Science.gov

Sample records for mechanical prosthetic valve

  1. Noninvasive detection of mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; He, Jiazhong; Yao, Jianping; Wu, Yuequan; Du, Minghui

    2012-08-01

    Auscultation is a widely used efficient technique by cardiologists for detecting the heart conditions. Since the mechanical prosthetic heart valves are widely used today, it is important to develop a simple and efficient method to detect abnormal mechanical valves. In this paper, the mechanical prosthetic heart valve sounds are analyzed by using different power spectral density (PSD) estimation techniques. To improve the classification accuracy of heart sounds, we propose two different feature extraction schemes, i.e., a modified local discriminant bases (LDB) scheme and a Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT)-based scheme. A database of 150 heart sounds is used in this study and an average classification accuracy of 97.3% is achieved for both the two feature extraction schemes, when a generic linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier is used in the classification stage.

  2. Unusual mechanism of myocardial infarction in prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Fernando A; Campos, Vanessa G; da Cunha, Claudio R; de Oliveira, Felipe Bezerra Martins; Otto, Maria Estefânia Bosco; Monte, Guilherme U

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old man with bicuspid aortic valve and severe calcific aortic stenosis was submitted to aortic valve replacement with a stented bioprosthesis. He developed Staphylococcus epidermidis prosthetic valve endocarditis a month later, presenting in the emergency room with acute myocardial infarction. The mechanism of myocardial ischemia was a large aortic root abscess causing left main extrinsic compression. He was urgently taken to the operating room, and an aortic root replacement with cryopreserved homograft was performed, associated with autologous pericardium patch closure of aortic to right atrium fistula and coronary artery bypass grafting of the left anterior descending. After a difficult postoperative period with multiple problems, he was eventually discharged home. At 36-month follow-up, he is asymptomatic with no recurrent infection, and the left main coronary artery is widely patent on control chest computed tomography. PMID:26045678

  3. Mechanical performance of pyrolytic carbon in prosthetic heart valve applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, H

    1996-06-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed for rigorous characterization of the fracture resistance and fatigue crack extension in pyrolytic carbon for prosthetic heart valve application. Experiments were conducted under sustained and cyclic loading in a simulated biological environment using Carbomedics Pyrolite carbon. While the material was shown to have modest fracture toughness, it exhibited excellent resistance to subcritical crack growth. The crack growth kinetics in pyrolytic carbon were formulated using a phenomenological description. A fatigue threshold was observed below which the crack growth rate diminishes. A damage tolerance concept based on fracture mechanics was used to develop an engineering design approach for mechanical heart valve prostheses. In particular, a new quantity, referred to as the safe-life index, was introduced to assess the design adequacy against subcritical crack growth in brittle materials. In addition, a weakest-link statistical description of the fracture strength is provided and used in the design of component proof-tests. It is shown that the structural reliability of mechanical heart valves can be assured by combining effective flaw detection and manufacturing quality control with adequate damage tolerance design.

  4. Prosthetic valves or tissue valves--a vote for mechanical prostheses.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, D

    1985-01-01

    Thirty years of effort to obtain better substitutes for destroyed human heart valves brought continuous improvement of the various designs and materials used for the prostheses. However, none of the mechanical or tissue valves currently available meet all the requirements of an ideal artificial heart valve. Accurate comparison of results after implantation of mechanical and tissue valves is difficult because there are no randomized studies and most of the published results are gathered from patient groups operated on in different centers and over different time frames. Reliable comparison therefore presumes criteria to assess the success of valve replacement. The late outcome of heart valve replacement can be determined by subjective improvement, improvement of functional capacity and central hemodynamics, normalization of impaired ventricular function and by the frequency of complications related to or induced by the prostheses. Subjective improvement and improvement of functional capacity is obviously dependent on the degree of postoperative normalization of the hemodynamics. The hemodynamic properties of modern mechanical prostheses are superior to those of tissue valves because of the significantly more favourable relation between total prosthetic valve area and effective prosthetic valve orifice area, conditioned by design. These unfavourable hemodynamics are manifest especially when prostheses of smaller sizes are implanted. The main disadvantage of biological valves is their limited durability due to calcification with tissue damage resulting in degeneration and dysfunction. In addition to the risk of re-operation of tissue valves, for some patients hemodynamical deterioration with consecutive decrease of their functional capacity must be expected a considerable time before a second operation is mandatory. When compared with tissue valves, the most important disadvantage of mechanical valves is their thrombogenicity with the need for life

  5. Holographic methods for quality monitoring and stress visualization in biological and mechanical prosthetic heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarubin, Alexander M.; von Bally, Gert; Deiwick, M.; Geiger, A. W.; Scheld, H. H.

    1996-01-01

    A new application of holographic interferometry in biomedicine and bioengineering is presented. Holographic interferometry techniques for non-destructive testing and biomechanical evaluation of prosthetic heart valves are developed, and experimental results obtained with tissue and mechanical values are demonstrated.

  6. Prosthetic valve endocarditis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gnann, J W; Dismukes, W E

    1983-12-01

    Infection of an intracardiac prosthesis, the incidence of which is about 2.5% among patients having undergone valve replacement, is a serious complication with considerable morbidity and mortality. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), with an onset within 60 days of valve replacement, accounts for approximately one-third of all cases, while the remaining two-thirds, occur more than two months postoperatively (late prosthetic valve endocarditis). Prosthetic valve endocarditis is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis, less frequently by viridans streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram-negative bacilli. The most likely pathogenetic mechanisms in prosthetic valve endocarditis are intraoperative contamination and postoperative infections at extracardiac sites. Prominent clinical features include fever, new or changing heart murmurs, leukocytosis, anemia and hematuria. The etiologic microorganism can be isolated in more than 90% of all cases. Patients with proven prosthetic valve endocarditis should be examined daily to detect signs of congestive heart failure and changes in murmurs; electrocardiographic monitoring is essential for documentation of arrhythmias. With limitations, echocardiography, especially two-dimensional, may help to demonstrate vegetations or valvular dehiscence. Cinefluoroscopy may reveal loosening or dehiscence of the sewing ring or impaired motion of a radio-opaque poppet due to thrombus or vegetation. Cardiac catheterization, not always necessary even when surgical intervention is anticipated, may provide valuable information on the degree of dysfunction, multiple valve involvement, left ventricular function and extent of concomitant coronary artery disease. In patients with mechanical valves, prosthetic valve endocarditis may be associated with a high incidence of valve ring and myocardial abscesses; the reported frequency of valve ring abscesses is lower with porcine heterografts. Infections on mechanical valves

  7. [A rare case of two mechanisms of prosthetic valve dysfunction in the same patient].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Gonçalo; Trabulo, Marisa; Andrade, Maria João; Ribeiras, Regina; Rodrigues, Rui; Neves, José Pedro; Queiróz e Melo, João; Mendes, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction is a significant clinical event. Determining its etiological mechanism and severity can be difficult. The authors present the case of a 50-year-old man, with two mechanical valve prostheses in aortic and mitral positions, hospitalized for decompensated heart failure. He had a long history of rheumatic multivalvular disease and had undergone three heart surgeries. On admission, investigation led to a diagnosis of severe dysfunction of both mechanical prostheses with different etiologies and mechanisms: pannus formation in the prosthetic aortic valve and intermittent dysfunction of the mitral prosthesis due to interference of a ruptured chorda tendinea in closure of the disks. The patient was reoperated, leading to significant improvement in functional class.

  8. Aspergillus prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Petheram, I S; Seal, R M

    1976-01-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and histopathological features of seven cases of Aspergillus fumigatus prosthetic valve endocarditis are presented. The exact nature of the lesion, a combination of infective fungal endocarditis and thrombosis on the prosthetic valve, is discussed and the difficulties in clinical diagnosis are emphasized. Helpful indications were sudden unexplained heart failure with the appearance of new murmurs, and emboli to large or medium-sized systemic arteries. Fever and anaemia were inconstant, and in no case was blood culture or precipitin investigation helpful. Spore contamination of operating theatre air was the likely source of infection, and measures taken to overcome this and other predisposing factors are discussed. Since medical diagnosis is usually late and the few reported cures in this condition have included replacement of the prosthesis, early surgical intervention combined with antifungal chemotherapy is advised. Images PMID:788218

  9. Advances in prosthetic heart valves: fluid mechanics of aortic valve designs.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, A P; Woo, Y R; Sung, H W; Jones, M

    1988-04-01

    The in vitro hemodynamic characteristics of a variety of mechanical and tissue heart valve designs used during the past two decades were investigated in the aortic position under pulsatile flow conditions. The following valve designs were studied: Starr-Edwards ball and cage (model 1260), Björk-Shiley tilting disc (convexo-concave model), Medtronic-Hall tilting disc, St. Jude Medical bileaflet, Carpentier-Edwards porcine and pericardial (models 2625, 2650 and 2900), Hancock porcine (models 250 and 410) and Ionescu-Shiley standard pericardial. The Starr-Edward ball and cage, Björk-Shiley tilting disc, Carpentier-Edwards porcine (model 2625) and Ionescu-Shiley standard pericardial valves were designed prior to 1975, while the Medtronic-Hall tilting disc, St. Jude Medical bileaflet, Hancock porcine (model 250), Hancock II porcine (model 410), Carpentier-Edwards porcine (model 2650) and Carpentier-Edwards pericardial (model 2900) valves were designed after 1975. The pressure drop results indicated that the valves designed prior to 1975 had performance indices of 0.30 to 0.45, whereas the valves designed after 1975 had performance indices of 0.40 to 0.70. The regurgitant volumes were higher for the mechanical designs (5.0 to 11.0 cm3/beat) compared to the tissue bioprostheses (1.0 to 5.0 cm3/beat). Two-dimensional laser Doppler anemometry studies indicated that the valves designed after 1975 tended to create more centralized flow fields, with reduced levels of turbulent shear stresses. However, none of the current valve designs is ideal: they all create areas of stasis and/or regions of low velocity reverse flow; and regions of elevated turbulent shear stresses that are capable of causing sub-lethal and/or lethal damage to the formed elements of blood.

  10. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined. PMID:25486519

  11. Prediction of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction using transesophageal echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. S.; Tiong, I. Y.; Asher, C. R.; Murphy, M. T.; Thomas, J. D.; Griffin, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction (MPVD) has important therapeutic implications. We sought to develop an algorithm, combining clinical and echocardiographic parameters, for prediction of thrombus-related MPVD in a series of 53 patients (24 men, age 52 +/- 16 years) who had intraoperative diagnosis of thrombus or pannus from 1992 to 1997. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed to identify predictors of thrombus and pannus. Prevalence of thrombus and diagnostic yields relative to the number of predictors were determined. There were 22 patients with thrombus, 19 patients with pannus, and 12 patients with both. Forty-two of 53 masses were visualized using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), including 29 of 34 thrombi or both thrombi and panni and 13 of 19 isolated panni. Predictors of thrombus or mixed presentation include mobile mass (p = 0.009), attachment to occluder (p = 0.02), elevated gradients (p = 0.04), and an international normalized ratio of < or = 2.5 (p = 0.03). All 34 patients with thrombus or mixed presentation had > or = 1 predictor. The prevalence of thrombus in the presence of < or = 1, 2, and > or = 3 predictors is 14%, 69%, and 91%, respectively. Thus, TEE is sensitive in the identification of abnormal mass in the setting of MPVD. An algorithm based on clinical and transesophageal echocardiographic predictors may be useful to estimate the likelihood of thrombus in the setting of MPVD. In the presence of > or = 3 predictors, the probability of thrombus is high.

  12. Prediction of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction using transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Lin, S S; Tiong, I Y; Asher, C R; Murphy, M T; Thomas, J D; Griffin, B P

    2000-11-15

    Identification of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction (MPVD) has important therapeutic implications. We sought to develop an algorithm, combining clinical and echocardiographic parameters, for prediction of thrombus-related MPVD in a series of 53 patients (24 men, age 52 +/- 16 years) who had intraoperative diagnosis of thrombus or pannus from 1992 to 1997. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed to identify predictors of thrombus and pannus. Prevalence of thrombus and diagnostic yields relative to the number of predictors were determined. There were 22 patients with thrombus, 19 patients with pannus, and 12 patients with both. Forty-two of 53 masses were visualized using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), including 29 of 34 thrombi or both thrombi and panni and 13 of 19 isolated panni. Predictors of thrombus or mixed presentation include mobile mass (p = 0.009), attachment to occluder (p = 0.02), elevated gradients (p = 0.04), and an international normalized ratio of < or = 2.5 (p = 0.03). All 34 patients with thrombus or mixed presentation had > or = 1 predictor. The prevalence of thrombus in the presence of < or = 1, 2, and > or = 3 predictors is 14%, 69%, and 91%, respectively. Thus, TEE is sensitive in the identification of abnormal mass in the setting of MPVD. An algorithm based on clinical and transesophageal echocardiographic predictors may be useful to estimate the likelihood of thrombus in the setting of MPVD. In the presence of > or = 3 predictors, the probability of thrombus is high. PMID:11074206

  13. Brucella Endocarditis in Prosthetic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Mehanic, Snjezana; Mulabdic, Velida; Baljic, Rusmir; Hadzovic-Cengic, Meliha; Pinjo, Fikret; Hadziosmanovic, Vesna; Topalovic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY CONFLICT OF INTEREST: none declared. Introduction Brucella endocarditis (BE) is a rare but severe and potentially lethal manifestation of brucellosis. Pre-existing valves lesions and prosthetic valves (PV) are favorable for BE. Case report We represent the case of a 46-year-old man who was treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Center of Sarajevo University, as blood culture positive (Brucella melitensis) mitral and aortic PV endocarditis. He was treated with combined anti-brucella and cardiac therapy. Surgical intervention was postponed due to cardiac instability. Four months later he passed away. Surgery was not performed. PMID:24493988

  14. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  15. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  16. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3945 - Prosthetic heart valve sizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve sizer. 870.3945 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3945 Prosthetic heart valve sizer. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve sizer is a device used to measure the size of...

  20. T Cell Response in Patients with Implanted Biological and Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Barbarash, L.; Kudryavtsev, I.; Rutkovskaya, N.; Golovkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing T cell subsets of peripheral blood from recipients of long-term functioning (more than 60 months) biological and mechanical heart valve prostheses. The absolute and relative number of CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets was analyzed: naïve (N, CD45RA+CD62L+), central memory (CM, CD45RA−CD62L+), effector memory (EM, CD45RA−CD62L−), and terminally differentiated CD45RA-positive effector memory (TEMRA, CD45RA+CD62L−) in 25 persons with biological and 7 with mechanical prosthesis compared with 48 apparently healthy volunteers. The relative and absolute number of central memory and naïve CD3+CD8+ in patients with biological prosthesis was decreased (p < 0.001). Meanwhile the number of CD45RA+CD62L−CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ was increased (p < 0.001). Patients with mechanical prosthesis had increased absolute and relative number of CD45RA+CD62L−CD3+CD8+ cells (p = 0.006). Also the relative number of CD3+CD4+ cells was reduced (p = 0.04). We assume that altered composition of T cell subsets points at development of xenograft rejection reaction against both mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses. PMID:26989331

  1. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  2. Modern prosthetic knee mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Michael, J W

    1999-04-01

    The plethora of presently available prosthetic knee components can be divided into two groups based on how they are controlled: recent innovations that incorporate an onboard computer and the more familiar purely mechanical devices. These categories then can be subdivided into generic functional classes based on the degree of stance phase stability and swing phase responsiveness offered by each type of knee mechanism. This article summarizes the key advantages and limitations of available prosthetic knee systems and suggests a simple method to match the biomechanical capabilities of specific prosthetic knee components to the individual functional capabilities and goals of the person with an amputated limb.

  3. Processing of Prosthetic Heart Valve Sounds from Anechoic Tank Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Meyer, A W

    2001-03-20

    People with serious cardiac problems have had their life span extended with the development of the prosthetic heart valve. However, the valves operate continuously at approximately 39 million cycles per year and are therefore subject to structural failures either by faulty design or material fatigue. The development of a non-invasive technique using an acoustic contact microphone and sophisticated signal processing techniques has been proposed and demonstrated on limited data sets. In this paper we discuss an extension of the techniques to perform the heart valve tests in an anechoic like. Here the objective is to extract a ''pure'' sound or equivalently the acoustical vibration response of the prosthetic valves in a quiet environment. The goal is to demonstrate that there clearly exist differences between values which have a specific mechanical defect known as single leg separation (SLS) and non-defective valves known as intact (INT). We discuss the signal processing and results of anechoic acoustic measurements on 50 prosthetic valves in the tank. Finally, we show the results of the individual runs for each valve, point out any of the meaningful features that could be used to distinguish the SLS from INT and summarize the experiments.

  4. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold a replacement heart valve while it is being sutured into place. (b) Classification. Class I. The device...

  9. Anticoagulation in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Fuster, Valentin

    2004-10-01

    The combination of heart disease and pregnancy can present a formidable challenge to the clinician entrusted to care for both the mother and fetus. Since most data is retrospective, a definitive prognosis for such a patient may be difficult to obtain. Nevertheless, certain cardiac conditions carry greater risks of maternal mortality than do others. However, even for certain preexisting conditions, a tremendous amount of debate persists with respect to risks during pregnancy and optimal peripartum management. One such area of controversy concerns anticoagulation in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves. For patients who require anticoagulation for mechanical valves, the choice of some combination of warfarin, unfractionated heparin, and low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) has resulted in many small-scale trials, which have not yet provided definite guidance as to the best course of action. Even more controversial has been the recent labeling change that advises against the use of LMWH in all patients with prosthetic heart valves, as a result of two cases of prosthetic valve thrombosis in women using LMWH while pregnant. Although the latest product labeling, in the summer of 2003, was changed to a less restrictive recommendation, debate persists. A discussion of the available data on anticoagulation in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves is presented here, to inform the clinician and the patient of the risks and benefits of the options presently available. PMID:15543433

  10. Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Maria-Sînziana; Bedeleanu, Daniela; Kovacs, Emese; Ciumărnean, Lorena; Molnar, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction, a complication of mechanical prosthetic valve replacement, is rare, with a slowly progressive evolution, but it can be acute, severe, requiring surgical reintervention. We present the case of a patient with a mechanical single disc aortic prosthesis, with moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch, minor pannus found on previous ultrasound examinations, who presented to our service with angina pain with a duration of 1 hour, subsequently interpreted as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) syndrome. Coronarography showed normal epicardial coronary arteries, an ample movement of the prosthetic disc, without evidence of coronary thromboembolism, and Gated Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) with Technetium (Tc)-99m detected no perfusion defects. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) evidenced a dysfunctional prosthesis due to a subvalvular mass; transesophageal echocardiography (TOE) showed the interference of this mass, with a pannus appearance, with the closure of the prosthetic disc. Under conditions of repeated angina episodes, under anticoagulant treatment, surgery was performed, with the intraoperative confirmation of pannus and its removal. Postoperative evolution was favorable. This case reflects the diagnostic and therapeutic management problems of pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. PMID:27004041

  11. Choice of prosthetic heart valve in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical prostheses and stented xenografts (bioprosthesis) are most commonly used substitutes for aortic and mitral valve replacement. The mechanical valves have the advantage of durability but are accompanied with the risk of thromboembolism, problems of long-term anticoagulation, and associated risk of bleeding. In contrast, bioprosthetic valves do not require long-term anticoagulation, but carry the risk of structural valve degeneration and re-operation. A mechanical valve is favoured in young patients (<40 years) if reliable anticoagulation is ensured. In elderly patients (>60 years), a bioprosthesis is a suitable substitute. In middle-aged patients (40–60 years), risk of re-operation in a bioprosthesis is equal to that of bleeding in a mechanical valve. Traditionally, a bioprosthesis is opted in patients with limited life expectancy. Calculation of life expectancy, based solely upon chronological age, is erroneous. In developing countries, the calculated life expectancy is much lower than that of Western population, hence age related Western cut-offs are not valid in developing countries. Besides age, cardiac condition of the patient, systemic illnesses, socio-economic status, gender and geographical location also decide the life expectancy of the patients. Selection of the prosthetic valve substitute should be based on: aspiration of the patient, life expectancy, socio-economic and educational background, occupation of the patient, availability, cost, monitoring of anti-coagulation, monitoring of valve function and other valve related complications, and possibility of re-operation. PMID:27326237

  12. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for classification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    People with serious heart conditions have had their expected life span extended considerably with the development of the prosthetic heart valve especially with the great strides made in valve design. Even though the designs are extremely reliable, the valves are mechanical and operating continuously over a long period, therefore, structural failures can occur due to fatigue. Measuring heart sounds non-invasively in a noisy environment puts more demands on the signal processing to extract the desired signals from the noise. In this paper the authors discuss acoustical signal processing techniques developed to process noisy heart valve sounds measured by a sensitive, surface contact microphone and used for the eventual classification of the valve.

  13. Mechanical suitability of glycerol-preserved human dura mater for construction of prosthetic cardiac valves.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, K A; Lee, J M; Boughner, D R

    1984-03-01

    We have examined the tensile viscoelastic properties of fresh and glycerol-preserved human dura mater, and correlated the results with structural information from the scanning electron microscope. The interwoven laminar structure of dura produces rather high flexural stiffness, while the crossed-fibrillar laminae produce planar mechanical isotropy. Glycerol storage shifts the stress-strain curve to lower strain, reduces stress relaxation and creep, and lowers the ultimate tensile strength and strain at fracture. These changes may be due to glyceraldehyde crosslinking, or to increased interfibrillar friction. The latter hypothesis suggests that glycerol storage may reduce the fatigue lifetime of the tissue.

  14. Acute massive mitral regurgitation from prosthetic valve dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D K; Sturridge, M F

    1976-01-01

    Two cases of prosthetic valve dysfunction resulting in acute massive mitral regurgitation are reported; emergency operation was successful in both cases. Survival following complete dislodgement of the occluder of a disc valve, as occurred in one case, does not appear to have been reported before. The diffculty in diagnosis of sudden cardiac decompensation in patients with prosthetic valves is stressed, as is the need for urgent operation. Images PMID:973894

  15. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  16. Acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ibrahim; Delil, Kenan; Ileri, Cigdem; Samadov, Fuad

    2014-01-01

    ST elevation acute myocardial infarction in patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve is rare and usually due to inadequate anticoagulation. We present a case of acute inferior myocardial infarction in a patient with a prosthetic aortic valve and high international normalized ratio, which has not been reported previously. PMID:24799934

  17. Hemolysis and infective endocarditis in a mitral prosthetic valve.

    PubMed

    Koç, Fatih; Bekar, Lütfi; Kadı, Hasan; Ceyhan, Köksal

    2010-09-01

    Traumatic intravascular hemolysis after heart valve replacement can be a serious problem. It is commonly associated with either structural deterioration or paravalvular leaks. A 63-year-old woman with a six-year history of surgery for mitral stenosis presented with complaints of weakness and dyspnea. She received treatment at other centers three times in the past six months for dyspnea and anemia requiring transfusion of red blood cells. Transthoracic echocardiography showed a normally functioning mitral mechanic prosthesis. Laboratory findings were abnormal for hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, serum haptoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase. Peripheral blood smear showed marked schistocytes, indicative of mechanical erythrocyte destruction. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated severe paravalvular leak and a large (9x13 mm) vegetation adhering to the prosthetic valve, protruding into the left atrium. Enterococcus faecalis was isolated from blood cultures. Surgery was planned because of large vegetation, repeated hemolysis, and severe paravalvular regurgitation, but the patient refused surgical treatment. PMID:21200125

  18. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-08-11

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient's presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  19. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient’s presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26500737

  20. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Jürgen Benjamin; Essig, Andreas; Herrmann, Manuel; Liebold, Andreas; Quader, Mohamed Abo

    2015-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) kroppenstedtii is a rarely detected agent of bacterial infections in humans. Here, we describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by C. kroppenstedtii. Application of molecular methods using surgically excised valve tissue was a cornerstone for the establishment of the microbiological diagnosis, which is crucial for targeted antimicrobial treatment.

  1. Do all patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis need surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Attaran, Saina; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Punjabi, Prakash P.; Anderson, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was ‘do all patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis need surgery?’ Seventeen papers were found using the reported search that represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. These studies compared the outcome and survival between surgically and non-surgically treated patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis. Of these studies, two were prospective observational studies and the rest were retrospective studies. The results of most of these papers were in accordance with the guidelines of the American College of Cardiology and American Heart association. These studies showed that unless a patient is not a surgical candidate, an operation is the treatment of choice in prosthetic valve endocarditis. Surgery should be performed as soon as possible, particularly in haemodynamically unstable patients and those who develop complications such as heart failure, valvular dysfunction, regurgitation/obstruction, dehiscence and annular abscess. In addition to the above indications and cardiac/valvularrelated complications of prosthetic valve endocarditis, infection with Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in the outcome, and the presence of this micro-organism should be considered an urgent surgical indication in the treatment of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Surgery should be performed before the development of any cerebral or other complications. In contrast, in stable patients with other micro-organisms, particularly those with organisms sensitive to antibiotic treatment who have no structural valvular damage or cardiac complications, surgery can be postponed. The option of surgical intervention can also be revisited if there is a change in response to the treatment. This

  2. Long-Term Outcome of Prosthetic Valve Replacement in Japanese Patients Aged 65 Years or Older: Are Guidelines for Prosthetic Valve Selection Based on Overseas Data Appropriate for Japanese Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Shunji; Yaoita, Hiroko; Ishii, Yusuke; Arimoto, Munehito; Hata, Hiroaki; Shiono, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Based on the revised AHA/ACC guidelines, it might be necessary to take into consideration the average life expectancy of Japanese people and revise the Japanese guidelines accordingly. Accordingly, we performed the present study to compare the long-term outcome in patients aged 65 years or older who underwent prosthetic valve replacement at our hospital using mechanical valves or biological valves. Methods: We have performed valve replacement in 416 patients aged 65 years or older (mechanical: 157; biological: 244). Results: There was no significant difference between the mechanical and biological valve for the actuarial survival rate. As for the valve-related complication free rate, in the mechanical valve group, the rates were significantly higher for all patients, aortic valve replacement (AVR) patients, and mitral valve replacement (MVR) patients. Conclusions: Following revision of the AHA/ACC guidelines for selection of prosthetic valves, it is necessary to investigate whether patients aged 60–70 represent the gray zone for selecting valves as in US and European guidelines, or whether a higher age is more appropriate in view of the longer average life expectancy in Japan. Accordingly, further evaluation of the long-term outcome for mechanical and biological valves in Japanese patients is needed to obtain evidence for preparation of original Japanese guidelines on prosthetic valve selection. PMID:26004117

  3. Mechanical versus biological aortic valve replacement strategies.

    PubMed

    Reineke, D; Gisler, F; Englberger, L; Carrel, T

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the most frequently performed procedure in valve surgery. The controversy about the optimal choice of the prosthetic valve is as old as the technique itself. Currently there is no perfect valve substitute available. The main challenge is to choose between mechanical and biological prosthetic valves. Biological valves include pericardial (bovine, porcine or equine) and native porcine bioprostheses designed in stented, stentless and sutureless versions. Homografts and pulmonary autografts are reserved for special indications and will not be discussed in detail in this review. We will focus on the decision making between artificial biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively. The first part of this article reviews guideline recommendations concerning the choice of aortic prostheses in different clinical situations while the second part is focused on novel strategies in the treatment of patients with aortic valve pathology. PMID:26678683

  4. Heart valve surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Valve replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves, Prosthetic valves ... place. The main types of new valves are: Mechanical -- made of man-made materials, such as metal ( ...

  5. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. PMID:25295408

  6. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve.

  7. Reynolds shear stress for textile prosthetic heart valves in relation to fabric design.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Yousefi, Atieh; Forleo, Marcio; Vaesken, Antoine; Heim, Frederic; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-07-01

    The most widely implanted prosthetic heart valves are either mechanical or bioprosthetic. While the former suffers from thrombotic risks, the latter suffers from a lack of durability. Textile valves, alternatively, can be designed with durability and to exhibit hemodynamics similar to the native valve, lowering the risk for thrombosis. Deviations from native valve hemodynamics can result in an increased Reynolds Shear Stress (RSS), which has the potential to instigate hemolysis or shear-induced thrombosis. This study is aimed at characterizing flow in multiple textile valve designs with an aim of developing a low profile valve. Valves were created using a shaping process based on heating a textile membrane and placed within a left heart simulator. Turbulence and bulk hemodynamics were assessed through particle imaging velocimetry, along with flow and pressure measurements. Overall, RSS was reduced for low profile valves relative to high profile valves, but was otherwise similar among low profile valves involving different fabric designs. However, leakage was found in 3 of the 4 low profile valve designs driving the fabric design for low profile valves. Through textile design, low profile valves can be created with favorable hemodynamics.

  8. A review of fluid-structure interaction simulations of prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctional natural heart valves are replaced with prosthetic heart valves through surgery. However, prosthetic valves are far from ideal. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) suffer from early calcification and structural damages. Mechanical heart valves (MHVs) are durable but highly thrombogenic and require lifelong anticoagulant treatment. These complications are believed to be related to nonphysiologic flow patterns created by these valves. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations are essential in revealing the hemodynamics of these valves. By combining the three-dimensional (3D) flow field obtained from realistic FSI simulations with platelet activation models, nonphysiologic flow patterns can be identified. In this review paper, state-of-the-art methods for simulating FSI in heart valves are reviewed, and the flow physics uncovered by FSI simulations are discussed. Finally, the limitations of current methods are discussed, and future research directions are proposed as follows: (1) incorporation of realistic, image-based ventricle and atrium geometries; (2) comparing MHV and BHV under similar conditions to identify nonphysiologic flow patterns; (3) developing better models to estimate platelet activation potential to be incorporated into the simulations; and (4) identifying the optimum placement of the valves in both mitral and aortic positions.

  9. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Gemella sanguinis: a consequence of persistent dental infection.

    PubMed

    Gundre, Prashant; Pascal, William; Abrol, Sunil; Kupfer, Yizhak; Tessler, Sidney

    2011-06-01

    Late prosthetic valve endocarditis is usually caused by streptococci, staphylococci, gram-negative bacilli and candida. The authors report the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Gemella sanguinis. The patient's risk factors for the development of Gemella endocarditis were the persistent severe dental caries and the presence of prosthetic valves. The patient required surgical replacement of the infected valve but had a good outcome with preservation of cardiac and valvular function. Evaluation and treatment of the persistent dental infection before initial valvular surgery may have prevented secondary infection of the prosthetic valve.

  10. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Functioning Prosthetic Valve.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm) reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function. PMID:26157465

  11. Contemporary management of prosthetic valve endocarditis: principals and future outlook.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Cormac T; Kiernan, Thomas J

    2015-05-01

    Infective endocarditis involving prosthetic valves accounts for 20% of all endocarditis cases. Rising in prevalence due to increasing placement of valvular prostheses, prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is more difficult to diagnose by conventional methods, associated with more invasive infection and increased mortality. This report explores the existing literature in identifying a direct approach to the management of PVE; such as adjuncts to establishing a diagnosis (for instance positron emission tomography/computed tomography and radiolabeled leukocyte scintigraphy), the trends in specific pathogens associated with PVE and the recommended antimicrobials for each. The patterns of disease requiring surgical intervention are also highlighted and explored. In addition, a 5-year outlook offers consolidated knowledge on epidemiological trends of both culprit organisms and population subgroups suffering (and projected to suffer) from PVE.

  12. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  13. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  14. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    DOEpatents

    McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood therethrough with two curved leaflets each of which is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance.

  15. Brown-Pigmented Mycobacterium mageritense as a Cause of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Allison R; Mattar, Caline; Kirmani, Nigar; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are a rare cause of endocarditis. Herein, we describe a case of Mycobacterium mageritense prosthetic valve endocarditis. This organism produced an unusual brown pigment on solid media. Cultures of valve tissue for acid-fast bacilli might be considered in some cases of apparently culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  16. Polymeric trileaflet prosthetic heart valves: evolution and path to clinical reality

    PubMed Central

    Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Hossainy, Syed; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Present prosthetic heart valves, while hemodynamically effective, remain limited by progressive structural deterioration of tissue valves or the burden of chronic anticoagulation for mechanical valves. An idealized valve prosthesis would eliminate these limitations. Polymeric heart valves (PHVs), fabricated from advanced polymeric materials, offer the potential of durability and hemocompatibility. Unfortunately, the clinical realization of PHVs to date has been hampered by findings of in vivo calcification, degradation and thrombosis. Here, the authors review the evolution of PHVs, evaluate the state of the art of this technology and propose a pathway towards clinical reality. In particular, the authors discuss the development of a novel aortic PHV that may be deployed via transcatheter implantation, as well as its optimization via device thrombogenicity emulation. PMID:23249154

  17. Limitations of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of pannus formation in prosthetic aortic valve and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Soumoulou, Juan Bautista; Cianciulli, Tomás Francisco; Zappi, Andrea; Cozzarin, Alberto; Saccheri, María Cristina; Lax, Jorge Alberto; Guidoin, Robert; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Pannus formation is a rare complication and occurs almost exclusively in mechanical prosthetic valves. It consists of fibrous tissue that covers the surface of the prosthesis either concentrically or eccentrically, resulting in valve dysfunction. The pathophysiology seems to be associated to a chronic inflammatory process that explains the late and insidious clinical presentation. This diagnosis should be considered in patients with high transvalvular gradients on transthoracic echo, and workup should be completed with fluoroscopy and transesophageal echocardiography. Treatment is always surgical and recurrence is rare. We present a case of pannus formation in a prosthetic aortic valve and a review of the literature regarding this disorder. PMID:25914791

  18. Does multiplane transesophageal echocardiography improve the assessment of prosthetic valve regurgitation?

    PubMed

    Flachskampf, F A; Hoffmann, R; Franke, A; Job, F P; Schöndube, F A; Messmer, B J; Hanrath, P

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of prosthetic valve regurgitation by echocardiography remains difficult. To study the value of the newly introduced multiplane transesophageal technology for this purpose, prosthetic valve regurgitation was examined in 63 consecutive patients with 35 mitral and 33 aortic prostheses (23 bioprostheses and 45 mechanical prostheses). Transvalvular, paravalvular and, in mechanical valves, normal or pathologic transvalvular regurgitation were identified first with 0 degrees (transverse) and 90 degrees (longitudinal) planes combined with flexion of the echoscope tip and then additionally with multiple intermediary planes by transducer rotation. In a subgroup of 20 patients interobserver variability was evaluated. Both methods showed regurgitation in 56 of 68 valves; one additional case of regurgitation was seen by multiplane imaging only. However, 19 cases of regurgitation were not clearly classifiable by biplane transesophageal echocardiography compared with only three with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography. Grading of severity was concordant by both modalities in 66 and discordant in only two cases. Observers disagreed on severity in two of 20 cases based on biplane imaging but in none based on multiplane imaging; classification of regurgitation differed in six of 20 (biplane) and one of 20 (multiplane), respectively. Multiplane transesophageal imaging improves classification of prosthetic regurgitation but has little effect on severity grading.

  19. Topography of aortic heart valves. [applied to the development of a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The cooperative effort towards the development of a tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valve is described. The photogrammetric studies were conducted on silicone rubber molds. Information on data acquisition and data reduction phases is given, and certain accuracy aspects of the project are explained. The various outputs which are discussed include digital models, profiles, and contour maps.

  20. Lagrangian coherent structures and turbulence characteristics downstream of prosthetic aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Tullio, Marco D.

    2015-11-01

    The flowfield through prosthetic heart valves is investigated by means of direct numerical simulations, considering the fully coupled fluid-structure interaction problem. Two different aortic valve models are modeled: a bileaflet mechanical and a biological one. In order to reveal fluid flow structures and to better understand the transport mechanics, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are used. LCS are distinguished material surfaces that can be identified as boundaries to regions with dynamically distinct behavior, and are revealed as hypersurfaces that locally maximize the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. Post-processing the flow simulation data, first FTLE fields are calculated integrating dense meshes of Lagrangian particles backward in time, and then attracting LCS are extracted. A three-jet configuration is distinctive of bi-leaflet mechanical valves, with higher turbulent shear stresses immediately distal to the valve leaflets, while a jet-like flow emerges from the central orifice of bio-prosthetic valves, with high turbulent shear stresses occurring at the edge of the jet. Details of the numerical methodology along with a thorough analysis of the different flow structures developing during the cardiac cycle for the two configurations will be provided.

  1. Prosthetic valve endocarditis: a review of 24 cases

    PubMed Central

    Petheram, Ian S.; Boyce, J. M. H.

    1977-01-01

    Petheram, I. S. and Boyce, J. M. H. (1977).Thorax, 32, 478-485. Prosthetic valve endocarditis: a review of 24 cases. Twenty-four episodes of prosthetic valve endocarditis occurred in 23 patients in a 10-year period. Fifteen patients presented within four months and nine from 14 months to seven years after surgery. The commonest pathogens in the early group were Candida albicans (five), but in three of these patients other organisms were found; diphtheroid species in five and Staphylococcus aureus in three. Four patients in the late group had Streptococcus viridans infection. Antistaphylococcal operative prophylaxis has been successful, but opportunist organisms of low virulence in health have emerged as pathogens. Continuous monitoring of antibiotic prophylaxis may reduce the incidence of early cases, and antibiotic cover for dental procedures should be as meticulous after valve replacement as before operation. The most frequent cause of death in both groups was delayed or inadequate treatment because of failure to isolate the pathogens from blood cultures with consequent severe haemodynamic upset or uncontrolled infection. Previous courses of antibiotics were the usual reason for negative blood cultures. Successful management requires close liaison with an interested clinical bacteriologist and aggressive surgery for haemodynamic faults or failure to control infection. PMID:929490

  2. Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Biteker, Murat; Altun, Ibrahim; Basaran, Ozcan; Dogan, Volkan; Yildirim, Birdal; Ergun, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. The optimal treatment of the PVT is controversial and depends on thrombus location and size, the patient’s functional class, the risk of surgery or thrombolysis, and the clinician’s experience. Although surgical therapy has been the traditional therapeutic approach, studies with low-dose and slow-infusion rates of thrombolytic agents have revealed excellent results. This article reviews the various treatment options in patient with PVT. PMID:26566406

  3. The obstetrical patient with a prosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Fuster, Valentin

    2006-09-01

    Definitive recommendations on anticoagulation strategy in pregnant women who have prosthetic heart valves are lacking because of the paucity of prospectively collected data. The use of warfarin, UFH, LMWH, or any combination of these choices has potentially adverse outcomes for the mother and fetus. Although there is no treatment option that has proven to be completely satisfactory, there is agreement that failures are most often due to underdosing and the lack of intensive monitoring of anticoagulation. A careful discussion with the patient must be undertaken so that she and the clinician can come to a decision about the most appropriate protocol. PMID:16962923

  4. Prosthetic valve endocarditis with valvular obstruction after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Pabilona, Christine; Gitler, Bernard; Lederman, Jeffrey A; Miller, Donald; Keltz, Theodore N

    2015-04-01

    Patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for open-heart surgery might be candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Streptococcus viridans endocarditis that caused prosthetic valve obstruction after TAVR. A 77-year-old man who had undergone TAVR 17 months earlier was admitted because of evidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a substantial increase in the transvalvular peak gradient and mean gradient in comparison with an echocardiogram of 7 months earlier. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.5-cm vegetation obstructing the valve. Blood cultures yielded penicillin-sensitive S. viridans. The patient was hemodynamically stable and was initially treated with vancomycin because of his previous penicillin allergy. Subsequent therapy with levofloxacin, oral penicillin (after a negative penicillin skin test), and intravenous penicillin eliminated the symptoms of the infection. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a relatively new procedure, and sequelae are still being discovered. We recommend that physicians consider obstructive endocarditis as one of these.

  5. Candida prosthetic valve endocarditis cured by caspofungin therapy without valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rajendram, R; Alp, N J; Mitchell, A R; Bowler, I C J W; Forfar, J C

    2005-05-01

    A 64-year-old woman with a mechanical mitral valve prosthesis developed late-onset Candida endocarditis. Blood cultures grew Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated vegetations on the valve. The patient was not medically fit for valve replacement, but her condition was successfully treated with 6 weeks of intravenous caspofungin therapy.

  6. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto; Vieira Junior, Francisco Ubaldo; Vieira, Reinaldo Wilson; Antunes, Nilson; Tabacow, Fabio Bittencourt Dutra; Costa, Eduardo Tavares; Petrucci Junior, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. Objective To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models) exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. Methods To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. ) and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. Results It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. Conclusions Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM) is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series). Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves. PMID:24598950

  7. Prosthetic Valve Dysfunction 35 Years after Mitral Valve Replacement with a Starr-Edwards Caged-disc Valve.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Ohara, Takahiro; Takashio, Seiji; Sakamoto, Mari; Wada, Yuko; Nakamura, Kenji; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Okamoto, Yoko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of dyspnea. He had a history of mitral valve replacement (MVR) with a Starr-Edwards (SE) caged-disc valve at the age of 14. Echocardiography revealed elevated trans-valvular pressure gradient of the mitral prosthetic valve with neither disk motion abnormality nor abnormal structure. Catheterization confirmed an elevation of the mean diastolic gradient of the mitral valve to 12.3 mmHg. Re-MVR was performed, and abnormal tissue attached to the cage of the valve and proliferating beneath the valve was observed. Histologic examination revealed them as fibrinous tissue and mild pannus proliferation, respectively. This rare case report focuses on long-term follow-up and the complication of a SE caged-disc valve. A SE caged-disc valve may become stenotic, only detected with a trans-valvular pressure gradient without any disk motion abnormality or abnormal structure during a prolonged follow-up period.

  8. Combined computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis is challenging. The gold standard for prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosis is trans-esophageal echocardiography. However, trans-esophageal echocardiography may result in negative findings or yield images difficult to differentiate from thrombus in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis. Combined computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a potentially promising diagnostic tool for several infectious conditions and it has also been employed in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis but data are still scant. Case presentations We reviewed the charts of 6 patients with prosthetic aortic valves evaluated for suspicion of prosthetic valve endocarditis, at two different hospital, over a 3-year period. We found 3 patients with early-onset PVE cases and blood cultures yielding Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis, respectively; and 3 late-onset cases in the remaining 3 patients with isolation in the blood of Streptococcus bovis, Candida albicans and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Initial trans-esophageal echocardiography was negative in all the patients, while fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed images suspicious for prosthetic valve endocarditis. In 4 out of 6 patients valve replacement was done with histology confirming the prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosis. After an adequate course of antibiotic therapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed resolution of prosthetic valve endocarditis in all the patients. Conclusion Our experience confirms the potential role of fluoroseoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and follow-up of prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:24418206

  9. The effect of warfarin dosage on maternal and fetal outcomes in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Soma-Pillay, P; Nene, Z; Mathivha, T M; Macdonald, A P

    2011-01-01

    There are several challenges in the management of pregnant women with mechanical heart valves. Pregnancy increases the risk of thromboembolism and there is currently no consensus on the safest anticoagulation method during pregnancy. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between the warfarin dose and pregnancy outcome in pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves. Warfarin in pregnancy was associated with a low risk of valve thrombosis or maternal death. The risk for fetal abnormalities was not related to the maternal warfarin dosage. However, the risk for stillbirth was significantly increased with increasing doses of warfarin. PMID:27579092

  10. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis with special reference to prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Westaby, S; Oakley, C; Sapsford, R N; Bentall, H H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with native valve endocarditis treated surgically between 1968 and 1978 (n = 15) and all patients presenting with prosthetic valve endocarditis during this period (n = 21) were followed up for at least four years. Five of the patients with native valve endocarditis required urgent early surgical intervention, of whom two died. The remaining 10 underwent valve replacement after a course of antibiotic treatment: all survived, though one required further valve replacement. The 21 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis suffered 25 attacks. Nine were cured by medical treatment alone; two died before surgical intervention was possible; 11 required valve replacement, of whom three died; and two required valve replacement after a course of antibiotic treatment. The incidence of early prosthetic valve endocarditis--that occurring within two months of operation--was 0.67%, but that of late prosthetic valve endocarditis could not be determined. Medical treatment when started early should cure endocarditis in most patients, but vigilance should be maintained for the appearance of indications for surgery. When such indications exist surgery should not be delayed. PMID:6409290

  11. Experimental Validation of a Cardiac Simulator for in vitro Evaluation of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Objective This work describes the experimental validation of a cardiac simulator for three heart rates (60, 80 and 100 beats per minute), under physiological conditions, as a suitable environment for prosthetic heart valves testing in the mitral or aortic position. Methods In the experiment, an aortic bileaflet mechanical valve and a mitral bioprosthesis were employed in the left ventricular model. A test fluid of 47.6% by volume of glycerin solution in water at 36.5ºC was used as blood analogue fluid. A supervisory control and data acquisition system implemented previously in LabVIEW was applied to induce the ventricular operation and to acquire the ventricular signals. The parameters of the left ventricular model operation were based on in vivo and in vitro data. The waves of ventricular and systemic pressures, aortic flow, stroke volume, among others, were acquired while manual adjustments in the arterial impedance model were also established. Results The acquired waves showed good results concerning some in vivo data and requirements from the ISO 5840 standard. Conclusion The experimental validation was performed, allowing, in future studies, characterizing the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic heart valves. PMID:27556315

  12. Effect of the prosthetic mitral valve on vortex dynamics and turbulence of the left ventricular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querzoli, G.; Fortini, S.; Cenedese, A.

    2010-04-01

    Mechanical heart valves implanted in mitral position have a great effect on the ventricular flow. Changes include alteration of the dynamics of the vortical structures generated during the diastole and the onset of turbulence, possibly affecting the efficiency of the heart pump or causing blood cell damage. Modifications to the hemodynamics in the left ventricle, when the inflow through the mitral orifice is altered, were investigated in vitro using a silicone rubber, flexible ventricle model. Velocity fields were measured in space and time by means of an image analysis technique: feature tracking. Three series of experiments were performed: one with a top hat inflow velocity profile (schematically resembling physiological conditions), and two with mechanical prosthetic valves of different design, mounted in mitral position—one monoleaflet and the other bileaflet. In each series of runs, two different cardiac outputs have been examined by changing the stroke volume. The flow was investigated in terms of phase averaged velocity field and second order moments of turbulent fluctuations. Results show that the modifications in the transmitral flow change deeply the interaction between the coherent structures generated during the first phase of the diastole and the incoming jet during the second diastolic phase. Top hat inflow gives the coherent structures which are optimal, among the compared cases, for the systolic function. The flow generated by the bileaflet valve preserves most of the beneficial features of the top hat inflow, whereas the monoleaflet valve generates a strong jet which discourages the permanence of large coherent structures at the end of the diastole. Moreover, the average shear rate magnitudes induced by the smoother flow pattern of the case of top hat inflow are nearly halved in comparison with the values measured with the mechanical valves. Finally, analysis of the turbulence statistics shows that the monoleaflet valves yield higher turbulence

  13. Candida parapsilosis: an unusual organism causing prosthetic heart valve infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Darwazah, A; Berg, G; Faris, B

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of Candida parapsilosis prosthetic heart valve infective endocarditis in a 67-year-old man. The infection was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) and flucytosine. Surgical replacement of the infected valve was necessary. Recurrence was prevented with oral fluconazole 400mg daily as maintenance therapy. The patient remained well after 2 years of follow-up.

  14. Successful Medical Treatment of Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis Caused by Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Shin, Hyo-Sun; Lee, Hee-Sun; Choi, Hong-Mi; Kim, Hyung-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Although Brucella endocarditis is a rare complication of human brucellosis, it is the main cause of the mortality in this disease. Traditionally, the therapeutic approach to endocarditis caused by Brucella species requires a combination of antimicrobial therapy and valve replacement surgery. In the literature, only a few cases of mitral prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Brucella species have been successfully treated without reoperation. We present a case of a 42-year-old man with a prosthetic mitral valve infected by Brucella abortus who was cured solely by medical treatment. PMID:25469149

  15. Selection of Prosthetic Valve and Evidence—Need for the Development of Japan’s Own Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Shiono, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In 2014, the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) guidelines were largely revised with regard to the selection of prosthetic valves. (1) A mechanical prosthesis is reasonable for aortic valve replacement (AVR) or mitral valve replacement (MVR) in patients less than 60 years of age, (2) A bioprosthesis is reasonable in patients more than 70 years of age, and (3) Either a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve is reasonable in patients between 60 and 70 years of age. Japan faces the unprecedented population aging, and moreover, the average life expectancy is longer among the Japanese than the Westerners. In Japan, whether this choice is appropriate seems questionable. Methods: This time, with the revision of the AHA/ACC guidelines, it might be necessary to take into consideration the average life expectancy of Japanese people and revise the Japanese guidelines accordingly. Results: We should consider whether 60–70 years should be set as a gray zone regarding the age criteria for choosing biological valves, or if the age should be set higher relative to that specified in the western guidelines, given the longer Japanese life expectancy. Conclusion: We believe that the development of unique, Japanese guidelines for the selection of prosthetic valves will allow us to provide appropriate selection and treatment for each patient. PMID:26062580

  16. Fibrinolytic Treatment after Transient Ischaemic Attack Caused by Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Neuß, Michael; Tambor, Grit; Hölschermann, Frank; Butter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the most severe complications after surgical valve replacement. There are many possible presentations: from asymptomatic to life-threatening complications. We report on a 61-year-old female patient with prosthetic replacement of the aortic and mitral valve in the in-house department of cardiac surgery 3 months ago. The patient was suffering from aphasia during 5 minutes in domesticity. After her presentation in the emergency room, the echocardiographic examination revealed a thrombotic formation of the prosthetic mitral valve. At presentation, the anticoagulation was outside the effective range (INR: 1.7). A successful thrombolytic therapy with the plasminogen activator urokinase was begun with complete resolution of the thrombus. PMID:27313908

  17. Fibrinolytic Treatment after Transient Ischaemic Attack Caused by Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Koban, Cornel; Neuß, Michael; Tambor, Grit; Hölschermann, Frank; Butter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the most severe complications after surgical valve replacement. There are many possible presentations: from asymptomatic to life-threatening complications. We report on a 61-year-old female patient with prosthetic replacement of the aortic and mitral valve in the in-house department of cardiac surgery 3 months ago. The patient was suffering from aphasia during 5 minutes in domesticity. After her presentation in the emergency room, the echocardiographic examination revealed a thrombotic formation of the prosthetic mitral valve. At presentation, the anticoagulation was outside the effective range (INR: 1.7). A successful thrombolytic therapy with the plasminogen activator urokinase was begun with complete resolution of the thrombus. PMID:27313908

  18. Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis: Mayo Clinic experience with a clinicopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Boland, Jennifer M; Chung, Heath H; Robberts, Frans J L; Wilson, Walter R; Steckelberg, James M; Baddour, Larry M; Miller, Dylan V

    2011-07-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is a rare but devastating disease. To better characterise this syndrome, we retrospectively reviewed 21 cases of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis seen at Mayo Clinic over the past 40 years. The average patient age was 65 years with a 2 : 1 male predominance. Twelve of 21 cases (57%) occurred within 1 year of prosthetic valve placement. The aortic valve was most commonly affected, and the most common aetiological agent was Candida species, followed by Histoplasma capsulatum. Although 20 of 21 patients (95%) were immunocompetent, they had other risk factors for fungal infection. Patients typically presented with systemic signs and symptoms of infection, and cardiac imaging was abnormal in 68% of cases. Pathological evaluation of valve material was of high yield, with organisms identified in 92% of cases who underwent valve replacement surgery or had an autopsy performed. Prosthetic valve fungal endocarditis was associated with a high morbidity and mortality, with 67% of patients experiencing complications and 57% of patients dying of infection-related disease. Hopefully, with the prompt institution of early medical therapy, surgical intervention and lifelong oral antifungal suppressive therapy, cure rates will continue to improve. PMID:20406395

  19. The Impact of Sinus in the Flow Dynamics around Prosthetic Venous Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Wei-Hsin; Chen, Henry Y.; Berwick, Zachary; Krieger, Joshua; Chambers, Sean; Dabiri, Dana; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-11-01

    The valves in the venous system are surrounded by a thinner but expandable vein section that forms a pocket region known as the sinus. The exact function of the sinus pocket for the venous valves is not fully understood. This is especially an issue for the bioprostheticvalve, since most of the prosthetic valves do not have a sinus pocket. To determine the impact of the sinus pocket on the flow dynamics to a prosthetic valve, an in-vitro experiment was setup at normal physiological flow conditions to simulate the flow inside a venous system. Two different valve designs were tested in glass tubes simulating the vein vessel with and without the sinus pocket profile using 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). Velocity measurements were made, and vorticity and flow shear were calculated. The results show that vortex structures near the valve leaflet tip were preserved better with the sinus present. The jet width at valve exit was found to be narrower with sinus than without sinus, and the effect was more significant with longer leaflet length. The results suggest that the sinus pocket alters the flow around the valve and functions as a flow regulator. For prosthetic valve without sinus, a shorter leaflet would provide similar effect of sinus and thus is more preferable.

  20. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (< 5%). However, patients still face the risks of blood cell damage, thromboembolic events, and material failure of the prosthetic device. One mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested. PMID:25571278

  1. Fibrinolytic treatment of thrombus on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed Central

    Witchitz, S; Veyrat, C; Moisson, P; Scheinman, N; Rozenstajn, L

    1980-01-01

    Fibrinolytic agents were administered for 13 episodes of thrombus formation on mitral or aortic valvar prostheses in 12 patients. The most common presenting features were pulmonary oedema (six cases) or arterial emboli (six cases). The diagnosis of thrombus formation was made by phonocardiography on the following criteria: (a) modifications of the prosthetic sounds (12 cases), (b) appearance of a valvar obstructive syndrome (10 cases). The treatment consisted of streptokinase (100 000 units/h after a loading dose, seven cases) or urokinase using either low doses (75 000 or 112 500 units/h, three cases) or moderate doses (150 000 units/h, three cases) for one to four days. Immediate complete regression of clinical and phonocardiographic anomalies was seen in eight cases. Incomplete improvement was seen in two patients, leading to operation: this was unsuccessful in one patient who had surgery on the third day, and was successful in the other on the 75th day. There were three failures leading to successful reoperative procedures in two patients and to an early death in the third patient suffering from acute myocardial infarction. One non-fatal haemopericardium was observed in a patient treated with streptokinase. No important side effect was noted during delivery in a pregnant woman. During subsequent follow-up, a recurrent episode of thrombus formation was observed in one patient, treated by fibrinolytic therapy with success. One patient had an operation for a valve replacement six months after fibrinolytic treatment because of non-thrombotic valvar dysfunction; the outcome was fatal. Six patients are alive and in good condition, with a follow-up of six months to five years. Images PMID:7437196

  2. Mechanical valve obstruction: Review of diagnostic and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Jason; Munoz-Mendoza, Jerson; Liebelt, Jared J; Taub, Cynthia C

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) is a rare but feared complication of mechanical valve replacement. Diagnostic evaluation should focus on differentiating prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) from pannus formation, as their treatment options differ. History of sub-optimal anti-coagulation and post-op time course to development of PVO are useful clinical characteristics in differentiating thrombus from pannus formation. Treatment of PVT is influenced by the patient’s symptoms, valve location, degree of obstruction and thrombus size and may include thrombolysis or surgical intervention. Alternatively, pannus formation requires surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnostic approach and treatment options for aortic and mitral valve PVO. PMID:26730292

  3. Fundamental mechanics of aortic heart valve closure.

    PubMed

    Hose, David Rodney; Narracott, Andrew James; Penrose, Justin M T; Baguley, David; Jones, Ian P; Lawford, Patricia V

    2006-01-01

    Stresses in a prosthetic heart valve at closure are determined by its geometrical and structural characteristics, by the mechanical support environment, and by the momentum of the valve leaflets or occluder and of the blood at the instant of closure. The mass of blood to be arrested is significantly greater than that of the leaflets or occluder, and is therefore likely to dominate the closure impulse. The kinetic energy of the blood must be transduced into potential energy in the structural components (valve leaflets, aortic root and aorta). This paper presents a methodology for computation and parameterisation of the blood momentum associated with a valve in the aortic position. It is suggested that the influence of physiological parameters, such as systolic waveform and systemic impedance, on the closure characteristics can be investigated based on the fluid dynamic implications. Detailed results are presented for a single leaflet mechanical valve (Bjork-Shiley 60 degrees Convexo-Concave). It is demonstrated that a simple analytical method can yield results that might be adequate for the purposes of valve design.

  4. Fibrinolytic therapy for mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Zahra; Mohammadzadeh, Shabnam; Maleki, Majid; Peighambari, Mohammad Mehdi; Sadeghpoor, Anita; Ghavidel, Alireza; Elahi, Behrad; Mirzaaghayan, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis using intravenous thrombolytics, although an acceptable alternative to surgery, is not complication free, and the literature has a dearth of data on the subject. This study analyzed the results of fibrinolytic treatment (FT) among a single-center group of patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Between 2000 and 2013, 23 consecutive patients with 25 episodes of pulmonary valve thrombosis received FT. The diagnosis of mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis was established by fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Streptokinase (SK) was used in 24 cases and alteplase in 1 case. The FT was continued a second day for 14 patients (58.3%), a third day for 1 patient, and a fourth day for 1 patient. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy were performed every day until improvement of malfunction was achieved. Of the 23 patients, 19 had complete resolution of hemodynamic abnormalities after FT, 1 had partial resolution, and 2 showed no change. No patient had major complications. Five minor complications were detected, namely, fever, nausea, thrombophlebitis, epistaxi, and pain. Seven patients (30%) experienced recurrence of thrombosis, whereas four patients had surgery (biological pulmonary valve replacement) without re-thrombolytic therapy, one patient was treated with Alteplase, one patient received SK, and one patient received intense anticoagulation using heparin and warfarin. Overall, FT had a success rate of 84%. The results indicate that regardless of the time to pulmonary valve replacement and echocardiographic and fluoroscopic findings, FT was effective in most cases of mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. The efficacy increased with second-day thrombolytic therapy. Major complications were not common after lytic therapy for mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis.

  5. Dual Prosthetic Heart Valve Presented with Chest Pain: A Case Report of Coronary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Sarawut

    2015-01-01

    Coronary embolism from a prosthetic heart valve is a rare but remarkable cause of acute coronary syndrome. There is no definite management of an entity like this. Here we report a case of 54-year-old male with a history of rheumatic heart disease with dual prosthetic heart valve and atrial fibrillation who developed chest pain from acute myocardial infarction. The laboratory values showed inadequate anticoagulation. Cardiac catheterization and thrombectomy with the aspiration catheter were chosen to be the treatment for this patient, and it showed satisfactory outcome. PMID:25785203

  6. Modeling Prosthetic Heart Valves for Numerical Analysis of Blood Flow in the Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskin, Charles S.; McQueen, David M.

    1980-08-01

    This paper extends our previous work on numerical analysis of blood flow in the heart. In that work the boundary forces were evaluated by solving a fixed-point problem, which we now reformulate as a problem in optimization. This optimization problem, which involves the energy function from which the boundary forces are derived, is solved by Murray's modification of Newton's method. The energy function turns out to be an extremely useful tool in modeling prosthetic heart valves. To enforce a constraint on the valve, we use an energy function which is zero when the constraint is satisfied and positive otherwise. The energy function must be invariant under translation and rotation so that conservation of momentum and angular momentum will be satisfied. We use this technique to construct computer models of several prosthetic valves, and we study the flow patterns of these valves in our computer test chamber.

  7. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement by Hybrid Approach Using a Novel Polymeric Prosthetic Heart Valve: Proof of Concept in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tong-yi; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Li, Xin; Han, Lin; Xu, Zhi-yun

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2000, transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement has steadily advanced. However, the available prosthetic valves are restricted to bioprosthesis which have defects like poor durability. Polymeric heart valve is thought as a promising alternative to bioprosthesis. In this study, we introduced a novel polymeric transcatheter pulmonary valve and evaluated its feasibility and safety in sheep by a hybrid approach. Methods We designed a novel polymeric trileaflet transcatheter pulmonary valve with a balloon-expandable stent, and the valve leaflets were made of 0.1-mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) coated with phosphorylcholine. We chose glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium valves as control. Pulmonary valve stents were implanted in situ by a hybrid transapical approach in 10 healthy sheep (8 for polymeric valve and 2 for bovine pericardium valve), weighing an average of 22.5±2.0 kg. Angiography and cardiac catheter examination were performed after implantation to assess immediate valvular functionality. After 4-week follow-up, angiography, echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac catheter examination were used to assess early valvular function. One randomly selected sheep with polymeric valve was euthanized and the explanted valved stent was analyzed macroscopically and microscopically. Findings Implantation was successful in 9 sheep. Angiography at implantation showed all 9 prosthetic valves demonstrated orthotopic position and normal functionality. All 9 sheep survived at 4-week follow-up. Four-week follow-up revealed no evidence of valve stent dislocation or deformation and normal valvular and cardiac functionality. The cardiac catheter examination showed the peak-peak transvalvular pressure gradient of the polymeric valves was 11.9±5.0 mmHg, while that of two bovine pericardium valves were 11 and 17 mmHg. Gross morphology demonstrated good opening and closure characteristics. No thrombus or calcification was seen

  8. In vitro flow dynamics of four prosthetic aortic valves: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Hanle, D D; Harrison, E C; Yoganathan, A P; Allen, D T; Corcoran, W H

    1989-01-01

    The velocity fields downstream of four prosthetic heart valves were mapped in vitro over the entire cross-section of a model aortic root using laser Doppler anemometry. THe Björk-Shiley 60 degrees convexo-concave tilting disc valve, the Smeloff-Cutter caged ball valve, the St. Jude Medical bileaflet valve, and the Ionescu-Shiley standard bioprosthesis were examined under both steady and pulsatile flows. Velocity profiles under steady flow conditions were a good approximation for pulsatile profiles only during midsystole. The pulsatile flow characteristics of the four valves showed variation in large scale flow structures. Comparison of the valves according to pressure drop, shear stress and maximum velocities are also provided. PMID:2808443

  9. Homograft Aortic Root Replacement with Saphenous Vein Graft Hemi-Cabrol for Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dimarakis, Ioannis; Wooldridge, Wilfred J.; Kadir, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old female presented with prosthetic valve endocarditis with periannular abscess involving the left coronary ostium. We describe cryopreserved aortic homograft root replacement with hemi-Cabrol reimplantation of the left coronary ostium using the long saphenous vein. PMID:26798762

  10. Misleading echocardiographic diagnosis of a prosthetic heart valve vegetation due to the cavitation phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Ramón Suárez; Piñero-Uribe, Isabel; Carreras, Francesc; Pujadas, Sandra; Leta, Rubén; Pons-Lladó, Guillem

    2009-01-01

    The cavitation phenomenon is caused by the local pressure depression that occurrs during the closure and/or opening of prosthetic valve leaflets. Occasionally, peculiar features of echocardiographic images generated by cavitation can simulate a mass or vegetation, and are a potential source of diagnostic error. A clinical case that illustrates this phenomenon is described. PMID:20198201

  11. Longest Event-Free Survival without Anticoagulation in a Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Salmane, Chadi; Pandya, Bhavi; Lafferty, Kristen; Patel, Nileshkumar J; McCord, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Sixty percent of the patients going for valve replacement opt for mechanical valves and the remaining 40% choose bioprosthetics. Mechanical valves are known to have a higher risk of thrombosis; this risk further varies depending on the type of valve, its position, and certain individual factors. According to current guidelines, long-term anticoagulation is indicated in patients with metallic prosthetic valve disease. We report two unique cases of patients who survived 27 and 37 years event free, respectively, after mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) without being on any form of anticoagulation. The latter case described the longest survival in a human with a prosthetic aortic valve without anticoagulation. A review of literature demonstrated few cases of prosthetic valves with no anticoagulation in the long term without significant embolic events reported as case reports. These cases have been summarized in this article. Some cases of long-term survival (in the absence of anticoagulation) were attributed to good luck, and others as the result of genetic variations. New mechanical prosthetic valves can be promising, such as microporus-surfaced valves that may be used without full anticoagulation. The use of dual antiplatelet agents alone can be currently recommended only when a patient cannot take oral anticoagulation after AVR, and it should be followed with measuring and monitoring of platelet reactivity. PMID:27053922

  12. Total prosthetic replacement of atrioventricular valves in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Den Otter, G.

    1968-01-01

    The free-floating cone and cage valve, described in a previous study as being successful as a substitute for the right atrioventricular valve, does not perform well when it is inserted in the mitral ostium. A tilting cone or disc was constructed and tested in a series of 15 dogs. This prosthesis gave excellent results in 12 animals. The reasons for its failure in the remaining three is discussed. The prosthesis presented has advantages over any ball and cage valve, mainly because of its smaller volume. Images PMID:5654076

  13. Perivalvular pannus and valve thrombosis: two concurrent mechanisms of mechanical valve prosthesis dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; Bueno-Codoñer, María E; López-Rodríguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Arribas-Jiménez, Antonio; Diego-Nieto, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Collado, Javier; Rodríguez-López, Jose María

    2015-02-01

    A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our institution with progressive dyspnea. She had previously been diagnosed with rheumatic heart disease and had undergone cardiac surgery for mechanical mitral valve replacement ten years previously. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed blockage of the mechanical prosthesis and the patient was scheduled for surgery, in which a thrombus was removed from the left atrial appendage. A partial thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis and circumferential pannus overgrowth were concomitantly detected. Prosthetic heart valve blockage is a rare but life-threatening complication, the main causes of which are thrombosis and pannus formation. The two conditions are different but both are usually misdiagnosed. Two concurrent mechanisms of prosthesis blockage were found in this patient.

  14. A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Liszka, E G; Lamson, T C; Stinebring, D R; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1994-11-01

    A method for real-time in vitro observation of cavitation on a prosthetic heart valve has been developed. Cavitation of four blood analog fluids (distilled water, aqueous glycerin, aqueous polyacrylamide, and aqueous xanthan gum) has been documented for a Medtronic/Hall prosthetic heart valve. This method employed a Penn State Electrical Ventricular Assist Device in a mock circulatory loop that was operated in a partial filling mode associated with reduced atrial filling pressure. The observations were made on a valve that was located in the mitral position, with the cavitation occurring on the inlet side after valve closure on every cycle. Stroboscopic videography was used to document the cavity life cycle. Bubble cavitation was observed on the valve occluder face. Vortex cavitation was observed at two locations in the vicinity of the valve occluder and housing. For each fluid, cavity growth and collapse occurred in less than one millisecond, which provides strong evidence that the cavitation is vaporous rather than gaseous. The cavity duration time was found to decrease with increasing atrial pressure at constant aortic pressure and beat rate. The area of cavitation was found to decrease with increasing delay time at a constant aortic pressure, atrial pressure, and beat rate. Cavitation was found to occur in each of the fluids, with the most cavitation seen in the Newtonian fluids (distilled water and aqueous glycerin). PMID:7869722

  15. New electromagnetic methods for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valves (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udpa, Satish

    2002-05-01

    Prosthetic devices are being implanted at record levels as the nation "ages" and advances in prosthetic science are made. Devices that are implanted range from artificial limbs and hips to devices such as heart valves. Periodic evaluation of the state of the devices is of significant interest particularly in the case of prosthetics whose failure can be fatal. An example of such a device is the artificial heart valve. Heart valves are usually replaced when stenosis or incompetence is indicated. This article presents a selection of some new techniques that are being developed for the detection of outlet strut failures in Bjork-Shiley heart valves. Methods that show particular promise include a noninvasive electromagnetic method that relies on the excitation and measurement of the resonant vibration modes of the strut. An alternate approach involves the induction of currents in the outlet strut using a pair of external excitation coils. The field generated by the current induced in the strut perturbs the field generated by the excitation coils. The field perturbations are measured using a catheter-mounted gradiometer. Test results obtained using an experimental rig designed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept are presented.

  16. Valve-related complications after mechanical heart valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-10-01

    The number of heart valve surgeries is increasing, and 19,164 patients underwent heart valve surgery in Japan in 2011. The early mortality rate has remained stable for more than 10 years. Many patients now survive for many years, with a reported 10-year survival rate of at least 60 %. However, unfavorable complications can occur after valve surgery. Valve-related complications include thromboembolisms, bleeding complications and prosthetic valve endocarditis, followed by structural and nonstructural prosthetic valve dysfunctions. Our review of studies published after 2000 revealed that the rate of all valve-related complications was 0.7-3.5 % per patient-year. Thromboembolisms occur at a rate of approximately 1 % per patient-year, and bleeding complications occur at almost 0.5 % per patient-year. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events related to anticoagulant therapy should be considered during life-long follow-up. The occurrence rate of endocarditis reaches 0.5 % per patient-year, with a poor postoperative survival. Structural dysfunctions have been largely overcome, and the nonstructural dysfunction rate is 0.4-1.2 % per patient-year. The nonstructural dysfunctions induced by paravalvular leaks and pannus ingrowth are also issues that need to be resolved.

  17. Transvalvular mitral regurgitation following mitral valve replacement a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, U. S. Dinesh; Nareppa, Umesh; Shetty, Shyam Prasad; Wali, Murugesh

    2015-01-01

    After mitral valve replacement with a prosthetic valve, the valve should be competent and there should not be any residual prosthetic valve regurgitation. Transvalvular residual prosthetic valve regurgitation are difficult to diagnose and quantify. we are reporting interesting TEE images as a diagnostic dilemma in a case of transvalvular mitral regurgitation following mitral valve replacement secondary to entrapment of sub-valvular apparatus in a Chitra mechanical heart valve. PMID:26440249

  18. Late postoperative prosthetic pulmonary valve endocarditis in a 13-year-old girl with repaired tetralogy of fallot.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michael C; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K; DeCampli, William M

    2015-06-01

    Prosthetic pulmonary valve endocarditis has infrequently been described outside large cohort reviews, which have typically focused on infections of the left-sided heart valves. Hence, the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management principles of prosthetic pulmonary valve endocarditis have not been well differentiated from those of infected aortic and mitral valves. More patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot are reaching adulthood and will need pulmonary valve implantation. Consequently, a focus on this infrequent but serious cardiac infection is needed, to learn what characteristics might distinguish it from infections of left-sided heart valves. We report the case of a 13-year-old girl with repaired tetralogy of Fallot who presented with fever and nonspecific symptoms. The patient initially failed to meet the Duke criteria for endocarditis but was then found to have endocarditis of her prosthetic pulmonary valve. We explanted the valve and replaced it with a pulmonary homograft, after which the patient had no infectious sequelae. In addition to presenting the patient's case, we review the literature on surgically inserted prosthetic pulmonary valves and discuss the primary management concerns when those valves become infected with endocarditis.

  19. Development and marketing of a prosthetic urinary control valve system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, J. B., Jr.; Rabinowitz, R.; Rogers, D. W.; Harrison, H. N.

    1983-01-01

    An implantable prosthetic for the control of urinary incontinence was developed and marketed. Three phases are presented: bench development studies, animal trials, and human clinical trials. This work was performed under the direction of a Research Team at Rochester General Hospital (RGH). Bench trials were completed on prototype hardware and provided early verification of the device's ability to withstand repeated cyclic testing. Configurational variants were evaluated and a preferred design concept was established. Silicone rubber (medical grade) was selected as the preferred material for the prosthesis.

  20. Indium-111 labeled platelet survival time studies in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    SciTech Connect

    Martinovitch, U.; Carrick, P.; Lieberman, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    Platelet survival time (PST) studies are useful to demonstrate whether or not patients with prosthetic heart valves have normal or shortened PST. During treatment for recurrent TIAs the PST will signal whether the patient is returning towards a normal PST. Using Indium-111 labeled platelets (ILP) the authors studied 10 patients suffering recurrent TIAs after prosthetic valve surgery to determine whether low dose aspirin increased their PST toward normal and whether the treatment had a beneficial effect on their TIA episodes. The authors conclude that low dose aspirin therapy as studied by ILP has no beneficial effect on PST or in preventing recurrent TIA. ILP is an important technique that allows the physician to identify those patients with shortened PST and to determine response to therapy.

  1. Mid-term results of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves in elder patients with small aortic annuli: comparison with 19-mm bioprosthetic valves.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Masahiko; Sano, Toshikazu; Tai, Ryuta; Horio, Naohiro; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the mid-term outcomes after aortic valve replacement (AVR) between 17-mm mechanical heart valves (MV) and 19-mm bioprosthetic valves (BV) in elderly patients with small aortic annuli. Between 2000 and 2011, 127 consecutive patients (mean age 79 years; 87 % female) underwent AVR for aortic valve stenosis with a small aortic annulus. 19-mm BV (n = 67) was implanted. When the 19-mm BV did not fit the annulus, 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic mechanical valve (n = 60) was used instead of an aortic root-enlargement procedure. The follow-up rate was 94.0 % in the BV group, and 98.5 % in the MV group. No significant differences in survival rate and valve-related complications were found between the 2 groups. In-hospital mortality rates were 1.5 % (n = 1) in the BV group and 5.0 % (n = 3) in the MV group. Late mortality rates were 3.9 % per patient-years (p-y; n = 8) in the BV group, and 6.0 % per p-y (n = 10) in the MV group. Five-year Kaplan-Meier survival rates were 62 % in the BV group, and 72 % in the MV group (log-rank P = 0.280). Freedom from major adverse valve-related stroke and cerebral bleeding events was 92.5 and 98.5 % in the BV group, and 94.7 and 100 % in the MV group. AVR using 17-mm MV in elder patients with small aortic annuli provided equivalent mid-term clinical results to that with 19-mm BV. PMID:24878870

  2. Cytokine profiles linked to fatal outcome in infective prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juan; Arévalo, Adolfo; Tamayo, Eduardo; Sarria, Cristina; Aguilar-Blanco, Eva M; Heredia, Maria; Almansa, Raquel; Rico, Lucia; Iglesias, Verónica; Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F

    2014-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is a disease normally of bacterial cause which affects the endocardic tissue, specifically the valves (native or prosthetic). It is a serious illness and mortality rates remain high, ranging between 20% and 40%. Previous reports have evidenced the potential role of cytokines in the diagnosis of this disease, but no information is available on their relationship with outcome. We recruited 26 consecutive patients with late prosthetic valve endocarditis requiring surgical treatment according to Duke criteria. Eight cytokines were measured in plasma in the first 24 h following diagnosis by using a Bio-Rad multiplex assay. Levels of IL-6, IL-8 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were higher in non survivors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis evidenced that IL-6, IL-8 and IFN-γ behaved as good diagnostic tests for identifying those patients with fatal outcome (area under the curve, CI 95%, p): IL-6: [0.81 (0.61-1.00) 0.012]; IL-8 [0.76 (0.56-0.96) 0.035]; IFN-γ [0.79 (0.59-0.99) 0.021]. Levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IFN-γ correlated positively between them, indicating that they are produced as consequence of a simultaneous response to the infection. Our findings support the participation of IL-6, IL-8 and IFN-γ in the events linked to fatal outcome in infective prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  3. Comparison of the occurrence of thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with mechanical heart valve prosthesis with one and two leaflets in the mitral position

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Nelson Leonardo Kerdahi Leite

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses must continuously be treated with oral anticoagulants to prevent thromboembolic events related to prosthetesis. These patients should be continually evaluated for the control of oral anticoagulation. Objective To compare the occurrence of thromboembolic and hemorragic complications in patients with mechanical heart valve prosthesis with one (mono) and two (bi) leaflets in the mitral position in anticoagulant therapy. Methods We studied the 10-year interval, 117 patients with prosthesis in the mitral position, 48 with prosthetic single leaflet and 69 with two leaflets. We evaluated the occurrence of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic major and minor degree under gravity. The results are presented in an actuarial study and the frequency of occurrence of linear events. Results The actuarial survival curves showed that over time, patients with prosthetic heart valve with one leaflet were less free of thromboembolic complications than patients with two leaflet prosthetic valve, while the latter (two leaflet) were less free of hemorrhagic accidents. The linearized frequency of occurrence of thromboembolism were higher in patients with mono leaflet prosthesis. Bleeding rates were higher for patients with bi leaflet prosthetic valve. Conclusion Patients with mono leaflet prosthetic heart valve showed that they are more prone to the occurrence of serious thromboembolic events compared to those with bi leaflet prosthetic valve. Patients with bi leaflet prosthetic valve had more bleeding than patients with mono leaflet prosthetic valve, however this difference was restricted to the bleeding of minor nature. PMID:24896164

  4. Novel method for the in vivo detection of single leg separation failures in prosthetic heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jie; Udpa, Satish S.; Sun, Yushi

    2002-06-01

    This paper presents a novel technique for the in vivo detection of single strut failures in Bjork-Shiley convexo-concave prosthetic heart valves. The method makes use of Lorentz forces to excite the resonant modes of the strut. The forces are generated by immersing the valve in a static magnetic field and inducing eddy currents in the valve using an auxiliary coil excited by a tone burst. The tone frequency is set at a value that is close to the resonant frequency of an Intact Outlet Strut. The state of the strut is assessed by measuring the acoustic field generated in response to the excitation, using a hydrophone placed on the chest of the patient. An intact outlet strut is indicated if the excitation is able to excite the resonant modes, which correspond to those of a healthy outlet strut. The paper describes work done in simulating the BSCC heart valve using finite element methods to estimate the modal frequencies. Simulation results together with experimental data supporting the predictions are presented. This work was supported by the Trustees of the Bowling-Pfizer Heart Valve Settlement Funds.

  5. Long-term prognosis of early and late prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan C; Anguita, Manuel P; Torres, Francisco; Mesa, Dolores; Franco, Manuel; González, Emilio; Muñoz, Ignacio; Vallés, Federico

    2004-05-01

    A prospective series of 78 cases of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) was studied (35 cases of early PVE and 43 cases of late PVE). The in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with early PVE (31% vs 9%, p <0.01) because the onset of heart failure was more common in these patients (55% vs 37%, p <0.05). However, event-free survival at 4 years in survivors to the active phase was not different (74% and 82%, respectively).

  6. "Removal without replacement" strategy for uncontrolled prosthetic tricuspid valve endocarditis associated with abortion sepsis.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Ahmet; Surgit, Ozgur; Akgul, Ozgur; Bakir, Ihsan

    2011-12-01

    Isolated tricuspid valve (TV) endocarditis associated with abortion is a rare entity with a poor prognosis. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a diagnosis of isolated prosthetic TV endocarditis secondary to recurrent abortion. The patient had progressed to multiorgan failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation during her clinical course. Because of the high operative risk and uncontrolled infection, we performed an unusual surgical approach that has not previously been reported. Resection of infected valvular tissue without replacement of the prosthesis led to a rapid convalescence period and complete cure. PMID:22167761

  7. In-vitro Measurements of the Synoptic Velocity Generated by a Prosthetic Aortic Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellings, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a precise means of evaluating the hydrodynamic performance of prosthetic aortic and mitral valves. Particle Image Velocimetry is used to measure the in-plane velocity components in selected planes of the flow, from which the turbulent shear stress is derived. The experimental facility used in this study is made of plexiglas tube, and has a circular cross section with a diameter that matches that of the valve. To ensure optical access the test fluid used matches the refractive index of plexiglas and the test section incorporates a square housing filled with the same fluid. The fluid used in this experiment is a mixture of glycerol, water and sodium iodide. Pulsatile flow is achieved by means of a pump and monitored in real time by means of an electronic flowmeter. Dynamic similarity is ensured in these experiments as the viscosity of the fluid mixture closely approximates that of blood.

  8. Live 3D TEE demonstrates and guides the management of prosthetic mitral valve obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Mangeet; Pandya, Utpal; Adlakha, Satjit; Khouri, Samer J

    2011-08-01

    A 43-year-old woman, with a remote history of rheumatic mitral stenosis and a St. Jude prosthetic mitral valve replacement, presented with shortness of breath and palpitations, shortly after a long flight. On admission, atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response was noted in the setting of a long history of noncompliance with her anticoagulation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated multiple laminated thrombi in the left atrial appendage. Live three-dimensional (3D) TEE confirmed this diagnosis and demonstrated an immobile posterior leaflet of the mitral prosthesis, which had direct implications in her management. She successfully underwent surgery for mitral valve replacement, left atrial appendage ligation, and a Maze procedure on the following day. The multiple thrombi within the atrial appendage were confirmed intraoperatively and pannus formation was determined to be the etiology of the leaflet immobility.

  9. Aortic root infection in a prosthetic valve demonstrated by gallium-67 citrate SPECT.

    PubMed

    Thomson, L E J; Goodman, M P; Naqvi, T Z; Feldman, R; Buchbinder, N A; Waxman, A; D'Agnolo, A

    2005-04-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with 6 weeks of worsening low back pain, fever, sweating, and weight loss with known severe lumbosacral osteoarthritis. His history included CABG in 1992, porcine aortic valve replacement, and permanent pacemaker implantation in 2002. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not demonstrate a cause for the symptoms. Blood cultures grew penicillin-sensitive enterococcus and he was referred for evaluation of possible osteodiskitis or epidural abscess. Gallium planar imaging demonstrated increased activity in the lumbar spine, suspicious for the presence of infection, and activity was noted in the mid mediastinum as well. SPECT clearly showed increased Ga-67 activity in the region of the aortic root, suspicious for infection. A perivalvular aortic root abscess was subsequently demonstrated by transesophageal echo. This case illustrates the value of Ga-67 chest SPECT in patients with prosthetic valves for detection of endocarditis. PMID:15764887

  10. When a Mechanical Valve Goes Freestyle: A Patient Tailored Valve-In-Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    François, J; Cathenis, K; Hamerlijnck, R

    2015-01-01

    In case of a redo operation after a full root replacement there are two possible options: replacing the entire root or performing a more conservative valve-in-valve implantation. Regarding the relatively high morbidity and mortality of a redo root replacement, the valve-in-valve implantation is the preferred choice if technically feasible. We present the case of a valve-in-valve implantation with a St. Jude mechanical valve in a Medtronic bioprosthesis in a 57-year old man. Follow-up echocardiography after 1 month showed a mean gradient of 17 mmHg and no paravalvular leakage. The combination of a St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve implanted in a Freestyle root prosthesis has not been described. This case shows that patient tailored treatment with a St. Jude bileaflet mechanical valve in a Freestyle aortic root valve can be safely performed and might be the preferred choice for younger patients, if technically feasible. PMID:26560005

  11. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps.

    PubMed

    Komolafe, Oluseeni; Wood, Sean; Caldwell, Ryan; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians' choices of existing products. In this study, we identified important pump-performance metrics and developed techniques to objectively characterize the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pumps. The sensitivity of the proposed techniques was assessed by characterizing the evacuation performance of two electrical (Harmony e-Pulse [Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany] and LimbLogic VS [Ohio Willow Wood; Mt. Sterling, Ohio]) and three mechanical (Harmony P2, Harmony HD, and Harmony P3 [Ottobock]) prosthetic pumps in bench-top testing. Five fixed volume chambers ranging from 33 cm(3) (2 in.(3)) to 197 cm(3) (12 in.(3)) were used to represent different air volume spaces between a prosthetic socket and a liner-clad residual limb. All measurements were obtained at a vacuum gauge pressure of 57.6 kPa (17 inHg). The proposed techniques demonstrated sensitivity to the different electrical and mechanical pumps and, to a lesser degree, to the different setting adjustments of each pump. The sensitivity was less pronounced for the mechanical pumps, and future improvements for testing of mechanical vacuum pumps were proposed. Overall, this study successfully offers techniques feasible as standards for assessing the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pump devices.

  12. DNA Persistence and Relapses Questions on the Treatment Strategies of Enterococcus Infections of Prosthetic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Casalta, Jean-Paul; Thuny, Franck; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Lepidi, Hubert; Habib, Gilbert; Grisoli, Dominique; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    We used amplification of the 16S rRNA gene followed by sequencing to evaluate the persistence of bacterial DNA in explanted heart valve tissue as part of the routine work of a clinical microbiology laboratory, and we analyzed the role of this persistence in the relapses observed in our center. We enrolled 286 patients treated for infective endocarditis (IE) who had valve replacement surgery and were diagnosed according to the modified Duke’s criteria described by Li et al. from a total of 579 IE cases treated in our center. The patients were grouped based on the infecting bacteria, and we considered the 4 most common bacterial genus associated with IE separately (144 were caused by Streptococcus spp., 52 by Enterococcus spp., 58 by Staphylococcus aureus and 32 by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus). Based on our cohort, the risk of relapse in patients with enterococcal prosthetic valve infections treated with antibiotics alone was 11%. Bacterial DNA is cleared over time, but this might be a very slow process, especially with Enterococcus spp. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature performed on Medline, most reports still advise combined treatment with penicillin and an aminoglycoside for as long as 4–6 weeks, but there has been no consensus for the treatment of enterococcal infection of prostheses in IE patients. PMID:23300913

  13. FLUID MECHANICS OF ARTIFICIAL HEART VALVES

    PubMed Central

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Simon, Helene A; Sucosky, Philippe; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Artificial heart valves have been in use for over five decades to replace diseased heart valves. Since the first heart valve replacement performed with a caged-ball valve, more than 50 valve designs have been developed, differing principally in valve geometry, number of leaflets and material. To date, all artificial heart valves are plagued with complications associated with haemolysis, coagulation for mechanical heart valves and leaflet tearing for tissue-based valve prosthesis. For mechanical heart valves, these complications are believed to be associated with non-physiological blood flow patterns. 2. In the present review, we provide a bird’s-eye view of fluid mechanics for the major artificial heart valve types and highlight how the engineering approach has shaped this rapidly diversifying area of research. 3. Mechanical heart valve designs have evolved significantly, with the most recent designs providing relatively superior haemodynamics with very low aerodynamic resistance. However, high shearing of blood cells and platelets still pose significant design challenges and patients must undergo life-long anticoagulation therapy. Bioprosthetic or tissue valves do not require anticoagulants due to their distinct similarity to the native valve geometry and haemodynamics, but many of these valves fail structurally within the first 10–15 years of implantation. 4. These shortcomings have directed present and future research in three main directions in attempts to design superior artificial valves: (i) engineering living tissue heart valves; (ii) development of advanced computational tools; and (iii) blood experiments to establish the link between flow and blood damage. PMID:19220329

  14. Dynamic tracking of prosthetic valve motion and deformation from bi-plane x-ray views: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Charles R.; Wagner, Martin; Raval, Amish N.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) requires navigation and deployment of a prosthetic valve within the aortic annulus under fluoroscopic guidance. To support improved device visualization in this procedure, this study investigates the feasibility of frame-by-frame 3D reconstruction of a moving and expanding prosthetic valve structure from simultaneous bi-plane x-ray views. In the proposed method, a dynamic 3D model of the valve is used in a 2D/3D registration framework to obtain a reconstruction of the valve. For each frame, valve model parameters describing position, orientation, expansion state, and deformation are iteratively adjusted until forward projections of the model match both bi-plane views. Simulated bi-plane imaging of a valve at different signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) levels was performed to test the approach. 20 image sequences with 50 frames of valve deployment were simulated at each SDNR. The simulation achieved a target registration error (TRE) of the estimated valve model of 0.93 +/- 2.6 mm (mean +/- S.D.) for the lowest SDNR of 2. For higher SDNRs (5 to 50) a TRE of 0.04 mm +/- 0.23 mm was achieved. A tabletop phantom study was then conducted using a TAVR valve. The dynamic 3D model was constructed from high resolution CT scans and a simple expansion model. TRE was 1.22 +/- 0.35 mm for expansion states varying from undeployed to fully deployed, and for moderate amounts of inter-frame motion. Results indicate that it is feasible to use bi-plane imaging to recover the 3D structure of deformable catheter devices.

  15. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach—fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    Background Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Methods Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Results Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ≤1.0). Conclusions Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration

  16. Long term follow up of prosthetic valve endocarditis: what characteristics identify patients who were treated successfully with antibiotics alone?

    PubMed Central

    Truninger, K; Jost, C; Seifert, B; Vogt, P; Follath, F; Schaffner, A; Jenni, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify predictors for the safe use of antibiotic treatment without reoperation in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis.
SETTING—Retrospective study in a tertiary care centre.
SUBJECTS AND DESIGN—All 49 episodes of definite prosthetic valve endocarditis (Duke criteria) diagnosed at one institution between 1980 to 1997 were analysed. Ten episodes (20%) were treated with antibiotics only (antibiotic group) and 39 episodes (80%) with combined antibiotic and surgical treatment (surgery group). The analysis included detailed study of hospital records and data on long term follow up which were obtained in all patients by a questionnaire or telephone contact with physician or patient. The length of follow up (mean (SD)) was 41 (32) months in the antibiotic group and 45 (24) months in the surgery group (NS). Long term survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log-rank test.
RESULTS—There was no significant difference in age, history of previous endocarditis, number of previous heart operations, vegetations, emboli, type of prosthesis, or percentage of early prosthetic valve endocarditis and positive blood cultures between the two groups. In the antibiotic group, there were more enterococcal (50%; p = 0.005) and in the surgery group more staphylococcal infections (55%; p = 0.048). Annular abscesses (p < 0.0001) and aortoventricular dehiscence (p = 0.02) were more common in the surgery group. No patient in the antibiotic group had heart failure. Long term follow up showed no significant difference between the surgery and antibiotic groups regarding late mortality (14% v 18%) and five year rates of recurrent endocarditis (14% v 16%), event related mortality (14% v 3%, log-rank test), and the need for reoperation (14% v 19%; log-rank test). The only patient with conservatively treated staphylococcal prosthetic valve endocarditis died after reoperation for recurrence

  17. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Sallam, I. A.; Bain, W. H.; Turner, M. A.; Lawrie, T. D. V.

    1974-01-01

    Slater, S. D., Sallam, I. A., Bain, W. H., Turner, M. A., and Lawrie, T. D. V. (1974).Thorax, 29, 624-632. Haemolysis with Björk-Shiley and Starr-Edwards prosthetic heart valves: a comparative study. A comparison was made of the haemolytic complications in 85 patients with two different types of Starr-Edwards cloth-covered ball and cage prosthesis with those in 44 patients with the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve. Intravascular haemolysis, as detected by the presence of haemosiderinuria, occurred significantly less often with the Björk-Shiley than with the Starr-Edwards valve, the overall incidence with aortic, mitral or multiple replacements being 31%, 15%, and 20% for Björk-Shiley and 94%, 92%, and 88% for Starr-Edwards valves respectively. There was no significant difference in the frequency of haemolysis between each of the two types of Starr-Edwards prosthesis studied at either the aortic (2300 versus 2310 model) or mitral (6300 versus 6310) site. Haemolytic anaemia developed in only one patient with a Björk-Shiley valve but was common though usually mild with Starr-Edwards prostheses, particularly aortic valve replacements with the 2300 model and in aortic plus mitral (± tricuspid) replacements. The greater severity of haemolysis produced by Starr-Edwards valves, again especially of the latter types, was further demonstrated by higher serum lactate dehydrogenase and 24-hour urinary iron levels. It is concluded that the Björk-Shiley tilting disc valve represents a significant advance in the amelioration of the haemolytic complications of prosthetic valves. PMID:4450173

  18. Successful treatment of severe mechanical mitral valve thrombosis with tissue plasminogen activator in a 7-month-old infant.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eva W; Aponte-Patel, Linda; Bacha, Emile A; Singh, Rakesh K; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Sen, Anita I

    2013-01-01

    Severe thrombosis of a mechanical valve is a rare complication in pediatric patients. Thrombolytic therapy as treatment of mechanical mitral valve thrombosis has rarely been reported in young infants. We report the successful treatment with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator of a mechanical mitral valve thrombus in a 7 month-old patient with trisomy 21, complete atrioventricular canal defect and pulmonary hypertension status post complete atrioventricular canal repair and subsequent prosthetic mitral valve replacement. He presented with respiratory decompensation and shock secondary to severe mechanical mitral valve stenosis. Serial echocardiograms showed significant resolution of the thrombus within 18 h of infusion with no major bleeding complications during the treatment course. Although a rare complication of mechanical valve placement in pediatrics, thrombosis of mechanical valves may result in severe hemodynamic and respiratory compromise. This case demonstrates that thrombolytic therapy is a feasible option for the treatment of critical thrombosis in pediatric patients after MVR.

  19. Overview: Mechanism and Control of a Prosthetic Arm.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tushar; Uddanwadiker, Rashmi

    2015-09-01

    Continuous growth in industrialization and lack of awareness in safety parameters the cases of amputations are growing. The search of safer, simpler and automated prosthetic arms for managing upper limbs is expected. Continuous efforts have been made to design and develop prosthetic arms ranging from simple harness actuated to automated mechanisms with various control options. However due the cost constraints, the automated prosthetic arms are still out of the reach of needy people. Recent data have shown that there is a wide scope to develop a low cost and light weight upper limb prosthesis. This review summarizes the various designs methodologies, mechanisms and control system developed by the researchers and the advances therein. Educating the patient to develop acceptability to prosthesis and using the same for the most basic desired functions of human hand, post amputation care and to improve patient's independent life is equally important. In conclusion it can be interpreted that there is a wide scope in design in an adaptive mechanism for opening and closing of the fingers using other methods of path and position synthesis. Simple mechanisms and less parts may optimize the cost factor. Reduction in the weight of the prosthesis may be achieved using polymers used for engineering applications. Control system will remain never ending challenge for the researchers, but it is essential to maintain the simplicity from the patients perspective. PMID:27281955

  20. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Gabriela; Garcia Raso, Aránzazu; Gonzalez-Dominguez Weber, Almudena; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro; Llamas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Methods: Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. Results: We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90), mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57), and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4). The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58) consisting of 44.38 (±42.30) for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43) for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87) for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38) for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68) for related complications. Conclusion: Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs. PMID:27579168

  1. Risk Factors for Prosthetic Pulmonary Valve Failure in Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jose Maria; Garcia-Hamilton, Diego; Gonzalez, Ana Elvira; Ruiz-Cantador, Jose; Sanchez-Recalde, Angel; Polo, Maria Luz; Aroca, Angel

    2015-10-15

    The incidence and risk factors for prosthetic pulmonary valve failure (PPVF) should be considered when determining optimal timing for pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in asymptomatic patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). The cumulative freedom for reintervention due to PPVF after 146 PVR in 114 patients with CHD was analyzed. Six potential risk factors (underlying cardiac defect, history of palliative procedures, number of previous cardiac interventions, hemodynamic indication for PVR, type of intervention, and age at intervention) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard modeling. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used for discrimination. Internal validation in patients with tetralogy of Fallot was also performed. Median age at intervention was 23 years. There were 60 reinterventions due to PPVF (41%). Median event-free survival was 14 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 12 to 16 years). The only independent risk factor was the age at intervention (hazard ratio [HR] 0.93, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.97; p = 0.001; area under the ROC curve 0.95, 95% CI 0.92 to 0.98; p <0.001). The best cut-off point was 20.5 years. Freedom from reintervention for PPVF 15 years after surgery was 70% when it was performed at age >20.5 years compared with 33% when age at intervention was <20.5 years (p = 0.004). Internal validation in 102 PVR in patient cohort with tetralogy of Fallot (ROC area 0.98, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.0; p <0.001) was excellent. In conclusion, age at intervention is the main risk factor of reintervention for PPVF. The risk of reintervention is 2-fold when PVR is performed before the age of 20.5 years.

  2. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Jean-François; Philippon, François; Trottier, Mikaël; Tessier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge. Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE. Over the past few years, cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients, and in assessing the need for surgery, mainly in the most difficult cases. Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations. In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis, the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE, but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment. This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE, and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging. It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE, the limitations of these tests, and potential areas of future research. PMID:27721936

  3. Mitral valve disease--morphology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert A; Hagége, Albert A; Judge, Daniel P; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N; Dietz, Harry C; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D; Jensen, Morten O; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-12-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but--even in adult life--remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular-ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  4. Mitral valve disease—morphology and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert A.; Hagége, Albert A.; Judge, Daniel P.; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P.; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H.; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N.; Dietz, Harry C.; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Jensen, Morten O.; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P.; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R.; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P.; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A.; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but—even in adult life—remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular–ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease. PMID:26483167

  5. Mitral valve disease--morphology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert A; Hagége, Albert A; Judge, Daniel P; Padala, Muralidhar; Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Aikawa, Elena; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Bischoff, Joyce; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Bruneval, Patrick; Butcher, Jonathan T; Carpentier, Alain; Chaput, Miguel; Chester, Adrian H; Clusel, Catherine; Delling, Francesca N; Dietz, Harry C; Dina, Christian; Durst, Ronen; Fernandez-Friera, Leticia; Handschumacher, Mark D; Jensen, Morten O; Jeunemaitre, Xavier P; Le Marec, Hervé; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Markwald, Roger R; Mérot, Jean; Messas, Emmanuel; Milan, David P; Neri, Tui; Norris, Russell A; Peal, David; Perrocheau, Maelle; Probst, Vincent; Pucéat, Michael; Rosenthal, Nadia; Solis, Jorge; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2015-12-01

    Mitral valve disease is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Emerging evidence indicates that the mitral valve is not a passive structure, but--even in adult life--remains dynamic and accessible for treatment. This concept motivates efforts to reduce the clinical progression of mitral valve disease through early detection and modification of underlying mechanisms. Discoveries of genetic mutations causing mitral valve elongation and prolapse have revealed that growth factor signalling and cell migration pathways are regulated by structural molecules in ways that can be modified to limit progression from developmental defects to valve degeneration with clinical complications. Mitral valve enlargement can determine left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and might be stimulated by potentially modifiable biological valvular-ventricular interactions. Mitral valve plasticity also allows adaptive growth in response to ventricular remodelling. However, adverse cellular and mechanobiological processes create relative leaflet deficiency in the ischaemic setting, leading to mitral regurgitation with increased heart failure and mortality. Our approach, which bridges clinicians and basic scientists, enables the correlation of observed disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to the discovery of new opportunities for improving the natural history of mitral valve disease.

  6. The potential of FDG PET/CT for early diagnosis of cardiac device and prosthetic valve infection before morphologic damages ensue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wengen; Kim, Jongho; Molchanova-Cook, Olga P; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac mechanical device or prosthesis valve infection, and more importantly accurate localization of the infection site, such as defibrillator pocket, pacemaker lead, annular or peri-annular valve ring abscesses remain clinically challenging. Inconclusive diagnosis can lead to delayed antibiotic therapy, device extraction or surgical intervention, which may have dire consequences to the patient. Among patients with suspected cardiac mechanical device or prosthetic valve infection, recent publications advocate the use of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography (FDG PET/CT), particularly when anatomy based imaging studies, such as echocardiography or CT, are uncertain or negative. A potential advantage of FDG PET/CT is in its detection of inflammatory cells early in the infection process, before morphologic damages ensue. However, there are many unanswered questions in the literature. There is a need for standardization amongst the various imaging studies, such as dietary preparation, duration and timing of image acquisition, image processing with and without CT attenuation correction, and more importantly image interpretation criteria. The answer for these issues awaits well designed, prospective studies.

  7. Successful treatment of mechanical mitral valve thrombosis without thrombolytic therapy or surgery.

    PubMed

    Al Habib, Hamad F; Tarola, Christopher; Diamantorous, Pantelis; Chu, Michael W A

    2013-11-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is an uncommon, life-threatening complication that often mandates urgent repeat surgery or thrombolytic therapy. We present an alternative approach in a patient with rheumatic heart disease who presented with subacute thrombosis of a recently implanted On-X mechanical mitral valve (On-X Life Technologies Inc, Austin, TX), diagnosed on echocardiography and valve fluoroscopy. The patient refused surgery, hence we elected to treat the patient with high-dose antithrombotic therapy alone. Echocardiographic monitoring demonstrated complete reabsorption of the thrombus within 6 months without any embolic complications. Endogenous fibrinolysis with appropriate antithrombotic therapy might be a suitable option for select, high-risk patients with mechanical mitral valve thrombosis.

  8. Mechanical haemolytic anaemia after valve repair operations for non-rheumatic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, C; Honey, M; Brooks, N; Davies, J; Gorman, A; Parker, N

    1980-01-01

    Two cases are described in which severe mechanical haemolytic anaemia developed shortly after operation for repair of non-rheumatic mitral regurgitation. One patient had a "floppy" valve and the other cleft mitral leaflets, and both had chordal rupture. In both there was residual regurgitation after repair though in one this was initially only trivial. Clinically manifest haemolysis ceased after replacement of the valve by a frame-mounted xenograft. There are two previously reported cases in which haemolytic anaemia followed an unsuccessful mitral valve repair operation. Subclinical haemolysis or mild haemolytic anaemia may occur with unoperated valve lesions, but hitherto frank haemolytic anaemia has been observed only when turbulent blood flow is associated with the presence of a prosthetic valve or patch of prosthetic fabric. In these four cases, however, polyester or Teflon sutures were the only foreign material, and it is suggested that when these are used for the repair of leaflets, particularly in non-rheumatic mitral valve disease, they may increase the damaging effect of turbulence on circulating red blood cells. PMID:7426198

  9. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Left Main Coronary Artery Embolism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal; Farooq, Salman; Ghani, Ali Raza; Mirrani, Ghazi A.; Athar, Muhammed Waqas

    2016-01-01

    Context: Coronary embolization is potentially a fatal sequela of endocarditis. Although the primary cause of acute coronary syndrome is atherosclerotic disease, it is imperative to consider septic embolism as an etiological factor. Case Report: Herein, we report a case of ventricular fibrillation and ST-segment depression myocardial infarction occurring in a patient who initially presented with fever and increased urinary frequency. Coronary angiography revealed new 99% occlusion of the left main coronary artery (LMCA). Transesophageal echocardiography showed bioprosthetic aortic valve with an abscess and vegetation. Histologic examination of the embolectomy specimen confirmed the presence of thrombus and Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. Subsequently, the patient was discharged to the skilled nursing facility in a stable condition where he completed 6 weeks of intravenous ampicillin. Conclusion: We present a rare case of LMCA embolism due to prosthetic valve endocarditis. The present report also highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with such patients. PMID:27500132

  10. Mechanical design and performance specifications of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands: a review.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Segil, Jacob L; Dollar, Aaron M; Weir, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we set forth a detailed analysis of the mechanical characteristics of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. We report on an empirical study concerning the performance of several commercially available myoelectric prosthetic hands, including the Vincent, iLimb, iLimb Pulse, Bebionic, Bebionic v2, and Michelangelo hands. We investigated the finger design and kinematics, mechanical joint coupling, and actuation methods of these commercial prosthetic hands. The empirical findings are supplemented with a compilation of published data on both commercial and prototype research prosthetic hands. We discuss numerous mechanical design parameters by referencing examples in the literature. Crucial design trade-offs are highlighted, including number of actuators and hand complexity, hand weight, and grasp force. Finally, we offer a set of rules of thumb regarding the mechanical design of anthropomorphic prosthetic hands.

  11. Candida glabrata prosthetic valve endocarditis treated successfully with fluconazole plus caspofungin without surgery: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lye, D C B; Hughes, A; O'Brien, D; Athan, E

    2005-11-01

    Reported here is the case of a 72-year-old man who was diagnosed with Candida glabrata prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis and treated successfully with fluconazole plus caspofungin after he refused and was determined unfit for surgery. Initial treatment with intravenous amphotericin B resulted in acute renal impairment. Despite 8 days of intravenous fluconazole therapy, he remained fungemic. Caspofungin was added to the treatment regimen with subsequent sterilisation of blood culture. The patient was treated for 34 days with caspofungin and 41 days with fluconazole. He continued oral fluconazole after hospital discharge and remained well at follow-up 11 months later. The role of fluconazole and caspofungin in the treatment of Candida endocarditis is discussed.

  12. A novel computational model for the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical valves in the opening phase.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2015-03-01

    A powerful alternative means to study the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is the computational fluid dynamics method. It is well recognized that computational fluid dynamics allows reliable physiological blood flow simulation and measurements of flow parameters. To date, in almost all of the modeling studies on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a velocity (mass flow)-based boundary condition and an axisymmetric geometry for the aortic root have been assigned, which, to some extent, are erroneous. Also, there have been contradictory reports of the profile of velocity in downstream of leaflets, that is, in some studies, it is suggested that the maximum blood velocity occurs in the lateral orifice, and in some other studies, it is postulated that the maximum velocities in the main and lateral orifices are identical. The reported values for the peak velocities range from 1 to 3 m/s, which highly depend on the model assumptions. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the importance of the exact anatomical model of the aortic root and the realistic boundary conditions in the hemodynamics of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The model considered in this study is based on the St Jude Medical valve in a novel modeling platform. Through a more realistic geometrical model for the aortic root and the St Jude Medical valve, we have developed a new set of boundary conditions in order to be used for the assessment of the hemodynamics of aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The results of this study are significant for the design improvement of conventional bileaflet mechanical heart valves and for the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves.

  13. A novel computational model for the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical valves in the opening phase.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2015-03-01

    A powerful alternative means to study the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is the computational fluid dynamics method. It is well recognized that computational fluid dynamics allows reliable physiological blood flow simulation and measurements of flow parameters. To date, in almost all of the modeling studies on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a velocity (mass flow)-based boundary condition and an axisymmetric geometry for the aortic root have been assigned, which, to some extent, are erroneous. Also, there have been contradictory reports of the profile of velocity in downstream of leaflets, that is, in some studies, it is suggested that the maximum blood velocity occurs in the lateral orifice, and in some other studies, it is postulated that the maximum velocities in the main and lateral orifices are identical. The reported values for the peak velocities range from 1 to 3 m/s, which highly depend on the model assumptions. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the importance of the exact anatomical model of the aortic root and the realistic boundary conditions in the hemodynamics of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The model considered in this study is based on the St Jude Medical valve in a novel modeling platform. Through a more realistic geometrical model for the aortic root and the St Jude Medical valve, we have developed a new set of boundary conditions in order to be used for the assessment of the hemodynamics of aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves. The results of this study are significant for the design improvement of conventional bileaflet mechanical heart valves and for the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves. PMID:25833999

  14. Processing of prosthetic heart valve sounds for single leg separation classification

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Jones, H.E.

    1995-06-01

    Efforts are concentrated on the sounds corresponding to the heart valve opening cycle. Valve opening and closing acoustics present additional information about the outlet strut condition---the structural component implicated in valve failure. The importance of the opening sound for single leg separation detection/classification is based on the fact that as the valve opens, the disk passively hits the outlet strut. The opening sounds thus yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal amount of disturbance caused by the energy radiated from the disk. Hence the opening sound is a very desirable acoustic signal to extract. Unfortunately, the opening sounds have much lower signal levels relative to the closing sounds and therefore noise plays a more significant role than during the closing event. Because of this it is necessary to screen the sounds for outliers in order to insure a high sensitivity of classification. Because of the sharp resonances appearing in the corresponding spectrum, a parametric processing approach is developed based on an autoregressive model which was selected to characterize the sounds emitted by the Bjork--Shiley convexo--concave (BSCC) valve during opening cycle. First the basic signals and the extraction process used to create an ensemble of heart valve sounds are briefly discussed. Next, a {ital beat} {ital monitor} capable of rejecting beats that fail to meet an acceptance criteria based on their spectral content is developed. Various approaches that have been utilized to enhance the screened data and produce a reliable {ital heart} {ital valve} {ital spectrogram} which displays the individual sounds (power) as a function of beat number and temporal frequency are discussed. Once estimated, the spectrogram and associated parameters are used to develop features supplied to the various classification schemes. Finally, future work aimed at even further signal enhancement and improved classifier performance is discussed.

  15. Design and Evaluation of a Prosthetic Knee Joint Using the Geared Five-Bar Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxi; Ge, Wenjie; Zheng, Jia; Dong, Dianbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, dynamics analysis and ankle trajectory analysis of a prosthetic knee joint using the geared five-bar mechanism. Compared with traditional four-bar or six-bar mechanisms, the geared five-bar mechanism is better at performing diverse movements and is easy to control. This prosthetic knee joint with the geared five-bar mechanism is capable of fine-tuning its relative instantaneous center of rotation and ankle trajectory. The centrode of this prosthetic knee joint, which is mechanically optimized according to the centrode of human knee joint, is better in the bionic performance than that of a prosthetic knee joint using the four-bar mechanism. Additionally, the stability control of this prosthetic knee joint during the swing and stance phase is achieved by a motor. By adjusting the gear ratio of this prosthetic knee joint, the ankle trajectories of both unilateral and bilateral amputees show less deviations from expected than that of the four-bar knee joint.

  16. Physical analysis of the Björk-Shiley prosthetic valve sound.

    PubMed

    Schöndube, F; Keusen, H; Messmer, B J

    1983-07-01

    The closing sound of an implanted Björk-Shiley heart valve prosthesis can be heard clearly in the proximity of the patient. A clinical interrogation of 35 patients showed that 16 (46%) were disturbed by the clicking noise and 10 (29%) reported disturbance of those nearby. A silent prosthesis would be preferred by 15 (43%) patients, eight (23%) declined such a valve for reasons of their own security, and 12 (34%) patients were undecided. The frequency spectrum of the metallic closing sound and its loudness were measured by noninvasive techniques in 20 patients. In the aortic as well as in the mitral position, a high peak of the sound pressure level was registered at 9.8 kHz. In 20 patients the average value of the sound pressure level was 35 dbA measured at a distance of 10 cm from the patient's chest. In vitro studies demonstrated a high peak of the sound pressure level at 9.5 kHz for the Björk-Shiley valve when recorded in free air and at 7 kHz in a standardized valve chamber of a mock circulatory system filled with blood or water. A decrease of the sound pressure level could be achieved by a textile wrap around the chest which damps frequencies around 10 kHz. This protects those nearby but not the patient, who hears the clicking mainly through internal conduction. This unpleasant valve noise can be eliminated only during construction of a new prosthesis provided that such "minor" side effects are measured and taken into consideration.

  17. Impact of Early Valve Surgery on Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis: Analysis in the International Collaboration of Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chirouze, Catherine; Alla, François; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.; Wang, Andrew; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hannan, Margaret M.; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Miró, José M.; Muñoz, Patricia; Murdoch, David R.; Tattevin, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Hoen, Bruno; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Nacinovich, Francisco; Oses, Pablo Fernandez; Ronderos, Ricardo; Sucari, Adriana; Thierer, Jorge; Casabé, José; Cortes, Claudia; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Spelman, Denis; Athan, Eugene; Harris, Owen; Kennedy, Karina; Tan, Ren; Gordon, David; Papanicolas, Lito; Eisen, Damon; Grigg, Leeanne; Street, Alan; Korman, Tony; Kotsanas, Despina; Dever, Robyn; Jones, Phillip; Konecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Rees, David; Ryan, Suzanne; Feneley, Michael P.; Harkness, John; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Post, Jeffrey; Reinbott, Porl; Ryan, Suzanne; Gattringer, Rainer; Wiesbauer, Franz; Andrade, Adriana Ribas; de Brito, Ana Cláudia Passos; Guimarães, Armenio Costa; Grinberg, Max; Mansur, Alfredo José; Siciliano, Rinaldo Focaccia; Strabelli, Tania Mara Varejao; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; de Medeiros Tranchesi, Regina Aparecida; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; Fortes, Claudio Querido; de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela; Ferraiuoli, Giovanna; Golebiovski, Wilma; Lamas, Cristiane; Santos, Marisa; Weksler, Clara; Karlowsky, James A.; Keynan, Yoav; Morris, Andrew M.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Jones, Sandra Braun; Garcia, Patricia; Cereceda, M; Fica, Alberto; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Barsic, Bruno; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Pangercic, Ana; Rudez, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Freiberger, Tomas; Pol, Jiri; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ashour, Zainab; El Kholy, Amani; Mishaal, Marwa; Rizk, Hussien; Aissa, Neijla; Alauzet, Corentine; Alla, Francois; Campagnac, Catherine; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Selton-Suty, Christine; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Delahaye, François; Delahaye, Armelle; Vandenesch, Francois; Donal, Erwan; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Michelet, Christian; Revest, Matthieu; Tattevin, Pierre; Violette, Jérémie; Chevalier, Florent; Jeu, Antoine; Sorel, Claire; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Bernard, Yvette; Chirouze, Catherine; Hoen, Bruno; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Mazaheri, Bahram; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Athanasia, Sofia; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Mylona, Elena; Paniara, Olga; Papanicolaou, Konstantinos; Pyros, John; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Sharma, Gautam; Francis, Johnson; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Venugopal, Krishnan; Hannan, Margaret; Hurley, John; Gilon, Dan; Israel, Sarah; Korem, Maya; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Casillo, Roberta; Cuccurullo, Susanna; Dialetto, Giovanni; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Irene, Mattucci; Ragone, Enrico; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Utili, Riccardo; Cecchi, Enrico; De Rosa, Francesco; Forno, Davide; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Tebini, Alessandro; Grossi, Paolo; Lattanzio, Mariangela; Toniolo, Antonio; Goglio, Antonio; Raglio, Annibale; Ravasio, Veronica; Rizzi, Marco; Suter, Fredy; Carosi, Giampiero; Magri, Silvia; Signorini, Liana; Baban, Tania; Kanafani, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S.; Yasmine, Mohamad; Abidin, Imran; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Martínez, Eduardo Rivera; Soto Nieto, Gabriel Israel; van der Meer, Jan T.M.; Chambers, Stephen; Holland, David; Morris, Arthur; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Murdoch, David R.; Dragulescu, Stefan; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Butkevich, O.M.; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vadim, Kulichenko; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Edathodu, Jameela; Halim, Magid; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Mueller-Premru, Manica; Commerford, Patrick; Commerford, Anita; Deetlefs, Eduan; Hansa, Cass; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Almela, Manuel; Armero, Yolanda; Azqueta, Manuel; Castañeda, Ximena; Cervera, Carlos; del Rio, Ana; Falces, Carlos; Garcia-de-la-Maria, Cristina; Fita, Guillermina; Gatell, Jose M.; Marco, Francesc; Mestres, Carlos A.; Miró, José M.; Moreno, Asuncion; Ninot, Salvador; Paré, Carlos; Pericas, Joan; Ramirez, Jose; Rovira, Irene; Sitges, Marta; Anguera, Ignasi; Font, Bernat; Guma, Joan Raimon; Bermejo, Javier; Bouza, Emilio; Fernández, Miguel Angel Garcia; Gonzalez-Ramallo, Victor; Marín, Mercedes; Muñoz, Patricia; Pedromingo, Miguel; Roda, Jorge; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Solis, Jorge; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; Tornos, Pilar; de Alarcón, Arístides; Parra, Ricardo; Alestig, Eric; Johansson, Magnus; Olaison, Lars; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Pachirat, Orathai; Pachirat, Pimchitra; Pussadhamma, Burabha; Senthong, Vichai; Casey, Anna; Elliott, Tom; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Eyton, Christina; Klein, John L.; Bradley, Suzanne; Kauffman, Carol; Bedimo, Roger; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Crowley, Anna Lisa; Douglas, Pamela; Drew, Laura; Fowler, Vance G.; Holland, Thomas; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Mudrick, Daniel; Samad, Zaniab; Sexton, Daniel; Stryjewski, Martin; Wang, Andrew; Woods, Christopher W.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Cantey, Robert; Steed, Lisa; Wray, Dannah; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Bonilla, Hector; DiPersio, Joseph; Salstrom, Sara-Jane; Baddley, John; Patel, Mukesh; Peterson, Gail; Stancoven, Amy; Afonso, Luis; Kulman, Theresa; Levine, Donald; Rybak, Michael; Cabell, Christopher H.; Baloch, Khaula; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Dixon, Christy C.; Fowler, Vance G.; Harding, Tina; Jones-Richmond, Marian; Pappas, Paul; Park, Lawrence P.; Redick, Thomas; Stafford, Judy; Anstrom, Kevin; Athan, Eugene; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cabell, Christopher H.; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Fowler, Vance G.; Hoen, Bruno; Karchmer, A. W.; Miró, José M.; Murdoch, David R.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Wang, Andrew; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cabell, Christopher H.; Chu, Vivian; Corey, G. Ralph; Durack, David T.; Eykyn, Susannah; Fowler, Vance G.; Hoen, Bruno; Miró, José M.; Moreillon, Phillipe; Olaison, Lars; Raoult, Didier; Rubinstein, Ethan; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of early valve surgery (EVS) on the outcome of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) prosthetic valve infective endocarditis (PVIE) is unresolved. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between EVS, performed within the first 60 days of hospitalization, and outcome of SA PVIE within the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study. Methods. Participants were enrolled between June 2000 and December 2006. Cox proportional hazards modeling that included surgery as a time-dependent covariate and propensity adjustment for likelihood to receive cardiac surgery was used to evaluate the impact of EVS and 1-year all-cause mortality on patients with definite left-sided S. aureus PVIE and no history of injection drug use. Results. EVS was performed in 74 of the 168 (44.3%) patients. One-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with S. aureus PVIE than in patients with non–S. aureus PVIE (48.2% vs 32.9%; P = .003). Staphylococcus aureus PVIE patients who underwent EVS had a significantly lower 1-year mortality rate (33.8% vs 59.1%; P = .001). In multivariate, propensity-adjusted models, EVS was not associated with 1-year mortality (risk ratio, 0.67 [95% confidence interval, .39–1.15]; P = .15). Conclusions. In this prospective, multinational cohort of patients with S. aureus PVIE, EVS was not associated with reduced 1-year mortality. The decision to pursue EVS should be individualized for each patient, based upon infection-specific characteristics rather than solely upon the microbiology of the infection causing PVIE. PMID:25389255

  18. Check valve with poppet damping mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line is presented where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction as well as provided a guiding function. The dashpot is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the plunger member becomes jammed in the dashpot.

  19. Development of Overflow-Prevention Valve with Trigger Mechanism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Yuji; Mizuno, Takeshi; Takasaki, Masaya

    2016-09-01

    A new overflow-prevention valve for combustible fluid is developed which uses a trigger mechanism. Loading arms for combustible fluid are used for transferring oil from a tanker to tanks and vice versa. The loading arm has a valve for preventing overflow. Overflow- prevention valves cannot use any electric component to avoid combustion. Therefore, the valve must be constructed only by mechanical parts. The conventional overflow-prevention valve uses fluid and pneumatic forces. It consists of a sensor probe, a cylinder, a main valve for shutting off the fluid and a locking mechanism for holding an open state of the main valve. The proposed overflow-prevention valve uses the pressure due to the height difference between the fluid level of the tank and the sensor probe. However, the force of the cylinder produced by the pressure is too small to release the locking mechanism. Therefore, a trigger mechanism is introduced between the cylinder and the locking mechanism. The trigger mechanism produces sufficient force to release the locking mechanism and close the main valve when the height of fluid exceeds a threshold value. A trigger mechanism is designed and fabricated. The operation necessary for closing the main valve is conformed experimentally.

  20. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage of Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves using Embedded Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Pablo; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of the mechanical prosthetic bileaflet aortic heart valve, is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for complications, associated with thrombosis and thromboembolism. These flow transients are investigated using phase and time-averaged PIV in a low-volume (about 150 ml) test setup that simulates the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 23 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The PIV measurements are accompanied by continuous monitoring of the ventricular and aortic pressures and valve flow rate. Following the valve closure, the leakage flow between the valve leaflets is caused by the pressure buildup across the leaflets, leading to the formation of a regurgitation jet starting from the BMHV B-datum line. As in a typical starting jet, a counter-rotating vortex pair is formed along each leaflet edge and the vorticity sheet is associated with high shear stress that may be result in blood platelet activation. The present investigation demonstrates that the placement of arrays of mm-scale vortex generators near the edges of the leaflets diffuses the vortex sheet and suppresses the formation of these vortices, weakening the local velocity gradients and small-scale vortical structures. Supported by NIH and NSF.

  1. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as

  2. Effect of heart rate on the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves' prostheses (St. Jude Medical) in the aortic position and in the opening phase: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Jahandardoost, Mehdi; Fradet, Guy; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    To date, to the best of the authors' knowledge, in almost all of the studies performed around the hemodynamics of bileaflet mechanical heart valves, a heart rate of 70-72 beats/min has been considered. In fact, the heart rate of ~72 beats/min does not represent the entire normal physiological conditions under which the aortic or prosthetic valves function. The heart rates of 120 or 50 beats/min may lead to hemodynamic complications, such as plaque formation and/or thromboembolism in patients. In this study, the hemodynamic performance of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves in a wide range of normal and physiological heart rates, that is, 60-150 beats/min, was studied in the opening phase. The model considered in this study was a St. Jude Medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the inner diameter of 27 mm in the aortic position. The hemodynamics of the native valve and the St. Jude Medical valve were studied in a variety of heart rates in the opening phase and the results were carefully compared. The results indicate that peak values of the velocity profile downstream of the valve increase as heart rate increases, as well as the location of the maximum velocity changes with heart rate in the St. Jude Medical valve model. Also, the maximum values of shear stress and wall shear stresses downstream of the valve are proportional to heart rate in both models. Interestingly, the maximum shear stress and wall shear stress values in both models are in the same range when heart rate is <90 beats/min; however, these values significantly increase in the St. Jude Medical valve model when heart rate is >90 beats/min (up to ~40% growth compared to that of the native valve). The findings of this study may be of importance in the hemodynamic performance of bileaflet mechanical heart valves. They may also play an important role in design improvement of conventional prosthetic heart valves and the design of the next generation of prosthetic valves, such as

  3. Mechanics of the pulmonary valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Soares, A L F; van Geemen, D; van den Bogaerdt, A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models can provide valuable information to assess and evaluate the mechanical behavior and remodeling of native tissue. A relevant example when studying collagen remodeling is the Ross procedure because it involves placing the pulmonary autograft in the more demanding aortic valve mechanical environment. The objective of this study was therefore to assess and evaluate the mechanical differences between the aortic valve and pulmonary valve and the remodeling that may occur in the pulmonary valve when placed in the aortic position. The results from biaxial tensile tests of pairs of human aortic and pulmonary valves were compared and used to determine the parameters of a structurally based constitutive model. Finite element analyzes were then performed to simulate the mechanical response of both valves to the aortic diastolic load. Additionally, remodeling laws were applied to assess the remodeling of the pulmonary valve leaflet to the new environment. The pulmonary valve showed to be more extensible and less anisotropic than the aortic valve. When exposed to aortic pressure, the pulmonary leaflet appeared to remodel by increasing its thickness and reorganizing its collagen fibers, rotating them toward the circumferential direction. PMID:24035437

  4. Molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Daihiko; Kimura, Naritaka; Yoshioka, Masatoyo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Morbidity from degenerative aortic valve disease is increasing worldwide, concomitant with the ageing of the general population and the habitual consumption of diets high in calories and cholesterol. Immunohistologic studies have suggested that the molecular mechanism occurring in the degenerate aortic valve resembles that of atherosclerosis, prompting the testing of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) for the prevention of progression of native and bioprosthetic aortic valve degeneration. However, the effects of these therapies remain controversial. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of aortic valve degeneration are largely unknown, research in this area is advancing rapidly. The signaling components involved in embryonic valvulogenesis, such as Wnt, TGF-beta(1), BMP, and Notch, are also involved in the onset of aortic valve degeneration. Furthermore, investigations into extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis in the aortic valve have been reported. Having noted avascularity of normal cardiac valves, we recently identified chondromodulin-I (chm-I) as a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. The expression of chm-I is restricted to cardiac valves from late embryogenesis to adulthood in the mouse, rat, and human. In human degenerate atherosclerotic valves, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases and angiogenesis is observed in the area of chm-I downregulation. Gene targeting of chm-I resulted in VEGF expression, angiogenesis, and calcification in the aortic valves of aged mice, and aortic stenosis is detected by echocardiography, indicating that chm-I is a crucial factor for maintaining normal cardiac valvular function by preventing angiogenesis. The present review focuses on the animal models of aortic valve degeneration and recent studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease. PMID:18766323

  5. Computational simulations of flow dynamics and blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve scaled to pediatric size and flow.

    PubMed

    Yun, B Min; McElhinney, Doff B; Arjunon, Shiva; Mirabella, Lucia; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-22

    Despite pressing needs, there are currently no FDA approved prosthetic valves available for use in the pediatric population. This study is performed for predictive assessment of blood damage in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) with pediatric sizing and flow conditions. A model of an adult-sized 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent(™) valve is selected for use in simulations, which is scaled in size for a 5-year old child and 6-month old infant. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow with thousands of suspended platelets for cases of adult, child, and infant BMHV flows. Adult BMHV flows demonstrate more disorganized small-scale flow features, but pediatric flows are associated with higher fluid shear stresses. Platelet damage in the pediatric cases is higher than in adult flow, highlighting thrombus complication dangers of pediatric BMHV flows. This does not necessarily suggest clinically important differences in thromboembolic potential. Highly damaged platelets in pediatric flows are primarily found far downstream of the valve, as there is less flow recirculation in pediatric flows. In addition, damage levels are well below expected thresholds for platelet activation. The extent of differences here documented between the pediatric and adult cases is of concern, demanding particular attention when pediatric valves are designed and manufactured. However, the differences between the pediatric and adult cases are not such that development of pediatric sized valves is untenable. This study may push for eventual approval of prosthetic valves resized for the pediatric population. Further studies will be necessary to determine the validity and potential thrombotic and clinical implications of these findings. PMID:25011622

  6. Orifice well safety valve with release mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Blizzard, W.A. Jr.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes an orifice well safety valve. It comprises a housing having a bore therethrough, a valve element connected to the housing and movable between open and closed positions in the bore, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve element, coiled spring means positioned between the housing and the flow tube for yieldably moving the tube in a direction for opening the valve, a choke bean connected to the flow tube, releasable latch means in the housing releasably engaging the flow tube, belleville spring means biasing the latch means in a direction yieldably opposing the movement of the tube in a direction for closing the valve, the belleville spring remaining out of engagement with the flow tube.

  7. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  8. [Related research on mechanical property of valve membrane in transcatheter bioprosthesis valve based on the chemical modification and cutting technology].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dakai; Li, Yu; Luo, Qiyi; Liu, Baolin; Chen, Kangmin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the preparation method of valve membrane in transcatheter bio- prosthetic valve, and to study the effect of chemical modification and cutting technology to tensile property and suture force property of valve membrane. We carried out a series of processes to perform the tests, such as firstly to test the crosslinking degree of valve membrane using ninhydrin method, then to test the tensile property and suture force property by using Instron's biomechanicAl testing equipment, and then to observe the collagen fiber orientation in valve membrane using Instron's biomechanical testing equipment and using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The study indicated that after the chemical modification, the crosslinking degree, tensile strength and suture force strength increasing rate of valve membrane were 93.78% ± 3. 2%, (8.24 ± 0.79) MPa, 102%, respectively. The valve membrane had a better biomechanical property and would be expected to become valve membrane in transcatheter bioprosthesis valve. PMID:25464791

  9. [Related research on mechanical property of valve membrane in transcatheter bioprosthesis valve based on the chemical modification and cutting technology].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dakai; Li, Yu; Luo, Qiyi; Liu, Baolin; Chen, Kangmin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the preparation method of valve membrane in transcatheter bio- prosthetic valve, and to study the effect of chemical modification and cutting technology to tensile property and suture force property of valve membrane. We carried out a series of processes to perform the tests, such as firstly to test the crosslinking degree of valve membrane using ninhydrin method, then to test the tensile property and suture force property by using Instron's biomechanicAl testing equipment, and then to observe the collagen fiber orientation in valve membrane using Instron's biomechanical testing equipment and using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The study indicated that after the chemical modification, the crosslinking degree, tensile strength and suture force strength increasing rate of valve membrane were 93.78% ± 3. 2%, (8.24 ± 0.79) MPa, 102%, respectively. The valve membrane had a better biomechanical property and would be expected to become valve membrane in transcatheter bioprosthesis valve. PMID:25508422

  10. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  11. Valve operating mechanism for internal combustion and like-valved engines

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, P.J.

    1986-06-10

    A valve operating mechanism is described for an internal combustion engine comprising of a piezo-electric actuating device arranged to drive an engine valve opening directly into a combustion chamber by the expansion of the piezo-electric actuating device such that expansion of the piezo-electric actuating device provides the sole motive force for opening the valve and control means to control an electrical feed to the piezo-electric actuating device in accordance with parameters of engine operation fed to it.

  12. Hemocompatibility of styrenic block copolymers for use in prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Brubert, Jacob; Krajewski, Stefanie; Wendel, Hans Peter; Nair, Sukumaran; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D

    2016-02-01

    Certain styrenic thermoplastic block copolymer elastomers can be processed to exhibit anisotropic mechanical properties which may be desirable for imitating biological tissues. The ex-vivo hemocompatibility of four triblock (hard-soft-hard) copolymers with polystyrene hard blocks and polyethylene, polypropylene, polyisoprene, polybutadiene or polyisobutylene soft blocks are tested using the modified Chandler loop method using fresh human blood and direct contact cell proliferation of fibroblasts upon the materials. The hemocompatibility and durability performance of a heparin coating is also evaluated. Measures of platelet and coagulation cascade activation indicate that the test materials are superior to polyester but inferior to expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and bovine pericardium reference materials. Against inflammatory measures the test materials are superior to polyester and bovine pericardium. The addition of a heparin coating results in reduced protein adsorption and ex-vivo hemocompatibility performance superior to all reference materials, in all measures. The tested styrenic thermoplastic block copolymers demonstrate adequate performance for blood contacting applications. PMID:26704549

  13. Numerical simulation of flow in mechanical heart valves: grid resolution and the assumption of flow symmetry.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Jones, S Casey; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Healy, Timothy M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2003-10-01

    A numerical method is developed for simulating unsteady, 3-D, laminar flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve with the leaflets fixed. The method employs a dual-time-stepping artificial-compressibility approach together with overset (Chimera) grids and is second-order accurate in space and time. Calculations are carried out for the full 3-D valve geometry under steady inflow conditions on meshes with a total number of nodes ranging from 4 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6). The computed results show that downstream of the leaflets the flow is dominated by two pairs of counter-rotating vortices, which originate on either side of the central orifice in the aortic sinus and rotate such that the common flow of each pair is directed away from the aortic wall. These vortices intensify with Reynolds number, and at a Reynolds number of approximately 1200 their complex interaction leads to the onset of unsteady flow and the break of symmetry with respect to both geometric planes of symmetry. Our results show the highly 3-D structure of the flow; question the validity of computationally expedient assumptions of flow symmetry; and demonstrate the need for highly resolved, fully 3-D simulations if computational fluid dynamics is to accurately predict the flow in prosthetic mechanical heart valves.

  14. Detail view of steam chest and valve mechanisms for high ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of steam chest and valve mechanisms for high pressure stage of unit 40. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  15. Detail view of valve mechanisms and goverenor on high pressure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of valve mechanisms and goverenor on high pressure stage engine of unit 43. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  16. Acute LVOT Obstruction with a Carbomedics Mechanical Valve Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alsidawi, Said; Joyce, David L; Malouf, Joseph F; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old female with severe symptomatic rheumatic mitral stenosis was referred for mitral valve replacement. A 27-mm Carbomedics mechanical mitral valve was placed using everting sutures. As the patient was weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass, she became hemodynamically unstable. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a significant drop in left ventricular function along with severe LVOT obstruction. The Carbomedics prosthesis was replaced by a 27-mm St. Jude mechanical valve using noneverting sutures which relieved the LVOT obstruction. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12749 (J Card Surg 2016;31:376-379). PMID:27087635

  17. Motion analysis of mechanical heart valve prosthesis utilizing high-speed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlparvar, Payam; Guo, George; Kingsbury, Chris

    1993-01-01

    The Edwards-Duromedics (ED) mechanical heart valve prosthesis is of a bileaflet design, incorporating unique design features that distinguish its performance with respect to other mechanical valves of similar type. Leaflet motion of mechanical heart valves, particularly during closure, is related to valve durability, valve sounds and the efficiency of the cardiac output. Modifications to the ED valve have resulted in significant improvements with respect to leaflet motion. In this study a high-speed video system was used to monitor the leaflet motion of the valve, and to compare the performance of the Modified Specification to that of the Original Specification using a St. Jude Medical as a control valve.

  18. Effects of bileaflet mechanical heart valve orientation on coronary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The aortic sinus is approximately tri-radially symmetric, but bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs), which are commonly used to replace diseased aortic valves, are bilaterally symmetric. This mismatch in symmetry suggests that the orientation in which a BMHV is implanted within the aortic sinus affects the flow characteristics downstream of it. This study examines the effect of BMHV orientation on the flow in the coronary arteries, which originate in the aortic sinus and supply the heart tissue with blood. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were made past a BMHV mounted at the inlet of an anatomical aorta model under physiological flow conditions. The complex interactions between the valve jets, the sinus vortex and the flow in the right coronary artery were elucidated for three valve orientations. The coronary flow rate was directly affected by the size, orientation, and time evolution of the vortex in the sinus, all of which were sensitive to the valve's orientation. The total flow through the artery was highest when the valve was oriented with its axis of symmetry intersecting the artery's opening. The findings of this research may assist surgeons in choosing the best orientation for BMHV implantation. The bileaflet valve was donated by St. Jude Medical. Financial support was provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  19. Excellent durability of Starr-Edwards ball valves implanted in the aortic and mitral positions for 27 years: report of a rare surgical case.

    PubMed

    Tochii, Masato; Takagi, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kan; Ishida, Michiko; Akita, Kiyotoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiro; Ando, Motomi

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old male who had undergone aortic and mitral valve replacement with Starr-Edwards ball valves 27 years ago was admitted to our hospital for hemolytic anemia and heart failure. Echocardiography revealed prosthetic valve failure with a high-pressure gradient and small effective orifice area. The Starr-Edwards ball valves were successfully replaced with bileaflet mechanical valves. The explanted valves revealed no structural abnormalities.

  20. Fluid Mechanics of Heart Valves and Their Replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Le, Trung Bao; Gilmanov, Anvar

    2016-01-01

    As the pulsatile cardiac blood flow drives the heart valve leaflets to open and close, the flow in the vicinity of the valve resembles a pulsed jet through a nonaxisymmetric orifice with a dynamically changing area. As a result, three-dimensional vortex rings with intricate topology emerge that interact with the complex cardiac anatomy and give rise to shear layers, regions of recirculation, and flow instabilities that could ultimately lead to transition to turbulence. Such complex flow patterns, which are inherently valve- and patient-specific, lead to mechanical forces at scales that can cause blood cell damage and thrombosis, increasing the likelihood of stroke, and can trigger the pathogenesis of various life-threatening valvular heart diseases. We summarize the current understanding of flow phenomena induced by heart valves, discuss their linkage with disease pathways, and emphasize the research advances required to translate in-depth understanding of valvular hemodynamics into effective patient therapies.

  1. Duration of Systole and Diastole for Hydrodynamic Testing of Prosthetic Heart Valves: Comparison Between ISO 5840 Standards and in vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To complement the ISO 5840 standards concerning the duration of left ventricular systole and diastole as a function of changes in heart rates according to in vivo studies from the physiologic literature review. Methods The systolic and diastolic durations from three in vivo studies were compared with the durations of systole proposed by the ISO 5840:2010 and ISO 5840-2:2015 for hydrodynamic performance assessment of prosthetic heart valves. Results Based on the in vivo studies analyzed, the systolic durations proposed by the ISO 5840 standard seemed consistent for 45 and 120 beats per minute (bpm), and showed diverse results for the 70 bpm condition. Conclusion Information on the realistic validation of the operation of left ventricular models for different heart rates were obtained. PMID:27556318

  2. Mid-term results of small-sized St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic valves (21 mm or less) for small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Sakaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazushige; Iwata, Takashi; Tei, Keikou; Miura, Takuya

    2013-11-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is always of concern when performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus. Although bioprosthetic AVR is preferred in patients older than 65 years, we have experienced cases in elderly patients with a small aortic annulus whereby we could not implant small-sized bioprosthetic valves. We have implanted St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR) mechanical valves (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) as necessary, even in elderly patients with no aortic annulus enlargement. We investigated our experiences of AVR with SJMR mechanical valves of 21 mm or less in size. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 40 patients underwent AVR with SJMR mechanical valves ≤21 mm in size: 9 patients received 21-mm valves, 19 received 19-mm valves, and 12 received 17-mm valves. The mean age was 65.9 ± 9.5 years, and 25 patients (62.5 %) were 65 years or older. We evaluated the clinical outcome and the echocardiographic data for each valve size. There was no operative or hospital mortality. The mean duration of clinical follow-up was 31.2 ± 17.6 months. During follow-up, there were no hospitalizations due to heart failure. The cumulative valve-related event-free survival was 93 % at 33 months, and the cumulative hemorrhagic event-free survival was 93 % at 33 months and 84 % at 43 months, using the Kaplan-Meier method. At follow-up, the mean values of the measured effective orifice area (EOA) for the 21-, 19-, and 17-mm prostheses were 2.00 ± 0.22, 1.74 ± 0.37, and 1.25 ± 0.26 cm(2), and the mean measured EOA index (EOAI) were 1.17 ± 0.12, 1.11 ± 0.21 and 0.90 ± 0.22 cm(2)/m(2), respectively. A PPM (EOAI ≤0.85) was documented in 5 patients, all of whom had received a 17-mm SJMR valve. AVR with SJMR valves of 21 mm or less in size appears to show satisfactory clinical and hemodynamic results.

  3. [Indices of chronic intravascular hemolysis in patients with different prosthetic heart valves in long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Orlovskiĭ, P I; Gritsenko, V V; Davydenko, V V; Kovalenko, A N; Mochalov, O Iu; Petrishina, T I; Vavilova, T V; Kadinskaia, M I; Polezhaev, D A

    2001-01-01

    An examination of 153 patients with valve replacement was performed at late stages of (6.8 +/- 0.2) years, in 84 patients the mitral valve replacement (MVR) was fulfilled, in 64--the aortic replacement (AVR) and in 5--two valve replacement were performed. Higher indices of hemolysis were noted in patients with AVR, in cases of two valve replacement and in patients with the paravascular fistula. The lowest indices of hemolysis take place in patients with bileaflet prostheses (MEDING/CarboMedics, St. Jude Medical), especially in patients with AVR. The complications of intravascular hemolysis are: cholelithiasis, anemia, hemosiderosis of the kidneys, sideropenia. The timely diagnosis, treatment and prophylactics are necessary to prevent these complications. PMID:11836993

  4. Measurements of flow past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2013-11-01

    A bileaflet mechanical heart valve has been inserted in an axisymmetric model of the aorta within a mock circulation apparatus with physiological pressure and flow variations. The velocity field behind the valve has been measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The results closely match those reported by similar studies. A triple jet emanated from the valve's orifices and regions of reverse flow formed in the sinus region. Velocity fluctuations were greatest in the shear layers of the jets. The average r.m.s. streamwise velocity fluctuation over the turbulent period was 0.22 m/s; its maximum value was 0.53 m/s and occurred at the onset of deceleration. Measurements with the valve inserted in an anatomical model of the aorta are planned for the near future. The present and future measurements will be compared to determine the effects of the aorta anatomy on the characteristics of flow through bileaflet valves. In particular, measurements of the viscous and turbulent shear stresses will be analyzed to identify possible locations of blood element damage, and regions of recirculation and stagnation will be identified as locations favourable to thrombus growth. The effects of flows in branching arteries and valve orientation will also be investigated. Supported by NSERC.

  5. Continuous Locomotion-Mode Identification for Prosthetic Legs Based on Neuromuscular–Mechanical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Hargrove, Levi J.; Dou, Zhi; Rogers, Daniel R.; Englehart, Kevin B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed an algorithm based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion to continuously recognize a variety of locomotion modes performed by patients with transfemoral (TF) amputations. Electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from gluteal and residual thigh muscles and ground reaction forces/moments measured from the prosthetic pylon were used as inputs to a phase-dependent pattern classifier for continuous locomotion-mode identification. The algorithm was evaluated using data collected from five patients with TF amputations. The results showed that neuromuscular–mechanical fusion outperformed methods that used only EMG signals or mechanical information. For continuous performance of one walking mode (i.e., static state), the interface based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion and a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm produced 99% or higher accuracy in the stance phase and 95% accuracy in the swing phase for locomotion-mode recognition. During mode transitions, the fusion-based SVM method correctly recognized all transitions with a sufficient predication time. These promising results demonstrate the potential of the continuous locomotion-mode classifier based on neuromuscular–mechanical fusion for neural control of prosthetic legs. PMID:21768042

  6. Robotic hand with locking mechanism using TCP muscles for applications in prosthetic hand and humanoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharan, Lokesh; Tadesse, Yonas

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a biomimetic, lightweight, 3D printed and customizable robotic hand with locking mechanism consisting of Twisted and Coiled Polymer (TCP) muscles based on nylon precursor fibers as artificial muscles. Previously, we have presented a small-sized biomimetic hand using nylon based artificial muscles and fishing line muscles as actuators. The current study focuses on an adult-sized prosthetic hand with improved design and a position/force locking system. Energy efficiency is always a matter of concern to make compact, lightweight, durable and cost effective devices. In natural human hand, if we keep holding objects for long time, we get tired because of continuous use of energy for keeping the fingers in certain positions. Similarly, in prosthetic hands we also need to provide energy continuously to artificial muscles to hold the object for a certain period of time, which is certainly not energy efficient. In this work we, describe the design of the robotic hand and locking mechanism along with the experimental results on the performance of the locking mechanism.

  7. Tandem GM Type-Pulse Tube Refrigerator with Novel Rotary Valve and Bypass Valve Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Jeong, S.; Kwon, Y.; Sohn, M.

    2006-04-01

    A single-stage tandem pulse tube refrigerator has been fabricated, which is driven by two pulsating pressures of opposite phase. The refrigerator is designed as the first stage machine of a 4 K pulse tube refrigerator using a recuperator as the second stage regenerator. In this tandem configuration, two pressure pulsations are generated by a single GM-cryocooler compressor. Two identical pulse tube refrigerators are operated with a novel rotary valve that can supply high and low pressures simultaneously. The pressure measurement at the regenerator inlets of the pulse tube refrigerators confirmed the proper pressure wave of two pulsating pressures in opposite phase. Detrimental DC-flow characteristic of double-inlet GM-type pulse tube refrigerator has been suppressed by the newly designed bypass valve mechanism. This new bypass valve set has one more extra degree of freedom than usual ones to eliminate DC-flow easily. This paper describes a novel feature of the bypass valve set and its performance in the experiment. The two twin pulse tube refrigerators in a tandem mode respectively reached 35 K at no load.

  8. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  9. Complete Transversal Disc Fracture in a Björk-Shiley Delrin Mitral Valve Prosthesis 43 Years After Implantation.

    PubMed

    González-Santos, Jose María; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; Sastre-Rincón, Jose Alfonso; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Pérez-Losada, María Elena; Sagredo-Meneses, Víctor; López-Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    A patient who underwent previous implantation of a mitral valve replacement with a Björk-Shiley Delrin (BSD) mitral valve prosthesis during infancy was admitted to our institution 43 years later after an episode of syncope and cardiac arrest. Under extreme hemodynamic instability, a mitral valve prosthetic dysfunction causing massive mitral regurgitation was identified. The patient underwent an emergent cardiac operation, and a complete disc fracture with partial disc migration was found. Exceptional cases of mechanical prosthetic heart valve fracture exist. We report the first case of complete transversal disc rupture of a BSD mitral valve prosthesis after the longest period of implantation ever reported in that position. PMID:27645963

  10. Candida prosthetic valve endocarditis: the complementary role of multidetector computed tomography and transoesophageal echocardiography in preoperative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ghersin, E; Lessick, J; Agmon, Y; Engel, A; Kophit, A; Adler, Z

    2007-12-01

    A 72-year-old man with previous mitral valve replacement and single coronary bypass surgery was diagnosed with recurrent candida endocarditis by transoesophageal echocardiography and positive blood cultures. Preoperative electrocardiogram-gated multidetector CT (MDCT) was ordered to evaluate the patency and course of the mammary graft. In addition to verifying graft patency, MDCT demonstrated a mobile vegetation on the mitral prosthesis as well as a vegetation on the posterior left atrial wall which was not visible by transoesophageal echocardiography. Multidetector CT also revealed signs of osteomyelitis in the thoracic spine. Repeated surgery confirmed these findings and mitral valve replacement with resection of the left atrial vegetation were performed. This case illustrates the complementary role of MDCT and echocardiography in the preoperative evaluation of fungal endocarditis.

  11. Integrating bio-prosthetic valves in the Fontan operation - Novel treatment to control retrograde flow in caval veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukicevic, Marija; Conover, Timothy; Zhou, Jian; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Figliola, Richard

    2012-11-01

    For a child born with only one functional heart ventricle, the sequence of palliative surgeries typically culminates in the Fontan operation. This procedure is usually successful initially, but leads to later complications, for reasons not fully understood. Examples are respiratory-dependent retrograde flows in the caval and hepatic veins, and increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), hypothesized to be responsible for elevated pressure in the liver and disease of the liver and intestines. Here we study the parameters responsible for retrograde flows in the inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatic vein (HV), and investigate two novel interventions to control retrograde flow: implanting either a Medtronic Contegra valved conduit or an Edwards lifescience pericardial aortic valve in the IVC or HV. We performed the experiments in a multi-scale, patient specific mock circuit, with normal and elevated PVR, towards the optimization of the Fontan circulation. The results show that both valves can significantly reduce retrograde flows in the veins, suggesting potential advantages in the treatment of the patients with congenital heart diseases. Fondation Leducq

  12. Intro to Valve Guide Reconditioning. Automotive Mechanics. Valves. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, W.

    This instructional package, one in a series of individualized instructional units on tools and techniques for repairing worn valve guides in motor vehicles, provides practical experience for students in working on cylinder heads. Covered in the module are reaming valve guides that are oversized to match a new oversized valve, reaming valve guides…

  13. Hydraulic lash adjuster for use in valve operating mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, T.; Matsubara, T.; Otowa, T.; Yoshida, K.

    1989-02-28

    A hydraulic lash adjuster is described for use in a valve operating mechanism in an internal combustion engine, comprising: a cylinder containing a longitudinal bore having a bottom; a plunger slidably disposed in a clearance gap in the cylinder bore; a pressure chamber formed between the bottom of the cylinder bore and the plunger, wherein the pressure chamber meets the dimensional relationship 2valve hole in the plunger providing fluid communication between the oil chamber and the pressure chamber; check valve means for selectively opening or closing the valve hole in response to a reduction or an increase, respectively, in oil pressure in the pressure chamber; spring means for normally urging the plunger outwardly of the cylinder bore; and means for returning oil leaked from the pressure chamber to the chamber.

  14. [The Starr-Edwards heart valve: one of the oldest mechanical heart valves still functioning today].

    PubMed

    Schoenaker, Michiel H; van Wetten, Herbert B; Morshuis, Wim J

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, the Starr-Edwards valve was the first artificial heart valve to be successfully implanted in humans. This valve has now been in use for decades with outstanding results: patients whose life expectancy had previously been short acquired a good prognosis with this development. Nowadays the Starr-Edwards valve is not used anymore, but patients are being described today in whom these valves are still functioning well after more than 40 years.

  15. Rare early prosthesis obstruction after mitral valve replacement: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As a dreadful complication after the mechanical heart valve replacement, prosthetic valve obstruction caused by pannus formation occurs increasingly with time. The authors here present a case of 42-year-old woman who was urgently admitted to hospital with acute heart failure symptoms due to the mechanical mitral valve failure only 3 months after surgery. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated that the bileaflet of the mitral prosthesis were completely immobilized with only a small transvalvular jet remained. During the reoperation, the reason of the prosthetic valve obstruction was attributed to the noncircular pannus ingrowth extending from the atrioventricular side. For a better understanding of the prosthetic valve dysfunction caused by pannus formation, the authors then compile a literature review to briefly discuss the status quo of the clinical characteristics of this uncommon complication. PMID:22747990

  16. On the Biaxial Mechanical Response of Porcine Tricuspid Valve Leaflets.

    PubMed

    Amini Khoiy, Keyvan; Amini, Rouzbeh

    2016-10-01

    Located on the right side of the heart, the tricuspid valve (TV) prevents blood backflow from the right ventricle to the right atrium. Similar to other cardiac valves, quantification of TV biaxial mechanical properties is essential in developing accurate computational models. In the current study, for the first time, the biaxial stress-strain behavior of porcine TV was measured ex vivo under different loading protocols using biaxial tensile testing equipment. The results showed a highly nonlinear response including a compliant region followed by a rapid transition to a stiff region for all of the TV leaflets both in the circumferential and in the radial directions. Based on the data analysis, all three leaflets were found to be anisotropic, and they were stiffer in the circumferential direction in comparison to the radial direction. It was also concluded that the posterior leaflet was the most anisotropic leaflet. PMID:27538260

  17. VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Arkelyan, A.M.; Rickard, C.L.

    1962-04-17

    A gate valve for controlling the flow of fluid in separate concentric ducts or channels by means of a single valve is described. In one position, the valve sealing discs engage opposed sets of concentric ducts leading to the concentric pipes defining the flow channels to block flow therethrough. In another position, the discs are withdrawn from engagement with the opposed ducts and at the same time a bridging section is interposed therebetween to define concentric paths coextensive with and connecting the opposed ducts to facilitate flow therebetween. A wedge block arrangement is employed with each sealing disc to enable it to engage the ducts. The wedge block arrangement also facilitates unobstructcd withdrawal of the discs out of the intervening space between the sets of ducts. (AEC)

  18. Valve

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A positive acting valve suitable for operation in a corrosive environment is provided. The valve includes a hollow valve body defining an open-ended bore for receiving two, axially aligned, spaced-apart, cylindrical inserts. One insert, designated the seat insert, terminates inside the valve body in an annular face which lies within plane normal to the axis of the two inserts. An elastomeric O-ring seal is disposed in a groove extending about the annular face. The other insert, designated the wedge insert, terminates inside the valve body in at least two surfaces oppositely inclined with respect to each other and with respect to a plane normal to the axis of the two inserts. An elongated reciprocable gate, movable between the two inserts along a path normal to the axis of the two inserts, has a first flat face portion disposed adjacent and parallel to the annular face of the seat insert. The gate has a second face portion opposite to the first face portion provided with at least two oppositely inclined surfaces for mating with respective inclined surfaces of the wedge insert. An opening is provided through the gate which registers with a flow passage through the two inserts when the valve is open. Interaction of the respective inclined surfaces of the gate and wedge insert act to force the first flat face portion of the gate against the O-ring seal in the seat insert at the limits of gate displacement where it reaches its respective fully open and fully closed positions.

  19. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    PubMed

    Bavo, Alessandra M; Rocatello, Giorgia; Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Francesco; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction) simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations’ outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results. PMID:27128798

  1. Star GK Bileaflet Mechanical Valve Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch After Mitral Valve Replacement: A Chinese Multicenter Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hua; Qiu, Zhihuang; Chen, Liangwan; Chen, Daozhong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and immediate and mid-term effects of heart valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after mitral valve replacement using the GK bileaflet mechanical valve. Material/Methods A total of 493 cases of mechanical mitral valve replacement were performed in the departments of cardiac surgery in 7 hospitals from January 2000 to January 2008. The patients included 142 men and 351 women ages 21 to 67 (average age, 48.75). The patients were followed for 3 years after surgery. The effective orifice area index (EOAI), ≤1.2 cm2/m2, was detected during the follow-up period and was defined as PPM. The patients were assigned to either the PPM group or the non-PPM group. Finally, the preoperative, perioperative and postoperative indexes of the 2 groups of patients were compared. Results A total of 157 patients had PPM 3 years after surgery. The incidence of PPM was 31.84%. Sixty-three patients in the PPM group received a 25-mm GK bileaflet valve (40.13%), 82 received a 27-mm valve (52.23%), and 12 (7.64%) received a 29-mm valve. There were significant differences in length of intensive care unit stay, duration of ventilator use, length of hospitalization, body surface area, EOAI, mean transmitral pressure gradient, and pulmonary artery pressure between the PPM and non-PPM group (P<0.05). There was a significant difference between preoperative and postoperative pulmonary artery pressures among non-PPM patients (P<0.05); however, there was no statistical difference in preoperative and postoperative pulmonary artery pressures among patients with PPM (P>0.05). Conclusions PPM after mitral valve replacement influences postoperative hemodynamics. Thus, larger-sized GK bileaflet mechanical valves are often used to reduce the risk of PPM. PMID:26313311

  2. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-3, Valve Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasil, Ed; Espy, John

    This third in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes all the major types of valves utilized in a nuclear power plant and the purposes of the preinstallation and installation inspections; also describes the valve testing required for particular valves. The module follows a typical format that includes the…

  3. Stress corrosion cracking in Björk-Shiley convexo-concave prosthetic heart valves due to random in vivo electrochemical pulsing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, K; Appleby, A J

    1996-08-01

    Welded downstream struts of Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves show failure in vivo, but not in in vitro testing. A pyrolytic carbon pivoting disk occluder closes against a Haynes 25 alloy ring, which is electrochemically machined from solid with the upstream retaining struts. The weld area is de-alloyed, with residual porosity and carbide inclusions. The valve becomes a short-circuited electrochemical cell when fully open or closed. It is an aggressive chloride electrolyte, whose high pulsed flow (2 m/s) ensures that supply of oxygen-rich cathode reactant is not mass-transport-limited. During the flight of the occluder, the cell is randomly at open circuit. A random current pulse is applied to the metal parts on circuit closure. Failure is not from simple mechanical fatigue, but from stress-corrosion-cracking and erosion of the less noble weld area caused by these pulses. All welded valves of this type may be susceptible to ultimate in vivo failure. PMID:8841847

  4. Fluid Dynamic Characterization of a Polymeric Heart Valve Prototype (Poli-Valve) tested under Continuous and Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Francesco; Serrani, Marta; Bagnoli, Paola; Brubert, Jacob; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D.; Costantino, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses are currently commercially available. The former show longer durability but require anticoagulant therapy, the latter display better fluid dynamic behaviour but do not have adequate durability. New Polymeric Heart Valves (PHVs) could potentially combine the haemodynamic properties of biological valves with the durability of mechanical valves. This work presents a hydrodynamic evaluation of two groups of newly developed supra-annular tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valves made from styrenic block copolymers (SBC): Poli-Valves. Methods Two types of Poli-Valves made of SBC differing in polystyrene fraction content were tested under continuous and pulsatile flow conditions as prescribed by ISO 5840 Standard. An ad - hoc designed pulse duplicator allowed the valve prototypes to be tested at different flow rates and frequencies. Pressure and flow were recorded; pressure drops, effective orifice area (EOA), and regurgitant volume were computed to assess the valve’s behaviour. Results Both types Poli-Valves met the minimum requirements in terms of regurgitation and EOA as specified by ISO 5840 Standard. Results were compared with five mechanical heart valves (MHVs) and five tissue heart valves (THVs), currently available on the market. Conclusion Based on these results, polymeric heart valves based on styrenic block copolymers, as Poli-Valves are, can be considered as promising alternative for heart valve replacement in near future. PMID:26689146

  5. Novel differential mechanism enabling two DOF from a single actuator: application to a prosthetic hand.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-06-01

    There will always be a drive to reduce the complexity, weight, and cost of mobile platforms while increasing their inherent capabilities. This paper presents a novel method of increasing the range of achievable grasp configurations of a mechatronic hand controlled by a single actuator. By utilizing the entire actuator space, the hand is able to perform four grasp types (lateral, precision, precision/power, and power) with a single input resulting in a potentially lighter and simpler hand design. We demonstrate this strategy in a prototype hand that is evaluated to determine the benefit of this method over the addition of a second actuator. Results show a decrease in weight but a 0.8 sec transition time between grasp types with the proposed method. The prototype hand can be controlled by a single EMG signal that can command a change in grasp type or an opening/closing of the hand. We discuss the potential of this mechanism to improve prosthetic hand design as compared to current myoelectric systems. PMID:24187259

  6. Load transfer mechanics between trans-tibial prosthetic socket and residual limb--dynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ming; Lee, Winson C C

    2004-09-01

    The effects of inertial loads on the interface stresses between trans-tibial residual limb and prosthetic socket were investigated. The motion of the limb and prosthesis was monitored using a Vicon motion analysis system and the ground reaction force was measured by a force platform. Equivalent loads at the knee joint during walking were calculated in two cases with and without consideration of the material inertia. A 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) model based on the actual geometry of residual limb, internal bones and socket liner was developed to study the mechanical interaction between socket and residual limb during walking. To simulate the friction/slip boundary conditions between the skin and liner, automated surface-to-surface contact was used. The prediction results indicated that interface pressure and shear stress had the similar double-peaked waveform shape in stance phase. The average difference in interface stresses between the two cases with and without consideration of inertial forces was 8.4% in stance phase and 20.1% in swing phase. The maximum difference during stance phase is up to 19%. This suggests that it is preferable to consider the material inertia effect in a fully dynamic FE model.

  7. Structural and mechanical characterisation of the peri-prosthetic tissue surrounding loosened hip prostheses. An explorative study.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Astrid; Zadpoor, Amir A; Oostlander, Angela; Schoeman, Monique; Rahnamay Moshtagh, Parisa; Pouran, Behdad; Valstar, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Very little is known about the structure and properties of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue that is found around loose orthopaedic implants. We describe a method for characterizing the structural organisation (histology, confocal microscopy) as well as the nano- and micro-scale mechanical behaviour (atomic force microscopy, nanoindentation) of peri-prosthetic fibrous tissue. The tissue was collected from 11 patients undergoing revision surgery due to aseptic loosening. Sirius Red and Movat histological staining procedures indicated that the tissue mainly consists of collagen fibres and ground substance. However, large inter- and intra-patient variations in the relative proportions of these tissue components were found, as well as in collagen fibre orientation and possibly also maturation. The nano-scale Young׳s moduli ranged from 0-950kPa, but showed large inter-patient variability. When the results per sample were presented in a probability density function, we could roughly discriminate one peak in the 0-100kPa range and/or one peak in the 100-500Pa range. These nano-scale moduli seem to respectively present the mechanical properties of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen molecules. The majority of the micro-scale Young׳s moduli ranged between 0.5 and 2.0kPa for all samples. This explorative study provides new insights in (the variations of) structural organisation and mechanical properties of peri-prosthetic tissue. PMID:27281163

  8. [Thrombolysis in left mechanical prosthetic heart valve obstruction by thrombus. Following and results].

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, Jesús Salvador; Arriaga-Nava, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la obstrucción de la válvula mecánica cardiaca izquierda por trombo es una complicación grave. Los factores relacionados con la mortalidad son clase funcional, tipo de prótesis valvular y urgencia de la cirugía. La trombólisis representa una opción terapéutica a la cirugía cardiaca. El objetivo de esta investigación fue analizar el papel de la trombólisis en el manejo de la válvula mecánica cardiaca izquierda obstruida por trombo. MÉTODOS: se estudiaron 22 casos consecutivos sometidos a trombólisis en el Hospital de Cardiología del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, bajo dos diferentes circunstancias: con edema agudo pulmonar y estado de choque en clase funcional IV y con clases funcionales I y II. Se realizó monitoreo clínico, ecocardiográfico y fluoroscopia.

  9. Comparison of human turning gait with the mechanical performance of lower limb prosthetic transverse rotation adapters.

    PubMed

    Flick, K C; Orendurff, M S; Berge, J S; Segal, A D; Klute, G K

    2005-04-01

    Given the importance of minimizing transverse plane shear stress on soft tissue, several transverse rotational adapters (TRAs) are available for incorporation in lower limb prostheses. This study compares kinetic and kinematic data from human subjects during straight and turning gaits to the mechanical performance of several TRAs. Physiological data were collected from three individuals walking straight and turning at self-selected speeds around a 1 m radius circle. The average peak torques and range of motion for normal subjects while turning were 8.2 Nm and 26 degrees (outside leg), 11.8Nm and 20 degrees (inside leg), and 11.4 Nm and 20 degrees (right leg) during straight gait. Each TRA was mechanically tested without axial loading in a servo-hydraulic material testing system (MTS) over its rotational range at 0.5 dergrees/s and 60 degrees/s. The TRAs with axial compression were also tested at 0.5 degrees/s under a 736N (75kg mass) axial load. Applying these torques to the different TRAs yielded 3 to 35 degrees rotation, depending on the elastomer installed. Some TRAs had nearly constant stiffness, while others stiffened with rotation. The TRAs also varied in their average maximum stiffness from 0.4Nm/degree to 2.7Nm/degrees. Normal subjects exhibit interior vs. exterior asymmetrical torques and displacements; however, only one of the TRAs is designed to allow asymmetrical stiffness, and none have asymmetric ranges. Prosthetists and physicians can use these data to better interpret amputees' qualitative remarks and to prescribe the correct TRA and/or elastomer. This information also forms a basis for further design and development of novel torque absorbing prosthetic adapters.

  10. Check valve with poppet dashpot/frictional damping mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An inline check valve for a flow line where the valve element is guided for inline travel forward and rearward of a valve sealing member and is spring biased to a closed sealing condition is presented. One of the guides for the valve element includes a dashpot housing with a bore and plunger member to control the rate of travel of the valve element in either direction, providing a guiding function. The plunger member is arranged with a dashpot ring to frictionally contact the dashpot bore and has an interior tortuous flow path from one side to the other side of the dashpot ring. The dashpot housing is not anchored to the valve body so that the valve can be functional even if the dashpot ring becomes jammed in the dashpot housing.

  11. Mechanical valve closing dynamics: relationship between velocity of closing, pressure transients, and cavitation initiation.

    PubMed

    Chandran, K B; Aluri, S

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the closing dynamics of mechanical heart valves was experimentally analyzed with the valves mounted in the mitral position of an in vitro flow chamber simulating a single closing event. The average linear velocity of the edge of the leaflet during the final 2.065 degrees of the traverse before closing was measured using a laser sweeping technique, and the negative pressure transients at 2 mm from the leaflet inflow surface in the fully closed position was recorded at the instant of valve closure. The cavitation number was computed for the various mechanical valves at a range of load at valve closure. The data were correlated with cavitation bubble visualization previously obtained with the same experimental set up. Cavitation incipience with mechanical valves was found to be independent of the flexibility of the valve holder. For the same loading rate at valve closure, valves with flexible (polyethylene) leaflets were found to close with comparable velocity to those with rigid (pyrolytic carbon) leaflets, but the negative pressure transients did not reach magnitudes close to the vapor pressure for the fluid with flexible leaflets. For the same leaflet closing velocity (and hence the cavitation number), valves with a seat stop or a seating lip in the region of maximum leaflet velocity were observed to cavitate earlier, suggesting that the effect of "squeeze flow" may be an important factor in cavitation incipience.

  12. Durability, reliability, viability: 48 year-survival of a Starr-Edwards mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Bilal; Guthier, Justin; Wu, James K; Martinez, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of 67 year-old female with a 48-year survival of a Starr-Edwards valve at mitral position. The patient underwent Starr-Edwards mitral valve replacement at age of 19 years for mitral stenosis secondary to severe rheumatic valve disease. The patient had experienced a progressive decline in her functional status with increasing dyspnoea on exertion over a two-week period to eventual development of severe shortness of breath at rest prior to hospitalisation. Transoesophageal echocardiogram revealed severe para-prosthetic and intravalvular mitral valve regurgitation. The patient underwent explantation of Starr-Edwards valve and replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Our case details the longest reported survival of a Starr-Edwards prosthetic valve at mitral area.

  13. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  14. Interventional therapy of supravalvular pulmonary stenosis via a mechanical valve in the pulmonary position.

    PubMed

    Habash, Sheeraz; Haas, Nikolaus A; Laser, Kai Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing number of patients with congenital heart disease and pathology of the right ventricular outflow tract in whom a mechanical pulmonary valve replacement is chosen for permanent palliation. Despite corrective surgery, some of these patients may have residual or secondary supravalvular pulmonary stenosis or peripheral pulmonary stenosis, which necessitate interventional therapy after valve replacement. There is a general understanding that interventional therapy via a mechanical valve in pulmonary position may induce mechanical valve dysfunction and should therefore be avoided. We report our experience in three patients with a St. Jude Medical mechanical valve in pulmonary position and supravalvular pulmonary stenosis or a peripheral pulmonary stenosis where we have safely performed standard interventions (i.e., balloon angioplasty and stent implantation) across the mechanical valve without any complications. Our specific technique using a long sheath as safety guard, which holds the mechanical valve open during the procedure but allows the positioning of all mechanical devices and catheters necessary for the procedures, is described. In all patients, the long-term follow-up of the valve function is excellent.

  15. Mechanical testing of prosthetic feet utilized in low-income countries according to ISO-10328 standard.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J Steen; Treichl, Henning B

    2007-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from 1132 ISO-10328 standard tests performed on 21 different prosthetic foot models commonly utilized in the developing world. None of the tested feet passed the strictest ISO testing protocol. All but one failed at the initial Static Proof test, which simulates a single momentary overload, due to permanent forefoot deformation. In addition, all tested feet had significant internal failures that were visible when sectioned longitudinally. Static Proof testing revealed average permanent deformation of the forefoot of all feet that exceeded the optional 5 mm ISO requirement. Forefoot deformation for non-Jaipur rubber feet came closest to meeting the standard at 8.3+/-3.4 mm; deformation of the various types of rubber Jaipur feet was the greatest at 22.5+/-5.4 mm. Forefoot deformation for polyurethane (PU) feet was 13.6+/-5.5 mm. Forefoot deformation of the ethyl-vinyl-acetate (EVA) feet was slightly greater than the Jaipur feet at 22.8+/-5.7 mm. After the Static Strength test, which simulates a higher momentary overload, permanent deformation of the feet increased. The average maximum deformation for rubber SACH forefeet varied from 17 - 30 mm, and 11 - 26 mm for the heel; Jaipur forefeet 47 - 60 mm and heels 13 - 19 mm; PU forefeet 20 - 44 mm and heels 20 - 33 mm; and EVA forefeet 33 - 50 mm and heels 16 - 31 mm. After completion of the Cyclic Test the prosthetic feet were sawn in half and closely examined visually. All feet revealed internal derangements: (i) Deformation of rubber or PU foam under the keel of forefoot and/or heel: HCMC, VI, EB1, BAVI, HI Cambodia, Myanmar, Angola, TATCOT, Kingsley and CR; (ii) Delamination from the keel: Mozambique, PHN, and Pro-cirugia; and (iii) Delamination between foam layers: BMVSS, NISHA, MUKTI, and OM. The influence of the two environmental factors tested was minimal for rubber feet with respect to deformation and inconsistent for the polymer feet; in particular for the forefeet. Creep

  16. Enlargement of mitral valve ring in a young woman with severe prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    Attisani, Matteo; Pellegrini, Augusto; Sorrentino, Paolo; Rinaldi, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical prosthesis is the first choice for valve replacement at the mitral position in children. Replacement of the original prosthesis because of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is almost inevitable when prostheses are implanted in small children. The impact of PPM on long-term mortality becomes significant when the effective orifice area (EOA) is severely reduced. In these cases prosthesis replacement can be technically difficult, and it often requires extended enlargement of the mitral valve annulus ring. We report a case of a woman who underwent a mitral valve replacement with a 19-mm St. Jude mechanical prosthetic valve at the age of 3 years. At the age of 33 years, the patient underwent a successful minimally invasive mitral annulus ring enlargement and implantation of a 23-mm St. Jude mechanical prosthetic valve via a right minithoracotomy. PMID:24808442

  17. [THE MECHANISMS OF ISCHEMIC MITRAL VALVE INSUFFICIENCY FORMATION].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, S A

    2015-07-01

    In clinic in the period from 2012 to 2014 in 142 patients were performed interventions on the mitral valve for coronary heart disease and ischemic mitral valve insufficiency (MVI). The majority of patients were able to work, its witness for social-economic significance of problem. The main reason of the ischemic MVI arised were the dilatation of mitral valve fibrousing and substitution of papillar muscles for left ventricle remodelling. Symmetrical deformation of mitral valve arised in most cases after anterior-septal myocardium infarction, left ventricle global remodelling and apical substitution of papillar muscles; asymmetrical ones--after posterior myocardial infarction for local left ventricle papillar muscles. PMID:26591216

  18. Mechanical biocompatibility of prosthetic meshes: a comprehensive protocol for mechanical characterization.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M M; Röhrnbauer, B; Feola, A; Deprest, J; Mazza, E

    2014-12-01

    This study is aimed at a comprehensive and extensive characterization of the mechanical biocompatibility of mesh prostheses. A robust and simple experimental protocol and a set of parameters is proposed, addressing stiffness under uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions, anisotropy, influence of prior deformation history, local mismatch of deformation mechanisms, and changes in mechanical properties when embedded in a homogeneous matrix. These parameters can form the basis for comparison of different mesh types and for evaluation of their mechanical biocompatibility. Measurements were performed on nine mesh types used for hernia and/or pelvic repair, including heavier as well as lighter implants and covering a wide range of mechanical responses. A total of 93 experiments were performed and all parameters are represented for each mesh in a single diagram to facilitate the quantitative assessment of implant characteristics and their comparison. The mechanics of implants is a critical factor determining clinical performance which should be accounted for in mesh selection and for development of future implants.

  19. Factors affecting computed tomography image quality for assessment of mechanical aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Hong, Sae Rom; Im, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Jung; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-06-01

    Evaluating mechanical valves with computed tomography (CT) can be problematic because artifacts from the metallic components of valves can hamper image quality. The purpose of this study was to determine factors affecting the image quality of cardiac CT to improve assessment of mechanical aortic valves. A total of 144 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with mechanical valves (ten different types) and who underwent cardiac CT were included. Using a four-point grading system, the image quality of the CT scans was assessed for visibility of the valve leaflets and the subvalvular regions. Data regarding the type of mechanical valve, tube voltage, average heart rate (HR), and HR variability during CT scanning were compared between the non-diagnostic (overall image quality score ≤2) and diagnostic (overall image quality score >2) image quality groups. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of non-diagnostic image quality. The percentage of valve types that incorporated a cobalt-chrome component (two types in total) and HR variability were significantly higher in the non-diagnostic image group than in the diagnostic group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.013, respectively). The average HR and tube voltage were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05). Valve type was the only independent predictor of non-diagnostic quality. The CT image quality for patients with mechanical aortic valves differed significantly depending on the type of mechanical valve used and on the degree of HR variability.

  20. Candida parapsilosis prosthetic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Pinto, André; Ferraz, Rita; Casanova, Jorge; Sarmento, António; Santos, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Candida endocarditis is a rare infection associated with high mortality and morbidity. There are still some controversies about Candida endocarditis treatment, especially about the treatment duration. We report a case of a Candida parapsilosis endocarditis that presented as a lower limb ischemia. The patient was surgically treated with a cryopreserved homograft aortic replacement. We used intravenous fluconazole 800 mg as initial treatment, followed with 12 months of 400 mg fluconazole per os. The patient outcome was good. PMID:26288749

  1. Two-dimensional FSI simulation of closing dynamics of a tilting disc mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, V; Udaykumar, H S; Herbertson, L H; Deutsch, S; Manning, K B; Chandran, K B

    2010-03-01

    The fluid dynamics during valve closure resulting in high shear flows and large residence times of particles has been implicated in platelet activation and thrombus formation in mechanical heart valves. Our previous studies with bi-leaflet valves have shown that large shear stresses induced in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing results in relatively high platelet activation levels whereas flow between the leaflets results in shed vortices not conducive to platelet damage. In this study we compare the result of closing dynamics of a tilting disc valve with that of a bi-leaflet valve. The two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction analysis of a tilting disc valve closure mechanics is performed with a fixed grid Cartesian mesh flow solver with local mesh refinement, and a Lagrangian particle dynamic analysis for computation of potential for platelet activation. Throughout the simulation the flow remains in the laminar regime and the flow through the gap width is marked by the development of a shear layer which separates from the leaflet downstream of the valve. Zones of re-circulation are observed in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing on the major orifice region of the tilting disc valve and are seen to be migrating towards the minor orifice region. Jet flow is observed at the minor orifice region and a vortex is formed which sheds in the direction of fluid motion as observed in experiments using PIV measurements. The activation parameter computed for the tilting disc valve, at the time of closure was found to be 2.7 times greater than that of the bi-leaflet mechanical valve and was found to be in the vicinity of the minor orifice region mainly due to the migration of vortical structures from the major to the minor orifice region during the leaflet rebound of the closing phase.

  2. A mechanical model of the human ankle in the transverse plane during straight walking: implications for prosthetic design.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Brian C; Schoen, Jason A; Orendurff, Michael S; Klute, Glenn K

    2009-03-01

    In order to protect sensitive residual limb soft tissues, lower limb prostheses need to control torsional loads during gait. To assist with the design of a torsional prosthesis, this paper used simple mechanical elements to model the behavior of the human ankle in the transverse plane during straight walking. Motion capture data were collected from ten able-bodied subjects walking straight ahead at self-selected walking speeds. Gait cycle data were separated into four distinct states, and passive torsional springs and dampers were chosen to model the behavior in each state. Since prosthetic design is facilitated by simplicity, it was desirable to investigate if elastic behavior could account for the physiological ankle moment and include viscous behavior only if necessary to account for the inadequacies of the spring model. In all four states, a springlike behavior was able to account for most of the physiological ankle moments, rendering the use of a damper unnecessary. In State 1, a quadratic torsional spring was chosen to model the behavior, while linear torsional springs were chosen for States 2-4. A prosthetic system that actively changes stiffness could be able to replicate the physiological behavior of the human ankle in the transverse plane. The results of this study will contribute to the mechanical design and control of a biomimetic torsional prosthesis for lower limb amputees. PMID:19154072

  3. Cardiac Valve Noise Reduction by Non-Drug Interventions Improves the Sleep Quality of Patients after Mechanical Cardiac Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Le; Huang, Xizhen; Jiang, Fei; Lin, Fen; Ye, Qingyang; Lin, Jianling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of non-drug interventions on the sleep quality of patients after mechanical cardiac valve implantation. Methods: In this prospective, randomized, controlled trial, 64 patients scheduled for mechanical mitral valve replacement were recruited. Patients underwent cognitive behavioral therapy and wore noise cancelling earplugs and eye mask. Sleep quality was evaluated on the 4th after admission and the 5th days after operation. The primary outcome was the total sleep quality score differences between the 4th day after admission and the 5th day after operation. Results: All patients had been suffering from poor sleep quality for a month before admission. There was no difference between both groups on the 4th day after admission. Overall sleep quality in the intervention group was better than in the control group on the 5th day after operation. The subjective sleep quality of the patients in each group was significantly lower on the 5th day after the operation than on the 4th day after admission (P <0.05). Conclusion: Non-drug intervention could improve the sleep quality of patients after mechanical cardiac valve implantation and help the postoperative recovery of the patients. (Trial registration: ChiCTR-TRC-14004405, 21 March 2014.) PMID:26853244

  4. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Maryam; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Sant, Shilpa; Jung, Sungmi; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Khavari-Nejad, Ramazan Ali; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Heart valve-related disorders are among the major causes of death worldwide. Although prosthetic valves are widely used to treat this pathology, current prosthetic grafts cannot grow with the patient while maintaining normal valve mechanical and hemodynamic properties. Tissue engineering may provide a possible solution to this issue through using biodegradable scaffolds and patients' own cells. Despite their similarity to heart valve tissue, most hydrogel scaffolds are not mechanically suitable for the dynamic stresses of the heart valve microenvironment. In this study, we integrated electrospun poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) microfiber scaffolds, which possess enhanced mechanical properties for heart valve engineering, within a hybrid hydrogel made from methacrylated hyaluronic acid and methacrylated gelatin. Sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells were encapsulated in the hydrogel and evaluated in hydrogel-only, PGS-PCL scaffold-only, and composite scaffold conditions. Although the cellular viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types, the presence of the hydrogel improved the three-dimensional distribution of mitral valvular interstitial cells. As seen by similar values in both the Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength between the PGS-PCL scaffolds and the composites, microfibrous scaffolds preserved their mechanical properties in the presence of the hydrogels. Compared to electrospun or hydrogel scaffolds alone, this combined system may provide a more suitable three-dimensional structure for generating scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

  5. Are bioprostheses associated with better outcome than mechanical valves in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis who undergo valve surgery?

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giacomo; Solinas, Marco; Bevilacqua, Stefano; Glauber, Mattia

    2012-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether patients with chronic kidney disease who required dialysis that undergo valve surgery have better surgical recovery rates with bioprostheses than with mechanical valves. Altogether more than 96 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing cardiac surgery are very fragile, with high in-hospital mortality rates (13-36%) and limited life expectancy (15-42 months in selected studies). Two studies outlined that diabetic ESRD, neurological impairment, age at the operation and poor ventricular function are the strongest predictors of early and late morbidity and mortality. Based on American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) 1998 valvular guidelines, bioprostheses were considered a contraindication in dialysis patients; this statement derived from anecdotal reports of accelerated valve degeneration. Structural valve deterioration was reported in only 5 of 1347 patients who received bioprosthesis through the studies and independent from implantation site. Likelihood of degeneration is low, with a calculated valve-excision rate of 7%, and occurred in a broad range of time (from 10 to 156 months). The AHA/ACC 2006 valvular revised guidelines removed the previous statement (1998) of class IIa recommendation for mechanical valves and class III for tissue valves; in the focus update of 2008, there is still no specific indication for valve selection in dialysis patients, but difficulties in maintaining anticoagulation in these patients was noted. Stroke, haemorrhage and gastro-intestinal bleeding events occurred in almost 15% of patients with mechanical

  6. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  7. Mitral valve replacement in systemic lupus erythematosus associated Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Akhlaq, Anam; Ali, Taimur A; Fatimi, Saulat H

    2016-04-01

    Libman-Sacks endocarditis, first discovered in 1924, is a cardiac manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Valvular involvement has been associated with SLE and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Mitral valve, especially its posterior leaflet, is most commonly involved. We report a case of a 34 year old woman with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and SLE, who presented with mitral valve regurgitation. The patient underwent a prosthetic mitral valve replacement, with no followup complications. We suggest mechanical valve replacement employment in the management of mitral regurgitation in Libman-Sacks endocarditis, in view of the recent medical literature and our own case report.

  8. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Choi, Charles H; Konda, Subbareddy; Shake, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose.

  9. Consequence of patient substitution of nattokinase for warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Maqsood M.; Choi, Charles H.; Konda, Subbareddy

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a patient's self-substitution of nattokinase for the vitamin K antagonist warfarin after aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Nattokinase is an enzyme derived from a popular fermented soybean preparation in Japan (natto), which has fibrinolytic properties and is gaining popularity in nontraditional health journals and nonmedical health websites as an over-the-counter thrombolytic. After nearly a year of use of nattokinase without warfarin, the patient developed thrombus on the mechanical valve and underwent successful repeat valve replacement. We believe this is the first documented case of nattokinase being used as a substitute for warfarin after valve replacement, and we strongly discourage its use for this purpose. PMID:25552810

  10. Thrombolytic Therapy for Right-Sided Mechanical Pulmonic and Tricuspid Valves: The Largest Survival Analysis to Date.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyed Reza; Hekmat, Manouchehr; Safi, Morteza; Taherkhani, Adineh; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    Data regarding thrombolytic treatment of right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis are almost nonexistent, and all current guidelines arise from very small case series. We retrospectively studied the in-hospital and long-term outcome data of a larger series of patients who had received, from September 2005 through June 2012, thrombolytic therapy for right-sided mechanical pulmonary valve or tricuspid valve thrombosis. We identified 16 patients aged 8-67 years who had undergone thrombolytic therapy for definite thrombotic mechanical valve obstruction in the tricuspid or pulmonary valve position (8 in each position). All study patients except one had subtherapeutic international normalized ratios. The 8 patients with pulmonary mechanical valve thrombosis had a 100% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, and their in-hospital survival rate was also 100%. The 8 patients with tricuspid mechanical valve thrombosis had a 75% response rate to thrombolytic therapy, with an in-hospital survival rate of 87.5%. The one-year survival rate for mechanical valve thrombosis treated with thrombolytic therapy (whether pulmonary or tricuspid) was 87.5%. On the basis of our data, we recommend that thrombolytic therapy remain the first-line therapy for right-sided mechanical valve thrombosis in adults or children-including children with complex congenital heart disease and patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Surgery should be reserved for patients in whom this treatment fails.

  11. Dissection of the atrial wall after mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, L; Kassai, I; Lengyel, M

    1996-01-01

    We describe an unusual sequela of mitral valve replacement in a 50-year-old woman who had undergone a closed mitral commissurotomy in 1975. She was admitted to our hospital because of mitral restenosis in November 1993, at which time her mitral valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis. On the 8th postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed dissection and rupture of the left atrial wall. At prompt reoperation, we found an interlayer dissection and rupture of the atrial wall into the left atrium. We repaired the ruptured atrial wall with a prosthetic patch. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative transesophageal echocardiography showed normal prosthetic valve function and no dissection. Images PMID:8680278

  12. Starr-Edwards valves at the aortic and mitral positions implanted for 39 years.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Shun-ichi; Aizawa, Kei; Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Muraoka, Arata; Misawa, Yoshio

    2011-06-01

    Cloth-covered Starr-Edwards caged ball valves implanted in the aortic and mitral valve positions for 39 years were extracted. Both showed valve dysfunction resulting from pannus overgrowth. The metal cages of the Starr-Edwards valves were covered with worn cloth. This case indicates the extended durability of Starr-Edwards valves and the importance of the design and materials of prosthetic heart valves to avoid pannus overgrowth and prosthetic valve abrasion.

  13. Multi-scale mechanical characterization of scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Argento, G; Simonet, M; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T

    2012-11-15

    Electrospinning is a promising technology to produce scaffolds for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Each electrospun scaffold is characterized by a complex micro-scale structure that is responsible for its macroscopic mechanical behavior. In this study, we focus on the development and the validation of a computational micro-scale model that takes into account the structural features of the electrospun material, and is suitable for studying the multi-scale scaffold mechanics. We show that the computational tool developed is able to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of electrospun scaffolds characterized by different microstructures. Moreover, we explore the global mechanical properties of valve-shaped scaffolds with different microstructural features, and compare the deformation of these scaffolds when submitted to diastolic pressures with a tissue engineered and a native valve. It is shown that a pronounced degree of anisotropy is necessary to reproduce the deformation patterns observed in the native heart valve.

  14. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  15. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation overcoming hostile anatomy: Evolut R for the treatment of Mitroflow bioprosthesis dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2016-10-01

    Redo surgery is regarded as the first-line treatment option for patients presenting with prosthetic valve degeneration. However, many patients have concomitant co-morbidities and this option is associated with significant risk. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation is an alternative strategy depending on the bioprosthetic valve that is being treated. The Sorin Mitroflow bioprosthetic aortic valve has been regarded as a contraindication to valve-in-valve treatment due to the high risk of coronary obstruction. We here present the case of a patient with small peripheral vasculature who underwent successful transfemoral valve-in-valve implantation and subsequently discuss the challenges and technical aspects that require consideration.

  16. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  17. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  18. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925... valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of any of the heart's natural valves. This device includes valves constructed of prosthetic...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925... valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of any of the heart's natural valves. This device includes valves constructed of prosthetic...

  20. Mechanical Outcomes of a Rolling-Joint Prosthetic Foot and Its Performance in the Dorsiflexion Phase of Transtibial Amputee Gait

    PubMed Central

    PITKIN, MARK R.

    2016-01-01

    To most closely simulate the pe1formance of a biological human foot, a prosthetic foot should function similarly to the biological foot: The shock absorption, propulsion, balance and dorsiflexion functions of the prosthesis should closely mirror those of the biological foot. Most prosthetic feet currently available have good absorption and propulsion abilities, and some also have good balance functions. Howeve1; most prosthetic feet lack proper imitation of the dorsiflexion phase of normal gait. Dorsiflexion is crucial to the gait pattern since most foot flexors are used during this phase. A new rolling-joint prosthetic foot (RJF) has been developed to simulate a more natural moment of resistance in the dorsiflexion phase. The pilot biomechanical study of one transtibial amputee presented here indicates improved gait pe1formance with use of the RJF. PMID:27087762

  1. The Work by Giulio Ceradini in Explaining the Mechanism of Semilunar Cardiac Valve Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiani, Diana; Manni, Ermanno

    2011-01-01

    Using an excised pig heart preparation with tubes, a manometer, and a visualizing apparatus, Giulio Ceradini, an Italian physiologist working in the years of 1871-1872 in Carl Ludwig's famous laboratory in Leipzig, Germany, illustrated the mechanism of closure of the semilunar valves. He was the first to conceive that the closure of the heart…

  2. Mechanics of mitral valve edge-to-edge-repair and MitraClip procedure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shamik; He, Zhaoming

    2015-01-01

    The edge-to-edge repair (ETER) technique has been used as a stand-alone procedure, or as a secondary procedure with ring annuloplasty for degenerative, functional mitral regurgitation, or for mitral regurgitation of other kinds of valvular etiologies. The percutaneous MitraClip technique based on ETER has been used in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. However, adverse events such as residual mitral regurgitation, and clip detachment or fracture indicate that the mechanics underlying these procedures is not well understood. Therefore, current studies on mitral valve functionality and mechanics related to the ETER and MitraClip procedures are reviewed to improve the efficacy and safety of both procedures. Extensive in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies related to ETER and MitraClip procedures along with MitraClip clinical trial results are presented and discussed herein. The ETER suture force and the mitral valve tissue mechanics and hemodynamics of each procedure are discussed. A quantitative understanding of the interplay of mitral valve components and as to biological response to the procedures remains challenging. Based on mitral valve mechanics, ETER or MitraClip therapy can be optimized to enhance repair efficacy and durability.

  3. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber. PMID:24753736

  4. Prothrombin complex concentrate for warfarin-induced bleeding in a patient with a mechanical aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Rahul; Abel, Erik; Burcham, Pamela; Firstenberg, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Reversal of anticoagulation-induced bleeding in the perioperative period can be challenging, particularly with an unstable patient with a mechanical valve. We present a case of life-threatening bleeding successfully managed with a prothrombin complex concentrate as an alternative to fresh frozen plasma. PMID:23667067

  5. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-03-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber.

  6. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  7. An 'in vitro' study of mechanical fatigue in glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve tissue.

    PubMed

    Broom, N D

    1980-01-01

    Leaflet tissue specimens prepared from porcine aortic valves treated with glutaraldehyde at low and high pressures have been subjected to 0.45 x 10(9) accelerated fatigue cycles in Ringer's solution. The waveform or crimped property of the collagen fibres in the leaflet tissue is an essential requirement for its ability to resist localized deformation during repeated flexure. High pressure glutaraldehyde fixation of the whole valve eliminated the crimp structure and resulted in the formation of localized kink sites in the tissue specimen during repeated flexure. Eleven separate sites of serious tissue disruption were observed in the three fatigue specimens obtained from the high pressure-treated valve. In contrast to this only one site of serious disruption was observed in the three fatigue specimens obtained from the low pressure-treated valve. Here fixation preserved the fully crimped morphology of the collagen. It is expected that the long-term mechanical durability of glutaraldehyde treated aortic valves can be substantially increased if careful consideration is given to the pressure at which initial fixation is carried out.

  8. Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis: Methods, Models, and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jordan D.; Weiss, Robert M.; Heistad, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS) is a major health problem facing aging societies. The identification of osteoblast-like and osteoclast-like cells in human tissue has led to a major paradigm shift in the field. CAVS was thought to be a passive, degenerative process, whereas now the progression of calcification in CAVS is considered to be actively regulated. Mechanistic studies examining the contributions of true ectopic osteogenesis, non-osseous calcification, and ectopic osteoblast-like cells (that appear to function differently from skeletal osteoblasts) to valvular dysfunction have been facilitated by the development of mouse models of CAVS. Recent studies also suggest that valvular fibrosis, as well as calcification, may play an important role in restricting cusp movement, and CAVS may be more appropriately viewed as a fibrocalcific disease. High resolution echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging have emerged as useful tools for testing the efficacy of pharmacological and genetic interventions in vivo. Key studies in humans and animals are reviewed that have shaped current paradigms in the field of CAVS, and suggest promising future areas for research. PMID:21617136

  9. Long-term survival with a stentless free-hand Batista pericardial aortic valve prosthesis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Valentina; Labbé, Javier; Cataldo, Anthony; Becerra, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stented bovine pericardial prosthetic valves are a good option for older patients, except when there is a fragile small aortic annulus, when, if there is no contraindication to anticoagulation, a mechanical prosthesis may be indicated. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a 72 year-old man who underwent coronary bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement with a stentless valve fashioned from bovine pericardium using the Batista technique. Despite early sternal infection and dehiscence, and renal and respiratory failure during 15 years follow-up, he remains alive and self-sufficient. Echocardiography demonstrates a well-functioning aortic valve. DISCUSSION When Batista reported his first 60 patients, concerns were raised about the surgical feasibility of constructing the valve and its long-term durability. Our case perhaps addresses both concerns. CONCLUSION Replacement of the aortic valve with a free-hand Batista pericardial valve is a feasible option in a suitable and carefully selected patient. PMID:25524300

  10. Automatic shutoff valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, S. F.; Overbey, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Cellulose-sponge disk absorbs incoming water and expands with enough force to shut valve. When water recedes, valve opens by squeezing sponge dry to its original size. This direct mechanical action is considered more reliable than solenoid valve.

  11. Micro particle image velocimetry measurements of steady diastolic leakage flow in the hinge of a St. Jude Medical® regent™ mechanical heart valve.

    PubMed

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-03-01

    A number of clinical, in vitro and computational studies have shown the potential for thromboembolic complications in bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV), primarily due to the complex and unsteady flows in the valve hinges. These studies have focused on quantitative and qualitative parameters such as velocity magnitude, turbulent shear stresses, vortex formation, and platelet activation to identify potential for blood damage. However, experimental characterization of the whole flow fields within the valve hinges has not yet been conducted. This information can be utilized to investigate instantaneous damage to blood elements and also to validate numerical studies focusing on the hinge's complex fluid dynamics. The objective of this study was therefore to develop a high-resolution imaging system to characterize the flow fields and global velocity maps in a BMHV hinge. In this study, the steady leakage hinge flow fields representing the diastolic phase during the cardiac cycle in a 23 mm St. Jude Medical regent BMHV in the aortic position were characterized using a two-dimensional micro particle image velocimetry system. Diastolic flow was simulated by imposing a static pressure head on the aortic side. Under these conditions, a reverse flow jet from the aortic to the ventricular side was observed with velocities in the range of 1.47-3.24 m/s, whereas low flow regions were observed on the ventricular side of the hinge with viscous shear stress magnitude up to 60 N/m². High velocities and viscous shearing may be associated with platelet activation and hemolysis, while low flow zones can cause thrombosis due to increased residence time in the hinge. Overall, this study provides a high spatial resolution experimental technique to map the fluid velocity in the BMHV hinge, which can be extended to investigate micron-scale flow domains in various prosthetic devices under different hemodynamic conditions.

  12. In-vitro calcification study of polyurethane heart valves.

    PubMed

    Boloori Zadeh, Parnian; Corbett, Scott C; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid

    2014-02-01

    Tri-leaflet polyurethane heart valves have been considered as a potential candidate in heart valve replacement surgeries. In this study, polyurethane (Angioflex(®)) heart valve prostheses were fabricated using a solvent-casting method to evaluate their calcification resistance. These valves were subjected to accelerated life testing (continuous opening and closing of the leaflets) in a synthetic calcification solution. Results showed that Angioflex(®) could be considered as a potential material for fabricating prosthetic heart valves with possibly a higher calcification resistance compared to tissue valves. In addition, calcification resistance of bisphosphonate-modified Angioflex(®) valves was also evaluated. Bisphosphonates are considered to enhance the calcification resistance of polymers once covalently bonded to the bulk of the material. However, our in-vitro results showed that bisphosphonate-modified Angioflex(®) valves did not improve the calcification resistance of Angioflex(®) compared to its untreated counterparts. The results also showed that cyclic loading of the valves' leaflets resulted in formation of numerous cracks on the calcified surface, which were not present when calcification study did not involve mechanical loading. Further study of these cracks did not result in enough evidence to conclude whether these cracks have penetrated to the polymeric surface.

  13. Risk of breast cancer among patients with bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement: a population-based study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianguang; Zöller, Bengt; Giaccia, Amato; Haile, Robert; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-11-01

    The association between breast cancer and warfarin is inconclusive as most previous studies examined their association using patients with thromboembolism, whereas thromboembolism itself is a risk factor for cancer. We explored this issue using patients received mechanical heart valves replacement as a proxy for warfarin exposure as these patients need a lifelong warfarin treatment, and compared them with patients received bioprosthesis valves replacement (short-term warfarin treatment) in Sweden between 1987 and 2010. Patients who were operated on for valve replacement were identified from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry and linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry to examine the hazard ratios of subsequent breast cancer. A total of 12,242 women were operated on for valve replacement (5481 with mechanical valve and 6401 with bioprosthetic valve). For the entire cohort, the HR of breast cancer was 1.49 (95 % CI 1.09-2.02) among patients with mechanical valve replacement compared to those with bioprosthetic valve replacement. After controlling for a number of confounding factors using propensity score weighting, the HR was 1.69 (95 % CI 1.15-2.47). Our study found that patients with mechanical valve replacement have an increased risk of breast cancer compared to those with bioprosthetic valve replacement. If confirmed, this increased risk should be considered when recommending breast cancer screening for women with mechanical valve replacement. Long-term use of warfarin may explain the observed increase. If so, patients who have used warfarin long-term for other reasons should be studied for a possible increased risk of breast cancer.

  14. Mechanical behavior of single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments for dental implant prosthetic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Llena-Blasco, Oriol; Bruguera, August; Llena-Blasco, Jaime; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; García-Calderón, Manuel; Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanical response of bare (as-received) and single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments with both internal and external connections that have been developed to enhanced aesthetic restorations. Material and Methods: Sixteen zirconia implant abutments (ZiReal Post®, Biomet 3i, USA) with internal and external connections have been analyzed. Half of the specimens were coated with a 0.5mm-thick layer of a low-fusing fluroapatite ceramic. Mechanical tests were carried out under static (constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min until fracture) and dynamic (between 100 and 400N at a frequency of 1Hz) loading conditions. The failure location was identified by electron microscopy. The removal torque of the retaining screws after testing was also evaluated. Results: The average fracture strength was above 300N for all the abutments, regardless of connection geometry and coating. In most of the cases (94%), failure occurred by abutment fracture. No significant differences were observed either in fatigue behavior and removal torque between the different abutment groups. Conclusions: Mechanical behavior of Zireal zirconia abutments is independent of the type of internal/external connection and the presence/absence of ceramic coating. This may be clinically valuable in dental rehabilitation to improve the aesthetic outcome of zirconia-based dental implant systems. Key words:Dental implant, zirconia, ceramic structure, mechanical properties. PMID:25674313

  15. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis of maxillofacial prosthetic elastomers: the effect of different disinfecting aging procedures.

    PubMed

    Eleni, Panagiota N; Krokida, Magdalini K; Polyzois, Gregory L; Gettleman, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    In this study, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was used to evaluate the changes that occurred in maxillofacial elastomers subjected to different disinfecting regimens. A commercial polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) and an experimental chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) were treated with different disinfection procedures for a period that simulates 1 year of clinical service: microwave exposure (D1), hypochlorite solution (D2), neutral soap (D3), and a commercial disinfecting solution (D4). A fifth group was kept in dark storage as control. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis tests operated in a fixed frequency (1 Hz) over a range of temperatures (-130°C to 20°C for PDMS, -60°C to 120°C for CPE). Loss modulus (G″), storage modulus (G'), and loss factor (tanδ) were recorded as a function of temperature. The obtained glass transition temperature (Tg) values were subjected to statistical analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis revealed changes in Tg values for both materials, which reflect the possible changes in their chemical and physical structure, after different disinfection procedures. The PDMS and CPE samples seem to have less dense structure maybe because of chain scission reaction that probably occurred during the disinfection procedures. According to statistical analysis, Tg values presented significant changes from the control samples among the different materials and disinfecting procedures. Microwave exposure and hypochlorite solution affect CPE significantly, whereas PDMS exhibited significant changes after being treated with a commercial antimicrobial agent, concerning changes that occurred in Tg. In all cases, Tg values were decreased compared with the untreated samples, which were stiffer, presenting higher Tg and G' values. PMID:24799103

  16. Mechanism of Microbubble Growth at Mitral Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambod, Edmond; Beizaie, Masoud; Shusser, Michael; Gharib, Morteza

    1999-11-01

    The growth mechanism of microbubbles at mitral MHV closure has been experimentally studied. In the heart, some of the tiny bubbles grow explosively and form larger and persistent bubbles. An experimental set-up was designed to allow the passage of micron-size bubbles through an 80 micron-wide slot, simulating a typical gap between the housing ring and the occluders in MHV. The bubbles were generated using an air-liquid dispenser and were delivered to the system via a 250 micron-diameter hypedermic needle positioned vertically near the slot. A solenoid valve was used to deliver a 10cc volume of liquid in 25ms time through the slot. High-speed imaging was used to study the impact of flow through the slot on bubble growth. The velocity of liquid through the slot was assessed to be in the range of 12-15 m/s. Our observations confirmed the rapid and drastic growth of microbubbles following their passage through the narrow slot, due to pressure drop. Vortices, which were induced by flow separation on the downstream of the slot, caused the grown bubbles to shatter and form more stable bubbles.

  17. Development of prosthetic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  18. Current status of valve replacement in children.

    PubMed

    Schaff, H V; Danielson, G K

    1986-01-01

    Management of valve diseases in children demands an eclectic approach by the surgeon. Whenever possible, valve function should be restored by repair rather than prosthetic replacement. Recent evidence firmly demonstrates that there are accelerated calcification and degeneration of porcine heterografts in children, especially in the aortic and mitral positions. For this reason, we reserve the use of heterograft prostheses for the right atrioventricular position and for conduits from the right ventricle to the pulmonary artery. Such patients are observed carefully for signs of valve degeneration. Long-term followup of the Starr-Edwards prosthesis in children demonstrates excellent durability and a thromboembolic rate that is equal to or lower than that found in adult patients. Hemodynamic properties of the Starr-Edwards valve are adequate even in the smallest size used in infants and have allowed children to reach early adolescence at which time valve re-replacement with an adult-sized prosthesis is possible. Intermediate-term experience with the Bjork-Shiley valve in children has also been favorable. At present we continue to use systemic anticoagulation with warfarin in all children with mechanical prostheses. PMID:3742534

  19. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  20. Manipulation of the closing transients of bileaflet mechanical heart valves using passive, surface-mounted elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Helene

    2005-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using PIV measurements that are phase locked to the leaflet motion. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. The valve is subjected to physiological flow conditions: a heart rate of 70 bpm; a cardiac output of 5 l/min; and a mean aortic pressure of 90 mmHg. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs.

  1. Mathematical modeling and mechanical and histopathological testing of porous prosthetic pylon for direct skeletal attachment

    PubMed Central

    Pitkin, Mark; Raykhtsaum, Grigory; Pilling, John; Shukeylo, Yuri; Moxson, Vladimir; Duz, Volodimir; Lewandowski, John; Connolly, Raymond; Kistenberg, Robert S.; Dalton, John F.; Prilutsky, Boris; Jacobson, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    This article presents recent results in the development of the skin and bone integrated pylon (SBIP) intended for direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses. In our previous studies of the porous SBIP-1 and SBIP-2 prototypes, the bond site between the porous pylons and residuum bone and skin did not show the inflammation characteristically observed when solid pylons are used. At the same time, porosity diminished the strength of the pylon. To find a reasonable balance between the biological conductivity and the strength of the porous pylon, we developed a mathematical model of the composite permeable structure. A novel manufacturing process was implemented, and the new SBIP-3 prototype was tested mechanically. The minimal strength requirements established earlier for the SBIP were exceeded threefold. The first histopathological analysis of skin, bone, and the implanted SBIP-2 pylons was conducted on two rats and one cat. The histopathological analysis provided new evidence of inflammation-free, deep ingrowth of skin and bone cells throughout the SBIP structure. PMID:19675985

  2. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  3. Engineering tissue constructs to mimic native aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets' structures and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Nafiseh

    There are several disadvantages correlated with current heart valve replacement, including anticoagulation therapy for patients with mechanical valves and the low durability of bioprosthetic valves. The non-viable nature of such devices is a critical drawback especially for pediatric cases due to the inability of the graft to grow in vivo with the patients. A tissue engineered heart valve (TEHV) with remodeling and growth ability, is conceptually appealing to use in the surgical repair and could serve as a permanent replacements when operating for pediatric valvular lesions. It is critical that scaffolds for functional heart valve tissue engineering, be capable of mimicking the native leaflet's structure and mechanical properties at the time of implantation. Meanwhile, the scaffolds should be able to support cellular proliferation and native-like tissue formation as the TEHV remodels toward a scaffold-free state. Our overall hypothesis is that an "ideal" engineered construct, designed based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics, will complement a native heart valve leaflet in providing benchmarks for use in the design of clinically-applicable TEHV. This hypothesis was addressed through several experiments conducted in the present study. To establish a functional biomimetic TEHV, we developed scaffolds capable of matching the anisotropic stiffness of native leaflet while promoting native-like cell and collagen content and supporting the ECM generation. Scaffolds with various polymer contents (e.g., poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly (epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL)) and structural designs (e.g., microfabricated and microfibrous scaffolds), were fabricated based on native leaflet's structure and mechanics. It was found that the tri-layered scaffold, designed with assembly of microfabricated PGS and microfibrous PGS/PCL was a functional leaflet capable of promoting tissue formation. Furthermore, to investigate the effect of cyclic stress and flexure

  4. Cyclic fatigue and fracture in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite mechanical heart-valve prostheses: role of small cracks in life prediction.

    PubMed

    Dauskardt, R H; Ritchie, R O; Takemoto, J K; Brendzel, A M

    1994-07-01

    A fracture-mechanics based study has performed to characterize the fracture toughness and rates of cyclic fatigue-crack growth of incipient flaws in prosthetic heart-valve components made of pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite. Such data are required to predict the safe structural lifetime of mechanical heart-valve prostheses using damage-tolerant analysis. Unlike previous studies where fatigue-crack propagation data were obtained using through-thickness, long cracks (approximately 2-20 mm long), growing in conventional (e.g., compact-tension) samples, experiments were performed on physically small cracks (approximately 100-600 microns long), initiated on the surface of the pyrolytic-carbon coating to simulate reality. Small-crack toughness results were found to agree closely with those measured conventionally with long cracks. However, similar to well-known observations in metal fatigue, it was found that based on the usual computations of the applied (far-field) driving force in terms of the maximum stress intensity, Kmax, small fatigue cracks grew at rates that exceeded those of long cracks at the same applied stress intensity, and displayed a negative dependency on Kmax; moreover, they grew at applied stress intensities less than the fatigue threshold value, below which long cracks are presumed dormant. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, it is shown that long and small crack results can be normalized, provided growth rates are characterized in terms of the total (near-tip) stress intensity (incorporating, for example, the effect of residual stress); with this achieved, in principle, either form of data can be used for life prediction of implant devices. Inspection of the long and small crack results reveals extensive scatter inherent in both forms of growth-rate data for the pyrolytic-carbon material.

  5. Heart Valve Prostheses in Pregnancy: Outcomes for Women and Their Infants

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Claire M.; Algert, Charles S.; Ford, Jane B.; Nippita, Tanya A.; Figtree, Gemma A.; Roberts, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background As the prognosis of women with prosthetic heart valves improves, and increasing number are contemplating and undertaking pregnancy. Accurate knowledge of perinatal outcomes is essential, assisting counseling and guiding care. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes in a contemporary population of women with heart valve prostheses undertaking pregnancy and to compare outcomes for women with mechanical and bioprosthetic prostheses. Methods and Results Longitudinally linked population health data sets containing birth and hospital admissions data were obtained for all women giving birth in New South Wales, Australia, 2000–2011. This included information identifying presence of maternal prosthetic heart valve. Cardiovascular and birth outcomes were evaluated. Among 1 144 156 pregnancies, 136 involved women with a heart valve prosthesis (1 per 10 000). No maternal mortality was seen among these women, although the relative risk for an adverse event was higher than the general population, including severe maternal morbidity (139 versus 14 per 1000 births, rate ratio [RR]=9.96, 95% CI 6.32 to 15.7), major maternal cardiovascular event (44 versus 1 per 1000, RR 34.6, 95% CI 14.6 to 81.6), preterm birth (183 versus 66 per 1000, RR=2.77, 95% CI 1.88 to 4.07), and small‐for‐gestational‐age infants (193 versus 95 per 1000, RR=2.03, 95% CI 1.40 to 2.96). There was a trend toward increased maternal and perinatal morbidity in women with a mechanical valve compared with those with a bioprosthetic valve. Conclusions Pregnancies in women with a prosthetic heart valve demonstrate an increased risk of an adverse outcome, for both mothers and infants, compared with pregnancies in the absence of heart valve prostheses. In this contemporary population, the risk was lower than previously reported. PMID:24970269

  6. Ascending aortic aneurysm in a patient with an aortic Starr-Edwards ball valve prosthesis implanted 39 years previously.

    PubMed

    Nishigawa, Kosaku; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Tsushima, Yoshimasa; Kuinose, Masahiko; Chikazawa, Genta

    2010-03-01

    A 53-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a Starr-Edwards ball valve prosthesis 39 years previously was admitted to our hospital under the diagnosis of ascending aortic aneurysm. Operative findings revealed that the ball valve was functioning normally. The markedly dilated ascending aorta was replaced with a 30-mm prosthetic vascular graft, and the ball valve was replaced with a19-mm bileaflet valve prosthesis. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged from our hospital 19 days after surgery. Dilatation of the ascending aorta in this case might have been caused by the poststenotic dilatation mechanism, which seems to be one of the long-term complications of Starr-Edwards ball valve implantation.

  7. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  8. Nanopatterned acellular valve conduits drive the commitment of blood-derived multipotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Liddo, Rosa; Aguiari, Paola; Barbon, Silvia; Bertalot, Thomas; Mandoli, Amit; Tasso, Alessia; Schrenk, Sandra; Iop, Laura; Gandaglia, Alessandro; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years toward elucidating the correlation among nanoscale topography, mechanical properties, and biological behavior of cardiac valve substitutes. Porcine TriCol scaffolds are promising valve tissue engineering matrices with demonstrated self-repopulation potentiality. In order to define an in vitro model for investigating the influence of extracellular matrix signaling on the growth pattern of colonizing blood-derived cells, we cultured circulating multipotent cells (CMC) on acellular aortic (AVL) and pulmonary (PVL) valve conduits prepared with TriCol method and under no-flow condition. Isolated by our group from Vietnamese pigs before heart valve prosthetic implantation, porcine CMC revealed high proliferative abilities, three-lineage differentiative potential, and distinct hematopoietic/endothelial and mesenchymal properties. Their interaction with valve extracellular matrix nanostructures boosted differential messenger RNA expression pattern and morphologic features on AVL compared to PVL, while promoting on both matrices the commitment to valvular and endothelial cell-like phenotypes. Based on their origin from peripheral blood, porcine CMC are hypothesized in vivo to exert a pivotal role to homeostatically replenish valve cells and contribute to hetero- or allograft colonization. Furthermore, due to their high responsivity to extracellular matrix nanostructure signaling, porcine CMC could be useful for a preliminary evaluation of heart valve prosthetic functionality. PMID:27789941

  9. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  10. An inverse modeling approach for semilunar heart valve leaflet mechanics: exploitation of tissue structure.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankush; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Determining the biomechanical behavior of heart valve leaflet tissues in a noninvasive manner remains an important clinical goal. While advances in 3D imaging modalities have made in vivo valve geometric data available, optimal methods to exploit such information in order to obtain functional information remain to be established. Herein we present and evaluate a novel leaflet shape-based framework to estimate the biomechanical behavior of heart valves from surface deformations by exploiting tissue structure. We determined accuracy levels using an "ideal" in vitro dataset, in which the leaflet geometry, strains, mechanical behavior, and fibrous structure were known to a high level of precision. By utilizing a simplified structural model for the leaflet mechanical behavior, we were able to limit the number of parameters to be determined per leaflet to only two. This approach allowed us to dramatically reduce the computational time and easily visualize the cost function to guide the minimization process. We determined that the image resolution and the number of available imaging frames were important components in the accuracy of our framework. Furthermore, our results suggest that it is possible to detect differences in fiber structure using our framework, thus allowing an opportunity to diagnose asymptomatic valve diseases and begin treatment at their early stages. Lastly, we observed good agreement of the final resulting stress-strain response when an averaged fiber architecture was used. This suggests that population-averaged fiber structural data may be sufficient for the application of the present framework to in vivo studies, although clearly much work remains to extend the present approach to in vivo problems. PMID:26449480

  11. Vorticity dynamics of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in an axisymmetric aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi, L. P.; Ge, L.; Simon, H. A.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Yoganathan, A. P.

    2007-06-01

    We present comprehensive particle image velocimetry measurements and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of physiological, pulsatile flow through a clinical quality bileaflet mechanical heart valve mounted in an idealized axisymmetric aorta geometry with a sudden expansion modeling the aortic sinus region. Instantaneous and ensemble-averaged velocity measurements as well as the associated statistics of leaflet kinematics are reported and analyzed in tandem to elucidate the structure of the velocity and vorticity fields of the ensuing flow-structure interaction. The measurements reveal that during the first half of the acceleration phase, the flow is laminar and repeatable from cycle to cycle. The valve housing shear layer rolls up into the sinus and begins to extract vorticity of opposite sign from the sinus wall. A start-up vortical structure is shed from the leaflets and is advected downstream as the leaflet shear layers become wavy and oscillatory. In the second half of flow acceleration the leaflet shear layers become unstable and break down into two von Karman-like vortex streets. The onset of vortex shedding from the valve leaflets is responsible for the growth of significant cycle-to-cycle vorticity oscillations. At peak flow, the housing and leaflet shear layers undergo secondary instabilities and break down rapidly into a chaotic, turbulent-like state with multiple small-scale vortical structures emerging in the flow. During the deceleration and closing phases all large-scale coherent flow features disappear and a chaotic small-scale vorticity field emerges, which persists even after the valve has closed. Probability density functions of the leaflet position during opening and closing phases show that the leaflet position fluctuates from cycle to cycle with larger fluctuations evident during valve closure. The DNS is carried out by prescribing the leaflet kinematics from the experimental data. The computed instantaneous vorticity fields are in very good

  12. Experimental investigations on the fluid-mechanics of an electrospun heart valve by means of particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Gasbarroni, Pier Luca; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-12-01

    End-stage failing heart valves are currently replaced by mechanical or biological prostheses. Both types positively contribute to restore the physiological function of native valves, but a number of drawbacks limits the expected performances. In order to improve the outcome, tissue engineering can offer an alternative approach to design and fabricate innovative heart valves capable to support the requested function and to promote the formation of a novel, viable and correctly operating physiological structure. This potential result is particularly critical if referred to the aortic valve, being the one mainly exposed to structural and functional degeneration. In this regard, the here proposed study presents the fabrication and in vitro characterization of a bioresorbable electrospun heart valve prosthesis using the particle image velocimetry technique either in physiological and pathological fluid dynamic conditions. The scaffold was designed to reproduce the aortic valve geometry, also mimicking the fibrous structure of the natural extracellular matrix. To evaluate its performances for possible implantation, the flow fields downstream the valve were accurately investigated and compared. The experimental results showed a correct functionality of the device, supported by the formation of vortex structures at the edge of the three cusps, with Reynolds stress values below the threshold for the risk of hemolysis (which can be comprised in the range 400-4000N/m(2) depending on the exposure period), and a good structural resistance to the mechanical loads generated by the driving pressure difference. PMID:27521817

  13. Experimental investigations on the fluid-mechanics of an electrospun heart valve by means of particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Gasbarroni, Pier Luca; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-12-01

    End-stage failing heart valves are currently replaced by mechanical or biological prostheses. Both types positively contribute to restore the physiological function of native valves, but a number of drawbacks limits the expected performances. In order to improve the outcome, tissue engineering can offer an alternative approach to design and fabricate innovative heart valves capable to support the requested function and to promote the formation of a novel, viable and correctly operating physiological structure. This potential result is particularly critical if referred to the aortic valve, being the one mainly exposed to structural and functional degeneration. In this regard, the here proposed study presents the fabrication and in vitro characterization of a bioresorbable electrospun heart valve prosthesis using the particle image velocimetry technique either in physiological and pathological fluid dynamic conditions. The scaffold was designed to reproduce the aortic valve geometry, also mimicking the fibrous structure of the natural extracellular matrix. To evaluate its performances for possible implantation, the flow fields downstream the valve were accurately investigated and compared. The experimental results showed a correct functionality of the device, supported by the formation of vortex structures at the edge of the three cusps, with Reynolds stress values below the threshold for the risk of hemolysis (which can be comprised in the range 400-4000N/m(2) depending on the exposure period), and a good structural resistance to the mechanical loads generated by the driving pressure difference.

  14. Time-dependent biaxial mechanical behavior of the aortic heart valve leaflet.

    PubMed

    Stella, John A; Liao, Jun; Sacks, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    . The relation between collagen fibril kinematics and mechanical properties in the mitral valve anterior leaflet. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering 129 (1), 78-87], we speculate that the mechanisms underlying this quasi-elastic behavior may be attributed to inter-fibrillar structures unique to valvular tissues. These mechanisms are an important functional aspect of native valvular tissues, and are likely critical to improve our understanding of valvular disease and help guide the development of valvular tissue engineering and surgical repair.

  15. Effect of vortex generators on the closing transient flow of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Dasi, Lakshmi; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2006-11-01

    The time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves is accompanied by a strong flow transient that is associated with the formation of a counter-rotating vortex pair near the b-datum line of leaflet edges. The strong transitory shear that is generated by these vortices may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation. In the present work, these flow transients are mitigated using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Two vortex generator designs were investigated: one design comprised staggered rectangular fins and the other one staggered hemispheres. The closing transients in the absence and presence of the passive vortex generators are characterized using phase locked PIV measurements. The study utilizes a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve placed in the aortic position of the Georgia Tech left heart simulator. Measurements of the velocity field in the center plane of the leaflets demonstrate that the dynamics of the transient vortices that precede the formation of the leakage jets can be significantly altered and controlled by relatively simple passive modifications of existing valve designs. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  16. Hemodynamic and thrombogenic analysis of a trileaflet polymeric valve using a fluid-structure interaction approach.

    PubMed

    Piatti, Filippo; Sturla, Francesco; Marom, Gil; Sheriff, Jawaad; Claiborne, Thomas E; Slepian, Marvin J; Redaelli, Alberto; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-10-15

    Surgical valve replacement in patients with severe calcific aortic valve disease using either bioprosthetic or mechanical heart valves is still limited by structural valve deterioration for the former and thrombosis risk mandating anticoagulant therapy for the latter. Prosthetic polymeric heart valves have the potential to overcome the inherent material and design limitations of these valves, but their development is still ongoing. The aim of this study was to characterize the hemodynamics and thrombogenic potential of the Polynova polymeric trileaflet valve prototype using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach. The FSI model replicated experimental conditions of the valve as tested in a left heart simulator. Hemodynamic parameters (transvalvular pressure gradient, flow rate, maximum velocity, and effective orifice area) were compared to assess the validity of the FSI model. The thrombogenic footprint of the polymeric valve was evaluated using a Lagrangian approach to calculate the stress accumulation (SA) values along multiple platelet trajectories and their statistical distribution. In the commissural regions, platelets were exposed to the highest SA values because of highest stress levels combined with local reverse flow patterns and vortices. Stress-loading waveforms from representative trajectories in regions of interest were emulated in our hemodynamic shearing device (HSD). Platelet activity was measured using our platelet activation state (PAS) assay and the results confirmed the higher thrombogenic potential of the commissural hotspots. In conclusion, the proposed method provides an in depth analysis of the hemodynamic and thrombogenic performance of the polymer valve prototype and identifies locations for further design optimization.

  17. Mitral valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... place. There are two types of mitral valves: Mechanical, made of man-made (synthetic) materials, such as ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. They last from 12 to 20 years. However, blood clots ...

  18. Aortic valve surgery - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  19. Experience with enoxaparin in patients with mechanical heart valves who must withhold acenocumarol

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, I; Dos, L; Tornos, P; Nicolau, I; Permanyer-Miralda, G; Soler-Soler, J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of thromboembolic and haemorrhagic events in a cohort of patients with mechanical heart valves who had to withhold acenocumarol and were treated with enoxaparin. Design: Observational prospective study. Setting: In hospital; after discharge, and follow up by telephone call. Patients and methods: All consecutive patients with mechanical heart valves admitted to the authors’ hospital between May 1999 and January 2002 who had to interrupt treatment with acenocumarol and were treated with enoxaparin as an alternative to other methods were enrolled. In each patient, the following characteristics were prospectively determined: the reason for interrupting acenocumarol, demographic data, estimated global risk for thromboembolic events, international normalised ratio before starting enoxaparin treatment, number of days taking enoxaparin, and mean level of anti-Xa activity during treatment. All patients were followed up through clinical history during the hospitalisation and by telephone after discharge to detect thromboembolic events. Main outcome measure: Presence of thromboembolic or haemorrhagic events. Results: 82 patients were identified and followed up for a mean of 2.8 months (range 1.5–3.5 months) after discharge. 61 of them (74%) had one or more associated thromboembolic risk factors. Acenocumarol was interrupted (to perform an invasive procedure in 74 patients and because of haemorrhagic complication in 8) an average of 11.2 days (range 3–40 days). Most patients received the standard enoxaparin dose (1 mg/kg at 12 hour intervals). Mean (SD) anti-Xa activity was 0.58 (0.3) IU/ml (median 0.51). There were 8 minor and 1 major bleeding events during enoxaparin treatment. No thromboembolic complications were clinically detected during hospitalisation or during follow up (95% confidence interval 0% to 3.6%). Conclusions: Enoxaparin may be an effective and relatively safe substitute anticoagulant for patients with mechanical

  20. The effect of implantation orientation of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve on kinematics and hemodynamics in an anatomic aorta.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-11-01

    We carry out three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions implanted at different orientations in an anatomic aorta obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a volunteer. We use the extensively validated for heart valve flow curvilinear-immersed boundary (CURVIB) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver in which the empty aorta is discretized with a curvilinear, aorta-conforming grid while the valve is handled as an immersed boundary. The motion of the valve leaflets are calculated through a strongly coupled FSI algorithm implemented in conjunction with the Aitken convergence acceleration technique. We perform simulations for three valve orientations, which differ from each other by 45 deg and compare the results in terms of leaflet motion and flow field. We show that the valve implanted symmetrically relative to the symmetry plane of the ascending aorta curvature exhibits the smallest overall asymmetry in the motion of its two leaflets and lowest rebound during closure. Consequently, we hypothesize that this orientation is beneficial to reduce the chance of intermittent regurgitation. Furthermore, we find that the valve orientation does not significantly affect the shear stress distribution in the aortic lumen, which is in agreement with previous studies. PMID:21034146

  1. Tri-layered elastomeric scaffolds for engineering heart valve leaflets

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Assmann, Alexander; Larson, Benjamin L.; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Alemdar, Neslihan; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Manning, Keefe B.; Mayer, John E.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) that can grow and remodel have the potential to serve as permanent replacements of the current non-viable prosthetic valves particularly for pediatric patients. A major challenge in designing functional TEHVs is to mimic both structural and anisotropic mechanical characteristics of the native valve leaflets. To establish a more biomimetic model of TEHV, we fabricated tri-layered scaffolds by combining electrospinning and microfabrication techniques. These constructs were fabricated by assembling microfabricated poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and fibrous PGS/poly(-caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun sheets to develop elastic scaffolds with tunable anisotropic mechanical properties similar to the mechanical characteristics of the native heart valves. The engineered scaffolds supported valvular interstitial cells (VICs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) growth within the 3D structure and promoted the deposition of heart valve extracellular matrix (ECM). MSCs were also organized and aligned along the anisotropic axes of the engineered tri-layered scaffolds. In addition, the fabricated constructs opened and closed properly in an ex vivo model of porcine heart valve leaflet tissue replacement. The engineered tri-layered scaffolds have the potential for successful translation towards TEHV replacements. PMID:24947233

  2. Cardiac Mechanics in Isolated Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease With Normal Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xijun; Zhu, Meihua; He, Tao; Yuan, Jianjun; Zhu, Haohui; Morrisroe, Dennis E.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aortic stenosis (AS) and aortic regurgitation (AR) are associated with congenital isolated bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease. The chronic pressure overload of AS and the volume overload of AR are known to impair the left ventricular function. This study assessed whether two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE) is capable of detecting the myocardial dysfunction associated with BAV caused by various aortic valve lesions in patients retaining normal ejection fraction (EF). Thirty-two isolated BAV patients and 20 healthy tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) volunteers were recruited. BAV patients were divided into 4 subgroups based on aortic valvular lesion types: normal function (NF) group, isolated AS group, isolated AR group, and a group who had both AS&AR. Myocardial strain and degree of twist were analyzed and compared between the BAV and TAV groups, as well as between valvular lesion groups and the NF group. Compared with healthy TAV controls, global radial strain (GRS), global circumferential strain (GCS), global longitudinal strain (GLS), and twist angle absolute values were lower in the BAV group (P < 0.05). The AS, AR, and AS&AR groups all demonstrated a significant decrease in GRS and GCS when compared with the TAV group. The AS and AS&AR groups demonstrated lower GLS than the TAV group, and the smallest degree of twist was detected in the AR group. There were no significant differences between the NF and TAV groups. The AR and AS&AR groups demonstrated significant differences in multiple parameters of cardiac mechanics compared with the NF group. 2D-STE is able to detect altered cardiac mechanics associated with aortic lesion types in BAV patients with normal EF compared with normal TAV controls, and so can provide valuable information for clinical decision-making. PMID:26632719

  3. A throat-bypass stability system for a YF-12 aircraft research inlet using self-acting mechanical valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, G. L.; Dustin, M. O.; Neiner, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel investigation are presented. The inlet was modified so that airflow can be removed through a porous cowl-bleed region in the vicinity of the throat. Bleed plenum exit flow area is controlled by relief type mechanical valves. Unlike valves in previous systems, these are made for use in a high Mach flight environment and include refinements so that the system could be tested on a NASA YF-12 aircraft. The valves were designed to provide their own reference pressure. The results show that the system can absorb internal-airflow-transients that are too fast for a conventional bypass door control system and that the two systems complement each other quite well. Increased tolerance to angle of attack and Mach number changes is indicated. The valves should provide sufficient time for the inlet control system to make geometry changes required to keep the inlet started.

  4. Use of an Edwards Sapien S3 valve to replace a dysfunctional mechanical mitral valve in an 11-year old boy: another small step for surgical and interventional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael; Austin, Conal; Bapat, Vinayak; Morgan, Gareth J

    2016-09-01

    An 11-year old boy, with complex left ventricular morphology in the setting of repaired double outlet right ventricle developed progressive mitral regurgitation leading to a repair which failed, necessitating replacement of the valve with a 21 mm St. Jude mechanical prosthesis. He represented 3 weeks later in extremis with signs of severe mitral stenosis. The valve was replaced via a hybrid technique with a 26 mm Edwards Sapien 3 valve mounted on a MEMO 3D annuloplasty ring. One year later, the valve is functioning well with no regurgitation or evidence of an inflow gradient.

  5. Use of an Edwards Sapien S3 valve to replace a dysfunctional mechanical mitral valve in an 11-year old boy: another small step for surgical and interventional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael; Austin, Conal; Bapat, Vinayak; Morgan, Gareth J

    2016-09-01

    An 11-year old boy, with complex left ventricular morphology in the setting of repaired double outlet right ventricle developed progressive mitral regurgitation leading to a repair which failed, necessitating replacement of the valve with a 21 mm St. Jude mechanical prosthesis. He represented 3 weeks later in extremis with signs of severe mitral stenosis. The valve was replaced via a hybrid technique with a 26 mm Edwards Sapien 3 valve mounted on a MEMO 3D annuloplasty ring. One year later, the valve is functioning well with no regurgitation or evidence of an inflow gradient. PMID:26994169

  6. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin.

    PubMed

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals. PMID:27376685

  7. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  8. Three-component laser Doppler velocimetry measurements in the vicinity of mechanical heart valves in a mock-circulatory loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Richard Scott

    Streakline flow visualization and three-component laser Doppler velocimetry were conducted in a mock-circulatory loop on four mechanical heart valve types in the mitral position. Measurements were conducted in the regurgitant flow region proximal to the valve. Results for the Bjork-Shiley Monostrutsp{TM} valve showed a highly non-uniform flow at valve closure, with very large velocities in the minor orifice region. These velocities were on the order of 15-20 mps and lasted less than one millisecond. Following closure, an interval of sustained regurgitant flow persisted for the duration of systole. Reynolds stresses were calculated from three-dimensional data, and yielded a maximum of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. Values as high as 80,000 dyne/cmsp2 were calculated during the initial spike, but due to the intermittency of the spike, they are artificially high. Similar measurements were conducted in the minor orifice of the Medtronic-Hall valve, and maximum velocities of about 4 mps were measured during the sustained regurgitant flow. Maximum Reynolds shear stresses were about 7,000 dyne/cmsp2. The velocity spike at closing was noted with this valve also. Two-component measurements around the center hole in the occluder showed a sustained jet with maximum velocities of about 1 mps, and maximum Reynolds shear stresses of about 2,000 dyne/cmsp2. Measurements in the St. Jude Medical valve showed velocities and stresses to be very low. No closing spike was measured, and sustained velocities were observed in the hinge region of about 0.2 mps with maximum stresses of about 1,000 dyne/cmsp2. The CarboMedicssp{TM} valve showed a regurgitant jets emanating from the gap between the leaflet and valve housing ring, with velocities of 3.3 mps for the duration of systole, and calculated stresses of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. No closing spike was noted. Differences between two and three-dimensional Reynolds shear stresses were significant only at locations where two-dimensional calculated values were

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Performance of Three Hinge Designs of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Hélène A.; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications (TECs) of bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are believed to be due to the nonphysiologic mechanical stresses imposed on blood elements by the hinge flows. Relating hinge flow features to design features is, therefore, essential to ultimately design BMHVs with lower TEC rates. This study aims at simulating the pulsatile three-dimensional hinge flows of three BMHVs and estimating the TEC potential associated with each hinge design. Hinge geometries are constructed from micro-computed tomography scans of BMHVs. Simulations are conducted using a Cartesian sharp-interface immersed-boundary methodology combined with a second-order accurate fractional-step method. Leaflet motion and flow boundary conditions are extracted from fluid–structure-interaction simulations of BMHV bulk flow. The numerical results are analyzed using a particle-tracking approach coupled with existing blood damage models. The gap width and, more importantly, the shape of the recess and leaflet are found to impact the flow distribution and TEC potential. Smooth, streamlined surfaces appear to be more favorable than sharp corners or sudden shape transitions. The developed framework will enable pragmatic and cost-efficient preclinical evaluation of BMHV prototypes prior to valve manufacturing. Application to a wide range of hinges with varying design parameters will eventually help in determining the optimal hinge design. PMID:20571852

  10. Image-based mechanical analysis of stent deformation: concept and exemplary implementation for aortic valve stents.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Hopf, Raoul; Pollok, Thomas; Russ, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Sündermann, Simon Harald; Hirsch, Sven; Mazza, Edoardo; Székely, Gábor; Falk, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    An approach for extracting the radial force load on an implanted stent from medical images is proposed. To exemplify the approach, a system is presented which computes a radial force estimation from computer tomography images acquired from patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The deformed shape of the implanted valve prosthesis' Nitinol frame is extracted from the images. A set of displacement vectors is computed that parameterizes the observed deformation. An iterative relaxation algorithm is employed to adapt the information extracted from the images to a finite-element model of the stent, and the radial components of the interaction forces between the stent and the tissue are extracted. For the evaluation of the method, tests were run using the clinical data from 21 patients. Stent modeling and extraction of the radial forces were successful in 18 cases. Synthetic test cases were generated, in addition, for assessing the sensitivity to the measurement errors. In a sensitivity analysis, the geometric error of the stent reconstruction was below 0.3 mm, which is below the image resolution. The distribution of the radial forces was qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable. An uncertainty remains in the quantitative evaluation of the radial forces due to the uncertainty in defining a radial direction on the deformed stent. With our approach, the mechanical situation of TAVI stents after the implantation can be studied in vivo, which may help to understand the mechanisms that lead to the complications and improve stent design. PMID:24626769

  11. A review of state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating flow through mechanical heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman

    2009-01-01

    In nearly half of the heart valve replacement surgeries performed annually, surgeons prefer to implant bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV) because of their durability and long life span. All current BMHV designs, however, are prone to thromboembolic complications and implant recipients need to be on a life-long anticoagulant medication regiment. Non-physiologic flow patterns and turbulence generated by the valve leaflets are believed to be the major culprit for the increased risk of thromboembolism in BMHV implant recipients. In this paper, we review recent advances in developing predictive fluid–structure interaction (FSI) algorithms that can simulate BMHV flows at physiologic conditions and at resolution sufficiently fine to start probing the links between hemodynamics and blood-cell damage. Numerical simulations have provided the first glimpse into the complex hemodynamic environment experienced by blood cells downstream of the valve leaflets and successfully resolved for the first time the experimentally observed explosive transition to a turbulent-like state at the start of the decelerating flow phase. The simulations have also resolved a number of subtle features of experimentally observed valve kinematics, such as the asymmetric opening and closing of the leaflets and the leaflet rebound during closing. The paper also discusses a future research agenda toward developing a powerful patient-specific computational framework for optimizing valve design and implantation in a virtual surgery environment. PMID:19194734

  12. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3925 Replacement heart valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of...

  13. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3925 Replacement heart valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of...

  14. 21 CFR 870.3925 - Replacement heart valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Replacement heart valve. 870.3925 Section 870.3925...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3925 Replacement heart valve. (a) Identification. A replacement heart valve is a device intended to perform the function of...

  15. Supercharged two-cycle engines employing novel single element reciprocating shuttle inlet valve mechanisms and with a variable compression ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to novel reciprocating shuttle inlet valves, effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines, employing spark or compression ignition. Also permitting the elimination of out-of-phase piston arrangements to control scavenging and supercharging of opposed-piston engines. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve (32) and its operating mechanism (34) is constructed as a single and simple uncomplicated member, in combination with the lost-motion abutments, (46) and (48), formed in a piston skirt, obviating the need for any complex mechanisms or auxiliary drives, unaffected by heat, friction, wear or inertial forces. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve retains the simplicity and advantages of two-cycle engines, while permitting an increase in volumetric efficiency and performance, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of two-cycle engines into many areas that are now dominated by the four-cycle engine.

  16. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  17. The Application of Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valves in the Polish Ventricular Assist Device: Physical and Numerical Study and First Clinical Usage.

    PubMed

    Malota, Zbigniew; Sadowski, Wojciech; Krzyskow, Marek; Stolarzewicz, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    The Polish ventricular assist device (Polvad) has been used successfully in clinical contexts for many years. The device contains two single-disc valves, one at the inlet and one at the outlet connector of the pneumatic pump. Unfortunately, in recent years, a problem has occurred with the availability of single-disc valves. This article presents the possibility of using bileaflet mechanical heart valve prostheses in the Polvad to avoid a discontinuity in clinical use. The study is based on experimental and numerical simulations and comparison of the distribution of flow, pressure, and stress (wall, shear, and turbulent) inside the Polvad chamber and the inlet/outlet connectors fitted with Sorin Monodisc and Sorin Bicarbon Fitline valves. The type and orientation of the inlet valve affects valve performance and flow distribution inside the chamber. Near-wall flow is observed for single-disc valves. In the case of bileaflet valves, the main jet is directed more centrally, with lower shear stress but higher turbulent stress in comparison with single-disc valves. For clinical usage, a 45° orientation of the bileaflet inlet valve was chosen, as this achieves good washing of the inlet area near the membrane paste surface. The Polvad with bileaflet valves has now been used successfully in our clinic for over a year and will continue to be used until new assist devices for heart support are developed.

  18. TIME DEPENDENT BIAXIAL MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF THE AORTIC HEART VALVE LEAFLET

    PubMed Central

    Stella, John A.; Liao, Jun; Sacks, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Despite continued progress in the treatment of aortic valve (AV) disease, current treatments continue to be challenged to consistently restore AV function for extended durations. Improved approaches toward AV repair and replacement rests upon our ability to more fully comprehend and simulate AV function. While the elastic behavior the AV leaflet (AVL) has been previously investigated, time dependent behaviors under physiological biaxial loading states have yet to be quantified. In the current study, we performed strain rate, creep, and stress relaxation experiments using porcine AVL under planar biaxial stretch and loaded to physiological levels (60 N/m equi-biaxial tension), with strain rates ranging from quasi-static to physiologic. The resulting stress-strain responses were found to be independent of strain rate, as was the observed low level of hysteresis (∼17%). Stress relaxation and creep results indicated that while the AVL exhibited significant stress relaxation, it exhibited negligible creep over the three hour test duration. These results are all in accordance with our previous findings for the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) (Grashow et al., 2006, ABME vol. 34, pp. 315-25; Grashow et al., ABME, Vol. 34, pp. 1509-18, 2006), and support our observations that valvular tissues are functionally anisotropic, quasi-elastic biological materials. These results appear to be unique to valvular tissues, and indicate an ability to withstand loading without time-dependent effects under physiologic loading conditions. Based on a recent study that suggested valvular collagen fibrils are not intrinsically viscoelastic (Liao, et al., JBME, vol. 129, 2007), we speculate that the mechanisms underlying this quasi-elastic behavior may be attributed to supra-fibrillar structure unique to valvular tissue. These mechanisms are an important functional aspect of native valvular tissues, and are likely critical to improve our understanding of valvular disease and help guide

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  20. Bench Models for Assessing the Mechanics of Mitral Valve Repair and Percutaneous Surgery.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Andrew W; Siskey, Ryan L

    2015-06-01

    Rapid preclinical evaluations of mitral valve (MV) mechanics are currently best facilitated by bench models of the left ventricle (LV). This review aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of these models to aid interpretation of their resulting data, inform future experimental evaluations, and further the translation of results to procedure and device development. For this review, two types of experimental bench models were evaluated. Rigid LV models were characterized as fluid-mechanical systems capable of testing explanted MVs under static and or pulsatile left heart hemodynamics. Passive LV models were characterized as explanted hearts whose left side is placed in series with a static or pulsatile flow-loop. In both systems, MV function and mechanics can be quantitatively evaluated. Rigid and passive LV models were characterized and evaluated. The materials and methods involved in their construction, function, quantitative capabilities, and disease modeling were described. The advantages and disadvantages of each model are compared to aid the interpretation of their resulting data and inform future experimental evaluations. Repair and percutaneous studies completed in these models were additionally summarized with perspective on future advances discussed. Bench models of the LV provide excellent platforms for quantifying MV repair mechanics and function. While exceptional work has been reported, more research and development is necessary to improve techniques and devices for repair and percutaneous surgery. Continuing efforts in this field will significantly contribute to the further development of procedures and devices, predictions of long-term performance, and patient safety.

  1. Effects of suture position on left ventricular fluid mechanics under mitral valve edge-to-edge repair.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongxing; Jiang, Song; Wang, Ze; Hu, Yingying; He, Zhaoming

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve (MV) edge-to-edge repair (ETER) is a surgical procedure for the correction of mitral valve regurgitation by suturing the free edge of the leaflets. The leaflets are often sutured at three different positions: central, lateral and commissural portions. To study the effects of position of suture on left ventricular (LV) fluid mechanics under mitral valve ETER, a parametric model of MV-LV system during diastole was developed. The distribution and development of vortex and atrio-ventricular pressure under different suture position were investigated. Results show that the MV sutured at central and lateral in ETER creates two vortex rings around two jets, compared with single vortex ring around one jet of the MV sutured at commissure. Smaller total orifices lead to a higher pressure difference across the atrio-ventricular leaflets in diastole. The central suture generates smaller wall shear stresses than the lateral suture, while the commissural suture generated the minimum wall shear stresses in ETER.

  2. Mitral Valve Replacement with Half-and-Half Technique for Recurrent Mitral Paravalvular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Akimasa; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yosuke; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2015-05-01

    Reoperation for paravalvular leakage can cause recurrent paravalvular leakage through severe damage to the mitral annulus. Previously, mitral valve replacement using a half-and-half technique for extensive mitral annular calcification was reported; here, application of the technique to treat recurrent paravalvular leakage is described. A 78-year-old male with three prior mitral valve replacements developed recurrent paravalvular leakage, for which he had undergone his third mitral valve replacement at the age of 69 years. On this occasion, a mechanical valve with circumferential equine pericardial patch reinforcement of the annulus had been used. Five years later, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and congestive heart failure due to recurrent paravalvular leakage. Intraoperatively, broad dehiscence was seen between the prosthetic valve and mitral annulus at two sites, the anterior and posterior commissures, without infection. A fourth mitral valve replacement was performed with a St. Jude Medical valve, using a half-and-half technique. This entailed the use of non-everting mattress sutures on the anterior half of the annulus, and everting mattress sutures on the left atrial wall around the posterior half of the annulus. Extensive annular defects required reinforcement of the posterior mitral annulus with a bovine pericardial patch. Postoperative echocardiography showed no paravalvular leakage. The half-and-half technique may be useful in treating recurrent paravalvular leakage of the mitral valve. PMID:26901904

  3. Patents and heart valve surgery - II: tissue valves.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Faisal H; Kossar, Alexander P; Rehman, Atiq; Younas, Fahad; Polvani, Gianluca

    2013-08-01

    Valvular heart disease affects millions of Americans yearly and currently requires surgical intervention to repair or replace the defective valves. Through a close-knit collaboration between physicians, scientists and biomedical engineers, a vast degree of research and development has been aimed towards the optimization of prosthetic heart valves. Although various methods have made fantastic strides in producing durable prostheses, the therapeutic efficacy of prosthetic valves is inherently limited by a dependency upon lifelong anticoagulant regimens for recipients - a difficult challenge for many in clinical setting. Thus, biological tissue valves have been developed to circumvent vascular and immunemediated complications by incorporating biological materials to mimic native valves while still maintaining a necessary level of structural integrity. Over the past decade, a multitude of patents pertaining to the refinement of designs as well as the advancement in methodologies and technologies associated with biological tissue valves have been issued. This review seeks to chronicle and characterize such patents in an effort to track the past, present, and future progress as well as project the trajectory of tissue valves in the years to come.

  4. Standing valve

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, S.B.

    1990-08-28

    This patent discusses an apparatus for removing fluids from a wellbore. It comprises a valve housing fixedly secured to a wellbore tubing string, the housing having perforations and a valve seating surface; a valve stem alignment guide secured to the valve housing; a valve stem adapted for movement in the valve stem alignment guide; and a valve seating device attached to the valve stem and capable of contacting the valve seating surface, thereby preventing fluid flow through the valve housing and past the valve seating surface when the seating device and valve seating surface are in contact.

  5. Mechanical and biological complication rates of the modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis in the posterior region: an alternative to the conventional Implant prosthetic system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis (LSP) is designed to combine the advantages of screw- and cement-retained implant prostheses. This retrospective study evaluated the mechanical and biological complication rates of implant-supported single crowns (ISSCs) inserted with the modified LSP in the posterior region, and determined how these complication rates are affected by clinical factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mechanical complications (i.e., lateral screw loosening [LSL], abutment screw loosening, lateral screw fracture, and ceramic fracture) and biological complications (i.e., peri-implant mucositis [PM] and peri-implantitis) were identified from the patients' treatment records, clinical photographs, periapical radiographs, panoramic radiographs, and clinical indices. The correlations between complication rates and the following clinical factors were determined: gender, age, position in the jaw, placement location, functional duration, clinical crown-to-implant length ratio, crown height space, and the use of a submerged or nonsubmerged placement procedure. RESULTS Mechanical and biological complications were present in 25 of 73 ISSCs with the modified LSP. LSL (n=11) and PM (n=11) were the most common complications. The incidence of mechanical complications was significantly related to gender (P=.018). The other clinical factors were not significantly associated with mechanical and biological complication rates. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the incidence of mechanical and biological complications in the posterior region was similar for both modified LSP and conventional implant prosthetic systems. In addition, the modified LSP is amenable to maintenance care, which facilitates the prevention and treatment of mechanical and biological complications. PMID:27141260

  6. A Novel Left Heart Simulator for the Multi-modality Characterization of Native Mitral Valve Geometry and Fluid Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical models of the mitral valve have been used to elucidate mitral valve function and mechanics. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional fully coupled fluid structure interaction models. However, to date these models lack direct one-to-one experimental validation. As computational solvers vary considerably, experimental benchmark data are critically important to ensure model accuracy. In this study, a novel left heart simulator was designed specifically for the validation of numerical mitral valve models. Several distinct experimental techniques were collectively performed to resolve mitral valve geometry and hemodynamics. In particular, micro-computed tomography was used to obtain accurate and high-resolution (39 µm voxel) native valvular anatomy, which included the mitral leaflets, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Threedimensional echocardiography was used to obtain systolic leaflet geometry for direct comparison of resultant leaflet kinematics. Stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry provided all three components of fluid velocity through the mitral valve, resolved every 25 ms in the cardiac cycle. A strong central filling jet was observed during peak systole, with minimal out-of-plane velocities (V~0.6m/s). In addition, physiologic hemodynamic boundary conditions were defined and all data were synchronously acquired through a central trigger. Finally, the simulator is a precisely controlled environment, in which flow conditions and geometry can be systematically prescribed and resultant valvular function and hemodynamics assessed. Thus, these data represent the first comprehensive database of high fidelity experimental data, critical for extensive validation of mitral valve fluid structure interaction simulations. PMID:22965640

  7. A novel left heart simulator for the multi-modality characterization of native mitral valve geometry and fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2013-02-01

    Numerical models of the mitral valve have been used to elucidate mitral valve function and mechanics. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional fully coupled fluid structure interaction models. However, to date these models lack direct one-to-one experimental validation. As computational solvers vary considerably, experimental benchmark data are critically important to ensure model accuracy. In this study, a novel left heart simulator was designed specifically for the validation of numerical mitral valve models. Several distinct experimental techniques were collectively performed to resolve mitral valve geometry and hemodynamics. In particular, micro-computed tomography was used to obtain accurate and high-resolution (39 μm voxel) native valvular anatomy, which included the mitral leaflets, chordae tendinae, and papillary muscles. Three-dimensional echocardiography was used to obtain systolic leaflet geometry. Stereoscopic digital particle image velocimetry provided all three components of fluid velocity through the mitral valve, resolved every 25 ms in the cardiac cycle. A strong central filling jet (V ~ 0.6 m/s) was observed during peak systole with minimal out-of-plane velocities. In addition, physiologic hemodynamic boundary conditions were defined and all data were synchronously acquired through a central trigger. Finally, the simulator is a precisely controlled environment, in which flow conditions and geometry can be systematically prescribed and resultant valvular function and hemodynamics assessed. Thus, this work represents the first comprehensive database of high fidelity experimental data, critical for extensive validation of mitral valve fluid structure interaction simulations.

  8. Characterization of three-dimensional anisotropic heart valve tissue mechanical properties using inverse finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mostafa; Barakat, Mohammed S; Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Azadani, Ali N

    2016-09-01

    Computational modeling has an important role in design and assessment of medical devices. In computational simulations, considering accurate constitutive models is of the utmost importance to capture mechanical response of soft tissue and biomedical materials under physiological loading conditions. Lack of comprehensive three-dimensional constitutive models for soft tissue limits the effectiveness of computational modeling in research and development of medical devices. The aim of this study was to use inverse finite element (FE) analysis to determine three-dimensional mechanical properties of bovine pericardial leaflets of a surgical bioprosthesis under dynamic loading condition. Using inverse parameter estimation, 3D anisotropic Fung model parameters were estimated for the leaflets. The FE simulations were validated using experimental in-vitro measurements, and the impact of different constitutive material models was investigated on leaflet stress distribution. The results of this study showed that the anisotropic Fung model accurately simulated the leaflet deformation and coaptation during valve opening and closing. During systole, the peak stress reached to 3.17MPa at the leaflet boundary while during diastole high stress regions were primarily observed in the commissures with the peak stress of 1.17MPa. In addition, the Rayleigh damping coefficient that was introduced to FE simulations to simulate viscous damping effects of surrounding fluid was determined. PMID:27173827

  9. Biaxial mechanical response of bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials to high in-plane shear.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sacks, Michael S; Sellaro, Tiffany L; Slaughter, William S; Scott, Michael J

    2003-06-01

    Utilization of novel biologically-derived biomaterials in bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) requires robust constitutive models to predict the mechanical behavior under generalized loading states. Thus, it is necessary to perform rigorous experimentation involving all functional deformations to obtain both the form and material constants of a strain-energy density function. In this study, we generated a comprehensive experimental biaxial mechanical dataset that included high in-plane shear stresses using glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium (GLBP) as the representative BHV biomaterial. Compared to our previous study (Sacks, JBME, v.121, pp. 551-555, 1999), GLBP demonstrated a substantially different response under high shear strains. This finding was underscored by the inability of the standard Fung model, applied successfully in our previous GLBP study, to fit the high-shear data. To develop an appropriate constitutive model, we utilized an interpolation technique for the pseudo-elastic response to guide modification of the final model form. An eight parameter modified Fung model utilizing additional quartic terms was developed, which fitted the complete dataset well. Model parameters were also constrained to satisfy physical plausibility of the strain energy function. The results of this study underscore the limited predictive ability of current soft tissue models, and the need to collect experimental data for soft tissue simulations over the complete functional range. PMID:12929242

  10. Prosthetics and Related Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Related Technology for Restoring Veterans’ Abilities DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT PROSTHETICS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGY VA Research and ... technology to perform day-to-day activities. DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT DISCOVERY INNOVATION ADVANCEMENT A Message to Our ...

  11. Prosthetic Care FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and practice management. What is a Certified Prosthetist (CP)? ABC Certified Prosthetists are healthcare professionals that have ... a free searchable database of its Certified Prosthetists (CPs) and accredited orthotic and prosthetic facilities to assist ...

  12. Safety valve

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Ulf C.

    1984-01-01

    The safety valve contains a resilient gland to be held between a valve seat and a valve member and is secured to the valve member by a sleeve surrounding the end of the valve member adjacent to the valve seat. The sleeve is movable relative to the valve member through a limited axial distance and a gap exists between said valve member and said sleeve.

  13. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment of a H7N9-caused respiratory failure patient with mechanical valves replacement history

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linfeng; Zheng, Junnan; Xu, Hongfei; Shi, Liping; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Patients with respiratory failure caused by H7N9 may benefit from veno-venous, veno-arterial, and veno-veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Case summary: A 55-year-old male patient was suffering from H7N9-caused acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). He had a mechanical mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery and was using warfarin for anticoagulation. After prolonged mechanical ventilation, oxygen saturation was not improved. Veno-veno ECMO was then applied. After 16 days of extracorporeal life support, the patient successfully weaned from ECMO, with relatively good pulmonary recovery. Conclusion: This report demonstrates that ECMO support can help treating life-threatening diseases such as H7N9-associated ARDS. Because of his special mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery history and long duration of mechanical ventilation before ECMO, we report it as a separate case, hoping to provide some reference for ECMO treatment. PMID:27749569

  14. Patterns of systolic stress distribution on mitral valve anterior leaflet chordal apparatus. A structural mechanical theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazari, S; Carli, F; Salvi, S; Banfi, C; Aluffi, A; Mourad, Z; Buniva, P; Rescigno, G

    2000-04-01

    Increasing diffusion and complexity of mitral valve repair procedures may prompt an interest in the evaluation of the patterns of stress distribution on the chords, which are, from the structural mechanical point of view, the weakest element of valve apparatus. This theoretical analysis concentrates in particular on the mitral valve anterior leaflet. As is known, the vast majority of the chordae are attached to the anterior leaflet within the coaptation area; during systole they are then necessarily parallel, aligned along the same plane as that of the leaflets' coaptation surface, to which they are attached; moreover the thickness of the chordae increases significantly from the marginal chordae to the more central ones. In normal conditions during systole the progressively wider coaptation surface causes the increasing stress to be supported by an increasing number of progressively thicker chords, which are substantially parallel and aligned on the coaptation surface plane in such a way that they can share the stress between them, according to their thickness; in other words chords form a multifilament functional unit which enrolls elements of increasing thickness in response to the mounting stress. The geometrical modifications of the valve apparatus architecture (annulus dilatation, leaflet retraction, chordal elongation or retraction) often associated with valve insufficiency due to chordal rupture, have the common result of causing, during systole, a radial disarrangement of the direction of most of the secondary chordae which are no longer parallel, aligned on the coaptation surface plane. Due to the negligible elastic module of the valve leaflet, in this new arrangement the various chordae cannot share the stress between themselves as they do in a normal physiological situation; on the contrary the thinner chordae nearer to the free margin are also loaded with the peak systolic stress, thus generating conditions favoring their rupture. It can, therefore, be

  15. Cells, scaffolds and bioreactors for tissue-engineered heart valves: a journey from basic concepts to contemporary developmental innovations.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Alessandro; Bagno, Andrea; Naso, Filippo; Spina, Michele; Gerosa, Gino

    2011-04-01

    The development of viable and functional tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is a challenge that, for almost two decades, the scientific community has been committed to face to create life-lasting prosthetic devices for treating heart valve diseases. One of the main drawbacks of tissue-based commercial substitutes, xenografts and homografts, is their lack of viability, and hence failure to grow, repair, and remodel. In adults, the average bioprostheses life span is around 13 years, followed by structural valve degeneration, such as calcification; in pediatric, mechanical valves are commonly used instead of biological substitutes, as in young patients, the mobilization of calcium, due to bone remodeling, accelerates the calcification process. Moreover, neither mechanical nor bioprostheses are able to follow children's body growth. Cell seeding and repopulation of acellular heart valve scaffolds, biological and polymeric, appears as a promising way to create a living valve. Biomechanical stimuli have significant impact on cell behavior including in vitro differentiation, and physiological hemodynamic conditioning has been found to promote new tissue development. These concepts have led scientists to design bioreactors to mimic the in vivo environment of heart valves. Many different types of somatic and stem cells have been tested for colonizing both the surface and the core of the valve matrix but controversial results have been achieved so far. PMID:21163670

  16. Cells, scaffolds and bioreactors for tissue-engineered heart valves: a journey from basic concepts to contemporary developmental innovations.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Alessandro; Bagno, Andrea; Naso, Filippo; Spina, Michele; Gerosa, Gino

    2011-04-01

    The development of viable and functional tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is a challenge that, for almost two decades, the scientific community has been committed to face to create life-lasting prosthetic devices for treating heart valve diseases. One of the main drawbacks of tissue-based commercial substitutes, xenografts and homografts, is their lack of viability, and hence failure to grow, repair, and remodel. In adults, the average bioprostheses life span is around 13 years, followed by structural valve degeneration, such as calcification; in pediatric, mechanical valves are commonly used instead of biological substitutes, as in young patients, the mobilization of calcium, due to bone remodeling, accelerates the calcification process. Moreover, neither mechanical nor bioprostheses are able to follow children's body growth. Cell seeding and repopulation of acellular heart valve scaffolds, biological and polymeric, appears as a promising way to create a living valve. Biomechanical stimuli have significant impact on cell behavior including in vitro differentiation, and physiological hemodynamic conditioning has been found to promote new tissue development. These concepts have led scientists to design bioreactors to mimic the in vivo environment of heart valves. Many different types of somatic and stem cells have been tested for colonizing both the surface and the core of the valve matrix but controversial results have been achieved so far.

  17. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two main types of new valves: Mechanical, made of man-made materials, such as titanium ... Mechanical heart valves do not fail often. However, blood clots can develop on them. If a blood ...

  18. [The structure and mechanical properties of the human pulmonary trunk and its valves].

    PubMed

    Antipas, D B; Milovanova, Z P; Zavalishin, N N

    1993-01-01

    The histological structure and mechanical properties of the pulmonary trunk and its valves were studied in 35 complexes of the pulmonary artery of man. The valvular apparatus of the pulmonary trunk is formed by anatomical elements with different morphological structures. In it there are elements which might be considered from standpoints of biomechanics as membranous (pulmonary trunk, sinuses, cusps) and shaft (fibrous ring, commissural shafts, arcuate crests) elements, the commissural shafts representing a combination of structures forming a closed spatial inter-related construction--a natural elastic framework of the pulmonary trunk root and the sheath elements are morphologically interrelated and fixed on this framework. The mechanical properties of these shaft elements are formed not only at the expense of inclusion of other formations in their structure but also at the expense of changes in the density of distribution and spatial orientation of main carrier structures of sheath elements attached to them. So, the strength and rigidity of the fibrous ring were associated not only with the presence of collagenous fibers and chondroid tissue n it, but also with the regular arrangement of collagenous fibers coming to it from the sinus. Similarly, the strength of arcuate crests was in many respects dependent on dense arrangement of longitudinally oriented smooth muscles. The amount of smooth muscles in the pulmonary trunk was 1.3 and 2 times higher than that of collagenous and elastic structures which allows the pulmonary trunk of man to be referred to arteries of muscular or mixed type. It points to the necessity to take into account the influence of muscle tone on mechanical behavior of the pulmonary trunk under physiological exercise. PMID:7889164

  19. Curative effect of mechanical heart valve replacement and anticoagulant therapy after surgery.

    PubMed

    Chuai, J B; Shi, L; Ma, X Y; Wu, D; Kang, K; Jiang, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the curative effect of low-intensity anticoagulant therapy by observing the oral administration of warfarin (anticoagulant therapy) on patients who had undergone mechanical heart valve replacement (MHVR) surgery with subsequent anticoagulation complications. Fifty patients who underwent MHVR in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University and 52 patients in the Cardiovascular Surgery of Daqing Oilfield General Hospital between January 2013 and January 2016 were selected (63 males and 39 females, ages 26-77 years). They took warfarin after treatment and were followed-up by means of outpatient review and telephone after leaving the hospital. The effect of warfarin and the occurrence of anticoagulation complications were analyzed. The operations lasted 230±106 min, extracorporeal circulation for 110±50 min and aorta occlusion for 82±23 min. During post-operation 3 patients developed skin purpura and one patient died. During follow-up we found 3 cases of anemia caused by excessive menstruation, 4 cases of hematuresis, 3 cases of peated epistaxis, 1 case of gastrointestinal bleeding, 1 case of cerebral hemorrhage, 1 case of embolism in the lower limbs and 1 case of cerebral infarction, although they all improved or were totally cured. Therefore, the incidence of complications can be reduced significantly by the correct administration of warfarin as well as timely monitoring of interference factors after MHVR. PMID:27049085

  20. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Extracellular matrix tenascin-X in calcific aortic valves].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-01

    We previously disclosed a novel extracellular matrix tenascin-X (TNX) , the largest member of the tenascin family. So far, we have made efforts to elucidate the roles of TNX. TNX is involved in collagen deposition, collagen fibrillogenesis, and modulation of collagen stiffness. Homozygous mutations in TNXB, the gene encoding TNX, cause a classic-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) , a heritable connective tissue disorder, whereas haploinsufficiency of TNXB and heterozygous mutations in TNXB are associated with hypermobility-type EDS. Recently, we performed proteomic analyses of calcific aortic valves (CAVs) compared with relatively adjacent normal tissues to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of dystrophic valvular calcification. Interestingly, we found that TNX was the protein with the greatest decrease in expression among the differentially expressed proteins and that expression levels of proteins modulating collagen structure and function, such as type I collagen and decorin, were also decreased in CAVs. In this review, I will discuss about the decreased level of collagen due to the reduction of expression levels of proteins that play regulatory roles in collagen functions such as fibril organization and fibrillogenesis in CAVs. PMID:25926574

  1. Transient pressure at closing of a monoleaflet mechanical heart valve prosthesis: mounting compliance effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z J; Gao, B Z; Hwang, N H

    1995-09-01

    An in vitro experimental study was performed to investigate the mounting compliance effect on the occluder closing dynamics and the transient pressure at the closing of the mitral Medtronic Hall (MH) mechanical heart valve (MHV). The closing velocity and the transient pressure were simultaneously measured at heart rates of 70, 90, 120, and 140 beats/minute with cardiac outputs of 5.0, 6.0, 7.5, and 8.5 liters/minute, respectively. The experiment was conducted under simulated physiologic ventricular and aortic pressures in a pulsatile mock flow loop. The characteristics of the transient pressure were investigated by detailed mapping of the transient pressure field in the atrial chamber using high frequency pressure transducers. Simultaneous measurements of the occluder closing velocity and the transient pressure around the seat stop of the MH showed that the transient pressure generated on the inflow side dropped below the vapor pressure of liquid during the occluder's sudden deceleration at closing. The amplitude of the transient pressure reduction (TR) was proportional to the occluder approaching velocity. The development of the transient pressure in the rigid and flexible mountings were significantly different. In the rigid mounting (RM), the pressure was reduced below the liquid's vapor pressure and maintained below -350 mmHg for approximately 180 microseconds. Strong signals of high frequency pressure oscillations (HPO) were recorded in the transient pressure traces. The timing of the HPO was found to be consistent with that of the cavitation bubble collapse as observed by others. In the flexible mounting (FM), TR also occurred, but recovered quickly and was followed immediately by a positive pressure spike. Relatively weak HPO appeared in the transient pressure trace. The mapping of the transient pressure field showed that both the transient pressure reduction (on the major orifice side) or rise (on the minor orifice side) as well as the HPO were locally

  2. [Acute Leaflet Arrest in St. Jude Medical Regent Mechanical Aortic Valve;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yuji; Arakaki, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with combined valvular disease and atrial fibrillation, and was admitted for surgery. We performed double valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty and maze operation. At the operation, a 19 mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve was implanted with non-everting mattress sutures at the aortic supra-annular position after mitral valve replacement. Although pulling down of the prosthesis into the aortic annulus was easy, the leaflets were unable to open at all in a movability test. After removing several stitches on the mitral side of the hinges, the subvalvular tissue was seen bulging into the hinge, hindering the free movement. The prosthesis was removed and replaced with a 17 mm Regent valve by the same technique. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. We suggest it is necessary to pay special attention to the structural characteristics of the prosthesis. PMID:26066878

  3. Stemless Ball Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Robert K.; Yakos, David; Walthall, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This invention utilizes a new method of opening and closing a ball valve. Instead of rotating the ball with a perpendicular stem (as is the case with standard ball valves), the ball is rotated around a fixed axis by two guide pins. This innovation eliminates the leak point that is present in all standard ball valves due to the penetration of an actuation stem through the valve body. The VOST (Venturi Off-Set-Technology) valve has been developed for commercial applications. The standard version of the valve consists of an off-set venturi flow path through the valve. This path is split at the narrowest portion of the venturi, allowing the section upstream from the venturi to be rotated. As this rotation takes place, the venturi becomes restricted as one face rotates with respect to the other, eventually closing off the flow path. A spring-loaded seal made of resilient material is embedded in the upstream face of the valve, making a leak-proof seal between the faces; thus a valve is formed. The spring-loaded lip seal is the only seal that can provide a class six, or bubble-tight, seal against the opposite face of the valve. Tearing action of the seal by high-velocity gas on this early design required relocation of the seal to the downstream face of the valve. In the stemless embodiment of this valve, inner and outer magnetic cartridges are employed to transfer mechanical torque from the outside of the valve to the inside without the use of a stem. This eliminates the leak path caused by the valve stems in standard valves because the stems penetrate through the bodies of these valves.

  4. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  5. Proportional mechanical ventilation through PWM driven on/off solenoid valve.

    PubMed

    Sardellitti, I; Cecchini, S; Silvestri, S; Caldwell, D G

    2010-01-01

    Proportional strategies for artificial ventilation are the most recent form of synchronized partial ventilatory assistance and intra-breath control techniques available in clinical practice. Currently, the majority of commercial ventilators allowing proportional ventilation uses proportional valves to generate the flow rate pattern. This paper proposes on-off solenoid valves for proportional ventilation given their small size, low cost and short switching time, useful for supplying high frequency ventilation. A new system based on a novel fast switching driver circuit combined with on/off solenoid valve is developed. The average short response time typical of onoff solenoid valves was further reduced through the driving circuit for the implementation of PWM control. Experimental trials were conducted for identifying the dynamic response of the PWM driven on/off valve and for verifying its effectiveness in generating variable-shaped ventilatory flow rate patterns. The system was able to smoothly follow the reference flow rate patterns also changing in time intervals as short as 20 ms, achieving a flow rate resolution up to 1 L/min and repeatability in the order of 0.5 L/min. Preliminary results showed the feasibility of developing a stand alone portable device able to generate both proportional and high frequency ventilation by only using on-off solenoid valves.

  6. Estimation of torque on mechanical heart valves due to magnetic resonance imaging including an estimation of the significance of the Lenz effect using a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Neil M.; Diaz-Gomez, Manuel; Condon, Barrie

    2000-12-01

    Mitral and aortic valve replacement is a procedure which is common in cardiac surgery. Some of these replacement valves are mechanical and contain moving metal parts. Should the patient in whom such a valve has been implanted be involved in magnetic resonance imaging, there is a possible dangerous interaction between the moving metal parts and the static magnetic field due to the Lenz effect. Mathematical models of two relatively common forms of single-leaflet valves have been derived and the magnitude of the torque which opposes the motion of the valve leaflet has been calculated for a valve disc of solid metal. In addition, a differential model of a ring-strengthener valve type has been considered to determine the likely significance of the Lenz effect in the context of the human heart. For common magnetic field strengths at present, i.e. 1 to 2 T, the effect is not particularly significant. However, there is a marked increase in back pressure as static magnetic field strength increases. There are concerns that, since field strengths in the range 3 to 4 T are increasingly being used, the Lenz effect could become significant. At 5 to 10 T the malfunction of the mechanical heart valve could cause the heart to behave as though it is diseased. For unhealthy or old patients this could possibly prove fatal.

  7. An infrared spectroscopic study of aortic valve. A possible mechanism of calcification and the role of magnesium salts.

    PubMed

    Dritsa, Vassiliki; Pissaridi, Katerina; Koutoulakis, Emmanouil; Mamarelis, Ioannis; Kotoulas, Christoforos; Anastassopoulou, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In the present study fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to study the mechanism of pathogenesis of aortic valve calcification. The high intensity bands of vCH3 and vCH2 groups of lipids and phospholipids of membranes, in the spectral region 3000-2800 cm(-1), show the high concentration of lipids and fatty components in aortic valve, resulting from degradation of the main aliphatic chain of the membranes, with a change of their permeability and fluidity. The presence of bands at 3075 and 1744 cm(-1), assigned to olefinic (v=CH) and aldehyde carbonyl groups, respectively, implies that reactive oxygen species are involved in the initiation of peroxidation of the lipids and phospholipids. These latter bands are related to the oxidative stress of the patients. From the shifts of bands to lower frequencies of the characteristic absorption bands of amide I and amide II, it is suggested that the proteins change their secondary structure from α-helix to β-sheets and random coil due to modifications of collagen, associated with the permeability of aortic valve atherosclerosis. From the spectral region 1150-900 cm(-1), where the characteristic stretching vibration bands of the phosphate groups (vPO4(-3)) absorb, the calcified aortic valve was found to contain biological hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), as well as amorphous hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)xOH) and CaHPO4. These findings are in agreement with scanning electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction analyses. SEM micrographs show that the valves are rich in fibrils and that the protein-protein cross-linked chemical bonds seem to be the points of initiation of calcification.

  8. Relapsing tricuspid valve endocarditis by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 11 years: tricuspid valve replacement with an aortic valve homograft.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Chang, Hyoung Woo; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kang, Dong Ki; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Eleven years ago, a 27-year-old non-drug abuser woman was admitted to the hospital due to a burn injury. During the treatment, she was diagnosed with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). She underwent tricuspid valve replacement (TVR) using a bioprosthetic valve, followed by 6 weeks of meropenem antibiotic therapy. Ten years later, she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. She underwent redo-TVR with a bioprosthetic valve and was treated with colistin and ciprofloxacin. Ten months later, she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis with MDR P. aeruginosa as a pathogen. She underwent a second redo-TVR with a tissue valve and was treated with colistin. Two months later, her fever recurred and she was again diagnosed with prosthetic valve infective endocarditis caused by MDR P. aeruginosa. She eventually underwent a third redo-TVR using an aortic valve homograft and was discharged from the hospital after additional 6 weeks' of antibiotic therapy. All the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from each event of infective endocarditis were analyzed by repetitive deoxyribonucleic acid sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strain typing to determine the correlation of isolates. All of the pathogens in 11 years were similar enough to be classified as the same strain, and this is the first case report of TVR using an aortic valve homograft to treat relapsing endocarditis. PMID:26051245

  9. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  10. Mechanical and thermal properties of hot pressed CoCrMo-porcelain composites developed for prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Henriques, B; Gasik, M; Souza, J C M; Nascimento, R M; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2014-02-01

    In this study, mechanical and thermal properties of CoCrMo-porcelain composites for dental restorations have been evaluated. These metal-ceramic composites were produced by powder metallurgy and hot pressing techniques from the mixtures of metal and ceramic powders with different volume fractions. Young's moduli and the coefficient of thermal expansion of materials were evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dilatometry (DIL) tests, respectively. The strength in flexion and shear was measured with a universal test machine and hardness with a respective tester. The microstructures and fracture surfaces were inspected by the means of optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Shear strength, Flexural strength and Young' moduli of ceramic and metal-matrix composites were found to increase with higher metal particles content. The DMA tests performed at different frequencies showed no frequency-dependent features of the materials studied, indicating no viscoelastic behavior. The fracture surfaces analysis suggests the load-transfer mechanism be possibly responsible for this behavior, as the differences in CTE are low enough to cause significant thermal stresses in these materials. The results might be included in a materials properties database for further use for design and optimization of dental restorations.

  11. Feasibility of pig and human-derived aortic valve interstitial cells seeding on fixative-free decellularized animal pericardium.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Rosaria; Consolo, Filippo; Spiccia, Marco; Piola, Marco; Kassem, Samer; Prandi, Francesca; Vinci, Maria Cristina; Forti, Elisa; Polvani, Gianluca; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Soncini, Monica; Pesce, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed pericardium of animal origin is the elective material for the fabrication of bio-prosthetic valves for surgical replacement of insufficient/stenotic cardiac valves. However, the pericardial tissue employed to this aim undergoes severe calcification due to chronic inflammation resulting from a non-complete immunological compatibility of the animal-derived pericardial tissue resulting from failure to remove animal-derived xeno-antigens. In the mid/long-term, this leads to structural deterioration, mechanical failure, and prosthesis leaflets rupture, with consequent need for re-intervention. In the search for novel procedures to maximize biological compatibility of the pericardial tissue into immunocompetent background, we have recently devised a procedure to decellularize the human pericardium as an alternative to fixation with aldehydes. In the present contribution, we used this procedure to derive sheets of decellularized pig pericardium. The decellularized tissue was first tested for the presence of 1,3 α-galactose (αGal), one of the main xenoantigens involved in prosthetic valve rejection, as well as for mechanical tensile behavior and distensibility, and finally seeded with pig- and human-derived aortic valve interstitial cells. We demonstrate that the decellularization procedure removed the αGAL antigen, maintained the mechanical characteristics of the native pig pericardium, and ensured an efficient surface colonization of the tissue by animal- and human-derived aortic valve interstitial cells. This establishes, for the first time, the feasibility of fixative-free pericardial tissue seeding with valve competent cells for derivation of tissue engineered heart valve leaflets.

  12. What do you do with the antiplatelet agents in patients with drug eluting stents who then receive a mechanical valve?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Michele; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Spadafora, Andrea; Renzulli, Attilio

    2012-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT) with aspirin and clopidogrel is a cornerstone of treatment during and after percutaneous coronary interventions with drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the recommended treatment for patients with mechanical heart valves. When patients with DES need a mechanical heart valve or vice versa, we face the difficult choice of their antithrombotic therapy. Different institutions empirically follow a combination of OAC and single or DAT, the so-called triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) aiming to find the best balance between the thrombotic and bleeding risk for this subset of patients. A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is an optimal antithrombotic management for patients with DES undergoing mechanical heart valve or vice versa. Altogether, more than 148 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that DES implantation in patients who could potentially need valve surgery in the future should be discouraged and bare-metal stent or an aortic bioprosthesis preferred. However, in high-risk patients with DES, the recommendation is to postpone elective surgery for 1 year and, if surgery cannot be deferred, continue aspirin during the perioperative period. Moreover, when OAC is given in combination with clopidogrel and/or low-dose aspirin, the target INR should be 2.0–2.5 (Class IIb, level of evidence C). As per the long-term management, antithrombotic management with DAT alone in mechanical aortic valve replacement might be possible, but there is not enough evidence to support it. The available evidence suggests that triple anticoagulation (OAC + DAT) is associated with the best

  13. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve. (a) Identification. An endolymphatic shunt tube with valve is a device that consists... device is the FDA guidance document “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Endolymphatic...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3850 - Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3850 Endolymphatic shunt tube with valve. (a) Identification. An endolymphatic shunt tube with valve is a device that consists... device is the FDA guidance document “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Endolymphatic...

  15. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, D.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Patro, K. C.; Devaraj, S.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Kothari, Y.; Satyaki, N.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure. PMID:23814428

  16. The effects of a low international normalized ratio on thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with mechanical mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical heart valve replacement has an inherent risk of thromboembolic events (TEs). Current guidelines recommend an international normalized ratio (INR) of at least 2.5 after mechanical mitral valve replacement (MVR). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a low INR (2.0–2.5) on thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with mechanical MVR on warfarin therapy. Methods One hundred and thirty-five patients who underwent mechanical MVR were enrolled in this study. The end points of this study were defined as TEs (valve thrombosis, transient ischemic attack, stroke) and bleeding (all minor and major bleeding) complications. Patients were followed up for a mean of 39.6 months and the mean INR of the patients was calculated. After data collection, patients were divided into 3 groups according to their mean INR, as follows: group 1 (n = 34), INR <2.0; group 2 (n = 49), INR 2.0–2.5; and group 3 (n = 52), INR >2.5. Results A total of 22 events (10 [7.4%] thromboembolic and 12 [8.8%] bleeding events) occurred in the follow-up period. The mean INR was an independent risk factor for the development of TEs. Mean INR and neurological dysfunction were independent risk factors for the development of bleeding events. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the log mean INR and all bleeding events, and a negative correlation was found between the log mean INR and all TEs. The total number of events was significantly lower in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3 (P = 0.036). Conclusions This study showed that a target INRs of 2.0–2.5 are acceptable for preventing TEs and safe in terms of bleeding complications in patients with mechanical MVR. PMID:24885719

  17. Mechanical analysis of ovine and pediatric pulmonary artery for heart valve stent design.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M S; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Bogers, A J J C; Hoerstrup, S P; Baaijens, F P T

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter heart valve replacement is an attractive and promising technique for congenital as well as acquired heart valve disease. In this procedure, the replacement valve is mounted in a stent that is expanded at the aimed valve position and fixated by clamping. However, for this technique to be appropriate for pediatric patients, the material properties of the host tissue need to be determined to design stents that can be optimized for this particular application. In this study we performed equibiaxial tensile tests on four adult ovine pulmonary artery walls and compared the outcomes with one pediatric pulmonary artery. Results show that the pediatric pulmonary artery was significantly thinner (1.06 ± 0.36 mm (mean ± SD)) than ovine tissue (2.85 ± 0.40 mm), considerably stiffer for strain values that exceed the physiological conditions (beyond 50% strain in the circumferential and 60% in the longitudinal direction), more anisotropic (with a significant difference in stiffness between the longitudinal and circumferential directions beyond 60% strain) and presented stronger non-linear stress-strain behavior at equivalent strains (beyond 26% strain) compared to ovine tissue. These discrepancies suggest that stents validated and optimized using the ovine pre-clinical model might not perform satisfactorily in pediatric patients. The material parameters derived from this study may be used to develop stent designs for both applications using computational models. PMID:23849135

  18. On-line two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection using a fully electric isolated mechanical valve.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Felix J; Montealegre, Cristina; Neusüß, Christian

    2016-04-01

    CE is becoming more and more important in many fields of bioanalytical chemistry. Besides optical detection, hyphenation to ESI-MS detection is increasingly applied for sensitive identification purposes. Unfortunately, many CE techniques and methods established in research and industry are not compatible to ESI-MS since essential components of the background electrolyte interfere in ES ionization. In order to identify unknown peaks in established CE methods, here, a heart-cut 2D-CE separation system is introduced using a fully isolated mechanical valve with an internal loop of only 20 nL. In this system, the sample is separated using potentially any non-ESI compatible method in the first separation dimension. Subsequently, the portion of interest is cut by the internal sample loop of the valve and reintroduced to the second dimension where the interfering compounds are removed, followed by ESI-MS detection. When comparing the separation efficiency of the system with the valve to a system using a continuous capillary only a slight increase in peak width is observed. Ultraviolet/visible detection is integrated in the first dimension for switching time determination, enabling reproducible cutting of peaks of interest. The feasibility of the system is successfully demonstrated by a 2D analysis of a BSA tryptic digest sample using a nonvolatile (phosphate based) background electrolyte in the first dimension.

  19. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices. PMID:25070372

  20. ELECTROSTRICTION VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1962-09-25

    An accurately controlled, pulse gas valve is designed capable of delivering output pulses which vary in length from one-tenth millisecond to one second or more, repeated at intervals of a few milliseconds or- more. The pulsed gas valve comprises a column formed of barium titanate discs mounted in stacked relation and electrically connected in parallel, with means for applying voltage across the discs to cause them to expand and effect a mechanical elongation axially of the column. The column is mounted within an enclosure having an inlet port and an outlet port with an internal seat in communication with the outlet port, such that a plug secured to the end of the column will engage the seat of the outlet port to close the outlet port in response to the application of voltage is regulated by a conventional electronic timing circuit connected to the column. (AEC)

  1. The relation between collagen fibril kinematics and mechanical properties in the mitral valve anterior leaflet.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jun; Yang, Lin; Grashow, Jonathan; Sacks, Michael S

    2007-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain (epsilonD) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, epsilonD increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using epsilonD, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5+/-25.5 MPa, which was approximately 27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58+/-1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and epsilonD remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min epsilonD was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen fibril strain was 8

  2. The Relation Between Collagen Fibril Kinematics and Mechanical Properties in the Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet

    SciTech Connect

    Liao,J.; Yang, L.; Grashow, J.; Sacks, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain ({epsilon}{sub D}) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, {epsilon}{sub D} increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using {epsilon}{sub D}, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5{+-}25.5 MPa, which was {approx}27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58{+-}1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and D remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min {epsilon}{sub D} was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen

  3. The Melody® valve and Ensemble® delivery system for transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    McElhinney, Doff B; Hennesen, Jill T

    2013-01-01

    The Melody® transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) is a percutaneous valve system designed for the treatment of obstruction and/or regurgitation of prosthetic conduits placed between the right ventricle and pulmonary arteries in patients with congenital heart disease. In 2000, Melody TPV became the first transcatheter valve implanted in a human; in 2006 it became the first transcatheter valve commercially available anywhere in the world; and in 2010 it was launched as the first commercially available transcatheter valve in the United States. In this review, we present the clinical background against which the Melody valve was developed and implemented, introduce the rationale for and challenges of transcatheter valve technology for this population, outline the history and technical details of its development and use, and summarize currently available data concerning the performance of the device. PMID:23834411

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  5. Additional value of biplane transoesophageal imaging in assessment of mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed Central

    Groundstroem, K; Rittoo, D; Hoffman, P; Bloomfield, P; Sutherland, G R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether biplane transoesophageal imaging offers advantages in the evaluation of mitral prostheses when compared with standard single transverse plane imaging or the precordial approach in suspected prosthetic dysfunction. DESIGN--Prospective mitral valve prosthesis in situ using precordial and biplane transoesophageal ultrasonography. SETTING--Tertiary cardiac referral centre. SUBJECTS--67 consecutive patients with suspected dysfunction of a mitral valve prosthesis (16 had bioprostheses and 51 mechanical prostheses) who underwent precordial, transverse plane, and biplane transoesophageal echocardiography. Correlative invasive confirmation from surgery or angiography, or both, was available in 44 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number, type, and site of leak according to the three means of scanning. RESULTS--Transverse plane transoesophageal imaging alone identified all 31 medial/lateral paravalvar leaks but only 24/30 of the anterior/posterior leaks. Combining the information from both imaging planes confirmed that biplane scanning identified all paravalvar leaks. Five of the six patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis, all three with valvar thrombus or obstruction, and all three with mitral annulus rupture were diagnosed from transverse plane imaging alone. Longitudinal plane imaging alone enabled diagnosis of the remaining case of prosthetic endocarditis and a further case of subvalvar pannus formation. CONCLUSIONS--Transverse plane transoesophageal imaging was superior to the longitudinal imaging in identifying medial and lateral lesions around the sewing ring of a mitral valve prosthesis. Longitudinal plane imaging was superior in identifying anterior and posterior lesions. Biplane imaging is therefore an important development in the study of mitral prosthesis function. Images PMID:8398497

  6. Biological response to prosthetic debris

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Diana; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty had revolutionized the outcome of orthopaedic surgery. Extensive and collaborative work of many innovator surgeons had led to the development of durable bearing surfaces, yet no single material is considered absolutely perfect. Generation of wear debris from any part of the prosthesis is unavoidable. Implant loosening secondary to osteolysis is the most common mode of failure of arthroplasty. Osteolysis is the resultant of complex contribution of the generated wear debris and the mechanical instability of the prosthetic components. Roughly speaking, all orthopedic biomaterials may induce a universal biologic host response to generated wear débris with little specific characteristics for each material; but some debris has been shown to be more cytotoxic than others. Prosthetic wear debris induces an extensive biological cascade of adverse cellular responses, where macrophages are the main cellular type involved in this hostile inflammatory process. Macrophages cause osteolysis indirectly by releasing numerous chemotactic inflammatory mediators, and directly by resorbing bone with their membrane microstructures. The bio-reactivity of wear particles depends on two major elements: particle characteristics (size, concentration and composition) and host characteristics. While any particle type may enhance hostile cellular reaction, cytological examination demonstrated that more than 70% of the debris burden is constituted of polyethylene particles. Comprehensive understanding of the intricate process of osteolysis is of utmost importance for future development of therapeutic modalities that may delay or prevent the disease progression. PMID:25793158

  7. Quadricuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Timperley, Jonathan; Milner, Robert; Marshall, Andrew J; Gilbert, Timothy J

    2002-12-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) are a rare but well recognized cause of significant aortic regurgitation. The first case was found reported in 1862. Since then there have been 110 reported cases of QAV and we report 4 more. Previously, these were diagnosed at the time of surgery or postmortem examination. With advances in echocardiography, including harmonic imaging, and also the advent of transesophageal echocardiography, more cases are being diagnosed prior to surgery. We describe four more cases, three diagnosed preoperatively and one at the time of surgery, and then review the previously reported cases. Of the 114 cases reported, 46 had the aortic valve replaced, most commonly in the 5th and 6th decade of life. Hurwitz and Roberts classified quadricuspid valves according to the size of the leaflets. It has previously been believed that QAVs with four equal sized leaflets were less likely to develop significant aortic regurgitation; however, on review of the available cases, this would not appear to be the case. The preoperative diagnosis of QAVs is important as they can be associated with abnormally placed coronary ostium. Of the 114 cases reported, there are 10 reports of abnormally placed ostia. There has been at least one reported case of death occurring because of obstruction of an abnormally placed right coronary ostium by a prosthetic aortic valve.

  8. Primary and secondary lymphatic valve development: molecular, functional and mechanical insights.

    PubMed

    Bazigou, Eleni; Wilson, John T; Moore, James E

    2014-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis in vertebrates critically relies on the lymphatic system forming a hierarchical network of lymphatic capillaries and collecting lymphatics, for the efficient drainage and transport of extravasated fluid back to the cardiovascular system. Blind-ended lymphatic capillaries employ specialized junctions and anchoring filaments to encourage a unidirectional flow of the interstitial fluid into the initial lymphatic vessels, whereas collecting lymphatics are responsible for the active propulsion of the lymph to the venous circulation via the combined action of lymphatic muscle cells and intraluminal valves. Here we describe recent findings on molecular and physical factors regulating the development and maturation of these two types of valves and examine their role in tissue-fluid homeostasis.

  9. Biological heart valves.

    PubMed

    Ciubotaru, Anatol; Cebotari, Serghei; Tudorache, Igor; Beckmann, Erik; Hilfiker, Andres; Haverich, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac valvular pathologies are often caused by rheumatic fever in young adults, atherosclerosis in elderly patients, or by congenital malformation of the heart in children, in effect affecting almost all population ages. Almost 300,000 heart valve operations are performed worldwide annually. Tissue valve prostheses have certain advantages over mechanical valves such as biocompatibility, more physiological hemodynamics, and no need for life-long systemic anticoagulation. However, the major disadvantage of biological valves is related to their durability. Nevertheless, during the last decade, the number of patients undergoing biological, rather than mechanical, valve replacement has increased from half to more than three-quarters for biological implants. Continuous improvement in valve fabrication includes development of new models and shapes, novel methods of tissue treatment, and preservation and implantation techniques. These efforts are focused not only on the improvement of morbidity and mortality of the patients but also on the improvement of their quality of life. Heart valve tissue engineering aims to provide durable, "autologous" valve prostheses. These valves demonstrate adaptive growth, which may avoid the need of repeated operations in growing patients.

  10. Plug valve

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, John J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved plug valve wherein a novel shape for the valve plug and valve chamber provide mating surfaces for improved wear characteristics. The novel shape of the valve plug is a frustum of a body of revolution of a curved known as a tractrix, a solid shape otherwise known as a peudosphere.

  11. Evaluation of mitral valve replacement anchoring in a phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Lang, Pencilla; Bainbridge, Dan; Campbell, Gordon; Jones, Doug L.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional mitral valve replacement requires a median sternotomy and cardio-pulmonary bypass with aortic crossclamping and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity which could be reduced by performing the procedure off-pump. Replacing the mitral valve in the closed, off-pump, beating heart requires extensive development and validation of surgical and imaging techniques. Image guidance systems and surgical access for off-pump mitral valve replacement have been previously developed, allowing the prosthetic valve to be safely introduced into the left atrium and inserted into the mitral annulus. The major remaining challenge is to design a method of securely anchoring the prosthetic valve inside the beating heart. The development of anchoring techniques has been hampered by the expense and difficulty in conducting large animal studies. In this paper, we demonstrate how prosthetic valve anchoring may be evaluated in a dynamic phantom. The phantom provides a consistent testing environment where pressure measurements and Doppler ultrasound can be used to monitor and assess the valve anchoring procedures, detecting pararvalvular leak when valve anchoring is inadequate. Minimally invasive anchoring techniques may be directly compared to the current gold standard of valves sutured under direct vision, providing a useful tool for the validation of new surgical instruments.

  12. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  13. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  14. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  15. Upper Extremity Amputations and Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ovadia, Steven A.; Askari, Morad

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions. PMID:25685104

  16. Comparison of hinge microflow fields of bileaflet mechanical heart valves implanted in different sinus shape and downstream geometry.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yee Han; Kabinejadian, Foad; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Su, Boyang; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) hinge microflow fields is a crucial step in heart valve engineering. Earlier in vitro studies of BMHV hinge flow at the aorta position in idealized straight pipes have shown that the aortic sinus shapes and sizes may have a direct impact on hinge microflow fields. In this paper, we used a numerical study to look at how different aortic sinus shapes, the downstream aortic arch geometry, and the location of the hinge recess can influence the flow fields in the hinge regions. Two geometric models for sinus were investigated: a simplified axisymmetric sinus and an idealized three-sinus aortic root model, with two different downstream geometries: a straight pipe and a simplified curved aortic arch. The flow fields of a 29-mm St Jude Medical BMHV with its four hinges were investigated. The simulations were performed throughout the entire cardiac cycle. At peak systole, recirculating flows were observed in curved downsteam aortic arch unlike in straight downstream pipe. Highly complex three-dimensional leakage flow through the hinge gap was observed in the simulation results during early diastole with the highest velocity at 4.7 m/s, whose intensity decreased toward late diastole. Also, elevated wall shear stresses were observed in the ventricular regions of the hinge recess with the highest recorded at 1.65 kPa. Different flow patterns were observed between the hinge regions in straight pipe and curved aortic arch models. We compared the four hinge regions at peak systole in an aortic arch downstream model and found that each individual hinge did not vary much in terms of the leakage flow rate through the valves. PMID:25343223

  17. Wide range force feedback for catheter insertion mechanism for use in minimally invasive mitral valve repair surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Roozbeh; Sokhanvar, Saeed; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Dargahi, Javad

    2009-02-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is a condition in which heart's mitral valve does not close tightly, which allows blood to leak back into the left atrium. Restoring the dimension of the mitral-valve annulus by percutaneous intervention surgery is a common choice to treat MR. Currently, this kind of open heart annuloplasty surgery is being performed through sternotomy with cardiomyopathy bypass. In order to reduce trauma to the patient and also to eliminate bypass surgery, robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedure, which requires small keyhole incisions, has a great potential. To perform this surgery through MIS procedure, an accurate computer controlled catheter with wide-range force feedback capabilities is required. There are three types of tissues at the site of operation: mitral leaflet, mitral annulus and left atrium. The maximum allowable applied force to these three types of tissue is totally different. For instance, leaflet tissue is the most sensitive one with the lowest allowable force capacity. For this application, therefore, a wide-range force sensing is highly required. Most of the sensors that have been developed for use in MIS applications have a limited range of sensing. Therefore, they need to be calibrated for different types of tissue. The present work, reports on the design, modeling and simulation of a novel wide-range optical force sensor for measurement of contact pressure between catheter tip and heart tissue. The proposed sensor offers a wide input range with a high resolution and sensitivity over this range. Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology, this sensor can be microfabricated and integrated with commercially available catheters.

  18. Check valve

    DOEpatents

    Upton, Hubert Allen; Garcia, Pablo

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion.

  19. Check valve

    DOEpatents

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs.

  20. Dynamic characterization of a new accelerated heart valve tester.

    PubMed

    Menzler, F; Haubold, A D; Hwang, N H

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new accelerated prosthetic heart valve tester prototype that incorporates a camshaft and poppet valves. A three element Windkessel system is used to mimic the afterload of the human systemic circulation. The device is capable of testing eight valves simultaneously at a rate up to 1,250 cycles/min, while the flow rate, the pressure, and the valve loading can be monitored and adjusted individually. The tester was characterized and calibrated using a set of eight Carpentier-Edwards bioprostheses at a flow rate varying between 3 and 5 L/min. The experiment was carried out with the pressure difference across the closed heart valve maintained between 140 and 190 mmHg. Smooth and complete opening and closing of the valve leaflets was achieved at all cycling rates. This confirms that the velocity profiles approaching the test valves were uniform, an important factor that allows the test valves to open and close synchronously each time.

  1. Mass-Spring Model for Simulation of Heart Valve Tissue Mechanical Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Peter E.; Sacks, Michael S.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Heart valves are functionally complex, making surgical repair difficult. Simulation-based surgical planning could facilitate repair, but current finite element (FE) studies are prohibitively slow for rapid, clinically oriented simulations. Mass-spring (M-S) models are fast but can be inaccurate. We quantify speed and accuracy differences between an anisotropic, nonlinear M-S and an efficient FE membrane model for simulating both biaxial and pressure loading of aortic valve (AV) leaflets. The FE model incurs approximately 10 times the computational cost of the M-S model. For simulated biaxial loading, mean error in normal strains is <1% for both FE and M-S models for equibiaxial loading but increases for non-equibiaxial states for the M-S model (7%). The M-S model was less able to simulate shear behavior, with mean strain error of approximately 80%. For pressurized AV leaflets, the M-S model predicts similar leaflet dimensions to the FE model (within 2.6%), and the coaptation zone is similar between models. The M-S model simulates in-plane behavior of AV leaflets considerably faster than the FE model and with only minor differences in the deformed mesh. While the M-S model does not allow explicit control of shear response, shear does not strongly influence shape of the simulated AV under pressure. PMID:21350891

  2. Native Triple Valve Endocarditis as Complication of Post-Abortal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Mohan Venkata Sumedha; Devasia, Tom; Kareem, Hashir

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a highly morbid condition in pregnancy which poses both maternal and fetal risk. In majority of cases, endocarditis occurs only on single valve and usually occurs on valve with structural disease or prosthetic valve. Multi-valvular involvement is not common and so we report a case of native triple valve endocarditis as a complication of post abortal sepsis which was successfully treated medically. PMID:27630889

  3. Native Triple Valve Endocarditis as Complication of Post-Abortal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Mohan Venkata Sumedha; Devasia, Tom; Rao, Mugula Sudhakar; Kareem, Hashir

    2016-07-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a highly morbid condition in pregnancy which poses both maternal and fetal risk. In majority of cases, endocarditis occurs only on single valve and usually occurs on valve with structural disease or prosthetic valve. Multi-valvular involvement is not common and so we report a case of native triple valve endocarditis as a complication of post abortal sepsis which was successfully treated medically. PMID:27630889

  4. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  5. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  6. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  7. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  8. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  9. Thermoplastics for prosthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, R B; Davies, R M

    1981-10-01

    The rapid and accurate thermoforming of plastics for prosthetic applications has been the subject of considerable research and development by the Bioengineering Centre. This paper outlines the progress in the general concepts that have been effected to date. The original below knee (B/K) socket vacuum forming technique has been extended to above knee (A/K) and supracondylar cases, and there have been developments in rotational casting technology. The work is necessarily based on a sound understanding of the properties of the materials concerned and of the associated manufacturing processes. The contribution of the Bioengineering Centre is outlined together with summaries of collaborative work carried out with other organizations.

  10. Are valve repairs associated with better outcomes than replacements in patients with native active valve endocarditis?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Zhang, Benqing

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether valve replacement was associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates than valve repair in patients with native active valve endocarditis. Altogether 662 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Traditionally, valve replacement has been the standard therapy for valve endocarditis when surgical treatment is indicated. But now valve repair is increasingly used as an alternative, which may avoid disadvantages of anticoagulation, lower the risk of prosthetic infection and improve postoperative survival. To compare outcomes of these two treatments between studies can be difficult because most of related papers contain raw data on prosthetic valve endocarditis or healed endocarditis, which were excluded from our manuscript. Studies only analysing the outcomes of either of these treatments without the comparison of valve repair and replacement were also excluded. Finally, seven papers were identified. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology 2006 valvular guidelines recommended that mitral valve repair should be performed instead of replacement when at all possible. In three of the seven studies, there were significant differences between valve repair and replacement in long-term survival. One study found that aortic valve repair offered better outcomes in freedom from reoperation at 5 years (P = 0.021) and in survival at 4 years (repair vs replacement 88 vs 65%; P = 0.047). One study reported that there was improved event-free survival at 10 years in the mitral valve repair group (P = 0.015), although there was more previous septic embolization in this group. In one study, early and late mortality

  11. Verification of Pharmacogenetics-Based Warfarin Dosing Algorithms in Han-Chinese Patients Undertaking Mechanic Heart Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Chunxia; Li, Bei; Dong, Li; Guo, Yingqiang; Xiao, Xijun; Zhang, Eryong; Qin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the performance of pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms in the initial and the stable warfarin treatment phases in a cohort of Han-Chinese patients undertaking mechanic heart valve replacement. Methods We searched PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang databases for selecting pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing models. Patients with mechanic heart valve replacement were consecutively recruited between March 2012 and July 2012. The predicted warfarin dose of each patient was calculated and compared with the observed initial and stable warfarin doses. The percentage of patients whose predicted dose fell within 20% of their actual therapeutic dose (percentage within 20%), and the mean absolute error (MAE) were utilized to evaluate the predictive accuracy of all the selected algorithms. Results A total of 8 algorithms including Du, Huang, Miao, Wei, Zhang, Lou, Gage, and International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) model, were tested in 181 patients. The MAE of the Gage, IWPC and 6 Han-Chinese pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithms was less than 0.6 mg/day in accuracy and the percentage within 20% exceeded 45% in all of the selected models in both the initial and the stable treatment stages. When patients were stratified according to the warfarin dose range, all of the equations demonstrated better performance in the ideal-dose range (1.88–4.38 mg/day) than the low-dose range (<1.88 mg/day). Among the 8 algorithms compared, the algorithms of Wei, Huang, and Miao showed a lower MAE and higher percentage within 20% in both the initial and the stable warfarin dose prediction and in the low-dose and the ideal-dose ranges. Conclusions All of the selected pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing regimens performed similarly in our cohort. However, the algorithms of Wei, Huang, and Miao showed a better potential for warfarin prediction in the initial and the stable treatment phases in Han

  12. Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the need for heart valve surgery. Percutaneous Interventions Balloon valvuloplasty is a procedure that may be used ... procedure works on valves in the same way balloon angioplasty does on the arteries. Like angioplasty, it ...

  13. Twenty-Two-Year Experience with Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Hans K.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Torsten T.; Magnussen, Karin; Knudsen, Mary A.; Albrechtsen, Ole K.

    1991-01-01

    From 1965 through 1986, 817 patients underwent aortic valve replacement at our institution. Six hundred forty-five patients received Starr-Edwards ball valves, including 286 Silastic ball valves (Models 1200/1260), 165 cloth-covered caged-ball prostheses (Models 2300/2310/2320), and 194 track-valve prostheses (Model 2400). In contrast, 172 patients received disc-valve prostheses, including 126 St. Jude Medical aortic bi-leaflet disc valves, 32 Lillehei-Kaster pivoting disc valves, and 14 Björk-Shiley valves (6 convexoconcave and 8 monostrut). With respect to preoperative data, the 2 groups were comparable, with the following differences. The Starr-Edwards group included 1) more men (77% versus 51%; p < 0.0001); 2) a significantly older patient population (59 ± 10 years versus 56 ± 15 years; p < 0.0001); 3) more patients in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV (72% versus 65%; p < 0.01); 4) fewer patients with angina pectoris as a limiting symptom (20% versus 36%; p < 0.0001); and 5) patients who tended to receive larger prostheses (26 ± 2 mm versus 23 ± 3 mm, p < 0.0001). The overall 10-year survival rate ± standard error was 59% ± 2% for patients receiving Starr-Edwards valves and 63% ± 6% for those with disc valves. The linearized complication rates (expressed as percentage per patient-year ± standard error) for the Starr-Edwards and disc-valve groups, respectively, were 2.0% ± 0.2% and 1.4% ± 0.5% for thromboembolism, 2.1% ± 0.2% and 3.9% ± 0.8% for Coumadin-related hemorrhage, 0.5% ± 0.1% and 0.3% ± 0.2% for endocarditis, 0.3% ± 0.1% and 0.7% ± 0.3% for other prosthesis-related complications, and 4.8% ± 0.1% and 6.4% ± 1.0% for all complications together. There were no instances of thrombotic occlusion or mechanical failure. After the 6th postoperative year, no thromboembolic events were encountered in patients with a Silastic ball valve; the 15-year freedom from thromboembolic events was 89%. Cox regression analysis showed

  14. Advances in cardiovascular fluid mechanics: bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Dasi, Lakshmi P; Sucosky, Philippe; de Zelicourt, Diane; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Jimenez, Jorge; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents recent advances in cardiovascular fluid mechanics that define the current state of the art. These studies include complex multimodal investigations with advanced measurement and simulation techniques. We first discuss the complex flows within the total cavopulmonary connection in Fontan patients. We emphasize the quantification of energy losses by studying the importance of caval offsets as well as the differences among various Fontan surgical protocols. In our studies of the fluid mechanics of prosthetic heart valves, we reveal for the first time the full three-dimensional complexity of flow fields in the vicinity of bileaflet and trileaflet valves and the microscopic hinge flow dynamics. We also present results of these valves functioning in a patient-specific native aorta geometry. Our in vitro mitral valve studies show the complex mechanism of the native mitral valve apparatus. We demonstrate that the different components of the mitral valve have independent and synergistically complex functions that allow the valve to operate efficiently. We also show how valve mechanics change under pathological and repair conditions associated with enlarged ventricles. Finally, our ex vivo studies on the interactions between the aortic valve and its surrounding hemodynamic environment are aimed at providing insights into normal valve function and valve pathology. We describe the development of organ- and tissue-culture systems and the biological response of the tissue subjected to their respective simulated mechanical environment. The studies noted above have enhanced our understanding of the complex fluid mechanics associated with the cardiovascular system and have led to new translational technologies.

  15. Are the Current Doppler Echocardiography Criteria Able to Discriminate Mitral Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Malfunction? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Evin, Morgane; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Rieu, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Malfunction of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in the mitral position could either be due to patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) or leaflet obstruction. The aim of this article is to investigate the validity of current echocardiographic criteria used for diagnosis of mitral prosthesis malfunction, namely maximum velocity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index. In vitro testing was performed on a double activation left heart duplicator. Both PPM and leaflet obstruction were investigated on a St. Jude Medical Master. PPM was studied by varying the St. Jude prosthesis size (21, 25, and 29 mm) and stroke volume (70 and 90 mL). Prosthesis leaflet obstruction was studied by partially or totally blocking the movement of one valve leaflet. Mitral flow conditions were altered in terms of E/A ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) to simulate physiologic panel of diastolic function. Maximum velocity, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index are shown to be insufficient to distinguish normal from malfunctioning St. Jude prostheses. Doppler velocity index and effective orifice area were 1.3 ± 0.49 and 1.83 ± 0.43 cm(2) for testing conditions with no malfunction below the 2.2 and 2 cm(2) thresholds (1.19 cm(2) for severe PPM and 1.23 cm(2) for fully blocked leaflet). The mean pressure gradient reached 5 mm Hg thresholds for several conditions of severe PPM only (6.9 mm Hg and mean maximum velocity value: 183.4 cm/s) whereas such value was never attained in the case of leaflet obstruction. In the case of leaflet obstruction, the maximum velocity averaged over the nine pulsed-wave Doppler locations increased by 38% for partial leaflet obstruction and 75% for a fully blocked leaflet when compared with normal conditions. Current echocardiographic criteria might be suboptimal for the detection of bileaflet mechanical heart valve malfunction. Further developments and investigations are required in order

  16. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing.

  17. Fast valve

    DOEpatents

    Van Dyke, W.J.

    1992-04-07

    A fast valve is disclosed that can close on the order of 7 milliseconds. It is closed by the force of a compressed air spring with the moving parts of the valve designed to be of very light weight and the valve gate being of wedge shaped with O-ring sealed faces to provide sealing contact without metal to metal contact. The combination of the O-ring seal and an air cushion create a soft final movement of the valve closure to prevent the fast air acting valve from having a harsh closing. 4 figs.

  18. [Tricuspid valve infective endocarditis in intravenous drug abuser].

    PubMed

    Rataj, O; Martinkovičová, L; Šetina, M

    2013-10-01

    Infective endocarditis can be divided from practical point of view into native valve endocarditis and prosthetic valve endocarditis. With regard to aquired endocarditis, endocarditis in intravenous drug abusers can be separetly differentiated. Echocardiography and microbio-logical cultures are essential for dia-gnosis. Treatment consists of antibio-tic therapy and often surgical procedure is required. We present a case report of an intravenous drug abuser with a tricuspid valve endocarditis, successfully treated with antibio-tic therapy and a following surgical valve repair. PMID:24164370

  19. Stentless aortic valve replacement: an update

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2011-01-01

    Although porcine aortic valves or pericardial tissue mounted on a stent have made implantation techniques easier, these valves sacrifice orifice area and increase stress at the attachment of the stent, which causes primary tissue failure. Optimizing hemodynamics to prevent patient–prosthetic mismatch and improve durability, stentless bioprostheses use was revived in the early 1990s. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of stentless valves in the aortic position. Retrospective and prospective randomized controlled studies showed similar operative mortality and morbidity in stented and stentless aortic valve replacement (AVR), though stentless AVR required longer cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass time. Several cohort studies showed improved survival after stentless AVR, probably due to better hemodynamic performance and earlier left ventricular (LV) mass regression compared with stented AVR. However, there was a bias of operation age and nonrandomization. A randomized trial supported an improved 8-year survival of patients with the Freestyle or Toronto valves compared with Carpentier–Edwards porcine valves. On the contrary, another randomized study did not show improved clinical outcomes up to 12 years. Freedom from reoperation at 12 years in Toronto stentless porcine valves ranged from 69% to 75%, which is much lower than for Carpentier–Edwards Perimount valves. Cusp tear with consequent aortic regurgitation was the most common cause of structural valve deterioration. Cryolife O’Brien valves also have shorter durability compared with stent valves. Actuarial freedom from reoperation was 44% at 10 years. Early prosthetic valve failure was also reported in patients who underwent root replacement with Shelhigh stentless composite grafts. There was no level I or IIa evidence of more effective orifice area, mean pressure gradient, LV mass regression, surgical risk, durability, and late outcomes in stentless bioprostheses. There is no

  20. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation in severe aortic stenosis patients with prior mitral valve prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Cenk; Baştuğ, Serdal; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Akçay, Murat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bozkurt, Engin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in patients with a previous mitral valve prosthesis is technically challenging, and pre-procedural comprehensive assessment of these patients before transcatheter aortic valve implantation is vital for an uncomplicated and successful procedure. Aim We want to share our experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with a preexisting functional mitral valve prosthesis and describe a series of important technical and pre-procedural details. Material and methods At our center, 135 patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Six of them with a preexisting mitral valve prosthesis received an Edwards SAPIEN XT valve through the transfemoral route. Results Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed successfully in all 6 patients without any deformation of the cobalt-chromium/steel stents of the aortic valve bioprosthesis. Also no distortion or malfunction in the mitral valve prosthesis was observed after the procedure. There were no complications during the hospitalization period. Post-procedural echocardiography revealed no or mild aortic paravalvular regurgitation and normal valve function in all the patients. In addition, serial echocardiographic examination demonstrated that both the stability and function of the aortic and mitral prosthetic valves were normal without any deterioration in the gradients and the degree of the regurgitation at long-term follow-ups. Conclusions Our experience confirms that transcatheter aortic valve implantation is technically feasible in patients with previous mitral valve replacement but comprehensive evaluation of patients by multimodal imaging techniques such as transesophageal echocardiography and multislice computed tomography is mandatory for a successful and safe procedure. PMID:26677380

  1. Multi-port valve assembly

    DOEpatents

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic

    1986-01-01

    A multi-port fluid valve apparatus is used to control the flow of fluids through a plurality of valves and includes a web, which preferably is a stainless steel endless belt. The belt has an aperture therethrough and is progressed, under motor drive and control, so that its aperture is moved from one valve mechanism to another. Each of the valve mechanisms comprises a pair of valve blocks which are held in fluid-tight relationship against the belt. Each valve block consists of a block having a bore through which the fluid flows, a first seal surrounding the bore and a second seal surrounding the first seal, with the distance between the first and second seals being greater than the size of the belt aperture. In order to open a valve, the motor progresses the belt aperture to where it is aligned with the two bores of a pair of valve blocks, such alignment permitting a flow of the fluid through the valve. The valve is closed by movement of the belt aperture and its replacement, within the pair of valve blocks, by a solid portion of the belt.

  2. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  3. Outcomes and safety of percutaneous aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Zajarias, Alan; Cribier, Alain G

    2009-05-19

    The concept of transcatheter aortic valve replacement was developed with the goal of offering a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not considered good candidates for surgical valve replacement. Initial attempts were complicated by vascular access problems and lack of appropriate tools. With time and experience, early problems were solved and the concepts of valve sizing, valve positioning, and patient selection were defined. Technological improvements allowed the use of smaller arterial sheaths to decrease vascular trauma, special catheters to facilitate valve delivery, and treatments on the valve prostheses that would ensure longer durability. After 5 years, the number of transcatheter aortic valve replacements has grown significantly, and will likely continue as this technology becomes increasingly available. Currently, 2 valve models, the Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California) and the CoreValve ReValving system (CoreValve Inc., Irvine, California), have been used in over 4,000 cases worldwide for the treatment of symptomatic aortic stenosis. Midterm follow-up shows no evidence of restenosis or prosthetic valve dysfunction. Transfemoral and transapical delivery routes can be selected depending on the quality of vascular access and the type of prosthesis used. Randomized trials that are currently underway will confirm procedural safety and guide the applicability of this technology.

  4. Depressurization valve

    DOEpatents

    Skoda, G.I.

    1989-03-28

    A depressurization valve for use in relieving completely the pressure in a simplified boiling water reactor is disclosed. The normally closed and sealed valve is provided with a valve body defining a conduit from an outlet of a manifold from the reactor through a valve seat. A closing valve disk is configured for fitting to the valve seat to normally close the valve. The seat below the disk is provided with a radially extending annulus extending a short distance into the aperture defined by the seat. The disk is correspondingly provided with a longitudinally extending annulus that extends downwardly through the aperture defined by the seat towards the high pressure side of the valve body. A ring shaped membrane is endlessly welded to the seat annulus and to the disk annulus. The membrane is conformed over the confronted surface of the seat and disk in a C-sectioned configuration to seal the depressurization valve against the possibility of weeping. The disk is held to the closed position by an elongate stem extending away from the high pressure side of the valve body. The stem has a flange configured integrally to the stem for bias by two springs. The first spring acts from a portion of the housing overlying the disk on the stem flange adjacent the disk. This spring urges the stem and attached disk away from the seat and thus will cause the valve to open at any pressure. A second spring-preferably of the Belleville variety-acts on a latch plate surrounding and freely moving relative to the end of the stem. This second spring overcomes the bias of the first spring and any pressure acting upon the disk. This Belleville spring maintains through its spring force the valve in the closed position. At the same time, the latch plate with its freedom of movement relative to the stem allows the stem to thermally expand during valve temperature excursion.

  5. Pannus Formation Leads to Valve Malfunction in the Tricuspid Position 19 Years after Triple Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Alskaf, Ebraham; McConkey, Hannah; Laskar, Nabila; Kardos, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The Medtronic ATS Open Pivot mechanical valve has been successfully used in heart valve surgery for more than two decades. We present the case of a patient who, 19 years following a tricuspid valve replacement with an ATS prosthesis as part of a triple valve operation following infective endocarditis, developed severe tricuspid regurgitation due to pannus formation. PMID:27355145

  6. Percutaneous balloon dilatation of the mitral valve: an analysis of echocardiographic variables related to outcome and the mechanism of dilatation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, G T; Weyman, A E; Abascal, V M; Block, P C; Palacios, I F

    1988-01-01

    Twenty two patients (four men, 18 women, mean age 56 years, range 21 to 88 years) with a history of rheumatic mitral stenosis were studied by cross sectional echocardiography before and after balloon dilatation of the mitral valve. The appearance of the mitral valve on the pre-dilatation echocardiogram was scored for leaflet mobility, leaflet thickening, subvalvar thickening, and calcification. Mitral valve area, left atrial volume, transmitral pressure difference, pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, cardiac rhythm, New York Heart Association functional class, age, and sex were also studied. Because there was some increase in valve area in almost all patients the results were classified as optimal or suboptimal (final valve area less than 1.0 cm2, final left atrial pressure greater than 10 mm Hg, or final valve area less than 25% greater than the initial area). The best multiple logistic regression fit was found with the total echocardiographic score alone. A high score (advanced leaflet deformity) was associated with a suboptimal outcome while a low score (a mobile valve with limited thickening) was associated with an optimal outcome. No other haemodynamic or clinical variables emerged as predictors of outcome in this analysis. Examination of pre-dilatation and post-dilatation echocardiograms showed that balloon dilatation reliably resulted in cleavage of the commissural plane and thus an increase in valve area. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 6 PMID:3190958

  7. Rothia prosthetic knee joint infection.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manish N; Malhotra, Prashant

    2015-08-01

    Rothia species - Gram-positive pleomorphic bacteria that are part of the normal oral and respiratory flora - are commonly associated with dental cavities and periodontal disease although systemic infections have been described. We describe a 53-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by prosthetic knee joint infection due to Rothia species, which was successfully treated by surgical removal of prosthesis and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. The issue of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures among patients with prosthetic joint replacements is discussed.

  8. Valve system incorporating single failure protection logic

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Rodger; Timmerman, Walter J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A valve system incorporating single failure protective logic. The system consists of a valve combination or composite valve which allows actuation or de-actuation of a device such as a hydraulic cylinder or other mechanism, integral with or separate from the valve assembly, by means of three independent input signals combined in a function commonly known as two-out-of-three logic. Using the input signals as independent and redundant actuation/de-actuation signals, a single signal failure, or failure of the corresponding valve or valve set, will neither prevent the desired action, nor cause the undesired action of the mechanism.

  9. Relationship between exercise-induced heart rate increase and the formation of microbubbles and high-intensity transient signals in mechanical heart valve implanted patients

    PubMed Central

    Sünbül, Ayşegül; Tanrıkulu, Nursen; Şengül, Cihan; Dağdeviren, Bahadır; Işık, Ömer

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The formation and collapse of vapor-filled bubbles near a mechanical heart valve is called cavitation. Microbubbles can be detected in vivo by doppler ultrasonography (USG) as HITS (high intensity transient signals) in cranial circulation. We investigated the relationship between exercise induced heart rate increase and HITS formation in cranial circulation. Material and methods Thirty-nine mechanical heart valve implanted (8 aortic valve replacement (AVR) + mitral valve replacement (MVR), 9 AVR, 22 MVR) patients aged 18-80 years old were included in our study. Microbubbles were counted in the left ventricular cavity via transthoracic echocardiography at rest per cardiac cycle. Afterwards transcranial Doppler USG was performed and HITS were counted in each patient's middle cerebral artery at 5 min duration. Subsequently an exercise test according to the Bruce protocol was performed. After achieving maximal heart rate, microbubbles in the left ventricle and HITS were counted again. Results Microbubbles in the left ventricle and transcranial HITS increased after exercise significantly compared to resting values (15.79 ±10.91 microbubbles/beat vs. 26.51 ±18.00 microbubbles/beat, p < 0.001; 6.13 ±8.07 HITS/5 min vs. 13.15 ±15.87 HITS/5 min, p = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between microbubbles and HITS counts after peak exercise (r = 0.55, p < 0.001). Conclusions In our study, we found that the microbubbles were increasing as the heart rate increased and more HITS were propelled to the cerebral circulation. As previously shown, HITS can alter cognitive functions. Therefore heart rate control is essential in mechanical heart valve patients to protect neurocognitive functions. PMID:25276153

  10. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  11. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  12. Depressurization valve

    DOEpatents

    Skoda, George I.

    1989-01-01

    A depressurization valve for use in relieving completely the pressure in a simplified boiling water reactor is disclosed. The normally closed and sealed valve is provided with a valve body defining a conduit from an outlet of a manifold from the reactor through a valve seat. A closing valve disk is configured for fitting to the valve seat to normally close the valve. The seat below the disk is provided with a radially extending annulus extending a short distance into the aperture defined by the seat. The disk is correspondingly provided with a longitudinally extending annulus that extends downwardly through the aperture defined by the seat towards the high pressure side of the valve body. A ring shaped membrane is endlessly welded to the seat annulus and to the disk annulus. The membrane is conformed over the confronted surface of the seat and disk in a C-sectioned configuration to seal the depressurization valve against the possibility of weeping. The disk is held to the closed position by an elongate stem extending away from the high pressure side of the valve body. The stem has a flange configured integrally to the stem for bias by two springs. The first spring acts from a portion of the housing overlying the disk on the stem flange adjacent the disk. This spring urges the stem and attached disk away from the seat and thus will cause the valve to open at any pressure. A second spring--preferably of the Belleville variety--acts on a latch plate surrounding and freely moving relative to the end of the stem. This second spring overcomes the bias of the first spring and any pressure acting upon the disk. This Belleville spring maintains through its spring force the valve in the closed position. At the same time, the latch plate with its freedom of movement relative to the stem allows the stem to thermally expand during valve temperature excursion. The latch plate in surrounding the stem is limited in its outward movement by a boss attached to the stem at the end of

  13. Effect of hinge gap width of a St. Jude medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve on blood damage potential--an in vitro micro particle image velocimetry study.

    PubMed

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Yun, B Min; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-01

    The hinge regions of the bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) can cause blood element damage due to nonphysiological shear stress levels and regions of flow stasis. Recently, a micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) system was developed to study whole flow fields within BMHV hinge regions with enhanced spatial resolution under steady leakage flow conditions. However, global velocity maps under pulsatile conditions are still necessary to fully understand the blood damage potential of these valves. The current study hypothesized that the hinge gap width will affect flow fields in the hinge region. Accordingly, the blood damage potential of three St. Jude Medical (SJM) BMHVs with different hinge gap widths was investigated under pulsatile flow conditions, using a μPIV system. The results demonstrated that the hinge gap width had a significant influence during the leakage flow phase in terms of washout and shear stress characteristics. During the leakage flow, the largest hinge gap generated the highest Reynolds shear stress (RSS) magnitudes (~1000 N/m²) among the three valves at the ventricular side of the hinge. At this location, all three valves indicated viscous shear stresses (VSS) greater than 30 N/m². The smallest hinge gap exhibited the lowest level of shear stress values, but had the poorest washout flow characteristics among the three valves, demonstrating propensity for flow stasis and associated activated platelet accumulation potential. The results from this study indicate that the hinge is a critical component of the BMHV design, which needs to be optimized to find the appropriate balance between reduction in fluid shear stresses and enhanced washout during leakage flow, to ensure minimal thrombotic complications. PMID:24976188

  14. Effect of hinge gap width of a St. Jude medical bileaflet mechanical heart valve on blood damage potential--an in vitro micro particle image velocimetry study.

    PubMed

    Jun, Brian H; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Yun, B Min; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-09-01

    The hinge regions of the bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) can cause blood element damage due to nonphysiological shear stress levels and regions of flow stasis. Recently, a micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) system was developed to study whole flow fields within BMHV hinge regions with enhanced spatial resolution under steady leakage flow conditions. However, global velocity maps under pulsatile conditions are still necessary to fully understand the blood damage potential of these valves. The current study hypothesized that the hinge gap width will affect flow fields in the hinge region. Accordingly, the blood damage potential of three St. Jude Medical (SJM) BMHVs with different hinge gap widths was investigated under pulsatile flow conditions, using a μPIV system. The results demonstrated that the hinge gap width had a significant influence during the leakage flow phase in terms of washout and shear stress characteristics. During the leakage flow, the largest hinge gap generated the highest Reynolds shear stress (RSS) magnitudes (~1000 N/m²) among the three valves at the ventricular side of the hinge. At this location, all three valves indicated viscous shear stresses (VSS) greater than 30 N/m². The smallest hinge gap exhibited the lowest level of shear stress values, but had the poorest washout flow characteristics among the three valves, demonstrating propensity for flow stasis and associated activated platelet accumulation potential. The results from this study indicate that the hinge is a critical component of the BMHV design, which needs to be optimized to find the appropriate balance between reduction in fluid shear stresses and enhanced washout during leakage flow, to ensure minimal thrombotic complications.

  15. Venous Thrombosis on Prosthetic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rodman, N. F.; Wolf, R. H.; Mason, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    Thrombi deposited on prosthetic devices in the superior vena cava of the rhesus monkey were studied by morphologic and biochemical technics. Glass or silicone-coated glass (SCG) rings were implanted for 30 minutes to 14 days. Thrombus was deposited on the surface of each prosthetic device, and deposition was much greater and more rapid on glass surfaces than on SCG surfaces. On SCG surfaces, initial deposits consisting of single platelets, small platelet aggregates and erythrocytes were seen by scanning electron microscopy. These were followed by larger platelet aggregates, fibrin and, much later, leukocytes. Transmission electron micrographs revealed disintegration of the platelets forming aggregates and an osmiophilic deposit on the prosthetic surface. Shortened partial thromboplastin times were observed in all test animals but the sham-operated one, and therefore may be predictive of thrombus formation. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:4207269

  16. Valve assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Marshala, D.L.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a subsurface pump actuated by a reciprocatable sucker rod for producing well liquids from a subsurface reservoir involving a piston adapted to reciprocate within a cylinder immersed in the reservoir, the piston being provided with a traveling valve. The improvement described here comprises valve means connected to the sucker tod for lifting a body of fluid during upstrokes of the sucker rod, the valve means comprising: a barrel assembly having an internal bore and comprising: a lower barrel member; and an upper barrel assembly connected to the lower barrel and having a beveled seating surface with at least one fluid port therethrough.

  17. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  18. Valve-"Health"-Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Scott L.; Drouant, George J.

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes sensors and data acquisition, wireless data-communication, and data-processing subsystems has been developed as a means of both real-time and historical tracking of information indicative of deterioration in the mechanical integrity and performance of a highgeared ball valve or a linearly actuated valve that operates at a temperature between cryogenic and ambient.

  19. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  20. The development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, A M

    1998-01-01

    Development of the Starr-Edwards heart valve marked a new era in the treatment of valvular heart disease. Until the development of the Starr-Edwards valve, there were no published reports of patients who had lived longer than 3 months with a prosthetic valve in the mitral position. This valve was the result of a unique partnership between a young surgeon, Dr. Albert Starr, and an experienced engineer, Mr. Lowell Edwards. Working as a team, these 2 men developed and successfully implanted the 1st Starr-Edwards valve within less than 2 years of their 1st meeting. Their key to success was their willingness and ability to make repeated modifications to their design to solve each clinical problem as it arose. Their constant focus on the clinical goal aided the rapid transformation of their design from a leaflet valve to a shielded ball valve, and finally to an unshielded ball valve suitable for implantation in a human being. Along the way, they abandoned the idea of imitating the appearance of native valves, in favor of developing valves that would be clinically successful. Their work has provided help and hope for patients who otherwise would have died from the complications of rheumatic heart disease and other valvular disorders for which valve replacement is the only treatment. Images PMID:9885105

  1. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  2. Biomechanical design considerations for transradial prosthetic interface: A review.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Traditional function and comfort assessment of transradial prostheses pay scant attention to prosthetic interface. With better understanding of the biomechanics of prosthetic interface comes better efficiency and safety for interface design; in this way, amputees are more likely to accept prosthetic usage. This review attempts to provide design and selection criteria of transradial interface for prosthetists and clinicians. Various transradial socket types in the literature were chronologically reviewed. Biomechanical discussion of transradial prosthetic interface design from an engineering point of view was also done. Suspension control, range of motion, stability, as well as comfort and safety of socket designs have been considered in varying degrees in the literature. The human-machine interface design should change from traditional "socket design" to new "interface design." From anatomy and physiology to biomechanics of the transradial residual limb, the force and motion transfer, together with comfort and safety, are the two main aspects in prosthetic interface design. Load distribution and transmission should mainly rely on achieving additional skeletal control through targeted soft tissue relief. Biomechanics of the residual limb soft tissues should be studied to find the relationship between mechanical properties and the comfort and safety of soft tissues.

  3. SLM Produced Hermetically Sealed Isolation Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a valve concept to replace traditional pyrotechnic-driven isolation valves. This paper will describe the valve design and development process. The valve design uses a stem/wedge to support a disk inside the valve. That disk hermetically seals the pressurized fluids. A release mechanism holds the stem/wedge and a large spring in place. When required to open, a solenoid is energized and pulls the release mechanism allowing the spring to pull the stem/wedge away from the disk. Now the disk is unsupported and the pressure ruptures the disk allowing flow to the outlet of the valve. This paper will provide details of this design, describe the development testing, and show the results from the valve level tests performed. Also, a trade study is presented to show the advantages of this design to a conventional pyrotechnic-based valve.

  4. SLM Produced Hermetically Sealed Isolation Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a valve concept to replace traditional pyrotechnic driven isolation valves. This paper will describe the valve design and development process. The valve design uses a stem/wedge to support a disk inside the valve. That disk hermetically seals the pressurized fluids. A release mechanism holds the stem/wedge and a large spring in place. When required to open, a solenoid is energized and pulls the release mechanism allowing the spring to pull the stem/wedge away from the disk. Now the disk is unsupported and the pressure ruptures the disk allowing flow to the outlet of the valve. This paper will provide details of this design, describe the development testing, and show the results from the valve level tests performed. Also, a trade study is presented to show the advantages of this design to a conventional pyrotechnic based valve.

  5. A Prosthetic Memory: An Application of the Prosthetic Environment Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Roy S., Jr.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A set of artifical reminders'' are developed to compensate for a profound memory deficit in a young brain damaged male. The prosthetic memory techniques are described, and his increase in functional level is documented. A report of a 15-month follow-up is included. (Author)

  6. Strategies and outcomes of periprocedural bridging therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin in patients with mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Jacqueline M; Majeed, Ammar; Mattsson, Eva; Schulman, Sam; Holmström, Margareta; Ågren, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Patients with mechanical heart valves (MHV) undergoing invasive procedures often receive periprocedural bridging with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). The bridging strategies used in real-life and the predictors for bleeding and thrombosis are not well studied. We retrospectively assessed patients with MHV that underwent invasive procedures requiring vitamin K antagonist interruption and LMWH bridging. Thromboembolic and bleeding events occurring up to 30 days after the procedures were recorded. Predictors of major bleeding events (MBEs) were analyzed with logistic regression. We evaluated 547 patients with MHV who underwent 275 procedures during a 6.5-year period. Bridging with LMWH was used in 185 procedures in a total of 117 patients. Combined pre- and post-operative bridging was the most frequently employed (63 %). Doses of LMWH were prophylactic in 96 (52 %) of the procedures and therapeutic in 89 (48 %). The procedure-related bleeding risk was evaluated as high in 70 (38 %) and low in 115 (62 %) of the procedures. There was a trend to more frequent use of prophylactic doses (61 %) in high-risk surgery, and more therapeutic doses (53 %) in low-risk ones. There were 36 bleeding episodes, 21 (11 % of procedures) of which were classified as MBEs, but there were no thromboembolic events. Most MBEs (n = 14; 67 %) occurred in surgeries with high bleeding risk. In the multivariate analysis, the bleeding risk of the surgery itself was the only independent predictor for MBEs. For patients with MHV receiving perioperative bridging with LMWH, the major predictor for MBE is the bleeding risk of the surgery.

  7. Safety and Cost-Effectiveness of Bridge Therapies for Invasive Dental Procedures in Patients with Mechanical Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Won, Ki-Bum; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Shim, Chi-Young; Hong, Gue-Ru; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bridge anticoagulation therapy is mostly utilized in patients with mechanical heart valves (MHV) receiving warfarin therapy during invasive dental procedures because of the risk of excessive bleeding related to highly vascular supporting dental structures. Bridge therapy using low molecular weight heparin may be an attractive option for invasive dental procedures; however, its safety and cost-effectiveness compared with unfractionated heparin (UFH) is uncertain. Materials and Methods This study investigated the safety and cost-effectiveness of enoxaparin in comparison to UFH for bridge therapy in 165 consecutive patients (57±11 years, 35% men) with MHV who underwent invasive dental procedures. Results This study included 75 patients treated with UFH-based bridge therapy (45%) and 90 patients treated with enoxaparin-based bridge therapy (55%). The bleeding risk of dental procedures and the incidence of clinical adverse outcomes were not significantly different between the UFH group and the enoxaparin group. However, total medical costs were significantly lower in the enoxaparin group than in the UFH group (p<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, old age (≥65 years) was significantly associated with an increased risk of total bleeding independent of bridging methods (odds ratio, 2.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.48; p=0.022). Enoxaparin-based bridge therapy (β=-0.694, p<0.001) and major bleeding (β=0.296, p=0.045) were significantly associated with the medical costs within 30 days after dental procedures. Conclusion Considering the benefit of enoxaparin in cost-effectiveness, enoxaparin may be more efficient than UFH for bridge therapy in patients with MHV who required invasive dental procedures. PMID:24954321

  8. Implications of Using Different Methods to Characterise Anticoagulant Control in Patients with Second Generation Mechanical Heart Valve Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Francesca; Rogers, Chris A.; Bryan, Alan J.; Angelini, Gianni D.; Reeves, Barnaby C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterisation of anticoagulant control is fundamental to investigations of its association with clinical outcome. Anticoagulant control depends on several factors. This paper aims to illustrate the implications of different methods for measuring and analysing anticoagulant control in patients with second generation mechanical heart valve prostheses. Methods International normalised ratio (INR) data collected during the 10-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial were analysed. We considered the influence of: 3 different target INR ranges; anticoagulant control expressed as the proportion of INR readings (PoR) vs. anticoagulant control follow-up time (PoT); 3 ways of describing the profile of anticoagulant control over time. Results Different target INR ranges dramatically influenced derived measures of anticoagulant control; the PoT within the target range varied from 88% for the widest to 28% for narrowest range. Overall distributions of PoR and PoT observations were similar but differed by up to ±20% for individuals; PoT exceeded PoR when control was good but was less than PoR when control was poor. Classifying PoT outside the target range showed that widely varying combinations of PoT too high and too low are possible across individuals. Conclusions Researchers' choices about methods for measuring and quantifying anticoagulant control markedly influence the values derived from INR readings. The use of different methods across studies makes it difficult or impossible to compare findings and to establish an evidence base for clinical practice. Methods for quantifying anticoagulant control should be standardised. PMID:24988447

  9. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  10. [Candida albicans endocarditis with mycotic aneurysms of the lower leg arteries in a patient with mechanical heart valve prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Kindel, M; Sternfeldt, R; Spiller, P

    2002-09-01

    We report on a 53-year-old patient in whom the aortic and mitral valves had been replaced. This patient developed Candida albicans sepsis with mycotic aneurysms of the tibial arteries as well as cerebral emboli under immunosuppression. Dispensing with a valve replacement operation, a sustained freedom from recurrence (period of observation currently 24 months) could be attained with antimycotic therapy with amphotericin B and flucytosine i.v. and subsequent long-term therapy with fluconazole p.o. as well as surgical and interventional clearance of the mycotic aneurysms.

  11. New trends in prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hubálková, H; Linetskiy, I

    2006-01-01

    Prosthetic dentistry is one of the fundamental pillars of dentistry. Even though it is highly specialized in replacement of missing teeth and adjacent soft and hard oral tissues, the cooperation with other branches of dentistry is very important. It usually provides final stages of rehabilitation of the whole maxillofacial system. The loss of several teeth doesn't have to be an immediate threat to the function of the whole dentition, but it can initiate serious problems related to the whole orofacial region, psychics and the wellbeing of the patient. From this point of view prosthetic dentistry is a valuable tool with high therapeutical and preventive character. Modern prosthetics offers classical solutions with simple fixed and removable dentures, and advanced solutions with dental implants support for rehabilitation of dental defects. Final quality and prognosis of prosthetic treatment depends both on materials and technologies used and on the patients' motivation and dental care. Superior esthetical demands and biocompatibility issues drive dental manufacturers to introduce new materials with defined properties. Nowadays the most sophisticated systems are based on ceramics, dental implants and CAD/CAM technologies.

  12. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  13. Control method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  14. Bacterial biofilms and implantable prosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, A; Donatucci, C F

    2003-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction afflicts millions of men. A group of patients with advanced degeneration of their erectile tissue do not respond to pharmacological therapy, and surgical prosthetic reconstruction represents an attractive and highly satisfying alternative. Yet many men are unwilling to take this step due to fear of infection. Implanted prosthetic devices are at risk for infection because they provide a platform for the development of a bacterial biofilm, an organized bacterial colony that grows on the surface of the implanted material. The biofilm is resistant to all efforts to eradicate it short of removal of the foreign material. Bacteria may attach to the surface of the foreign material by surface charge attraction, hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions, and by specific attachment by fimbrae. Growth, colonization, and maturation follow bacterial attachment. A mature biofilm is composed of three layers: a linking film binding the biofilm to the surface; a base film made up of a compact layer of bacteria; and a surface film from which free-floating bacteria can arise and spread. The majority of the surface layer is made up of exopolysaccharide matrix. Bacteria deep within the biofilm matrix live in a protected environment; diffusion of antibiotics is difficult, low oxygen tension leads to a lower bacterial metabolic rate rendering the bacteria functionally resistant to high levels of antibiotics. Effective strategies to reduce prosthetic infection levels must rely on the prevention of biofilm formation through surface modification. Possible mechanisms include the addition of antimicrobials to the surface of the device, or chemical modifications, which reduces bacterial attachment.

  15. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  16. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  17. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of heart valves.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Moeller, Andrew D; Lee, J Michael; Wells, Sarah M

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated remodeling of aortic and mitral valves leaflets under the volume loading and cardiac expansion of pregnancy. Those valves' leaflets enlarge with altered collagen fiber architecture, content, and cross-linking and biphasic changes (decreases, then increases) in extensibility during gestation. This study extends our analyses to right-sided valves, with additional compositional measurements for all valves. Valve leaflets were harvested from nonpregnant heifers and pregnant cows. Leaflet structure was characterized by leaflet dimensions, and ECM composition was determined using standard biochemical assays. Histological studies assessed changes in cellular and ECM components. Leaflet mechanical properties were assessed using equibiaxial mechanical testing. Collagen thermal stability and cross-linking were assessed using denaturation and hydrothermal isometric tension tests. Pulmonary and tricuspid leaflet areas increased during pregnancy by 35 and 55%, respectively. Leaflet thickness increased by 20% only in the pulmonary valve and largely in the fibrosa (30% thickening). Collagen crimp length was reduced in both the tricuspid (61%) and pulmonary (42%) valves, with loss of crimped area in the pulmonary valve. Thermomechanics showed decreased collagen thermal stability with surprisingly maintained cross-link maturity. The pulmonary leaflet exhibited the biphasic change in extensibility seen in left side valves, whereas the tricuspid leaflet mechanics remained largely unchanged throughout pregnancy. The tricuspid valve exhibits a remodeling response during pregnancy that is significantly diminished from the other three valves. All valves of the heart remodel in pregnancy in a manner distinct from cardiac pathology, with much similarity valve to valve, but with interesting valve-specific responses in the aortic and tricuspid valves.

  18. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  19. The Impact of Fluid Inertia on In Vivo Estimation of Mitral Valve Leaflet Constitutive Properties and Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-05-01

    We examine the influence of the added mass effect (fluid inertia) on mitral valve leaflet stress during isovolumetric phases. To study this effect, oscillating flow is applied to a flexible membrane at various frequencies to control inertia. Resulting membrane strain is calculated through a three-dimensional reconstruction of markers from stereo images. To investigate the effect in vivo, the analysis is repeated on a published dataset for an ovine mitral valve (Journal of Biomechanics 42(16): 2697-2701). The membrane experiment demonstrates that the relationship between pressure and strain must be corrected with a fluid inertia term if the ratio of inertia to pressure differential approaches 1. In the mitral valve, this ratio reaches 0.7 during isovolumetric contraction for an acceleration of 6 m/s(2). Acceleration is reduced by 72% during isovolumetric relaxation. Fluid acceleration also varies along the leaflet during isovolumetric phases, resulting in spatial variations in stress. These results demonstrate that fluid inertia may be the source of the temporally and spatially varying stiffness measurements previously seen through inverse finite element analysis of in vivo data during isovolumetric phases. This study demonstrates that there is a need to account for added mass effects when analyzing in vivo constitutive relationships of heart valves. PMID:26416720

  20. The Impact of Fluid Inertia on In Vivo Estimation of Mitral Valve Leaflet Constitutive Properties and Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Dasi, Lakshmi P

    2016-05-01

    We examine the influence of the added mass effect (fluid inertia) on mitral valve leaflet stress during isovolumetric phases. To study this effect, oscillating flow is applied to a flexible membrane at various frequencies to control inertia. Resulting membrane strain is calculated through a three-dimensional reconstruction of markers from stereo images. To investigate the effect in vivo, the analysis is repeated on a published dataset for an ovine mitral valve (Journal of Biomechanics 42(16): 2697-2701). The membrane experiment demonstrates that the relationship between pressure and strain must be corrected with a fluid inertia term if the ratio of inertia to pressure differential approaches 1. In the mitral valve, this ratio reaches 0.7 during isovolumetric contraction for an acceleration of 6 m/s(2). Acceleration is reduced by 72% during isovolumetric relaxation. Fluid acceleration also varies along the leaflet during isovolumetric phases, resulting in spatial variations in stress. These results demonstrate that fluid inertia may be the source of the temporally and spatially varying stiffness measurements previously seen through inverse finite element analysis of in vivo data during isovolumetric phases. This study demonstrates that there is a need to account for added mass effects when analyzing in vivo constitutive relationships of heart valves.

  1. Automatic measuring of quality criteria for heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condurache, Alexandru Paul; Hahn, Tobias; Hofmann, Ulrich G.; Scharfschwerdt, Michael; Misfeld, Martin; Aach, Til

    2007-03-01

    Patients suffering from a heart valve deficiency are often treated by replacing the valve with an artificial or biological implant. In case of biological implants, the use of porcine heart valves is common. Quality assessment and inspection methods are mandatory to supply the patients (and also medical research) with only the best such xenograft implants thus reducing the number of follow-up surgeries to replace worn-up valves. We describe an approach for automatic in-vitro evaluation of prosthetic heart valves in an artificial circulation system. We show how to measure the orifice area during a heart cycle to obtain an orifice curve. Different quality parameters are then estimated on such curves.

  2. [FTIR spectroscopic studies of facial prosthetic adhesives].

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Yang, Qing-fang; Liang, Jian-feng; Zhao, Yi-min

    2008-10-01

    According to the composition of the traditional facial prosthetic adhesives, most of adhesives can be classified into two categories: acrylic polymer-based adhesive and silicone-based adhesive. In previous studies, measurements of various mechanical bond strengths were carried out, whereas the functional groups of the adhesives were evaluated seldom during the adhesion. In the present study the analysis of two facial prosthetic adhesives (Epithane and Secure Adhesive) was carried out by using infrared spectroscopy. Two adhesives in the form of fluid or semisolid were submitted to FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The results showed that water and ammonia residue volatilized during the solidification of Epithane, and absorption peak reduction of carbonyl was due to the volatilization of acetate vinyl from Secure Adhesive. Similar silicone functional groups both in the silicone-based adhesive and in silicone elastomer could be the key to higher bond strength between silicone elastomer and skin with silicone-based adhesive. The position, shape of main absorption peaks of three adhesives didn't change, which showing that their main chemicals and basic structures didn't change during solidification. PMID:19123392

  3. Packing developments improve valve availability

    SciTech Connect

    Aikin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Regulatory environment and clean air legislation demand improvements in valve stuffing box performance. In normally inaccessible or hazardous areas, the cost of valve maintenance and repair in terms of safety, radiation, and toxic gas exposure is very high. AECL Research`s Mechanical Equipment Development (MED) branch at Chalk River Laboratories (Chalk River, Ont.) has researched stem packing leakage problems since the early 1970s. Early research and development (R and D) significantly improved the understanding of operational characteristics of asbestos-based valve packing. Of note was the development of live loading, a stem packing method that reduces valve leakage to near zero under most operating conditions, and significantly prolongs packing life. This article describes how stem packing developments, including live loading techniques, are reducing valve fugitive emissions and leakage.

  4. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  5. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  6. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  7. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  8. 49 CFR 236.383 - Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. 236.383... Inspection and Tests § 236.383 Valve locks, valves, and valve magnets. Valve locks on valves of the non-cut-off type shall be tested at least once every three months, and valves and valve magnets shall...

  9. Piezoelectric valve

    DOEpatents

    Petrenko, Serhiy Fedorovich

    2013-01-15

    A motorized valve has a housing having an inlet and an outlet to be connected to a pipeline, a saddle connected with the housing, a turn plug having a rod, the turn plug cooperating with the saddle, and a drive for turning the valve body and formed as a piezoelectric drive, the piezoelectric drive including a piezoelectric generator of radially directed standing acoustic waves, which is connected with the housing and is connectable with a pulse current source, and a rotor operatively connected with the piezoelectric generator and kinematically connected with the rod of the turn plug so as to turn the turn plug when the rotor is actuated by the piezoelectric generator.

  10. Evolution of penile prosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Le, Brian; Burnett, Arthur L

    2015-03-01

    Penile implant usage dates to the 16th century yet penile implants to treat erectile dysfunction did not occur until nearly four centuries later. The modern era of penile implants has progressed rapidly over the past 50 years as physicians' knowledge of effective materials for penile prostheses and surgical techniques has improved. Herein, we describe the history of penile prosthetics and the constant quest to improve the technology. Elements of the design from the first inflatable penile prosthesis by Scott and colleagues and the Small-Carrion malleable penile prosthesis are still found in present iterations of these devices. While there have been significant improvements in penile prosthesis design, the promise of an ideal prosthetic device remains elusive. As other erectile dysfunction therapies emerge, penile prostheses will have to continue to demonstrate a competitive advantage. A particular strength of penile prostheses is their efficacy regardless of etiology, thus allowing treatment of even the most refractory cases. PMID:25763121

  11. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  12. Candida glabrata prosthetic hip infection.

    PubMed

    Bartalesi, Filippo; Fallani, Stefania; Salomoni, Elena; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Meli, Massimo; Pecile, Patrizia; Cassetta, Maria Iris; Latella, Leonardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Novelli, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian woman carrying a 2-year-old hip prosthesis infected by Candida glabrata dose-dependent susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Resection arthroplasty was performed. Six weeks of caspofungin plus liposomal amphotericin combination therapy achieved joint sterilization and allowed a successfully reimplantation arthroplasty. In addition we review 9 cases of C. glabrata prosthetic joint infection described to date in the literature.

  13. Impact testing of the residual limb: System response to changes in prosthetic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Boutwell, Erin; Stine, Rebecca; Gard, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether changing prosthetic limb stiffness affects the total limb stiffness and influences the shock absorption of an individual with transtibial amputation. The hypotheses tested within this study are that a decrease in longitudinal prosthetic stiffness will produce (1) a reduced total limb stiffness, and (2) reduced magnitude of peak impact forces and increased time delay to peak force. Fourteen subjects with a transtibial amputation participated in this study. Prosthetic stiffness was modified by means of a shock-absorbing pylon that provides reduced longitudinal stiffness through compression of a helical spring within the pylon. A sudden loading evaluation device was built to examine changes in limb loading mechanics during a sudden impact event. No significant change was found in the peak force magnitude or timing of the peak force between prosthetic limb stiffness conditions. Total limb stiffness estimates ranged from 14.9 to 17.9 kN/m but were not significantly different between conditions. Thus, the prosthetic-side total limb stiffness was unaffected by changes in prosthetic limb stiffness. The insensitivity of the total limb stiffness to prosthetic stiffness may be explained by the mechanical characteristics (i.e., stiffness and damping) of the anatomical tissue within the residual limb. PMID:27272982

  14. Excess flow shutoff valve

    DOEpatents

    Kiffer, Micah S.; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2016-02-09

    Excess flow shutoff valve comprising a valve body, a valve plug, a partition, and an activation component where the valve plug, the partition, and activation component are disposed within the valve body. A suitable flow restriction is provided to create a pressure difference between the upstream end of the valve plug and the downstream end of the valve plug when fluid flows through the valve body. The pressure difference exceeds a target pressure difference needed to activate the activation component when fluid flow through the valve body is higher than a desired rate, and thereby closes the valve.

  15. [Contribution of multiplane transesophageal echocardiography in the study of mitral valve prostheses].

    PubMed

    Malergue, M C; Illouz, E; Temkine, J; Dibie, A; Folliguet, T; Laborde, F

    1996-01-01

    Many reports have confirmed the value of transoesophageal echocardiography in the diagnosis of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis dysfunction: new biplane and multiplane probes seem to provide additional information in the assessment of cardiac disease. The aim of this study was to quantify the additional value of these new probes in the assessment of mitral valve prostheses. Seventy-five mitral valve prostheses were assessed with the multiplane probe, 45 normal bileaflet prostheses, 17 with regurgitant dysfunction and 12 with non obstructive thrombi and/or strands, and one with a blocked leaflet. In order to compare the respective values of monoplane, biplane and multiplane probes, the recordings were performed at 0 degrees, 90 degrees and from 0 degrees to 180 degrees in continuous sweep mode through the scanning plane. Globally, with the monoplane assessment, it was only possible to visualise both leaflets simultaneously in 13% of cases. The majority of prostheses was correctly analysed between 60 and 100 degrees. This was of paramount importance for the diagnosis of blockage of one leaflet. With respect to para-prosthetic valve regurgitation, the transverse view allowed visualisation of the lateral and paraseptal annular regions. The addition of a longitudinal view allowed visualisation of anterior and posterior regurgitant jets: the supplementary views provided by the multiplane probe allowed detection of small regurgitant jets in the diagonal planes between the longitudinal and transverse views. The multiplane probe offers the possibility of identifying the precise origin of the jet and helps quantification and peroperative localisation of its position. Small, non-obstructive thrombi and strands are better seen using a multiplane probe, especially when of small size. Therefore, multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography improves the assessment of mitral valve prostheses, the majority of diagnoses being, however, accessible with biplane probes.

  16. Plasma valve

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Sharma, Sushil; Noonan, John; Rotela, Elbio; Khounsary, Ali

    2003-01-01

    A plasma valve includes a confinement channel and primary anode and cathode disposed therein. An ignition cathode is disposed adjacent the primary cathode. Power supplies are joined to the cathodes and anode for rapidly igniting and maintaining a plasma in the channel for preventing leakage of atmospheric pressure through the channel.

  17. A case of Starr-Edwards valve thrombosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Margot; Kiess, Marla; Rychel, Valerie; Fofonoff, Doreen; Grewal, Jasmine

    2012-11-01

    Starr-Edwards ball-in-cage prosthetic heart valves, although durable, are associated with a particularly high rate of thromboembolic complications. This valve is seldom used in North America, and is certainly not the valve of choice in a woman of childbearing age. Few reports exist from the 1970s of thrombotic complications in pregnant women with Starr-Edwards prostheses, and the optimal management strategy for such valves is unclear. Here, the case is reported of a 31-year-old woman with a Starr-Edwards prosthesis in the mitral position who was transferred to the authors' center at six weeks' gestation with pulmonary edema. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated thrombosis of the prosthetic valve, with a mean gradient of 23 mmHg. When treated initially with intravenous heparin and furosemide the patient improved significantly; however, the optimal management going forward was unclear. Here, the options for anticoagulation during pregnancy and for management in the event of valve thrombosis are reviewed. In the absence of any clear guidelines, a thorough discussion of the various risks and benefits with the patient is necessary, but ultimately any consideration of the risk to the mother is paramount.

  18. Floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse/mitral valvular regurgitation: effects on the circulation.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, H; Wooley, C F

    2001-01-01

    The floppy mitral valve prolapses into the left atrium in such a dynamic manner that the prolapsing floppy mitral valve becomes a space-occupying lesion within the left atrium. A significant result of the floppy mitral valve prolapsing into the left atrium during left ventricular systole is the development of a "third chamber" located between the mitral annulus and the prolapsing mitral valve leaflets. Since the blood in the third chamber does not contribute to forward stroke volume, the third chamber may have significant effects on stroke volume and cardiac output. The floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse dynamics also affect left ventricular papillary muscle tension and traction, altering the patterns of left ventricular contraction and relaxation, activating papillary muscle and left ventricular stretch receptors, and contributing to the production of cardiac arrhythmias. Floppy mitral valve innervation patterns with distinct nerve terminals provide a neural basis for brain-heart interactions, augmented by mechanical stimuli from the prolapsing floppy mitral valve. With the onset of mitral valvular regurgitation, and gradual progression of the mitral valve regurgitation from mild, to moderate, to severe, alterations in left atrial and left ventricular chamber size and performance occur, resulting in left atrial and left ventricular myopathy. As a connective tissue disorder, floppy mitral valve/mitral valve prolapse may be associated with abnormal structural and elastic properties of the aorta, with resultant changes in aortic function. Progression of mitral valve regurgitation and the aging process also affect aortic function indices in an adverse manner. The phenomena associated with floppy mitral valve dysfunction, with prolapse of the mitral valve into the left atrium and the unique, resultant forms of mitral valve regurgitation, are dynamic in nature. As the long-term natural history of these interrelated phenomena is being clarified, it is apparent

  19. Development of a Prototype Over-Actuated Biomimetic Prosthetic Hand

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Matthew R.; Walter, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results. PMID:25790306

  20. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  1. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T.; Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P.; Cook, S.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  2. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve. Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vita, F.; de Tullio, M. D.; Verzicco, R.

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the comparison between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flows through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in the aortic root. The blood, in fact, is a concentrated suspension of cells, mainly red blood cells, in a Newtonian matrix, the plasma, and consequently its overall behavior is that of a non-Newtonian fluid owing to the action of the cells' membrane on the fluid part. The common practice, however, assumes the blood in large vessels as a Newtonian fluid since the shear rate is generally high and the effective viscosity becomes independent of the former. In this paper, we show that this is not always the case even in the aorta, the largest artery of the systemic circulation, owing to the pulsatile and transitional nature of the flow. Unexpectedly, for most of the pulsating cycle and in a large part of the fluid volume, the shear rate is smaller than the threshold level for the blood to display a constant effective viscosity and its shear thinning character might affect the system dynamics. A direct inspection of the various flow features has shown that the valve dynamics, the transvalvular pressure drop and the large-scale features of the flow are very similar for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models. On the other hand, the mechanical damage of the red blood cells (hemolysis), induced by the altered stress values in the flow, is larger for the non-Newtonian fluid model than for the Newtonian one.

  3. High-resolution fluid-structure interaction simulations of flow through a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve in an anatomic aorta.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-02-01

    We have performed high-resolution fluid-structure interaction simulations of physiologic pulsatile flow through a bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) in an anatomically realistic aorta. The results are compared with numerical simulations of the flow through an identical BMHV implanted in a straight aorta. The comparisons show that although some of the salient features of the flow remain the same, the aorta geometry can have a major effect on both the flow patterns and the motion of the valve leaflets. For the studied configuration, for instance, the BMHV leaflets in the anatomic aorta open much faster and undergo a greater rebound during closing than the same valve in the straight axisymmetric aorta. Even though the characteristic triple-jet structure does emerge downstream of the leaflets for both cases, for the anatomic case the leaflet jets spread laterally and diffuse much faster than in the straight aorta due to the aortic curvature and complex shape of the anatomic sinus. Consequently the leaflet shear layers in the anatomic case remain laminar and organized for a larger portion of the accelerating phase as compared to the shear layers in the straight aorta, which begin to undergo laminar instabilities well before peak systole is reached. For both cases, however, the flow undergoes a very similar explosive transition to the small-scale, turbulent-like state just prior to reaching peak systole. The local maximum shear stress is used as a metric to characterize the mechanical environment experienced by blood cells. Pockets of high local maximum shear are found to be significantly more widespread in the anatomic aorta than in the straight aorta throughout the cardiac cycle. Pockets of high local maximum shear were located near the leaflets and in the aortic arc region. This work clearly demonstrates the importance of the aortic geometry on the flow phenomena in a BMHV and demonstrates the potential of our computational method to carry out image

  4. Acute obstruction of a mechanical aortic valve in a young woman: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Karapanagiotidis, Georgios T; Sarsam, Mazin A I; Fletcher, Simon N

    2014-01-01

    Summary Acute aortic valve obstruction is a medical and surgical emergency necessitating intensive care unit admission. The differential diagnosis includes thrombosis, pannus formation or vegetations. The diagnosis should be obtained as soon as possible, with possible orientation towards the cause. Different diagnostic modalities exist nowadays. Notably, the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) offers a diagnosis and a guide for management. Surgical treatment remains of choice despite growing evidence about a benefit of combined thrombolytic and anticoagulation line of management. Learning points Acute management and resuscitation of acute valvular obstruction.Differential diagnosis and role of echo in the diagnosis.Management options. PMID:26693322

  5. VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1959-08-25

    Electromagnetically operated vapor valves are described for apparatus employed in the separation of isotopes or elements to control the flow of gaseous vapors between a vaporizing charge chamber and an ionizing chamber, The charge chamber and ionizing chamber are positioned in a magnetic field, and the flow of vapors through an orifice connecting the chambers is regulated by regulating the flow of current through a resilient metal strip rigidly mounted at one end and positioned in the magnetic field adjacent to the orifice.

  6. Toward patient-specific simulations of cardiac valves: state-of-the-art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Votta, Emiliano; Le, Trung Bao; Stevanella, Marco; Fusini, Laura; Caiani, Enrico G; Redaelli, Alberto; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    Recent computational methods enabling patient-specific simulations of native and prosthetic heart valves are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on two critical components of such methods: 1) anatomically realistic finite element models for simulating the structural dynamics of heart valves; and 2) fluid structure interaction methods for simulating the performance of heart valves in a patient specific beating left ventricle. It is shown that the significant progress achieved in both fronts paves the way toward clinically relevant computational models that can simulate the performance of a range of heart valves, native and prosthetic, in a patient-specific left heart environment. The significant algorithmic and model validation challenges that need to be tackled in the future to realize this goal are also discussed. PMID:23174421

  7. Staphylococcus hominis native mitral valve bacterial endocarditis (SBE) in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Esrick, Michael D; Larusso, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    There are several species of coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) that are part of the normal skin flora and are relatively noninvasive/low virulence organisms. CoNS are important pathogens in patients with prosthetic devices and are the most common pathogen associated with prosthetic valve endocarditis. CoNS native valve infective endocarditis (IE) is rare. Patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an outflow pressure gradient greater than 30 mm Hg are predisposed to IE. There has been only one reported case of non-mitral valve IE due to CoNS in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of Staphylococcal hominis mitral valve endocarditis in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

  8. Novel Materials for Prosthetic Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragolta, Carolina I.; Morford, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Existing materials for prosthetic liners tend to be thick and airtight, causing perspiration to accumulate inside the liner and potentially causing infection and injury that reduce quality of life. The purpose of this project was to examine the suitability of aerogel for prosthetic liner applications. Three tests were performed on several types of aerogel to assess the properties of each material. Moisture vapor permeability was tested by incubating four aerogel varieties with an artificial sweat solution at 37.0 C and less than 20% relative humidity for 24 hours. Two aerogel varieties were eliminated from the study due to difficulties in handling the material, and further testing proceeded with Pyrogel in 2.0 and 6.0 mm thicknesses. Force distribution was tested by compressing samples under a load of 4448 N at a rate of 2.5 mm/min. Biofilm formation was tested in a high-shear CDC Biofilm Reactor. Results showed that 2.0 mm Pyrogel blanket allowed 55.7 plus or minus 28.7% of an artificial sweat solution to transpire, and 35.5 plus or minus 27.8% transpired through 6.0 mm Pyrogel blanket. Samples also outperformed the load-bearing capabilities of existing liner materials. No statistically significant difference was found between the two Pyrogel thicknesses for either moisture vapor permeability or force distribution. In addition, biofilm formation results showed no change between the two Pyrogel thicknesses. The breathability and load bearing properties of aerogel make it a suitable material for application to prosthetic liners.

  9. Self-Rupturing Hermetic Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Curtis E., Jr.; Sherrit, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    For commercial, military, and aerospace applications, low-cost, small, reliable, and lightweight gas and liquid hermetically sealed valves with post initiation on/off capability are highly desirable for pressurized systems. Applications include remote fire suppression, single-use system-pressurization systems, spacecraft propellant systems, and in situ instruments. Current pyrotechnic- activated rupture disk hermetic valves were designed for physically larger systems and are heavy and integrate poorly with portable equipment, aircraft, and small spacecraft and instrument systems. Additionally, current pyrotechnically activated systems impart high g-force shock loads to surrounding components and structures, which increase the risk of damage and can require additional mitigation. The disclosed mechanism addresses the need for producing a hermetically sealed micro-isolation valve for low and high pressure for commercial, aerospace, and spacecraft applications. High-precision electrical discharge machining (EDM) parts allow for the machining of mated parts with gaps less than a thousandth of an inch. These high-precision parts are used to support against pressure and extrusion, a thin hermetically welded diaphragm. This diaphragm ruptures from a pressure differential when the support is removed and/or when the plunger is forced against the diaphragm. With the addition of conventional seals to the plunger and a two-way actuator, a derivative of this design would allow nonhermetic use as an on/off or metering valve after the initial rupturing of the hermetic sealing disk. In addition, in a single-use hermetically sealed isolation valve, the valve can be activated without the use of potential leak-inducing valve body penetrations. One implementation of this technology is a high-pressure, high-flow-rate rupture valve that is self-rupturing, which is advantageous for high-pressure applications such as gas isolation valves. Once initiated, this technology is self

  10. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  11. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  12. Degenerative mitral valve regurgitation: best practice revolution

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David H.; Rosenhek, Raphael; Falk, Volkmar

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease often leads to leaflet prolapse due to chordal elongation or rupture, and resulting in mitral valve regurgitation. Guideline referral for surgical intervention centres primarily on symptoms and ventricular dysfunction. The recommended treatment for degenerative mitral valve disease is mitral valve reconstruction, as opposed to valve replacement with a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve, because valve repair is associated with improved event free survival. Recent studies have documented a significant number of patients are not referred in a timely fashion according to established guidelines, and when they are subjected to surgery, an alarming number of patients continue to undergo mitral valve replacement. The debate around appropriate timing of intervention for asymptomatic severe mitral valve regurgitation has put additional emphasis on targeted surgeon referral and the need to ensure a very high rate of mitral valve repair, particularly in the non-elderly population. Current clinical practice remains suboptimal for many patients, and this review explores the need for a ‘best practice revolution’ in the field of degenerative mitral valve regurgitation. PMID:20624767

  13. [The influence of hereditary thrombophilic mechanisms on the degree of permanent intravascular coagulation in patients with artificial heart valves].

    PubMed

    Vavilova, T V; Sirotkina, O V; Razorenov, G I; Razorenova, T S; Emanuél', V L; Gritsenko, V V; Orlovskiĭ, P I; Doĭnikov, D N; Sharafutdinov, V E; Karpov, S A; Kuznetsov, A A; Kadinskaia, M I

    2004-01-01

    The genotyping of 40 patients with artificial heart valves (AHV) was performed after prosthesis of the mitral and aotic valves with bicuspid AHV (Medinzh-2 and CarboMedics). The patients took phenylin and varfarin. The patients' genotype was estimated by the thrombophylic genes: factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase C677T, G/A--455FGB, 4G/5G PAI-1, PI A1/A2 GPIIIa. The genes determining the thrombocytic activity or the vascular wall state substantially influence the third degree of the intensity of the permanent intravascular coagulation (PIC-3) independent of the degree of correction of hemostasis of oral anticoagulants. The addition of anti-aggregants to therapy is the only that can normalize functional activity of thrombocytes in patients with AHV having such defects. The laboratory detection of the genetic defects is of great practical importance for the determination of risk groups of formation of PIC-3 and the strategy of antithrombotic protection of patients with AHV. PMID:15651704

  14. Conical Seat Shut-Off Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farner, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    A moveable valve for controlling flow of a pressurized working fluid was designed. This valve consists of a hollow, moveable floating piston pressed against a stationary solid seat, and can use the working fluid to seal the valve. This open/closed, novel valve is able to use metal-to-metal seats, without requiring seat sliding action; therefore there are no associated damaging effects. During use, existing standard high-pressure ball valve seats tend to become damaged during rotation of the ball. Additionally, forces acting on the ball and stem create large amounts of friction. The combination of these effects can lead to system failure. In an attempt to reduce damaging effects and seat failures, soft seats in the ball valve have been eliminated; however, the sliding action of the ball across the highly loaded seat still tends to scratch the seat, causing failure. Also, in order to operate, ball valves require the use of large actuators. Positioning the metal-to-metal seats requires more loading, which tends to increase the size of the required actuator, and can also lead to other failures in other areas such as the stem and bearing mechanisms, thus increasing cost and maintenance. This novel non-sliding seat surface valve allows metal-to-metal seats without the damaging effects that can lead to failure, and enables large seating forces without damaging the valve. Additionally, this valve design, even when used with large, high-pressure applications, does not require large conventional valve actuators and the valve stem itself is eliminated. Actuation is achieved with the use of a small, simple solenoid valve. This design also eliminates the need for many seals used with existing ball valve and globe valve designs, which commonly cause failure, too. This, coupled with the elimination of the valve stem and conventional valve actuator, improves valve reliability and seat life. Other mechanical liftoff seats have been designed; however, they have only resulted in

  15. Novel Annular and Subvalvular Enlargement in Congenital Mitral Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Nels D; Beers, Kevin M; Maldonado, Elaine M; Calhoon, John H; Husain, S Adil

    2016-09-01

    Reparative procedures are not always feasible in congenitally abnormal mitral valves. Mechanical prosthesis has been accepted as the choice for valve replacement in the pediatric population. This report describes a case of congenital mitral valve disease requiring mitral valve replacement. The infant's mitral valve annulus was not amenable to placement of the smallest available mechanical prosthesis. The approach used here for annular and subvalvular enlargement facilitated implantation of a larger prosthesis for congenital mitral valve replacement. Five-year outcomes in a single patient may indicate broader applicability and avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch.

  16. Valve sparing surgery in an adult patient with dextrocardia and annuloaortic ectasia.

    PubMed

    Zeybek, Rahmi; Bacaksiz, Ahmet; Sharifov, Rasul; Sevgili, Emrah; Ay, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a patient with situs inversus totalis, annuloaortic ectasia complicated by aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation which induced congestive heart failure. Both valvular lesions were repaired physiologically using aortic root sparing Yacoub 'remodeling' technique and mitral ring annuloplasty. Valve sparing techniques can be used effectively even in patients with complicated clinical scenarios (like dextrocardia and annuloaortic ectasia) to avoid the potential risks related to prosthetic valve implantation and lifelong anticoagulation therapy.

  17. Valve sparing surgery in an adult patient with dextrocardia and annuloaortic ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Zeybek, Rahmi; Sharifov, Rasul; Sevgili, Emrah; Ay, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with situs inversus totalis, annuloaortic ectasia complicated by aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation which induced congestive heart failure. Both valvular lesions were repaired physiologically using aortic root sparing Yacoub ‘remodeling’ technique and mitral ring annuloplasty. Valve sparing techniques can be used effectively even in patients with complicated clinical scenarios (like dextrocardia and annuloaortic ectasia) to avoid the potential risks related to prosthetic valve implantation and lifelong anticoagulation therapy. PMID:27212978

  18. Mitral valve regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    Mitral valve regurgitation; Mitral valve insufficiency; Heart mitral regurgitation; Valvular mitral regurgitation ... regurgitation is the most common type of heart valve disorder. Blood that flows between different chambers of ...

  19. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  20. Wireless Microstimulators for Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimetersize floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  1. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  2. Wireless microstimulators for neural prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2011-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimeter-size floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  3. Magnetically operated check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor); Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  4. Rehand: Realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Ryo; Higashihara, Takanori; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Myoelectric prosthetic hands provide an appearance with five fingers and a grasping function to forearm amputees. However, they have problems in weight, appearance, and cost. This paper reports on the Rehand, a realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer. It provides a realistic appearance that is same as the cosmetic prosthetic hand and a grasping function. A simple link mechanism with one linear actuator for grasping and 3D printed parts achieve low cost, light weight, and ease of maintenance. An operating system based on a distance sensor provides a natural operability equivalent to the myoelectric control system. A supporter socket allows them to wear the prosthetic hand easily. An evaluation using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) demonstrated that an amputee was able to operate various objects and do everyday activities with the Rehand.

  5. Adjustable safety relief valve

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W.L.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a pressure relief valve having a relief set pressure. It comprises: a valve body having a fluid inlet and outlet, a spherical, metal valve seat associated with the inlet and a valve member comprising at least a portion of a spherical,metal ball attached to a ball holding element, the valve member being biased against the valve seat and thus providing a metal-to-metal seal preventing the passage of fluids past the valve seat when the fluid pressure in the inlet is below the relief pressure setting of the valve.

  6. Low-Pressure-Drop Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornborrow, John

    1994-01-01

    Flapper valve remains open under normal flow conditions but closes upon sudden increases to high rate of flow and remains closed until reset. Valve is fluid/mechanical analog of electrical fuse or circuit breaker. Low-pressure-drop shutoff valve contains flapper machined from cylindrical surface. During normal flow conditions, flapper presents small cross section to flow. (Useful in stopping loss of fluid through leaks in cooling systems.)

  7. Perioperative management of patient with Bombay blood group undergoing mitral valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Priye, Shio; Sathyanarayan, J; Shivaprakash, S; Reddy, Durgaprasad

    2015-12-01

    Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of stenotic mitral valve with Bombay phenotype who underwent minimal invasive right lateral thoracotomy for the replacement of the mitral valve. A male patient from Bangladesh presented to the hospital with New York Heart Association III symptoms. His medical evaluation revealed severe mitral valve stenosis and mild aortic valve regurgitation. The patient received erythropoietin, intravenous iron succinate and folic acid tablets. Autologous blood transfusion was carried out. The mitral valve was replaced with a prosthetic valve successfully. After weaning off from cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinisation was corrected with protamine. Post-operatively, the patient received autologous red blood cells. The patient recovered after 1-day of inotropic support with adrenaline and milrinone, and diuretics and was discharged on the 5(th) post-operative day.

  8. Perioperative management of patient with Bombay blood group undergoing mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Priye, Shio; Sathyanarayan, J; Shivaprakash, S; Reddy, Durgaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of stenotic mitral valve with Bombay phenotype who underwent minimal invasive right lateral thoracotomy for the replacement of the mitral valve. A male patient from Bangladesh presented to the hospital with New York Heart Association III symptoms. His medical evaluation revealed severe mitral valve stenosis and mild aortic valve regurgitation. The patient received erythropoietin, intravenous iron succinate and folic acid tablets. Autologous blood transfusion was carried out. The mitral valve was replaced with a prosthetic valve successfully. After weaning off from cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinisation was corrected with protamine. Post-operatively, the patient received autologous red blood cells. The patient recovered after 1-day of inotropic support with adrenaline and milrinone, and diuretics and was discharged on the 5th post-operative day. PMID:26903676

  9. Candida parapsilosis tricuspid native valve endocarditis: 3-year follow-up after surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Akcar, Murat; Arnaz, Ahmet; Kizilay, Mehmet

    2008-05-01

    In non-addicted patients, several states such as alcoholism, previous valvular heart disease or prosthetic valve replacement, immunodeficiency states, prolonged intravenous hyperalimentation, permanent pacemakers, and some congenital heart diseases can provide the predisposing factors for tricuspid valve endocarditis. It is an extremely rare occurrence in patients with normal native cardiac valves. In this report, we present a case of a 67-year-old woman with tricuspid native valve endocarditis related to Candida parapsilosis which is a very rare cause of infective endocarditis and carries a high mortality risk. An operation was indicated for the patient due to persistent enlarging vegetation on tricuspid valve, severe tricuspid regurgitation, septic pulmonary emboli and finally uncompensated respiratory and heart failure. She underwent tricuspid valve replacement with bioprothesis three years ago and now she is in a satisfactory condition without any medical treatment.

  10. Cardiac arrest due to left circumflex coronary artery embolism as a complication of subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation in a patient with mitral and aortic mechanical valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Protasiewicz, Marcin; Gajek, Jacek; Mysiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female patient after replacement of aortic and mitral valve with mechanical prostheses and implantation of a pacemaker hospitalized in our clinic due to acute coronary syndrome complicated with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. The electrocardiogram performed on admission showed signs of myocardial infarction with concomitant ventricular pacing. After successful resuscitation the coronary angiography was performed, which showed occlusion of the left circumflex artery (LCx) by thrombus. On the basis of intravascular ultrasound imaging the presence of vulnerable plaque, parietal thrombus and dissection of LCx were excluded. It suggested that occlusion of the LCx resulted from its embolism by left-sided heart thrombus due to subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation. In this case suboptimal anticoagulation was partially iatrogenic. Two weeks before the patient had been given vitamin K intravenously due to indeterminable international normalized ratio (INR) level, which caused transient resistance to oral anticoagulants. This case report illustrates tragic difficulties in the treatment with vitamin K antagonists, which concern as many as 2/3 of anticoagulated patients. These troubles contributed to the search for new, more efficient and safer anticoagulants. There are two classes of new oral anticoagulant drugs, which do not require monitoring of coagulation: direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban). In spite of their proven efficacy in the prevention of ischaemic stroke related to atrial fibrillation and prevention or treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the use of new oral anticoagulants for the treatment of patients with mechanical valve prostheses needs further research. PMID:24570697

  11. Cardiac arrest due to left circumflex coronary artery embolism as a complication of subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation in a patient with mitral and aortic mechanical valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Protasiewicz, Marcin; Rojek, Aleksandra; Gajek, Jacek; Mysiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female patient after replacement of aortic and mitral valve with mechanical prostheses and implantation of a pacemaker hospitalized in our clinic due to acute coronary syndrome complicated with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. The electrocardiogram performed on admission showed signs of myocardial infarction with concomitant ventricular pacing. After successful resuscitation the coronary angiography was performed, which showed occlusion of the left circumflex artery (LCx) by thrombus. On the basis of intravascular ultrasound imaging the presence of vulnerable plaque, parietal thrombus and dissection of LCx were excluded. It suggested that occlusion of the LCx resulted from its embolism by left-sided heart thrombus due to subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation. In this case suboptimal anticoagulation was partially iatrogenic. Two weeks before the patient had been given vitamin K intravenously due to indeterminable international normalized ratio (INR) level, which caused transient resistance to oral anticoagulants. This case report illustrates tragic difficulties in the treatment with vitamin K antagonists, which concern as many as 2/3 of anticoagulated patients. These troubles contributed to the search for new, more efficient and safer anticoagulants. There are two classes of new oral anticoagulant drugs, which do not require monitoring of coagulation: direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban). In spite of their proven efficacy in the prevention of ischaemic stroke related to atrial fibrillation and prevention or treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the use of new oral anticoagulants for the treatment of patients with mechanical valve prostheses needs further research.

  12. Self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2012-03-27

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  13. Bioprosthetic heart valves of the future.

    PubMed

    Manji, Rizwan A; Ekser, Burcin; Menkis, Alan H; Cooper, David K C

    2014-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves (GBHVs), derived from pigs or cows, undergo structural valve deterioration (SVD) over time, with calcification and eventual failure. It is generally accepted that SVD is due to chemical processes between glutaraldehyde and free calcium ions in the blood. Valve companies have made significant progress in decreasing SVD from calcification through various valve chemical treatments. However, there are still groups of patients (e.g., children and young adults) that have accelerated SVD of GBHV. Unfortunately, these patients are not ideal patients for valve replacement with mechanical heart valve prostheses as they are at high long-term risk from complications of the mandatory anticoagulation that is required. Thus, there is no "ideal" heart valve replacement for children and young adults. GBHVs represent a form of xenotransplantation, and there is increasing evidence that SVD seen in these valves is at least in part associated with xenograft rejection. We review the evidence that suggests that xenograft rejection of GBHVs is occurring, and that calcification of the valve may be related to this rejection. Furthermore, we review recent research into the transplantation of live porcine organs in non-human primates that may be applicable to GBHVs and consider the potential use of genetically modified pigs as sources of bioprosthetic heart valves.

  14. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair... baldness. Prosthetic hair fibers may consist of various materials; for example, synthetic fibers, such...

  15. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair... baldness. Prosthetic hair fibers may consist of various materials; for example, synthetic fibers, such...

  16. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic devices subject...

  17. 42 CFR 414.228 - Prosthetic and orthotic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prosthetic and orthotic devices. 414.228 Section... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.228 Prosthetic and orthotic devices. (a) Payment rule. Payment is made on a lump-sum basis for prosthetic and orthotic devices subject...

  18. Effects of outdoor weathering on facial prosthetic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Eleni, Panagiota N; Krokida, Magdalini; Polyzois, Gregory; Gettleman, Lawrence; Bisharat, Gasan I

    2011-01-01

    Physical weathering is usually responsible for the degradation of maxillofacial prosthetic elastomers and the replacement of prostheses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of outdoor weathering on the physical properties of four nonpigmented facial prosthetics after 1 year of exposure. In addition, simple mathematical models were developed to correlate the measured properties with irradiation time, including parameters with physical meaning. Three different medical-grade polydimethyl siloxanes (PDMSs) and an experimental chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) were examined in this study. The samples were exposed to solar radiation for 1 year in Athens, Greece. Mechanical tests (compression and tensile) were performed using universal-type testing machine, and hardness measurements were performed with a durometer (Shore A). Thermal tests were also performed with a differential scanning calorimeter. Simple mathematical models were developed to describe the examined properties. Changes observed in the properties of examined materials, before and after the exposure, reflected the effect of weathering. More specifically, two of the silicone prosthetics (Elastomer 42, TechSIL 25) seemed to become harder and more brittle, different from the other silicone (M511) sample and the CPE sample, which became softer and more ductile. Moreover mathematical models correlate the measured properties with irradiation time, and their constants indicate that duration of exposure seems to increase the degradation. Significant changes in the mechanical and thermal properties of the examined materials were observed as a result of outdoor weathering. The effect of weathering on samples' properties was introduced through its effect on the mathematical models' parameters.

  19. Native mitral valve endocarditis due to Rhizobium Radiobacter - first case report.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Nuno Carvalho; Nobre, Angelo; Cravino, João

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium Radiobacter (RR) has rarely been associated with human infection, mainly sepsis or bacteremia, and an unique case of prosthetic aortic endocarditis has been reported. We present a case of native mitral valve endocarditis to RR, to our knowledge the first clinical report of such infection.

  20. On the applicability of fluidic flexible matrix composite variable impedance materials for prosthetic and orthotic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philen, M.

    2009-10-01

    The applicability of variable impedance fluidic flexible matrix composites (F2MC) is investigated for development of prosthetic and orthotic devices. The F2MC material is an innovative combination of high performance composite tubes containing high bulk modulus fluids. The new material system can potentially achieve a change in stiffness of several orders of magnitude through valve control. The F2MC material system is investigated in this research through analytical studies for active impedance control for load transfer reduction in transtibial prosthetic sockets and impedance joint control for ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). Preliminary analysis results indicate that the variable modulus system can reduce the load transfer between the limb and transtibial socket and can provide impedance tailoring for improving foot-slap in an AFO.

  1. Effect of bias voltage on tunneling mechanism in Co40Fe40B20/MgO/Co40Fe40B20 pseudo-spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Mustafa; Öksüzoğlu, Ramis Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    Bias voltage dependence of tunneling mechanism has been systematically investigated in Co40Fe40B20 (2.1 nm)/MgO (2 nm)/Co40Fe40B20 (1.7 nm) pseudo-spin valve magnetic tunnel junction deposited using the combination of the pulsed DC unbalanced magnetron and RF magnetron sputtering techniques. Structural investigations revealed polycrystalline and partially (001) oriented growth of CoFeB/MgO(001) MTJ with similar low interface roughness on both side of the MgO barrier. The junction with a 25×25 μm2 area indicates a giant tunnel magnetoresistance in the order of 505% at room temperature. The magnetoresistance ratio decreases with increasing applied bias voltage ranging from 0.5 to 1.8 V. Reasonable values for barrier thickness and heights were obtained using the combination of Brinkman and Gundlach models, including average barrier height and symmetry. Both barrier parameters and the tunneling mechanism vary in dependence of applied bias voltage. The tunneling mechanism indicates a change from direct to the FN tunneling, especially when reaching high bias voltages. Effect of the tunneling mechanism on the bias dependence of the magnetoresistance was also discussed.

  2. Smart prosthetics based on magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J. David; Matthis, Wilfried; Toscano, James R.

    2001-06-01

    One of the most exciting new applications for magnetorheological fluid technology is that of real-time controlled dampers for use in advanced prosthetic devices. In such systems a small magnetorheological fluid damper is used to control, in real-time, the motion of an artificial limb based on inputs from a group of sensors. A 'smart' prosthetic knee system based on a controllable magnetorheological fluid damper was commercially introduced to the orthopedics and prosthetics market in 2000. The benefit of such an artificial knee is a more natural gait that automatically adapts to changing gait conditions.

  3. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability is disclosed. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three. 6 figs.

  4. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.; Dietrich, Daniel D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three.

  5. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  6. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  7. Rotary pneumatic valve

    DOEpatents

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  8. Liquid rocket valve components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A monograph on valves for use with liquid rocket propellant engines is presented. The configurations of the various types of valves are described and illustrated. Design criteria and recommended practices for the various valves are explained. Tables of data are included to show the chief features of valve components in use on operational vehicles.

  9. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  10. Valve-in-valve-in-valve: Treating endocarditis of a transcatheter heart valve.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Caroline; Cheong, Adrian P; Himbert, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Transcatheter heart valve endocarditis is a rare, but life threatening complication. We describe the case of a patient who was successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve-in-valve replacement with a favorable 1-year outcome, despite severe early complications.

  11. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  12. Brain responses to acupuncture stimulation in the prosthetic hand of an amputee patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Seon; Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2015-10-01

    This report describes the brain responses to acupuncture in an upper limb amputee patient. A 62-year-old male had previously undergone a lower left arm amputation following an electrical accident. Using functional MRI, we investigated brain responses to acupuncture stimulation in the aforementioned amputee under three conditions: (a) intact hand, (b) prosthetic hand (used by the patient), and (c) fake fabric hand. The patient described greater de qi sensation when he received acupuncture stimulation in his prosthetic hand compared to a fake hand, with both stimulations performed in a similar manner. We found enhanced brain activation in the insula and sensorimotor cortex in response to acupuncture stimulation in the amputee's prosthetic hand, while there was only minimal activation in the visual cortex in response to acupuncture stimulation in a fake hand. The enhanced brain responses to acupuncture stimulation of the patient's prosthetic hand might be derived from cortical reorganisation, as he has been using his prosthetic hand for over 40 years. Our findings suggest the possible use of acupuncture stimulation in a prosthetic hand as an enhanced sensory feedback mechanism, which may represent a new treatment approach for phantom limb pain.

  13. In vitro heart valve testing: steady versus pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Black, M M; Hose, D R; Lamb, C J; Lawford, P V; Ralph, S J

    1994-03-01

    The design of artificial heart valves has traditionally been based on the development of a prototype device which was then subjected to extensive laboratory testing in order to confirm its suitability for clinical use. In the past the in vitro assessment of a valve's performance was based principally on the measurement of parameters such as pressure difference, regurgitation and, more recently, energy losses. Such measurements can be defined as being at the 'macro' level and rarely show any clinically significant differences amongst currently available prostheses. The analytical approach to flow through heart valves has previously been hampered by difficulties experienced in solving the relevant equations of flow particularly in the case of pulsatile conditions. Computational techniques are now available which enable appropriate solutions to be obtained for these problems and consequently provide an opportunity for detailed examination of the 'micro' level of flow disturbances exhibited by the different valves. This present preliminary study is designed to illustrate the use of such an analytical approach to the flow through prosthetic valves. A single topic has been selected for this purpose which is the comparative value of steady versus pulsatile flow testing. A bileaflet valve was chosen for the analysis and a mathematical model of this valve in the aortic position of the Sheffield Pulse Duplicator was created. The theoretical analysis was carried out using a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics package, namely, FIDAP, on a SUN MICROSYSTEMS 10-30 workstation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dual stage check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, D. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A dual stage seat valve head arrangement is described which consists of a primary sealing point located between a fixed orifice seat and a valve poppet, and a secondary sealing point between an orifice poppet and a valve poppet. Upstream of the valve orifice is a flexible, convoluted metal diaphragm attached to the orifice poppet. Downstream of the valve orifice, a finger spring exerts a force against the valve poppet, tending to keep the valve in a closed position. The series arrangement of a double seat and poppet is able to tolerate small particle contamination while minimizing chatter by controlling throttling or metering across the secondary seat, thus preserving the primary sealing surface.

  15. Miniature diaphragm valve for medical equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadler, T. J.; Taylor, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Valve assembly keeps nutrient out of moving parts of valve by physically isolating plunger from fluid. Poppet and diaphragm are molded together, and latter is shaped to act as static seal, which remains seated during the operation. As plunger moves, diaphragm also moves to form separate cavity for nutrient and thus isolates it from plunger cavity and latching mechanism.

  16. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  17. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation.

  18. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  19. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  20. Limb Loss in Children: Prosthetic Issues

    MedlinePlus

    ... Part 3 Prosthetic Issues for Children http://www.amputee-coalition.org/inmotion/may_jun_06/congenital_part3. ... 05/2009 Back to Top © Copyrighted by the Amputee Coalition . Local reproduction for use by Amputee Coalition ...

  1. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    PubMed

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  2. Valve for fluid control

    SciTech Connect

    Oborny, Michael C.; Paul, Phillip H.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2001-01-01

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  3. Prosthetic Leg Control in the Nullspace of Human Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Robert D.; Martin, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has extended the control method of virtual constraints, originally developed for autonomous walking robots, to powered prosthetic legs for lower-limb amputees. Virtual constraints define desired joint patterns as functions of a mechanical phasing variable, which are typically enforced by torque control laws that linearize the output dynamics associated with the virtual constraints. However, the output dynamics of a powered prosthetic leg generally depend on the human interaction forces, which must be measured and canceled by the feedback linearizing control law. This feedback requires expensive multi-axis load cells, and actively canceling the interaction forces may minimize the human's influence over the prosthesis. To address these limitations, this paper proposes a method for projecting virtual constraints into the nullspace of the human interaction terms in the output dynamics. The projected virtual constraints naturally render the output dynamics invariant with respect to the human interaction forces, which instead enter into the internal dynamics of the partially linearized prosthetic system. This method is illustrated with simulations of a transfemoral amputee model walking with a powered knee-ankle prosthesis that is controlled via virtual constraints with and without the proposed projection. PMID:27746585

  4. Prosthetic Tool For Holding Small Ferromagnetic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Carden, James R.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Tool attached to prosthetic hand or arm enables user to hold nails, screws, nuts, rivets, and other small ferromagnetic objects on small magnetic tip. Device adjusted to hold nail or screw at proper angle for hammering or for use of screwdriver, respectively. Includes base connector with threaded outer surface and lower male member inserted in standard spring-action, quick-connect/quick-disconnect wrist adapter on prosthetic hand or arm.

  5. A history of facial and ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Reisberg, D J; Habakuk, S W

    1990-01-01

    This article traces the history of facial and ocular prosthetics. Creative individuals who have made significant contributions are highlighted and the evolution of techniques and materials is presented. In view of the significance placed upon facial beauty in today's society, it becomes incumbent upon us to recognize the ingenuity and skill of those in the past to gain appreciation for the present state of the art and to provide incentive for improving facial and ocular prosthetic restorations in the future.

  6. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in...

  7. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in...

  8. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in...

  9. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in...

  10. 46 CFR 105.10-20 - Pressure vacuum relief valve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure vacuum relief valve. 105.10-20 Section 105.10... Pressure vacuum relief valve. (a) The term pressure vacuum relief valve means any device or assembly of a mechanical, liquid, weight, or other type used for the automatic regulation of pressure or vacuum in...

  11. Fuel and oxidizer valve assembly employs single solenoid actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Valve assembly simultaneously starts or stops the flow of oxidizer and fuel from separate inlet channels to reaction control motors. The assembly combines an oxidizer shutoff valve and a fuel shutoff valve which are mechanically linked and operated by a single high-speed solenoid actuator.

  12. Isolated Lactobacillus chronic prosthetic knee infection.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David M; Shekhel, Tatyana; Radelet, Matt; Miller, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus is a gram-positive rod bacteria found primarily in the gastrointestinal and female genital tracts. Prosthetic infections in implants are being increasingly reported. The authors present a case of a 58-year-old patient with Lactobacillus septic prosthetic knee joint infection. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of chronic prosthetic knee infection with isolated Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus has been most commonly implicated with bacteremia and endocarditis and rarely with pneumonia, meningitis, and endovascular infection, and a vast majority of the cases are reported in immunocompromised patients. In the current case, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis, malnutrition, anemia, and liver failure were comorbid conditions, placing the patient at increased risk of infection. The findings suggest that further case series are necessary to establish the significance of Lactobacillus as an etiologic agent in chronic low-virulence, and potentially vancomycin-resistant, prosthetic joint infection. The need also exists for further research aimed at the risk of prosthetic joint infection with oral intake of certain probiotic foods and supplements. The goal of this case report is to bring to light the potential of this organism to be a cause of subtle chronic prosthetic joint infection. PMID:24683663

  13. Isolated Lactobacillus chronic prosthetic knee infection.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David M; Shekhel, Tatyana; Radelet, Matt; Miller, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus is a gram-positive rod bacteria found primarily in the gastrointestinal and female genital tracts. Prosthetic infections in implants are being increasingly reported. The authors present a case of a 58-year-old patient with Lactobacillus septic prosthetic knee joint infection. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of chronic prosthetic knee infection with isolated Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus has been most commonly implicated with bacteremia and endocarditis and rarely with pneumonia, meningitis, and endovascular infection, and a vast majority of the cases are reported in immunocompromised patients. In the current case, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis, malnutrition, anemia, and liver failure were comorbid conditions, placing the patient at increased risk of infection. The findings suggest that further case series are necessary to establish the significance of Lactobacillus as an etiologic agent in chronic low-virulence, and potentially vancomycin-resistant, prosthetic joint infection. The need also exists for further research aimed at the risk of prosthetic joint infection with oral intake of certain probiotic foods and supplements. The goal of this case report is to bring to light the potential of this organism to be a cause of subtle chronic prosthetic joint infection.

  14. Titanium in Engine Valve Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. E.; Sherman, A. M.; Bapna, M. R.

    1987-03-01

    Titanium alloys offer a unique combination of high strength-to-weight ratio, good corrosion resistance and favorable high temperature mechanical properties. Still, their relatively high cost has discouraged consideration for widespread use in automotive components. Recent demands for increased fuel economy have led to the consideration of these alloys for use as valve train materials where higher costs might be offset by improvements in performance and fuel economy. Lighter weight valve train components permit the use of lower spring loads, thus reducing friction and increasing fuel economy. Camshaft friction measurements made on a typical small displacement engine indicate that a twoto-four percent increase in fuel economy can be achieved. Valve train components are, however, subject to a severe operating environment, including elevated temperatures, sliding wear and high mechanical loads. This paper discusses the details of alloy and heat treatment selection for optimizing valve performance. When properly manufactured, titanium valves have been shown to withstand very stringent durability testing, indicating the technical feasibility of this approach to fuel economy improvement.

  15. Time-resolved DPIV analysis of vortex dynamics in a left ventricular model through bileaflet mechanical and porcine heart valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pierrakos, Olga; Vlachos, Pavios P; Telionis, Demetri P

    2004-12-01

    The performance of the heart after a mitral valve replacement operation greatly depends on the flow character downstream of the valve. The design and implanting orientation of valves may considerably affect the flow development. A study of the hemodynamics of two orientations, anatomical and anti-anatomical, of the St. Jude Medical (SJM) bileaflet valve are presented and compared with those of the SJM Biocor porcine valve, which served also to represent the natural valve. We document the velocity field in a flexible, transparent (LV) using time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (TRDPIV). Vortex formation and vortex interaction are two important physical phenomena that dominate the filling and emptying of the ventricle. For the three configurations, the following effects were examined: mitral valve inlet jet asymmetry, survival of vortical structures upstream of the aortic valve, vortex-induced velocities and redirection of theflow in abidance of the Biot-Savart law, domain segmentation, resonant times of vortical structures, and regions of stagnantflow. The presence of three distinct flow patterns, for the three configurations, was identified by the location of vortical structures and level of coherence corresponding to a significant variation in the turbulence level distribution inside the LV. The adverse effect of these observations could potentially compromise the efficiency of the LV and result in flow patterns that deviate from those in the natural heart. PMID:15796330

  16. The Role of Virtual Articulator in Prosthetic and Restorative Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Aljanakh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based technology linked with the future of dentistry and dental practice. The virtual articulator is one such application in prosthetic and restorative dentistry based on virtual reality that will significantly reduce the limitations of the mechanical articulator, and by simulation of real patient data, allow analyses with regard to static and dynamic occlusion as well as to jaw relation. It is the purpose of this article to present the concepts and strategies for a future replacement of the mechanical articulator by a virtual one. Also, a brief note on virtual reality haptic system has been highlighted along with newly developed touch enabled virtual articulator. PMID:25177664

  17. The role of virtual articulator in prosthetic and restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi; Aljanakh, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based technology linked with the future of dentistry and dental practice. The virtual articulator is one such application in prosthetic and restorative dentistry based on virtual reality that will significantly reduce the limitations of the mechanical articulator, and by simulation of real patient data, allow analyses with regard to static and dynamic occlusion as well as to jaw relation. It is the purpose of this article to present the concepts and strategies for a future replacement of the mechanical articulator by a virtual one. Also, a brief note on virtual reality haptic system has been highlighted along with newly developed touch enabled virtual articulator.

  18. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  19. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  20. Surface EMG in advanced hand prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Claudio; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    One of the major problems when dealing with highly dexterous, active hand prostheses is their control by the patient wearing them. With the advances in mechatronics, building prosthetic hands with multiple active degrees of freedom is realisable, but actively controlling the position and especially the exerted force of each finger cannot yet be done naturally. This paper deals with advanced robotic hand control via surface electromyography. Building upon recent results, we show that machine learning, together with a simple downsampling algorithm, can be effectively used to control on-line, in real time, finger position as well as finger force of a highly dexterous robotic hand. The system determines the type of grasp a human subject is willing to use, and the required amount of force involved, with a high degree of accuracy. This represents a remarkable improvement with respect to the state-of-the-art of feed-forward control of dexterous mechanical hands, and opens up a scenario in which amputees will be able to control hand prostheses in a much finer way than it has so far been possible.