were inactivated irreversibly and with halftimes (current maxima) of 6.2-10.7 min. Inactivation was voltage-dependent, so that the activation ("gating") potential for the current was shifted, positive-going, with time in FC. Channel gating kinetics, inferred from the macroscopic currents, were also affected; current rise at positive potentials accelerated 4.5-fold and more, but in a manner apparently independent of voltage and

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng

    This thesis applies molecular dynamics simulations and statistical mechanics to study: (i) protein folding; and (ii) protein aggregation. Most small proteins fold into their native states via a first-order-like phase transition with a major free energy barrier between the folded and unfolded states. A set of protein conformations corresponding to the free energy barrier, Delta G >> kBT, are the folding transition state ensemble (TSE). Due to their evasive nature, TSE conformations are hard to capture (probability ∝ exp(-DeltaG/k BT)) and characterize. A coarse-grained discrete molecular dynamics model with realistic steric constraints is constructed to reproduce the experimentally observed two-state folding thermodynamics. A kinetic approach is proposed to identify the folding TSE. A specific set of contacts, common to the TSE conformations, is identified as the folding nuclei which are necessary to be formed in order for the protein to fold. Interestingly, the amino acids at the site of the identified folding nuclei are highly conserved for homologous proteins sharing the same structures. Such conservation suggests that amino acids that are important for folding kinetics are under selective pressure to be preserved during the course of molecular evolution. In addition, studies of the conformations close to the transition states uncover the importance of topology in the construction of order parameter for protein folding transition. Misfolded proteins often form insoluble aggregates, amyloid fibrils, that deposit in the extracellular space and lead to a type of disease known as amyloidosis. Due to its insoluble and non-crystalline nature, the aggregation structure and, thus the aggregation mechanism, has yet to be uncovered. Discrete molecular dynamics studies reveal an aggregate structure with the same structural signatures as in experimental observations and show a nucleation aggregation scenario. The simulations also suggest a generic aggregation mechanism

  20. Further investigation of the mechanism of Doxorubicin release from P105 micelles using kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson-Abouelnasr, Dana; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Pitt, William G.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of the release of Doxorubicin from Pluronic P105 micelles during ultrasonication and its subsequent re-encapsulation upon cessation of insonation were investigated. Four mechanisms are proposed to explain the acoustically-triggered Doxorubicin (Dox) release and re-encapsulation from Pluronic P105 micelles. The four mechanisms are: micelle destruction; destruction of cavitating nuclei; reassembly of micelles, and the re-encapsulation of Dox. The first mechanism, the destruction of micelles during insonation, causes the release of Dox into solution. The micelles are destroyed because of cavitation events produced by collapsing nuclei, or bubbles in the insonated solution. The second mechanism, the slow destruction of cavitating nuclei, results in a slow partial recovery phase, when a small amount of Dox is re-encapsulated. The third and fourth mechanisms, the reassembly of micelles and the re-encapsulatin of Dox, are independent of ultrasound. These two mechanism are responsible for maintaining the drug release at a partial level, and for recovery after insonation ceases. A normal distribution was used to describe micellar size. Parameters for the model were determined based upon the best observed fit to experimental data. The resulting model provides a good approximation to experimental data for the release of Dox from Pluronic P105 micelles. PMID:17207611

  1. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  2. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G.; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  3. Characterization of nicotinamidases: steady state kinetic parameters, classwide inhibition by nicotinaldehydes, and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    French, Jarrod B; Cen, Yana; Vrablik, Tracy L; Xu, Ping; Allen, Eleanor; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Sauve, Anthony A

    2010-12-14

    Nicotinamidases are metabolic enzymes that hydrolyze nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are widely distributed across biology, with examples found encoded in the genomes of Mycobacteria, Archaea, Eubacteria, Protozoa, yeast, and invertebrates, but there are none found in mammals. Although recent structural work has improved our understanding of these enzymes, their catalytic mechanism is still not well understood. Recent data show that nicotinamidases are required for the growth and virulence of several pathogenic microbes. The enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans regulate life span in their respective organisms, consistent with proposed roles in the regulation of NAD(+) metabolism and organismal aging. In this work, the steady state kinetic parameters of nicotinamidase enzymes from C. elegans, Sa. cerevisiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae (a pathogen responsible for human pneumonia), Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen that causes Lyme disease), and Plasmodium falciparum (responsible for most human malaria) are reported. Nicotinamidases are generally efficient catalysts with steady state k(cat) values typically exceeding 1 s(-1). The K(m) values for nicotinamide are low and in the range of 2 -110 μM. Nicotinaldehyde was determined to be a potent competitive inhibitor of these enzymes, binding in the low micromolar to low nanomolar range for all nicotinamidases tested. A variety of nicotinaldehyde derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors in kinetic assays. Inhibitions are consistent with reaction of the universally conserved catalytic Cys on each enzyme with the aldehyde carbonyl carbon to form a thiohemiacetal complex that is stabilized by a conserved oxyanion hole. The S. pneumoniae nicotinamidase can catalyze exchange of (18)O into the carboxy oxygens of nicotinic acid with H(2)(18)O. The collected data, along with kinetic analysis of several mutants, allowed us to propose a catalytic

  4. Mechanical stability model of progradational carbonate platform margins under tectonic loads: Deformation of Cretaceous carbonate platforms in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Juan; Suter, Max

    2015-02-01

    Shortening in the Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt (east central Mexico) is localized along the margins of Cretaceous carbonate platforms and controlled by mechanical stratigraphy. The platform margins are deformed by imbricate series of thrust ramps, whereas the coeval basins and platform interiors are deformed by map-scale detachment folds. Here we present a finite element model to evaluate the influence of the boundary geometry and boundary conditions on the style of deformation observed at these basinward progradational platform margins. We calculate the stress distribution in a linearly elastic platform-basin transition zone under the action of horizontal tectonic stress, taking into account changes of rock mechanical properties across the platform margin, as well as their dependence on direction, and infer the resulting fracture patterns based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. Stress concentrations are predicted at the contacts between the massive rocks of the platform margin and the well-layered rocks of both, the platform interior and the adjacent basin. Brittle failure of the platform border can be mostly attributed to three effects: mechanical coupling between the carbonate platform and a substratum of moderate to low viscosity, variations in layering and texture that governed the mechanical properties of the involved carbonates as well as their dependence on direction, and the development of sharp domain boundary corners associated with progradational facies changes. In contrast, the dip of the basement and a possible taper of the overlying Upper Cretaceous shale toward the basin appear to have little influence on the mechanical failure of the platform margin.

  5. Kinetic nanofriction: a mechanism transition from quasi-continuous to ballistic-like Brownian regime.

    PubMed

    Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Reddy, Chilla Damodara; Sorkin, Viacheslav; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2012-02-21

    Surface diffusion of mobile adsorbates is not only the key to control the rate of dynamical processes on solid surfaces, e.g. epitaxial growth, but also of fundamental importance for recent technological applications, such as nanoscale electro-mechanical, tribological, and surface probing devices. Though several possible regimes of surface diffusion have been suggested, the nanoscale surface Brownian motion, especially in the technologically important low friction regimes, remains largely unexplored. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show for the first time, that a C60 admolecule on a graphene substrate exhibits two distinct regimes of nanoscale Brownian motion: a quasi-continuous and a ballistic-like. A crossover between these two regimes is realized by changing the temperature of the system. We reveal that the underlying physical origin for this crossover is a mechanism transition of kinetic nanofriction arising from distinctive ways of interaction between the admolecule and the graphene substrate in these two regimes due to the temperature change. Our findings provide insight into surface mass transport and kinetic friction control at the nanoscale.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism for degradation of dichlorvos by permanganate in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Qiang, Zhimin; Adams, Craig; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Tao

    2009-08-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of dichlorvos by permanganate during drinking water treatment were investigated. The reaction of dichlorvos with permanganate was of second-order overall with negligible pH dependence and an activation energy of 29.5 kJ x mol(-1). At pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C, the rate constant was 25.2+/-0.4M(-1)s(-1). Dichlorvos was first degraded to trimethyl phosphate (TMP) and dimethyl phosphate (DMP) simultaneously which approximately accounted for <5% and >or=95% with respect to phosphorus mass, respectively. Further oxidation of DMP generated a final byproduct, monomethyl phosphate (MMP). MMP was for the first time identified as a major byproduct in chemical oxidation of dichlorvos. The kinetic model based on degradation mechanism and determined reaction rate constants allowed us to predict the evolution of dichlorvos and its byproduct concentrations during permanganate pre-oxidation process at water treatment plants. These results suggest that even though the dichlorvos concentration in surface water complies with the surface water quality standards of China (50 microg L(-1)), its concentration after conventional water treatment will most probably exceed the drinking water quality standards (1 microg L(-1)). Moreover, luminescent bacteria test shows that the acute toxicity of dichlorvos solution evidently increased after permanganate oxidation.

  7. Active mechanics in living oocytes reveal molecular-scale force kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Wylie; Fodor, Etienne; Almonacid, Maria; Bussonnier, Matthias; Verlhac, Marie-Helene; Gov, Nir; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frederic; Betz, Timo

    Unlike traditional materials, living cells actively generate forces at the molecular scale that change their structure and mechanical properties. This nonequilibrium activity is essential for cellular function, and drives processes such as cell division. Single molecule studies have uncovered the detailed force kinetics of isolated motor proteins in-vitro, however their behavior in-vivo has been elusive due to the complex environment inside the cell. Here, we quantify active forces and intracellular mechanics in living oocytes using in-vivo optical trapping and laser interferometry of endogenous vesicles. We integrate an experimental and theoretical framework to connect mesoscopic measurements of nonequilibrium properties to the underlying molecular- scale force kinetics. Our results show that force generation by myosin-V drives the cytoplasmic-skeleton out-of-equilibrium (at frequencies below 300 Hz) and actively softens the environment. In vivo myosin-V activity generates a force of F ~ 0 . 4 pN, with a power-stroke of length Δx ~ 20 nm and duration τ ~ 300 μs, that drives vesicle motion at vv ~ 320 nm/s. This framework is widely applicable to characterize living cells and other soft active materials.

  8. Anaerobic waste-activated sludge digestion - A bioconversion mechanism and kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Tatsuo; Kudo, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshikazu )

    1993-05-01

    The anaerobic bioconversion of raw and mechanically lysed waste-activated sludge was kinetically investigated. The hydrolysis of the biopolymers, such as protein, which leaked out from the biological sludge with ultrasonic lysis, was a first-order reaction in anaerobic digestion and the rate constant was much higher than the decay rate constant of the raw waste activated sludge. An anaerobic digestion model that is capable of evaluating the effect of the mechanical sludge lysis on digestive performance was developed. The present model includes four major biological processes - the release of intracellular matter with sludge lysis; hydrolysis of biopolymers to volatile acids; the degradation of various volatile acids to acetate; and the conversion of acetate and hydrogen to methane. Each process was assumed to follow first-order kinetics. The model approximately simulated the overall process performance of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. The model suggested that when the lysed waste-activated sludge was fed, the overall digestive performance remarkably increased in the two-phase system consisting of an acid forming process and a methanogenic process, which ensured the symbiotic growth of acetogenic and methanogenic bacteria.

  9. Elucidating the Catalytic Mechanism of Sulfite Oxidizing Enzymes using Structural, Spectroscopic and Kinetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Tollin, Gordon; Enemark, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs) are molybdenum cofactor dependent enzymes that are found in plants, animals and bacteria. Sulfite oxidase (SO) is found in animals and plants, while sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH) is found in bacteria. In animals, SO catalyzes the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate as the final step in the catabolism of the sulfur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine. In humans, sulfite oxidase deficiency is an inherited recessive disorder that produces severe neonatal neurological problems that lead to early death. Plant SO (PSO) also plays an important role in sulfite detoxification, but in addition serves as an intermediate enzyme in the assimilatory reduction of sulfate. In vertebrates the proposed catalytic mechanism of SO involves two intramolecular one-electron transfer (IET) steps from the molybdenum cofactor to the iron of the integral b-type heme. A similar mechanism is proposed for SDH, involving its molybdenum cofactor and c-type heme. However, PSO, which lacks an integral heme cofactor, uses molecular oxygen as its electron acceptor. Here we review recent results for SOEs from kinetic measurements, computational studies, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, electrochemical measurements, and site-directed mutagenesis on active site residues of SOEs and of the flexible polypepetide tether that connects the heme and molybdenum domains of human SO. Rapid-kinetic studies of PSO are also discussed. PMID:20666399

  10. Integration of large chemical kinetic mechanisms via exponential methods with Krylov approximations to Jacobian matrix functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2012-06-01

    Recent trends in hydrocarbon fuel research indicate that the number of species and reactions in chemical kinetic mechanisms is rapidly increasing in an effort to provide predictive capabilities for fuels of practical interest. In order to cope with the computational cost associated with the time integration of stiff, large chemical systems, a novel approach is proposed. The approach combines an exponential integrator and Krylov subspace approximations to the exponential function of the Jacobian matrix. The components of the approach are described in detail and applied to the ignition of stoichiometric methane-air and iso-octane-air mixtures, here described by two widely adopted chemical kinetic mechanisms. The approach is found to be robust even at relatively large time steps and the global error displays a nominal third-order convergence. The performance of the approach is improved by utilising an adaptive algorithm for the selection of the Krylov subspace size, which guarantees an approximation to the matrix exponential within user-defined error tolerance. The Krylov projection of the Jacobian matrix onto a low-dimensional space is interpreted as a local model reduction with a well-defined error control strategy. Finally, the performance of the approach is discussed with regard to the optimal selection of the parameters governing the accuracy of its individual components.

  11. Insight into removal kinetic and mechanisms of anionic dye by calcined clay materials and lime.

    PubMed

    Vimonses, Vipasiri; Jin, Bo; Chow, Christopher W K

    2010-05-15

    Our recent work reported that a mixed adsorbent with natural clay materials and lime demonstrated an enhanced capacity and efficiency to remove anionic Congo Red dye from wastewater. This study aims to investigate the removal kinetic and mechanisms of the mixed materials involved in the decolourisation of the dye to maximise their prospective applications for industrial wastewater treatment. The experimental results showed that dye removal was governed by combined physiochemical reactions of adsorption, ion-exchange, and precipitation. Ca-dye precipitation contributed over 70% total dye removal, followed by adsorption and ion-exchange. The dye removal kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order expression and was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. This study indicated pH was a key parameter to govern the removal mechanisms, i.e. adsorption/coagulation at acidic pH and precipitation at basic condition. Yet, the overall removal efficiency was found to be independent to the operation conditions, resulting in more than 94% dye removal. This work revealed that the mixed clays and lime can be applied as alternative low-cost adsorbents for industrial wastewater treatment. PMID:20079967

  12. A new mechanism for the terminal stages of complement hemolysis based on kinetic and thermodynamic rationales

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, G.H.; Canady, W.J.

    1982-08-16

    Okada, Boyle and Borsos made a study of the temperature dependence of and effects of preincubation on the terminal reactions in complement hemolysis. They suggested that EAC1-9/sup inserted/ could go on to lysis by either of two reaction paths and also that there is an enzyme catalyzed step. In this paper we show by kinetic and thermodynamic analysis a) that their results are inconsistent with such a double path mechanism and b) that their data are quantitatively compatible with a fairly conventional Michaelis-Menten mechanism. Although we agree with Okada et. al that their data are consistant with the participation of an enzyme in the terminal stages of complement hemolysis, the type of rate laws referred to in this paper could apply to some non-enzymatic reactions.

  13. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  14. Theoretical study on the mechanism and kinetics of acetaldehyde and hydroperoxyl radical: An important atmospheric reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnia, Solaleh; Vahedpour, Morteza; Abedi, Mostafa; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-09-01

    A systematic theoretical study was performed on the mechanism and kinetics of the atmospheric reaction of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the gas phase. The DFT-B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) methods were employed for calculations. Based on the calculations, this reaction leads to four different products through radical addition and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms which are very important in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. The favorable reaction paths begin with α-hydroxyethylperoxy radical, CH3CH(OO)OH, in a exothermic process and finally leads to the product P1 (CH3COOH + OH). The overall rate constants for favorite reaction paths have been calculated at different temperatures (200-2500 K).

  15. Kinetic insulation as an effective mechanism for achieving pathway specificity in intracellular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Marcelo; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways that share common components often elicit distinct physiological responses. In most cases, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this signal specificity remain poorly understood. Protein scaffolds and cross-inhibition have been proposed as strategies to prevent unwanted cross-talk. Here, we report a mechanism for signal specificity termed “kinetic insulation.” In this approach signals are selectively transmitted through the appropriate pathway based on their temporal profile. In particular, we demonstrate how pathway architectures downstream of a common component can be designed to efficiently separate transient signals from signals that increase slowly over time. Furthermore, we demonstrate that upstream signaling proteins can generate the appropriate input to the common pathway component regardless of the temporal profile of the external stimulus. Our results suggest that multilevel signaling cascades may have evolved to modulate the temporal profile of pathway activity so that stimulus information can be efficiently encoded and transmitted while ensuring signal specificity. PMID:17913886

  16. Bioremediation of cadmium by growing Rhodobacter sphaeroides: kinetic characteristic and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Zhao-Ming; Yang, Guan-E; Li, Bao-Zhen

    2008-11-01

    The removal kinetic characteristic and mechanism of cadmium by growing Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated. The removal data were fitted to the second-order equation, with a correlation coefficient, R2=0.9790-0.9916. Furthermore, it was found that the removal mechanism of cadmium was predominantly governed by bioprecipitation as cadmium sulfide with biosorption contributing to a minor extent. Also, the results revealed that the activities of cysteine desulfhydrase in strains grown in the presence of 10 and 20 mg/l of cadmium were higher than in the control, while the activities in the presence of 30 and 40 mg/l of cadmium were lower than in the control. Content analysis of subcellular fractionation showed that cadmium was mostly removed and transformed by precipitation on the cell wall.

  17. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation. PMID:27009901

  18. Graphene folding on flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yadong; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-10-28

    We present a combined experimental-theoretical study of graphene folding on flat substrates. The structure and deformation of the folded graphene sheet are experimentally characterized by atomic force microscopy. The local graphene folding behaviors are interpreted based on nonlinear continuum mechanics modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our study on self-folding of a trilayer graphene sheet reports a bending stiffness of about 6.57 eV, which is about four times the reported values for monolayer graphene. Our results reveal that an intriguing free sliding phenomenon occurs at the interlayer van der Waals interfaces during the graphene folding process. This work demonstrates that it is a plausible venue to quantify the bending stiffness of graphene based on its self-folding conformation on flat substrates. The findings reported in this work are useful to a better understanding of the mechanical properties of graphene and in the pursuit of its applications.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of jack bean urease inhibition by Hg2+

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Jack bean urease (EC 3.5.1.5) is a metalloenzyme, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. The heavy metal ions are common inhibitors to control the rate of the enzymatic urea hydrolysis, which take the Hg2+ as the representative. Hg2+ affects the enzyme activity causing loss of the biological function of the enzyme, which threatens the survival of many microorganism and plants. However, inhibitory kinetics of urease by the low concentration Hg2+ has not been explored fully. In this study, the inhibitory effect of the low concentration Hg2+ on jack bean urease was investigated in order to elucidate the mechanism of Hg2+ inhibition. Results According to the kinetic parameters for the enzyme obtained from Lineweaver–Burk plot, it is shown that the Km is equal to 4.6±0.3 mM and Vm is equal to 29.8±1.7 μmol NH3/min mg. The results show that the inhibition of jack bean urease by Hg2+ at low concentration is a reversible reaction. Equilibrium constants have been determined for Hg2+ binding with the enzyme or the enzyme-substrate complexes (Ki =0.012 μM). The results show that the Hg2+ is a noncompetitive inhibitor. In addition, the kinetics of enzyme inhibition by the low concentration Hg2+ has been studied using the kinetic method of the substrate reaction. The results suggest that the enzyme first reversibly and quickly binds Hg2+ and then undergoes a slow reversible course to inactivation. Furthermore, the rate constant of the forward reactions (k+0) is much larger than the rate constant of the reverse reactions (k-0). By combining with the fact that the enzyme activity is almost completely lost at high concentration, the enzyme is completely inactivated when the Hg2+ concentration is high enough. Conclusions These results suggest that Hg2+ has great impacts on the urease activity and the established inhibition kinetics model is suitable. PMID:23228101

  20. Correlation of Impact Conditions, Interface Reactions, Microstructural Evolution, and Mechanical Properties in Kinetic Spraying of Metals: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee

    2016-09-01

    In the past, most studies into kinetic spraying technology focused on basic research, but a large portion of current research is devoted to industrial applications of the technology. To advance, however, studies about industrial applications of kinetic spraying require profound understanding of the scientific foundations of the kinetic spray process. Nevertheless, no one has yet provided a well-organized summary of the correlations among impact conditions, interface reactions, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties across the whole field of kinetic spraying technology. This paper provides such an overview of these correlations for kinetic spraying of metals. For each correlation, the interactions between the given conditions and the material properties of the metal feedstock powder are the most influential. These interactions are so complicated that it is difficult to systematically classify all cases into certain types. Nonetheless, we try to explain and summarize the critical factors and their roles in each relationship.

  1. Influence of calcium on β-lactoglobulin denaturation kinetics: Implications in unfolding and aggregation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Petit, J; Herbig, A-L; Moreau, A; Delaplace, G

    2011-12-01

    Much research dealing with the processing of milk by-products in heat exchangers has noted the key role of calcium in β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) fouling behavior. Nevertheless, the manner by which Ca affects β-LG denaturation has rarely been quantified using reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data. To this end, the influence of Ca on β-LG denaturation mechanisms in simulated lactoserum concentrates was studied on the laboratory-scale under 100°C by HPLC analysis. The heat-treated solutions were composed of 53.3g/L β-LG and were enriched in Ca at various concentrations (0, 66, 132, and 264 mg/kg). The kinetic parameters (reaction order, activation energy, and frequency factor) associated with β-LG denaturation, along with the unfolding and aggregation thermodynamic parameters were deduced from these experiments and discussed with respect to Ca content. We found that the multistage process characterizing β-LG thermal denaturation is not greatly affected by Ca addition. In fact, the general model subdividing β-LG denaturation mechanisms in 2 steps, namely, unfolding and aggregation, remained valid for all tested Ca concentrations. The change in the predominant mechanism from unfolding to aggregation was observed at 80°C across the entire Ca concentration range. Moreover, the classical 1.5 reaction order value was unaffected by the presence of Ca. Interpretation of the acquired kinetic data showed that Ca addition led to a significant increase in kinetic rate, and more so in the aggregation temperature range. This indicates that Ca principally catalyzes β-LG aggregation, by lowering the Coulombian repulsion between the negatively charged β-LG reactive species, bridging β-LG proteins, or via an ion-specific conformational change. To a lesser extent, Ca favors β-LG unfolding, probably by disturbing the noncovalent binding network of native β-LG. Simultaneously, Ca has a slight protective role on the native and unfolded β-LG species, as shown by the increase

  2. Mechanism and kinetics of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over supported ruthenium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kellner, C.S.

    1981-06-01

    A detailed study of the kinetics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons, methanol, and acetaldehyde, over alumina- and silica-supported ruthenium catalysts has been carried out over a broad range of reaction conditions. Based on these results and information taken from the literature, mechanisms for the formation of normal paraffins, ..cap alpha..-olefins, methanol, and acetaldehyde have been proposed. Rate data were obtained between 448 and 548K, 1 and 10 atm, and H/sub 2//CO ratios between 1 and 3, utilizing a micro flow reactor operated at very low conversions. In addition to the studies performed with H/sub 2//CO mixtures, a series of experiments were carried out utilizing D/sub 2//CO mixtures. These studies were used to help identify rate limited steps and steps that were at equilibrium. A complementary investigation, carried out by in situ infrared spectroscopy, was performed using a Fourier Transform spectrometer. The spectra obtained were used to identify the modes of CO adsorption, the CO coverage, and the relative reactivity of different forms of adsorbed CO. It was established that CO adsorbs on alumina-supported Ru in, at least, two forms: (i) Ru-CO and (ii) OC-Ru-CO. Only the first of these forms participates in CO hydrogenation. The coverage of this species is described by a simple Langmuir isotherm. A reaction mechanism is presented for interpreting the kinetics of hydrocarbon synthesis, the olefin to paraffin ratio for each product, and the probability of chain propagation. Rate expressions based on this mechanism are reasonably consistent with the experimental data. Acetaldehyde, obtained mainly over silica-supported Ru, appears to be formed by a mechanism related to that for hydroformulation of olefins. The effect of the dispersion of Ru/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts on their specific activity and selectivity was also investigated. The specific activity for all products decreased rapidly with increasing dispersions.

  3. PREFACE Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers Protein folding: lessons learned and new frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    multi-scale dynamical problem when one considers the synergies between protein expression, spontaneous folding, chaperonin-assisted folding, protein targeting, the kinetics of post-translational modifications, protein degradation, and of course the drive to avoid aggregation. Further, there is growing recognition that cells not only tolerate but select for proteins that are intrinsically disordered. These proteins are essential for many crucial activities, and yet their inability to fold in isolation makes them prone to proteolytic processing and aggregation. In the series of papers that make up this special focus on protein folding in physical biology, leading researchers provide insights into diverse cross-sections of problems in protein folding. Barrick provides a concise review of what we have learned from the study of two-state folders and draws attention to how several unanswered questions are being approached using studies on large repeat proteins. Dissecting the contribution of hydration-mediated interactions to driving forces for protein folding and assembly has been extremely challenging. There is renewed interest in using hydrostatic pressure as a tool to access folding intermediates and decipher the role of partially hydrated states in folding, misfolding, and aggregation. Silva and Foguel review many of the nuances that have been uncovered by perturbing hydrostatic pressure as a thermodynamic parameter. As noted above, protein folding in vivo is expected to be considerably more complex than the folding of two-state proteins in dilute solutions. Lucent et al review the state-of-the-art in the development of quantitative theories to explain chaperonin-assisted folding in vivo. Additionally, they highlight unanswered questions pertaining to the processing of unfolded/misfolded proteins by the chaperone machinery. Zhuang et al present results that focus on the effects of surface tethering on transition state ensembles and folding mechanisms of a model two

  4. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility: a petrofrabric tool for understanding mechanisms of fold and thrust belt evolution. Application in Malargüe FTB, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branellec, Matthieu; Callot, Jean Paul; Aubourg, Charles; Nivière, Bertrand; Ringenbach, Jean Claude

    2013-04-01

    In fold and thrust belts (FTB), sedimentary beds are folded and faulted but rocks do not always show evidence of strong internal deformation. Nevertheless, several studies have demonstrated that a weak internal deformation (layer parallel shortening) can be recorded at the matrix scale before any macroscopic deformation. The Anisotropy of Magnetic susceptibility (AMS) provides information about the preferred orientation of billions of magnetic minerals. It enables the definition of a magnetic fabric, which may be visualized as an ellipsoid with principal axes K1 ≥ K2 ≥ K3. Basic elements of a magnetic fabric are the magnetic foliation (K1-K2 plane) and the magnetic lineation (K1 axe), when they are statistically defined. Both are related to strain-controlled petrofrabric. The Neuquén Basin is a wide intracratonic sag basin with complex and polyphased/diachronic evolution. The Pacific subduction and south Atlantic opening were the mechanisms controlling the large scale geodynamic framework. By late Triassic times, continental scale extension initiated fault-related narrow rift depocenters which later evolved toward a sag basin from middle Jurassic to upper Cretaceous. At that time, the basin started to record the compressive stress regime from the Pacific subduction. Three pulses of compressive deformation (Cretaceous, Paleogene and Miocene) are recorded in this retro-arc foreland setting. Approximately 300 samples have been collected from 30 sites in terrigenous rocks located along three cross sections from foothills to uplifted foreland area in Malargüe FTB. We mainly sample Kimmeridgian red beds of the Tordillo formation, Tithonian shales from the Vaca Muerta Fm, and late cretaceous red beds of the Neuquén Group. AMS fabrics are used as a proxy to measure accumulated microscopic finite strain and compares it with mesoscale (fractures) and macroscale structures (faults, folds…). This multi-scaled approach helps in defining a kinematic scenario for Malarg

  5. Vacuum contact drying kinetics of Jack pine wood and its influence on mechanical properties: industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouertani, Sahbi; Koubaa, Ahmed; Azzouz, Soufien; Hassini, Lamine; Dhib, Kamel Ben; Belghith, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Wood can be dried rapidly using combined contact heating and low vacuum. However, the impact on Jack pine wood drying and its mechanical strength remains unclear. The aim of this paper was to determine the kinetics of vacuum contact drying of Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) wood boards (dimensions 50 × 100 × 2480 mm3) under various drying temperatures and vacuum pressures at a pilot scale. Drying temperatures and vacuum pressures ranged from 65 to 95 °C and from 169.32 to 507.96 mbar, respectively. Dried samples were subjected to flexural loading to determine mechanical strength. Results indicated that drying time decreased with higher drying temperature and vacuum pressure, where as decreased vacuum pressure increased the temperature of wood samples at a constant drying temperature. Results also indicated that the mechanical properties of dried samples were affected by drying temperature, vacuum pressure, and lumber grade. Mechanical test results were then compared to those for a conventional drying process, revealing that vacuum contact drying do not have a negative impact on the wood mechanical properties.

  6. Pseudoknots in RNA folding landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Kucharík, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The function of an RNA molecule is not only linked to its native structure, which is usually taken to be the ground state of its folding landscape, but also in many cases crucially depends on the details of the folding pathways such as stable folding intermediates or the timing of the folding process itself. To model and understand these processes, it is necessary to go beyond ground state structures. The study of rugged RNA folding landscapes holds the key to answer these questions. Efficient coarse-graining methods are required to reduce the intractably vast energy landscapes into condensed representations such as barrier trees or basin hopping graphs (BHG) that convey an approximate but comprehensive picture of the folding kinetics. So far, exact and heuristic coarse-graining methods have been mostly restricted to the pseudoknot-free secondary structures. Pseudoknots, which are common motifs and have been repeatedly hypothesized to play an important role in guiding folding trajectories, were usually excluded. Results: We generalize the BHG framework to include pseudoknotted RNA structures and systematically study the differences in predicted folding behavior depending on whether pseudoknotted structures are allowed to occur as folding intermediates or not. We observe that RNAs with pseudoknotted ground state structures tend to have more pseudoknotted folding intermediates than RNAs with pseudoknot-free ground state structures. The occurrence and influence of pseudoknotted intermediates on the folding pathway, however, appear to depend very strongly on the individual RNAs so that no general rule can be inferred. Availability and implementation: The algorithms described here are implemented in C++ as standalone programs. Its source code and Supplemental material can be freely downloaded from http://www.tbi.univie.ac.at/bhg.html. Contact: qin@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID

  7. Fry and Rf/ϕ strain methods constraints and fold transection mechanisms in the NW Iberian Variscides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, A.; Dias, R.

    2015-10-01

    Apúlia is a small Portuguese sector in NW of Central-Iberian Zone, that have been deformed in a non-coaxial sinistral transpressive regime during the first and main Variscan tectonic event (D1). This deformation give rise to a major NW-SE anticline, where the S1 N-S cleavage transect the inverted short NE limb; two and three-dimensional strains analysis have been done in the low metamorphic grade Ordovician quartzites of this limb using Fry and Rf/ϕ methods. The data show that most deformation was due to intergranular deformation mechanisms. The intragranular deformation leading to the distortion of strain markers and to cleavage was very incipient and a latter event in the D1 phase. The apparent plane strain ellipsoids (if no volume change is assumed) related to the intragranular mechanisms contrast with the more prolate strain ellipsoids related to the bulk deformation of Apúlia Quartzites. This constrictional bulk strain fabrics are characteristic of the sinistral transpressive regimes dominant in the northern sectors of the Central-Iberian Zone.

  8. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory constituents of propolis: kinetics and mechanism of inhibition of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, Narayan D; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Muhammad, Ilias; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2014-11-18

    Propolis is the resinous material that bees gather from leaf buds, flowers and vegetables. Propolis extracts contain constituents with a broad spectra of pharmacological properties and are important ingredients of popular dietary supplements. Propolis extracts were evaluated in vitro for inhibition of recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and MAO-B. The dichloromethane extract of propolis showed potent inhibition of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Further fractionation identified the most active fractions as rich in flavonoids. Galangin and apigenin were identified as the principal MAO-inhibitory constituents. Inhibition of MAO-A by galangin was about 36 times more selective than MAO-B, while apigenin selectivity for MAO-A vs. MAO-B was about 1.7 fold. Apigenin inhibited MAO-B significantly more potently than galangin. Galangin and apigenin were further evaluated for kinetic characteristics and the mechanism for the enzymes' inhibition. Binding of galangin and apigenin with MAO-A and -B was not time-dependent and was reversible, as suggested by enzyme-inhibitor binding and dissociation-dialysis assay. The inhibition kinetics studies suggested that galangin and apigenin inhibited MAO-A and -B by a competitive mechanism. Presence of prominent MAO inhibitory constituents in propolis products suggests their potential for eliciting pharmacological effects that might be useful in depression or other neurological disorders. The results may also have important implications in drug-dietary supplement interactions.

  9. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  10. Kinetic Mechanism and Rate-Limiting Steps of Focal Adhesion Kinase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, Jessica L.; Briand, Jacques; Chen, Stephanie; Lehr, Ruth; McDevitt, Patrick; Zhao, Baoguang; Smallwood, Angela; Concha, Nestor; Oza, Khyati; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Yan, Kang; Villa, James P.; Meek, Thomas D.; Thrall, Sara H.

    2010-12-07

    Steady-state kinetic analysis of focal adhesion kinase-1 (FAK1) was performed using radiometric measurement of phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide substrate (Ac-RRRRRRSETDDYAEIID-NH{sub 2}, FAK-tide) which corresponds to the sequence of an autophosphorylation site in FAK1. Initial velocity studies were consistent with a sequential kinetic mechanism, for which apparent kinetic values k{sub cat} (0.052 {+-} 0.001 s{sup -1}), K{sub MgATP} (1.2 {+-} 0.1 {micro}M), K{sub iMgATP} (1.3 {+-} 0.2 {micro}M), K{sub FAK-tide} (5.6 {+-} 0.4 {micro}M), and K{sub iFAK-tide} (6.1 {+-} 1.1 {micro}M) were obtained. Product and dead-end inhibition data indicated that enzymatic phosphorylation of FAK-tide by FAK1 was best described by a random bi bi kinetic mechanism, for which both E-MgADP-FAK-tide and E-MgATP-P-FAK-tide dead-end complexes form. FAK1 catalyzed the {beta}{gamma}-bridge:{beta}-nonbridge positional oxygen exchange of [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP in the presence of 1 mM [{gamma}-{sup 18}O{sub 4}]ATP and 1.5 mM FAK-tide with a progressive time course which was commensurate with catalysis, resulting in a rate of exchange to catalysis of k{sub x}/k{sub cat} = 0.14 {+-} 0.01. These results indicate that phosphoryl transfer is reversible and that a slow kinetic step follows formation of the E-MgADP-P-FAK-tide complex. Further kinetic studies performed in the presence of the microscopic viscosogen sucrose revealed that solvent viscosity had no effect on k{sub cat}/K{sub FAK-tide}, while k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub MgATP} were both decreased linearly at increasing solvent viscosity. Crystallographic characterization of inactive versus AMP-PNP-liganded structures of FAK1 showed that a large conformational motion of the activation loop upon ATP binding may be an essential step during catalysis and would explain the viscosity effect observed on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for MgATP but not on k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for FAK-tide. From the positional isotope exchange, viscosity, and

  11. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

    2008-02-08

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

  12. [Mechanism and kinetics of phenol degradation by TiO2 photocatalytic combined technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Ruo-Nan; Wang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Qi; Cong, Yan-Qing

    2013-02-01

    The combination H2O2, or electrical catalytic (EC) system with TiO2 photbcatalytic system for phenol degradation was investigated. The catalytic systems of TiO2/UV, H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV/H2O2 and TiO2/UV/EC were compared to investigate the phenol degradation mechanism and kinetic model. The degradation of phenol in TiO2/UV/H2O2 and TiO2/UV/EC system is more effective than that in TiO2/UV system. With the solution pH of 6, TiO, concentration of 0.2 g.L-1, UV illumination of 2 h, the photocatalysis removal efficiency of phenol reaches to 86%, if the current density of 12 mA.cm-2 is added, the removal efficiency of phenol could reach to 100%. The energy utilization in different catalytic systems was also compared. When phenol is degraded in 15 min, in TiO2/UV/EC system the energy utilization is the highest of 0.0306 g.(kW. h)-1 with the energy consumption of 0.0640 kW.h-1. It indicates that much more energy is used in TiO2/UV/EC system for phenol degradation. During the analysis of intermediate products in different catalysis systems, the first-order kinetic model of phenol degradation and intermediate products such as hydroquinone, catechol and benzoquinone formation were established. The kinetic model is validated the phenol degradation pathway in different catalysis systems, and also indicates the TiO2/UV/EC system could enhance phenol and intermediate products degradation.

  13. Temperature dependence of in vitro Rubisco kinetics in species of Flaveria with different photosynthetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Juan Alejandro; Cavanagh, Amanda P; Kubien, David S; Galmés, Jeroni

    2015-04-01

    There is general consensus in the literature that plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms (i.e. C3 vs. C4) have Rubiscos characterised by different kinetic performances. However, potential differences in the temperature dependencies of Rubisco kinetic parameters between C3 and C4 plants are uncertain. Accordingly, six species of Flaveria with contrasting photosynthetic mechanisms (C3, C3/C4 and C4) were selected and their Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 and RuBP (K c and K RuBP), carboxylase catalytic turnover rate ([Formula: see text]) and CO2/O2 specificity factor (S c/o) were measured between 10 and 40 °C. The results confirmed different Rubisco characteristics between C3 and C4 plants. Rubisco from the C3 species had higher E a for K c and [Formula: see text] than that from C4 species, which were translated into differences in the temperature response of the carboxylase catalytic efficiency ([Formula: see text]/K c). However, E a did not differ for S c/o or K RuBP. Although a mechanism remains uncertain, it appears that the Asp/Glu-149-Ala and Met-309-Ile substitutions lead to differences in the temperature responses of catalysis between C3 and C4 Rubiscos in Flaveria. Therefore, the above observations are consistent with the fact that C3 species have a higher photosynthetic efficiency and ecological dominance in cool environments, with respect to C4 species in temperate environments. PMID:25663529

  14. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis cyclophilin38 reveals a previously uncharacterized immunophilin fold and a possible autoinhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Dileep; Fu, Aigen; Luan, Sheng; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2012-06-01

    Cyclophilin38 (CYP38) is one of the highly divergent cyclophilins from Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report the crystal structure of the At-CYP38 protein (residues 83 to 437 of 437 amino acids) at 2.39-Å resolution. The structure reveals two distinct domains: an N-terminal helical bundle and a C-terminal cyclophilin β-barrel, connected by an acidic loop. Two N-terminal β-strands become part of the C-terminal cyclophilin β-barrel, thereby making a previously undiscovered domain organization. This study shows that CYP38 does not possess peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity and identifies a possible interaction of CYP38 with the E-loop of chlorophyll protein47 (CP47), a component of photosystem II. The interaction of CYP38 with the E-loop of CP47 is mediated through its cyclophilin domain. The N-terminal helical domain is closely packed together with the putative C-terminal cyclophilin domain and establishes a strong intramolecular interaction, thereby preventing the access of the cyclophilin domain to other proteins. This was further verified by protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast two-hybrid system. Furthermore, the non-Leucine zipper N-terminal helical bundle contains several new elements for protein-protein interaction that may be of functional significance. Together, this study provides the structure of a plant cyclophilin and explains a possible mechanism for autoinhibition of its function through an intramolecular interaction.

  15. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  16. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Isomers of Heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H C; Boercker, J; Kunrath, E

    2001-03-26

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for all nine chemical isomers of heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), following techniques and models developed previously for other smaller alkane hydrocarbon species. These reaction mechanisms are tested at high temperatures by computing shock tube ignition delay times and at lower temperatures by simulating ignition in a rapid compression machine. Although the corresponding experiments have not been reported in the literature for most of these isomers of heptane, intercomparisons between the computed results for these isomers and comparisons with available experimental results for other alkane fuels are used to validate the reaction mechanisms as much as possible. Differences in the overall reaction rates of these fuels are discussed in terms of differences in their molecular structure and the resulting variations in rates of important elementary reactions. Reaction mechanisms in this study are works in progress and the results reported here are subject to change, based on model improvements and corrections of errors not yet discovered.

  17. Mechanism and kinetics of sintering of nonstoichiometric Y-Ba-Cu-O powders

    SciTech Connect

    Paritskaya, L.N.; Kaganovskii, Yu.S.; Bogdanov, V.V.

    1995-03-01

    Using high-resolution optical and scanning electron microscopy with x-ray microanalysis at temperatures of 880 to 920{degrees}C, we studied the kinetics and mechanism of the formation of intergranular contacts during sintering of powder-substrate models and also studied the mechanism of shrinkage during sintering of Y-Ba-Cu-O compacts with a stoichiometric composition and two nonstoichiometric compositions, YO{sub O.95}Ba{sub 2}CU{sub 3}O{sub Y} and Y{sub 1.05}Ba{sub 2}CU{sub 3}O{sub Y}. The formation and the shrinkage of powders of different compositions were found to be described by equations of different degrees, which points to different diffusion sintering mechanisms. Powders with stoichiometric and hyperstoichiometric compositions are sintered by a volume diffusion mechanism, which is controlled by the slowest ion, Y{sup 3+}. Powders with a substoichiometric composition (Y-0.95) are sintered like a liquid phase, i.e., is controlled by diffusion through liquid or solid layers where new phases with higher diffusion coefficients are formed as a result of segregation effects.

  18. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun -Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-06-26

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics somore » that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. Lastly, this study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries.« less

  19. Deciphering the kinetic mechanisms controlling selected plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Hwang, Seon K; Stewart, Jon D; Curtis Hannah, L

    2013-07-15

    ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a rate-limiting enzyme in starch biosynthesis, is controlled by thermostability and allosteric regulation. Previous studies suggested that redox affects turnover number and heat stability of AGPases. Here, we investigated how allostery and redox state affect kinetic mechanisms of the reduced, heat labile and the oxidized, heat stable potato tuber enzymes; the heat labile maize endosperm enzyme and a chimeric maize/potato heat stable enzyme that lacks the cysteine responsible for redox changes. With 3-PGA, all AGPases followed a Theorell-Chance Bi Bi mechanism with ATP binding first and ADP-Glc releasing last. 3-PGA increases the binding affinity for both substrates with little effect on velocity for the maize and MP isoforms. By contrast, 3-PGA increases the velocity and the affinity for G-1-P for the potato enzymes. Redox state does not affect kcat of the two potato isoforms. Without 3-PGA the oxidized potato enzyme exhibits a rapid equilibrium random Bi Bi mechanism with a dead end ternary complex. This fundamental change from rapid, ordered binding with little buildup of intermediates to a mechanism featuring relatively slow, random binding is unique to the oxidized potato tuber enzyme. Finally, ADP-Glc the physiologically relevant product of this enzyme has complex, isoform-specific effects on catalysis. PMID:23603314

  20. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Herein, we demonstrate physical/mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515. SLAC-PUB-16300 2 lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high performance Li-ion batteries.

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of auto- and copper-catalyzed oxidation of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu; Miller, Christopher J; Pham, A Ninh; Waite, T David

    2014-06-01

    Although quinones represent a class of organic compounds that may exert toxic effects both in vitro and in vivo, the molecular mechanisms involved in quinone species toxicity are still largely unknown, especially in the presence of transition metals, which may both induce the transformation of the various quinone species and result in generation of harmful reactive oxygen species. In this study, the oxidation of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone (NH2Q) in the absence and presence of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(II) in 10 mM NaCl solution over a pH range of 6.5-7.5 has been investigated, with detailed kinetic models developed to describe the predominant mechanisms operative in these systems. In the absence of copper, the apparent oxidation rate of NH2Q increased with increasing pH and initial NH2Q concentration, with concomitant oxygen consumption and peroxide generation. The doubly dissociated species, NQ(2-), has been shown to be the reactive species with regard to the one-electron oxidation by O2 and comproportionation with the quinone species, both generating the semiquinone radical (NSQ(·-)). The oxidation of NSQ(·-) by O2 is shown to be the most important pathway for superoxide (O2(·-)) generation with a high intrinsic rate constant of 1.0×10(8)M(-1)s(-1). Both NSQ(·-) and O2(·-) served as chain-propagating species in the autoxidation of NH2Q. Cu(II) is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of NH2Q in the presence of O2 with the oxidation also accelerated by increasing the pH. Both the uncharged (NH2Q(0)) and the mono-anionic (NHQ(-)) species were found to be the kinetically active forms, reducing Cu(II) with an intrinsic rate constant of 4.0×10(4) and 1.2×10(7)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The presence of O2 facilitated the catalytic role of Cu(II) by rapidly regenerating Cu(II) via continuous oxidation of Cu(I) and also by efficient removal of NSQ(·-) resulting in the generation of O2(·-). The half-cell reduction potentials of various redox couples at neutral p

  2. Mechanical study of the Chartreuse Fold-and-Thrust Belt: relationships between fluids overpressure and decollement within the Toarcian source-rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelon, Josselin; Sassi, William; Burov, Evgueni

    2016-04-01

    Many source-rocks are shale and constitute potential detachment levels in Fold-and-Thrust Belts (FTB): the toarcian Schistes-Cartons in the French Chartreuse FTB for example. Their mechanical properties can change during their burial and thermal maturation, as for example when large amount of hydrocarbon fluids are generated. A structural reconstruction of the Chartreuse FTB geo-history places the Toarcian Formation as the major decollement horizon. In this work, a mechanical analysis integrating the fluids overpressuring development is proposed to discuss on the validity of the structural interpretation. At first, an analogue of the Chartreuse Toarcian Fm, the albanian Posidonia Schist, is documented as it can provide insights on its initial properties and composition of its kerogen content. Laboratory characterisation documents the vertical evolution of the mineralogical, geochemical and mechanical parameters of this potential decollement layer. These physical parameters (i.e. Total Organic Carbon (TOC), porosity/permeability relationship, friction coefficient) are used to address overpressure buildup in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB with TEMISFlow Arctem Basin modelling approach (Faille et al, 2014) and the structural emplacement of the Chartreuse thrust units using the FLAMAR thermo-mechanical model (Burov et al, 2014). The hydro-mechanical modeling results highlight the calendar, distribution and magnitude of the overpressure that developed within the source-rock in the footwall of a simple fault-bend fold structure localized in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB. Several key geological conditions are required to create an overpressure able to fracture the shale-rocks and induce a significant change in the rheological behaviour: high TOC, low permeability, favourable structural evolution. These models highlight the importance of modeling the impact of a diffuse natural hydraulic fracturing to explain fluids propagation toward the foreland within

  3. The prosegment catalyzes native folding of Plasmodium falciparum plasmepsin II.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Ahmad Haniff; Xiao, Huogen; Dee, Derek R; Bryksa, Brian C; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-10-01

    Plasmepsin II is a malarial pepsin-like aspartic protease produced as a zymogen containing an N-terminal prosegment domain that is removed during activation. Despite structural similarities between active plasmepsin II and pepsin, their prosegments adopt different conformations in the respective zymogens. In contrast to pepsinogen, the proplasmepsin II prosegment is 80 residues longer, contains a transmembrane region and is non-essential for recombinant expression in an active form, thus calling into question the prosegment's precise function. The present study examines the role of the prosegment in the folding mechanism of plasmepsin II. Both a shorter (residues 77-124) and a longer (residues 65-124) prosegment catalyze plasmepsin II folding at rates more than four orders of magnitude faster compared to folding without prosegment. Native plasmepsin II is kinetically trapped and requires the prosegment both to catalyze folding and to shift the folding equilibrium towards the native conformation. Thus, despite low sequence identity and distinct zymogen conformations, the folding landscapes of plasmepsin II and pepsin, both with and without prosegment, are qualitatively identical. These results imply a conserved and unusual feature of the pepsin-like protease topology that necessitates prosegment-assisted folding. PMID:27378574

  4. Polymer Uncrossing and Knotting in Protein Folding, and Their Role in Minimal Folding Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mohazab, Ali R.; Plotkin, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for calculating the extent to which chain non-crossing is important in the most efficient, optimal trajectories or pathways for a protein to fold. This involves recording all unphysical crossing events of a ghost chain, and calculating the minimal uncrossing cost that would have been required to avoid such events. A depth-first tree search algorithm is applied to find minimal transformations to fold , , , and knotted proteins. In all cases, the extra uncrossing/non-crossing distance is a small fraction of the total distance travelled by a ghost chain. Different structural classes may be distinguished by the amount of extra uncrossing distance, and the effectiveness of such discrimination is compared with other order parameters. It was seen that non-crossing distance over chain length provided the best discrimination between structural and kinetic classes. The scaling of non-crossing distance with chain length implies an inevitable crossover to entanglement-dominated folding mechanisms for sufficiently long chains. We further quantify the minimal folding pathways by collecting the sequence of uncrossing moves, which generally involve leg, loop, and elbow-like uncrossing moves, and rendering the collection of these moves over the unfolded ensemble as a multiple-transformation “alignment”. The consensus minimal pathway is constructed and shown schematically for representative cases of an , , and knotted protein. An overlap parameter is defined between pathways; we find that proteins have minimal overlap indicating diverse folding pathways, knotted proteins are highly constrained to follow a dominant pathway, and proteins are somewhere in between. Thus we have shown how topological chain constraints can induce dominant pathway mechanisms in protein folding. PMID:23365638

  5. The kinetic mechanism of Human Thymidine Phosphorylase - a molecular target for cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Deves, Candida; Rostirolla, Diana Carolina; Martinelli, Leonardo Kras Borges; Bizarro, Cristiano Valim; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2014-03-01

    Human Thymidine Phosphorylase (HTP), also known as the platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) or gliostatin, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of thymidine (dThd) to thymine and 2-deoxy-α-d-ribose-1-phosphate (2dR1P). HTP is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway involved in dThd homeostasis in cells. HTP is a target for anticancer drug development as its enzymatic activity promotes angiogenesis. Here, we describe cloning, expression, and purification to homogeneity of recombinant TYMP-encoded HTP. Peptide fingerprinting and the molecular mass value of the homogenous protein confirmed its identity as HTP assessed by mass spectrometry. Size exclusion chromatography showed that HTP is a dimer in solution. Kinetic studies revealed that HTP displayed substrate inhibition for dThd. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies suggest that HTP catalysis follows a rapid-equilibrium random bi-bi kinetic mechanism. ITC measurements also showed that dThd and Pi binding are favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles indicated that maximal enzyme activity was achieved at low pH values. Functional groups with apparent pK values of 5.2 and 9.0 are involved in dThd binding and groups with pK values of 6.1 and 7.8 are involved in phosphate binding. PMID:24407036

  6. Cr(VI) Adsorption on Red Mud Modified by Lanthanum: Performance, Kinetics and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Li, Jie; Du, Zhao-Fu; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution caused by the highly toxic metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) creates significant human health and ecological risks. In this study, a novel adsorbent was used to treat Cr(VI)-containing wastewater; the adsorbent was prepared using red mud (RM) generated from the alumina production industry and the rare earth element lanthanum. This study explored adsorption performance, kinetics, and mechanisms. Results showed that the adsorption kinetics of the RM modified by lanthanum (La-RM), followed the pseudo-second-order model, with a rapid adsorption rate. Cr(VI) adsorption was positively associated with the absorbent dose, pH, temperature, and initial Cr(VI) concentration; coexisting anions had little impact. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity was 17.35 mg/g. Cr(VI) adsorption on La-RM was a mono-layer adsorption pattern, following the Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic parameters showed the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on La-RM occurred as a result of LaOCl formation on the RM surface, which in turn further reacted with Cr(VI) in the wastewater. This study highlighted a method for converting industrial waste into a valuable material for wastewater treatment. The novel absorbent could be used as a potential adsorbent for treating Cr(VI)-contaminating wastewater, due to its cost-effectiveness and high adsorption capability. PMID:27658113

  7. Equilibrium and kinetic mechanisms of woody biochar on aqueous glyphosate removal.

    PubMed

    Mayakaduwa, S S; Kumarathilaka, Prasanna; Herath, Indika; Ahmad, Mahtab; Al-Wabel, Mohammed; Ok, Yong Sik; Usman, Adel; Abduljabbar, Adel; Vithanage, Meththika

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the removal of aqueous glyphosate using woody (dendro) biochar obtained as a waste by product from bioenergy industry. Equilibrium isotherms and kinetics data were obtained by adsorption experiments. Glyphosate adsorption was strongly pH dependent occurring maximum in the pH range of 5-6. The protonated amino moiety of the glyphosate molecule at this pH may interact with π electron rich biochar surface via π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions. Isotherm data were best fitted to the Freundlich and Temkin models indicating multilayer sorption of glyphosate. The maximum adsorption capacity of dendro biochar for glyphosate was determined by the isotherm modeling to be as 44 mg/g. Adsorption seemed to be quite fast, reaching the equilibrium <1 h. Pseudo-second order model was found to be the most effective in describing kinetics whereas the rate limiting step possibly be chemical adsorption involving valence forces through sharing or exchanging electrons between the adsorbent and sorbate. The FTIR spectral analysis indicated the involvement of functional groups such as phenolic, amine, carboxylic and phosphate in adsorption. Hence, a heterogeneous chemisorption process between adsorbate molecules and functional groups on biochar surface can be suggested as the mechanisms involved in glyphosate removal. PMID:26340852

  8. CarD stabilizes mycobacterial open complexes via a two-tiered kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rammohan, Jayan; Ruiz Manzano, Ana; Garner, Ashley L; Stallings, Christina L; Galburt, Eric A

    2015-03-31

    CarD is an essential and global transcriptional regulator in mycobacteria. While its biological role is unclear, CarD functions by interacting directly with RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme promoter complexes. Here, using a fluorescent reporter of open complex, we quantitate RPo formation in real time and show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis CarD has a dramatic effect on the energetics of RNAP bound complexes on the M. tuberculosis rrnAP3 ribosomal RNA promoter. The data reveal that Mycobacterium bovis RNAP exhibits an unstable RPo that is stabilized by CarD and suggest that CarD uses a two-tiered, concentration-dependent mechanism by associating with open and closed complexes with different affinities. Specifically, the kinetics of open-complex formation can be explained by a model where, at saturating concentrations of CarD, the rate of bubble collapse is slowed and the rate of opening is accelerated. The kinetics and open-complex stabilities of CarD mutants further clarify the roles played by the key residues W85, K90 and R25 previously shown to affect CarD-dependent gene regulation in vivo. In contrast to M. bovis RNAP, Escherichia coli RNAP efficiently forms RPo on rrnAP3, suggesting an important difference between the polymerases themselves and highlighting how transcriptional machinery can vary across bacterial genera.

  9. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures.

  10. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC.

  11. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetics of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Zeng, Wei-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Liao, Xue-Pin; Shi, Bi

    2016-03-01

    Gelatin is a mixture of soluble proteins prepared by partial hydrolysis of native collagen. Gelatin can be enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce bioactive hydrolysates. However, the preparation of gelatin peptide with expected activity is usually a time-consuming process. The production efficiency of gelatin hydrolysates needs to be improved. In present work, effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on kinetic parameters of gelatin hydrolysis by collagenase was investigated based on an established kinetic model. With ultrasonic pretreatment, reaction rate constant and enzyme inactivation constant were increased by 27.5% and 27.8%, respectively. Meanwhile, hydrolysis activation energy and enzyme inactivation energy were reduced by 36.3% and 43.0%, respectively. In order to explore its possible mechanism, influence of sonication on structural properties of gelatin was determined using atomic force microscopy, particle size analyzer, fluorescence spectroscopy, protein solubility test and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide was used as a positive control for potential sonochemical effect. It was found that reduction of gelatin particle size was mainly caused by physical effect of ultrasound. Increased solubility and variation in β-sheet and random coil elements of gelatin were due to sonochemical effect. Both physical and chemical effects of sonication contributed to the change in α-helix and β-turn structures. The current results suggest that ultrasound can be potentially applied to stimulate the production efficiency of gelatin peptides, mainly due to its effects on modification of protein structures. PMID:26558996

  12. Mechanism and kinetics of evaporation from laser irradiated UO/sub 2/ surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, J.; Bloem, J.; Ohse, R.W.

    1982-06-15

    A theoretical analysis of laser evaporation experiments for the determination of the high temperture saturated vapor pressure of uranium dioxide is presented. The interaction of laser radation with the condensed phase is discussed and the timescales involved in the energy equilibration processes are given. The mechanism of evaporation is described within the framework of the Terrace--Ledge--Kink model, where it is shown that by using symmetry properties of ionic crystal lattices, the surface Madelung potentials and binding energies of ions and neutral ionic units may be determined. Results are presented for NaCl, CsCl, and UO/sub 2/ surfaces. Based on these calculations, general conclusions are drawn on the nature of the evaporating species. In addition, it is shown that the multispecies evaporation from uranium dioxide is fundamentally related to the amount of atomic and electronic disorder in the surface layer. The effects of the kinetics of surface reactions on the rate of evaporation are investigated. Parallel reaction paths such as direct evaporation from kink sites are treated in addition to surface diffusion followed by desorption series reactions. Finally, the possibility of producing superheated metastable surface layers under pulsed laser heating conditions is investigated using models for the kinetics of atomic and electronic disorder in the condensed phase.

  13. The mechanism and kinetic model on the OH-initiated degradation of acetofenate in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lingyan; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-02-01

    As an analog of DDT, acetofenate (AF), one of the organochlorine pesticides, is widely used in agricultural and mosquito sprayings. In this paper, the main reaction mechanism of AF with the OH radical and ensuing reactions are researched, including the OH-initiated reaction, oxidation reaction in the presence of O2, bimolecular reaction of AF-OH-O2 with NO/H2O, bond cleavage of aromatic ring and C7-O bond, and dehydrogenation. Among all the reaction pathways, the main products are obtained via C2-C7/C7-O bond cleavage, C3-C4/C4-C5 bond cleavage of aromatic ring, and the generation of ketene and aldehyde. The kinetic model is constructed based on the rate constants of element reactions over a temperature range of 200-600 K, which are calculated with the transition state theory method and fitted with the Arrhenius formulas. According to the kinetic model, the atmospheric lifetime of AF, is 37 days, compared to OH radical.

  14. CarD stabilizes mycobacterial open complexes via a two-tiered kinetic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Jayan; Ruiz Manzano, Ana; Garner, Ashley L.; Stallings, Christina L.; Galburt, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    CarD is an essential and global transcriptional regulator in mycobacteria. While its biological role is unclear, CarD functions by interacting directly with RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme promoter complexes. Here, using a fluorescent reporter of open complex, we quantitate RPo formation in real time and show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis CarD has a dramatic effect on the energetics of RNAP bound complexes on the M. tuberculosis rrnAP3 ribosomal RNA promoter. The data reveal that Mycobacterium bovis RNAP exhibits an unstable RPo that is stabilized by CarD and suggest that CarD uses a two-tiered, concentration-dependent mechanism by associating with open and closed complexes with different affinities. Specifically, the kinetics of open-complex formation can be explained by a model where, at saturating concentrations of CarD, the rate of bubble collapse is slowed and the rate of opening is accelerated. The kinetics and open-complex stabilities of CarD mutants further clarify the roles played by the key residues W85, K90 and R25 previously shown to affect CarD-dependent gene regulation in vivo. In contrast to M. bovis RNAP, Escherichia coli RNAP efficiently forms RPo on rrnAP3, suggesting an important difference between the polymerases themselves and highlighting how transcriptional machinery can vary across bacterial genera. PMID:25697505

  15. Mechanism and kinetics of the NOCO reaction on Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.; Kasemo, B.

    During the past 15 years, the NOCO reaction on Rh has attracted considerable attention of the researchers working in academic and applied surface science. The practical importance of this reaction is connected with its relevance for environmental chemistry. From the point of view of academic studies, the NOCO reaction on Rh is of interest because it represents one of the simplest examples from the class of catalytic reactions occurring via decomposition of adsorbed species. At present, the detailed kinetic data for this reaction are available both for single-crystal and supported Rh, at ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions and also at realistic pressures. For this reason, the NOCO reaction on Rh has become one of the major testing platforms for a microscopic, surface-science based approach to heterogeneous catalysis. The present review shows how far the progress in this field has come. In particular, the review describes in detail the evolution of the ideas for the mechanism of the reaction and also presents the data for the elementary reaction steps, obtained primarily on Rh(1 1 1) at UHV conditions. Then, the possibility of using these data for simulation of the reaction kinetics at moderate pressures, P NO ⋍ P CO ⋍ 0.01 bar, is discussed. The technological aspects of application of Rh in the automotive exhaust systems are surveyed as well, but only briefly.

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic mechanisms of woody biochar on aqueous glyphosate removal.

    PubMed

    Mayakaduwa, S S; Kumarathilaka, Prasanna; Herath, Indika; Ahmad, Mahtab; Al-Wabel, Mohammed; Ok, Yong Sik; Usman, Adel; Abduljabbar, Adel; Vithanage, Meththika

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the removal of aqueous glyphosate using woody (dendro) biochar obtained as a waste by product from bioenergy industry. Equilibrium isotherms and kinetics data were obtained by adsorption experiments. Glyphosate adsorption was strongly pH dependent occurring maximum in the pH range of 5-6. The protonated amino moiety of the glyphosate molecule at this pH may interact with π electron rich biochar surface via π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions. Isotherm data were best fitted to the Freundlich and Temkin models indicating multilayer sorption of glyphosate. The maximum adsorption capacity of dendro biochar for glyphosate was determined by the isotherm modeling to be as 44 mg/g. Adsorption seemed to be quite fast, reaching the equilibrium <1 h. Pseudo-second order model was found to be the most effective in describing kinetics whereas the rate limiting step possibly be chemical adsorption involving valence forces through sharing or exchanging electrons between the adsorbent and sorbate. The FTIR spectral analysis indicated the involvement of functional groups such as phenolic, amine, carboxylic and phosphate in adsorption. Hence, a heterogeneous chemisorption process between adsorbate molecules and functional groups on biochar surface can be suggested as the mechanisms involved in glyphosate removal.

  17. Substrate specificity and kinetic mechanism of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2009-06-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtPNP) is numbered among targets for persistence of the causative agent of tuberculosis. Here, it is shown that MtPNP is more specific to natural 6-oxopurine nucleosides and synthetic compounds, and does not catalyze the phosphorolysis of adenosine. Initial velocity, product inhibition and equilibrium binding data suggest that MtPNP catalyzes 2'-deoxyguanosine (2dGuo) phosphorolysis by a steady-state ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism, in which inorganic phosphate (P(i)) binds first followed by 2dGuo, and ribose 1-phosphate dissociates first followed by guanine. pH-rate profiles indicated a general acid as being essential for both catalysis and 2dGuo binding, and that deprotonation of a group abolishes P(i) binding. Proton inventory and solvent deuterium isotope effects indicate that a single solvent proton transfer makes a modest contribution to the rate-limiting step. Pre-steady-state kinetic data indicate that product release appears to contribute to the rate-limiting step for MtPNP-catalyzed reaction.

  18. Kinetic studies on photolysis-induced gelation of sickle cell hemoglobin suggest a new mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrone, F.A.; Hofrichter, J.; Sunshine, H.R.; Eaton, W.A.

    1980-10-01

    The kinetics of deoxyhemoglobin S gelation have been investigated using photolytic dissociation of the carbon monoxide complex to initiate the process. Measurements over a wide range of times, 10/sup -3/ -10/sup 4/s, show that both the concentration dependence of the tenth-time (i.e., the time required to complete one-tenth the reaction) and the time dependence of the process decrease as gelation speeds up. In slowly gelling samples, where single domains of polymers are formed in the small sample volumes employed with this technique (1 to 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 3/), there is a marked increase in the variability of the tenth-times. These results are explained by a mechanism in which gelation is initiated by homogeneous nucleation of polymers in the bulk solution phase, followed by heterogeneous nucleation on the surface of existing polymers. At the lowest concentrations, homogeneous nucleation is so improbable that stochastic behavior is observed in the small sample volumes, and heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant pathway for polymer formation, thereby accounting for the high time dependence. At the highest concentrations homogeneous nucleation becomes much more probable, and the time dependence decreases. The decrease in concentration dependence of the tenth-time with increasing concentration results from a decrease in size of both the homogeneous and heterogeneous critical nuclei. The model rationalizes the major observations on the kinetics of gelation of deoxyhemoglobin S, and is readily testable by further experiments.

  19. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  20. Mechanisms and Kinetics of the Post-Garnet Transformation in Pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Ohtani, E.; Kondo, T.; Kato, T.; Kikegawa, T.; Nagase, T.

    2001-12-01

    Garnet, which is one of the major constituent minerals of the subducting oceanic crust, transforms to perovskite (post-garnet transformation) at the depth of ~600-800 km. Metastability of garnet and changes of microstructures in the post-garnet transformation under subduction zone conditions possibly affect on dynamics of the subducting oceanic crust in the deep mantle. In order to clarify them, we performed high-pressure and high-temperature in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments on the post-garnet transformation kinetics of pyrope. Here we report preliminary results on mechanisms and kinetics of the decomposition reaction of pyrope garnet into aluminous perovskite and corundum. In-situ X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out using sintered-diamond multi-anvil apparatus MAX-III installed at KEK-PF. White X-ray from synchrotron radiation was used as the incident X-ray beam and the diffracted beam was measured by the energy dispersive method. Pressure was evaluated from the equation of state of gold (Anderson, 1989). The starting material is a sintered mixture of Mg3Al2Si3O12 pyrope (grain size is 2-5 μm ) and gold. It was compressed to the desired pressure at room temperature, and then heated to the desired temperature at constant oil pressure. When the temperature reached to the desired value, it was kept constant and time-resolved X-ray diffraction profiles were taken every 10-200 seconds. The transformation proceeded by about 50%\\ in 4 and 130 minutes at 31.0 GPa and 1473K, and 30.3 GPa and 1273K, respectively. When the transformed fraction reached about 50% the transformation rate drastically slowed down. At 26.0 GPa and 1673K, the transformation completed in 10 seconds. These preliminary kinetic data qualitatively suggest that kinetics of the post-garnet transformation in pyrope is significantly slower than those of the post-spinel transformation. SEM and TEM observations of the sample recovered from 30.3 GPa and 1273K revealed the grain

  1. A similar in vitro and in cell lysate folding intermediate for the FF domain.

    PubMed

    Latham, Michael P; Kay, Lewis E

    2014-09-23

    Understanding the mechanisms by which proteins fold into their three-dimensional structures, including a description of the intermediates that are formed during the folding process, remains a goal of protein science. Most studies are performed under carefully controlled conditions in which the folding reaction is monitored in a buffer solution that is far from the natural milieu of the cell. Here, we have used (13)C and (1)H relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy to study folding of the FF domain in both Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cellular lysates. We find that a conformationally excited state is populated in both lysates, which is very similar in structure to a folding intermediate observed in previous studies in buffer, with the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interconversion between native and intermediate conformers somewhat changed. The results point to the importance of extending folding studies beyond the test tube yet emphasize that insights can be obtained through careful experiments recorded in controlled buffer solutions.

  2. Mechanisms and kinetics for preparing carbohydrazide by reacting dimethyl carbonate with hydrazine: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Feng, Lina; Zhang, Shaowen; Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Tonglai; Yang, Li; Zheng, Huihui

    The mechanism and kinetic modeling for preparing carbohydrazide from dimethyl carbonate and hydrazine has been declared. The geometries of all the stationary points (reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products) are optimized by using the B3LYP method with the cc-pVDZ basis set, and the harmonic vibrational frequencies as well as infrared intensities are predicted with the same method. The minimum-energy paths are obtained by using the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) theory at the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory with the step length 0.02 (amu)1/2·bohr. The rate constants are evaluated by using the TST, TST/Eckart, and RRKM (T)/Eckart methods.

  3. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Tribello, Gareth A; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-07-01

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed.

  4. Phase Transformations in CuAu: Morphologies and Kinetics from Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ken; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    1996-03-01

    The existence of a modulated superlattice at intermediate temperatures in CuAu gives rise to a rich and complex set of phase transformations. For example, quenches from high and low temperatures into the modulated region leads respectively to the nucleation of labyrinth and bullseye patterns. In this alloy even the formation of the ordered superlattice from a disordered phase is dramatically different than that which occurs in standard disorder/order transformations. This transformation is strongly influenced by the presence of small metastable droplets that are the size of the modulated wavelength. A theoretical description(Bulbul Chakraborty, Ken Elder and Nigel Goldenfeld, Physica A, in press (1995)) of these kinetics and morphologies will be presented and compared to experiment. This description is based on a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation that was derived from a quantum mechanical Hamiltonian using the embedded atom method(Bulbul Chakraborty and Zhigang Xi, Phys. Rev. Lett 68), 2039 (1992).

  5. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Tribello, Gareth A; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-07-01

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed. PMID:27269363

  6. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most ice in nature forms because of impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is about 20 orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong two-dimensional character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed. PMID:27269363

  7. Theoretical study of the decomposition mechanisms and kinetics of the ingredients RDX in composition B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Kun; Niu, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Shao-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Tong-Lai; Zhou, Zun-Ning

    2012-08-01

    RDX as a component in composition B (TNT + RDX) was first studied by us on its mechanism and kinetics of decomposition reactions in this paper. We have pointed out three possible pathways and found a new low-energy process of its decomposition. The N-N bond cleavage in composition B has higher dissociation energies than the monomer, but it is also the initial step. The optimized structures and the frequencies of all the stationary points were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The minimum-energy paths were obtained by using the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) theory, and the reaction potential energy curve was corrected with zero-point energy. Finally, the rate constants were calculated in a wide temperature region from 200 to 2500 K using TST, TST/Eckart theories. The obtained results also indicate that the tunneling effects are remarkable at low temperature (200 K

  8. Study on the Kinetics of Aluminum Removal from Liquid Silicon to Slag with Mechanical Stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewoo; White, Jesse F.; Hildal, Kjetil; Sichen, Du

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of aluminum removal from silicon melt to CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 slag was studied. A recently designed experimental setup using mechanical stirring was employed to focus the study on the chemical reaction. The slag and metal were found to reach chemical equilibrium in 300 seconds. A simple model could reproduce the experimental data satisfactorily. Both the experimental results and the model prediction further confirmed that the process was controlled by the chemical reaction, since the reaction rate constant was found to be independent of the amount of slag and the initial slag composition. The experimental data at equilibrium were compared with the model calculations. The discrepancy between the model calculations and the experimental data strongly suggests the need for careful thermodynamic measurements.

  9. Light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis: energetics, kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Renger, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    The essential steps of photosynthetic water splitting take place in Photosystem II (PSII) and comprise three different reaction sequences: (i) light induced formation of the radical pair P680(+)Q(A)(-), (ii) P680(+) driven oxidative water splitting into O(2) and four protons, and (iii) two step plastoquinone reduction to plastoquinol by Q(A)(-). This mini-review briefly summarizes our state of knowledge on energetics, kinetics and mechanism of oxidative water splitting. Essential features of the two types of reactions involved are described: (a) P680(+) reduction by the redox active tyrosine Y(z) and (b) sequence of oxidation steps induced by Y(z)(ox) in the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). The rate of the former reaction is limited by the non-adiabatic electron transfer (NET) step and the multi-phase kinetics shown to originate from a sequence of relaxation processes. In marked contrast, the rate of the stepwise oxidation by Y(z)(ox) of the WOC up to the redox level S(3) is not limited by NET but by trigger reactions which probably comprise proton shifts and/or conformational changes. The overall rate of the final reaction sequence leading to formation and release of O(2) is assumed to be limited by the electron transfer step from the S(3) state of WOC to Y(z)(ox) due to involvement of an endergonic redox equilibrium. Currently discussed controversial ideas on possible pathways are briefly outlined. Several crucial points of the mechanism of oxidative water splitting, like O-O bond formation, role of local proton shift(s), details of hydrogen bonding, are still not clarified and remain a challenging topic of future research.

  10. Anaerobic transformation kinetics and mechanism of steroid estrogenic hormones in dairy lagoon water.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Yates, Scott R; Bradford, Scott A

    2012-05-15

    Wastewater from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) frequently contains high concentrations of steroid estrogenic hormones. Release of these hormones into the environment may occur when CAFO wastewater is applied to agricultural lands as a nutrient and water source for crop production. To assess the potential risk of hormone contaminants derived from animal wastewater, we investigated the transformation kinetics and mechanisms of three natural estrogenic hormones (17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone) in aqueous solutions blended with dairy lagoon water under anaerobic conditions. Initial transformations of the three hormones in the dairy lagoon water were dominated by biodegradation and the degradation rates were temperature-dependent. The total amounts of hormones (initial concentration at 5 mg L(-1)) remaining in the solution after 52 days at 35 °C accounted for approximately 85%, 78%, and 77% of the initial amounts of 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone, respectively. This observation suggests that these hormones are relatively stable over time and may accumulate in anaerobic or anoxic environments and anaerobic CAFO lagoons. A racemization reaction between 17α-estradiol and 17β-estradiol via estrone was observed in aqueous solutions in the presence of CAFO wastewater under anaerobic conditions. The initial hormone concentrations did not affect this degradation mechanism. A reversible reaction kinetic model was applied to fit the observed transformation dynamics. The degradation and regeneration of the parent hormone and its metabolites were successfully simulated by this model. The information in this study is useful for assessing the environmental risk of steroid hormones released from CAFO wastewater and to better understand why these hormone contaminants persist in many aquatic environments.

  11. UPTAKE OF NITRATE AND NITRITE BY DITYLUM BRIGHTWELLII-KINETICS AND MECHANISMS(1) (2).

    PubMed

    Eppley, R W; Coatsworth, J L

    1968-06-01

    Ditylum brightwellii grown on NO2 - as a nitrogen source took up and assimilated NO2 - only in the light, apparently via a photosynthetic nitrite reductase. Assimilation was inhibited by dichlorophenyldimethylurea (DCMU), KCN, partially by 2,4 dinitrophenol, and by NO3 -. Kinetics of inhibition of NO2 - assimilation by NO3 - appeared to be "competitive." D. brightwellii cells grown on NO2 - took up NO3 - in both light and dark and in both cases the uptake was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, but not by DCMU, KCN, or by NO2 -. Most of the NO3 - taken up in the dark was recovered unchanged from the cells. However only 40% of NO3 - taken up in light was recovered from the cells and no NO2 - was found. This suggests that a photosynthetic nitrate reduction mechanism was active in these cells. DCMU inhibited the light-induced NO3 - reduction. This mechanism of NO3 - reduction is distinct from that involving NADH nitrate reductase in D. brightwellii since the concentration of the latter enzyme is very low in cells grown on NO2 -. Saturation kinetics were observed for NO2 - and NO3 - uptake. Half-saturation concentrations (Ks values) were 4 and 2 μM, respectively. These values are compared with those obtained for NO2 - and NO3 - assimilation by other unicellular algae. The comparisons show lower Ks values in oceanic species compared with tide-pool or freshwater algae and they support the idea that Ks values for NO3 - assimilation may provide a key to understanding species succession when this is due to declining: nitrate concentrations in the sea. PMID:27067951

  12. Anaerobic transformation kinetics and mechanism of steroid estrogenic hormones in dairy lagoon water.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Yates, Scott R; Bradford, Scott A

    2012-05-15

    Wastewater from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) frequently contains high concentrations of steroid estrogenic hormones. Release of these hormones into the environment may occur when CAFO wastewater is applied to agricultural lands as a nutrient and water source for crop production. To assess the potential risk of hormone contaminants derived from animal wastewater, we investigated the transformation kinetics and mechanisms of three natural estrogenic hormones (17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone) in aqueous solutions blended with dairy lagoon water under anaerobic conditions. Initial transformations of the three hormones in the dairy lagoon water were dominated by biodegradation and the degradation rates were temperature-dependent. The total amounts of hormones (initial concentration at 5 mg L(-1)) remaining in the solution after 52 days at 35 °C accounted for approximately 85%, 78%, and 77% of the initial amounts of 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol, and estrone, respectively. This observation suggests that these hormones are relatively stable over time and may accumulate in anaerobic or anoxic environments and anaerobic CAFO lagoons. A racemization reaction between 17α-estradiol and 17β-estradiol via estrone was observed in aqueous solutions in the presence of CAFO wastewater under anaerobic conditions. The initial hormone concentrations did not affect this degradation mechanism. A reversible reaction kinetic model was applied to fit the observed transformation dynamics. The degradation and regeneration of the parent hormone and its metabolites were successfully simulated by this model. The information in this study is useful for assessing the environmental risk of steroid hormones released from CAFO wastewater and to better understand why these hormone contaminants persist in many aquatic environments. PMID:22519517

  13. Fundamental and semi-global kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon combustion. Final report, March 1977-October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F L; Glassman, I; Brezinsky, K

    1981-03-01

    Over the past three and one half years, substantial research efforts of the Princeton Fuels Research Group have been directed towards the development of simplified mechanisms which would accurately describe the oxidation of hydrocarbons fuels. The objectives of this combustion research included the study of semi-empirical modeling (that is an overall description) of the chemical kinetic mechanisms of simple hydrocarbon fuels. Such fuels include the alkanes: ethane, propane, butane, hexane and octane as well as the critically important alkenes: ethene, propene and butene. As an extension to this work, the study of the detailed radical species characteristics of combustion systems was initiated as another major aspect of the program, with emphasis on the role of the OH and HO/sub 2/ radicals. Finally, the studies of important alternative fuel problems linked the program to longer range approaches to the energy supply question. Studies of alternative fuels composed the major elements of this area of the program. The efforts on methanol research were completed, and while the aromatics aspects of the DOE work have been a direct extension of efforts supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, they represented a significant part of the overall research effort. The emphasis in the proposed program is to provide further fundamental understanding of the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels which will be useful in guiding engineering approaches. Although the scope of program ranges from the fundamentals of chemical kinetics to that of alternative fuel combustion, the objective in mind is to provide insight and guidance to the understanding of practical combustion environments. The key to our approach has been our understanding of the fundamental combustion chemistry and its relation to the important practical combustion problems which exist in implementing energy efficient, alternate fuels technologies.

  14. Parallel versus Off-Pathway Michaelis-Menten Mechanism for Single-Enzyme Kinetics of a Fluctuating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Maity, Hiranmay; Dua, Arti

    2015-07-01

    Recent fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of the turnover time distribution of single-enzyme turnover kinetics of β-galactosidase provide evidence of Michaelis-Menten kinetics at low substrate concentration. However, at high substrate concentrations, the dimensionless variance of the turnover time distribution shows systematic deviations from the Michaelis-Menten prediction. This difference is attributed to conformational fluctuations in both the enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex and to the possibility of both parallel- and off-pathway kinetics. Here, we use the chemical master equation to model the kinetics of a single fluctuating enzyme that can yield a product through either parallel- or off-pathway mechanisms. An exact expression is obtained for the turnover time distribution from which the mean turnover time and randomness parameters are calculated. The parallel- and off-pathway mechanisms yield strikingly different dependences of the mean turnover time and the randomness parameter on the substrate concentration. In the parallel mechanism, the distinct contributions of enzyme and enzyme-substrate fluctuations are clearly discerned from the variation of the randomness parameter with substrate concentration. From these general results, we conclude that an off-pathway mechanism, with substantial enzyme-substrate fluctuations, is needed to rationalize the experimental findings of single-enzyme turnover kinetics of β-galactosidase.

  15. Free radical scavenger properties of α-mangostin: thermodynamics and kinetics of HAT and RAF mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana; Galano, Annia; Vargas, Rubicelia

    2011-11-01

    Mangosteen is a tropical fruit that presents beneficial effects on human health since it is rich in anthocyanins and xanthones, which are considered bioactive compounds that have been described as good free radical scavengers. One of its most active compounds is α-mangostin. In this report, a theoretical study on the free radical scavenger capacity of α-mangostin and its monoanion is analyzed using the density functional theory approximation. Two well-known reaction mechanisms are investigated: the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and the radical adduct formation (RAF). Two other mechanisms are also considered: sequential electron proton Transfer (SEPT) and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET). According to thermodynamics and kinetics, α-mangostin and its deprotonated form are good free radical scavenger through the HAT mechanism, with the anionic (deprotonated) form being more reactive than the neutral one. Their capacity to scavenge OOH free radical is similar to that of carotenes, higher than that of allicin, much higher than that of melatonin and N-acetylcysteine amide, and about 15 times lower than that of 2-propenesulfenic acid.

  16. An efficient error-propagation-based reduction method for large chemical kinetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2008-07-15

    Production rates obtained from a detailed chemical mechanism are analyzed in order to quantify the coupling between the various species and reactions involved. These interactions can be represented by a directed relation graph. A geometric error propagation strategy applied to this graph accurately identifies the dependencies of specified targets and creates a set of increasingly simplified kinetic schemes containing only the chemical paths deemed the most important for the targets. An integrity check is performed concurrently with the reduction process to avoid truncated chemical paths and mass accumulation in intermediate species. The quality of a given skeletal model is assessed through the magnitude of the errors introduced in the target predictions. The applied error evaluation is variable-dependent and unambiguous for unsteady problems. The technique yields overall monotonically increasing errors, and the smallest skeletal mechanism that satisfies a user-defined error tolerance over a selected domain of applicability is readily obtained. An additional module based on life-time analysis identifies a set of species that can be modeled accurately by quasi-steady state relations. An application of the reduction procedure is presented for autoignition using a large iso-octane mechanism. The whole process is automatic, is fast, has moderate CPU and memory requirements, and compares favorably to other existing techniques. (author)

  17. Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM): description and sensitivity to some estimated kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taraborrelli, Domenico; Cabrera Perez, David; Sander, Rolf; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Despite decades of reasearch, global atmospheric chemistry models still have significant biases compared to the estimated distribution and evolution of tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical. The gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is acknowledged to play an important role among the processes affecting tropospheric ozone, methane lifetime and aerosol evolution. Thus, chemical mechanisms of very diverse complexity have been developed for the major VOCs. However, all mechanisms present shortcomings such as neglection or lumping of intermediates and estimate of many rate constants and product distributions. Here, we present a VOC oxidation mechanism of intermediate complexity called the Mainz Organics Mechanism (MOM). With about 400 species and 1500 reactions, it represents the oxidation of about 20 primarily emitted VOCs comprising small alkanes and alkenes, isoprene, pinenes and monocyclic aromatic compounds. The development protocol significantly borrows from the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). However, MOM distinguishes itself for a number of features. First, the structure activity relationship for estimating the rate constants involving hydroxyl radical is site-specific and dependent on temperature. Second, the alkyl nitrate yields are considered to be dependent on temperature, pressure and molecular structure. RO2 + HO2 reaction kinetics is consistent with the recent direct studies of \\chem{OH}-reformation. Isoprene chemistry includes the latest experimental advancements with respect to OH-recycling and alkyl nitrate chemistry. Pinenes chemistry is largely the one by the MCM but with some modifications according to the work of the Leuven's group. Finally, the chemistry of the aromatics is also borrowed from the MCM but with additional photolysis of ortho-nitrophenols leading to \\chem{HONO} formation. The sensitivity of the model to the temperature and pressure dependence of estimated \\chem{OH} rate constants and alkyl nitrate yields will

  18. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    scheme to extract kinetic information about the adduct reations with O2 and branching ratios for OH regeneration. A plausible mechanism for OH regeneration in (2) involves OH addition to the nitrogen atom followed by O2 addition to the cyano carbon atom, isomeriazation and decomposition to D2CO + DOCN + OH. Our results suggest that the OH + CH3CN reaction occurs via a complex mechanism involving both bimolecular and termolecular pathways, analogous to the mechanisms for the the important atmospheric reactions of OH with CO and HNO3.

  19. Egg white sulfhydryl oxidase: kinetic mechanism of the catalysis of disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Hoober, K L; Thorpe, C

    1999-03-01

    The flavin-dependent sulfhydryl oxidase from chicken egg white catalyzes the oxidation of sulfhydryl groups to disulfides with reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. The oxidase contains FAD and a redox-active cystine bridge and accepts a total of 4 electrons per active site. Dithiothreitol (DTT; the best low molecular weight substrate known) reduces the enzyme disulfide bridge with a limiting rate of 502/s at 4 degrees C, pH 7.5, yielding a thiolate-to-flavin charge-transfer complex. Further reduction to EH4 is limited by the slow internal transfer of reducing equivalents from enzyme dithiol to oxidized flavin (3.3/s). In the oxidative half of catalysis, oxygen rapidly converts EH4 to EH2, but Eox appearance is limited by the slow internal redox equilibration. During overall turnover with DTT, the thiolate-to-flavin charge-transfer complex accumulates with an apparent extinction coefficient of 4.9 mM-1 cm-1 at 560 nm. In contrast, glutathione (GSH) is a much slower reductant of the oxidase to the EH2 level and shows a kcat/Km 100-fold smaller than DTT. Full reduction of EH2 by GSH shows a limiting rate of 3.6/s at 4 degrees C comparable to that seen with DTT. Reduced RNase is an excellent substrate of the enzyme, with kcat/Km per thiol some 1000- and 10-fold better than GSH and DTT, respectively. Enzyme-monitored steady-state turnover shows that RNase is a facile reductant of the oxidase to the EH2 state. This work demonstrates the basic similarity in the mechanism of turnover between all of these three substrates. A physiological role for sulfhydryl oxidase in the formation of disulfide bonds in secreted proteins is discussed.

  20. Oxidative folding: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2011-10-01

    Disulfide bond formation in proteins is an effective tool of both structure stabilization and redox regulation. The prokaryotic periplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotes were long considered as the only compartments for enzyme mediated formation of stable disulfide bonds. Recently, the mitochondrial intermembrane space has emerged as the third protein-oxidizing compartment. The classic view on the mechanism of oxidative folding in the endoplasmic reticulum has also been reshaped by new observations. Moreover, besides the structure stabilizing function, reversible disulfide bridge formation in some proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum, seems to play a regulatory role. This review briefly summarizes the present knowledge of the redox systems supporting oxidative folding, emphasizing recent developments. PMID:25962043

  1. Equilibrium Kinetic Network of the Villin Headpiece in Implicit Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Du, Weina; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We applied the single-replica multiple-state transition-interface sampling method to elucidate the equilibrium kinetic network of the 35-residue-fragment (HP-35) villin headpiece in implicit water at room temperature. Starting from the native Protein Data Bank structure, nine (meta)stable states of the system were identified, from which the kinetic network was built by sampling pathways between these states. Application of transition path theory allowed analysis of the (un)folding mechanism. The resulting (un)folding rates agree well with experiments. This work demonstrates that high (un)folding barriers can now be studied. PMID:25606685

  2. Kinetics and mechanisms of crystal growth inhibition of indomethacin by model precipitation inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dhaval

    Supersaturating Drug Delivery Systems (SDDS) could enhance oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs (PWSD). Precipitation inhibitors (PIs) in SDDS could maintain supersaturation by inhibiting nucleation, crystal growth, or both. The mechanisms by which these effects are realized are generally unknown. The goal of this dissertation was to explore the mechanisms underpinning the effects of model PIs including hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrins (HP-beta-CD), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the crystal growth of indomethacin, a model PWSD. At high degrees of supersaturation (S), the crystal growth kinetics of indomethacin was bulk diffusion-controlled, which was attributed to a high energy form deposited on the seed crystals. At lower S, indomethacin growth kinetics was surface integration-controlled. The effect of HP-beta-CD at high S was successfully modeled using the reactive diffusion layer theory. The superior effects of PVP and HPMC as compared to HP-beta-CD at high S were attributed to a change in the rate limiting step from bulk diffusion to surface integration largely due to prevention of the high energy form formation. The effects of PIs at low S were attributed to significant retardation of the surface integration rate, a phenomenon that may reflect the adsorption of PIs onto the growing surface. PVP was selected to further understand the relationship between adsorption and crystal growth inhibition. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm model fit the adsorption isotherms of PVP and N-vinylpyrrolidone well. The affinity and extent of adsorption of PVP were significantly higher than those of N-vinylpyrrolidone, which was attributed to cooperative interactions between PVP and indomethacin. The extent of PVP adsorption on a weight-basis was greater for higher molecular weight PVP but less on a molar-basis indicating an increased percentage of loops and tails for higher molecular weight PVPs. PVP significantly inhibited

  3. Kinetics and mechanisms of degradation of chloroacetonitriles by the UV/H2O2 process.

    PubMed

    Ling, Li; Sun, Jianliang; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-08-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are emerging disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are more toxic than the regulated DBPs and widely found in the chlorinated/chloraminated water. This paper studied kinetics and mechanisms of the degradation of chloroacetonitriles (CANs) by the UV/H2O2 process at pH 6 and 7.5 and H2O2 concentrations of 1 × 10(-3) M, 5 × 10(-3) M and 1 × 10(-2) M. The degradation followed pseudo first-order degradation kinetics. The degradation rate of monochloroacetonitrile (MCAN) remained similar, while those of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) increased with increasing pH and H2O2 concentrations. The different trends were attributed to the changing contributions of the two major mechanisms: the nucleophilic attack by hydroperoxide ions ( [Formula: see text] ) and the hydroxyl radical (•OH) oxidation. The second-order rate constants of [Formula: see text] towards MCAN, DCAN and TCAN were determined to be 11.8 (±0.62), 4.83 (±0.01) × 10(3), and 2.54 (±0.23) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, while that of •OH were 8.7 × 10(6), 4.4 × 10(6), and < 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The degradation of TCAN was mainly attributed to the [Formula: see text] nucleophilic attack, while that of MCAN was dominated by the •OH oxidation. DCAN was degraded by both mechanisms. The nucleophilic attack increased linearly with increasing [Formula: see text] concentration as a result of increasing H2O2 concentration and/or pH, while the •OH oxidation was less dependent on H2O2 concentrations and/or pH. The nucleophilic attack mainly transformed HANs to haloacetamides, while the •OH oxidation dechlorinated HANs. This paper firstly illustrated the importance of the [Formula: see text] nucleophilic attack, in addition to the •OH oxidation, on the CAN degradation in the UV/H2O2 process.

  4. Mechanism, kinetics, and pathways of self-sensitized sunlight photodegradation of phenylarsonic compounds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiande; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-06-01

    Being highly water-soluble, phenylarsonic feed additives discharged in animal wastes can easily accumulate in surface water bodies. The photodegradation mechanism, kinetics, and pathways of p-arsanilic acid (p-ASA), 4-hydrophenylarsonic acid (4-HPAA), and phenylarsonic acid (PAA) in water under simulated and natural sunlight irradiation were investigated. The -AsO(OH)2 group was cleaved from the aromatic ring during photodegradation, and p-benzoquinone and p-hydroquinone were formed as the major organic degradation intermediates. Experimental results did not indicate any significant direct photolysis of the phenylarsonic compounds under simulated and natural sunlight irradiation, but consistently showed that they sensitized the formation of singlet oxygen, which was responsible for their photodegradation and oxidation of the As(III) released. A simple (1)O2-based "heterogeneous" model was developed, which could well describe the kinetics of (1)O2 formation and phenylarsonic compound photodegradation under various conditions. Indirect photolysis caused by inorganic ions commonly present in natural waters was negligible, while natural organic matter could significantly inhibit their photodegradation. The half-lives of p-ASA, 4-HPAA, and PAA photodegradation under simulated sunlight irradiation (765 W m(-2), 25 °C) were 11.82 ± 0.19, 20.06 ± 0.10, and 135 ± 6.0 min, respectively, while their degradation rates under natural sunlight in the Pearl River Delta of southern China were 5 times slower due to lower irradiation intensity and water temperatures (19-23 °C). PMID:27038583

  5. Troilite formation kinetics and growth mechanism in the solar nebula. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Troilite formation via the reaction Fe(s) + H2S(g) + H2(g) is the major mechanism for S retention in grains in the solar nebula. Thermodynamic calculations predict that troilite condenses from a solar composition gas. We present experimental results on the kinetics and growth of troilite crystals on Fe metal at temperature (450-650 C) and composition (50-1000 ppm H2S in H2) conditions similar to those in the solar nebula. The fraction of Fe reacted (based on gravimetric data) is plotted at 450, 505, 575, and 650 C. The thickness change of unreacted iron (measured by optical microscopy) is plotted at 575 and 650 C vs. time. the weight change per unit area varies as the square root of time at the lower temperatures and varies linearly with time at the highest temperature. The growth behavior along the lower isotherms is due to diffusion. This behavior suggests sulfide diffusion to the metal-sulfide interface and suggests Fe(2+) diffusion to the sulfide-gas interface. The reaction along the highest isotherm appears to be interface controlled. The formation of troilite crystals is a rapid process forming measurable layers in a few hours. The crystalgrowth is complicated. Initially there are intergrowths of troilite into the pure Fe metal. As the reaction progresses two distinct layers of troilite crystals form. One is in contact with the Fe metal and consists of small randomly oriented crystals with pore space between them. The outermost layer contains large crystals that are all oriented in the same direction. The intergrowth layer is much smaller at 650 C than at 575 C. This suggest that FeS nucleation is inhibited at the higher temperature, accounting for the initially slower reaction rate. Once nucleated, the reaction kinetics are apparently controlled by the growth of the crystals at the interface.

  6. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Young, Jodi N; Heureux, Ana M C; Sharwood, Robert E; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Morel, François M M; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-05-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat (c)), oxygenation (k cat (o)), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23-68 µM), SC/O (57-116mol mol(-1)), and K O (413-2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat (c) for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1-3.7s(-1)), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat (c) for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  7. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi N.; Heureux, Ana M.C.; Sharwood, Robert E.; Rickaby, Rosalind E.M.; Morel, François M.M.; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat c), oxygenation (k cat o), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23–68 µM), SC/O (57–116mol mol−1), and K O (413–2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat c for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1–3.7s−1), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat c for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily. PMID:27129950

  8. Large variation in the Rubisco kinetics of diatoms reveals diversity among their carbon-concentrating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Young, Jodi N; Heureux, Ana M C; Sharwood, Robert E; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Morel, François M M; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-05-01

    While marine phytoplankton rival plants in their contribution to global primary productivity, our understanding of their photosynthesis remains rudimentary. In particular, the kinetic diversity of the CO2-fixing enzyme, Rubisco, in phytoplankton remains unknown. Here we quantify the maximum rates of carboxylation (k cat (c)), oxygenation (k cat (o)), Michaelis constants (K m) for CO2 (K C) and O2 (K O), and specificity for CO2 over O2 (SC/O) for Form I Rubisco from 11 diatom species. Diatom Rubisco shows greater variation in K C (23-68 µM), SC/O (57-116mol mol(-1)), and K O (413-2032 µM) relative to plant and algal Rubisco. The broad range of K C values mostly exceed those of C4 plant Rubisco, suggesting that the strength of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in diatoms is more diverse, and more effective than previously predicted. The measured k cat (c) for each diatom Rubisco showed less variation (2.1-3.7s(-1)), thus averting the canonical trade-off typically observed between K C and k cat (c) for plant Form I Rubisco. Uniquely, a negative relationship between K C and cellular Rubisco content was found, suggesting variation among diatom species in how they allocate their limited cellular resources between Rubisco synthesis and their CCM. The activation status of Rubisco in each diatom was low, indicating a requirement for Rubisco activase. This work highlights the need to better understand the correlative natural diversity between the Rubisco kinetics and CCM of diatoms and the underpinning mechanistic differences in catalytic chemistry among the Form I Rubisco superfamily.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of bacterial inactivation by ultrasound waves and sonoprotective effect of milk components.

    PubMed

    Gera, N; Doores, S

    2011-03-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes were investigated in buffer and milk upon treatment with ultrasound waves (USW). In addition, sonoprotective effect of milk components and ultrasound-induced changes in bacterial cells were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacterial cells were added to phosphate buffer, whole milk, skim milk, or simulated milk ultrafiltrate (SMUF). To determine the sonoprotective effect of milk components, lactose (5%), casein (3%), or β lactoglobulin (0.3%) was added to SMUF. Samples were sonicated with 24 kHz pulse USW while maintaining the system temperature between 30 to 35 °C. Aliquots were drawn at set times during sonication and bacteria were enumerated by surface plating appropriate dilutions on selective and nonselective media plates. Escherichia coli exhibited significantly higher D values in whole (2.43 min) and skim milk (2.41 min) than phosphate buffer (2.19 min). Listeria monocytogenes also showed higher D values in whole (9.31 min) and skim milk (8.61 min) compared to phosphate buffer (7.63 min). Data suggest that milk exerts a sonoprotective effect on these bacteria. Escherichia coli exhibited a log-linear inactivation kinetics followed by tailing whereas L. monocytogenes showed 1st-order kinetics throughout. Among the milk components tested, presence of lactose in SMUF resulted in significantly higher D values than SMUF for both organisms suggesting that lactose was exerting a protective effect on bacteria. SEM images showed that USW caused mechanical damage to the cell wall and cell membrane of bacteria leading to their inactivation. PMID:21535773

  10. Transient state kinetic evidence for an oligomer in the mechanism of Na sup + -H sup + exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Otsu, K.; Kinsella, J.; Sacktor, B.; Froehlich, J.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements of {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake by the amiloride-sensitive Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchanger in renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were performed at 0{degree}C to characterize the intermediate reactions of the exchange cycle. At 1 mM Na{sup +}, the initial time course of Na{sup +} uptake was resolved into three separate components: (i) a lag phase, (ii) an exponential or burst phase, and (iii) a constant velocity or steady-state phase. Pulse-chase experiments using partially loaded BBMV showed no evidence for {sup 22}Na{sup +} backflux, suggesting that the decline in the rate of Na{sup +} uptake rate following the burst represents completion of the first turnover of the exchanger. Gramicidin completely abolished Na{sup +} uptake, indicating that the burst phase results from the translocation of Na{sup +} rather than from residual Na{sup +} binding to external sites. Raising the (Na{sup +}) from 1 to 10 mM at constant pH produced a sigmoidal increase in the amplitude of the burst phase without affecting the lag duration or the apparent burst rate. These results suggest that a minimum of two Na{sup +} transport sites must be occupied to activate Na{sup +} uptake in the pre-steady state. The transition to Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the steady state can be explained by a flip-flop or alternating site mechanism in which the functional transport unit is an oligomer and only one protomer per cycle is allowed to form a translocation complex with Na{sup +} after the first turnover.

  11. Acceptor Substrate Selectivity and Kinetic Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis TagA†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Ginsberg, Cynthia; Yuan, Yanqiu; Walker, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are anionic polymers that coat the cell walls of Gram-positive bacteria. Because they are essential for survival or virulence in many organisms, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of WTAs are attractive antibiotic targets. The first committed step in the WTA biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus subtilis is catalyzed by TagA, which transfers N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc) to the C4 hydroxyl of a membrane-anchored N-acetyl glucosaminyl diphospholipid (GlcNAc-pp-undecaprenyl, lipid I) to make ManNAc-β-(1,4)-GlcNAc-pp-undecaprenyl (lipid II). We have previously shown that TagA utilizes an alternative substrate containing a saturated C13H27 lipid chain. Here we use unnatural substrates and products to establish the lipid preferences of the enzyme and to characterize the kinetic mechanism. We report that TagA is a metal ion-independent glycosyltransferase that follows a steady-state ordered Bi Bi mechanism in which UDP-ManNAc binds first and UDP is released last. TagA shares homology with a large family of bacterial glycosyltransferases, and the work described here should facilitate structural analysis of the enzyme in complex with its substrates. PMID:16953575

  12. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Amyloid Aggregation Investigated by a Phenomenological Coarse-Grained Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magno, Andrea; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered polypeptide aggregates that have been implicated in several neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion diseases, [1, 2] and, more recently, also in biological functionalities. [3, 4, 5] These findings have paved the way for a wide range of experimental and computational studies aimed at understanding the details of the fibril-formation mechanism. Computer simulations using low-resolution models, which employ a simplified representation of protein geometry and energetics, have provided insights into the basic physical principles underlying protein aggregation in general [6, 7, 8] and ordered amyloid aggregation. [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15] For example, Dokholyan and coworkers have used the Discrete Molecular Dynamics method [16, 17] to shed light on the mechanisms of protein oligomerization [18] and the conformational changes that take place in proteins before the aggregation onset. [19, 20] One challenging observation, which is difficult to observe by computer simulations, is the wide range of aggregation scenarios emerging from a variety of biophysical measurements. [21, 22] Atomistic models have been employed to study the conformational space of amyloidogenic polypeptides in the monomeric state, [23, 24, 25] the very initial steps of amyloid formation, [26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32] and the structural stability of fibril models. [33, 34, 35) However, all-atom simulations of the kinetics of fibril formation are beyond what can be done with modern computers.

  13. Biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of azo dye 4BS by a microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Yuezhong

    2004-10-01

    A microbial consortium consisting of a white-rot fungus 8-4* and a Pseudomonas 1-10 was isolated from wastewater treatment facilities of a local dyeing house by enrichment, using azo dye Direct Fast Scarlet 4BS as the sole source of carbon and energy, which had a high capacity for rapid decolorization of 4BS. To elucidate the decolorization mechanisms, decolorization of 4BS was compared between individual strains and the microbial consortium under different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement on dye decolorization rates under either static or shaking culture, which might be attributed to the synergetic reaction of single strains. From the curve of COD values and the UV-visible spectra of 4BS solutions before and after decolorization cultivation with the microbial consortium, it was found that 4BS could be mineralized completely, and the results had been used for presuming the degrading pathway of 4BS. This study also examined the kinetics of 4BS decolorization by immobilized microbial consortium. The results demonstrated that the optimal decolorization activity was observed in pH range between four and 9, temperature range between 20 and 40 degrees C and the maximal specific decolorization rate occurred at 1,000 mg l(-1) of 4BS. The proliferation and distribution of microbial consortium were also microscopically observed, which further confirmed the decolorization mechanisms of 4BS.

  14. Chemical mechanism of lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. pH-dependence of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gil, J; Martín, J; Acebal, C; Arche, R

    1990-01-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyses two reactions: hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine and transacylation between two molecules of lysophosphatidylcholine to give disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Following the kinetic model previously proposed for this enzyme [Martín, Pérez-Gil, Acebal & Arche (1990) Biochem. J. 266, 47-53], the values of essential pK values in free enzyme and substrate-enzyme complexes have now been determined. The chemical mechanism of catalysis was dependent on the deprotonation of a histidine residue with pK about 5.7. This result was supported by the perturbation of pK values by addition of organic solvent. Very high and exothermic enthalpy of ionization was measured, indicating that a conformational re-arrangement in the enzyme accompanies the ionization of the essential histidine residue. These results, as well as the results from previous studies, enabled the proposal of a chemical mechanism for the enzymic reactions catalysed by lysophosphatidylcholine: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase from rabbit lung. PMID:2241908

  15. Mechanism and kinetics of a sodium-driven bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chien-Jung; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Pilizota, Teuta; Berry, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a large rotary molecular machine that propels swimming bacteria, powered by a transmembrane electrochemical potential difference. It consists of an ∼50-nm rotor and up to ∼10 independent stators anchored to the cell wall. We measured torque–speed relationships of single-stator motors under 25 different combinations of electrical and chemical potential. All 25 torque–speed curves had the same concave-down shape as fully energized wild-type motors, and each stator passes at least 37 ± 2 ions per revolution. We used the results to explore the 25-dimensional parameter space of generalized kinetic models for the motor mechanism, finding 830 parameter sets consistent with the data. Analysis of these sets showed that the motor mechanism has a “powerstroke” in either ion binding or transit; ion transit is channel-like rather than carrier-like; and the rate-limiting step in the motor cycle is ion binding at low concentration, ion transit, or release at high concentration. PMID:23788659

  16. Elution kinetics, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical properties of 11 different antibiotic loaded acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-López, Ruben; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Antelo-Lorenzo, Ramón; Guardia-Olmedo, Juan; Moliz, Juan; Hernández-Quero, José; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements (ALABC) spacers are routinely used in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections. The objectives of our study were to evaluate different ALABC for elution kinetics, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. A 10 or 20% mixture (w/w) beads of medium viscosity bone cement (DePuy, Inc) and vancomycin (VAN), gentamycin (GM), daptomycin (DAP), moxifloxacin (MOX), rifampicin (RIF), cefotaxime (CTX), cefepime (FEP), amoxicillin clavulanate (AmC), ampicillin (AMP), meropenem (MER), and ertapenem (ERT) were formed and placed into wells filled with phosphate-buffered saline. Antibiotic concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 or Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. AmC, AMP, and FEP concentration rapidly decreased after day 2, being almost undetectable at day 4. Sustained and high elution rates were observed with VAN, GM, MOX, and RIF for the 30-day duration of the experiment. DAP, MER, ERT, and CTX elution rates constantly decreased from day 4. All antibiotics tested retained antimicrobial activity proving thermal stability. Mechanical properties of ALABC were maintained except when RIF was used. PMID:24231380

  17. Insights into the Mechanism and Kinetics of Thermo-Oxidative Degradation of HFPE High Performance Polymer.

    PubMed

    Kunnikuruvan, Sooraj; Parandekar, Priya V; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Thomas K; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-06-01

    The growing requisite for materials having high thermo-oxidative stability makes the design and development of high performance materials an active area of research. Fluorination of the polymer backbone is a widely applied strategy to improve various properties of the polymer, most importantly the thermo-oxidative stability. Many of these fluorinated polymers are known to have thermo-oxidative stability up to 700 K. However, for space and aerospace applications, it is important to improve its thermo-oxidative stability beyond 700 K. Molecular-level details of the thermo-oxidative degradation of such polymers can provide vital information to improve the polymer. In this spirit, we have applied quantum mechanical and microkinetic analysis to scrutinize the mechanism and kinetics of the thermo-oxidative degradation of a fluorinated polymer with phenylethenyl end-cap, HFPE. This study gives an insight into the thermo-oxidative degradation of HFPE and explains most of the experimental observations on the thermo-oxidative degradation of this polymer. Thermolysis of C-CF3 bond in the dianhydride component (6FDA) of HFPE is found to be the rate-determining step of the degradation. Reaction pathways that are responsible for the experimentally observed weight loss of the polymer is also scrutinized. On the basis of these results, we propose a modification of HFPE polymer to improve its thermo-oxidative stability. PMID:27187246

  18. Kinetic rate constant prediction supports the conformational selection mechanism of protein binding.

    PubMed

    Moal, Iain H; Bates, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of protein-protein kinetic rate constants provides a fundamental test of our understanding of molecular recognition, and will play an important role in the modeling of complex biological systems. In this paper, a feature selection and regression algorithm is applied to mine a large set of molecular descriptors and construct simple models for association and dissociation rate constants using empirical data. Using separate test data for validation, the predicted rate constants can be combined to calculate binding affinity with accuracy matching that of state of the art empirical free energy functions. The models show that the rate of association is linearly related to the proportion of unbound proteins in the bound conformational ensemble relative to the unbound conformational ensemble, indicating that the binding partners must adopt a geometry near to that of the bound prior to binding. Mirroring the conformational selection and population shift mechanism of protein binding, the models provide a strong separate line of evidence for the preponderance of this mechanism in protein-protein binding, complementing structural and theoretical studies.

  19. Elution kinetics, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical properties of 11 different antibiotic loaded acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-López, Ruben; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Antelo-Lorenzo, Ramón; Guardia-Olmedo, Juan; Moliz, Juan; Hernández-Quero, José; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements (ALABC) spacers are routinely used in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections. The objectives of our study were to evaluate different ALABC for elution kinetics, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. A 10 or 20% mixture (w/w) beads of medium viscosity bone cement (DePuy, Inc) and vancomycin (VAN), gentamycin (GM), daptomycin (DAP), moxifloxacin (MOX), rifampicin (RIF), cefotaxime (CTX), cefepime (FEP), amoxicillin clavulanate (AmC), ampicillin (AMP), meropenem (MER), and ertapenem (ERT) were formed and placed into wells filled with phosphate-buffered saline. Antibiotic concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 or Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. AmC, AMP, and FEP concentration rapidly decreased after day 2, being almost undetectable at day 4. Sustained and high elution rates were observed with VAN, GM, MOX, and RIF for the 30-day duration of the experiment. DAP, MER, ERT, and CTX elution rates constantly decreased from day 4. All antibiotics tested retained antimicrobial activity proving thermal stability. Mechanical properties of ALABC were maintained except when RIF was used.

  20. New insights into atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation: kinetics, reaction products and transformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuefei; Dong, Changxun; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe

    2015-03-21

    The widespread occurrence of atrazine in waters poses potential risk to ecosystem and human health. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms and transformation pathways of atrazine degradation by cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (Co(II)/PMS). Co(II)/PMS was found to be more efficient for ATZ elimination in aqueous solution than Fe(II)/PMS process. ATZ oxidation by Co(II)/PMS followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the reaction rate constant (k(obs)) increased appreciably with increasing Co(II) concentration. Increasing initial PMS concentration favored the decomposition of ATZ, however, no linear relationship between k(obs) and PMS concentration was observed. Higher efficiency of ATZ oxidation was observed around neutral pH, implying the possibility of applying Co(II)/PMS process under environmental realistic conditions. Natural organic matter (NOM), chloride (Cl(-)) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) showed detrimental effects on ATZ degradation, particularly at higher concentrations. Eleven products were identified by applying solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC/MS) techniques. Major transformation pathways of ATZ included dealkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation, and alkyl chain oxidation. Detailed mechanisms responsible for these transformation pathways were discussed. Our results reveal that Co(II)/PMS process might be an efficient technique for remediation of groundwater contaminated by ATZ and structurally related s-triazine herbicides.

  1. Reaction kinetics, catalytic mechanisms, conformational changes, and inhibitor design for prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Po-Huang

    2009-07-21

    Isoprenoids comprise a family of more than 55000 natural products with great structural variety derived from five-carbon isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Allylic diphosphates such as farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthesized from DMAPP and IPP serve as outlet points for a great variety of products. A group of prenyltransferases catalyzing chain elongation of FPP to designated lengths by consecutive condensation reactions with specific numbers of IPP are classified as cis and trans types according to the stereochemistry of the double bonds formed by IPP condensation. The complete kinetics of the multistep IPP condensation reactions by both types of enzymes has been determined using steady-state and pre-steady-state approaches. Because their crystal structures were determined in conjunction with biochemical studies, a more thorough understanding of their catalytic mechanisms, protein conformational changes, and product chain-length determination mechanisms has been gained recently. Since these prenyltransferases play important roles, potent inhibitors have been identified and their cocrystal structures have been determined for drug development. In this review, the current knowledge of these prenyltransferases that synthesize prenyl oligomers or polymers is summarized.

  2. Sequence specific recognition of ssDNA by a lupus autoantibody: kinetics and mechanism of binding.

    PubMed

    Beckingham, J A; Glick, G D

    2001-09-01

    11F8 is a pathogenic anti-ssDNA monoclonal autoantibody isolated from a lupus-prone mouse. Previous studies have established that 11F8 is sequence specific. To determine the basis for the observed binding specificity, stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the kinetic parameters and establish the mechanisms for the association of 11F8 with its target sequence, noncognate, and nonspecific ssDNA ligands. The data revealed that sequence-specific binding follows a two-step mechanism where the initial association step is second order. Values of k(1) are fast and above the modified Smoluchowski limit for a diffusion limited interaction (10(5)-10(6)M(-1)s(-1)). The dependency of k(1) on [salt] and solvent polarity indicates that electrostatic steering is responsible for this rapid association rate. The second association step is rate limiting and is characteristic of an isomerization process during which binding interfaces are optimized. This step apparently is driven by the desolvation of hydrophobic surfaces within the binding interface. The differences in the rate of dissociation for the various DNA ligands suggest that specificity is governed primarily through the dissociation of the final complexes.

  3. Measurement of fatigue crack growth kinetics of Copper-Kapton laminates by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, J.M.; Walters, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Copper-Kapton laminates fabricated with epoxy and Du Pont WA acrylic adhesives are used in printed circuit applications that are of current interest to the Department of Energy. Kinetics for fatigue crack growth at the Cu-epoxy interface were measured under a helium atmosphere over the temperature range of 473 to 563 K by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). A least squares treatment of data derived on the basis of a first-order fatigue mechanism resulted in: log(k(T)/s/sup -1/ = (14.6 +- 0.4) - (175.4 +- 3.8)/2.303RT, where k(T) is the rate coefficient for thermal fatigue, T is absolute temperature, and R is the ideal gas law constant (R = 0.00831 kJ/K mol). Error estimates for the pre-exponential factor and activation energy correspond to one standard deviation. Arguments are presented which indicate that the upper temperature limit for continuous use of the laminate is 85/sup 0/C. It is concluded that the laminate will meet and possibly exceed the 27-y shelf life required by the DOE.

  4. The parallel universe of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Batey, R T; Doudna, J A

    1998-05-01

    How do large RNA molecules find their active conformations among a universe of possible structures? Two recent studies reveal that RNA folding is a rapid and ordered process, with surprising similarities to protein folding mechanisms.

  5. The effect of foreland palaeo-uplift on deformation mechanism in the Wupoer fold-and-thrust belt, NE Pamir: Constraints from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyang; Cheng, Xiaogan; Chen, Hanlin; Ding, Weiwei; Lin, Xiubin; Wu, Lei; Li, Kang; Shi, Jun; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Palaeo-uplifts often exist in fold-and-thrust belts. However, their effects on the deformational process have not yet been well understood. To evaluate such effects, six analogue models were systematically run based on geological features of the Wupoer fold-and-thrust belt (FTB), NE Pamir, where the Wulagen palaeo-uplift with overlying gypsum bed has been clearly identified. Our analogue results demonstrated that the palaeo-uplift (its location and inhomogenous distribution), accompanied with overlying gypsum bed that serves as ductile décollement, plays a critical role in localizing the front thrust fault and shaping it into arc form. The results indicate that the front thrust fault slides along the ductile décollement (gypsum bed), and breaks through onto the surface at the region where the palaeo-uplift develops, forming a piggy-back basin in the hanging wall. It suggests that the palaeo-uplift with consequent topographic variation of the overlying ductile décollement localizes the breakthrough point of the front thrust fault. In addition, the results indicate that the front thrust fault (Pamir Front Thrust, PFT) initially broke through in the location where it develops the Wulagen palaeo-uplift and propagated aside. This resulted in the distance between the PFT and the basement-involved fault (Main Pamir Thrust, MPT) to decrease from the region with palaeo-uplift to the areas aside without palaeo-uplift, thereby forming the arc-shaped PFT in map view. The results of this study also provide a revised geological model, which emphasizes the effect of décollement layer on absorbing the slip along the PFT. Our results provide a new mechanical interpretation of the deformation of Wupoer FTB, NE Pamir.

  6. Folding analysis of the most complex Stevedore's protein knot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Iren; Chen, Szu-Yu; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2016-01-01

    DehI is a homodimeric haloacid dehalogenase from Pseudomonas putida that contains the most complex 61 Stevedore's protein knot within its folding topology. To examine how DehI attains such an intricate knotted topology we combined far-UV circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate its folding mechanism. Equilibrium unfolding of DehI by chemical denaturation indicated the presence of two highly populated folding intermediates, I and I'. While the two intermediates vary in secondary structure contents and tertiary packing according to CD and intrinsic fluorescence, respectively, their overall dimension and compactness are similar according to SAXS. Three single-tryptophan variants (W34, W53, and W196) were generated to probe non-cooperative unfolding events localized around the three fluorophores. Kinetic fluorescence measurements indicated that the transition from the intermediate I' to the unfolded state is rate limiting. Our multiparametric folding analyses suggest that DehI unfolds through a linear folding pathway with two distinct folding intermediates by initial hydrophobic collapse followed by nucleation condensation, and that knotting precedes the formation of secondary structures. PMID:27527519

  7. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  8. The protein folding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Francesco; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2004-03-01

    Networks are everywhere. The conformation space of a 20-residue antiparallel beta-sheet peptide [1], sampled by molecular dynamics simulations, is mapped to a network. Conformations are nodes of the network, and the transitions between them are links. As previously found for the World-Wide Web as well as for social and biological networks , the conformation space contains highly connected hubs like the native state which is the most populated free energy basin. Furthermore, the network shows a hierarchical modularity [2] which is consistent with the funnel mechanism of folding [3] and is not observed for a random heteropolymer lacking a native state. Here we show that the conformation space network describes the free energy landscape without requiring projections into arbitrarily chosen reaction coordinates. The network analysis provides a basis for understanding the heterogeneity of the folding transition state and the existence of multiple pathways. [1] P. Ferrara and A. Caflisch, Folding simulations of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet peptide, PNAS 97, 10780-10785 (2000). [2] Ravasz, E. and Barabási, A. L. Hierarchical organization in complex networks. Phys. Rev. E 67, 026112 (2003). [3] Dill, K. and Chan, H From Levinthal to pathways to funnels. Nature Struct. Biol. 4, 10-19 (1997)

  9. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Autoignition of Isomers of Heptane Under Rapid Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Boercker, J E; Curran, H J; Griffiths, J F; Mohamed, C; Ribaucour, M

    2001-12-17

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for combustion of all nine isomers of heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), and these mechanisms are tested by simulating autoignition of each isomer under rapid compression machine conditions. The reaction mechanisms focus on the manner in which the molecular structure of each isomer determines the rates and product distributions of possible classes of reactions. The reaction pathways emphasize the importance of alkylperoxy radical isomerizations and addition reactions of molecular oxygen to alkyl and hydroperoxyalkyl radicals. A new reaction group has been added to past models, in which hydroperoxyalkyl radicals that originated with abstraction of an H atom from a tertiary site in the parent heptane molecule are assigned new reaction sequences involving additional internal H atom abstractions not previously allowed. This process accelerates autoignition in fuels with tertiary C-H bonds in the parent fuel. In addition, the rates of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radical isomerization reactions have all been reduced so that they are now equal to rates of analogous alkylperoxy radical isomerizations, significantly improving agreement between computed and experimental ignition delay times in the rapid compression machine. Computed ignition delay times agree well with experimental results in the few cases where experiments have been carried out for specific heptane isomers, and predictive model calculations are reported for the remaining isomers. The computed results fall into three general groups; the first consists of the most reactive isomers, including n-heptane, 2-methyl hexane and 3-methyl hexane. The second group consists of the least reactive isomers, including 2,2-dimethyl pentane, 3,3-dimethyl pentane, 2,3-dimethyl pentane, 2,4-dimethyl pentane and 2,2,3-trimethyl butane. The remaining isomer, 3-ethyl pentane, was observed computationally to have an intermediate level of reactivity. These observations are generally

  10. APPLICATION OF ADVANCED IN VITRO TECHNIQUES TO MEASURE, UNDERSTAND AND PREDICT THE KINETICS AND MECHANISMS OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a research program in metabolism that involves numerous collaborators across EPA as well as other federal and academic labs. A primary goal is to develop and apply advanced in vitro techniques to measure, understand and predict the kinetics and mechanisms of xen...

  11. Transfer Kinetics at the Aqueous/Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Interface. A Statistical Mechanic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, S. K.; Ezzedine, S.; Ezzedine, S.; Ziagos, J. P.; Hoffman, F.; Gelinas, R. J.

    2001-05-01

    Many modeling efforts in the literature use a first-order, linear-driving-force model to represent the chemical dissolution process at the non-aqueous/aqueous phase liquid (NAPL/APL) interface. In other words, NAPL to APL phase flux is assumed to be equal to the difference between the solubility limit and the "bulk aqueous solution" concentrations times a mass transfer coefficient. Under such assumptions, a few questions are raised: where, in relation to a region of pure NAPL, does the "bulk aqueous solution" regime begin and how does it behave? The answers are assumed to be associated with an arbitrary, predetermined boundary layer, which separates the NAPL from the surrounding solution. The mass transfer rate is considered to be, primarily, limited by diffusion of the component through the boundary layer. In fact, compositional models of interphase mass transfer usually assume that a local equilibrium is reached between phases. Representing mass flux as a rate-limiting process is equivalent to assuming diffusion through a stationary boundary layer with an instantaneous local equilibrium and linear concentration profile. Some environmental researchers have enjoyed success explaining their data using chemical engineering-based correlations. Correlations are strongly dependent on the experimental conditions employed. A universally applicable theory for NAPL dissolution in natural systems does not exist. These correlations are usually expressed in terms of the modified Sherwood number as a function of Reynolds, Peclet, and Schmidt numbers. The Sherwood number may be interpreted as the ratio between the grain size and the thickness of the Nernst stagnant film. In the present study, we show that transfer kinetics at the NAPL/APL interface under equilibrium conditions disagree with approaches based on the Nernst stagnant film concept. It is unclear whether local equilibrium assumptions used in current models are suitable for all situations.A statistical mechanic

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of Calcium Hydroxide Conversion into Calcium Alkoxides: Implications in Heritage Conservation Using Nanolimes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Vettori, Irene; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2016-05-24

    Nanolimes are alcohol dispersions of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used in the conservation of cultural heritage. Although it was believed that Ca(OH)2 particles were inert when dispersed in short-chain alcohols, it has been recently shown that they can undergo transformation into calcium alkoxides. Little is known, however, about the mechanism and kinetics of such a phase transformation as well as its effect on the performance of nanolimes. Here we show that Ca(OH)2 particles formed after lime slaking react with ethanol and isopropanol and partially transform (fractional conversion, α up to 0.08) into calcium ethoxide and isopropoxide, respectively. The transformation shows Arrhenius behavior, with apparent activation energy Ea of 29 ± 4 and 37 ± 6 kJ mol(-1) for Ca-ethoxide and Ca-isopropoxide conversion, respectively. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses of reactant and product phases show that the alkoxides replace the crystalline structure of Ca(OH)2 along specific [hkl] directions, preserving the external hexagonal (platelike) morphology of the parent phase. Textural and kinetic results reveal that this pseudomorphic replacement involves a 3D diffusion-controlled deceleratory advancement of the reaction front. The results are consistent with an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation replacement mechanism. Analysis of the carbonation of Ca(OH)2 particles with different degree of conversion into Ca-ethoxide (α up to 0.08) and Ca-isopropoxide (α up to 0.04) exposed to air (20 °C, 80% relative humidity) reveals that Ca-alkoxides significantly reduce the rate of transformation into cementing CaCO3 and induce the formation of metastable vaterite, as opposed to stable calcite which forms in untransformed Ca(OH)2 samples. Similar effects are obtained when a commercial nanolime partially transformed into Ca-ethoxide is subjected to carbonation. Such effects may hamper/delay the strengthening or consolidation effects of nanolimes, thus having

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Calcium Hydroxide Conversion into Calcium Alkoxides: Implications in Heritage Conservation Using Nanolimes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Vettori, Irene; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion

    2016-05-24

    Nanolimes are alcohol dispersions of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used in the conservation of cultural heritage. Although it was believed that Ca(OH)2 particles were inert when dispersed in short-chain alcohols, it has been recently shown that they can undergo transformation into calcium alkoxides. Little is known, however, about the mechanism and kinetics of such a phase transformation as well as its effect on the performance of nanolimes. Here we show that Ca(OH)2 particles formed after lime slaking react with ethanol and isopropanol and partially transform (fractional conversion, α up to 0.08) into calcium ethoxide and isopropoxide, respectively. The transformation shows Arrhenius behavior, with apparent activation energy Ea of 29 ± 4 and 37 ± 6 kJ mol(-1) for Ca-ethoxide and Ca-isopropoxide conversion, respectively. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analyses of reactant and product phases show that the alkoxides replace the crystalline structure of Ca(OH)2 along specific [hkl] directions, preserving the external hexagonal (platelike) morphology of the parent phase. Textural and kinetic results reveal that this pseudomorphic replacement involves a 3D diffusion-controlled deceleratory advancement of the reaction front. The results are consistent with an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation replacement mechanism. Analysis of the carbonation of Ca(OH)2 particles with different degree of conversion into Ca-ethoxide (α up to 0.08) and Ca-isopropoxide (α up to 0.04) exposed to air (20 °C, 80% relative humidity) reveals that Ca-alkoxides significantly reduce the rate of transformation into cementing CaCO3 and induce the formation of metastable vaterite, as opposed to stable calcite which forms in untransformed Ca(OH)2 samples. Similar effects are obtained when a commercial nanolime partially transformed into Ca-ethoxide is subjected to carbonation. Such effects may hamper/delay the strengthening or consolidation effects of nanolimes, thus having

  14. [Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of triclosan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang

    2011-09-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent widely used in many personal care products. We investigated oxidation of TCS by aqueous ferrate Fe(VI) to determine reaction kinetics, interpreted the reaction mechanism by a linear free-energy relationship, and evaluated the degradation efficiency. Second-order reaction kinetics was used to model Fe (VI) oxidation of TCS, with the apparent second-order rate constant (k(app)) being 531.9 L x (mol x s)(-1) at pH 8.5 and (24 +/- 1) degrees C. The half life (t1/2) is 25.8 s for an Fe( VI) concentration of 10 mg x L(-1). The rate constants of the reaction decrease with increasing pH values. These pH-dependent variations in k(app) could be distributed by considering species-specific reactions between Fe(VI) species and acid-base species of an ionizable TCS. Species-specific second-order reaction rate constants, k, were determined for reaction of HFeO4(-) with each of TCS's acid-base species. The value of k determined for neutral TCS was (4.1 +/- 3.5) x 10(2) L x (mol x s)(-1), while that measured for anionic TCS was (1.8 +/- 0.1) x 10(4) L x (mol x s)(-1). The reaction between HFeO4(-) and the dissociated TCS controls the overall reaction. A linear free-energy relationship illustrated the electrophilic oxidation mechanism. Fe (VI) reacts initially with TCS by electrophilic attack at the latter's phenol moiety. At a n[Fe(VI)]: n(TCS) > 7: 1, complete removal of TCS was achieved. And lower concentration of the humic acid could enhance the k(app) of Fe( VI) with TCS. In conclusion, Fe(VI) oxidation technology appears to be a promising tool for applications of WWTPs effluents and other decontamination processes.

  15. Development of Kinetic Mechanisms for Next-Generation Fuels and CFD Simulation of Advanced Combustion Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, William J.; McNenly, Matt J.; Whitesides, Russell; Mehl, Marco; Killingsworth, Nick J.; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2015-12-17

    Predictive chemical kinetic models are needed to represent next-generation fuel components and their mixtures with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels. These kinetic models will allow the prediction of the effect of alternative fuel blends in CFD simulations of advanced spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines. Enabled by kinetic models, CFD simulations can be used to optimize fuel formulations for advanced combustion engines so that maximum engine efficiency, fossil fuel displacement goals, and low pollutant emission goals can be achieved.

  16. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Thiol–Disulfide Exchange Covering Direct Substitution and Thiol Oxidation-Mediated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Disulfides are important building blocks in the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, serving as inter- and intra-subunit cross links. Disulfides are also the major products of thiol oxidation, a process that has primary roles in defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and in redox regulation of cell signaling. Although disulfides are relatively stable, their reduction, isomerisation, and interconversion as well as their production reactions are catalyzed by delicate enzyme machineries, providing a dynamic system in biology. Redox homeostasis, a thermodynamic parameter that determines which reactions can occur in cellular compartments, is also balanced by the thiol–disulfide pool. However, it is the kinetic properties of the reactions that best represent cell dynamics, because the partitioning of the possible reactions depends on kinetic parameters. Critical Issues: This review is focused on the kinetics and mechanisms of thiol–disulfide substitution and redox reactions. It summarizes the challenges and advances that are associated with kinetic investigations in small molecular and enzymatic systems from a rigorous chemical perspective using biological examples. The most important parameters that influence reaction rates are discussed in detail. Recent Advances and Future Directions: Kinetic studies of proteins are more challenging than small molecules, and quite often investigators are forced to sacrifice the rigor of the experimental approach to obtain the important kinetic and mechanistic information. However, recent technological advances allow a more comprehensive analysis of enzymatic systems via using the systematic kinetics apparatus that was developed for small molecule reactions, which is expected to provide further insight into the cell's machinery. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1623–1641. PMID:23075118

  17. Selecting the optimum quasi-steady-state species for reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms using a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Christopher J.; Yang, Chongguan; Parkinson, Alan R.; Chen, J.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    A genetic optimization algorithm has been applied to the selection of quasi-steady-state (QSS) species in reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms. The algorithm seeks to minimize the error between reduced and