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Sample records for mechanically exfoliated graphene

  1. Mechanism of graphene formation by graphite electro-exfoliation in ionic liquids-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junli; Shi, Zhongning; Zhang, Xia; Haarberg, Geir Martin

    2014-12-01

    Graphene was produced from graphite electrode by exfoliation in ionic liquid. The influences of process parameters such as ionic liquid concentration, electrolysis potential and the type of anions in the ionic liquid on the production of graphene were studied, and a new mechanism is proposed. The results show that the increase of ionic liquid concentration is beneficial for the formation of graphene, and it is easier to produce graphene by increasing the applied voltage. Ionic liquids anions have great effect on the production of graphene. Both graphite anode and graphite cathode can be modified to graphene during electrolysis. Gases formed inside of the electrode play an important role for the production of graphene, while ionic liquids serve to accelerate the switching rate of graphite to graphene.

  2. Hydrogen storage in platinum decorated hydrogen exfoliated graphene sheets by spillover mechanism.

    PubMed

    P, Divya; Ramaprabhu, S

    2014-12-28

    Development of lightweight materials with high hydrogen storage capacities is a great challenge for the hydrogen economy. Here, we report high pressure hydrogen adsorption-desorption studies of platinum-decorated hydrogen-exfoliated graphene sheets (Pt-HEG). Pt-HEG shows a maximum hydrogen uptake capacity of 1.4 wt% at 25 °C and 3 MPa. Analysis of the isosteric heat of adsorption provides evidence of spillover mechanism.

  3. Radiofrequency plasma assisted exfoliation and reduction of large-area graphene oxide platelets produced by a mechanical transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, Marta; Valentini, Luca; Fabbri, Paola; Kenny, Josè M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a method to produce extended few layer flakes of reduced graphene oxide starting from bulk graphene oxide platelets using Ar plasma treatment at room temperature of mechanically exfoliated platelets. Multilayer graphene oxide platelets transferred to a silicon wafer by micromechanical cleavage were thinned in a controllable and reproducible way by plasma treatment to achieve few-layer reduced graphene sheets without the use of heating or wet chemistry approaches.

  4. Liquid exfoliation of defect-free graphene.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jonathan N

    2013-01-15

    Due to its unprecedented physical properties, graphene has generated huge interest over the last 7 years. Graphene is generally fabricated in one of two ways: as very high quality sheets produced in limited quantities by micromechanical cleavage or vapor growth or as a rather defective, graphene-like material, graphene oxide, produced in large quantities. However, a growing number of applications would profit from the availability of a method to produce high-quality graphene in large quantities. This Account describes recent work to develop such a processing route inspired by previous theoretical and experimental studies on the solvent dispersion of carbon nanotubes. That work had shown that nanotubes could be effectively dispersed in solvents whose surface energy matched that of the nanotubes. We describe the application of the same approach to the exfoliation of graphite to give graphene in a range of solvents. When graphite powder is exposed to ultrasonication in the presence of a suitable solvent, the powder fragments into nanosheets, which are stabilized against aggregation by the solvent. The enthalpy of mixing is minimized for solvents with surface energies close to that of graphene (∼68 mJ/m(2)). The exfoliated nanosheets are free of defects and oxides and can be produced in large quantities. Once solvent exfoliation is possible, the process can be optimized and the nanosheets can be separated by size. The use of surfactants can also stabilize exfoliated graphene in water, where the ζ potential of the surfactant-coated graphene nanosheets controls the dispersed concentration. Liquid exfoliated graphene can be used for a range of applications: graphene dispersions as optical limiters, films of graphene flakes as transparent conductors or sensors, and exfoliated graphene as a mechanical reinforcement for polymer-based composites. Finally, we have extended this process to exfoliate other layered compounds such as BN and MoS(2). Such materials will be

  5. Electrochemical characterization of exfoliated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasala, Milinda

    In this research we have investigated electrochemical and impedance characteristics of liquid phase exfoliated graphene electrodes. The exfoliated graphene electrodes were characterized in Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitors (EDLCs) geometry. Liquid phase exfoliation was performed on bulk graphite powder in order to produces few layer graphene flakes in large quantities. The exfoliation processes produced few layer graphene based materials with increased specific surface area and were found to have suitable electrochemical charge storage capacities. Electrochemical evaluation and performance of exfoliated graphene electrodes were tested with Cyclic Voltammetry, constant current charging discharging and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) at ambient conditions. We have used several electrolytes in order to evaluate the effect of electrolyte in charge storage capacities. Specific capacitance value of ~ 47F/g and ~ 262F/g was measured for aqueous and ionic electrolytes respectively. These values are at least an order of magnitude higher than those obtained by using EDLC's electrodes fabricated with the bulk graphite powder. In addition these EDLC electrodes give consistently good performance over a wide range of scan rates and voltage windows. These encouraging results illustrate the exciting potential for high performance electrical energy storage devices based on liquid phase exfoliated graphene electrodes.

  6. Uniaxial Drawing of Graphene-PVA Nanocomposites: Improvement in Mechanical Characteristics via Strain-Induced Exfoliation of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Rahim; Habib, Amir; Akram, Muhammad Aftab; Zia, Tanveer-ul-Haq; Khan, Ahmad Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-stabilized graphene nanosheets (GNS) of lateral dimension ( L) ~1 μm are obtained via liquid phase exfoliation technique to prepare its composites in the PVA matrix. These composites show low levels of reinforcements due to poor alignment of GNS within the matrix as predicted by the modified Halpin-Tsai model. Drawing these composites up to 200 % strain, a significant improvement in mechanical properties is observed. Maximum values for Young's modulus and strength are ~×4 and ~×2 higher respectively than that of neat PVA. Moreover, the rate of increase of the modulus with GNS volume fraction is up to 700 GPa, higher than the values predicted using the Halpin-Tsai theory. However, alignment along with strain-induced de-aggregation of GNS within composites accounts well for the obtained results as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization.

  7. Uniaxial Drawing of Graphene-PVA Nanocomposites: Improvement in Mechanical Characteristics via Strain-Induced Exfoliation of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Jan, Rahim; Habib, Amir; Akram, Muhammad Aftab; Zia, Tanveer-Ul-Haq; Khan, Ahmad Nawaz

    2016-12-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-stabilized graphene nanosheets (GNS) of lateral dimension (L) ~1 μm are obtained via liquid phase exfoliation technique to prepare its composites in the PVA matrix. These composites show low levels of reinforcements due to poor alignment of GNS within the matrix as predicted by the modified Halpin-Tsai model. Drawing these composites up to 200 % strain, a significant improvement in mechanical properties is observed. Maximum values for Young's modulus and strength are ~×4 and ~×2 higher respectively than that of neat PVA. Moreover, the rate of increase of the modulus with GNS volume fraction is up to 700 GPa, higher than the values predicted using the Halpin-Tsai theory. However, alignment along with strain-induced de-aggregation of GNS within composites accounts well for the obtained results as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization. PMID:27558496

  8. Preparation and characterization of solar exfoliated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Sreejesh; K, Udaya Bhat; S, Nagaraja H.

    2014-10-01

    Hummer's method was used for the chemical synthesis of graphite oxide from graphite flakes. Simultaneous exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide to Graphene was achieved through focused solar light irradiation using a convex lens. The morphological characteristics were studied using SEM and TEM. Layered morphology of Graphene was observed through TEM. Raman spectra and FTIR were used for the structural characterization of Graphene. EDAX analysis showed the drop in oxygen content during exfoliation. The method offered a faster, easier and environmental friendly method to produce Graphene for potential applications.

  9. Preparation and characterization of solar exfoliated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    M, Sreejesh S, Nagaraja H.; K, Udaya Bhat

    2014-10-15

    Hummer's method was used for the chemical synthesis of graphite oxide from graphite flakes. Simultaneous exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide to Graphene was achieved through focused solar light irradiation using a convex lens. The morphological characteristics were studied using SEM and TEM. Layered morphology of Graphene was observed through TEM. Raman spectra and FTIR were used for the structural characterization of Graphene. EDAX analysis showed the drop in oxygen content during exfoliation. The method offered a faster, easier and environmental friendly method to produce Graphene for potential applications.

  10. Doping of graphene during chemical exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pawan Kumar; Yadav, Premlata; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2013-02-01

    Graphene provides a perfect platform to explore the unique electronic properties in two-dimensions. However, most electronic applications are handicapped by the absence of a semiconducting gap in pristine graphene. To control the semiconducting properties of graphene, doping is regarded as one of the most feasible methods. Here we demonstrate that graphene can be effectively doped during chemical exfoliation of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite in organic solvents. Layered structure of graphene sheets was confirmed by confocal Raman spectroscopy and doping was probed by analyzing shift in Raman peak positions and transistor transfer (IDS-VGS) characteristics.

  11. Understanding Graphene Coatings: Characterization of Solvent Exfoliated Few-Layer Graphene by Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Jorge; Lampert, Lester; Arifin, Willson; Flaig, Robby; Rue, Timothy; Krisko, Tyler; Hamilton, James

    2011-03-01

    Graphene has unique properties like its ballistic transport at room temperature combined with chemical and mechanical stability and these properties can be extended to few-layer of graphene. Potential large-area applications that include transparent conductive coatings and fuel cell electrodes require dispersing graphene in a fluid phase. Graphene nano-platelets can be synthesized by dispersion and exfoliation of graphite in organic solvents such N-methyl-pyrrolidine (NMP) and cyclohexylpyrrolidone (CHP). However, liquid-phase exfoliation produces graphene with defects that can disrupt the electronic properties. One of the remaining questions is whether the defects created during synthesis can be minimized. We report a Raman spectroscopic study showing that defects in few-layer graphene produced by liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite can be controlled by the type or mixture of solvents used.

  12. Foam stabilisation using surfactant exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-air foams have been stabilised using a suspension of graphene particles at very low particle loadings. The suspension was prepared through the liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in the presence of the non-ionic tri-block surfactant, Pluronic® F108. The graphene particles possess an extremely high aspect ratio, with lateral dimensions of between 0.1 and 1.3 μm as evidenced by TEM imaging. The particles were shown to exhibit a number of other properties known to favour stabilisation of foam structures. Particle surface activity was confirmed through surface tension measurements, suggesting the particles favour adsorption at the air-water interface. The evolution of bubble size distributions over time indicated the presence of particles yielded improvements to foam stability due to a reduction in disproportionation. Foam stability measurements showed a non-linear relationship between foam half-life and graphene concentration, indicative of the rate at which particles adsorb at bubble surfaces. The wettability of the graphene particles was altered upon addition of alkali metal chlorides, with the stability of the foams being enhanced according to the series Na(+)>Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+). This effect is indicative of the relative hydration capacity of each salt with respect to the surfactant, which is adsorbed along the graphene plane as a result of the exfoliation process. Thus, surfactant exfoliated graphene particles exhibit a number of different features that demonstrate efficient application of high-aspect ratio particles in the customisation and enhancement of foams.

  13. Selective exfoliation of single-layer graphene from non-uniform graphene grown on Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Hyeon-Sik; Joo, Won-Jae; Hwang, SungWoo; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-11-01

    Graphene growth on a copper surface via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition has several advantages in terms of providing high-quality graphene with the potential for scale-up, but the product is usually inhomogeneous due to the inability to control the graphene layer growth. The non-uniform regions strongly affect the reliability of the graphene in practical electronic applications. Herein, we report a novel graphene transfer method that allows for the selective exfoliation of single-layer graphene from non-uniform graphene grown on a Cu foil. Differences in the interlayer bonding energy are exploited to mechanically separate only the top single-layer graphene and transfer this to an arbitrary substrate. The dry-transferred single-layer graphene showed electrical characteristics that were more uniform than those of graphene transferred using conventional wet-etching transfer steps.

  14. Graphene via sonication assisted liquid-phase exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, the 2D form of carbon based material existing as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has set the science and technology sectors alight with interest in the last decade in view of its astounding electrical and thermal properties, combined with its mechanical stiffness, strength and elasticity. Two distinct strategies have been undertaken for graphene production, i.e. the bottom-up and the top-down. The former relies on the generation of graphene from suitably designed molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction to form covalently linked 2D networks. The latter occurs via exfoliation of graphite into graphene. Bottom-up techniques, based on the organic syntheses starting from small molecular modules, when performed in liquid media, are both size limited, because macromolecules become more and more insoluble with increasing size, and suffer from the occurrence of side reactions with increasing molecular weight. Because of these reasons such a synthesis has been performed more and more on a solid (ideally catalytically active) surface. Substrate-based growth of single layers can be done also by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or via reduction of silicon carbide, which unfortunately relies on the ability to follow a narrow thermodynamic path. Top-down approaches can be accomplished under different environmental conditions. Alongside the mechanical cleavage based on the scotch tape approach, liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) methods are becoming more and more interesting because they are extremely versatile, potentially up-scalable, and can be used to deposit graphene in a variety of environments and on different substrates not available using mechanical cleavage or growth methods. Interestingly, LPE can be applied to produce different layered systems exhibiting different compositions such as BN, MoS2, WS2, NbSe2, and TaS2, thereby enabling the tuning of numerous physico-chemical properties of the material. Furthermore, LPE can be

  15. Graphene via sonication assisted liquid-phase exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, the 2D form of carbon based material existing as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has set the science and technology sectors alight with interest in the last decade in view of its astounding electrical and thermal properties, combined with its mechanical stiffness, strength and elasticity. Two distinct strategies have been undertaken for graphene production, i.e. the bottom-up and the top-down. The former relies on the generation of graphene from suitably designed molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction to form covalently linked 2D networks. The latter occurs via exfoliation of graphite into graphene. Bottom-up techniques, based on the organic syntheses starting from small molecular modules, when performed in liquid media, are both size limited, because macromolecules become more and more insoluble with increasing size, and suffer from the occurrence of side reactions with increasing molecular weight. Because of these reasons such a synthesis has been performed more and more on a solid (ideally catalytically active) surface. Substrate-based growth of single layers can be done also by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or via reduction of silicon carbide, which unfortunately relies on the ability to follow a narrow thermodynamic path. Top-down approaches can be accomplished under different environmental conditions. Alongside the mechanical cleavage based on the scotch tape approach, liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) methods are becoming more and more interesting because they are extremely versatile, potentially up-scalable, and can be used to deposit graphene in a variety of environments and on different substrates not available using mechanical cleavage or growth methods. Interestingly, LPE can be applied to produce different layered systems exhibiting different compositions such as BN, MoS2, WS2, NbSe2, and TaS2, thereby enabling the tuning of numerous physico-chemical properties of the material. Furthermore, LPE can be

  16. Nitroaromatic explosives detection using electrochemically exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ying Teng; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Detection of nitroaromatic explosives is of paramount importance from security point of view. Graphene sheets obtained from the electrochemical anodic exfoliation of graphite foil in different electrolytes (LiClO4 and Na2SO4) were compared and tested as electrode material for the electrochemical detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in seawater. Voltammetry analysis demonstrated the superior electrochemical performance of graphene produced in LiClO4, resulting in higher sensitivity and linearity for the explosives detection and lower limit of detection (LOD) compared to the graphene obtained in Na2SO4. We attribute this to the presence of oxygen functionalities onto the graphene material obtained in LiClO4 which enable charge electrostatic interactions with the -NO2 groups of the analyte, in addition to π-π stacking interactions with the aromatic moiety. Research findings obtained from this study would assist in the development of portable devices for the on-site detection of nitroaromatic explosives. PMID:27633489

  17. Nitroaromatic explosives detection using electrochemically exfoliated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yew, Ying Teng; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Detection of nitroaromatic explosives is of paramount importance from security point of view. Graphene sheets obtained from the electrochemical anodic exfoliation of graphite foil in different electrolytes (LiClO4 and Na2SO4) were compared and tested as electrode material for the electrochemical detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in seawater. Voltammetry analysis demonstrated the superior electrochemical performance of graphene produced in LiClO4, resulting in higher sensitivity and linearity for the explosives detection and lower limit of detection (LOD) compared to the graphene obtained in Na2SO4. We attribute this to the presence of oxygen functionalities onto the graphene material obtained in LiClO4 which enable charge electrostatic interactions with the –NO2 groups of the analyte, in addition to π-π stacking interactions with the aromatic moiety. Research findings obtained from this study would assist in the development of portable devices for the on-site detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  18. Nitroaromatic explosives detection using electrochemically exfoliated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Ying Teng; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Detection of nitroaromatic explosives is of paramount importance from security point of view. Graphene sheets obtained from the electrochemical anodic exfoliation of graphite foil in different electrolytes (LiClO4 and Na2SO4) were compared and tested as electrode material for the electrochemical detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in seawater. Voltammetry analysis demonstrated the superior electrochemical performance of graphene produced in LiClO4, resulting in higher sensitivity and linearity for the explosives detection and lower limit of detection (LOD) compared to the graphene obtained in Na2SO4. We attribute this to the presence of oxygen functionalities onto the graphene material obtained in LiClO4 which enable charge electrostatic interactions with the –NO2 groups of the analyte, in addition to π-π stacking interactions with the aromatic moiety. Research findings obtained from this study would assist in the development of portable devices for the on-site detection of nitroaromatic explosives. PMID:27633489

  19. Thermal Exfoliation of Natural Cellulosic Material for Graphene Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Chatterjee, Somenath; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Bapari, Himangshu

    2015-01-01

    Hibiscus flower petals have been used as a cheap natural resource precursor for cost-effective synthesis of high quality graphene by thermal exfoliation process. In order to compare the quality of graphene obtained from the flower petals directly with the flower petals pretreated with nickel(II) chloride, Raman spectroscopic technique has been used as the structural probe. The role of temperature and the effect of nickel on thermal exfoliation process have been examined. It has been observed that graphene obtained via nickel incorporation is of better quality because NI2+ ions that get dispersed in the layered-structured cellulose at elevated temperatures get reduced to the metallic state, which in turn push the graphitic layers during thermal exfoliation to produce good quality graphene. In contrast, no such driving force is present in cellulose and hemi-cellulose of flower petals that contain lignin.

  20. Shear Assisted Electrochemical Exfoliation of Graphite to Graphene.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Dhanraj B; Brenker, Jason; Easton, Christopher D; Tabor, Rico F; Neild, Adrian; Majumder, Mainak

    2016-04-12

    The exfoliation characteristics of graphite as a function of applied anodic potential (1-10 V) in combination with shear field (400-74 400 s(-1)) have been studied in a custom-designed microfluidic reactor. Systematic investigation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicates that at higher potentials thicker and more fragmented graphene sheets are obtained, while at potentials as low as 1 V, pronounced exfoliation is triggered by the influence of shear. The shear-assisted electrochemical exfoliation process yields large (∼10 μm) graphene flakes with a high proportion of single, bilayer, and trilayer graphene and small ID/IG ratio (0.21-0.32) with only a small contribution from carbon-oxygen species as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. This method comprises intercalation of sulfate ions followed by exfoliation using shear induced by a flowing electrolyte. Our findings on the crucial role of hydrodynamics in accentuating the exfoliation efficiency suggest a safer, greener, and more automated method for production of high quality graphene from graphite.

  1. Stable Aqueous Dispersion of Exfoliated Graphene for Tribological Applications.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuaishuai; Shen, Zhigang; Yi, Min; Liu, Lei; Cai, Chujiang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the directly exfoliated graphene prepared by a jet cavitation method was tested as additive in pure water toward tribological applications. Reductions of friction coefficient and wear volume up to 22.8% and 44.4% respectively were achieved by addition of the graphene flakes. The as-prepared aqueous graphene dispersions exhibited high stability against sedimentation, and concurrently maintained their tribological properties after deposited for 15 days. The improvement in lubricating and anti-wear performances can be attributed to the graphene network formed on the sliding surfaces during the test. PMID:27433609

  2. Ultrasound exfoliation of inorganic analogues of graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound exfoliation of a bulk-layered material is an attractive route for large-scale preparation of monolayers. The monolayer slices could potentially be prepared with a high yield (up to 100%) in a few minutes. Exfoliation of natural minerals (such as tungstenite and molybdenite) or bulk synthetic materials (including hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BCN), and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4)) in liquids leads to the breakdown of the 3D graphitic structure into a 2D structure; the efficiency of this process is highly dependent upon the physical effects of the ultrasound. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were employed to verify the quality of the exfoliation. Herein, this new method of exfoliation with ultrasound assistance for application to mono- and bilayered materials in hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments is presented. PMID:24708572

  3. Controlling the number of graphene sheets exfoliated from graphite by designed normal loading and frictional motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2014-07-14

    We use molecular dynamics to study the exfoliation of patterned nanometer-sized graphite under various normal loading conditions for friction-induced exfoliation. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) as well as both amorphous and crystalline SiO{sub 2} substrate as example systems, we show that the exfoliation process is attributed to the corrugation of the HOPG surface and the atomistic roughness of the substrate when they contact under normal loading. The critical normal strain, at which the exfoliation occurs, is higher on a crystalline substrate than on an amorphous substrate. This effect is related to the atomistic flatness and stiffness of the crystalline surface. We observe that an increase of the van der Waals interaction between the graphite and the substrate results in a decrease of the critical normal strain for exfoliation. We find that the magnitude of the normal strain can effectively control the number of exfoliated graphene layers. This mechanism suggests a promising approach of applying designed normal loading while sliding to pattern controlled number of graphene layers or other two-dimensional materials on a substrate surface.

  4. Role of Peroxide Ions in Formation of Graphene Nanosheets by Electrochemical Exfoliation of Graphite

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kodepelly Sanjeeva; Senthilnathan, Jaganathan; Liu, Yung-Fang; Yoshimura, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a facile, mild and environmentally-friendly sustainable (soft processing) approach for the efficient electrochemical exfoliation of graphite using a sodium hydroxide/hydrogen peroxide/water (NaOH/H2O2/H2O) system that can produce high-quality, anodic few-layer graphene nanosheets in 95% yield at ambient reaction conditions. The control experiment conducted using NaOH/H2O revealed the crucial role of H2O2 in the exfoliation of graphite. A possible exfoliation mechanism is proposed. The reaction of H2O2 with hydroxyl ions (HO−) leads to the formation of highly nucleophilic peroxide ions (O22−), which play a crucial role in the exfoliation of graphite via electrochemical-potential-assisted intercalation and strong expansion of graphite sheets. PMID:24577336

  5. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene: functionalization, characterization, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Jesús Iván

    2014-01-01

    Summary The development of chemical strategies to render graphene viable for incorporation into devices is a great challenge. A promising approach is the production of stable graphene dispersions from the exfoliation of graphite in water and organic solvents. The challenges involve the production of a large quantity of graphene sheets with tailored distribution in thickness, size, and shape. In this review, we present some of the recent efforts towards the controlled production of graphene in dispersions. We also describe some of the chemical protocols that have provided insight into the vast organic chemistry of the single atomic plane of graphite. Controlled chemical reactions applied to graphene are expected to significantly improve the design of hierarchical, functional platforms, driving the inclusion of graphene into advanced functional materials forward. PMID:25551061

  6. Characterizing Edge and Stacking Structures of Exfoliated Graphene by Photoelectron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Ishii, Ryo; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Morita, Makoto; Kitagawa, Satoshi; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Koh, Shinji; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    The two-dimensional C 1s photoelectron intensity angular distributions (PIADs) and spectra of exfoliated graphene flakes and crystalline graphite were measured using a focused soft X-ray beam. Suitable graphene samples were selected by thickness characterization using Raman spectromicroscopy after transferring mechanically exfoliated graphene flakes onto a 90-nm-thick SiO2 film. In every PIAD, a Kagomé interference pattern was observed, particularly clearly in the monolayer graphene PIAD. Its origin is the overlap of the diffraction rings formed by an in-plane C-C bond honeycomb lattice. Thus, the crystal orientation of each sample can be determined. In the case of bilayer graphene, PIAD was threefold-symmetric, while those of monolayer graphene and crystalline graphite were sixfold-symmetric. This is due to the stacking structure of bilayer graphene. From comparisons with the multiple scattering PIAD simulation results, the way of layer stacking as well as the termination types in the edge regions of bilayer graphene flakes were determined. Furthermore, two different C 1s core levels corresponding to the top and bottom layers of bilayer graphene were identified. A chemical shift to a higher binding energy by 0.25 eV for the bottom layer was attributed to interfacial interactions.

  7. Experimental observation of low threshold optical bistability in exfoliated graphene with low oxidation degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Morteza A.; Majles Ara, M. H.; Ghafary, Bijan; Salmani, Somayeh; Mohajer, Salman

    2016-03-01

    We have experimentally investigated low threshold Optical Bistability (OB) and multi-stability in exfoliated graphene ink with low oxidation degree. Theoretical predictions of N-layer problem and the resonator feedback problem show good agreement with the experimental observation. In contrary to the other graphene oxide samples, we have indicated that the absorbance does not restrict OB process. We have concluded from the experimental results and Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation (NLSE) that the nonlinear dispersion - rather than absorption - is the main nonlinear mechanism of OB. In addition to the enhanced nonlinearity, exfoliated graphene with low oxidation degree possesses semiconductors group III-V equivalent band gap energy, high charge carrier mobility and thus, ultra-fast optical response which makes it a unique optical material for application in all optical switching, especially in THz frequency range.

  8. Ultrafast carrier kinetics in exfoliated graphene and thin graphite films.

    PubMed

    Newson, Ryan W; Dean, Jesse; Schmidt, Ben; van Driel, Henry M

    2009-02-16

    Time-resolved transmissivity and reflectivity of exfoliated graphene and thin graphite films on a 295 K SiO(2)/Si substrate are measured at 1300 nm following excitation by 150 fs, 800 nm pump pulses. From the extracted transient optical conductivity we identify a fast recovery time constant which increases from approximately 200 to 300 fs and a longer one which increases from 2.5 to 5 ps as the number of atomic layers increases from 1 to approximately 260. We attribute the temporal recovery to carrier cooling and recombination with the layer dependence related to substrate coupling. Results are compared with related measurements for epitaxial, multilayer graphene.

  9. Facile Large Scale Production of Few-Layer Graphene Sheets by Shear Exfoliation in Volatile Solvent.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Wasim; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Youn Sop; Kim, Jong Seok

    2015-12-01

    Few layer graphene sheets were synthesized from natural graphite through mechanical shear mixer in 1-butanol as solvent. The liquid phase exfoliation of graphite through the shear mixer generated incising forces for 20 minutes which changed the large amount of graphite's flake into few layer graphene. The removal of solvent from the deposited dispersion was performed immediately by keeping at the room temperature. The deposited graphene thin films were characterized by AFM, HR-TEM, XRD, FT-IR and Raman Spectroscopy. The HR-TEM results showed the formation of few layers and well dispersed graphene. The Raman spectroscopy and XRD characterization confirmed the good quality and non-oxidized state of graphene. PMID:26682388

  10. Reliable Exfoliation of Large-Area High-Quality Flakes of Graphene and Other Two-Dimensional Materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; Sutter, Eli; Shi, Norman N; Zheng, Jiabao; Yang, Tianzhong; Englund, Dirk; Gao, Hong-Jun; Sutter, Peter

    2015-11-24

    Mechanical exfoliation has been a key enabler of the exploration of the properties of two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, by providing routine access to high-quality material. The original exfoliation method, which remained largely unchanged during the past decade, provides relatively small flakes with moderate yield. Here, we report a modified approach for exfoliating thin monolayer and few-layer flakes from layered crystals. Our method introduces two process steps that enhance and homogenize the adhesion force between the outermost sheet in contact with a substrate: Prior to exfoliation, ambient adsorbates are effectively removed from the substrate by oxygen plasma cleaning, and an additional heat treatment maximizes the uniform contact area at the interface between the source crystal and the substrate. For graphene exfoliation, these simple process steps increased the yield and the area of the transferred flakes by more than 50 times compared to the established exfoliation methods. Raman and AFM characterization shows that the graphene flakes are of similar high quality as those obtained in previous reports. Graphene field-effect devices were fabricated and measured with back-gating and solution top-gating, yielding mobilities of ∼4000 and 12,000 cm(2)/(V s), respectively, and thus demonstrating excellent electrical properties. Experiments with other layered crystals, e.g., a bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (BSCCO) superconductor, show enhancements in exfoliation yield and flake area similar to those for graphene, suggesting that our modified exfoliation method provides an effective way for producing large area, high-quality flakes of a wide range of 2D materials.

  11. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Kottaisamy, M.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-02-01

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  12. In Situ Exfoliation of Graphene in Epoxy Resins: A Facile Strategy to Efficient and Large Scale Graphene Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Han; Crespo, Maria; Porwal, Harshit; Picot, Olivier; Santagiuliana, Giovanni; Huang, Zhaohui; Barbieri, Ettore; Pugno, Nicola M; Peijs, Ton; Bilotti, Emiliano

    2016-09-14

    Any industrial application aiming at exploiting the exceptional properties of graphene in composites or coatings is currently limited by finding viable production methods for large volumes of good quality and high aspect ratio graphene, few layer graphene (FLG) or graphite nanoplatelets (GNP). Final properties of the resulting composites are inherently related to those of the initial graphitic nanoparticles, which typically depend on time-consuming, resource-demanding and/or low yield liquid exfoliation processes. In addition, efficient dispersion of these nanofillers in polymer matrices, and their interaction, is of paramount importance. Here we show that it is possible to produce graphene/epoxy nanocomposites in situ and with high conversion of graphite to FLG/GNP through the process of three-roll milling (TRM), without the need of any additives, solvents, compatibilisers or chemical treatments. This readily scalable production method allows for more than 5 wt % of natural graphite (NG) to be directly exfoliated into FLG/GNP and dispersed in an epoxy resin. The in situ exfoliated graphitic nanoplatelets, with average aspect ratios of 300-1000 and thicknesses of 5-17 nm, were demonstrated to conferee exceptional enhancements in mechanical and electrical properties to the epoxy resin. The above conclusions are discussed and interpreted in terms of simple analytical models. PMID:27541488

  13. A flexible and transparent graphene/ZnO nanorod hybrid structure fabricated by exfoliating a graphite substrate.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gwang-Hee; Baek, Seong-Ho; Cho, Chang-Hee; Park, Il-Kyu

    2014-10-21

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a graphene/ZnO nanorod (NR) hybrid structure by mechanical exfoliation of ZnO NRs grown on a graphite substrate. We confirmed the existence of graphene sheets on the hybrid structure by analyzing the Raman spectra and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The Raman spectra of the exfoliated graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure show G and 2D band peaks that are shifted to lower wavenumbers, indicating that the exfoliated graphene layer exists under a significant amount of strain. The I-V characteristics of the graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure show current flow through the graphene layer, while no current flow is observed on the ZnO NR/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite without graphene, thereby indicating that the few-layer graphene was successfully transferred onto the hybrid structure. A piezoelectric nanogenerator is demonstrated by using the fabricated graphene/ZnO NR hybrid structure. The nanogenerator exhibits stable output voltage up to 3.04 V with alternating current output characteristics.

  14. Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Graphite into Single- and Few-Layer Graphene with α-Functionalized Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Haar, Sébastien; Bruna, Matteo; Lian, Jian Xiang; Tomarchio, Flavia; Olivier, Yoann; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Morandi, Vittorio; Moran, Joseph; Ferrari, Andrea C; Beljonne, David; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-07-21

    Graphene has unique physical and chemical properties, making it appealing for a number of applications in optoelectronics, sensing, photonics, composites, and smart coatings, just to cite a few. These require the development of production processes that are inexpensive and up-scalable. These criteria are met in liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE), a technique that can be enhanced when specific organic molecules are used. Here we report the exfoliation of graphite in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, in the presence of heneicosane linear alkanes terminated with different head groups. These molecules act as stabilizing agents during exfoliation. The efficiency of the exfoliation in terms of the concentration of exfoliated single- and few-layer graphene flakes depends on the functional head group determining the strength of the molecular dimerization through dipole-dipole interactions. A thermodynamic analysis is carried out to interpret the impact of the termination group of the alkyl chain on the exfoliation yield. This combines molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics to rationalize the role of functionalized alkanes in the dispersion and stabilization process, which is ultimately attributed to a synergistic effect of the interactions between the molecules, graphene, and the solvent. PMID:27349897

  15. Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Graphite into Single- and Few-Layer Graphene with α-Functionalized Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Haar, Sébastien; Bruna, Matteo; Lian, Jian Xiang; Tomarchio, Flavia; Olivier, Yoann; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Morandi, Vittorio; Moran, Joseph; Ferrari, Andrea C; Beljonne, David; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-07-21

    Graphene has unique physical and chemical properties, making it appealing for a number of applications in optoelectronics, sensing, photonics, composites, and smart coatings, just to cite a few. These require the development of production processes that are inexpensive and up-scalable. These criteria are met in liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE), a technique that can be enhanced when specific organic molecules are used. Here we report the exfoliation of graphite in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, in the presence of heneicosane linear alkanes terminated with different head groups. These molecules act as stabilizing agents during exfoliation. The efficiency of the exfoliation in terms of the concentration of exfoliated single- and few-layer graphene flakes depends on the functional head group determining the strength of the molecular dimerization through dipole-dipole interactions. A thermodynamic analysis is carried out to interpret the impact of the termination group of the alkyl chain on the exfoliation yield. This combines molecular dynamics and molecular mechanics to rationalize the role of functionalized alkanes in the dispersion and stabilization process, which is ultimately attributed to a synergistic effect of the interactions between the molecules, graphene, and the solvent.

  16. Exfoliated Graphene Oxide/MoO2 Composites as Anode Materials in Lithium-Ion Batteries: An Insight into Intercalation of Li and Conversion Mechanism of MoO2.

    PubMed

    Petnikota, Shaikshavali; Teo, Keefe Wayne; Chen, Luo; Sim, Amos; Marka, Sandeep Kumar; Reddy, M V; Srikanth, V V S S; Adams, S; Chowdari, B V R

    2016-05-01

    Exfoliated graphene oxide (EG)/MoO2 composites are synthesized by a simple solid-state graphenothermal reduction method. Graphene oxide (GO) is used as a reducing agent to reduce MoO3 and as a source for EG. The formation of different submicron sized morphologies such as spheres, rods, flowers, etc., of monoclinic MoO2 on EG surfaces is confirmed by complementary characterization techniques. As-synthesized EG/MoO2 composite with a higher weight percentage of EG performed excellently as an anode material in lithium-ion batteries. The galvanostatic cycling studies aided with postcycling cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic intermittent titrations followed by ex situ structural studies clearly indicate that Li intercalation into MoO2 is transformed into conversion upon aging at low current densities while intercalation mechanism is preferably taking place at higher current rates. The intercalation mechanism is found to be promising for steady-state capacity throughout the cycling because of excess graphene and higher current density even in the operating voltage window of 0.005-3.0 V in which MoO2 undergoes conversion below 0.8 V.

  17. Polyelectrolyte-induced reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide: a facile route to synthesis of soluble graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Liao, Honggang; Engelhard, Mark H; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-03-22

    Here we report that poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) acts as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer to prepare soluble graphene nanosheets from graphite oxide. The results of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared indicated that graphite oxide was successfully reduced to graphene nanosheets which exhibited single-layer structure and high dispersion in various solvents. The reaction mechanism for PDDA-induced reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide was proposed. Furthermore, PDDA facilitated the in situ growth of highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surface of graphene nanosheets to form Pt/graphene nanocomposites, which exhibited excellent catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation. This work presents a facile and environmentally friendly approach to the synthesis of graphene nanosheets and opens up a new possibility for preparing graphene and graphene-based nanomaterials for large-scale applications.

  18. Direct synthesis of hydrophobic graphene-based nanosheets via chemical modification of exfoliated graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jigang; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Dawei; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Hongpeng; Wang, Haiteng; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bingyang; Xu, Haiteng; Fu, Ming

    2012-08-01

    Hydrophobic graphene-based material at the nanoscale was prepared by treatment of exfoliated graphene oxide with organic isocyanates. The lipophilic modified graphene oxide (LMGO) can then be exfoliated into the functionalized graphene nanoplatelets that can form a stable dispersion in polar aprotic solvents. AFM image shows the thickness of LMGO is approximately 1 nm. Characterization of LMGO by elemental analysis suggested that the chemical treatment results in the functionalization of the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups in GO via formation of amides and carbamate esters, respectively. The degree of GO functionalization can be controlled via either the reactivity of the isocyanate or the reaction time. Then we investigated the thermal properties of the SPFGraphene by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the TGA curve shows a greater weight loss of approximately 20% occurred indicating removal of functional groups from the LMGO sheets and an obvious exothermic peak at 176 degrees can be observed from 150 to 250 degrees. We also compared the structure of graphene oxide with the structure of chemical treated graphene oxide by FT-IR spectroscopy. The morphology and microstructure of the LMGO nanosheets were also characterized by SEM and XRD. Graphene can be used to fabricate a wide range of simple electronic devices such as field-effect transistors, resonators, quantum dots and some other extensive industrial manufacture such as super capacitor, li ion battery, solar cells and even transparent electrodes in device applications.

  19. Modification of Chemically Exfoliated Graphene to Produce Efficient Piezoresistive Polystyrene-Graphene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirpouri, Farzad; Pourmahmoudi, Hassan; Abbasi, Farhang; Littlejohn, Samuel; Chauhan, Ashok S.; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-10-01

    We report the chemical exfoliation of grapheneoxide from graphite and its subsequent reduction to graphene nanosheets (GN) to obtain highly conducting composites of graphene sheets in a polymer matrix. The effect of using graphite nanoparticles or flakes as precursors, and different drying methods, was investigated to obtain multilayer graphene sheets of atomically controlled thickness, which was essential to optimizing their dispersion in a polystyrene (PS) polymer matrix. In situ emulsion polymerization of the styrene monomer in the presence of GN was performed to obtain thin composite films with highly uniform dispersion and fewer graphene layers when GN were obtained from graphite flakes then freeze drying. The highest electrical conductivity of PS-GN composites was ~0.01 S/m for a graphene filling fraction of 2%. The piezoresistance of the PS-GN composites was evaluated and used in pressure sensor arrays with pressure field imaging capability.

  20. Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Liquid Phase Exfoliated Graphene Flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richie, Julianna; Huffstutler, Jacob; Wasala, Milinda; Winchester, Andrew; Ghosh, Sujoy; Kar, Swastik; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-03-01

    We will present our results on synthesis and characterization of few-layer graphene nanoflakes obtained from bulk graphite in isopropanol alcohol (IPA) using Liquid-phase exfoliation technique. Results of sample characterization using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and galvanostatic charge-discharge will be presented. Potential use of these materials as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes were investigated using 6M KOH as electrolyte. We found that these devices possess specific capacitance values as high as 23F/g at a 1 mV scan rate. Several other parameters related to the EDLC performances will be presented in detail.

  1. Graphene from electrochemical exfoliation and its direct applications in enhanced energy storage devices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Di; Grande, Lorenzo; Chundi, Vishnu; White, Richard; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Ryhänen, Tapani

    2012-01-30

    Graphite was electrochemically exfoliated in mixtures of room temperature ionic liquids and deionized water containing lithium salts to produce functionalized graphenes and such an electrochemical exfoliation technique can be directly used in making primary battery electrodes with significantly enhanced specific energy capacity. PMID:22170354

  2. BioGraphene: Direct Exfoliation of Graphite in a Kitchen Blender for Enzymology Applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C V; Pattammattel, A

    2016-01-01

    A high yielding method for the aqueous exfoliation of graphite crystals to produce high quality graphene nanosheets in a kitchen blender is described here. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, lysozyme, and hemoglobin as well as calf serum were used for the exfoliation of graphene. Among these, BSA gave the maximum exfoliation efficiency, exceeding 4mgmL(-1)h(-1) of graphene. Quality of graphene produced was examined by Raman spectroscopy, which indicated 3-5 layer graphene of very high quality and very low levels of defects. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an average size of ~0.5μm flakes. The graphene/BSA dispersions were stable over pH 3.0-11, and at 5°C or 50°C, for more than 2 months. Current approach gave higher rates of BSA/graphene (BioGraphene) in better yields than other methods. Calf serum, when used in place of BSA, also gave high yields of good quality BioGraphene and these preparations may be of direct use for cell culture studies. A simple example of BioGraphene preparation is described that can be adapted in most laboratories, and graphene-adsorbed glucose oxidase is nearly as active as the free enzyme. Current approach may facilitate large-scale production of graphene in most laboratories around the world and it may open new opportunities for biological applications of graphene. PMID:27112402

  3. Enhancing the Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Graphene in Organic Solvents upon Addition of n-Octylbenzene

    PubMed Central

    Haar, Sébastien; El Gemayel, Mirella; Shin, Yuyoung; Melinte, Georgian; Squillaci, Marco A.; Ersen, Ovidiu; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Due to a unique combination of electrical and thermal conductivity, mechanical stiffness, strength and elasticity, graphene became a rising star on the horizon of materials science. This two-dimensional material has found applications in many areas of science ranging from electronics to composites. Making use of different approaches, unfunctionalized and non-oxidized graphene sheets can be produced; among them an inexpensive and scalable method based on liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite (LPE) holds potential for applications in opto-electronics and nanocomposites. Here we have used n-octylbenzene molecules as graphene dispersion-stabilizing agents during the graphite LPE process. We have demonstrated that by tuning the ratio between organic solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone or ortho-dichlorobenzene, and n-octylbenzene molecules, the concentration of exfoliated graphene can be enhanced by 230% as a result of the high affinity of the latter molecules for the basal plane of graphene. The LPE processed graphene dispersions were further deposited onto solid substrates by exploiting a new deposition technique called spin-controlled drop casting, which was shown to produce uniform highly conductive and transparent graphene films. PMID:26573383

  4. Fast Production of High-Quality Graphene via Sequential Liquid Exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tanna, Vijesh A; Yavitt, Benjamin M; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Winter, H Henning

    2015-12-16

    A novel and practical approach of exfoliating graphite into graphene uses a sequence of flow and sonication on graphite suspensions. Graphite sediment after intense mixing is found to be altered, graphite having curled-up edges, which increases its sensitivity to ultrasound. Quadrupled graphene yield is achieved through introducing flow pretreatment.

  5. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene. PMID:27064575

  6. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  7. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene. PMID:27064575

  8. Optical properties of exfoliated MoS2 coaxial nanotubes - analogues of graphene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first exfoliation of MoS2 coaxial nanotubes. The single-layer flakes, as the result of exfoliation, represent the transition metal dichalcogenides' analogue of graphene. They show a very low degree of restacking in comparison with exfoliation of MoS2 plate-like crystals. MoS2 monolayers were investigated by means of electron and atomic force microscopies, showing their structure, and ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, revealing quantum confinement as the consequence of the nanoscale size in the z-direction. PMID:22085544

  9. Exfoliation and Performance Properties of Non-Oxidized Graphene in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Wen Peter; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jhou, Sheng-Hong Saint; Zhang, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Single-layered graphene has unique electronic, chemical, and electromechanical properties. Recently, graphite exfoliation in N-methylpyrrolidone and molten salt has been demonstrated to generate monolayer exfoliated graphene sheets (EGS). However, these solvents are either high-priced or require special care and have high boiling points and viscosities, making it difficult to deposit the dispersed graphene onto substrates. Here we show a universal principle for the exfoliation of graphite in water to single-layered and several-layered graphene sheets via the direct exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using pyridinium tribromide (Py+Br3-). Electrical conductivity >5100 S/cm was observed for filtered graphene paper, and the EGS exhibited superior performance as a hole transport layer compared to the conventional material N,N-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N-diphenylbenzidine at low voltage. The overall results demonstrate that this method is a scalable process for the preparation of highly conductive graphene for use in the commercial manufacture of high-performance electronic devices.

  10. Exfoliation and performance properties of non-oxidized graphene in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Wen Peter; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jhou, Sheng-Hong Saint; Zhang, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Single-layered graphene has unique electronic, chemical, and electromechanical properties. Recently, graphite exfoliation in N-methylpyrrolidone and molten salt has been demonstrated to generate monolayer exfoliated graphene sheets (EGS). However, these solvents are either high-priced or require special care and have high boiling points and viscosities, making it difficult to deposit the dispersed graphene onto substrates. Here we show a universal principle for the exfoliation of graphite in water to single-layered and several-layered graphene sheets via the direct exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using pyridinium tribromide (Py(+)Br3(-)). Electrical conductivity >5100 S/cm was observed for filtered graphene paper, and the EGS exhibited superior performance as a hole transport layer compared to the conventional material N,N-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N-diphenylbenzidine at low voltage. The overall results demonstrate that this method is a scalable process for the preparation of highly conductive graphene for use in the commercial manufacture of high-performance electronic devices. PMID:24473336

  11. Exfoliation and performance properties of non-oxidized graphene in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Wen Peter; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jhou, Sheng-Hong Saint; Zhang, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-29

    Single-layered graphene has unique electronic, chemical, and electromechanical properties. Recently, graphite exfoliation in N-methylpyrrolidone and molten salt has been demonstrated to generate monolayer exfoliated graphene sheets (EGS). However, these solvents are either high-priced or require special care and have high boiling points and viscosities, making it difficult to deposit the dispersed graphene onto substrates. Here we show a universal principle for the exfoliation of graphite in water to single-layered and several-layered graphene sheets via the direct exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using pyridinium tribromide (Py(+)Br3(-)). Electrical conductivity >5100 S/cm was observed for filtered graphene paper, and the EGS exhibited superior performance as a hole transport layer compared to the conventional material N,N-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N-diphenylbenzidine at low voltage. The overall results demonstrate that this method is a scalable process for the preparation of highly conductive graphene for use in the commercial manufacture of high-performance electronic devices.

  12. Influence of pH condition on colloidal suspension of exfoliated graphene oxide by electrostatic repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Long-Yue; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-02-15

    A facile chemical process is described to produce graphene oxide utilizing a zwitterions amino acid intermediate from graphite oxide sheets. 11-aminoundecanoic acid molecules were protonated to intercalate molecules into the graphite oxide sheets to achieve ion exchange, and the carboxyl groups were then ionized in a NaOH solution to exfoliate the graphite oxide sheets. In this way, the produced graphene oxide nanosheets were stably dispersed in water. The delaminated graphene nanosheets were confirmed by XRD, AFM, and TEM. XRD patterns indicated the d{sub 002}-spacing of the graphite greatly increased from 0.380 nm and 0.870 nm. AFM and TEM images showed that the ordered graphite crystal structure of graphene nanosheets was effectively exfoliated by this method. The prepared graphene nanosheets films showed 87.1% transmittance and a sheet resistance of 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} {Omega}/square. - Graphical abstract: A stable graphene oxide suspension could be quickly prepared by exfoliating a graphite oxide suspension by a host-guest electrostatic repulsion in aqueous solution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene nanosheets were prepared by a zwitterions amino acid intermediate from graphite oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 11-aminoundecanoic acid was protonated to intercalate molecules into the graphene oxide to achieve ion exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The d{sub 002}-spacing of the graphite oxide greatly increased from 0.330 nm to 0.415 nm after 11-aminoundecanoic acid treatment.

  13. Stable aqueous dispersions of functionalized multi-layer graphene by pulsed underwater plasma exfoliation of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Plath, Asmus; Beckert, Fabian; Tölle, Folke J.; Sturm, Heinz; Mülhaupt, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    A process was developed for graphite particle exfoliation in water to stably dispersed multi-layer graphene. It uses electrohydraulic shockwaves and the functionalizing effect of solution plasma discharges in water. The discharges were excited by 100 ns high voltage pulsing of graphite particle chains that bridge an electrode gap. The underwater discharges allow simultaneous exfoliation and chemical functionalization of graphite particles to partially oxidized multi-layer graphene. Exfoliation is caused by shockwaves that result from rapid evaporation of carbon and water to plasma-excited gas species. Depending on discharge energy and locus of ignition, the shockwaves cause stirring, erosion, exfoliation and/or expansion of graphite flakes. The process was optimized to produce long-term stable aqueous dispersions of multi-layer graphene from graphite in a single process step without requiring addition of intercalants, surfactants, binders or special solvents. A setup was developed that allows continuous production of aqueous dispersions of flake size-selected multi-layer graphenes. Due to the well-preserved sp2-carbon structure, thin films made from the dispersed graphene exhibited high electrical conductivity. Underwater plasma discharge processing exhibits high innovation potential for morphological and chemical modifications of carbonaceous materials and surfaces, especially for the generation of stable dispersions of two-dimensional, layered materials.

  14. High-yield production of graphene by liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Yenny; Nicolosi, Valeria; Lotya, Mustafa; Blighe, Fiona M; Sun, Zhenyu; De, Sukanta; McGovern, I T; Holland, Brendan; Byrne, Michele; Gun'Ko, Yurii K; Boland, John J; Niraj, Peter; Duesberg, Georg; Krishnamurthy, Satheesh; Goodhue, Robbie; Hutchison, John; Scardaci, Vittorio; Ferrari, Andrea C; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2008-09-01

    Fully exploiting the properties of graphene will require a method for the mass production of this remarkable material. Two main routes are possible: large-scale growth or large-scale exfoliation. Here, we demonstrate graphene dispersions with concentrations up to approximately 0.01 mg ml(-1), produced by dispersion and exfoliation of graphite in organic solvents such as N-methyl-pyrrolidone. This is possible because the energy required to exfoliate graphene is balanced by the solvent-graphene interaction for solvents whose surface energies match that of graphene. We confirm the presence of individual graphene sheets by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Our method results in a monolayer yield of approximately 1 wt%, which could potentially be improved to 7-12 wt% with further processing. The absence of defects or oxides is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron, infrared and Raman spectroscopies. We are able to produce semi-transparent conducting films and conducting composites. Solution processing of graphene opens up a range of potential large-area applications, from device and sensor fabrication to liquid-phase chemistry.

  15. Mechanical exfoliation of graphite in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6) providing graphene nanoplatelets that exhibit enhanced electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, William Ignatius; Lubarsky, Gennady; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-12-01

    A novel production method for graphene nanoplatelets (GPs) with enhanced electrocatalytic behaviour is presented. GPs show improvement in their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysis after prolonging the grinding of graphite in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6). Nitrogen doping of the GPs has inferred a further increase in ORR. The ORR onset potential, cathodic current magnitude and electron transfer efficiency have all improved as a direct consequence of increasing the graphite grinding duration from 30 min to 4 h. Atomic force microscopy has confirmed a decrease in the GP diameter and height as the grinding increases. Raman spectroscopy indicates a higher level of defects present after prolonging the graphite grinding in BMIM-PF6, most likely a result of the increased edge plane exposure. This increased edge plane appears to promote a higher level of nitrogen incorporation as the graphite grinding duration increases, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The stability of the cathodic current assessed by chronoamperometry analysis is higher for the GP and nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelet (N-GP) samples than the platinum on carbon black (Pt/C). This study presents a novel process for the production of nitrogen doped graphene nanoplatelets, constituting a strategy for the up-scaled production of electrocatalysts.

  16. Graphene Oxide-Assisted Liquid Phase Exfoliation of Graphite into Graphene for Highly Conductive Film and Electromechanical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tran Thanh; Yoo, Jeongha; Alotaibi, Faisal K; Nine, Md J; Karunagaran, Ramesh; Krebsz, Melinda; Nguyen, Giang T; Tran, Diana N H; Feller, Jean-Francois; Losic, Dusan

    2016-06-29

    Here, we report a new method to prepare graphene from graphite by the liquid phase exfoliation process with sonication using graphene oxide (GO) as a dispersant. It was found that GO nanosheets act a as surfactant to the mediated exfoliation of graphite into a GO-adsorbed graphene complex in the aqueous solution, from which graphene was separated by an additional process. The preparation of isolated graphene from a single to a few layers is routinely achieved with an exfoliation yield of up to higher than 40% from the initial graphite material. The prepared graphene sheets showed a high quality (C/O ∼ 21.5), low defect (ID/IG ∼ 0.12), and high conductivity (6.2 × 10(4) S/m). Moreover, the large lateral size ranging from 5 to 10 μm of graphene, which is believed to be due to the shielding effect of GO avoiding damage under ultrasonic jets and cavitation formed by the sonication process. The thin graphene film prepared by the spray-coating technique showed a sheet resistance of 668 Ω/sq with a transmittance of 80% at 550 nm after annealing at 350 °C for 3 h. The transparent electrode was even greater with the resistance only 66.02 Ω when graphene is deposited on an interdigitated electrode (1 mm gap). Finally, a flexible sensor based on a graphene spray-coating polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is demonstrated showing excellent performance working under human touch pressure (<10 kPa). The graphene prepared by this method has some distinct properties showing it as a promising material for applications in electronics including thin film coatings, transparent electrodes, wearable electronics, human monitoring sensors, and RFID tags.

  17. Graphene Oxide-Assisted Liquid Phase Exfoliation of Graphite into Graphene for Highly Conductive Film and Electromechanical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tran Thanh; Yoo, Jeongha; Alotaibi, Faisal K; Nine, Md J; Karunagaran, Ramesh; Krebsz, Melinda; Nguyen, Giang T; Tran, Diana N H; Feller, Jean-Francois; Losic, Dusan

    2016-06-29

    Here, we report a new method to prepare graphene from graphite by the liquid phase exfoliation process with sonication using graphene oxide (GO) as a dispersant. It was found that GO nanosheets act a as surfactant to the mediated exfoliation of graphite into a GO-adsorbed graphene complex in the aqueous solution, from which graphene was separated by an additional process. The preparation of isolated graphene from a single to a few layers is routinely achieved with an exfoliation yield of up to higher than 40% from the initial graphite material. The prepared graphene sheets showed a high quality (C/O ∼ 21.5), low defect (ID/IG ∼ 0.12), and high conductivity (6.2 × 10(4) S/m). Moreover, the large lateral size ranging from 5 to 10 μm of graphene, which is believed to be due to the shielding effect of GO avoiding damage under ultrasonic jets and cavitation formed by the sonication process. The thin graphene film prepared by the spray-coating technique showed a sheet resistance of 668 Ω/sq with a transmittance of 80% at 550 nm after annealing at 350 °C for 3 h. The transparent electrode was even greater with the resistance only 66.02 Ω when graphene is deposited on an interdigitated electrode (1 mm gap). Finally, a flexible sensor based on a graphene spray-coating polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is demonstrated showing excellent performance working under human touch pressure (<10 kPa). The graphene prepared by this method has some distinct properties showing it as a promising material for applications in electronics including thin film coatings, transparent electrodes, wearable electronics, human monitoring sensors, and RFID tags. PMID:27268515

  18. A single-stage functionalization and exfoliation method for the production of graphene in water: stepwise construction of 2D-nanostructured composites with iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Melin, Frédéric; Hellwig, Petra; Janowska, Izabela; Begin, Dominique; Baaziz, Walid; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Baati, Rachid

    2013-10-01

    A practically simple top-down process for the exfoliation of graphene (GN) and few-layer graphene (FLG) from graphite is described. We have discovered that a biocompatible amphiphilic pyrene-based hexahistidine peptide is able to exfoliate, functionalize, and dissolve few layer graphene flakes in pure water under exceptionally mild, sustainable and virtually innocuous low intensity cavitation conditions. Large area functionalized graphene flakes with the hexahistidine oligopeptide (His₆-TagGN = His₆@GN) have been produced efficiently at room temperature and characterized by TEM, Raman, and UV spectroscopy. Conductivity experiments carried out on His₆-TagGN samples revealed superior electric performances as compared to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and non-functionalized graphene, demonstrating the non-invasive features of our non-covalent functionalization process. We postulated a rational exfoliation mechanism based on the intercalation of the peptide amphiphile under cavitational chemistry. We also demonstrated the ability of His6-TagGN nanoassemblies to self-assemble spontaneously with inorganic iron oxide nanoparticles generating magnetic two-dimensional (2D) His₆-TagGN/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposites under mild and non-hydrothermal conditions. The set of original experiments described here open novel perspectives in the facile production of water dispersible high quality GN and FLG sheets that will improve and facilitate the interfacing, processing and manipulation of graphene for promising applications in catalysis, nanocomposite construction, integrated nanoelectronic devices and bionanotechnology.

  19. Direct exfoliation of graphite to graphene in aqueous media with diazaperopyrenium dications.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Srinivasan; Basuray, Ashish N; Hartlieb, Karel J; Aytun, Taner; Stupp, Samuel I; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-05-21

    The 2,9-dimethyldiazaperopyrenium dication can be made from a ubiquitous and inexpensive feedstock in three simple steps as its chloride salt. When mixed with powdered graphite at 23 °C, this behemoth of a molecular compound exfoliates graphite to graphene in water under mild conditions.

  20. One-pot liquid-phase exfoliation from graphite to graphene with carbon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghan; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zhi; Yu, Fan; Ma, Yujie; Hu, Nantao; He, Dannong; Liang, Qi; Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yafei

    2015-06-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are novel carbon nanomaterials and are attracting increasing interest due to their good characteristics such as hydrophilicity, chemical stability, quantum yield, small particle sizes, and low cytotoxicity. Herein, we used CQDs as stabilizers and exfoliation agents to exfoliate graphite to graphene in an aqueous medium for the first time. The functions of CQDs are to reduce the surface tension of water to match that of graphite and to make weak interactions (π-π conjugation, hydrophobic force, and the Coulomb attraction) with the graphite surface. Different characterization methods were used to evaluate the presence of layers (<5 layers) of graphene sheets with fewer defects and low oxidation. In the future, CQDs can also be good candidates to exfoliate other two-dimensional materials, such as WS2, BN, MoS2, and g-C3N4, to form two-dimensional heterostructures for a range of possible applications.Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are novel carbon nanomaterials and are attracting increasing interest due to their good characteristics such as hydrophilicity, chemical stability, quantum yield, small particle sizes, and low cytotoxicity. Herein, we used CQDs as stabilizers and exfoliation agents to exfoliate graphite to graphene in an aqueous medium for the first time. The functions of CQDs are to reduce the surface tension of water to match that of graphite and to make weak interactions (π-π conjugation, hydrophobic force, and the Coulomb attraction) with the graphite surface. Different characterization methods were used to evaluate the presence of layers (<5 layers) of graphene sheets with fewer defects and low oxidation. In the future, CQDs can also be good candidates to exfoliate other two-dimensional materials, such as WS2, BN, MoS2, and g-C3N4, to form two-dimensional heterostructures for a range of possible applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Particle size distribution, UV-vis spectrum, and XRD pattern of

  1. Exfoliation of graphene with an industrial dye: teaching an old dog new tricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlierf, Andrea; Cha, Kitty; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Samorı, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    We describe the exfoliation, processing and inclusion in polymer composites of few-layers graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) by using the molecule indanthrone blue sulphonic acid sodium salt (IBS), a very common industrial dyestuff and intermediate for liquid crystal preparation. We show how IBS can be used to successfully exfoliate graphite into few-layers graphene yielding highly stable dispersions in water. To demonstrate that the method is suitable for applications in composites, these graphene-organic hybrids are processed into a commercial commodity polymer (polyvinyl alcohol, PVA), enhancing its electrical bulk conductivity by ten orders of magnitude by adding as few as 3% of GNP. We attribute the good performance of IBS in dispersing GNPs in water to its amphiphilic nature and the tendency to self-assemble through π-π interaction of its large aromatic core with the graphene surface. The molecule studied here, unlike many specialty organic surfactants or solvents commonly known to exfoliate graphene, is already used as a blue pigment dispersant additive in the industrial production of polymers and thus does not need to be removed from the final product.

  2. Efficient fluorescence quenching in electrochemically exfoliated graphene decorated with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Morales, M; Ortiz, M; Acuña, C; Nerl, H C; Nicolosi, V; Hernández, Y

    2016-07-01

    High surface area graphene sheets were obtained by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite in an acid medium under constant potential conditions. Filtration and centrifugation processes played an important role in order to obtain stable dispersions in water. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed highly exfoliated crystalline samples of ∼5 μm. Raman, Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy further confirmed the high quality of the exfoliated material. The electrochemically exfoliated graphene (EEG) was decorated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using sodium cholate as a buffer layer. This approach allowed for a non-covalent functionalization without altering the desirable electronic properties of the EEG. The AuNP-EEG samples were characterized with various techniques including absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. These samples displayed a fluorescence signal using an excitation wavelength of 290 nm. The calculated quantum yield (Φ) for these samples was 40.04%, a high efficiency compared to previous studies using solution processable graphene.

  3. Efficient fluorescence quenching in electrochemically exfoliated graphene decorated with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado-Morales, M.; Ortiz, M.; Acuña, C.; Nerl, H. C.; Nicolosi, V.; Hernández, Y.

    2016-07-01

    High surface area graphene sheets were obtained by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite in an acid medium under constant potential conditions. Filtration and centrifugation processes played an important role in order to obtain stable dispersions in water. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy imaging revealed highly exfoliated crystalline samples of ∼5 μm. Raman, Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy further confirmed the high quality of the exfoliated material. The electrochemically exfoliated graphene (EEG) was decorated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using sodium cholate as a buffer layer. This approach allowed for a non-covalent functionalization without altering the desirable electronic properties of the EEG. The AuNP-EEG samples were characterized with various techniques including absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. These samples displayed a fluorescence signal using an excitation wavelength of 290 nm. The calculated quantum yield (Φ) for these samples was 40.04%, a high efficiency compared to previous studies using solution processable graphene.

  4. Creating high yield water soluble luminescent graphene quantum dots via exfoliating and disintegrating carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2012-10-21

    We have developed an effective method to exfoliate and disintegrate multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes. With this technique, high yield production of luminescent graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield and low oxidization can be achieved.

  5. Turbulence-assisted shear exfoliation of graphene using household detergent and a kitchen blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varrla, Eswaraiah; Paton, Keith R.; Backes, Claudia; Harvey, Andrew; Smith, Ronan J.; McCauley, Joe; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2014-09-01

    To facilitate progression from the lab to commercial applications, it will be necessary to develop simple, scalable methods to produce high quality graphene. Here we demonstrate the production of large quantities of defect-free graphene using a kitchen blender and household detergent. We have characterised the scaling of both graphene concentration and production rate with the mixing parameters: mixing time, initial graphite concentration, rotor speed and liquid volume. We find the production rate to be invariant with mixing time and to increase strongly with mixing volume, results which are important for scale-up. Even in this simple system, concentrations of up to 1 mg ml-1 and graphene masses of >500 mg can be achieved after a few hours mixing. The maximum production rate was ~0.15 g h-1, much higher than for standard sonication-based exfoliation methods. We demonstrate that graphene production occurs because the mean turbulent shear rate in the blender exceeds the critical shear rate for exfoliation.To facilitate progression from the lab to commercial applications, it will be necessary to develop simple, scalable methods to produce high quality graphene. Here we demonstrate the production of large quantities of defect-free graphene using a kitchen blender and household detergent. We have characterised the scaling of both graphene concentration and production rate with the mixing parameters: mixing time, initial graphite concentration, rotor speed and liquid volume. We find the production rate to be invariant with mixing time and to increase strongly with mixing volume, results which are important for scale-up. Even in this simple system, concentrations of up to 1 mg ml-1 and graphene masses of >500 mg can be achieved after a few hours mixing. The maximum production rate was ~0.15 g h-1, much higher than for standard sonication-based exfoliation methods. We demonstrate that graphene production occurs because the mean turbulent shear rate in the blender exceeds

  6. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  7. Production and stability of mechanochemically exfoliated graphene in water and culture media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, V.; González-Domínguez, J. M.; Fierro, J. L. G.; Prato, M.; Vázquez, E.

    2016-07-01

    The preparation of graphene suspensions in water, without detergents or any other additives is achieved using freeze-dried graphene powders, produced by mechanochemical exfoliation of graphite. These powders of graphene can be safely stored or shipped, and promptly dissolved in aqueous media. The suspensions are relatively stable in terms of time, with a maximum loss of ~25% of the initial concentration at 2 h. This work provides an easy and general access to aqueous graphene suspensions of chemically non-modified graphene samples, an otherwise (almost) impossible task to achieve by other means. A detailed study of the stability of the relative dispersions is also reported.The preparation of graphene suspensions in water, without detergents or any other additives is achieved using freeze-dried graphene powders, produced by mechanochemical exfoliation of graphite. These powders of graphene can be safely stored or shipped, and promptly dissolved in aqueous media. The suspensions are relatively stable in terms of time, with a maximum loss of ~25% of the initial concentration at 2 h. This work provides an easy and general access to aqueous graphene suspensions of chemically non-modified graphene samples, an otherwise (almost) impossible task to achieve by other means. A detailed study of the stability of the relative dispersions is also reported. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A video showing the dispersion process, the N 1s XPS spectrum of BMG, image of the graphite test in CCM, and the characterization of the GO employed. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03246j

  8. Performance of Liquid Phase Exfoliated Graphene As Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitors Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffstutler, Jacob; Wasala, Milinda; Richie, Julianna; Winchester, Andrew; Ghosh, Sujoy; Kar, Swastik; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-03-01

    We will present the results of our investigations of electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) or supercapacitors (SC) fabricated using liquid-phase exfoliated graphene. Several electrolytes, such as aqueous potassium hydroxide KOH (6M), ionic 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF6], and ionic 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate[BMP][FAP] were used. These EDLC's show good performance compared to other carbon nanomaterials based EDLC's devices. We found that the liquid phase exfoliated graphene based devices possess specific capacitance values as high as 262 F/g, when used with ionic liquid electrolyte[BMP][FAP], with power densities (~ 454 W/kg) and energy densities (~ 0.38Wh/kg). Further, these devices indicated rapid charge transfer response even without the use of any binders or specially prepared current collectors. A detailed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis in order to understand the phenomenon of charge storage in these materials will be presented.

  9. Facile method for liquid-exfoliated graphene size prediction by UV-visible spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Zulhelmi; Yusoh, Kamal

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an application of UV spectroscopy for facile prediction of liquid -exfoliated graphene size is discussed. Dynamic light scattering method was used to estimate the graphene flake size ( whilst UV spectroscopy measurement was carried out for extinction coefficient value (ɛ) determination. It was found that the value of (ɛ) decreased gradually as the graphene size was further reduced after intense sonication time (7h). This observation showed the influence of sonication time on electronic structure of graphene. A mathematical equation was derived from log-log graph for correlation between () and (ɛ) value. Both values can be expressed in a single equation as ( = (3.4 × 10-2) ɛ1.2).

  10. Reinforcement of poly ether sulphones (PES) with exfoliated graphene oxide for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-09-01

    Composite materials have been used for aerospace for some time now and have gained virtually 100% acceptance as the materials of choice. Speciality polymers like poly ether sulphones (PES), poly ether ether ketones(PEEK), poly ether imides (PEI) are highly preferred materials as plastic matrix due to their superior temperature performance, excellent wear & friction resistance, excellent dimensional accuracy, high tensile strength, high modulus, precise machinability and chemical resistance. In recent years nanoadditives like single and multiwall carbon nanotubes, graphenes and graphene oxides(GO) are finding huge market potential in aerospace and automobile industries. But manufacture related factors such as particle/ matrix interphases, surface activation, mixing process, particle agglomeration, particle size and shape may lead to different property effects. In this research GO/PES composites were prepared by high shear melt blending technique. GO monolayers were exfoliated from natural graphite flake and dispersed homogeneously in PES matrix for the GO content ranging between 0.5 to 2.0 volume percentage with a high shear twin screw batch mixer. These melt blended nanocomposites were injection moulded for mechanical property validation of tensile strength, flexural modulus and impact resistance. Addition of 0.5 volume percentage of GO enhanced the tensile strength and flexural modulus by 40% and 90% respectively. The results show that addition of GO to PES increase mechanical properties due to the formation of continuous network, good dispersion and strong interfacial interactions. The strong interfacial interactions were accounted for the increase in glass transition temperature. Also there was a significant improvement in the impact resistance of the PES/ GO nanocomposite. The injection moulded samples were tested for stealth performance by measuring the electromagnetic shielding property.

  11. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Graphene is an exciting new atomically-thin two-dimensional (2D) system of carbon atoms organized in a hexagonal lattice structure. This "wonder material" has been extensively studied in the last few years since it's first isolation in 2004. Its rapid rise to popularity in scientific and technological communities can be attributed to a number of its exceptional properties. In this thesis I will present several topics including fabrication of graphene devices, electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. I will start with a brief introduction of electronic transport in nanosclae system including quantum Hall effect, followed by a discussion of fundamental electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. Next I will describe how graphene devices are produced: from the famous "mechnical exfoliation" to our innovative "scratching exfoliation" method, together with the traditional lithography fabrication for graphene devices. We also developed a lithography-free technique for making electrical contacts to suspended graphene devices. Most of the suspended devices presented in this thesis are fabricated by this technique. Graphene has remarkable electrical properties thanks to its crystal and band structures. In Chapter 3, I will first focus on proximity-induced superconductivity in graphene Josephson transistors. In this section we investigate electronic transport in single layer graphene coupled to superconducting electrodes. We observe significant suppression in the critical current I c and large variation in the product IcR n in comparison to theoretic prediction; both phenomena can be satisfactorily accounted for by premature switching in underdamped Josephson junctions. Another focus of our studies is quantum Hall effect and many body physics in graphene in suspended bilayer and trilayer graphene. We demonstrate that symmetry breaking of the first 3 Landau levels and fractional quantum Hall states are observed in both bilayer and trilayer suspended graphene

  12. Leveraging the ambipolar transport in polymeric field-effect transistors via blending with liquid-phase exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    El Gemayel, Mirella; Haar, Sébastien; Liscio, Fabiola; Schlierf, Andrea; Melinte, Georgian; Milita, Silvia; Ersen, Ovidiu; Ciesielski, Artur; Palermo, Vincenzo; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-07-23

    Enhancement in the ambipolar behavior of field-effect transistors based on an n-type polymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), is obtained by co-deposition with liquid-phase exfoliated graphene. This approach provides a prospective pathway for the application of graphene-based nanocomposites for logic circuits.

  13. Efficient electrocatalytic performance of thermally exfoliated reduced graphene oxide-Pt hybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Antony, Rajini P. Preethi, L.K.; Gupta, Bhavana; Mathews, Tom Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of Pt–RGO nanohybrids of very high electrochemically active surface area. • Electrocatalytic activity-cum-stability: ∼10 times that of commercial Pt-C catalyst. • TEM confirms narrow size distribution and excellent dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. • SAED and XRD indicate (1 1 1) orientation of Pt nanoparticles. • Methanol oxidation EIS reveal decrease in charge transfer resistance with potential - Abstract: High quality thermally exfoliated reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets decorated with platinum nanocrystals have been synthesized using a simple environmentally benign process. The electrocatalytic behaviour of the Pt–RGO nanohybrid for methanol oxidation was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows uniform dispersion of Pt nanoparticles of ∼2–4 nm size. X-ray diffraction and selected area diffraction studies reveal (1 1 1) orientation of the platinum nanoparticles. The cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry results indicate higher catalytic activity and stability for Pt–RGO compared to commercial Pt-C. The electrochemical active surface area of Pt–RGO (52.16 m{sup 2}/g) is found to be 1.5 times that of commercial Pt-C. Impedance spectroscopy shows different impedance behaviour at different potential regions, indicating change in methanol oxidation reaction mechanism with potential. The reversal of impedance pattern to the second quadrant, at potentials higher than ∼0.40 V, indicates change in the rate determining reaction.

  14. Controllable Edge Oxidation and Bubbling Exfoliation Enable the Fabrication of High Quality Water Dispersible Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Suyun; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant progresses made on mass production of chemically exfoliated graphene, the quality, cost and environmental friendliness remain major challenges for its market penetration. Here, we present a fast and green exfoliation strategy for large scale production of high quality water dispersible few layer graphene through a controllable edge oxidation and localized gas bubbling process. Mild edge oxidation guarantees that the pristine sp2 lattice is largely intact and the edges are functionalized with hydrophilic groups, giving rise to high conductivity and good water dispersibility at the same time. The aqueous concentration can be as high as 5.0 mg mL−1, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reports. The water soluble graphene can be directly spray-coated on various substrates, and the back-gated field effect transistor give hole and electron mobility of ~496 and ~676 cm2 V−1 s−1, respectively. These results achieved are expected to expedite various applications of graphene. PMID:27666869

  15. Controllable Edge Oxidation and Bubbling Exfoliation Enable the Fabrication of High Quality Water Dispersible Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Suyun; Sun, Jing; Yang, Siwei; He, Peng; Wang, Gang; di, Zengfeng; Ding, Guqiao; Xie, Xiaoming; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-09-01

    Despite significant progresses made on mass production of chemically exfoliated graphene, the quality, cost and environmental friendliness remain major challenges for its market penetration. Here, we present a fast and green exfoliation strategy for large scale production of high quality water dispersible few layer graphene through a controllable edge oxidation and localized gas bubbling process. Mild edge oxidation guarantees that the pristine sp2 lattice is largely intact and the edges are functionalized with hydrophilic groups, giving rise to high conductivity and good water dispersibility at the same time. The aqueous concentration can be as high as 5.0 mg mL‑1, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reports. The water soluble graphene can be directly spray-coated on various substrates, and the back-gated field effect transistor give hole and electron mobility of ~496 and ~676 cm2 V‑1 s‑1, respectively. These results achieved are expected to expedite various applications of graphene.

  16. A single-stage functionalization and exfoliation method for the production of graphene in water: stepwise construction of 2D-nanostructured composites with iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Melin, Frédéric; Hellwig, Petra; Janowska, Izabela; Begin, Dominique; Baaziz, Walid; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Baati, Rachid

    2013-09-01

    A practically simple top-down process for the exfoliation of graphene (GN) and few-layer graphene (FLG) from graphite is described. We have discovered that a biocompatible amphiphilic pyrene-based hexahistidine peptide is able to exfoliate, functionalize, and dissolve few layer graphene flakes in pure water under exceptionally mild, sustainable and virtually innocuous low intensity cavitation conditions. Large area functionalized graphene flakes with the hexahistidine oligopeptide (His6-TagGN = His6@GN) have been produced efficiently at room temperature and characterized by TEM, Raman, and UV spectroscopy. Conductivity experiments carried out on His6-TagGN samples revealed superior electric performances as compared to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and non-functionalized graphene, demonstrating the non-invasive features of our non-covalent functionalization process. We postulated a rational exfoliation mechanism based on the intercalation of the peptide amphiphile under cavitational chemistry. We also demonstrated the ability of His6-TagGN nanoassemblies to self-assemble spontaneously with inorganic iron oxide nanoparticles generating magnetic two-dimensional (2D) His6-TagGN/Fe3O4 nanocomposites under mild and non-hydrothermal conditions. The set of original experiments described here open novel perspectives in the facile production of water dispersible high quality GN and FLG sheets that will improve and facilitate the interfacing, processing and manipulation of graphene for promising applications in catalysis, nanocomposite construction, integrated nanoelectronic devices and bionanotechnology.A practically simple top-down process for the exfoliation of graphene (GN) and few-layer graphene (FLG) from graphite is described. We have discovered that a biocompatible amphiphilic pyrene-based hexahistidine peptide is able to exfoliate, functionalize, and dissolve few layer graphene flakes in pure water under exceptionally mild, sustainable and virtually innocuous low

  17. In-situ synthesis of vanadium pentoxide nanofibre/exfoliated graphene nanohybrid and its supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Arup; Bonso, Jeliza S.; Wunch, Melissa; Yang, Kap Seung; Ferraris, John P.; Yang, Duck J.

    2015-08-01

    A novel nanohybrid material composed of vanadium pentoxide nanofibres (VNFs) and exfoliated graphene were prepared by in-situ growth of VNFs onto graphene nanosheets, and explicated as electrode material for supercapacitor applications. The existence of non-covalent interactions between VNFs and graphene surfaces was confirmed by Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopes. Morphological analysis of the nanohybrid revealed that the VNF layer uniformly grown on the graphene surfaces, producing high specific surface area and good electronic or ionic conducing path. High crystalline structure with small d-spacing of the VNFs on graphene was observed in X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Compared to pristine VNF, the VNF/graphene nanohybrid exhibited higher specific capacitance of 218 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1, higher energy density of 22 Wh kg-1 and power density of 3594 W kg-1. Asymmetric supercapacitor devices were prepared using the Spectracarb 2225 activated carbon cloth and VNF/graphene nanohybrid as positive and negative electrode, respectively. The asymmetric device exhibited capacitance of 279 F g-1 at 1 A g-1, energy density of 37.2 Wh kg-1 and power density of 3743 W kg-1, which are comparable and or superior to reported asymmetric devices consisting of carbon material and metal oxide as electrode components.

  18. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes.

    PubMed

    Munuera, J M; Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S; Ayán-Varela, M; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2016-02-01

    Electrolytic--usually referred to as electrochemical--exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.

  19. Low-temperature exfoliation of multilayer-graphene material from FeCl3 and CH3NO2 co-intercalated graphite compound.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wujun; Kiggans, Jim; Overbury, Steven H; Schwartz, Viviane; Liang, Chengdu

    2011-05-14

    Microwave induced rapid decomposition of nitromethane at low temperature exfoliates the graphene sheets from the FeCl(3) and CH(3)NO(2) co-intercalated graphite compound without creating many defects and functional groups. This approach provides a scalable method for high-quality graphene materials via low-temperature exfoliation of graphite under mild chemical conditions.

  20. Exfoliation of non-oxidized graphene flakes for scalable conductive film.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Bo Hyun; Song, Sung Ho; Kwon, Jiyoung; Kong, Byung Seon; Kang, Kisuk; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2012-06-13

    The increasing demand for graphene has required a new route for its mass production without causing extreme damages. Here we demonstrate a simple and cost-effective intercalation based exfoliation method for preparing high quality graphene flakes, which form a stable dispersion in organic solvents without any functionalization and surfactant. Successful intercalation of alkali metal between graphite interlayers through liquid-state diffusion from ternary KCl-NaCl-ZnCl(2) eutectic system is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy. Chemical composition and morphology analyses prove that the graphene flakes preserve their intrinsic properties without any degradation. The graphene flakes remain dispersed in a mixture of pyridine and salts for more than 6 months. We apply these results to produce transparent conducting (∼930 Ω/□ at ∼75% transmission) graphene films using the modified Langmuir-Blodgett method. The overall results suggest that our method can be a scalable (>1 g/batch) and economical route for the synthesis of nonoxidized graphene flakes.

  1. Large scale production of highly-qualified graphene by ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunwei; Tong, Xili; Guo, Xiaoning; Wang, Yingyong; Jin, Guoqiang; Guo, Xiangyun

    2013-11-29

    Highly-qualified graphene was prepared by the ultrasonic exfoliation of commercial expanded graphite (EG) under the promotion of (NH4)2CO3 decomposition. The yield of graphene from the first exfoliation is 7 wt%, and it can be increased to more than 65 wt% by repeated exfoliations. Atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analysis show that the as-prepared graphene only has a few defects or oxides, and more than 95% of the graphene flakes have a thickness of ~1 nm. The electrochemical performance of the as-prepared graphene is comparable to reduced graphene oxide in the determination of dopamine (DA) from the mixed solution of ascorbic acid, uric acid and DA. These results show that the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3 molecules in the EG layers under ultrasonication promotes the exfoliation of graphite and provides a low-priced route for large scale production of highly-quality graphene.

  2. Liquid-phase exfoliation of chemical vapor deposition-grown single layer graphene and its application in solution-processed transparent electrodes for flexible organic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan E-mail: gtl-fzu@hotmail.com; Wu, Wei; Chen, Wei; Guo, Tailiang E-mail: gtl-fzu@hotmail.com

    2014-12-15

    Efficient and low-cost methods for obtaining high performance flexible transparent electrodes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene are highly desirable. In this work, the graphene grown on copper foil was exfoliated into micron-size sheets through controllable ultrasonication. We developed a clean technique by blending the exfoliated single layer graphene sheets with conducting polymer to form graphene-based composite solution, which can be spin-coated on flexible substrate, forming flexible transparent conducting film with high conductivity (∼8 Ω/□), high transmittance (∼81% at 550 nm), and excellent mechanical robustness. In addition, CVD-grown-graphene-based polymer light emitting diodes with excellent bendable performances were demonstrated.

  3. Manganese oxide nanosheets and a 2D hybrid of graphene-manganese oxide nanosheets synthesized by liquid-phase exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, João; Mendoza-Sánchez, Beatriz; Pettersson, Henrik; Pokle, Anuj; McGuire, Eva K.; Long, Edmund; McKeon, Lorcan; Bell, Alan P.; Nicolosi, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Manganese oxide nanosheets were synthesized using liquid-phase exfoliation that achieved suspensions in isopropanol (IPA) with concentrations of up to 0.45 mg ml-1. A study of solubility parameters showed that the exfoliation was optimum in N,N-dimethylformamide followed by IPA and diethylene glycol. IPA was the solvent of choice due to its environmentally friendly nature and ease of use for further processing. For the first time, a hybrid of graphene and manganese oxide nanosheets was synthesized using a single-step co-exfoliation process. The two-dimensional (2D) hybrid was synthesized in IPA suspensions with concentrations of up to 0.5 mg ml-1 and demonstrated stability against re-aggregation for up to six months. The co-exfoliation was found to be a energetically favorable process in which both solutes, graphene and manganese oxide nanosheets, exfoliate with an improved yield as compared to the single-solute exfoliation procedure. This work demonstrates the remarkable versatility of liquid-phase exfoliation with respect to the synthesis of hybrids with tailored properties, and it provides proof-of-concept ground work for further future investigation and exploitation of hybrids made of two or more 2D nanomaterials that have key complementary properties for various technological applications.

  4. Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction Performance of Silver Nanoparticle Decorated Electrochemically Exfoliated Graphene.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joao Henrique; Ye, Siyu; Gostick, Jeff T; Barralet, Jake E; Merle, Geraldine

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a potentiostatic double-pulse technique for silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) deposition on graphene (GRn) with superior electronic and ionic conductivity. This approach yielded a two-dimensional electrocatalyst with a homogeneous Ag NP spatial distribution having remarkable performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). GRn sheets were reproducibly prepared by the electrochemical exfoliation of graphite (GRp) at high yield and purity with a low degree of oxidation. Polystyrenesulfonate added during exfoliation enhanced the stability of the GRn solution by preventing the restacking of the graphene sheets and increased its ionic conductivity. The potentiostatic double-pulse technique is generally used to electrodeposit Pt nanoparticles and remains challenging for silver metal that exhibits nucleation and growth potentials relatively close to each other. We judiciously exploited this narrow margin of potential, and for the first time we report Ag NP electrodeposited onto graphene with the subsequent ability to control both the density and the size of metallic nanoparticles. Considering the high activity along with the lower cost of Ag compared to Pt, these findings are highly relevant to the successful commercialization of fuel cells and other electrochemical energy devices.

  5. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices. PMID:23824229

  6. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices.

  7. Ultrahigh-throughput exfoliation of graphite into pristine 'single-layer' graphene using microwaves and molecularly engineered ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Michio; Saito, Yusuke; Park, Chiyoung; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-09-01

    Graphene has shown much promise as an organic electronic material but, despite recent achievements in the production of few-layer graphene, the quantitative exfoliation of graphite into pristine single-layer graphene has remained one of the main challenges in developing practical devices. Recently, reduced graphene oxide has been recognized as a non-feasible alternative to graphene owing to variable defect types and levels, and attention is turning towards reliable methods for the high-throughput exfoliation of graphite. Here we report that microwave irradiation of graphite suspended in molecularly engineered oligomeric ionic liquids allows for ultrahigh-efficiency exfoliation (93% yield) with a high selectivity (95%) towards 'single-layer' graphene (that is, with thicknesses <1 nm) in a short processing time (30 minutes). The isolated graphene sheets show negligible structural deterioration. They are also readily redispersible in oligomeric ionic liquids up to ~100 mg ml(-1), and form physical gels in which an anisotropic orientation of graphene sheets, once induced by a magnetic field, is maintained.

  8. Graphene prepared by thermal reduction–exfoliation of graphite oxide: Effect of raw graphite particle size on the properties of graphite oxide and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Trung Dung; Jeong, Han Mo

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Effect of raw graphite particle size on properties of GO and graphene is reported. • Size of raw graphite affects oxidation degree and chemical structure of GO. • Highly oxidized GO results in small-sized but well-exfoliated graphene. • GO properties affect reduction degree, structure, and conductivity of graphene. - Abstract: We report the effect of raw graphite size on the properties of graphite oxide and graphene prepared by thermal reduction–exfoliation of graphite oxide. Transmission electron microscope analysis shows that the lateral size of graphene becomes smaller when smaller size graphite is used. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that graphite with smaller size is more effectively oxidized, resulting in a more effective subsequent exfoliation of the obtained graphite oxide toward graphene. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that reduction of the graphite oxide derived from smaller size graphite into graphene is more efficient. However, Raman analysis suggests that the average size of the in-plane sp{sup 2}-carbon domains on graphene is smaller when smaller size graphite is used. The enhanced reduction degree and the reduced size of sp{sup 2}-carbon domains contribute contradictively to the electrical conductivity of graphene when the particle size of raw graphite reduces.

  9. Electrochemical anchoring of dual doping polypyrrole on graphene sheets partially exfoliated from graphite foil for high-performance supercapacitor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu; Xu, Jun-Li; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2014-03-01

    Partial exfoliation of graphene from graphite foil (GF) is achieved by a convenient one-step electrochemical exfoliation method to afford partially exfoliated graphene electrode (Ex-GF) with graphene sheets standing on GF matrix stably. Electropolymerization of pyrrole is carried out on Ex-GF with 1,5-naphthalene disulfonate (NDS) and 2-naphthalene sulfonate (NMS) as the 'permanent' doping anions to prepare Ex-GF/PPy-NDS and Ex-GF/PPy-NMS, respectively, in which the polymer is anchoring on the surfaces of graphene sheets. The PPy displays an opened structure due to the facilitated homogeneous nucleation on Ex-GF and so exhibits enhanced specific capacitance compared to the polymers deposited on pristine GF (to afford GF/PPy-NDS and GF/PPy-NMS). Specifically, Ex-GF/PPy-NDS film maintains 79% of its specific capacitance when the discharge current density increases from 1 to 20 A g-1. Moreover, discharge potential window of the polymer is enlarged to 1.3 V (from -0.8 to 0.5 V vs. SCE) due to the dual doping mode. Ex-GF/PPy-NDS film displays a high energy density of 82.4 Wh kg-1 at the power density of 650 W kg-1 and 65.1 Wh kg-1 at the power density of 13 kW kg-1. The cyclic charge/discharge stability of the polymer is also improved due to synergistic effect with partially exfoliated graphene.

  10. Enhancement of electrode performance by a simple casting method using sonochemically exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Walch, Nik J; Davis, Frank; Langford, Nathan; Holmes, Joanne L; Collyer, Stuart D; Higson, Séamus P J

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate within this paper a method for modifying commercial screen-printed electrodes with aqueous graphene suspensions to enhance their electrochemical activity. The graphene suspensions are synthesized by a simple ultrasonic exfoliation method from graphite, where reaggregation is prevented by the addition of common cationic or anionic surfactants, thereby avoiding the use of organic solvents or harsh chemical procedures. These suspensions can then be simply cast onto the screen-printed electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry with a number of redox active species such as phenols, as well as impedance measurements, were made to characterize these systems. The modified electrodes are shown to demonstrate significantly enhanced electrochemical activity and greatly lowered electron transfer resistances compared to the unmodified electrodes. Initial proof of concept applications of these electrodes, including the detection of heavy metals by absorptive stripping voltammetry, are also shown. PMID:26289227

  11. The mechanical exfoliation mechanism of black phosphorus to phosphorene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yunsheng; Si, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today, the renaissance of black phosphorus largely depends on the mechanical exfoliation method, which is accessible to produce few-layer forms from the bulk counterpart. However, the deep understanding of the exfoliation mechanism is missing. To this end, we resolve this issue by simulating the sliding processes of bilayer phosphorene based on first-principles calculations. It is found that the interlayer Coulomb interactions dictate the optimal sliding pathway, leading to the minimal energy barrier as low as ∼60 \\text{meV} , which gives a comparable surface energy of ∼59 \\text{mJ/m}2 in experiment. This means that black phosphorus can be exfoliated by the sliding approach. In addition, considerable bandgap modulations along these sliding pathways are obtained. The study like ours builds up a fundamental understanding of how black phosphorus is exfoliated to few-layer forms, providing a good guide to experimental research.

  12. Graphenothermal reduction synthesis of 'exfoliated graphene oxide/iron (II) oxide' composite for anode application in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petnikota, Shaikshavali; Marka, Sandeep Kumar; Banerjee, Arkaprabha; Reddy, M. V.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Chowdari, B. V. R.

    2015-10-01

    Graphenothermal Reduction process is used to obtain exfoliated graphene oxide (EG)/iron (II) oxide (FeO) composite prepared at 650 °C for 5 h in argon. Structural and compositional analyses of the sample confirm the formation of EG/FeO composite. This composite shows a reversible capacity of 857 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 50 mA g-1 in the voltage range 0.005-3.0 V versus Li. An excellent capacity retention up to 60 cycles and high coulombic efficiency of 98% are also observed. Characteristic Fe2+/0 redox peaks observed in Cyclic Voltammetry measurement are explained in correlation with lithium storage mechanism. Thermal, electrical and impedance spectroscopy studies of EG/FeO composite are discussed in detail. Comparative electrochemical cycling studies of EG/FeO composite with Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 materials prepared under controlled conditions are also discussed.

  13. Direct Fabrication of the Graphene-Based Composite for Cancer Phototherapy through Graphite Exfoliation with a Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Qin, Hongmei; Amano, Tsukuru; Murakami, Takashi; Komatsu, Naoki

    2015-10-28

    We report on the application of pristine graphene as a drug carrier for phototherapy (PT). The loading of a photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (Ce6), was achieved simply by sonication of Ce6 and graphite in an aqueous solution. During the loading process, graphite was gradually exfoliated to graphene to give its composite with Ce6 (G-Ce6). This one-step approach is considered to be superior to the graphene oxide (GO)-based composites, which required pretreatment of graphite by strong oxidation. Additionally, the directly exfoliated graphene ensured a high drug loading capacity, 160 wt %, which is about 10 times larger than that of the functionalized GO. Furthermore, the Ce6 concentration for killing cells by G-Ce6 is 6-75 times less than that of the other Ce6 composites including GO-Ce6.

  14. Sulfur-doped graphene via thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in H2S, SO2, or CS2 gas.

    PubMed

    Poh, Hwee Ling; Šimek, Petr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-06-25

    Doping of graphene with heteroatoms is an effective way to tailor its properties. Here we describe a simple and scalable method of doping graphene lattice with sulfur atoms during the thermal exfoliation process of graphite oxides. The graphite oxides were first prepared by Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods followed by treatments in hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, or carbon disulfide. The doped materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The ζ-potential and conductivity of sulfur-doped graphenes were also investigated in this paper. It was found that the level of doping is more dramatically influenced by the type of graphite oxide used rather than the type of sulfur-containing gas used during exfoliation. Resulting sulfur-doped graphenes act as metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction.

  15. Thermally exfoliated graphene based counter electrode for low cost dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniyoor, Adarsh; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2011-06-01

    Graphene obtained from thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide are highly wrinkled and have large surface area. Their wrinkled nature is expected to give them excellent catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the use of thermally exfoliated graphene (TEG) as cost effective electrocatalyst for the tri-iodide reduction in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). X-ray diffraction, Raman and Infra red spectroscopy and electron microscopy studies confirm the defective and wrinkled nature of TEG. BET surface area measurement show a large surface area of ˜ 470 m2/g. The counter electrode was fabricated by drop casting a slurry of TEG dispersed in a Nafion:Ethanol solution on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The use of Nafion prevented film "peel off," thus ensuring a good substrate adhesion. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that TEG had a catalytic performance comparable to that of Pt, suggesting its use as counter electrode material. As expected, the DSSC fabricated with Nafion solubilized TEG/FTO as counter electrode shows an efficiency of about 2.8%, comparable to Pt counter electrode based DSSC which has an efficiency of about 3.4%.

  16. Layer-by-layer assembly of thin films containing exfoliated pristine graphene nanosheets and polyethyleneimine.

    PubMed

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2014-03-11

    A method for the modification of surface properties through the deposition of stabilized graphene nanosheets is described. Here, the thickness of the film is controlled through the use of the layer-by-layer technique, where the sequential adsorption of the cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI) is followed by the adsorption of anionic graphene sheets modified with layers of polyethylene oxide-polypropylene oxide-polyethylene oxide (PEO-PPO-PEO) surfactants. The graphene particles were prepared using the surfactant-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation technique, with the low residual negative charge arising from edge defects. The buildup of the multilayer assembly through electrostatic interactions was strongly influenced by the solution conditions, including pH, ionic strength, and ionic species. Thereby, not only could the thickness of the film be tailored through the choice of the number of bilayers deposited but the viscoelastic properties of the film could also be modified by changing solution conditions at which the different species were deposited. The quartz crystal microbalance was used to measure the mass of graphene and polyelectrolyte immobilized at the interface as well as to probe the energy dissipated in the adsorbed layer.

  17. Interlayer catalytic exfoliation realizing scalable production of large-size pristine few-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiumei; Guo, Yufen; Li, Dongfang; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Chao; Wei, Xiangfei; Chen, Mingliang; Gao, Song; Qiu, Shengqiang; Gong, Youpin; Wu, Liqiong; Long, Mingsheng; Sun, Mengtao; Pan, Gebo; Liu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of reduced graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets has recently been achieved. However, a great challenge still remains in realizing large-quantity and high-quality production of large-size thin few-layer graphene (FLG). Here, we create a novel route to solve the issue by employing one-time-only interlayer catalytic exfoliation (ICE) of salt-intercalated graphite. The typical FLG with a large lateral size of tens of microns and a thickness less than 2 nm have been obtained by a mild and durative ICE. The high-quality graphene layers preserve intact basal crystal planes owing to avoidance of the degradation reaction during both intercalation and ICE. Furthermore, we reveal that the high-quality FLG ensures a remarkable lithium-storage stability (>1,000 cycles) and a large reversible specific capacity (>600 mAh g(-1)). This simple and scalable technique acquiring high-quality FLG offers considerable potential for future realistic applications.

  18. Interlayer catalytic exfoliation realizing scalable production of large-size pristine few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiumei; Guo, Yufen; Li, Dongfang; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Chao; Wei, Xiangfei; Chen, Mingliang; Gao, Song; Qiu, Shengqiang; Gong, Youpin; Wu, Liqiong; Long, Mingsheng; Sun, Mengtao; Pan, Gebo; Liu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of reduced graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets has recently been achieved. However, a great challenge still remains in realizing large-quantity and high-quality production of large-size thin few-layer graphene (FLG). Here, we create a novel route to solve the issue by employing one-time-only interlayer catalytic exfoliation (ICE) of salt-intercalated graphite. The typical FLG with a large lateral size of tens of microns and a thickness less than 2 nm have been obtained by a mild and durative ICE. The high-quality graphene layers preserve intact basal crystal planes owing to avoidance of the degradation reaction during both intercalation and ICE. Furthermore, we reveal that the high-quality FLG ensures a remarkable lithium-storage stability (>1,000 cycles) and a large reversible specific capacity (>600 mAh g-1). This simple and scalable technique acquiring high-quality FLG offers considerable potential for future realistic applications.

  19. Enhanced Thermionic Emission and Low 1/f Noise in Exfoliated Graphene/GaN Schottky Barrier Diode.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Kashid, Ranjit; Ghosh, Arindam; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical transport characteristics of exfoliated graphene/GaN Schottky diodes are investigated and compared with conventional Ni/GaN Schottky diodes. The ideality factor of graphene/GaN and Ni/GaN diodes are measured to be 1.33 and 1.51, respectively, which is suggestive of comparatively higher thermionic emission current in graphene/GaN diode. The barrier height values for graphene/GaN diode obtained using thermionic emission model and Richardson plots are found to be 0.60 and 0.72 eV, respectively, which are higher than predicted barrier height ∼0.40 eV as per the Schottky-Mott model. The higher barrier height is attributed to hole doping of graphene due to graphene-Au interaction which shifts the Fermi level in graphene by ∼0.3 eV. The magnitude of flicker noise of graphene/GaN Schottky diode increases up to 175 K followed by its decrease at higher temperatures. This indicates that diffusion currents and barrier inhomogeneities dominate the electronic transport at lower and higher temperatures, respectively. The exfoliated graphene/GaN diode is found to have lower level of barrier inhomogeneities than conventional Ni/GaN diode, as well as earlier reported graphene/GaN diode fabricated using chemical vapor deposited graphene. The lesser barrier inhomogeneities in graphene/GaN diode results in lower flicker noise by 2 orders of magnitude as compared to Ni/GaN diode. Enhanced thermionic emission current, lower level of inhomogeneities, and reduced flicker noise suggests that graphene-GaN Schottky diodes may have the underlying trend for replacing metal-GaN Schottky diodes.

  20. Powder, paper and foam of few-layer graphene prepared in high yield by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation of expanded graphite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liqiong; Li, Weiwei; Li, Peng; Liao, Shutian; Qiu, Shengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Guo, Yufen; Li, Qi; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Liwei

    2014-04-01

    A facile and high-yield approach to the preparation of few-layer graphene (FLG) by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation (EIE) of expanded graphite in sulfuric acid electrolyte is reported. Stage-1 H2SO4-graphite intercalation compound is used as a key intermediate in EIE to realize the efficient exfoliation. The yield of the FLG sheets (<7 layers) with large lateral sizes (tens of microns) is more than 75% relative to the total amount of starting expanded graphite. A low degree of oxygen functionalization existing in the prepared FLG flakes enables them to disperse effectively, which contributes to the film-forming characteristics of the FLG flakes. These electrochemically exfoliated FLG flakes are integrated into several kinds of macroscopic graphene structures. Flexible and freestanding graphene papers made of the FLG flakes retain excellent conductivity (≈24,500 S m(-1)). Three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams with light weight are fabricated from the FLG flakes by the use of Ni foams as self-sacrifice templates. Furthermore, 3D graphene/Ni foams without any binders, which are used as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolyte, provide the specific capacitance of 113.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), retaining 90% capacitance after 1000 cycles.

  1. Electrolytic exfoliation of graphite in water with multifunctional electrolytes: en route towards high quality, oxide-free graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuera, J. M.; Paredes, J. I.; Villar-Rodil, S.; Ayán-Varela, M.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrolytic - usually referred to as electrochemical - exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise as a simple, green and high-yield method for the mass production of graphene, but currently suffers from several drawbacks that hinder its widespread adoption, one of the most critical being the oxidation and subsequent structural degradation of the carbon lattice that is usually associated with such a production process. To overcome this and other limitations, we introduce and implement the concept of multifunctional electrolytes. The latter are amphiphilic anions (mostly polyaromatic hydrocarbons appended with sulfonate groups) that play different relevant roles as (1) an intercalating electrolyte to trigger exfoliation of graphite into graphene flakes, (2) a dispersant to afford stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of the flakes suitable for further use, (3) a sacrificial agent to prevent graphene oxidation during exfoliation and (4) a linker to promote nanoparticle anchoring on the graphene flakes, yielding functional hybrids. The implementation of this strategy with some selected amphiphiles even furnishes anodically exfoliated graphenes of a quality similar to that of flakes produced by direct, ultrasound- or shear-induced exfoliation of graphite in the liquid phase (i.e., almost oxide- and defect-free). These high quality materials were used for the preparation of catalytically efficient graphene-Pt nanoparticle hybrids, as demonstrated by model reactions (reduction of nitroarenes). The multifunctional performance of these electrolytes is also discussed and rationalized, and a mechanistic picture of their oxidation-preventing ability is proposed. Overall, the present results open the prospect of anodic exfoliation as a competitive method for the production of very high quality graphene flakes.Electrolytic - usually referred to as electrochemical - exfoliation of graphite in water under anodic potential holds enormous promise

  2. Light-enhanced liquid-phase exfoliation and current photoswitching in graphene-azobenzene composites.

    PubMed

    Döbbelin, Markus; Ciesielski, Artur; Haar, Sébastien; Osella, Silvio; Bruna, Matteo; Minoia, Andrea; Grisanti, Luca; Mosciatti, Thomas; Richard, Fanny; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; De Cola, Luisa; Palermo, Vincenzo; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Morandi, Vittorio; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Ferrari, Andrea C; Beljonne, David; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional materials can be engineered by combining multiple chemical components, each conferring a well-defined function to the ensemble. Graphene is at the centre of an ever-growing research effort due to its combination of unique properties. Here we show that the large conformational change associated with the trans-cis photochemical isomerization of alkyl-substituted azobenzenes can be used to improve the efficiency of liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite, with the photochromic molecules acting as dispersion-stabilizing agents. We also demonstrate reversible photo-modulated current in two-terminal devices based on graphene-azobenzene composites. We assign this tuneable electrical characteristics to the intercalation of the azobenzene between adjacent graphene layers and the resulting increase in the interlayer distance on (photo)switching from the linear trans-form to the bulky cis-form of the photochromes. These findings pave the way to the development of new optically controlled memories for light-assisted programming and high-sensitive photosensors.

  3. Light-enhanced liquid-phase exfoliation and current photoswitching in graphene-azobenzene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döbbelin, Markus; Ciesielski, Artur; Haar, Sébastien; Osella, Silvio; Bruna, Matteo; Minoia, Andrea; Grisanti, Luca; Mosciatti, Thomas; Richard, Fanny; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; de Cola, Luisa; Palermo, Vincenzo; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Morandi, Vittorio; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Beljonne, David; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Multifunctional materials can be engineered by combining multiple chemical components, each conferring a well-defined function to the ensemble. Graphene is at the centre of an ever-growing research effort due to its combination of unique properties. Here we show that the large conformational change associated with the trans-cis photochemical isomerization of alkyl-substituted azobenzenes can be used to improve the efficiency of liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite, with the photochromic molecules acting as dispersion-stabilizing agents. We also demonstrate reversible photo-modulated current in two-terminal devices based on graphene-azobenzene composites. We assign this tuneable electrical characteristics to the intercalation of the azobenzene between adjacent graphene layers and the resulting increase in the interlayer distance on (photo)switching from the linear trans-form to the bulky cis-form of the photochromes. These findings pave the way to the development of new optically controlled memories for light-assisted programming and high-sensitive photosensors.

  4. Photocatalytic applications with CdS • block copolymer/exfoliated graphene nanoensembles: hydrogen generation and degradation of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Skaltsas, T; Karousis, N; Pispas, S; Tagmatarchis, N

    2014-11-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymer poly(isoprene-b-acrylic acid) (PI-b-PAA) was used to stabilize exfoliated graphene in water, allowing the immobilization of semiconductor CdS nanoparticles forming CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene. Characterization using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy proved the success of the preparation method and revealed the presence of spherical CdS. Moreover, UV-Vis and photoluminescence assays suggested that electronic interactions within CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene exist as evidenced by the significant quenching of the characteristic emission of CdS by exfoliated graphene. Photoillumination of CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, in the presence of ammonium formate as a quencher for the photogenerated holes, resulted in the generation of hydrogen by water splitting, monitored by the reduction of 4-nitroaniline to benzene-1,4-diamine (>80 ± 4% at 20 min; 100% at 24 min), much faster and more efficient compared to when reference CdS • PI-b-PAA was used as the photocatalyst (<30 ± 3% at 20 min; 100% at 240 min). Moreover, Rhodamine B was photocatalytically degraded by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene, with fast kinetics under visible light illumination in the presence of air. The enhancement of both photocatalytic processes by CdS • PI-b-PAA/graphene was rationalized in terms of effective separation of holes and electrons, contrary to reference CdS • PI-b-PAA, in which rapid recombination of the hole-electron pair is inevitable due to the absence of exfoliated graphene as a suitable electron acceptor.

  5. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  6. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride: novel exfoliation synthesis and its application in photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical selective detection of trace amount of Cu2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Yan, Jia; She, Xiaojie; Xu, Li; Xia, Jiexiang; Xu, Yuanguo; Song, Yanhua; Huang, Liying; Li, Huaming

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C3N4) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C3N4-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m2 g-1, increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene-analogue carbon nitride had a new features that could make it suitable as a sensor for Cu2+ determination. So GA-C3N4 is a new but promising candidate for heavy metal ions (Cu2+) determination in water environment. The photocatalytic mechanism and photoelectrochemical selective sensing of Cu2+ were also discussed.Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C3N4) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C3N4-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m2 g-1, increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene

  7. High Voltage Li-Ion Battery Using Exfoliated Graphite/Graphene Nanosheets Anode.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Marco; Brutti, Sergio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2016-05-01

    The achievement of a new generation of lithium-ion battery, suitable for a continuously growing consumer electronic and sustainable electric vehicle markets, requires the development of new, low-cost, and highly performing materials. Herein, we propose a new and efficient lithium-ion battery obtained by coupling exfoliated graphite/graphene nanosheets (EGNs) anode and high-voltage, spinel-structure cathode. The anode shows a capacity exceeding by 40% that ascribed to commercial graphite in lithium half-cell, at very high C-rate, due to its particular structure and morphology as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Li-ion battery reveals excellent efficiency and cycle life, extending up to 150 cycles, as well as an estimated practical energy density of about 260 Wh kg(-1), that is, a value well exceeding the one associated with the present-state Li-ion battery.

  8. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  9. Schwinger mechanism and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Allor, Danielle; Cohen, Thomas D.; McGady, David A.

    2008-11-01

    The Schwinger mechanism, the production of charged particle-antiparticle pairs in a macroscopic external electric field, is derived for 2+1-dimensional theories. The rate of pair production per unit area for four species of massless fermions, with charge q, in a constant electric field E is given by {pi}{sup -2}({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup -3/2}c-tilde{sup -1/2}(qE){sup 3/2} where c-tilde is the speed of light for the two-dimensional system. To the extent undoped graphene behaves like the quantum field-theoretic vacuum for massless fermions in 2+1 dimensions, the Schwinger mechanism should be testable experimentally. A possible experimental configuration for this is proposed. Effects due to deviations from this idealized picture of graphene are briefly considered. It is argued that with present day samples of graphene, tests of the Schwinger formula may be possible.

  10. Electrical characterization of thermally and mechanically exfoliated silicon films for flat panel display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Felix Paul

    For the next generation of flat panel displays (FPDs), higher resolutions and sharp, full motion video are expected. To meet these requirements, high quality semiconductor material on glass substrates are a desirable way to fabricate the thin film transistors (TFTs) needed to drive the pixels and to quickly and precisely control the currents. Single crystal silicon films can be exfoliated onto Corning I737F glass substrates using ion-cutting techniques. Because the ion-cutting technique requires ion implantation through the film material, the electrical properties of the exfoliated film have to be examined to understand the behavior as it goes through temperature cycling inherent in the TFT fabrication process. After the film exfoliation, Hall effect, hot probe and four point probe measurements are used along with layer by layer etching to get a picture of the carrier depth distribution. The electrical properties of mechanically exfoliated and thermally exfoliated films are compared and discussed in the context of using these for MOSFETs. Finally, p-MOSFETs are fabricated and the transistor parameters such as leakage current, subthreshold slope, on/off current ratio and mobility compare and contrasted with MOSFETs made from bulk silicon. The mechanically exfoliated films show superior performance with respect to the p-MOSFET off-state, drain to source leakage current compared to the thermally exfoliated films. This difference is attributed to the lower temperature the mechanically exfoliated film is subjected to even before film delamination. The temperature difference of the exfoliation temperatures is responsible for a higher density of oxide precipitates in the thermally exfoliated film which leads to higher leakage currents.

  11. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride: novel exfoliation synthesis and its application in photocatalysis and photoelectrochemical selective detection of trace amount of Cu²⁺.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Yan, Jia; She, Xiaojie; Xu, Li; Xia, Jiexiang; Xu, Yuanguo; Song, Yanhua; Huang, Liying; Li, Huaming

    2014-01-01

    Graphene-analogue nanostructures defined as a new kind of promising materials with unique electronic, surface and optical properties have received much attention in the fields of catalysis, energy storage, sensing and electronic devices. Due to the distinctive structure characteristics of the graphene-analogue materials, they brought novel and amazing properties. Herein, graphene-analogue carbon nitride (GA-C₃N₄) was synthesized by high-yield, large-scale thermal exfoliation from the graphitic C₃N₄-based intercalation compound. Graphene-analogue carbon nitride exhibited 2D thin-layer structure with 6-9 atomic thickness, a high specific surface area of 30.1 m(2) g(-1), increased photocurrent responses and improved electron transport ability, which could give rise to enhancing the photocatalytic activity and stability. The graphene-analogue carbon nitride had a new features that could make it suitable as a sensor for Cu(2+) determination. So GA-C₃N₄ is a new but promising candidate for heavy metal ions (Cu(2+)) determination in water environment. The photocatalytic mechanism and photoelectrochemical selective sensing of Cu(2+) were also discussed. PMID:24309635

  12. Studies on Synthesis of Electrochemically Exfoliated Functionalized Graphene and Polylactic Acid/Ferric Phytate Functionalized Graphene Nanocomposites as New Fire Hazard Suppression Materials.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaming; Wang, Xin; Cai, Wei; Qiu, Shuilai; Hu, Yuan; Liew, Kim Meow

    2016-09-28

    Practical application of functionalized graphene in polymeric nanocomposites is hampered by the lack of cost-effective and eco-friendly methods for its production. Here, we reported a facile and green electrochemical approach for preparing ferric phytate functionalized graphene (f-GNS) by simultaneously utilizing biobased phytic acid as electrolyte and modifier for the first time. Due to the presence of phytic acid, electrochemical exfoliation leads to low oxidized graphene sheets (a C/O ratio of 14.8) that are tens of micrometers large. Successful functionalization of graphene was confirmed by the appearance of phosphorus and iron peaks in the X-ray photoelectron spectrum. Further, high-performance polylactic acid/f-GNS nanocomposites are readily fabricated by a convenient masterbatch strategy. Notably, inclusion of well-dispersed f-GNS resulted in dramatic suppression on fire hazards of polylactic acid in terms of reduced peak heat-release rate (decreased by 40%), low CO yield, and formation of a high graphitized protective char layer. Moreover, obviously improvements in crystallization rate and thermal conductivities of polylactic acid nanocomposites were observed, highlighting its promising potential in practical application. This novel strategy toward the simultaneous exfoliation and functionalization for graphene demonstrates a simple yet very effective approach for fabricating graphene-based flame retardants.

  13. Studies on Synthesis of Electrochemically Exfoliated Functionalized Graphene and Polylactic Acid/Ferric Phytate Functionalized Graphene Nanocomposites as New Fire Hazard Suppression Materials.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaming; Wang, Xin; Cai, Wei; Qiu, Shuilai; Hu, Yuan; Liew, Kim Meow

    2016-09-28

    Practical application of functionalized graphene in polymeric nanocomposites is hampered by the lack of cost-effective and eco-friendly methods for its production. Here, we reported a facile and green electrochemical approach for preparing ferric phytate functionalized graphene (f-GNS) by simultaneously utilizing biobased phytic acid as electrolyte and modifier for the first time. Due to the presence of phytic acid, electrochemical exfoliation leads to low oxidized graphene sheets (a C/O ratio of 14.8) that are tens of micrometers large. Successful functionalization of graphene was confirmed by the appearance of phosphorus and iron peaks in the X-ray photoelectron spectrum. Further, high-performance polylactic acid/f-GNS nanocomposites are readily fabricated by a convenient masterbatch strategy. Notably, inclusion of well-dispersed f-GNS resulted in dramatic suppression on fire hazards of polylactic acid in terms of reduced peak heat-release rate (decreased by 40%), low CO yield, and formation of a high graphitized protective char layer. Moreover, obviously improvements in crystallization rate and thermal conductivities of polylactic acid nanocomposites were observed, highlighting its promising potential in practical application. This novel strategy toward the simultaneous exfoliation and functionalization for graphene demonstrates a simple yet very effective approach for fabricating graphene-based flame retardants. PMID:27588582

  14. A supramolecular strategy to leverage the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphene in the presence of surfactants: unraveling the role of the length of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Haar, Sébastien; Ciesielski, Artur; Clough, Joseph; Yang, Huafeng; Mazzaro, Raffaello; Richard, Fanny; Conti, Simone; Merstorf, Nicolas; Cecchini, Marco; Morandi, Vittorio; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Samorì, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Achieving the full control over the production as well as processability of high-quality graphene represents a major challenge with potential interest in the field of fabrication of multifunctional devices. The outstanding effort dedicated to tackle this challenge in the last decade revealed that certain organic molecules are capable of leveraging the exfoliation of graphite with different efficiencies. Here, a fundamental understanding on a straightforward supramolecular approach for producing homogenous dispersions of unfunctionalized and non-oxidized graphene nanosheets in four different solvents is attained, namely N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, N,N-dimethylformamide, ortho-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. In particular, a comparative study on the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphene in the presence of linear alkanes of different lengths terminated by a carboxylic-acid head group is performed. These molecules act as graphene dispersion-stabilizing agents during the exfoliation process. The efficiency of the exfoliation in terms of concentration of exfoliated graphene is found to be proportional to the length of the employed fatty acid. Importantly, a high percentage of single-layer graphene flakes is revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy analyses. A simple yet effective thermodynamic model is developed to interpret the chain-length dependence of the exfoliation yield. This approach relying on the synergistic effect of a ad-hoc solvent and molecules to promote the exfoliation of graphene in liquid media represents a promising and modular strategy towards the rational design of improved dispersion-stabilizing agents.

  15. Mechanism of Exfoliation and Prediction of Materials Properties of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites from Multiscale Modeling.

    PubMed

    Suter, James L; Groen, Derek; Coveney, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    We describe the mechanism that leads to full exfoliation and dispersion of organophilic clays when mixed with molten hydrophilic polymers. This process is of fundamental importance for the production of clay-polymer nanocomposites with enhanced materials properties. The chemically specific nature of our multiscale approach allows us to probe how chemistry, in combination with processing conditions, produces such materials properties at the mesoscale and beyond. In general agreement with experimental observations, we find that a higher grafting density of charged quaternary ammonium surfactant ions promotes exfoliation, by a mechanism whereby the clay sheets slide transversally over one another. We can determine the elastic properties of these nanocomposites; exfoliated and partially exfoliated morphologies lead to substantial enhancement of the Young's modulus, as found experimentally. PMID:26575149

  16. Production of quasi-2D graphene nanosheets through the solvent exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Youngju; Lee, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Youl; Lee, Jihoon; Kim, Bongsoo; Park, Byoungnam; In, Insik

    2015-09-18

    Stable dispersion of quasi-2D graphene sheets with a concentration up to 1.27 mg mL(-1) was prepared by sonication-assisted solvent exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber in N-methyl pyrrolidone with the mass yield of 2.32%. Prepared quasi-2D graphene sheets have multi-layered 2D plate-like morphology with rich inclusions of graphitic carbons, a low number of structural defects, and high dispersion stability in aprotic polar solvents, and facilitate the utilization of quasi-2D graphene sheets prepared from pitch-based carbon fiber for various electronic and structural applications. Thin films of quasi-2D graphene sheets prepared by vacuum filtration of the dispersion of quasi-2D graphene sheets demonstrated electrical conductivity up to 1.14 × 10(4) Ω/□ even without thermal treatment, which shows that pitch-based carbon fiber might be useful as the source of graphene-related nanomaterials. Because pitch-based carbon fiber could be prepared from petroleum pitch, a very cheap structural material for the pavement of asphalt roads, our approach might be promising for the mass production of quasi-2D graphene nanomaterials. PMID:26313887

  17. Production of quasi-2D graphene nanosheets through the solvent exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeon, Youngju; Lee, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Youl; Lee, Jihoon; Kim, Bongsoo; Park, Byoungnam; In, Insik

    2015-09-01

    Stable dispersion of quasi-2D graphene sheets with a concentration up to 1.27 mg mL-1 was prepared by sonication-assisted solvent exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber in N-methyl pyrrolidone with the mass yield of 2.32%. Prepared quasi-2D graphene sheets have multi-layered 2D plate-like morphology with rich inclusions of graphitic carbons, a low number of structural defects, and high dispersion stability in aprotic polar solvents, and facilitate the utilization of quasi-2D graphene sheets prepared from pitch-based carbon fiber for various electronic and structural applications. Thin films of quasi-2D graphene sheets prepared by vacuum filtration of the dispersion of quasi-2D graphene sheets demonstrated electrical conductivity up to 1.14 × 104 Ω/□ even without thermal treatment, which shows that pitch-based carbon fiber might be useful as the source of graphene-related nanomaterials. Because pitch-based carbon fiber could be prepared from petroleum pitch, a very cheap structural material for the pavement of asphalt roads, our approach might be promising for the mass production of quasi-2D graphene nanomaterials.

  18. High Voltage Li-Ion Battery Using Exfoliated Graphite/Graphene Nanosheets Anode.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Marco; Brutti, Sergio; Hassoun, Jusef

    2016-05-01

    The achievement of a new generation of lithium-ion battery, suitable for a continuously growing consumer electronic and sustainable electric vehicle markets, requires the development of new, low-cost, and highly performing materials. Herein, we propose a new and efficient lithium-ion battery obtained by coupling exfoliated graphite/graphene nanosheets (EGNs) anode and high-voltage, spinel-structure cathode. The anode shows a capacity exceeding by 40% that ascribed to commercial graphite in lithium half-cell, at very high C-rate, due to its particular structure and morphology as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Li-ion battery reveals excellent efficiency and cycle life, extending up to 150 cycles, as well as an estimated practical energy density of about 260 Wh kg(-1), that is, a value well exceeding the one associated with the present-state Li-ion battery. PMID:27052542

  19. Exfoliation of graphite with triazine derivatives under ball-milling conditions: preparation of few-layer graphene via selective noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    León, Verónica; Rodriguez, Antonio M; Prieto, Pilar; Prato, Maurizio; Vázquez, Ester

    2014-01-28

    A ball-milling treatment can be employed to exfoliate graphite through interactions with commercially available melamine under solid conditions. This procedure allows the fast production of relatively large quantities of material with a low presence of defects. The milling treatment can be modulated in order to achieve graphene flakes with different sizes. Once prepared, the graphene samples can be redispersed in organic solvents, water, or culture media, forming stable dispersions that can be used for multiple purposes. In the present work, we have screened electron-rich benzene derivatives along with triazine derivatives in their respective ability to exfoliate graphite. The results suggest that the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network is important for the formation of multipoint interactions with the surfaces of graphene, which can be used for the exfoliation of graphite and the stabilization of graphene in different solvents. Aminotriazine systems were found to be the best partners in the preparation and stabilization of graphene layers in different solvents, while the equivalent benzene derivatives did not show comparable exfoliation ability. Computational studies have also been performed to rationalize the experimental results. The results provide also the basis for further work in the preparation of noncovalently modified graphene, where derivatives of aminotriazines can be designed to form extensive hydrogen-bond 2D networks on the graphene surface with the aim of manipulating their electronic and chemical properties.

  20. Electrochemically exfoliated graphene anodes with enhanced biocurrent production in single-chamber air-breathing microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Ng, Norvin; Gyenge, Előd

    2016-07-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present promising options for environmentally sustainable power generation especially in conjunction with waste water treatment. However, major challenges remain including low power density, difficult scale-up, and durability of the cell components. This study reports enhanced biocurrent production in a membrane-free MFC, using graphene microsheets (GNs) as anode and MnOx catalyzed air cathode. The GNs are produced by ionic liquid assisted simultaneous anodic and cathodic electrochemical exfoliation of iso-molded graphite electrodes. The GNs produced by anodic exfoliation increase the MFC peak power density by over 300% compared to plain carbon cloth (i.e., 2.85Wm(-2) vs 0.66Wm(-2), respectively), and by 90% compared to conventional carbon black (i.e., Vulcan XC-72) anode. These results exceed previously reported power densities for graphene-containing MFC anodes. The fuel cell polarization results are corroborated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicating three times lower charge transfer resistance for the GN anode. Material characterizations suggest that the best performing GN samples were of relatively smaller size (~500nm), with higher levels of ionic liquid induced surface functionalization during the electrochemical exfoliation process.

  1. Electrochemically exfoliated graphene anodes with enhanced biocurrent production in single-chamber air-breathing microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Ng, Norvin; Gyenge, Előd

    2016-07-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present promising options for environmentally sustainable power generation especially in conjunction with waste water treatment. However, major challenges remain including low power density, difficult scale-up, and durability of the cell components. This study reports enhanced biocurrent production in a membrane-free MFC, using graphene microsheets (GNs) as anode and MnOx catalyzed air cathode. The GNs are produced by ionic liquid assisted simultaneous anodic and cathodic electrochemical exfoliation of iso-molded graphite electrodes. The GNs produced by anodic exfoliation increase the MFC peak power density by over 300% compared to plain carbon cloth (i.e., 2.85Wm(-2) vs 0.66Wm(-2), respectively), and by 90% compared to conventional carbon black (i.e., Vulcan XC-72) anode. These results exceed previously reported power densities for graphene-containing MFC anodes. The fuel cell polarization results are corroborated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicating three times lower charge transfer resistance for the GN anode. Material characterizations suggest that the best performing GN samples were of relatively smaller size (~500nm), with higher levels of ionic liquid induced surface functionalization during the electrochemical exfoliation process. PMID:26926591

  2. Dynamics and Mechanisms of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Sublimation.

    PubMed

    Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Levesque, Pierre L; Martel, Richard; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    We report on real time observations of the sublimation of exfoliated black phosphorus layers throughout annealing using in situ low energy electron microscopy. We found that sublimation manifests itself above 375 ± 20 °C through the nucleation and expansion of asymmetric, faceted holes with the long axis aligned along the [100] direction and sharp tips defined by edges consisting of alternating (10) and (11) steps. This thermally activated process repeats itself via successive sublimation of individual layers. Calculations and simulations using density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo allowed to determine the involved atomic pathways. Sublimation is found to occur via detachments of phosphorus dimers rather than single atoms. This behavior and the role of defects is described using an analytical model that captures all essential features. This work establishes an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal stability of exfoliated black phosphorus and defines the temperature window available for material and device processing. PMID:27097073

  3. In situ growth of capping-free magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on liquid-phase exfoliated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoufis, T.; Syrgiannis, Z.; Akhtar, N.; Prato, M.; Katsaros, F.; Sideratou, Z.; Kouloumpis, A.; Gournis, D.; Rudolf, P.

    2015-05-01

    We report a facile approach for the in situ synthesis of very small iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of high-quality graphene sheets. Our synthetic strategy involved the direct, liquid-phase exfoliation of highly crystalline graphite (avoiding any oxidation treatment) and the subsequent chemical functionalization of the graphene sheets via the well-established 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The resulting graphene derivatives were employed for the immobilization of the nanoparticle precursor (Fe cations) at the introduced organic groups by a modified wet-impregnation method, followed by interaction with acetic acid vapours. The final graphene-iron oxide hybrid material was achieved by heating (calcination) in an inert atmosphere. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy gave evidence for the formation of rather small (<12 nm), spherical, magnetite-rich nanoparticles which were evenly distributed on the surface of few-layer (<1.2 nm thick) graphene. Due to the presence of the iron oxide nanoparticles, the hybrid material showed a superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature.We report a facile approach for the in situ synthesis of very small iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of high-quality graphene sheets. Our synthetic strategy involved the direct, liquid-phase exfoliation of highly crystalline graphite (avoiding any oxidation treatment) and the subsequent chemical functionalization of the graphene sheets via the well-established 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The resulting graphene derivatives were employed for the immobilization of the nanoparticle precursor (Fe cations) at the introduced organic groups by a modified wet-impregnation method, followed by interaction with acetic acid vapours. The final graphene-iron oxide hybrid material was achieved by heating (calcination) in an inert atmosphere. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, transmission

  4. Epitaxial graphene: the material for graphene electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, M.; Soukiassian, P.; de Heer, W.A.; Berger, C.; Conrad, E.H.

    2009-12-10

    The search for an ideal graphene sheet has been a quest driving graphene research. While most research has focused on exfoliated graphene, intrinsic substrate interactions and mechanical disorder have precluded the observation of a number of graphene's expected physical properties in this material. The only graphene candidate that has demonstrated all the essential properties of an ideal sheet is multilayer graphene grown on the SiC(000) surface. Its unique stacking allows nearly all the sheets in the stack to behave like isolated graphene, while the weak graphene-graphene interaction prevents any significant doping or distortion in the band near the Fermi level.

  5. Spectroscopic metrics allow in situ measurement of mean size and thickness of liquid-exfoliated few-layer graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Backes, Claudia; Paton, Keith R; Hanlon, Damien; Yuan, Shengjun; Katsnelson, Mikhail I; Houston, James; Smith, Ronan J; McCloskey, David; Donegan, John F; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2016-02-21

    Liquid phase exfoliation is a powerful and scalable technique to produce defect-free mono- and few-layer graphene. However, samples are typically polydisperse and control over size and thickness is challenging. Notably, high throughput techniques to measure size and thickness are lacking. In this work, we have measured the extinction, absorption, scattering and Raman spectra for liquid phase exfoliated graphene nanosheets of various lateral sizes (90 ≤ 〈L〉 ≤ 810 nm) and thicknesses (2.7 ≤ 〈N〉 ≤ 10.4). We found all spectra to show well-defined dependences on nanosheet dimensions. Measurements of extinction and absorption spectra of nanosheet dispersions showed both peak position and spectral shape to vary with nanosheet thickness in a manner consistent with theoretical calculations. This allows the development of empirical metrics to extract the mean thickness of liquid dispersed nanosheets from an extinction (or absorption) spectrum. While the scattering spectra depended on nanosheet length, poor signal to noise ratios made the resultant length metric unreliable. By analyzing Raman spectra measured on graphene nanosheet networks, we found both the D/G intensity ratio and the width of the G-band to scale with mean nanosheet length allowing us to establish quantitative relationships. In addition, we elucidate the variation of 2D/G band intensities and 2D-band shape with the mean nanosheet thickness, allowing us to establish quantitative metrics for mean nanosheet thickness from Raman spectra.

  6. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-09-01

    In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al2O3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm2. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  7. Microwave exfoliated graphene oxide/TiO2 nanowire hybrid for high performance lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishtiaque Shuvo, Mohammad Arif; Rodriguez, Gerardo; Islam, Md Tariqul; Karim, Hasanul; Ramabadran, Navaneet; Noveron, Juan C.; Lin, Yirong

    2015-09-01

    Lithium ion battery (LIB) is a key solution to the demand of ever-improving, high energy density, clean-alternative energy systems. In LIB, graphite is the most commonly used anode material; however, lithium-ion intercalation in graphite is limited, hindering the battery charge rate and capacity. To date, one of the approaches in LIB performance improvement is by using porous carbon (PC) to replace graphite as anode material. PC's pore structure facilitates ion transport and has been proven to be an excellent anode material candidate in high power density LIBs. In addition, to overcome the limited lithium-ion intercalation obstacle, nanostructured anode assembly has been extensively studied to increase the lithium-ion diffusion rate. Among these approaches, high specific surface area metal oxide nanowires connecting nanostructured carbon materials accumulation have shown promising results for enhanced lithium-ion intercalation. Herein, we demonstrate a hydrothermal approach of growing TiO2 nanowires (TON) on microwave exfoliated graphene oxide (MEGO) to further improve LIB performance over PC. This MEGO-TON hybrid not only uses the high surface area of MEGO but also increases the specific surface area for electrode-electrolyte interaction. Therefore, this new nanowire/MEGO hybrid anode material enhances both the specific capacity and charge-discharge rate. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used for materials characterization. Battery analyzer was used for measuring the electrical performance of the battery. The testing results have shown that MEGO-TON hybrid provides up to 80% increment of specific capacity compared to PC anode.

  8. Exfoliation of Graphene Oxide Nanosheets from Pencil Lead and IN SITU Preparation of Gold Nanoparticles on Graphene Oxide Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boruah, Sontara Konwar; Boruah, Prabin Kumar; Sarma, Pradyut; Bezbaruah, Bipul; Medhi, Chitrani; Medhi, Okhil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the low-cost exfoliation of graphene oxide (GO) from pencil lead using modified Hummer's method. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) supported on GO is prepared via an in situ bio reduction of HAuCl4 by polyphenolic biomolecules present in young leaves of tea (Camellia sinensis) extracted in the presence of GO. The UV-Visible absorption spectrum of GO dispersion in water exhibits two bands at 228 nm and a shoulder at 300 nm corresponding to π-π* transitions of aromatic C-C bonds and n-π* transitions of C=O bonds. In photoluminescence (PL) study, GO dispersion in water shows an emission band at 555 nm, when excited at 325 nm. When AuNPs are supported on GO nanosheets the bands at 228 nm and 300 nm of GO disappears and two new UV-Visible bands at 229 nm for π-π* (for C=C) and 550 nm for transverse surface plasmon resonance (TSPR) of AuNPs appears. When AuNPs are supported on GO nanosheets, PL emission band at 555 nm disappears and two new PL emission bands appear at 431 nm and 658 nm. The physical and morphological characterizations are performed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), High-resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and BET surface area measurement. Morphological studies revealed that the GO nanosheets are well dispersed in water and AuNPs are supported on the GO nanosheets.

  9. Mechanically-exfoliated stacks of thin films of Bi2Te3 topological insulators with enhanced thermoelectric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, V.; Teweldebrhan, D.; Balandin, A. A.

    2010-09-01

    The authors report on "graphene-like" mechanical exfoliation of single-crystal Bi2Te3 films and thermoelectric characterization of the stacks of such films. Thermal conductivity of the resulting "pseudosuperlattices" was measured by the "hot disk" and "laser flash" techniques. The room temperature in-plane (cross-plane) thermal conductivity of the stacks decreases by a factor of ˜2.4 (3.5) as compared to bulk. The thermal conductivity reduction with preserved electrical properties leads to strong increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit. It is suggested that the film thinning to few-quintuples and tuning of the Fermi level can help in achieving the topological-insulator surface transport regime with an extraordinary thermoelectric efficiency.

  10. Efficient exfoliation N-doped graphene from N-containing bamboo-like carbon nanotubes for anode materials of Li-ion battery and Na-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-Min; Dong, Lei; Han, Yan; Li, Xi-Fei; Li, De-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Nanosize N-doped graphene is prepared from N-containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical exfoliation. The CNTs adopted for graphene are characterized by a discontinuous wall that consists of nanosize graphite layers, exhibiting a bamboo-like appearance. Take advantage of this characterization, the most time-consuming process of chemical oxidation that involves intercalation in graphene from CNT has been markedly reduced. The reduction in processing time is attributed to the diffusion distance of chemical oxidation intercalation into nanosize graphite composed of a bamboo-like carbon nanotube (BCNT) wall being far less than that of conventional chemical exfoliation into microsize graphite. The as-prepared nanosize N-doped graphene from BCNTs has shown an excellent electrochemical performance for Li-ion battery and Na-ion battery anode materials.

  11. Transfer of an exfoliated monolayer graphene flake onto an optical fiber end face for erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes Rosa, Henrique; Viana Gomes, José Carlos; Thoroh de Souza, Eunézio A.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, the successful transfer of exfoliated monolayer graphene flake to the optical fiber end face and alignment to its core. By fabricating and optimizing a polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) substrate, it is possible to obtain a contrast of up to 11% for green light illumination, allowing the identification of monolayer graphene flakes that were transferred to optical fiber samples and aligned to its core. With Raman spectroscopy, it is demonstrated that graphene flake completely covers the optical fiber core, and its quality remains unaltered after the transfer. The generation of mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser pulses, with a duration of 672 fs, with a single-monolayer graphene flake as a saturable absorber, is demonstrated for the first time. This transfer technique is of general applicability and can be used for other two-dimensional (2D) exfoliated materials.

  12. Ultrathin hexagonal hybrid nanosheets synthesized by graphene oxide-assisted exfoliation of β-Co(OH)2 mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Deng, Suzi; Thomas Cherian, Christie; Liu, Xiao Li; Tan, Hui Ru; Yeo, Li Hsia; Yu, Xiaojiang; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chowdari, B V R; Fan, Hai Ming; Sow, Chorng Haur

    2014-09-22

    In the present study, we report the synthesis of a high-quality, single-crystal hexagonal β-Co(OH)2 nanosheet, exhibiting a thickness down to ten atomic layers and an aspect ratio exceeding 900, by using graphene oxide (GO) as an exfoliant of β-Co(OH)2 nanoflowers. Unlike conventional approaches using ionic precursors in which morphological control is realized by structure-directing molecules, the β-Co(OH)2 flower-like superstructures were first grown by a nanoparticle-mediated crystallization process, which results in large 3D superstructure consisting of ultrathin nanosheets interspaced by polydimethoxyaniline (PDMA). Thereafter, β-Co(OH)2 nanoflowers were chemically exfoliated by surface-active GO under hydrothermal conditions into unilamellar single-crystal nanosheets. In this reaction, GO acts as a two-dimensional (2D) amphiphile to facilitate the exfoliation process through tailored interactions between organic and inorganic molecules. Meanwhile, the on-site conjugation of GO and Co(OH)2 promotes the thermodynamic stability of freestanding ultrathin nanosheets and restrains further growth through Oswald ripening. The unique 2D structure combined with functionalities of the hybrid ultrathin Co(OH)2 nanosheets on rGO resulted in a remarkably enhanced lithium-ion storage performance as anode materials, maintaining a reversible capacity of 860 mA h g(-1) for as many as 30 cycles. Since mesocrystals are ubiquitous and rich in morphological diversity, the strategy of the GO-assisted exfoliation of mesocrystals developed here provides an opportunity for the synthesis of new functional nanostructures that could bear importance in clean renewable energy, catalysis, photoelectronics, and photonics. PMID:25111836

  13. Epoxy based nanocomposites with fully exfoliated unmodified clay: mechanical and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gao, Jianming; Song, Zhihai; Qi, Guicun; Liu, Yiqun; Qiao, Jinliang

    2010-09-01

    The unmodified clay has been fully exfoliated in epoxy resin with the aid of a novel ultrafine full-vulcanized powdered rubber. Epoxy/rubber/clay nanocomposites with exfoliated morphology have been successfully prepared. The microstructures of the nanocomposites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the unmodified clay was fully exfoliated and uniformly dispersed in the resulting nanocomposite. Characterizations of mechanical properties revealed that the impact strength of this special epoxy/rubber/clay nanocomposite increased up 107% over the neat epoxy resin. Thermal analyses showed that thermal stability of the nanocomposite was much better than that of epoxy nanocomposite based on organically modified clay. PMID:21133117

  14. Ultrasensitive NO2 Sensor Based on Ohmic Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces of Electrolytically Exfoliated Graphene/Flame-Spray-Made SnO2 Nanoparticles Composite Operating at Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tammanoon, Nantikan; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Sriprachuabwong, Chakrit; Phokharatkul, Ditsayut; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Phanichphant, Sukon; Liewhiran, Chaikarn

    2015-11-01

    In this work, flame-spray-made undoped SnO2 nanoparticles were loaded with 0.1-5 wt % electrolytically exfoliated graphene and systematically studied for NO2 sensing at low working temperatures. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, transmission/scanning electron microscopy, and Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that high-quality multilayer graphene sheets with low oxygen content were widely distributed within spheriodal nanoparticles having polycrystalline tetragonal SnO2 phase. The 10-20 μm thick sensing films fabricated by spin coating on Au/Al2O3 substrates were tested toward NO2 at operating temperatures ranging from 25 to 350 °C in dry air. Gas-sensing results showed that the optimal graphene loading level of 0.5 wt % provided an ultrahigh response of 26,342 toward 5 ppm of NO2 with a short response time of 13 s and good recovery stabilization at a low optimal operating temperature of 150 °C. In addition, the optimal sensor also displayed high sensor response and relatively short response time of 171 and 7 min toward 5 ppm of NO2 at room temperature (25 °C). Furthermore, the sensors displayed very high NO2 selectivity against H2S, NH3, C2H5OH, H2, and H2O. Detailed mechanisms for the drastic NO2 response enhancement by graphene were proposed on the basis of the formation of graphene-undoped SnO2 ohmic metal-semiconductor junctions and accessible interfaces of graphene-SnO2 nanoparticles. Therefore, the electrolytically exfoliated graphene-loaded FSP-made SnO2 sensor is a highly promising candidate for fast, sensitive, and selective detection of NO2 at low operating temperatures. PMID:26479951

  15. Interconnecting Carbon Fibers with the In-situ Electrochemically Exfoliated Graphene as Advanced Binder-free Electrode Materials for Flexible Supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Shuangyin

    2015-01-01

    Flexible energy storage devices are highly demanded for various applications. Carbon cloth (CC) woven by carbon fibers (CFs) is typically used as electrode or current collector for flexible devices. The low surface area of CC and the presence of big gaps (ca. micro-size) between individual CFs lead to poor performance. Herein, we interconnect individual CFs through the in-situ exfoliated graphene with high surface area by the electrochemical intercalation method. The interconnected CFs are used as both current collector and electrode materials for flexible supercapacitors, in which the in-situ exfoliated graphene act as active materials and conductive “binders”. The in-situ electrochemical intercalation technique ensures the low contact resistance between electrode (graphene) and current collector (carbon cloth) with enhanced conductivity. The as-prepared electrode materials show significantly improved performance for flexible supercapacitors. PMID:26149290

  16. Interconnecting Carbon Fibers with the In-situ Electrochemically Exfoliated Graphene as Advanced Binder-free Electrode Materials for Flexible Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Shuangyin

    2015-07-07

    Flexible energy storage devices are highly demanded for various applications. Carbon cloth (CC) woven by carbon fibers (CFs) is typically used as electrode or current collector for flexible devices. The low surface area of CC and the presence of big gaps (ca. micro-size) between individual CFs lead to poor performance. Herein, we interconnect individual CFs through the in-situ exfoliated graphene with high surface area by the electrochemical intercalation method. The interconnected CFs are used as both current collector and electrode materials for flexible supercapacitors, in which the in-situ exfoliated graphene act as active materials and conductive "binders". The in-situ electrochemical intercalation technique ensures the low contact resistance between electrode (graphene) and current collector (carbon cloth) with enhanced conductivity. The as-prepared electrode materials show significantly improved performance for flexible supercapacitors.

  17. Synthesis of Multimetal-Graphene Composite by Mechanical Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiphaneendra, Bachu; Srivastava, Avi Krishna; Srivastava, Chandan

    2016-10-01

    Multimetal-graphene composites were synthesized using the ball milling technique. To prepare the composite, graphite powder was mixed with Fe, Cr, Co, Cu and Mg powders. This mixture was then mechanically milled for 35 h in toluene medium. After milling, the multimetal-graphite mixture was mixed with sodium lauryl sulfate and sonicated for 2 h. Sonication led to the exfoliation of graphene sheets. Formation of graphene was confirmed from x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy-based analysis revealed the formation of multimetal deposits over the graphene surface. Compositional analysis of the multimetal deposits revealed fairly uniform distribution of all the five component metal atoms over the graphene sheet. The average composition of the multimetal deposit was determined to be 11.4 ± 4 at.% Mg, 33.8 ± 19 at.% Cr, 21.8 ± 16 at.% Fe, 9.4 ± 5.7 at.% Co and 23.6 ± 12 at.% Cu.

  18. Synthesis of Multimetal-Graphene Composite by Mechanical Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiphaneendra, Bachu; Srivastava, Avi Krishna; Srivastava, Chandan

    2016-06-01

    Multimetal-graphene composites were synthesized using the ball milling technique. To prepare the composite, graphite powder was mixed with Fe, Cr, Co, Cu and Mg powders. This mixture was then mechanically milled for 35 h in toluene medium. After milling, the multimetal-graphite mixture was mixed with sodium lauryl sulfate and sonicated for 2 h. Sonication led to the exfoliation of graphene sheets. Formation of graphene was confirmed from x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy-based analysis revealed the formation of multimetal deposits over the graphene surface. Compositional analysis of the multimetal deposits revealed fairly uniform distribution of all the five component metal atoms over the graphene sheet. The average composition of the multimetal deposit was determined to be 11.4 ± 4 at.% Mg, 33.8 ± 19 at.% Cr, 21.8 ± 16 at.% Fe, 9.4 ± 5.7 at.% Co and 23.6 ± 12 at.% Cu.

  19. Exfoliation of graphene oxide and its application in improving the electro-optical response of ferroelectric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Veeresh; Kumar, Ajay; Bhandari, Shruti; Biradar, A. M.; Pasricha, Renu E-mail: renu1505@gmail.com; Reddy, G. B.

    2015-09-21

    Near complete exfoliation and reduction of lyophilized graphene oxide (GO) has been carried out at temperature as low as 400 °C. The structural characterizations of the reduced GO have been performed using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The morphological studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized GO finds an application in improving the switching performance of a liquid crystal (LC) mixture by remarkably modifying the physical properties, such as spontaneous polarization and rotational viscosity of the ferroelectric LC (FLC) material which in turn resulted into faster response of the FLC. The present study explores the possibility of low temperature thermal reduction of GO along with its application in improving the properties of LC based display systems.

  20. Electrolytically exfoliated graphene-loaded flame-made Ni-doped SnO2 composite film for acetone sensing.

    PubMed

    Singkammo, Suparat; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Sriprachuabwong, Chakrit; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Phanichphant, Sukon; Liewhiran, Chaikarn

    2015-02-11

    In this work, flame-spray-made SnO2 nanoparticles are systematically studied by doping with 0.1-2 wt % nickel (Ni) and loading with 0.1-5 wt % electrolytically exfoliated graphene for acetone-sensing applications. The sensing films (∼12-18 μm in thickness) were prepared by a spin-coating technique on Au/Al2O3 substrates and evaluated for acetone-sensing performances at operating temperatures ranging from 150 to 350 °C in dry air. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, transmission/scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that Ni-doped SnO2 nanostructures had a spheriodal morphology with a polycrystalline tetragonal SnO2 phase, and Ni was confirmed to form a solid solution with SnO2 lattice while graphene in the sensing film after annealing and testing still retained its high-quality nonoxidized form. Gas-sensing results showed that SnO2 sensing film with 0.1 wt % Ni-doping concentration exhibited an optimal response of 54.2 and a short response time of ∼13 s toward 200 ppm acetone at an optimal operating temperature of 350 °C. The additional loading of graphene at 5 wt % into 0.1 wt % Ni-doped SnO2 led to a drastic response enhancement to 169.7 with a very short response time of ∼5.4 s at 200 ppm acetone and 350 °C. The superior gas sensing performances of Ni-doped SnO2 nanoparticles loaded with graphene may be attributed to the large specific surface area of the composite structure, specifically the high interaction rate between acetone vapor and graphene-Ni-doped SnO2 nanoparticles interfaces and high electronic conductivity of graphene. Therefore, the 5 wt % graphene loaded 0.1 wt % Ni-doped SnO2 sensor is a promising candidate for fast, sensitive and selective detection of acetone. PMID:25602118

  1. Functionalized graphene nanomaterials: new insight into direct exfoliation of graphite with supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chang, Feng-Chih; Wang, Jui-Hsu; Chen, Jem-Kun; Yen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-01-14

    A novel urea-cytosine end-capped polypropylene glycol (UrCy-PPG) can self-assemble into a long-range ordered lamellar microstructure on the surface of graphene, due to the strong specific interactions between UrCy-PPG and graphene. In addition, the graphene composite produced exhibits a high conductivity (∼1093 S m(-1)) with a dramatic thermo-responsive ON/OFF resistance-switching behavior (10 consecutive cycles). PMID:26660032

  2. Direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene from graphite grown on a nickel foil using polydimethylsiloxane with tunable elasticity and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kwanghyun; Takei, Yusuke; Kim, Sungjin; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-05-24

    We firstly introduce a facile method for the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets from cheap and easily enlargeable graphite grown on a Ni foil using an optimized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp. By decreasing the PDMS cross-linking time, the PDMS elasticity is reduced to ∼52 kPa, similar to that of a typical gel. As a result of this process, the PDMS becomes more flexible yet remains in a handleable state as a stamp. Furthermore, the PDMS adhesion to a graphite/Ni surface, as measured by the peel strength, increases to ∼5.1 N m⁻¹, which is approximately 17 times greater than that of typical PDMS. These optimized properties allow the PDMS stamp to have improved contact with the graphite/Ni surface, including the graphite wrinkles. This process is verified, and changes in surface morphology are observed using a 3D laser scanning microscope. Under conformal contact, the optimized PDMS stamp demonstrates the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets including mono- and bi-layer graphene sheets from the graphite/Ni substrate without the use of special equipment, conditions or chemicals. The number of layers of the exfoliated graphene and its high quality are revealed by the measured Raman spectroscopy. The exfoliation method using tunable elasticity and adhesion of the PDMS stamp can be used not only for cost-effective mass production of defect-less few-layer graphene from the graphite substrate for micro/nano device arrays but also for nano-contact printing of various structures, devices and cells.

  3. Direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene from graphite grown on a nickel foil using polydimethylsiloxane with tunable elasticity and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kwanghyun; Takei, Yusuke; Kim, Sungjin; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-05-01

    We firstly introduce a facile method for the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets from cheap and easily enlargeable graphite grown on a Ni foil using an optimized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp. By decreasing the PDMS cross-linking time, the PDMS elasticity is reduced to ˜52 kPa, similar to that of a typical gel. As a result of this process, the PDMS becomes more flexible yet remains in a handleable state as a stamp. Furthermore, the PDMS adhesion to a graphite/Ni surface, as measured by the peel strength, increases to ˜5.1 N m-1, which is approximately 17 times greater than that of typical PDMS. These optimized properties allow the PDMS stamp to have improved contact with the graphite/Ni surface, including the graphite wrinkles. This process is verified, and changes in surface morphology are observed using a 3D laser scanning microscope. Under conformal contact, the optimized PDMS stamp demonstrates the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets including mono- and bi-layer graphene sheets from the graphite/Ni substrate without the use of special equipment, conditions or chemicals. The number of layers of the exfoliated graphene and its high quality are revealed by the measured Raman spectroscopy. The exfoliation method using tunable elasticity and adhesion of the PDMS stamp can be used not only for cost-effective mass production of defect-less few-layer graphene from the graphite substrate for micro/nano device arrays but also for nano-contact printing of various structures, devices and cells.

  4. Water-soluble polymer exfoliated graphene: as catalyst support and sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Xia, Baoyu; Yan, Ya; Li, Nan; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Xin

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we obtained various water-soluble polymer functionalized graphene in dimethyl sulfoxide under ultrasonication. The atomic force microscope analysis and control experiment shows the water-soluble polymer is the crucial part to help solvent molecules separate interlayer. Such polymer/graphene exhibits high conductivity and tunable surface property, as confirmed by the selected area electron diffraction and Raman and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As a result, a catalyst based on polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/graphene shows better methanol oxidation performance than that based on PVP/reduced graphene oxide. By changing to another polymer, poly(4-vinylpyridine)/graphene shows a stable and reversible response to pH, and demonstrates its potential for sensor application. PMID:23574310

  5. Functionalized graphene nanomaterials: new insight into direct exfoliation of graphite with supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chang, Feng-Chih; Wang, Jui-Hsu; Chen, Jem-Kun; Yen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-12-01

    A novel urea-cytosine end-capped polypropylene glycol (UrCy-PPG) can self-assemble into a long-range ordered lamellar microstructure on the surface of graphene, due to the strong specific interactions between UrCy-PPG and graphene. In addition, the graphene composite produced exhibits a high conductivity (~1093 S m-1) with a dramatic thermo-responsive ON/OFF resistance-switching behavior (10 consecutive cycles).A novel urea-cytosine end-capped polypropylene glycol (UrCy-PPG) can self-assemble into a long-range ordered lamellar microstructure on the surface of graphene, due to the strong specific interactions between UrCy-PPG and graphene. In addition, the graphene composite produced exhibits a high conductivity (~1093 S m-1) with a dramatic thermo-responsive ON/OFF resistance-switching behavior (10 consecutive cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07076g

  6. Exfoliating and Dispersing Few-Layered Graphene in Low-Boiling-Point Organic Solvents towards Solution-Processed Optoelectronic Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Miao, Zhongshuo; Hao, Zhen; Liu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    With normal organic surfactants, graphene can only be dispersed in water and cannot be dispersed in low-boiling-point organic solvents, which hampers its application in solution-processed organic optoelectronic devices. Herein, we report the exfoliation of graphite into graphene in low-boiling-point organic solvents, for example, methanol and acetone, by using edge-carboxylated graphene quantum dots (ECGQD) as the surfactant. The great capability of ECGQD for graphene dispersion is due to its ultralarge π-conjugated unit that allows tight adhesion on the graphene surface through strong π-π interactions, its edge-carboxylated structure that diminishes the steric effects of the oxygen-containing functional groups on the basal plane of ECGQD, and its abundance of carboxylic acid groups for solubility. The graphene dispersion in methanol enables the application of graphene:ECGQD as a cathode interlayer in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Moreover, the PSC device performance of graphene:ECGQD is better than that of Ca, the state-of-the-art cathode interlayer material.

  7. Exfoliating and Dispersing Few-Layered Graphene in Low-Boiling-Point Organic Solvents towards Solution-Processed Optoelectronic Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Miao, Zhongshuo; Hao, Zhen; Liu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    With normal organic surfactants, graphene can only be dispersed in water and cannot be dispersed in low-boiling-point organic solvents, which hampers its application in solution-processed organic optoelectronic devices. Herein, we report the exfoliation of graphite into graphene in low-boiling-point organic solvents, for example, methanol and acetone, by using edge-carboxylated graphene quantum dots (ECGQD) as the surfactant. The great capability of ECGQD for graphene dispersion is due to its ultralarge π-conjugated unit that allows tight adhesion on the graphene surface through strong π-π interactions, its edge-carboxylated structure that diminishes the steric effects of the oxygen-containing functional groups on the basal plane of ECGQD, and its abundance of carboxylic acid groups for solubility. The graphene dispersion in methanol enables the application of graphene:ECGQD as a cathode interlayer in polymer solar cells (PSCs). Moreover, the PSC device performance of graphene:ECGQD is better than that of Ca, the state-of-the-art cathode interlayer material. PMID:26957045

  8. Examination of humidity effects on measured thickness and interfacial phenomena of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide via amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jinkins, K.; Farina, L.; Wu, Y.; Camacho, J.

    2015-12-14

    The properties of Few-Layer Graphene (FLG) change with the number of layers and Amplitude Modulation (AM) Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of FLG. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AM-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. The loss tangent values of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO{sub 2}. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO{sub 2} substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AM-AFM.

  9. One-Pot Synthesis of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic N-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots via Exfoliating and Disintegrating Graphite Flakes

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Na-Jung; Chen, Yu-Syuan; Wu, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, I-Wen Peter

    2016-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have drawn tremendous attention on account of their numerous alluring properties and a wide range of application potentials. Here, we report that hydrophilic and hydrophobic N-doped GQDs can be prepared via exfoliating and disintegrating graphite flakes. Various spectroscopic characterizations including TEM, AFM, FTIR, PL, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the hydrophilic N-doped GQDs (IN-GQDs) and the hydrophobic N-doped GQDs (ON-GQDs) are mono-layered and multi-layered, respectively. In terms of practical aspects, the supercapacitor of an ON-GQDs/SWCNTs composite paper electrode was fabricated and exhibited an areal capacitance of 114 mF/cm2, which is more than 250% higher than the best reported value to date for a GQDs/carbon nanotube hybrid composite. For IN-GQDs applications, bio-memristor devices of IN-GQDs-albumen combination exhibited on/off current ratios in excess of 104 accompanied by stable switching endurance of over 250 cycles. The resistance stability of the high resistance state and the low resistance state could be maintained for over 104 s. Moreover, the IN-GQDs exhibited a superior quantum yield (34%), excellent stability of cellular imaging, and no cytotoxicity. Hence, the solution-based method for synchronized production of IN-GQDs and ON-GQDs is a facile and processable route that will bring GQDs-based electronics and composites closer to actualization. PMID:27452118

  10. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide, application for amperometric determination of NADH and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Alinajafi, Hossein A; Jafari-Asl, M; Rezaei, B; Ghazaei, F

    2016-03-01

    Here, cobalt ferrite nanohybrid decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide (CoFe2O4/EGO) was synthesized. The nanohybrid was characterized by different methods such as X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. The CoFe2O4/EGO nanohybrid was used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The voltammetric investigations showed that CoFe2O4/EGO nanohybrid has synergetic effect towards the electro-reduction of H2O2 and electro-oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used for their quantitative analysis. The calibration curves were observed in the range of 0.50 to 100.0 μmol L(-1) NADH and 0.9 to 900.0 μmol L(-1) H2O2 with detections limit of 0.38 and 0.54 μmol L(-1), respectively. The repeatability, reproducibility and selectivity of the electrochemical sensor for analysis of the analytes were studied. The new electrochemical sensor was successfully applied for the determination of NADH and H2O2 in real samples with satisfactory results.

  11. One-Pot Synthesis of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic N-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots via Exfoliating and Disintegrating Graphite Flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Na-Jung; Chen, Yu-Syuan; Wu, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, I.-Wen Peter

    2016-07-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have drawn tremendous attention on account of their numerous alluring properties and a wide range of application potentials. Here, we report that hydrophilic and hydrophobic N-doped GQDs can be prepared via exfoliating and disintegrating graphite flakes. Various spectroscopic characterizations including TEM, AFM, FTIR, PL, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the hydrophilic N-doped GQDs (IN-GQDs) and the hydrophobic N-doped GQDs (ON-GQDs) are mono-layered and multi-layered, respectively. In terms of practical aspects, the supercapacitor of an ON-GQDs/SWCNTs composite paper electrode was fabricated and exhibited an areal capacitance of 114 mF/cm2, which is more than 250% higher than the best reported value to date for a GQDs/carbon nanotube hybrid composite. For IN-GQDs applications, bio-memristor devices of IN-GQDs-albumen combination exhibited on/off current ratios in excess of 104 accompanied by stable switching endurance of over 250 cycles. The resistance stability of the high resistance state and the low resistance state could be maintained for over 104 s. Moreover, the IN-GQDs exhibited a superior quantum yield (34%), excellent stability of cellular imaging, and no cytotoxicity. Hence, the solution-based method for synchronized production of IN-GQDs and ON-GQDs is a facile and processable route that will bring GQDs-based electronics and composites closer to actualization.

  12. One-Pot Synthesis of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic N-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots via Exfoliating and Disintegrating Graphite Flakes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Na-Jung; Chen, Yu-Syuan; Wu, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, I-Wen Peter

    2016-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have drawn tremendous attention on account of their numerous alluring properties and a wide range of application potentials. Here, we report that hydrophilic and hydrophobic N-doped GQDs can be prepared via exfoliating and disintegrating graphite flakes. Various spectroscopic characterizations including TEM, AFM, FTIR, PL, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the hydrophilic N-doped GQDs (IN-GQDs) and the hydrophobic N-doped GQDs (ON-GQDs) are mono-layered and multi-layered, respectively. In terms of practical aspects, the supercapacitor of an ON-GQDs/SWCNTs composite paper electrode was fabricated and exhibited an areal capacitance of 114 mF/cm(2), which is more than 250% higher than the best reported value to date for a GQDs/carbon nanotube hybrid composite. For IN-GQDs applications, bio-memristor devices of IN-GQDs-albumen combination exhibited on/off current ratios in excess of 10(4) accompanied by stable switching endurance of over 250 cycles. The resistance stability of the high resistance state and the low resistance state could be maintained for over 10(4) s. Moreover, the IN-GQDs exhibited a superior quantum yield (34%), excellent stability of cellular imaging, and no cytotoxicity. Hence, the solution-based method for synchronized production of IN-GQDs and ON-GQDs is a facile and processable route that will bring GQDs-based electronics and composites closer to actualization. PMID:27452118

  13. Graphene quantum dots from graphite by liquid exfoliation showing excitation-independent emission, fluorescence upconversion and delayed fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Suprabhat; Gandla, Dayakar; Venkatesh, Yeduru; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan; Ghosh, Sutapa; Yang, Yang; Misra, Sunil

    2016-08-21

    Facile synthesis of 2-10 nm-sized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) from graphite powder by organic solvent-assisted liquid exfoliation using a sonochemical method is reported in this study. Synthesized GQDs are well dispersed in organic solvents like ethyl acetoacetate (EAA), dimethyl formamide (DMF) and also in water. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry reveals its selective mass fragmentation. Detailed characterizations by various techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirm the formation of disordered, functional GQDs. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms HOMO-LUMO energy gap variation with changing size and functionalities. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of as-prepared GQDs were studied in detail. The ensemble studies of GQDs showed excellent photoluminescence properties comprising normal and upconverted fluorescence, delayed fluorescence and room-temperature phosphorescence. PL decay dynamics of GQDs has been explored using time-correlated single-photon technique (TCSPC) as well as femtosecond fluorescence upconversion technique. In vitro cytotoxicity study reveals its biocompatibility and high cell viability (>91%) even at high concentration (400 μg mL(-1)) of GQDs in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. PMID:27302411

  14. Carrier lifetime in exfoliated few-layer graphene determined from intersubband optical transitions.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-24

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  15. Carrier Lifetime in Exfoliated Few-Layer Graphene Determined from Intersubband Optical Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  16. Graphene Mechanics: Current Status and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Galiotis, Costas; Frank, Otakar; Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Sfyris, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of 2D materials such as monolayer graphene are of extreme importance for several potential applications. We summarize the experimental and theoretical results to date on mechanical loading of freely suspended or fully supported graphene. We assess the obtained axial properties of the material in tension and compression and comment on the methods used for deriving the various reported values. We also report on past and current efforts to define the elastic constants of graphene in a 3D representation. Current areas of research that are concerned with the effect of production method and/or the presence of defects upon the mechanical integrity of graphene are also covered. Finally, we examine extensively the work related to the effect of graphene deformation upon its electronic properties and the possibility of employing strained graphene in future electronic applications. PMID:25898069

  17. Superior Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Composites Reinforced by 3D Interconnected Graphene Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ya; Chen, Lei; Teng, Kunyue; Shi, Jie; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Tian, Xu; Hu, Chuansheng; Ma, Meijun

    2015-06-01

    Epoxy-based composites reinforced by three-dimensional graphene skeleton (3DGS) were fabricated in resin transfer molding method with respect to the difficulty in good dispersion and arrangement of graphene sheets in composites by directly mixing graphene and epoxy. 3DGS was synthesized in the process of self-assembly and reduction with poly(amidoamine) dendrimers. In the formation of 3DGS, graphene sheets were in good dispersion and ordered state, which resulted in exceptional mechanical properties and thermal stability for epoxy composites. For 3DGS/epoxy composites, the tensile and compressive strengths significantly increased by 120.9% and 148.3%, respectively, as well as the glass transition temperature, which increased by a notable 19 °C, unlike the thermal exfoliation graphene/epoxy composites via direct-mixing route, which increased by only 0.20 wt % content of fillers. Relative to the graphene/epoxy composites in direct-mixing method mentioned in literature, the increase in tensile and compressive strengths of 3DGS/epoxy composites was at least twofold and sevenfold, respectively. It can be expected that 3DGS, which comes from preforming graphene sheets orderly and dispersedly, would replace graphene nanosheets in polymer nanocomposite reinforcement and endow composites with unique structure and some unexpected performance.

  18. Biomolecule-assisted exfoliation and dispersion of graphene and other two-dimensional materials: a review of recent progress and applications.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S

    2016-08-25

    Direct liquid-phase exfoliation of layered materials by means of ultrasound, shear forces or electrochemical intercalation holds enormous promise as a convenient, cost-effective approach to the mass production of two-dimensional (2D) materials, particularly in the form of colloidal suspensions of high quality and micrometer- and submicrometer-sized flakes. Of special relevance due to environmental and practical reasons is the production of 2D materials in aqueous medium, which generally requires the use of certain additives (surfactants and other types of dispersants) to assist in the exfoliation and colloidal stabilization processes. In this context, biomolecules have received, in recent years, increasing attention as dispersants for 2D materials, as they provide a number of advantages over more conventional, synthetic surfactants. Here, we review research progress in the use of biomolecules as exfoliating and dispersing agents for the production of 2D materials. Although most efforts in this area have focused on graphene, significant advances have also been reported with transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, WS2, etc.) or hexagonal boron nitride. Particular emphasis is placed on the specific merits of different types of biomolecules, including proteins and peptides, nucleotides and nucleic acids (RNA, DNA), polysaccharides, plant extracts and bile salts, on their role as efficient colloidal dispersants of 2D materials, as well as on the potential applications that have been explored for such biomolecule-exfoliated materials. These applications are wide-ranging and encompass the fields of biomedicine (photothermal and photodynamic therapy, bioimaging, biosensing, etc.), energy storage (Li- and Na-ion batteries), catalysis (e.g., catalyst supports for the oxygen reduction reaction or electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction), or composite materials. As an incipient area of research, a number of knowledge gaps, unresolved issues and novel future

  19. Biomolecule-assisted exfoliation and dispersion of graphene and other two-dimensional materials: a review of recent progress and applications.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S

    2016-08-25

    Direct liquid-phase exfoliation of layered materials by means of ultrasound, shear forces or electrochemical intercalation holds enormous promise as a convenient, cost-effective approach to the mass production of two-dimensional (2D) materials, particularly in the form of colloidal suspensions of high quality and micrometer- and submicrometer-sized flakes. Of special relevance due to environmental and practical reasons is the production of 2D materials in aqueous medium, which generally requires the use of certain additives (surfactants and other types of dispersants) to assist in the exfoliation and colloidal stabilization processes. In this context, biomolecules have received, in recent years, increasing attention as dispersants for 2D materials, as they provide a number of advantages over more conventional, synthetic surfactants. Here, we review research progress in the use of biomolecules as exfoliating and dispersing agents for the production of 2D materials. Although most efforts in this area have focused on graphene, significant advances have also been reported with transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS2, WS2, etc.) or hexagonal boron nitride. Particular emphasis is placed on the specific merits of different types of biomolecules, including proteins and peptides, nucleotides and nucleic acids (RNA, DNA), polysaccharides, plant extracts and bile salts, on their role as efficient colloidal dispersants of 2D materials, as well as on the potential applications that have been explored for such biomolecule-exfoliated materials. These applications are wide-ranging and encompass the fields of biomedicine (photothermal and photodynamic therapy, bioimaging, biosensing, etc.), energy storage (Li- and Na-ion batteries), catalysis (e.g., catalyst supports for the oxygen reduction reaction or electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction), or composite materials. As an incipient area of research, a number of knowledge gaps, unresolved issues and novel future

  20. Microwave exfoliated graphene oxide/TiO{sub 2} nanowire hybrid for high performance lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ishtiaque Shuvo, Mohammad Arif; Rodriguez, Gerardo; Karim, Hasanul; Lin, Yirong; Islam, Md Tariqul; Noveron, Juan C.; Ramabadran, Navaneet

    2015-09-28

    Lithium ion battery (LIB) is a key solution to the demand of ever-improving, high energy density, clean-alternative energy systems. In LIB, graphite is the most commonly used anode material; however, lithium-ion intercalation in graphite is limited, hindering the battery charge rate and capacity. To date, one of the approaches in LIB performance improvement is by using porous carbon (PC) to replace graphite as anode material. PC's pore structure facilitates ion transport and has been proven to be an excellent anode material candidate in high power density LIBs. In addition, to overcome the limited lithium-ion intercalation obstacle, nanostructured anode assembly has been extensively studied to increase the lithium-ion diffusion rate. Among these approaches, high specific surface area metal oxide nanowires connecting nanostructured carbon materials accumulation have shown promising results for enhanced lithium-ion intercalation. Herein, we demonstrate a hydrothermal approach of growing TiO{sub 2} nanowires (TON) on microwave exfoliated graphene oxide (MEGO) to further improve LIB performance over PC. This MEGO-TON hybrid not only uses the high surface area of MEGO but also increases the specific surface area for electrode–electrolyte interaction. Therefore, this new nanowire/MEGO hybrid anode material enhances both the specific capacity and charge–discharge rate. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used for materials characterization. Battery analyzer was used for measuring the electrical performance of the battery. The testing results have shown that MEGO-TON hybrid provides up to 80% increment of specific capacity compared to PC anode.

  1. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green process for transferring graphene to flexible substrates and templating of sub-nanometer plasmonic gaps (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V.; Marin, Brandon C.; Moetazedi, Herad; Dill, Tyler J.; Jibril, Liban; Kong, Casey; Tao, Andrea R.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a new technique, termed "metal-assisted exfoliation," for the scalable transfer of graphene from catalytic copper foils to flexible polymeric supports. The process is amenable to roll-to-roll manufacturing, and the copper substrate can be recycled. We then demonstrate the use of single-layer graphene as a template for the formation of sub-nanometer plasmonic gaps using a scalable fabrication process called "nanoskiving." These gaps are formed between parallel gold nanowires in a process that first produces three-layer thin films with the architecture gold/single-layer graphene/gold, and then sections the composite films with an ultramicrotome. The structures produced can be treated as two gold nanowires separated along their entire lengths by an atomically thin graphene nanoribbon. Oxygen plasma etches the sandwiched graphene to a finite depth; this action produces a sub-nanometer gap near the top surface of the junction between the wires that is capable of supporting highly confined optical fields. The confinement of light is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements, which indicate that the enhancement of the electric field arises from the junction between the gold nanowires. These experiments demonstrate nanoskiving as a unique and easy-to-implement fabrication technique that is capable of forming sub-nanometer plasmonic gaps between parallel metallic nanostructures over long, macroscopic distances. These structures could be valuable for fundamental investigations as well as applications in plasmonics and molecular electronics.

  2. Graphene-graphene oxide-graphene hybrid nanopapers with superior mechanical, gas barrier and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xilian; Huang, Wenyi; Cabrera, Eusebio; Castro, Jose; Lee, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanopaper-like thin films with a graphene oxide (GO) layer sandwiched by two functionalized graphene (GP-SO3H) layers were successfully prepared from oxidized graphene and benzene sulfonic modified graphene. The hybrid graphene-graphene oxide-graphene (GP-GO-GP) nanopapers showed combination of high mechanic strength and good electrical conductivity, leading to desirable electromagnetic interference shielding performance, from the GP-SO3H layers, and superior gas diffusion barrier provided by the GO layer. These GP-GO-GP nanopapers can be readily coated onto plastic and composite substrates by thermal lamination and injection molding for various industrial applications such as fuel cell and natural gas containers.

  3. 2 µm ultrafast fiber laser modelocked by mechanically exfoliated Sb2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarka, Jan; Boguslawski, Jakub; Zybala, Rafał; Kowalczyk, Maciej; Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the usage of a saturable absorber material - antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) for efficient mode-locking of a Thulium-doped fiber laser. The Sb2Te3 layers were obtained by mechanical exfoliation and transferred onto the fiber ferrule. The all-fiber laser was capable of generating optical solitons with the full width at half-maximum of 4.5 nm centered at 1945 nm, with 39.5 MHz repetition rate and more than 60 dB signal to noise ratio. The pulse energy of the generated 890 fs pulses was at the level of 30 pJ. Our experiment showed that Sb2Te3 saturable absorbers are suitable for the operation in 2 μm bandwidth.

  4. The mechanism of caesium intercalation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Petrović, M; Šrut Rakić, I; Runte, S; Busse, C; Sadowski, J T; Lazić, P; Pletikosić, I; Pan, Z-H; Milun, M; Pervan, P; Atodiresei, N; Brako, R; Šokčević, D; Valla, T; Michely, T; Kralj, M

    2013-01-01

    Properties of many layered materials, including copper- and iron-based superconductors, topological insulators, graphite and epitaxial graphene, can be manipulated by the inclusion of different atomic and molecular species between the layers via a process known as intercalation. For example, intercalation in graphite can lead to superconductivity and is crucial in the working cycle of modern batteries and supercapacitors. Intercalation involves complex diffusion processes along and across the layers; however, the microscopic mechanisms and dynamics of these processes are not well understood. Here we report on a novel mechanism for intercalation and entrapment of alkali atoms under epitaxial graphene. We find that the intercalation is adjusted by the van der Waals interaction, with the dynamics governed by defects anchored to graphene wrinkles. Our findings are relevant for the future design and application of graphene-based nano-structures. Similar mechanisms can also have a role for intercalation of layered materials. PMID:24212475

  5. Formation mechanisms and near-surface stress orientations derived from fractographic markings on exfoliation joints in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Loew, S.; Bahat, D.

    2013-12-01

    1 orientations to topographic perturbation (caused by glacial valley erosion) of a more uniform far-field stress field. A portion of young, shallow exfoliation fractures of batch 2 exhibits numerous (up to about 50) arrest marks and plumose structure shapes (with plumose axes pitch angles >45°) that indicate primarily downwards directed fracture propagation. These provide evidence for a distinctly different fracture mechanism. Figure 1. Sketch of fractographic features frequently encountered on exfoliation fractures (upper Aar valley, Swiss Alps).

  6. Gram-scale synthesis of graphene sheets by a catalytic arc-discharge method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Wu, Bin; Chen, Jianyi; Xue, Yunzhou; Geng, Dechao; Guo, Yunlong; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-04-22

    Flake graphite is used as carbon source and ZnO or ZnS as catalyst in the synthesis of high-quality graphene sheets. A catalytic growth mechanism for cathode-part graphene synthesis in the arc-discharge apparatus and an exfoliation mechanism for wall-part graphene synthesis are introduced. N-doped cathode-part graphene and undoped wall-part graphene are formed simultaneously. PMID:23463696

  7. Understanding Mechanical Response of Elastomeric Graphene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Na; Barg, Suelen; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Macul Perez, Felipe; Miranda, Miriam; Lu, Cong; Mattevi, Cecilia; Saiz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-light porous networks based on nano-carbon materials (such as graphene or carbon nanotubes) have attracted increasing interest owing to their applications in wide fields from bioengineering to electrochemical devices. However, it is often difficult to translate the properties of nanomaterials to bulk three-dimensional networks with a control of their mechanical properties. In this work, we constructed elastomeric graphene porous networks with well-defined structures by freeze casting and thermal reduction, and investigated systematically the effect of key microstructural features. The porous networks made of large reduced graphene oxide flakes (>20 μm) are superelastic and exhibit high energy absorption, showing much enhanced mechanical properties than those with small flakes (<2 μm). A better restoration of the graphitic nature also has a considerable effect. In comparison, microstructural differences, such as the foam architecture or the cell size have smaller or negligible effect on the mechanical response. The recoverability and energy adsorption depend on density with the latter exhibiting a minimum due to the interplay between wall fracture and friction during deformation. These findings suggest that an improvement in the mechanical properties of porous graphene networks significantly depend on the engineering of the graphene flake that controls the property of the cell walls. PMID:26348898

  8. Achieving significantly enhanced visible-light photocatalytic efficiency using a polyelectrolyte: the composites of exfoliated titania nanosheets, graphene, and poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; An, Qi; Luan, Xinglong; Huang, Hongwei; Li, Xiaowei; Meng, Zilin; Tong, Wangshu; Chen, Xiaodong; Chu, Paul K.; Zhang, Yihe

    2015-08-01

    A high-performance visible-light-active photocatalyst is prepared using the polyelectrolyte/exfoliated titania nanosheet/graphene oxide (GO) precursor by flocculation followed by calcination. The polyelectrolyte poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride) serves not only as an effective binder to precipitate GO and titania nanosheets, but also boosts the overall performance of the catalyst significantly. Unlike most titania nanosheet-based catalysts reported in the literature, the composite absorbs light in the UV-Vis-NIR range. Its decomposition rate of methylene blue is 98% under visible light. This novel strategy of using a polymer to enhance the catalytic performance of titania nanosheet-based catalysts affords immense potential in designing and fabricating next-generation photocatalysts with high efficiency.A high-performance visible-light-active photocatalyst is prepared using the polyelectrolyte/exfoliated titania nanosheet/graphene oxide (GO) precursor by flocculation followed by calcination. The polyelectrolyte poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride) serves not only as an effective binder to precipitate GO and titania nanosheets, but also boosts the overall performance of the catalyst significantly. Unlike most titania nanosheet-based catalysts reported in the literature, the composite absorbs light in the UV-Vis-NIR range. Its decomposition rate of methylene blue is 98% under visible light. This novel strategy of using a polymer to enhance the catalytic performance of titania nanosheet-based catalysts affords immense potential in designing and fabricating next-generation photocatalysts with high efficiency. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03256c

  9. Graphene mechanical oscillators with tunable frequency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyao; Lee, Sunwoo; Deshpande, Vikram V; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Lekas, Michael; Shepard, Kenneth; Hone, James

    2013-12-01

    Oscillators, which produce continuous periodic signals from direct current power, are central to modern communications systems, with versatile applications including timing references and frequency modulators. However, conventional oscillators typically consist of macroscopic mechanical resonators such as quartz crystals, which require excessive off-chip space. Here, we report oscillators built on micrometre-size, atomically thin graphene nanomechanical resonators, whose frequencies can be electrostatically tuned by as much as 14%. Self-sustaining mechanical motion is generated and transduced at room temperature in these oscillators using simple electrical circuitry. The prototype graphene voltage-controlled oscillators exhibit frequency stability and a modulation bandwidth sufficient for the modulation of radiofrequency carrier signals. As a demonstration, we use a graphene oscillator as the active element for frequency-modulated signal generation and achieve efficient audio signal transmission. PMID:24240431

  10. Graphene mechanical oscillators with tunable frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Lee, Sunwoo; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Lekas, Michael; Shepard, Kenneth; Hone, James

    2013-12-01

    Oscillators, which produce continuous periodic signals from direct current power, are central to modern communications systems, with versatile applications including timing references and frequency modulators. However, conventional oscillators typically consist of macroscopic mechanical resonators such as quartz crystals, which require excessive off-chip space. Here, we report oscillators built on micrometre-size, atomically thin graphene nanomechanical resonators, whose frequencies can be electrostatically tuned by as much as 14%. Self-sustaining mechanical motion is generated and transduced at room temperature in these oscillators using simple electrical circuitry. The prototype graphene voltage-controlled oscillators exhibit frequency stability and a modulation bandwidth sufficient for the modulation of radiofrequency carrier signals. As a demonstration, we use a graphene oscillator as the active element for frequency-modulated signal generation and achieve efficient audio signal transmission.

  11. Stable aqueous dispersions of noncovalently functionalized graphene from graphite and their multifunctional high-performance applications.

    PubMed

    An, Xiaohong; Simmons, Trevor; Shah, Rakesh; Wolfe, Christopher; Lewis, Kim M; Washington, Morris; Nayak, Saroj K; Talapatra, Saikat; Kar, Swastik

    2010-11-10

    We present a scalable and facile technique for noncovalent functionalization of graphene with 1-pyrenecarboxylic acid that exfoliates single-, few-, and multilayered graphene flakes into stable aqueous dispersions. The exfoliation mechanism is established using stringent control experiments and detailed characterization steps. Using the exfoliated graphene, we demonstrate highly sensitive and selective conductometric sensors (whose resistance rapidly changes >10,000% in saturated ethanol vapor), and ultracapacitors with extremely high specific capacitance (∼ 120 F/g), power density (∼ 105 kW/kg), and energy density (∼ 9.2 Wh/kg).

  12. In-Situ Measurements of Graphene Mechanics During Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Aaron; de Alba, Roberto; Sebastian, Abhilash; Parpia, Jeevak

    Graphene shows great potential as a material for a new generation of mechanical nanodevices. However, current methodologies used for fabricating graphene structures involve polymer resists for transfer and patterning, which degrades mechanical performance. To improve surface quality, high current or high temperature annealing of graphene is commonly employed. Previous studies of graphene mechanics have focused on performance after annealing or temperature-dependent behavior from 4K-300K. Here we present real-time, in-situ measurements of graphene mechanical resonance during high temperature annealing from 300K-600K. Upon heating, reversible changes in mechanical frequency are indicative of graphene thermal contraction. Discontinuous and irreversible changes are also seen, corresponding to graphene slipping and mass desorption. Both reversible and irreversible changes in quality factor are also observed. Characterizing the effects of annealing on the structural properties of graphene will enable more precise engineering for particular applications, such as mass sensing.

  13. Metal-assisted exfoliation (MAE): green, roll-to-roll compatible method for transferring graphene to flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretski, Aliaksandr V.; Moetazedi, Herad; Kong, Casey; Sawyer, Eric J.; Savagatrup, Suchol; Valle, Eduardo; O'Connor, Timothy F.; Printz, Adam D.; Lipomi, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is expected to play a significant role in future technologies that span a range from consumer electronics, to devices for the conversion and storage of energy, to conformable biomedical devices for healthcare. To realize these applications, however, a low-cost method of synthesizing large areas of high-quality graphene is required. Currently, the only method to generate large-area single-layer graphene that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing destroys approximately 300 kg of copper foil (thickness = 25 μm) for every 1 g of graphene produced. This paper describes a new environmentally benign and scalable process of transferring graphene to flexible substrates. The process is based on the preferential adhesion of certain thin metallic films to graphene; separation of the graphene from the catalytic copper foil is followed by lamination to a flexible target substrate in a process that is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing. The copper substrate is indefinitely reusable and the method is substantially greener than the current process that uses relatively large amounts of corrosive etchants to remove the copper. The sheet resistance of the graphene produced by this new process is unoptimized but should be comparable in principle to that produced by the standard method, given the defects observable by Raman spectroscopy and the presence of process-induced cracks. With further improvements, this green, inexpensive synthesis of single-layer graphene could enable applications in flexible, stretchable, and disposable electronics, low-profile and lightweight barrier materials, and in large-area displays and photovoltaic modules.

  14. Deformation of wrinkled graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Kinloch, Ian A; Young, Robert J; Novoselov, Kostya S; Anagnostopoulos, George; Parthenios, John; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Lu, Ching-Yu; Britnell, Liam

    2015-04-28

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  15. Deformation of Wrinkled Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The deformation of monolayer graphene, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on a polyester film substrate has been investigated through the use of Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that the microstructure of the CVD graphene consists of a hexagonal array of islands of flat monolayer graphene separated by wrinkled material. During deformation, it was found that the rate of shift of the Raman 2D band wavenumber per unit strain was less than 25% of that of flat flakes of mechanically exfoliated graphene, whereas the rate of band broadening per unit strain was about 75% of that of the exfoliated material. This unusual deformation behavior has been modeled in terms of mechanically isolated graphene islands separated by the graphene wrinkles, with the strain distribution in each graphene island determined using shear lag analysis. The effect of the size and position of the Raman laser beam spot has also been incorporated in the model. The predictions fit well with the behavior observed experimentally for the Raman band shifts and broadening of the wrinkled CVD graphene. The effect of wrinkles upon the efficiency of graphene to reinforce nanocomposites is also discussed. PMID:25765609

  16. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-03-24

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO₂/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

  17. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-03-24

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO₂/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope.more » We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials.« less

  18. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO2/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25801337

  19. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects formed under local mechanical stress on hexagonal monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonggu; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Taekjib; Lee, Mi Jung; Jia, Quanxi; Park, Minwoo; Lee, Hoonkyung; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Ripples in graphene are extensively investigated because they ensure the mechanical stability of two-dimensional graphene and affect its electronic properties. They arise from spontaneous symmetry breaking and are usually manifested in the form of domains with long-range order. It is expected that topological defects accompany a material exhibiting long-range order, whose functionality depends on characteristics of domains and topological defects. However, there remains a lack of understanding regarding ripple domains and their topological defects formed on monolayer graphene. Here we explore configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects in exfoliated monolayer graphenes on SiO2/Si substrates using transverse shear microscope. We observe three-color domains with three different ripple directions, which meet at a core. Furthermore, the closed domain is surrounded by an even number of cores connected together by domain boundaries, similar to topological vortex and anti-vortex pairs. In addition, we have found that axisymmetric three-color domains can be induced around nanoparticles underneath the graphene. This fascinating configuration of ripple domains may result from the intrinsic hexagonal symmetry of two-dimensional graphene, which is supported by theoretical simulation using molecular dynamics. Our findings are expected to play a key role in understanding of ripple physics in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. PMID:25801337

  20. The location and extent of exfoliation of clay on the fracture mechanisms in nylon 66-based ternary nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yang, Mingshu

    2008-04-01

    The primary focus of this work is to elucidate the location and extent of exfoliation of clay on fracture (under both static and dynamic loading conditions) of melt-compounded nylon 66/clay/SEBS-g-MA ternary nanocomposites fabricated by different blending sequences. Distinct microstructures are obtained depending on the blending protocol employed. The state of exfoliation and dispersion of clay in nylon 66 matrix and SEBS-g-MA phase are quantified and the presence of clay in rubber is shown to have a negative effect on the toughness of the nanocomposites. The level of toughness enhancement of ternary nanocomposites depends on the blending protocol and the capability of different fillers to activate the plastic deformation mechanisms in the matrix. These mechanisms include: cavitation of SEBS-g-MA phase, stretching of voided matrix material, interfacial debonding of SEBS-g-MA particles, debonding of intercalated clay embedded inside the SEBS-g-MA phase, and delamination of intercalated clay platelets. Based on these results, new insights and approaches for the processing of better toughened polymer ternary nanocomposites are discussed. PMID:18572592

  1. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast, the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.

  2. Atomistic mechanisms for bilayer growth of graphene on metal substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wei; Cui, Ping; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-08

    Epitaxial growth on metal substrates has been shown to be the most powerful approach in producing large-scale high-quality monolayer graphene, yet it remains a major challenge to realize uniform bilayer graphene growth. Here we carry out a comparative study of the atomistic mechanisms for bilayer graphene growth on the (111) surfaces of Cu and Ni, using multiscale approaches combining first-principles calculations and rate-equation analysis. We first show that the relatively weak graphene-Cu interaction enhances the lateral diffusion and effective nucleation of C atoms underneath the graphene island, thereby making it more feasible to grow bilayer graphene on Cu. In contrast,more » the stronger graphene-Ni interaction suppresses the lateral mobility and dimerization of C atoms underneath the graphene, making it unlikely to achieve controlled growth of bilayer graphene on Ni. We then determine the critical graphene size beyond which nucleation of the second layer will take place. Intriguingly, the critical size exhibits an effective inverse "Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier" effect, becoming smaller for faster C migration from the Cu surface to the graphene-Cu interface sites across the graphene edge. Lastly, these findings allow us to propose a novel alternating growth scheme to realize mass production of bilayer graphene.« less

  3. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals. PMID:26339027

  4. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals.

  5. Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

    2013-09-03

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  6. Nanoparticle-Mediated Physical Exfoliation of Aqueous-Phase Graphene for Fabrication of Three-Dimensionally Structured Hybrid Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Younghee; Choi, Hojin; Kim, Min-Sik; Noh, Seonmyeong; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Im, Kyungun; Kwon, Oh Seok; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Monodispersed polypyrrole (PPy) nanospheres were physically incorporated as guest species into stacked graphene layers without significant property degradation, thereby facilitating the formation of unique three-dimensional hybrid nanoarchitecture. The electrochemical properties of the graphene/particulate PPy (GPPy) nanohybrids were dependent on the sizes and contents of the PPy nanospheres. The nanohybrids exhibited optimum electrochemical performance in terms of redox activity, charge-transfer resistance, and specific capacitance at an 8:1 PPy/graphite (graphene precursor) weight ratio. The packing density of the alternately stacked nanohybrid structure varied with the nanosphere content, indicating the potential for high volumetric capacitance. The nanohybrids also exhibited good long-term cycling stability because of a structural synergy effect. Finally, fabricated nanohybrid-based flexible all–solid state capacitor cells exhibited good electrochemical performance in an acidic electrolyte with a maximum energy density of 8.4 Wh kg−1 or 1.9 Wh L−1 at a maximum power density of 3.2 kW kg−1 or 0.7 kW L−1; these performances were based on the mass or packing density of the electrode materials. PMID:26813878

  7. Nanoparticle-Mediated Physical Exfoliation of Aqueous-Phase Graphene for Fabrication of Three-Dimensionally Structured Hybrid Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Younghee; Choi, Hojin; Kim, Min-Sik; Noh, Seonmyeong; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Im, Kyungun; Kwon, Oh Seok; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Monodispersed polypyrrole (PPy) nanospheres were physically incorporated as guest species into stacked graphene layers without significant property degradation, thereby facilitating the formation of unique three-dimensional hybrid nanoarchitecture. The electrochemical properties of the graphene/particulate PPy (GPPy) nanohybrids were dependent on the sizes and contents of the PPy nanospheres. The nanohybrids exhibited optimum electrochemical performance in terms of redox activity, charge-transfer resistance, and specific capacitance at an 8:1 PPy/graphite (graphene precursor) weight ratio. The packing density of the alternately stacked nanohybrid structure varied with the nanosphere content, indicating the potential for high volumetric capacitance. The nanohybrids also exhibited good long-term cycling stability because of a structural synergy effect. Finally, fabricated nanohybrid-based flexible all-solid state capacitor cells exhibited good electrochemical performance in an acidic electrolyte with a maximum energy density of 8.4 Wh kg-1 or 1.9 Wh L-1 at a maximum power density of 3.2 kW kg-1 or 0.7 kW L-1 these performances were based on the mass or packing density of the electrode materials.

  8. Nanoparticle-Mediated Physical Exfoliation of Aqueous-Phase Graphene for Fabrication of Three-Dimensionally Structured Hybrid Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Younghee; Choi, Hojin; Kim, Min-Sik; Noh, Seonmyeong; Ahn, Ki-Jin; Im, Kyungun; Kwon, Oh Seok; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Monodispersed polypyrrole (PPy) nanospheres were physically incorporated as guest species into stacked graphene layers without significant property degradation, thereby facilitating the formation of unique three-dimensional hybrid nanoarchitecture. The electrochemical properties of the graphene/particulate PPy (GPPy) nanohybrids were dependent on the sizes and contents of the PPy nanospheres. The nanohybrids exhibited optimum electrochemical performance in terms of redox activity, charge-transfer resistance, and specific capacitance at an 8:1 PPy/graphite (graphene precursor) weight ratio. The packing density of the alternately stacked nanohybrid structure varied with the nanosphere content, indicating the potential for high volumetric capacitance. The nanohybrids also exhibited good long-term cycling stability because of a structural synergy effect. Finally, fabricated nanohybrid-based flexible all–solid state capacitor cells exhibited good electrochemical performance in an acidic electrolyte with a maximum energy density of 8.4 Wh kg‑1 or 1.9 Wh L‑1 at a maximum power density of 3.2 kW kg‑1 or 0.7 kW L‑1 these performances were based on the mass or packing density of the electrode materials.

  9. Defect engineering as a versatile route to estimate various scattering mechanisms in monolayer graphene on solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pawan Kumar; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2015-10-14

    It is known that the experimental conditions and growth methods determine the different carrier scatterings responsible for large variation of carrier mobility in graphene monolayers. Here we present a systematic investigation on various possible scattering mechanisms responsible for limiting the carrier mobility in graphene on a solid substrate, like SiO2. This has been possible by defect engineering in graphene monolayers obtained by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in polar and non-polar solvents with the dielectric constant varying from 2.5 to 64. Lattice defects in graphene monolayers have been characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Correlation between the results obtained from electrical measurements and the information obtained from Raman spectra have revealed different scattering mechanisms responsible for deciding the carrier mobility. It has been shown that remote interfacial phonons in SiO2 are responsible for limiting the carrier mobility at room temperature whereas, substrate impurities and Raman active point defects in the graphene lattice are the dominant scatterers for limiting the mobility at low temperatures. PMID:26372472

  10. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton's law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the "Chern number" occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton's law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases. PMID:26667580

  11. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton’s law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the “Chern number” occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton’s law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases.

  12. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton’s law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the “Chern number” occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton’s law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases. PMID:26667580

  13. Spin diffusion and non-local spin-valve effect in an exfoliated multilayer graphene with a Co electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lijun; Lee, Inyeal; Lim, Dongsuk; Rathi, Servin; Kang, Moonshik; Uemura, Tetsuya; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated a non-local spin valve with a thin layer of graphite with Co transparent electrodes. The spin-valve effect and spin precession were observed at room temperature. The magnitude of the mangetoresistance increases when temperature decreases. The spin-relaxation time, {τ }s, obtained from the fitting of the Hanle curves increases with decreasing temperature with a weak dependence ∼ {T}-0.065 while the spin-diffusion constant D decreases. At room temperature, {τ }s exceeds 100 ps and the spin-diffusion length, {λ }s, is ∼2 μm. The temperature dependence of {λ }s is not monotonic, and it has the largest value at room temperature. Our results show that multilayer graphene is a suitable material for spintronic devices.

  14. Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites from reassembling of exfoliated graphene oxide layers with colloidal titania nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yongjun; Aizawa, Mami; Peng Wenqing; Wang Zhengming; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2013-01-15

    Nanoporous composites of carbon nanosheets (CNS) and titania nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by reassembling of delaminated graphite oxide (GO) layers with titania clear sol (TCS), and their structural and porous properties were examined by various physico-chemical methods such as XRD, TG/DTA, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/TEM, and low temperature N{sub 2} adsorption. It was found that the facile approach, which utilizes the electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged GO layers and the positively charged TCS particles, leads to a well composed CNS and ultrafine TiO{sub 2} NPs material whose titania amount reaches up to 71 wt%. The titania phase in these composite materials is mainly anatase, which is resistible against high temperature calcination, but also contains a little amount of rutile and brookite depending on synthesis condition. The porosity of the composite is improved and partially affected by the size distributions of TiO{sub 2} NPs. The unique structure, better porosity, and compatible surface affinity of these composites bring about an adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalytic effects toward organic dyes by successfully combining both properties of CNS and titania NPs. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon nanosheet-titania nanocrystal composites can be synthesized by a facile delamination-reassembling method from graphene oxide and colloidal titania. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A facile delamination-reassembling method for graphene oxide-titania nanocomposite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A nanoporous composite containing mixed phase titania nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition effect of carbon nanosheets preventing TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from aggregating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption concentration-promoted photocatalysis.

  15. Mechanically Robust Polymer-Graphene Aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Heonjoo; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has been intensely studied for the past several years due to its many attractive properties. Graphene oxide (GO) aerogels are particularly interesting due to their light weight and excellent performance in various applications, such as environmental remediation, super-hydrophobic and super-oleophilic materials, energy storage, etc. However, GO aerogels are generally weak and delicate which complicates their handling and potentially limits their application outside the research lab. The focus of this work is to synthesize mechanically stable aerogels that are robust and easy to handle without substantially sacrificing their low density. To overcome this challenge, we found that by intermixing a small amount of readily available and thermally crosslinkable polymer can enhance the mechanical properties without disrupting other characteristic intrinsic properties of the aerogel itself. This method is a simple straight-forward procedure that does not include any tedious chemical reactions or harsh chemicals. Furthermore, we will demonstrate the performance of these materials as a super-absorbent and pressure sensor.

  16. Elastic, plastic, and fracture mechanisms in graphene materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Colin; Horning, Andrew; Phillips, Anthony; Massote, Daniel V. P.; Liang, Liangbo; Bullard, Zachary; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Meunier, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    In both research and industry, materials will be exposed to stresses, be it during fabrication, normal use, or mechanical failure. The response to external stress will have an important impact on properties, especially when atomic details govern the functionalities of the materials. This review aims at summarizing current research involving the responses of graphene and graphene materials to applied stress at the nanoscale, and to categorize them by stress-strain behavior. In particular, we consider the reversible functionalization of graphene and graphene materials by way of elastic deformation and strain engineering, the plastic deformation of graphene oxide and the emergence of such in normally brittle graphene, the formation of defects as a response to stress under high temperature annealing or irradiation conditions, and the properties that affect how, and mechanisms by which, pristine, defective, and polycrystalline graphene fail catastrophically during fracture. Overall we find that there is significant potential for the use of existing knowledge, especially that of strain engineering, as well as potential for additional research into the fracture mechanics of polycrystalline graphene and device functionalization by way of controllable plastic deformation of graphene.

  17. Elastic, plastic, and fracture mechanisms in graphene materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Colin; Horning, Andrew; Phillips, Anthony; Massote, Daniel V P; Liang, Liangbo; Bullard, Zachary; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2015-09-23

    In both research and industry, materials will be exposed to stresses, be it during fabrication, normal use, or mechanical failure. The response to external stress will have an important impact on properties, especially when atomic details govern the functionalities of the materials. This review aims at summarizing current research involving the responses of graphene and graphene materials to applied stress at the nanoscale, and to categorize them by stress-strain behavior. In particular, we consider the reversible functionalization of graphene and graphene materials by way of elastic deformation and strain engineering, the plastic deformation of graphene oxide and the emergence of such in normally brittle graphene, the formation of defects as a response to stress under high temperature annealing or irradiation conditions, and the properties that affect how, and mechanisms by which, pristine, defective, and polycrystalline graphene fail catastrophically during fracture. Overall we find that there is significant potential for the use of existing knowledge, especially that of strain engineering, as well as potential for additional research into the fracture mechanics of polycrystalline graphene and device functionalization by way of controllable plastic deformation of graphene.

  18. Fabrication of Boron Nitride Nanosheets by Exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Tang, Zijie; Xue, Qi; Huang, Yan; Huang, Yang; Zhu, Minshen; Pei, Zengxia; Li, Hongfei; Jiang, Hongbo; Fu, Chenxi; Zhi, Chunyi

    2016-06-01

    Nanomaterials with layered structures, with their intriguing properties, are of great research interest nowadays. As one of the primary two-dimensional nanomaterials, the hexagonal boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS, also called white graphene), which is an analogue of graphene, possesses various attractive properties, such as high intrinsic thermal conductivity, excellent chemical and thermal stability, and electrical insulation properties. After being discovered, it has been one of the most intensively studied two-dimensional non-carbon nanomaterials and has been applied in a wide range of applications. To support the exploration of applications of BNNSs, exfoliation, as one of the most promising approaches to realize large-scale production of BNNSs, has been intensively investigated. In this review, methods to yield BNNSs by exfoliation will be summarized and compared with other potential fabrication methods of BNNSs. In addition, the future prospects of the exfoliation of h-BN will also be discussed. PMID:27062213

  19. Graphene NanoElectroMechanical Resonators and Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao

    Made of only one sheet of carbon atoms, graphene is the thinnest yet strongest material ever exist. Since its discovery in 2004, graphene has attracted tremendous research effort worldwide. Guaranteed by the superior electrical and excellent mechanical properties, graphene is the ideal building block for NanoElectroMechanical Systems (NEMS). In the first parts of the thesis, I will discuss the fabrications and measurements of typical graphene NEMS resonators, including doubly clamped and fully clamped graphene mechanical resonators. I have developed a electrical readout technique by using graphene as frequency mixer, demonstrated resonant frequencies in range from 30 to 200 MHz. Furthermore, I developed the advanced fabrications to achieve local gate structure, which led to the real-time resonant frequency detection under resonant channel transistor (RCT) scheme. Such real-time detection improve the measurement speed by 2 orders of magnitude compared to frequency mixing technique, and is critical for practical applications. Finally, I employed active balanced bridge technique in order to reduce overall electrical parasitics, and demonstrated pure capacitive transduction of graphene NEMS resonators. Characterizations of graphene NEMS resonators properties are followed, including resonant frequency and quality factor (Q) tuning with tension, mass and temperatures. A simple continuum mechanics model was constructed to understand the frequency tuning behavior, and it agrees with experimental data extremely well. In the following parts of the thesis, I will discuss the behavior of graphene mechanical resonators in applied magnetic field, i.e. in Quantum Hall (QH) regime. The couplings between mechanical motion and electronic band structure turned out to be a direct probe for thermodynamic quantities, i.e., chemical potential and compressibility. For a clean graphene resonators, with quality factors of 1 x 104, it underwent resonant frequency oscillations as applied

  20. Enhanced Graphene Mechanical Properties through Ultrasmooth Copper Growth Substrates.

    PubMed

    Griep, Mark H; Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Tumlin, Travis M; Wetzel, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The combination of extraordinary strength and stiffness in conjunction with exceptional electronic and thermal properties in lightweight two-dimensional materials has propelled graphene research toward a wide array of applications including flexible electronics and functional structural components. Tailoring graphene's properties toward a selected application requires precise control of the atomic layer growth process, transfer, and postprocessing procedures. To date, the mechanical properties of graphene are largely controlled through postprocess defect engineering techniques. In this work, we demonstrate the role of varied catalytic surface morphologies on the tailorability of subsequent graphene film quality and breaking strength, providing a mechanism to tailor the physical, electrical, and mechanical properties at the growth stage. A new surface planarization methodology that results in over a 99% reduction in Cu surface roughness allows for smoothness parameters beyond that reported to date in literature and clearly demonstrates the role of Cu smoothness toward a decrease in the formation of bilayer graphene defects, altered domain sizes, monolayer graphene sheet resistance values down to 120 Ω/□ and a 78% improvement in breaking strength. The combined electrical and mechanical enhancements achieved through this methodology allows for the direct growth of application quality flexible transparent conductive films with monolayer graphene. PMID:26882091

  1. Non-oxidative, controlled exfoliation of graphite in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pawan Kumar; Yadav, Premlata; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-08-25

    We present a simple, non-oxidative and controlled method to synthesize graphene monolayers by exfoliation in water from different solid carbon sources, such as highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and low density graphite. Any water based method is highly desirable due to several attractive features, such as environmental friendliness, low cost and wide compatibility with other water based processes. We show that thin graphene layers can be exfoliated controllably and reproducibly by varying different parameters during exfoliation in aqueous medium. It has been possible to obtain high quality graphene monolayers with a yield of ∼2.45 wt%, which can be increased up to 16.6 wt% by recycling the sediments. Field effect transistors based on exfoliated graphene monolayers have shown n-type doping and a high carrier mobility of 4500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature and ∼20 000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at low temperature. Density functional calculations corroborate the infrared spectroscopic results and also indicate that the charge transfer preferentially occurs from water molecules to the graphene sheets resulting in n-type doping. We anticipate that exfoliation of high quality graphene layers in aqueous medium would open up a pathway for various graphene based electronic and biological applications. PMID:27523721

  2. Mechanical Stability of Flexible Graphene-Based Displays.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, George; Pappas, Panagiotis-Nektarios; Li, Zheling; Kinloch, Ian A; Young, Robert J; Novoselov, Kostya S; Lu, Ching Yu; Pugno, Nicola; Parthenios, John; Galiotis, Costas; Papagelis, Konstantinos

    2016-08-31

    The mechanical behavior of a prototype touch panel display, which consists of two layers of CVD graphene embedded into PET films, is investigated in tension and under contact-stress dynamic loading. In both cases, laser Raman spectroscopy was employed to assess the stress transfer efficiency of the embedded graphene layers. The tensile behavior was found to be governed by the "island-like" microstructure of the CVD graphene, and the stress transfer efficiency was dependent on the size of graphene "islands" but also on the yielding behavior of PET at relatively high strains. Finally, the fatigue tests, which simulate real operation conditions, showed that the maximum temperature gradient developed at the point of "finger" contact after 80 000 cycles does not exceed the glass transition temperature of the PET matrix. The effect of these results on future product development and the design of new graphene-based displays are discussed. PMID:27494211

  3. Negative nonlinear damping of a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vibhor; Shevchuk, Olga; Blanter, Ya. M.; Steele, Gary A.

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigate the nonlinear response of a multilayer graphene resonator using a superconducting microwave cavity to detect its motion. The radiation pressure force is used to drive the mechanical resonator in an optomechanically induced transparency configuration. By varying the amplitudes of drive and probe tones, the mechanical resonator can be brought into a nonlinear limit. Using the calibration of the optomechanical coupling, we quantify the mechanical Duffing nonlinearity. By increasing the drive force, we observe a decrease in the mechanical dissipation rate at large amplitudes, suggesting a negative nonlinear damping mechanism in the graphene resonator. Increasing the optomechanical backaction further, we observe instabilities in the mechanical response.

  4. Mechanical tearing of graphene on an oxidizing metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lijin; Gupta, Aparna; Shaina, P. R.; Das Gupta, Nandita; Jaiswal, Manu

    2015-12-01

    Graphene, the thinnest possible anticorrosion and gas-permeation barrier, is poised to transform the protective coatings industry for a variety of surface applications. In this work, we have studied the structural changes of graphene when the underlying copper surface undergoes oxidation upon heating. Single-layer graphene directly grown on a copper surface by chemical vapour deposition was annealed under ambient atmosphere conditions up to 400 °C. The onset temperature of the surface oxidation of copper is found to be higher for graphene-coated foils. Parallel arrays of graphene nanoripples are a ubiquitous feature of pristine graphene on copper, and we demonstrate that these form crucial sites for the onset of the oxidation of copper, particularly for ˜0.3-0.4 μm ripple widths. In these regions, the oxidation proceeds along the length of the nanoripples, resulting in the formation of parallel stripes of oxidized copper regions. We demonstrate from temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy that the primary defect formation process in graphene involves boundary-type defects rather than vacancy or sp3-type defects. This observation is consistent with a mechanical tearing process that splits graphene into small polycrystalline domains. The size of these is estimated to be sub-50 nm.

  5. High-efficiency exfoliation of layered materials into 2D nanosheets in switchable CO2/Surfactant/H2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Xu, Qun; Xu, Shanshan; Qi, Yuhang; Chen, Meng; Li, Hongxiang; Han, Buxing

    2015-11-01

    Layered materials present attractive and important properties due to their two-dimensional (2D) structure, allowing potential applications including electronics, optoelectronics, and catalysis. However, fully exploiting the outstanding properties will require a method for their efficient exfoliation. Here we present that a series of layered materials can be successfully exfoliated into single- and few-layer nanosheets using the driving forces coming from the phase inversion, i.e., from micelles to reverse micelles in the emulsion microenvironment built by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2). The effect of variable experimental parameters including CO2 pressure, ethanol/water ratio, and initial concentration of bulk materials on the exfoliation yield have been investigated. Moreover, we demonstrate that the exfoliated 2D nanosheets have their worthwhile applications, for example, graphene can be used to prepare conductive paper, MoS2 can be used as fluorescent label to perform cellular labelling, and BN can effectively reinforce polymers leading to the promising mechanical properties.

  6. Mechanical properties of graphene on deformable patterned substrates: Experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, S.; Chialvo, C.; Rocklin, D. Z.; Weaver, R.; Goldbart, P. M.; Mason, N.

    2010-03-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene can strongly influence its electronic behavior, and are relevant for implementing novel nano-mechanical devices. In this talk we present results on the mechanical behavior of few-layered graphene (FLG) placed on a patterned rubbery surface. Samples of FLG, with thicknesses ranging from 1-7 atomic layers, were deposited on micro-scale grooved polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. AFM imaging techniques were then used to study the surface deformations, and to perform thickness measurements on the samples. AFM phase-imaging shows that the graphene strongly adheres to the substrate. The graphene also substantially deforms the substrate, with thicker pieces causing greater deformation. The results are discussed in the context of a linear elasticity theory (detailed in an accompanying paper) which can be used to explain the data and place bounds on the various interface strengths.

  7. 7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane-assisted one-step electrochemical exfoliation of graphite and its performance as an electrode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanra, Partha; Lee, Chang-No; Kuila, Tapas; Kim, Nam Hoon; Park, Min Jun; Lee, Joong Hee

    2014-04-01

    electrolytes was described. TCNQ is an organic charge-transfer complex with electron accepting and noteworthy electrical properties. The exfoliation of graphite to a few-layer graphene sheets was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image analysis. The chemical state, surface functional groups and chemical compositions of bulk graphite as well as TCNQ-functionalized graphene sheets were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Adsorption of TCNQ onto the surface of graphene sheets was confirmed by the appearance of the N1s peak at ~399.4 eV in the XPS of TCNQ-functionalized graphene. Exfoliation of bulk graphite to functionalized graphene sheets was further confirmed by the appearance of a sharp single peak at ~2695 cm-1 along with increased intensity ratios of the D-band to the G-band. Electrochemical performance of a TCNQ-functionalized graphene sheet was investigated using 1 M Na2SO4 and 1 M KOH aqueous solutions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanometric charge-discharge experiments revealed that TCNQ-functionalized graphene could be used as a supercapacitor electrode material. The specific capacitance values of TCNQ-modified graphene measured with electrolytes (1 M KOH and 1 M Na2SO4) were 324 and 140 F g-1, respectively, at a current density of 1 A g-1. Impedance spectroscopic analysis revealed that the charge transfer process was dependent on surface functionalization and interaction between the electrode and the electrolyte. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Schematic diagram of the electrochemical exfoliation mechanism, XPS survey spectra of pure graphite, TCNQG1 and TCNQG2, deconvoluted C1s spectra of graphite and comparison of materials preparation and electrochemical performance of TCNQ functionalized graphene sheets with the existing state-of-the-art compounds. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05307e

  8. Mechanical Robustness of Graphene on Flexible Transparent Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moon H; Prieto López, Lizbeth O; Chen, Bingan; Teo, Ken; Williams, John A; Milne, William I; Cole, Matthew T

    2016-08-31

    This study reports on a facile and widely applicable method of transferring chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene uniformly onto optically transparent and mechanically flexible substrates using commercially available, low-cost ultraviolet adhesive (UVA) and hot-press lamination (HPL). We report on the adhesion potential between the graphene and the substrate, and we compare these findings with those of the more commonly used cast polymer handler transfer processes. Graphene transferred with the two proposed methods showed lower surface energy and displayed a higher degree of adhesion (UVA: 4.40 ± 1.09 N/m, HPL: 0.60 ± 0.26 N/m) compared to equivalent CVD-graphene transferred using conventional poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA: 0.44 ± 0.06 N/m). The mechanical robustness of the transferred graphene was investigated by measuring the differential resistance as a function of bend angle and repeated bend-relax cycles across a range of bend radii. At a bend angle of 100° and a 2.5 mm bend radius, for both transfer techniques, the normalized resistance of graphene transferred on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was around 80 times less than that of indium-tin oxide on PET. After 10(4) bend cycles, the resistance of the transferred graphene on PET using UVA and HPL was found to be, on average, around 25.5 and 8.1% higher than that of PMMA-transferred graphene, indicating that UVA- and HPL-transferred graphene are more strongly adhered compared to PMMA-transferred graphene. The robustness, in terms of maintained electrical performance upon mechanical fatigue, of the transferred graphene was around 60 times improved over ITO/PET upon many thousands of repeated bending stress cycles. On the basis of present production methods, the development of the next-generation of highly conformal, diverse form factor electronics, exploiting the emerging family of two-dimensional materials, necessitates the development of simple, low-cost, and mechanically robust transfer processes

  9. Transport Properties of Graphene and Suspended Graphene with EMC: The Role of Various Scattering Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, M. D.; Atasever, Ö. S.; Özdemir, B.; Yarar, Z.; Özdemir, M.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic transport properties of graphene and suspended (intrinsic) graphene sheets are studied using an ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) technique. The combined scattering mechanisms that are taken into account for both cases are nonpolar optic and acoustic phonons, ionized impurity, interface roughness, and surface polar phonon scatterings. The effect of screening is also considered in the ionized impurity and surface polar phonon scatterings of electrons. A rejection technique is used in EMC simulations to account for the occupancy of the final states. Velocity-field characteristics of graphene and suspended graphene sheets are obtained using various values of acoustic deformation potential constants. The variation of electron mobility of graphene is studied as a function of electron concentration and its variation as a function of temperature are investigated for the case of suspended graphene. For the former case, the mobility increases with electron concentration first and after a certain value of electron concentration it begins to decrease, while for the latter case the mobility decreases almost linearly with temperature. The mobility results from EMC simulations are compatible with the existing experimental studies for the unsuspended graphene case.

  10. Graphene and graphene-like two-dimensional materials in photodetection: mechanisms and methodology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenhua; Chang, Haixin

    2014-05-27

    Graphene and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted much attention due to its extraordinary electronic and optical properties, which accommodate a large potential in optoelectronic applications such as photodetection. However, although much progress has been made, many challenges exist in fundamental and practical aspects hindering graphene and graphene-like 2D materials from photodetector and other photonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we review the recent progress in photodetection based on graphene and graphene-like 2D materials and start with the summary of some most important physical mechanisms, including photoelectric, photo-thermoelectric, and photo-bolometric regimes. Then methodology-level discussions are given from viewpoints of state-of-the-art designs in device geometry and materials. It is worth emphasizing that emerging photodetection and photodetectors based on graphene-like 2D materials such as metal chalcogenide nanosheets are reviewed systematically. Finally, we conclude this review in a brief discussion with remaining challenges in photodetection of two-dimensional photonics and optoelectronics (2D POE) and note that complete understandings of 2D materials and 2D POE may inspire solar energy conversion and other new applications.

  11. Nanoscale Mechanics of Graphene and Graphene Oxide in Composites: A Scientific and Technological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Kinloch, Ian A; Ligi, Simone; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-08-01

    Graphene shows considerable promise in structural composite applications thanks to its unique combination of high tensile strength, Young's modulus and structural flexibility which arise due to its maximal chemical bond strength and minimal atomic thickness. However, the ultimate performance of graphene composites will depend, in addition to the properties of the matrix and interface, on the morphology of the graphene used, including the size and shape of the sheets and the number of chemical defects present. For example, whilst oxidized sp(3) carbon atoms and vacancies in a graphene sheet can degrade its mechanical strength, they can also increase its interaction with other materials such as the polymer matrix of a composite, thus maximizing stress transfer and leading to more efficient mechanical reinforcement. Herein, we present an overview of some recently published work on graphene mechanical properties and discuss a list of challenges that need to be overcome (notwithstanding the strong hype existing on this material) for the development of graphene-based materials into a successful technology.

  12. Nanoscale Mechanics of Graphene and Graphene Oxide in Composites: A Scientific and Technological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Kinloch, Ian A; Ligi, Simone; Pugno, Nicola M

    2016-08-01

    Graphene shows considerable promise in structural composite applications thanks to its unique combination of high tensile strength, Young's modulus and structural flexibility which arise due to its maximal chemical bond strength and minimal atomic thickness. However, the ultimate performance of graphene composites will depend, in addition to the properties of the matrix and interface, on the morphology of the graphene used, including the size and shape of the sheets and the number of chemical defects present. For example, whilst oxidized sp(3) carbon atoms and vacancies in a graphene sheet can degrade its mechanical strength, they can also increase its interaction with other materials such as the polymer matrix of a composite, thus maximizing stress transfer and leading to more efficient mechanical reinforcement. Herein, we present an overview of some recently published work on graphene mechanical properties and discuss a list of challenges that need to be overcome (notwithstanding the strong hype existing on this material) for the development of graphene-based materials into a successful technology. PMID:26960186

  13. Dynamic mechanical behavior of multilayer graphene via supersonic projectile penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Loya, Phillip E.; Lou, Jun; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2014-11-01

    Multilayer graphene is an exceptional anisotropic material due to its layered structure composed of two-dimensional carbon lattices. Although the intrinsic mechanical properties of graphene have been investigated at quasi-static conditions, its behavior under extreme dynamic conditions has not yet been studied. We report the high-strain-rate behavior of multilayer graphene over a range of thicknesses from 10 to 100 nanometers by using miniaturized ballistic tests. Tensile stretching of the membrane into a cone shape is followed by initiation of radial cracks that approximately follow crystallographic directions and extend outward well beyond the impact area. The specific penetration energy for multilayer graphene is ~10 times more than literature values for macroscopic steel sheets at 600 meters per second.

  14. Mechanical properties of hydrogenated electron-irradiated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Muniz, Andre R.; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    We report a systematic analysis on the effects of hydrogenation on the mechanical behavior of irradiated single-layer graphene sheets, including irradiation-induced amorphous graphene, based on molecular-dynamics simulations of uniaxial tensile straining tests and using an experimentally validated model of electron-irradiated graphene. We find that hydrogenation has a significant effect on the tensile strength of the irradiated sheets only if it changes the hybridization of the hydrogenated carbon atoms to sp3, causing a reduction in the strength of irradiation-induced amorphous graphene by ˜10 GPa. Hydrogenation also causes a substantial decrease in the failure strain of the defective sheets, regardless of the hybridization of the hydrogenated carbon atoms, and in their fracture toughness, which decreases with increasing hydrogenation for a given irradiation dose. We characterize in detail the fracture mechanisms of the hydrogenated irradiated graphene sheets and elucidate the role of hydrogen and the extent of hydrogenation in the deformation and fracture processes. Our study sets the stage for designing hydrogenation and other chemical functionalization strategies toward tailoring the properties of defect-engineered ductile graphene.

  15. Mechanisms of monovacancy diffusion in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadey, Jack D.; Markevich, Alexander; Robertson, Alex; Warner, Jamie; Kirkland, Angus; Besley, Elena

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive investigation of monovacancy diffusion in graphene has been carried out with the use of density functional theory and the climbing image nudged elastic band method. An out-of-plane spiro structure is found for the first-order saddle point, which defines the transition state in the vacancy diffusion pathway. The obtained activation energy for diffusion is significantly lower than the reported values for the in-plane saddle point structures. The time between consecutive vacancy jumps in graphene is estimated to be in the range of 100-200 s at room temperature in a good agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Thermal, mechanical and dielectric properties of poly(vinyl alcohol)/graphene oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, Sunil G.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Pujari, P. K.; Sheela, T.; Naik, Jagadish

    2014-04-01

    In this work the composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) doped with functionalized Graphene Oxide (GO) were prepared by solution casting method. The films were characterized using FT-IR, DSC, XRD, mechanical properties and dielectric studies at room temperature. FTIR spectra shows the formation of hydrogen bonds between hydroxyl groups of PVA and the hydroxy groups of GO. The DSC thermograms shows the addition of GO to PVA greatly improves the thermal stability of the composites. XRD patterns shows that the GO exfoliated and uniformly dispersed in PVA matrix. Mechanical properties are significantly improved in PVA/GO composites. The tensile strength increased from 8.2 to 13.7 MPa and the Young's modulus increased from 7.5 to 24.8 MPa for 5 wt% GO doped sample. Dielectric spectroscopy showed a highest dielectric constant for the 5 wt% GO doped PVA films. This work provides a potential design strategy on PVA/GO composite, which would lead to higher-performance, flexible dielectric materials, high charge-storage devices.

  17. Production of graphene oxide from pitch-based carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Jihoon; Park, Sung Young; Min, Byunggak; Kim, Bongsoo; in, Insik

    2015-07-01

    Pitch-based graphene oxide (p-GO) whose compositional/structural features are comparable to those of graphene oxide (GO) was firstly produced by chemical exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber rather than natural graphite. Incorporation of p-GO as nanofillers into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a matrix polymer resulted in excellent mechanical reinforcement. p-GO/PMMA nanocomposite (1 wt.-% p-GO) demonstrated 800% higher modulus of toughness of neat PMMA.

  18. Production of graphene oxide from pitch-based carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Jihoon; Park, Sung Young; Min, Byunggak; Kim, Bongsoo; In, Insik

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-based graphene oxide (p-GO) whose compositional/structural features are comparable to those of graphene oxide (GO) was firstly produced by chemical exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber rather than natural graphite. Incorporation of p-GO as nanofillers into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a matrix polymer resulted in excellent mechanical reinforcement. p-GO/PMMA nanocomposite (1 wt.-% p-GO) demonstrated 800% higher modulus of toughness of neat PMMA. PMID:26156067

  19. Ultrafine nickel oxide quantum dots enbedded with few-layer exfoliative graphene for an asymmetric supercapacitor: Enhanced capacitances by alternating voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Mingjun; Wang, Chiwei; Hou, Hongshuai; Wu, Zhibin; Zhu, Yirong; Yang, Yingchang; Jia, Xinnan; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    A green and one-step method of electrochemical alternating voltage has been utilized to form NiO quantum dots/graphene flakes (NiO-dots/Gh) for supercapacitor applications. NiO quantum dots (∼3 nm) are uniformly deposited on few-layer graphene surfaces by oxygen functional groups on graphene surface that is naturally utilized to bridge NiO and graphene through Ni-O-C bands, which exhibits outstanding specific capacitance 1181.1 F g-1 at a current density of 2.1 A g-1 and rate behavior 66.2% at 42 A g-1 as NiO dots can be fleetly wired up to current collector through the underlying graphene two-dimensional layers. The NiO-dots/Gh composite is further undertaken in asymmetric supercapacitors with high energy density (27.3 Wh kg-1 at 1562.6 W kg-1).

  20. Mechanical Property and Structure of Covalent Functionalised Graphene/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Naebe, Minoo; Wang, Jing; Amini, Abbas; Khayyam, Hamid; Hameed, Nishar; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Fox, Bronwyn

    2014-01-01

    Thermally reduced graphene nanoplatelets were covalently functionalised via Bingel reaction to improve their dispersion and interfacial bonding with an epoxy resin. Functionalised graphene were characterized by microscopic, thermal and spectroscopic techniques. Thermal analysis of functionalised graphene revealed a significantly higher thermal stability compared to graphene oxide. Inclusion of only 0.1 wt% of functionalised graphene in an epoxy resin showed 22% increase in flexural strength and 18% improvement in storage modulus. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites is due to the uniform dispersion of functionalised graphene and strong interfacial bonding between modified graphene and epoxy resin as confirmed by microscopy observations. PMID:24625497

  1. Coupling graphene mechanical resonators to superconducting microwave cavities.

    PubMed

    Weber, P; Güttinger, J; Tsioutsios, I; Chang, D E; Bachtold, A

    2014-05-14

    Graphene is an attractive material for nanomechanical devices because it allows for exceptional properties, such as high frequencies, quality factors, and low mass. An outstanding challenge, however, has been to obtain large coupling between the motion and external systems for efficient readout and manipulation. Here, we report on a novel approach, in which we capacitively couple a high-Q graphene mechanical resonator (Q ≈ 10(5)) to a superconducting microwave cavity. The initial devices exhibit a large single-photon coupling of ∼10 Hz. Remarkably, we can electrostatically change the graphene equilibrium position and thereby tune the single photon coupling, the mechanical resonance frequency, and the sign and magnitude of the observed Duffing nonlinearity. The strong tunability opens up new possibilities, such as the tuning of the optomechanical coupling strength on a time scale faster than the inverse of the cavity line width. With realistic improvements, it should be possible to enter the regime of quantum optomechanics. PMID:24745803

  2. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ming; Zeng, Anna; Zeng, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of monolayer graphene with different shapes have been studied using an efficient quantum mechanics molecular dynamics scheme based on a semi-empirical Hamiltonian (refereed as SCED-LCAO) [PRB 74, 15540; PHYSE 42, 1]. We have found the anisotropic nature of the membrane stress. The stresses along the armchair direction are slightly stronger than that along the zigzag direction, showing strong direction selectivity. The graphene with the rectangular shape could sustain strong load (i . e ., 20%) in both armchair and zigzag directions. The graphene with the rhombus shape show large difference in the strain direction: it will quickly crack after 18 % of strain in armchair the direction, but slowly destroyed after 20% in the zigzag direction. The obtained 2D Young's modulus at infinitesimal strain and the third-order (effective nonlinear) elastic modulus are in good consistent with the experimental observation.

  3. Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    Multigenerational graphene oxide architectures can be programmed by specific sequences of mechanical deformations. Each new deformation results in a progressively larger set of features decorated by smaller preexisting patterns, indicating a structural "memory." It is shown that these multiscale architectures are superhydrophobic and display excellent functionality as electrochemical electrodes. PMID:26996525

  4. Mechanical control over valley magnetotransport in strained graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Shengli; Liu, Daqing

    2016-05-01

    Recent experiments report that the graphene exhibits Landau levels (LLs) that form in the presence of a uniform strain pseudomagnetic field with magnitudes up to hundreds of tesla. We further reveal that the strain removes the valley degeneracy in LLs, and leads to a significant valley polarization with inversion symmetry broken. This accordingly gives rise to the well separated valley Hall plateaus and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. These effects are absent in strainless graphene, and can be used to generate and detect valley polarization by mechanical means, forming the basis for the new paradigm "valleytronics" applications.

  5. Strain variation in corrugated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanye; Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Christopher, Jason; Paiella, Roberto; Swan, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for analyzing strain in graphene. Recently there has been interest in making corrugated graphene devices with varying spatial wavelengths Λ for plasmonic and THz applications. Transferring graphene onto corrugated substrates introduces strain, which if there was perfect clamping (high fraction) would cause a periodic strain variation. However, the strain variation for pattern size smaller than the diffraction limit λ makes it hard to precisely model the strain distribution. Here we present a detailed study on how strain varies in corrugated graphene with sub-diffraction limit periodicity Λ < λ. Mechanically exfoliated graphene was deposited onto sinusoidal shape silicon dioxide gratings with Λ=400 nm period using the pick and place transfer technique. We observed that the graphene is not rigidly clamped, but partially slides to relieve the strain. We model the linewidth variation to extract the local strain variation as well as the sliding in the presence of charge puddling in graphene. The method gives us a better understanding on graphene slippage and strain distribution in graphene on a corrugated substrate with sub-diffraction limit spatial period.

  6. Fibrous nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes and graphene-oxide with synergetic mechanical and actuative performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ranran; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian; Xu, Chaohe; Zhang, Jing

    2011-08-14

    Fibrous nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes, graphene-oxide or graphene were prepared by a simple coagulation spinning technique exhibiting synergetic enhancement of mechanical strength, electronic conductivity and electrical actuation performance. PMID:21725531

  7. Graphene Topographies: Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    P.-Y. Chen, R. H. Hurt, I. Y. Wong and co-workers demonstrate a hierarchical graphene surface architecture generated by using various sequences and combinations of extreme mechanical deformation, as shown in the false-colored SEM image. As described on page 3564, the sequential patterning approach enables the design of feature sizes and orientations across multiple length scales which are retained during mechanical deformations of similar extent. This results in sequence-dependent surface topographies with structural memory. PMID:27151628

  8. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  9. Basal Plane Fluorination of Graphene by XeF2 via a Radical Cation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijun; Noffke, Benjamin W; Qiao, Xiaoxiao; Li, Qiqi; Gao, Xinfeng; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Li, Liang-shi

    2015-09-17

    Graphene fluorination with XeF2 is an attractive method to introduce a nonzero bandgap to graphene under mild conditions for potential electro-optical applications. Herein, we use well-defined graphene nanostructures as a model system to study the reaction mechanism of graphene fluorination by XeF2. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies show that the reaction can proceed through a radical cation mechanism, leading to fluorination and sp(3)-hybridized carbon in the basal plane.

  10. Mechanical strength of nanoporous graphene as a desalination membrane.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-11-12

    Recent advances in the development of nanoporous graphene (NPG) hold promise for the future of water supply by reverse osmosis (RO) desalination. But while previous studies have highlighted the potential of NPG as an RO membrane, there is less understanding as to whether NPG is strong enough to maintain its mechanical integrity under the high hydraulic pressures inherent to the RO desalination process. Here, we show that an NPG membrane can maintain its mechanical integrity in RO but that the choice of substrate for graphene is critical to this performance. Using molecular dynamics simulations and continuum fracture mechanics, we show that an appropriate substrate with openings smaller than 1 μm would allow NPG to withstand pressures exceeding 57 MPa (570 bar) or ten times more than typical pressures for seawater RO. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NPG membranes exhibit an unusual mechanical behavior in which greater porosity may help the membrane withstand even higher pressures.

  11. Promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The present article is a review of research works on promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures. It contains five main scientific subjects. The first one is the research on graphene-based transparent and flexible conductive films for displays and electrodes: efficient method ensuring uniform and controllable deposition of reduced graphene oxide thin films over large areas, large-scale pattern growth of graphene films for stretchble transparent electrodes, utilization of graphene-based transparent conducting films and graphene oxide-based ones in many photonic and optoelectronic devices and equipments such as the window electrodes of inorganic, organic and dye-sensitized solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, light-emitting electrochemical cells, touch screens, flexible smart windows, graphene-based saturated absorbers in laser cavities for ultrafast generations, graphene-based flexible, transparent heaters in automobile defogging/deicing systems, heatable smart windows, graphene electrodes for high-performance organic field-effect transistors, flexible and transparent acoustic actuators and nanogenerators etc. The second scientific subject is the research on conductive inks for printed electronics to revolutionize the electronic industry by producing cost-effective electronic circuits and sensors in very large quantities: preparing high mobility printable semiconductors, low sintering temperature conducting inks, graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in organic solutions, and developing inkjet printing technique for mass production of high-quality graphene patterns with high resolution and for fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin-film transistors and micro supercapacitors. The third scientific subject is the research on graphene-based separation membranes: molecular dynamics simulation study on the mechanisms of the transport of

  12. Graphene mechanics: II. Atomic stress distribution during indentation until rupture.

    PubMed

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    Previous Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments found single layers of defect-free graphene to rupture at unexpectedly high loads in the micronewton range. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled an AFM spherical tip pressing on a circular graphene sheet and studied the stress distribution during the indentation process until rupture. We found the graphene rupture force to have no dependency on the sheet size and a very weak dependency on the indenter velocity, allowing a direct comparison to experiment. The deformation showed a non-linear elastic behavior, with a two-dimensional elastic modulus in good agreement with previous experimental and computational studies. In line with theoretical predictions for linearly elastic sheets, rupture forces of non-linearly elastic graphene are proportional to the tip radius. However, as a deviation from the theory, the atomic stress concentrates under the indenter tip more strongly than predicted and causes a high probability of bond breaking only in this area. In turn, stress levels decrease rapidly towards the edge of the sheet, most of which thus only serves the role of mechanical support for the region under the indenter. As a consequence, the high ratio between graphene sheets and sphere radii, hitherto supposed to be necessary for reliable deformation and rupture studies, could be reduced to a factor of only 5-10 without affecting the outcome. Our study suggests time-resolved analysis of forces at the atomic level as a valuable tool to predict and interpret the nano-scale response of stressed materials beyond graphene.

  13. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  14. Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing Application of GRAPHENE/Y2O3 Quantum Dots Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemade, K. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    Graphene/Y2O3 quantum dots (QDs) composite was investigated towards the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas at room temperature. Graphene synthesized by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite. The composite prepared by mixing 20-wt% graphene into the 1 g Y2O3 in organic medium (acetone). The chemiresistor of composite prepared by screen-printing on glass substrate. The optimum value of sensing response (1.08) was showed by 20-wt% graphene/Y2O3 QDs composite. The excellent stability with optimum sensing response evidenced for the composite. The gas sensing mechanism discussed on the basis of electron transfer reaction.

  15. Fabrication of graphene field-effect transistor on top of ferroelectric single-crystal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nahee; Kang, Haeyong; Lee, Yourack; Kim, Jeong-Gyun; Kim, Joong-Gyu; Yun, Yoojoo; Park, Jeongmin; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Jung Ho; Jin, Youngjo; Shin, Yong Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    2015-03-01

    In the analysis of Graphene field-effect transistor, the substrate material which has the direct contact with Graphene layer plays an important in the device performance. In this presentation, we have tested PMN-PT(i.e.(1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3-xPbTiO3) substrate as a gate dielectric of Graphene field-effect transistor. Unlike the case of previously used substrates such as silicon oxide or hexagonal Boron-Nitride(h-BN), the PMN-PT substrate can induce giant amount of surface charge that is directly injected to the attached Graphene layer due to its ferroelectric property. And the hysteresis of polarization versus electric field of PMN-PT can cause the device to show the ferroelectric nonvolatile memory operation. We had successfully fabricated Graphene field-effect transistor using the mechanically exfoliated Graphene layer transferred on the PMN-PT(001) substrate. Unlike the case of mechanical exfoliation on the surface of silicon-oxide or the Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), the weak adhesion properties between graphene and PMNPT required the pretreatment on PMMA before the exfoliation process. The device performance is analyzed in terms of the effect of ferro- and piezo-electric effect of PMNPT substrate.

  16. Mechanism of strength reduction along the graphenization pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa, Antonio; Farbos, Baptiste; Aurel, Philippe; Vignoles, Gérard L.; Leyssale, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Even though polycrystalline graphene has shown a surprisingly high tensile strength, the influence of inherent grain boundaries on such property remains unclear. We study the fracture properties of a series of polycrystalline graphene models of increasing thermodynamic stability, as obtained from a long molecular dynamics simulation at an elevated temperature. All of the models show the typical and well-documented brittle fracture behavior of polycrystalline graphene; however, a clear decrease in all fracture properties is observed with increasing annealing time. The remarkably high fracture properties obtained for the most disordered (less annealed) structures arise from the formation of many nonpropagating prefracture cracks, significantly retarding failure. The stability of these reversible cracks is due to the nonlocal character of load transfer after a bond rupture in very disordered systems. It results in an insufficient strain level on neighboring bonds to promote fracture propagation. Although polycrystallinity seems to be an unavoidable feature of chemically synthesized graphenes, these results suggest that targeting highly disordered states might be a convenient way to obtain improved mechanical properties. PMID:26702443

  17. Epitaxial growth mechanisms of graphene and effects of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özçelik, V. Ongun; Cahangirov, S.; Ciraci, S.

    2012-06-01

    The growth process of single layer graphene with and without substrate is investigated using ab initio, finite temperature molecular dynamic calculations within density functional theory. An understanding of the epitaxial graphene growth mechanisms in the atomic level is provided by exploring the transient stages which occur at the growing edges of graphene. These stages are formation and collapse of large carbon rings together with the formation and healing of Stone-Wales like pentagon-heptagon defects. The activation barriers for the healing of these growth induced defects on various substrates are calculated using the climbing image nudge elastic band method and compared with that of the Stone-Wales defect. It is found that the healing of pentagon-heptagon defects occurring near the edge in the course of growth is much easier than that of Stone-Wales defect. The role of the substrate in the epitaxial growth and in the healing of defects are also investigated in detail, along with the effects of using carbon dimers as the building blocks of graphene growth.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  19. Exfoliated MoS2 Sheets and Reduced Graphene Oxide-An Excellent and Fast Anode for Sodium-ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Tuhin Subhra; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) MoS2 nanoflowers are successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. Further, a composite of as prepared MoS2 nanoflowers and rGO is constructed by simple ultrasonic exfoliation technique. The crystallography and morphological studies have been carried out by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, HR-TEM and EDS etc. Here, XRD study revealed, a composite of exfoliated MoS2 with expanded spacing of (002) crystal plane and rGO can be prepared by simple 40 minute of ultrasonic treatment. While, FE-SEM and TEM studies depict, individual MoS2 nanoflowers with an average diameter of 200 nm are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO surface. When tested as sodium-ion batteries anode material by applying two different potential windows, the composite demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity of 575 mAhg-1 at 100 mAg-1 in between 0.01 V-2.6 V and 218 mAhg-1 at 50 mAg-1 when discharged in a potential range of 0.4 V-2.6 V. As per our concern, the results are one of the best obtained as compared to the earlier published one on MoS2 based SIB anode material and more importantly this material shows such an excellent reversible Na-storage capacity and good cycling stability without addition of any expensive additive stabilizer, like fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), in comparison to those in current literature.

  20. Exfoliated MoS2 Sheets and Reduced Graphene Oxide-An Excellent and Fast Anode for Sodium-ion Battery

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Tuhin Subhra; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) MoS2 nanoflowers are successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. Further, a composite of as prepared MoS2 nanoflowers and rGO is constructed by simple ultrasonic exfoliation technique. The crystallography and morphological studies have been carried out by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, HR-TEM and EDS etc. Here, XRD study revealed, a composite of exfoliated MoS2 with expanded spacing of (002) crystal plane and rGO can be prepared by simple 40 minute of ultrasonic treatment. While, FE-SEM and TEM studies depict, individual MoS2 nanoflowers with an average diameter of 200 nm are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO surface. When tested as sodium-ion batteries anode material by applying two different potential windows, the composite demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity of 575 mAhg−1 at 100 mAg−1 in between 0.01 V–2.6 V and 218 mAhg−1 at 50 mAg−1 when discharged in a potential range of 0.4 V–2.6 V. As per our concern, the results are one of the best obtained as compared to the earlier published one on MoS2 based SIB anode material and more importantly this material shows such an excellent reversible Na-storage capacity and good cycling stability without addition of any expensive additive stabilizer, like fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), in comparison to those in current literature. PMID:26215284

  1. Exfoliated MoS2 Sheets and Reduced Graphene Oxide-An Excellent and Fast Anode for Sodium-ion Battery.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Tuhin Subhra; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-07-28

    Three dimensional (3D) MoS2 nanoflowers are successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method. Further, a composite of as prepared MoS2 nanoflowers and rGO is constructed by simple ultrasonic exfoliation technique. The crystallography and morphological studies have been carried out by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, HR-TEM and EDS etc. Here, XRD study revealed, a composite of exfoliated MoS2 with expanded spacing of (002) crystal plane and rGO can be prepared by simple 40 minute of ultrasonic treatment. While, FE-SEM and TEM studies depict, individual MoS2 nanoflowers with an average diameter of 200 nm are uniformly distributed throughout the rGO surface. When tested as sodium-ion batteries anode material by applying two different potential windows, the composite demonstrates a high reversible specific capacity of 575 mAhg(-1) at 100 mAg(-1) in between 0.01 V-2.6 V and 218 mAhg(-1) at 50 mAg(-1) when discharged in a potential range of 0.4 V-2.6 V. As per our concern, the results are one of the best obtained as compared to the earlier published one on MoS2 based SIB anode material and more importantly this material shows such an excellent reversible Na-storage capacity and good cycling stability without addition of any expensive additive stabilizer, like fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), in comparison to those in current literature.

  2. Promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-06-01

    The present article is a review of research works on promising applications of graphene and graphene-based nanostructures. It contains five main scientific subjects. The first one is the research on graphene-based transparent and flexible conductive films for displays and electrodes: efficient method ensuring uniform and controllable deposition of reduced graphene oxide thin films over large areas, large-scale pattern growth of graphene films for stretchble transparent electrodes, utilization of graphene-based transparent conducting films and graphene oxide-based ones in many photonic and optoelectronic devices and equipments such as the window electrodes of inorganic, organic and dye-sensitized solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, light-emitting electrochemical cells, touch screens, flexible smart windows, graphene-based saturated absorbers in laser cavities for ultrafast generations, graphene-based flexible, transparent heaters in automobile defogging/deicing systems, heatable smart windows, graphene electrodes for high-performance organic field-effect transistors, flexible and transparent acoustic actuators and nanogenerators etc. The second scientific subject is the research on conductive inks for printed electronics to revolutionize the electronic industry by producing cost-effective electronic circuits and sensors in very large quantities: preparing high mobility printable semiconductors, low sintering temperature conducting inks, graphene-based ink by liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in organic solutions, and developing inkjet printing technique for mass production of high-quality graphene patterns with high resolution and for fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin-film transistors and micro supercapacitors. The third scientific subject is the research on graphene-based separation membranes: molecular dynamics simulation study on the mechanisms of the transport of

  3. Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Activation as the Main Mechanisms Underlying Graphene Toxicity against Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jarosz, Anna; Skoda, Marta; Dudek, Ilona; Szukiewicz, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Due to the development of nanotechnology graphene and graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted the most attention owing to their unique physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Graphene can be applied in many fields among which biomedical applications especially diagnostics, cancer therapy, and drug delivery have been arousing a lot of interest. Therefore it is essential to understand better the graphene-cell interactions, especially toxicity and underlying mechanisms for proper use and development. This review presents the recent knowledge concerning graphene cytotoxicity and influence on different cancer cell lines. PMID:26649139

  4. Graphene- and graphene oxide- based multisensor arrays for selective gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Varezhnikov, Alexey; Sysoev, Victor; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Arrays of nearly identical graphene devices on Si/SiO2 exhibit a substantial device-to-device variation, even in case of a high-quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or mechanically exfoliated graphene. We propose that such device-to-device variation could provide a platform for highly selective multisensor electronic olfactory systems. We fabricated a multielectode array of CVD graphene devices on a Si/SiO2 substrate, and demonstrated that the diversity of these devices is sufficient to reliably discriminate different short-chain alcohols: methanol, ethanol and isopropanol. The diversity of graphene devices on Si/SiO2 could possibly be used to construct multisensor systems trained to recognize other analytes as well. Similar multisensory arrays based on graphene oxide (GO) devices are also capable of discriminating these short-chain alcohols. We will discuss the possibility of chemical modification of GO for further increase the selectivity of GO multisensory arrays.

  5. Oxygen Intercalation of Graphene on Transition Metal Substrate: An Edge-Limited Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, Jinlan

    2015-10-15

    Oxygen intercalation has been proven to be an efficient experimental approach to decouple chemical vapor deposition grown graphene from metal substrate with mild damage, thereby enabling graphene transfer. However, the mechanism of oxygen intercalation and associated rate-limiting step are still unclear on the molecular level. Here, by using density functional theory, we evaluate the thermodynamics stability of graphene edge on transition metal surface in the context of oxygen and explore various reaction pathways and energy barriers, from which we can identify the key steps as well as the roles of metal passivated graphene edges during the oxygen intercalation. Our calculations suggest that in well-controlled experimental conditions, oxygen atoms can be easily intercalated through either zigzag or armchair graphene edges on metal surface, whereas the unwanted graphene oxidation etching can be suppressed. Oxygen intercalation is, thus, an efficient and low-damage way to decouple graphene from a metal substrate while it allows reusing metal substrate for graphene growth.

  6. Fragmentation and exfoliation of 2-dimensional materials: a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Kouroupis-Agalou, Konstantinos; Liscio, Andrea; Treossi, Emanuele; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Pugno, Nicola Maria; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The main advantage for applications of graphene and related 2D materials is that they can be produced on large scales by liquid phase exfoliation. The exfoliation process shall be considered as a particular fragmentation process, where the 2D character of the exfoliated objects will influence significantly fragmentation dynamics as compared to standard materials. Here, we used automatized image processing of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data to measure, one by one, the exact shape and size of thousands of nanosheets obtained by exfoliation of an important 2D-material, boron nitride, and used different statistical functions to model the asymmetric distribution of nanosheet sizes typically obtained. Being the resolution of AFM much larger than the average sheet size, analysis could be performed directly at the nanoscale and at the single sheet level. We find that the size distribution of the sheets at a given time follows a log-normal distribution, indicating that the exfoliation process has a "typical" scale length that changes with time and that exfoliation proceeds through the formation of a distribution of random cracks that follow Poisson statistics. The validity of this model implies that the size distribution does not depend on the different preparation methods used, but is a common feature in the exfoliation of this material and thus probably for other 2D materials.

  7. Preparation of bacterial cellulose/graphene nanosheets composite films with enhanced mechanical performances.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Hui; Wu, Jimin; Zhang, Rui; Min, Huihua; Huang, Min

    2016-03-15

    Graphene has been considered to be a promising nanofiller material for building polymeric nanocomposites because it has large specific surface area and unique mechanical property. In the study, BC/graphene composites were prepared by a simple blending method. The resulting structure and thermal stability of the composites were investigated by several techniques including TEM, SEM, XRD, TG and Raman spectrum. These results indicate graphene nanosheets were successfully impregnated and uniformly dispersed in the BC matrix. Water contact angles result showed that the addition of graphene decreased hydrophilic property since water contact angle of BC increased from 51.2° to 84.3° with 4wt% graphene added. The mechanical performances of BC/graphene composites were highly evaluated. When compared to pristine BC, the incorporation of 4wt% graphene improved the tensile strength from 96MPa to 155MPa and Young's modulus from 369MPa to 530MPa, respectively.

  8. Preparation of bacterial cellulose/graphene nanosheets composite films with enhanced mechanical performances.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Hui; Wu, Jimin; Zhang, Rui; Min, Huihua; Huang, Min

    2016-03-15

    Graphene has been considered to be a promising nanofiller material for building polymeric nanocomposites because it has large specific surface area and unique mechanical property. In the study, BC/graphene composites were prepared by a simple blending method. The resulting structure and thermal stability of the composites were investigated by several techniques including TEM, SEM, XRD, TG and Raman spectrum. These results indicate graphene nanosheets were successfully impregnated and uniformly dispersed in the BC matrix. Water contact angles result showed that the addition of graphene decreased hydrophilic property since water contact angle of BC increased from 51.2° to 84.3° with 4wt% graphene added. The mechanical performances of BC/graphene composites were highly evaluated. When compared to pristine BC, the incorporation of 4wt% graphene improved the tensile strength from 96MPa to 155MPa and Young's modulus from 369MPa to 530MPa, respectively. PMID:26794749

  9. Anomalous Enhancement of Mechanical Properties in the Ammonia Adsorbed Defective Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fengxian; Jiao, Yalong; Gu, Yuantong; Bilic, Ante; Chen, Ying; Chen, Zhongfang; Du, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    Pure graphene is known as the strongest material ever discovered. However, the unavoidable defect formation in the fabrication process renders the strength of defective graphene much lower (~14%) than that of its perfect counterpart. By means of density functional theory computations, we systematically explored the effect of gas molecules (H2, N2, NH3, CO, CO2 and O2) adsorption on the mechanical strength of perfect/defective graphene. The NH3 molecule is found to play a dominant role in enhancing the strength of defective graphene by up to ~15.6%, while other gas molecules decrease the strength of graphene with varying degrees. The remarkable strength enhancement can be interpreted by the decomposition of NH3, which saturates the dangling bond and leads to charge redistribution at the defect site. The present work provides basic information for the mechanical failure of gas-adsorbed graphene and guidance for manufacturing graphene-based electromechanical devices. PMID:27667709

  10. Enhancement mechanisms of graphene in nano-58S bioactive glass scaffold: mechanical and biological performance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chengde; Liu, Tingting; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is a novel material and currently popular as an enabler for the next-generation nanocomposites. Here, we report the use of graphene to improve the mechanical properties of nano-58S bioactive glass for bone repair and regeneration. And the composite scaffolds were fabricated by a homemade selective laser sintering system. Qualitative and quantitative analysis demonstrated the successful incorporation of graphene into the scaffold without obvious structural damage and weight loss. The optimum compressive strength and fracture toughness reached 48.65 ± 3.19 MPa and 1.94 ± 0.10 MPa·m1/2 with graphene content of 0.5 wt%, indicating significant improvements by 105% and 38% respectively. The mechanisms of pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection and crack tip shielding were found to be responsible for the mechanical enhancement. Simulated body fluid and cell culture tests indicated favorable bioactivity and biocompatibility of the composite scaffold. The results suggest a great potential of graphene/nano-58S composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:24736662

  11. Thermal conduction in graphene and graphene multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suchismita

    There has been increasing interest in thermal conductivity of materials motivated by the heat removal issues in electronics and by the need of fundamental science to understand heat conduction at nanoscale [1, 2, 3]. This dissertation reports the results of the experimental investigation of heat conduction in graphene and graphene multilayers. Graphene is a planar single sheet of sp2-bonded carbon atoms arranged in honeycomb lattice. It reveals many unique properties, including the extraordinarily high carrier mobility. In order to measure the thermal conductivity of graphene we developed an original non-contact technique based on micro-Raman spectroscopy. The samples for this study were prepared by mechanical exfoliation and suspended across trenches in Si/SiO2 substrates. The number of atomic planes was determined by deconvolution of the Raman 2D band. The suspended graphene flakes attached to the heat sinks were heated by the laser light focused in the middle. The Raman G peak's temperature sensitivity allowed us to monitor the local temperature change produced by the variation of the excitation laser power. A special calibration procedure was developed to determine the fraction of power absorbed by graphene. Our measurements revealed that single-layer graphene has an extremely high room-temperature thermal conductivity in the range 3800-5300 W/mK depending on the flake size and quality. It was also found that most of the heat near room temperature is transferred by acoustic phonons rather than electrons. Theoretical studies of the phonon thermal conduction in graphene, which included detail treatment of the Umklapp scattering, are in agreement with our experiments. The measurements were also extended to few-layer graphene. It was shown that the thermal conductivity reduces with the increasing number of layers approaching the bulk graphite limit. To validate the measurement technique we investigated the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline graphene films

  12. Pressure dependence of quality factors of graphene nano-mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksaran, M. Hadi; Yanik, Cenk; Karakan, M. Cagatay; Ari, Atakan Bekir; Hanay, M. Selim; Kaya, Ismet I.

    In recent few years, low mass density and high stiffness of graphene has drawn attention for developing high frequency mechanical resonators with high quality factor at the same time. As a single-atom thick material, graphene has many desirable properties for high-frequency sensor applications compared to top-down nano-mechanical resonators . In this work we address the energy dissipation in graphene resonators due to viscous damping. We experimentally measure the pressure dependence of the quality factor of a graphene nano-mechanical resonator to understand its interaction with fluids at high frequencies. This work is supprted by TUBITAK under Grant Number 112T990.

  13. Two-dimensional Clay and Graphene Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites and Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuqiang

    Clay and graphene nanosheets are attractive to materials scientists due to their unique structural and physical properties and potentially low cost. This thesis focuses on the surface modification and structure design of clay and graphene nanosheets, targeting special requirements in polymer nanocomposites and energy storage applications. The high aspect ratio and stiffness of clay and graphene nanosheets make them promising candidates to reinforce polymers. However, it is challenging to achieve a good dispersion of the nanosheets in a polymer matrix. It is demonstrated in this study that organic modifications of clay and graphene nanosheets lead to better filler dispersion in polymer matrices. A prepolymer route was developed to achieve clay exfoliation in a polyurethane-vermiculite system. However, the phase-separated structure of the polyurethane matrix was disrupted. Intragallery catalysis was adopted to promote the clay exfoliation during polymerization. With both catalytic and reactive groups on the clay modifier, the polyurethane-vermiculite nanocomposites showed a significant increase in modulus and improved barrier performance, compared to neat polyurethane. The toughening effect of graphene on thermosetting epoxies and unsaturated polyesters (UPs) was also investigated. Various types of graphene with different structures and surface functionalities were incorporated into the thermosetting resin by in situ polymerization. The toughening effect was observed for epoxy nanocomposites at loading levels of less than 0.1 wt%, and a peak of fracture toughness was observed at 0.02 or 0.04 wt% of graphene loadings for all epoxy-graphene systems. A microcrack-crazing mechanism was proposed to explain the fracture behavior of epoxy-graphene systems based on fractography observations. Similar peak behavior of fracture toughness was not observed in UP system. UP nanocomposites with modified graphene oxide showed better mechanical performance than those with unmodified

  14. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications.

  15. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications. PMID:26797529

  16. Surface Tension Components Based Selection of Cosolvents for Efficient Liquid Phase Exfoliation of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianfeng; Wu, Jingjie; Wang, Man; Dong, Pei; Xu, Jingxuan; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Junhua; Wang, Xifan; Ye, Mingxin; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-05-01

    A proper design of direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) for 2D materials as graphene, MoS2 , WS2 , h-BN, Bi2 Se3 , MoSe2 , SnS2 , and TaS2 with common cosolvents is carried out based on considering the polar and dispersive components of surface tensions of various cosolvents and 2D materials. It has been found that the exfoliation efficiency is enhanced by matching the ratio of surface tension components of cosolvents to that of the targeted 2D materials, based on which common cosolvents composed of IPA/water, THF/water, and acetone/water can be designed for sufficient LPE process. In this context, the library of low-toxic and low-cost solvents with low boiling points for LPE is infinitely enlarged when extending to common cosolvents. Polymer-based composites reinforced with a series of different 2D materials are compared with each other. It is demonstrated that the incorporation of cosolvents-exfoliated 2D materials can substantially improve the mechanical and thermal properties of polymer matrices. Typically, with the addition of 0.5 wt% of such 2D material as MoS2 nanosheets, the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased up to 74.85% and 136.97%, respectively. The different enhancement effect of 2D materials is corresponded to the intrinsic properties and LPE capacity of 2D materials. PMID:27059403

  17. Surface Tension Components Based Selection of Cosolvents for Efficient Liquid Phase Exfoliation of 2D Materials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianfeng; Wu, Jingjie; Wang, Man; Dong, Pei; Xu, Jingxuan; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Junhua; Wang, Xifan; Ye, Mingxin; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-05-01

    A proper design of direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) for 2D materials as graphene, MoS2 , WS2 , h-BN, Bi2 Se3 , MoSe2 , SnS2 , and TaS2 with common cosolvents is carried out based on considering the polar and dispersive components of surface tensions of various cosolvents and 2D materials. It has been found that the exfoliation efficiency is enhanced by matching the ratio of surface tension components of cosolvents to that of the targeted 2D materials, based on which common cosolvents composed of IPA/water, THF/water, and acetone/water can be designed for sufficient LPE process. In this context, the library of low-toxic and low-cost solvents with low boiling points for LPE is infinitely enlarged when extending to common cosolvents. Polymer-based composites reinforced with a series of different 2D materials are compared with each other. It is demonstrated that the incorporation of cosolvents-exfoliated 2D materials can substantially improve the mechanical and thermal properties of polymer matrices. Typically, with the addition of 0.5 wt% of such 2D material as MoS2 nanosheets, the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased up to 74.85% and 136.97%, respectively. The different enhancement effect of 2D materials is corresponded to the intrinsic properties and LPE capacity of 2D materials.

  18. Exfoliation corrosion susceptibility and mechanisms of Al -- Li 2060 T8E30 aluminum lithium alloy in acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayan, Ahmad Ivan

    The Al - Li 2060 aluminum lithium alloy was first launched in 2011. This alloy is a potential candidate for the use at wing/fuselage forgings, lower wing, and fuselage/pressure cabin. However, since its first launching, the corrosion properties of this alloy has not been extensively explored. There are three common laboratory tests for assessing the exfoliation corrosion (EFC) susceptibility of aluminum alloy 2XXX, namely EFC test in EXCO, modified EXCO and MASTMAASIS media. The objectives of this work is to study the susceptibility and mecahnism of corrosion of this alloy in EXCO, modified EXCO and MATSMAASIS media. These three media are acid. In the EXCO solution, this alloy suffers EFC after a 96-hour EFC test. The pH dramatically increases in the first 11 hours from 0.25 to 0.30. The pH then slightly increases and tends to remain constant at pH of 3.45 after 96 hours. The cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) test results show the presence of negative hysteresis and one breakdwon potential. This negative hysteresis suggests the absence of pitting corrosion due to the breakdown of passive film. The potentiostatic tests at potentials below and above the breakdown potential show an abrupt increase in potential in the first minutes and the presence of current transients. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examination confirms that the Al 20Cu2Mn3 particles preferentially dissolve, leaving the pitting after a potentiostatic test below the breakdown potential. From the potentiostatic test at a potential above the breakdown potential and an SEM examination after this potentiostatic test, intergranular corrosion (IGC) was observed. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test and mathematical modeling indicates that the adsorption of intermediates in reduction of hydrogen ions is dominant in the first hours of immersion. The two time constants are observed when EFC occurs. The video capture microscopy

  19. Stamp transferred suspended graphene mechanical resonators for radio frequency electrical readout.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuefeng; Oksanen, Mika; Sillanpää, Mika A; Craighead, H G; Parpia, J M; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2012-01-11

    We present a simple micromanipulation technique to transfer suspended graphene flakes onto any substrate and to assemble them with small localized gates into mechanical resonators. The mechanical motion of the graphene is detected using an electrical, radio frequency (RF) reflection readout scheme where the time-varying graphene capacitor reflects a RF carrier at f = 5-6 GHz producing modulation sidebands at f ± f(m). A mechanical resonance frequency up to f(m) = 178 MHz is demonstrated. We find both hardening/softening Duffing effects on different samples and obtain a critical amplitude of ~40 pm for the onset of nonlinearity in graphene mechanical resonators. Measurements of the quality factor of the mechanical resonance as a function of dc bias voltage V(dc) indicates that dissipation due to motion-induced displacement currents in graphene electrode is important at high frequencies and large V(dc). PMID:22141577

  20. Graphene mechanics: I. Efficient first principles based Morse potential.

    PubMed

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Baldus, Ilona B; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    We present a computationally efficient pairwise potential for use in molecular dynamics simulations of large graphene or carbon nanotube systems, in particular, for those under mechanical deformation, and also for mixed systems including biomolecules. Based on the Morse potential, it is only slightly more complex and computationally expensive than a harmonic bond potential, allowing such large or mixed simulations to reach experimentally relevant time scales. By fitting to data obtained from quantum mechanics (QM) calculations to represent bond breaking in graphene patches, we obtain a dissociation energy of 805 kJ mol(-1) which reflects the steepness of the QM potential up to the inflection point. A distinctive feature of our potential is its truncation at the inflection point, allowing a realistic treatment of ruptured C-C bonds without relying on a bond order model. The results obtained from equilibrium MD simulations using our potential compare favorably with results obtained from experiments and from similar simulations with more complex and computationally expensive potentials.

  1. Preparation and mechanical properties of graphene oxide: cement nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Babak, Fakhim; Abolfazl, Hassani; Alimorad, Rashidi; Parviz, Ghodousi

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the performance of graphene oxide (GO) in improving mechanical properties of cement composites. A polycarboxylate superplasticizer was used to improve the dispersion of GO flakes in the cement. The mechanical strength of graphene-cement nanocomposites containing 0.1-2 wt% GO and 0.5 wt% superplasticizer was measured and compared with that of cement prepared without GO. We found that the tensile strength of the cement mortar increased with GO content, reaching 1.5%, a 48% increase in tensile strength. Ultra high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) used to observe the fracture surface of samples containing 1.5 wt% GO indicated that the nano-GO flakes were well dispersed in the matrix, and no aggregates were observed. FE-SEM observation also revealed good bonding between the GO surfaces and the surrounding cement matrix. In addition, XRD diffraction data showed growth of the calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) gels in GO cement mortar compared with the normal cement mortar.

  2. Preparation and Mechanical Properties of Graphene Oxide: Cement Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Babak, Fakhim; Abolfazl, Hassani; Alimorad, Rashidi; Parviz, Ghodousi

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the performance of graphene oxide (GO) in improving mechanical properties of cement composites. A polycarboxylate superplasticizer was used to improve the dispersion of GO flakes in the cement. The mechanical strength of graphene-cement nanocomposites containing 0.1–2 wt% GO and 0.5 wt% superplasticizer was measured and compared with that of cement prepared without GO. We found that the tensile strength of the cement mortar increased with GO content, reaching 1.5%, a 48% increase in tensile strength. Ultra high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) used to observe the fracture surface of samples containing 1.5 wt% GO indicated that the nano-GO flakes were well dispersed in the matrix, and no aggregates were observed. FE-SEM observation also revealed good bonding between the GO surfaces and the surrounding cement matrix. In addition, XRD diffraction data showed growth of the calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) gels in GO cement mortar compared with the normal cement mortar. PMID:24574878

  3. Strong and electrically conductive graphene-based composite fibers and laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Polyzos, Georgios; Cooper, Ryan C.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-04-28

    In this study, graphene is an ideal candidate for lightweight, high-strength composite materials given its superior mechanical properties (specific strength of 130 GPa and stiffness of 1 TPa). To date, easily scalable graphene-like materials in a form of separated flakes (exfoliated graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide) have been investigated as candidates for large-scale applications such as material reinforcement. These graphene-like materials do not fully exhibit all the capabilities of graphene in composite materials. In this study, we show that macro (2 inch × 2 inch) graphene laminates and fibers can be produced using large continuous sheets of single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The resulting composite structures have potential to outperform the current state-of-the-art composite materials in both mechanical properties and electrical conductivities (>8 S/cm with only 0.13% volumetric graphene loading and 5 × 103 S/cm for pure graphene fibers) with estimated graphene contributions of >10 GPa in strength and 1 TPa in stiffness.

  4. Strong and electrically conductive graphene-based composite fibers and laminates

    DOE PAGES

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Polyzos, Georgios; Cooper, Ryan C.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Paulauskas, Felix L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-04-28

    In this study, graphene is an ideal candidate for lightweight, high-strength composite materials given its superior mechanical properties (specific strength of 130 GPa and stiffness of 1 TPa). To date, easily scalable graphene-like materials in a form of separated flakes (exfoliated graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide) have been investigated as candidates for large-scale applications such as material reinforcement. These graphene-like materials do not fully exhibit all the capabilities of graphene in composite materials. In this study, we show that macro (2 inch × 2 inch) graphene laminates and fibers can be produced using large continuous sheets of single-layermore » graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The resulting composite structures have potential to outperform the current state-of-the-art composite materials in both mechanical properties and electrical conductivities (>8 S/cm with only 0.13% volumetric graphene loading and 5 × 103 S/cm for pure graphene fibers) with estimated graphene contributions of >10 GPa in strength and 1 TPa in stiffness.« less

  5. Selective mechanical transfer of graphene from seed copper foil using rate effects.

    PubMed

    Na, Seung Ryul; Suk, Ji Won; Tao, Li; Akinwande, Deji; Ruoff, Rodney S; Huang, Rui; Liechti, Kenneth M

    2015-02-24

    A very fast, dry transfer process based on mechanical delamination successfully effected the transfer of large-area, CVD grown graphene on copper foil to silicon. This has been achieved by bonding silicon backing layers to both sides of the graphene-coated copper foil with epoxy and applying a suitably high separation rate to the backing layers. At the highest separation rate considered (254.0 μm/s), monolayer graphene was completely transferred from the copper foil to the target silicon substrate. On the other hand, the lowest rate (25.4 μm/s) caused the epoxy to be completely separated from the graphene. Fracture mechanics analyses were used to determine the adhesion energy between graphene and its seed copper foil (6.0 J/m(2)) and between graphene and the epoxy (3.4 J/m(2)) at the respective loading rates. Control experiments for the epoxy/silicon interface established a rate dependent adhesion, which supports the hypothesis that the adhesion of the graphene/epoxy interface was higher than that of the graphene/copper interface at the higher separation rate, thereby providing a controllable mechanism for selective transfer of graphene in future nanofabrication systems such as roll-to-roll transfer.

  6. Enhanced mechanical, thermal and antimicrobial properties of poly(vinyl alcohol)/graphene oxide/starch/silver nanocomposites films.

    PubMed

    Usman, Adil; Hussain, Zakir; Riaz, Asim; Khan, Ahmad Nawaz

    2016-11-20

    In the present work, synthesis of poly(vinyl alcohol)/graphene oxide/starch/silver (PVA/GO/Starch/Ag) nanocomposites films is reported. Such films have been characterized and investigated for their mechanical, thermal and antimicrobial properties. The exfoliation of GO in the PVA matrix occurs owing to the non-covalent interactions of the polymer chains of PVA and hydrophilic surface of the GO layers. Presence of GO in PVA and PVA/starch blends were found to enhance the tensile strength of the nanocomposites system. It was found that the thermal stability of PVA as well as PVA/starch blend systems increased by the incorporation of GO where strong physical bonding between GO layers and PVA/starch blends is assumed to cause thermal barrier effects. Antimicrobial properties of the prepared films were investigated against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our results show enhanced antimicrobial properties of the prepared films where PVA-GO, PVA-Ag, PVA-GO-Ag and PVA-GO-Ag-Starch showed antimicrobial activity in ascending order. PMID:27561532

  7. Photoluminescence from chemically exfoliated MoS2.

    PubMed

    Eda, Goki; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Voiry, Damien; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Chhowalla, Manish

    2011-12-14

    A two-dimensional crystal of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer is a photoluminescent direct gap semiconductor in striking contrast to its bulk counterpart. Exfoliation of bulk MoS2 via Li intercalation is an attractive route to large-scale synthesis of monolayer crystals. However, this method results in loss of pristine semiconducting properties of MoS2 due to structural changes that occur during Li intercalation. Here, we report structural and electronic properties of chemically exfoliated MoS2. The metastable metallic phase that emerges from Li intercalation was found to dominate the properties of as-exfoliated material, but mild annealing leads to gradual restoration of the semiconducting phase. Above an annealing temperature of 300 °C, chemically exfoliated MoS2 exhibit prominent band gap photoluminescence, similar to mechanically exfoliated monolayers, indicating that their semiconducting properties are largely restored.

  8. Crumpling deformation regimes of monolayer graphene on substrate: a molecular mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulla, Talal; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-09-01

    Experiments and simulations demonstrating reversible and repeatable crumpling of graphene warrant a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms of graphene crumple formation, especially for design of tailored nanostructures. To systematically study the formation of crumples in graphene, we use a simple molecular dynamics model, and perform a series of simulations to characterize the finite number of deformation regimes of graphene on substrate after compression. We formulate a quantitative measure of predicting these deformations based on observed results of the simulations and distinguish graphene crumpling considered in this study from others. In our study, graphene is placed on a model substrate while controlling and varying the interfacial energy between graphene and substrate and the substrate roughness through a set of particles embedded in the substrate. We find that a critical value of interfacial adhesion energy marks a transition point that separates two deformation regimes of graphene on substrate under uniaxial compression. The interface between graphene and substrate plays a major role in the formation of crumples, and we show that the choice of substrate can help in designing desired topologies in graphene. PMID:26252422

  9. Mechanically Self-Assembled, Three-Dimensional Graphene-Gold Hybrid Nanostructures for Advanced Nanoplasmonic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Leem, Juyoung; Wang, Michael Cai; Kang, Pilgyu; Nam, SungWoo

    2015-11-11

    Hybrid structures of graphene and metal nanoparticles (NPs) have been actively investigated as higher quality surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. Compared with SERS substrates, which only contain metal NPs, the additional graphene layer provides structural, chemical, and optical advantages. However, the two-dimensional (2D) nature of graphene limits the fabrication of the hybrid structure of graphene and NPs to 2D. Introducing three-dimensionality to the hybrid structure would allow higher detection sensitivity of target analytes by utilizing the three-dimensional (3D) focal volume. Here, we report a mechanical self-assembly strategy to enable a new class of 3D crumpled graphene-gold (Au) NPs hybrid nanoplasmonic structures for SERS applications. We achieve a 3D crumpled graphene-Au NPs hybrid structure by the delamination and buckling of graphene on a thermally activated, shrinking polymer substrate. We also show the precise control and optimization of the size and spacing of integrated Au NPs on crumpled graphene and demonstrate the optimized NPs' size and spacing for higher SERS enhancement. The 3D crumpled graphene-Au NPs exhibits at least 1 order of magnitude higher SERS detection sensitivity than that of conventional, flat graphene-Au NPs. The hybrid structure is further adapted to arbitrary curvilinear structures for advanced, in situ, nonconventional, nanoplasmonic sensing applications. We believe that our approach shows a promising material platform for universally adaptable SERS substrate with high sensitivity.

  10. The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-10-01

    Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

  11. The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes

    SciTech Connect

    Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-10-21

    Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

  12. Graphene field effect transistors with niobium contacts and asymmetric transfer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bartolomeo, Antonio Di; Giubileo, Filippo; Romeo, Francesco; Sabatino, Paolo; Carapella, Giovanni; Iemmo, Laura; Schroeder, Thomas; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2015-11-27

    We fabricate back-gated field effect transistors using niobium electrodes on mechanically exfoliated monolayer graphene and perform electrical characterization in the pressure range from atmospheric down to 10(-4) mbar. We study the effect of room temperature vacuum degassing and report asymmetric transfer characteristics with a resistance plateau in the n-branch. We show that weakly chemisorbed Nb acts as p-dopant on graphene and explain the transistor characteristics by Nb/graphene interaction with unpinned Fermi level at the interface. PMID:26535591

  13. Fragmentation and exfoliation of 2-dimensional materials: a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroupis-Agalou, Konstantinos; Liscio, Andrea; Treossi, Emanuele; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Pugno, Nicola Maria; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    The main advantage for applications of graphene and related 2D materials is that they can be produced on large scales by liquid phase exfoliation. The exfoliation process shall be considered as a particular fragmentation process, where the 2D character of the exfoliated objects will influence significantly fragmentation dynamics as compared to standard materials. Here, we used automatized image processing of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data to measure, one by one, the exact shape and size of thousands of nanosheets obtained by exfoliation of an important 2D-material, boron nitride, and used different statistical functions to model the asymmetric distribution of nanosheet sizes typically obtained. Being the resolution of AFM much larger than the average sheet size, analysis could be performed directly at the nanoscale and at the single sheet level. We find that the size distribution of the sheets at a given time follows a log-normal distribution, indicating that the exfoliation process has a ``typical'' scale length that changes with time and that exfoliation proceeds through the formation of a distribution of random cracks that follow Poisson statistics. The validity of this model implies that the size distribution does not depend on the different preparation methods used, but is a common feature in the exfoliation of this material and thus probably for other 2D materials.The main advantage for applications of graphene and related 2D materials is that they can be produced on large scales by liquid phase exfoliation. The exfoliation process shall be considered as a particular fragmentation process, where the 2D character of the exfoliated objects will influence significantly fragmentation dynamics as compared to standard materials. Here, we used automatized image processing of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data to measure, one by one, the exact shape and size of thousands of nanosheets obtained by exfoliation of an important 2D-material, boron nitride, and used

  14. The influence of tilt grain boundaries on the mechanical properties of bicrystalline graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Na; Guo, Jian-Gang; Cui, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical properties of bicrystalline graphene nanoribbons with various tilt grain boundaries (GBs) which typically consist of repeating pentagon-heptagon ring defects are investigated based on the method of molecular structural mechanics. The GB models are constructed via the theory of disclinations in crystals, and the elastic properties and ultimate strength of bicrystalline graphene nanoribbons are calculated under uniaxial tensile loads in perpendicular and parallel directions to grain boundaries. The dependence of mechanical properties is analyzed on the chirality and misorientation angles of graphene nanoribbons, and the experimental phenomena that Young's modulus and ultimate strength of bicrystalline graphene nanoribbons can either increase or decrease with the grain boundary angles are further verified and discussed. In addition, the influence of GB on the size effects of graphene Young's modulus is also analyzed.

  15. Graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites decorated with quantum tunneling junctions: preparation strategies, microstructures and formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxiu; Wu, Xianzheng; Wang, Lijun; Chen, Zhiwen; Wang, Shilong

    2014-09-28

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) and graphene are versatile materials that are vitally important for creating new functional and smart materials. A facile, simple and efficient ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal synthesis approach has been developed to prepare graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites (GSNCs), including three samples with graphene/Sn weight ratios = 1 : 2 (GSNC-2), 1 : 1 (GSNC-1), and graphene oxide/Sn weight ratio = 1 : 1 (GOSNC-1). Low-magnification electron microscopy analysis indicated that graphene was exfoliated and adorned with SnO2 nanoparticles, which were dispersed uniformly on both the sides of the graphene nanosheets. High-magnification electron microscopy analysis confirmed that the graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites presented network tunneling frameworks, which were decorated with the SnO2 quantum tunneling junctions. The size distribution of SnO2 nanoparticles was estimated to range from 3 to 5.5 nm. Comparing GSNC-2, GSNC-1, and GOSNC-1, GOSNC-1 was found to exhibit a significantly better the homogeneous distribution and a considerably smaller size distribution of SnO2 nanoparticles, which indicated that it was better to use graphene oxide as a supporting material and SnCl4·5H2O as a precursor to synthesize hybrid graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites. Experimental results suggest that the graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites with interesting SnO2 quantum tunneling junctions may be a promising material to facilitate the improvement of the future design of micro/nanodevices.

  16. Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Graphene (Reduced Graphene Oxide)/Aluminum Composites with a Bioinspired Nanolaminated Structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zan; Guo, Qiang; Li, Zhiqiang; Fan, Genlian; Xiong, Ding-Bang; Su, Yishi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Di

    2015-12-01

    Bulk graphene (reduced graphene oxide)-reinforced Al matrix composites with a bioinspired nanolaminated microstructure were fabricated via a composite powder assembly approach. Compared with the unreinforced Al matrix, these composites were shown to possess significantly improved stiffness and tensile strength, and a similar or even slightly higher total elongation. These observations were interpreted by the facilitated load transfer between graphene and the Al matrix, and the extrinsic toughening effect as a result of the nanolaminated microstructure. PMID:26574873

  17. Strong coupling and parametric amplification in mechanical modes of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, John; Patel, Raj; Borah, Abhinandan; Vijayaraghavan, Rajamani; Deshmukh, Mandar

    We demonstrate strong dynamical coupling and parametric amplification in mechanical modes of a graphene drum using an all electrical configuration. Low tension in the system allows large electrostatic tunability of the modes thus enabling dynamic pumping experiments. In the strong coupling regime a red detuned pump gives rise to new eigenmodes having highly tunable mode splitting (cooperativity ~60) with coherent energy transfer. The coupling is also used to amplify the modes under the action of a blue detuned pump. In addition, self-oscillations and parametric amplification of the fundamental vibrational mode is demonstrated with a gain of nearly 3. The low mass and high frequency of these atomically thin resonators could prove useful for studying mode coupling in the quantum regime.

  18. The effect of intrinsic crumpling on the mechanics of free-standing graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Nicholl, Ryan J. T.; Conley, Hiram J.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Sreenivas, Vijayashree Parsi; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Bolotin, Kirill I.

    2015-11-06

    Free-standing graphene is inherently crumpled in the out-of-plane direction due to dynamic flexural phonons and static wrinkling. We explore the consequences of this crumpling on the effective mechanical constants of graphene. We develop a sensitive experimental approach to probe stretching of graphene membranes under low applied stress at cryogenic to room temperatures. We find that the in-plane stiffness of graphene is 20–100 N m–1 at room temperature, much smaller than 340 N m–1 (the value expected for flat graphene). Moreover, while the in-plane stiffness only increases moderately when the devices are cooled down to 10 K, it approaches 300 Nmore » m–1 when the aspect ratio of graphene membranes is increased. Finally, these results indicate that softening of graphene at temperatures <400 K is caused by static wrinkling, with only a small contribution due to flexural phonons. Altogether, these results explain the large variation in reported mechanical constants of graphene devices and pave the way towards controlling their mechanical properties.« less

  19. The effect of intrinsic crumpling on the mechanics of free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholl, Ryan J. T.; Conley, Hiram J.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Sreenivas, Vijayashree Parsi; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Bolotin, Kirill I.

    2015-11-01

    Free-standing graphene is inherently crumpled in the out-of-plane direction due to dynamic flexural phonons and static wrinkling. We explore the consequences of this crumpling on the effective mechanical constants of graphene. We develop a sensitive experimental approach to probe stretching of graphene membranes under low applied stress at cryogenic to room temperatures. We find that the in-plane stiffness of graphene is 20-100 N m-1 at room temperature, much smaller than 340 N m-1 (the value expected for flat graphene). Moreover, while the in-plane stiffness only increases moderately when the devices are cooled down to 10 K, it approaches 300 N m-1 when the aspect ratio of graphene membranes is increased. These results indicate that softening of graphene at temperatures <400 K is caused by static wrinkling, with only a small contribution due to flexural phonons. Together, these results explain the large variation in reported mechanical constants of graphene devices and pave the way towards controlling their mechanical properties.

  20. Mechanical properties and failure behaviors of the interface of hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride sheets

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet has been fabricated recently and verified to possess unusual physical properties. During the growth process, defects such as vacancies are unavoidably present at the interface between graphene and h-BN. In the present work, typical vacancy defects, which were located at the interface between graphene and h-BN, were studied by density functional theory. The interface structure, mechanical and electronic properties, and failure behavior of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet were investigated and compared. The results showed that the formation energy of the defective graphene/h-BN interface basically increased with increasing inflection angles. However, Young’s modulus for all graphene/h-BN systems studied decreased with the increase in inflection angles. The intrinsic strength of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheets was affected not only by the inflection angles, but also by the type of interface connection and the type of defects. The energy band structure of the hybrid interface could be tuned by applying mechanical strain to the systems. These results demonstrated that vacancies introduced significant effects on the mechanical and electronic properties of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet. PMID:27527371

  1. The effect of intrinsic crumpling on the mechanics of free-standing graphene.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, Ryan J T; Conley, Hiram J; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S; Sreenivas, Vijayashree Parsi; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2015-11-06

    Free-standing graphene is inherently crumpled in the out-of-plane direction due to dynamic flexural phonons and static wrinkling. We explore the consequences of this crumpling on the effective mechanical constants of graphene. We develop a sensitive experimental approach to probe stretching of graphene membranes under low applied stress at cryogenic to room temperatures. We find that the in-plane stiffness of graphene is 20-100 N m(-1) at room temperature, much smaller than 340 N m(-1) (the value expected for flat graphene). Moreover, while the in-plane stiffness only increases moderately when the devices are cooled down to 10 K, it approaches 300 N m(-1) when the aspect ratio of graphene membranes is increased. These results indicate that softening of graphene at temperatures <400 K is caused by static wrinkling, with only a small contribution due to flexural phonons. Together, these results explain the large variation in reported mechanical constants of graphene devices and pave the way towards controlling their mechanical properties.

  2. Mechanical properties and failure behaviors of the interface of hybrid graphene/hexagonal boron nitride sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ning; Chen, Xiangfeng; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet has been fabricated recently and verified to possess unusual physical properties. During the growth process, defects such as vacancies are unavoidably present at the interface between graphene and h-BN. In the present work, typical vacancy defects, which were located at the interface between graphene and h-BN, were studied by density functional theory. The interface structure, mechanical and electronic properties, and failure behavior of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet were investigated and compared. The results showed that the formation energy of the defective graphene/h-BN interface basically increased with increasing inflection angles. However, Young’s modulus for all graphene/h-BN systems studied decreased with the increase in inflection angles. The intrinsic strength of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheets was affected not only by the inflection angles, but also by the type of interface connection and the type of defects. The energy band structure of the hybrid interface could be tuned by applying mechanical strain to the systems. These results demonstrated that vacancies introduced significant effects on the mechanical and electronic properties of the hybrid graphene/h-BN sheet.

  3. The effect of intrinsic crumpling on the mechanics of free-standing graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, Ryan J. T.; Conley, Hiram J.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Sreenivas, Vijayashree Parsi; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Bolotin, Kirill I.

    2015-11-06

    Free-standing graphene is inherently crumpled in the out-of-plane direction due to dynamic flexural phonons and static wrinkling. We explore the consequences of this crumpling on the effective mechanical constants of graphene. We develop a sensitive experimental approach to probe stretching of graphene membranes under low applied stress at cryogenic to room temperatures. We find that the in-plane stiffness of graphene is 20–100 N m–1 at room temperature, much smaller than 340 N m–1 (the value expected for flat graphene). Moreover, while the in-plane stiffness only increases moderately when the devices are cooled down to 10 K, it approaches 300 N m–1 when the aspect ratio of graphene membranes is increased. Finally, these results indicate that softening of graphene at temperatures <400 K is caused by static wrinkling, with only a small contribution due to flexural phonons. Altogether, these results explain the large variation in reported mechanical constants of graphene devices and pave the way towards controlling their mechanical properties.

  4. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Graphene-Germanium Interfaces Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Brian; Jacobberger, Robert M; Mannix, Andrew J; Campbell, Gavin P; Bedzyk, Michael J; Arnold, Michael S; Hersam, Mark C; Guisinger, Nathan P

    2015-11-11

    Epitaxially oriented wafer-scale graphene grown directly on semiconducting Ge substrates is of high interest for both fundamental science and electronic device applications. To date, however, this material system remains relatively unexplored structurally and electronically, particularly at the atomic scale. To further understand the nature of the interface between graphene and Ge, we utilize ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) along with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe interfacial atomic structure and chemistry. STS reveals significant differences in electronic interactions between graphene and Ge(110)/Ge(111), which is consistent with a model of stronger interaction on Ge(110) leading to epitaxial growth. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene is considerably strained after growth, with more point-to-point variation on Ge(111). Furthermore, this native strain influences the atomic structure of the interface by inducing metastable and previously unobserved Ge surface reconstructions following annealing. These nonequilibrium reconstructions cover >90% of the surface and, in turn, modify both the electronic and mechanical properties of the graphene overlayer. Finally, graphene on Ge(001) represents the extreme strain case, where graphene drives the reorganization of the Ge surface into [107] facets. From this work, it is clear that the interaction between graphene and the underlying Ge is not only dependent on the substrate crystallographic orientation, but is also tunable and strongly related to the atomic reconfiguration of the graphene-Ge interface.

  5. Experimental and modeling study on charge storage/transfer mechanism of graphene-based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Shuai; Jing, Xie; Zhou, Hongjun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jiujun

    2014-12-01

    A symmetrical graphene-based supercapacitor is constructed for studying the charge-transfer mechanism within the graphene-based electrodes using both experiment measurements and molecular simulation. The in-house synthesized graphene is characterized by XRD, SEM and BET measurements for morphology and surface area. It is observed that the electric capacity of graphene electrode can be reduced by both high internal resistance and limited mass transfer. Computer modeling is conducted at the molecular level to characterize the diffusion behavior of electrolyte ions to the interior of electrode with emphasis on the unique 2D confinement imposed by graphene layers. Although graphene powder poses a moderate internal surface of 400 m2 g-1, the capacitance performance of graphene electrode can be as good as that of commercial activated carbon which has an overwhelming surface area of 1700 m2 g-1. An explanation to this abnormal correlation is that graphene material has an intrinsic capability of adaptively reorganizing its microporous structure in response to intercalation of ions and immergence of electrolyte solvent. The accessible surface of graphene is believed to be dramatically enlarged for ion adsorption during the charging process of capacitor.

  6. In situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites: thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olowojoba, Ganiu B.; Eslava, Salvador; Gutierrez, Eduardo S.; Kinloch, Anthony J.; Mattevi, Cecilia; Rocha, Victoria G.; Taylor, Ambrose C.

    2016-10-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties and this has made it a prime target for use as a filler material in the development of multifunctional polymeric composites. However, several challenges need to be overcome to take full advantage of the aforementioned properties of graphene. These include achieving good dispersion and interfacial properties between the graphene filler and the polymeric matrix. In the present work, we report the thermal and mechanical properties of reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites prepared via a facile, scalable and commercially viable method. Electron micrographs of the composites demonstrate that the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is well dispersed throughout the composite. Although no improvements in glass transition temperature, tensile strength and thermal stability in air of the composites were observed, good improvements in thermal conductivity (about 36 %), tensile and storage moduli (more than 13 %) were recorded with the addition of 2 wt% of rGO.

  7. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ke Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang

    2014-01-07

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  8. Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Haijian; Xu, Ke; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang; Yang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

  9. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  10. Synthesis of soluble graphite and graphene.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K F; Billups, W E

    2013-01-15

    Because of graphene's anticipated applications in electronics and its thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, many scientists and engineers are interested in this material. Graphene is an isolated layer of the π-stacked hexagonal allotrope of carbon known as graphite. The interlayer cohesive energy of graphite, or exfoliation energy, that results from van der Waals attractions over the interlayer spacing distance of 3.34 Å (61 meV/C atom) is many times weaker than the intralayer covalent bonding. Since graphene itself does not occur naturally, scientists and engineers are still learning how to isolate and manipulate individual layers of graphene. Some researchers have relied on the physical separation of the sheets, a process that can sometimes be as simple as peeling of sheets from crystalline graphite using Scotch tape. Other researchers have taken an ensemble approach, where they exploit the chemical conversion of graphite to the individual layers. The typical intermediary state is graphite oxide, which is often produced using strong oxidants under acidic conditions. Structurally, researchers hypothesize that acidic functional groups functionalize the oxidized material at the edges and a network of epoxy groups cover the sp(2)-bonded carbon network. The exfoliated material formed under these conditions can be used to form dispersions that are usually unstable. However, more importantly, irreversible defects form in the basal plane during oxidation and remain even after reduction of graphite oxide back to graphene-like material. As part of our interest in the dissolution of carbon nanomaterials, we have explored the derivatization of graphite following the same procedures that preserve the sp(2) bonding and the associated unique physical and electronic properties in the chemical processing of single-walled carbon nanotubes. In this Account, we describe efficient routes to exfoliate graphite either into graphitic nanoparticles or into graphene without

  11. Adsorption of Ar on individual carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Boris; Kahn, Joshua; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    2015-03-01

    We compare and contrast results of adsorption measurements of Ar on single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite. Adsorption isotherms on individual suspended nanotubes were obtained using both the mechanical resonance frequency shift (sensitive to mass adsorption) and the electrical conductance. Isotherms on graphene mounted on hexagonal boron nitride were obtained using only the conductance. New volumetric adsorption isotherms on bulk exfoliated graphite were also obtained, paying special attention to the very low coverage region (less than 2% of a monolayer). This allowed us to compare the degree of heterogeneity on the three substrate types, the binding energies, and the van der Waals 2D parameters. Research supported by NSF DMR 1206208.

  12. Evaluation of Nanoclay Exfoliation Strategies for Thermoset Polyimide Nanocomposite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginter, Michael J.; Jana, Sadhan C.; Miller, Sandi G.

    2007-01-01

    Prior works show exfoliated layered silicate reinforcement improves polymer composite properties. However, achieving full clay exfoliation in high performance thermoset polyimides remains a challenge. This study explores a new method of clay exfoliation, which includes clay intercalation by lower molecular weight PMR monomer under conditions of low and high shear and sonication, clay treatments by aliphatic and aromatic surfactants, and clay dispersion in primary, higher molecular weight PMR resin. Clay spacing, thermal, and mechanical properties were evaluated and compared with the best results available in literature for PMR polyimide systems.

  13. Biomass derived solvents for the scalable production of single layered graphene from graphite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Singh, Nripat; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-07-12

    Among four different biomass derived green and sustainable solvents namely levulinic acid (LA), ethyl lactate (EL), γ-valerolactone (GVL) and formic acid (FA) only LA was found to exfoliate graphite to single and few layered graphene sheets. During exfoliation, the formation of LA crystals embedded with single layered graphene sheets was observed. The process is scalable and the solvent can be recovered and reused in five subsequent cycles of exfoliation for the large scale production of graphene sheets.

  14. Tunable Exfoliation of Synthetic Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöter, Matthias; Rosenfeldt, Sabine; Breu, Josef

    2015-07-01

    The large hydration enthalpy of inorganic interlayer cations sandwiched between moderately negatively charged silicate layers endows to smectites (e.g., hectorite) remarkably rich intracrystalline reactivity compared with most other layered materials. Moreover, they are transparent and inert in most potential suspension media. Upon suspension in water, smectites readily swell. For homogeneous, melt-synthesized smectites, the degree of swelling can be tuned by choice of interlayer cation and charge density of the layer. Because swelling renders the clay stacks more shear labile, the efficiency of exfoliation by applying shearing forces can in turn be adjusted. Certain smectites even spontaneously delaminate into clay platelets of uniform thickness of 1 nm by progressive osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling can also be applied to produce well-defined double stacks when one starts with ordered, interstratified heterostructures. Nanocomposites made with high-aspect-ratio fillers obtained this way show superior mechanical, flame retardancy, and permeability properties.

  15. Penta-graphene: A new carbon allotrope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qian; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2015-01-01

    A 2D metastable carbon allotrope, penta-graphene, composed entirely of carbon pentagons and resembling the Cairo pentagonal tiling, is proposed. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations confirm that the new carbon polymorph is not only dynamically and mechanically stable, but also can withstand temperatures as high as 1000 K. Due to its unique atomic configuration, penta-graphene has an unusual negative Poisson’s ratio and ultrahigh ideal strength that can even outperform graphene. Furthermore, unlike graphene that needs to be functionalized for opening a band gap, penta-graphene possesses an intrinsic quasi-direct band gap as large as 3.25 eV, close to that of ZnO and GaN. Equally important, penta-graphene can be exfoliated from T12-carbon. When rolled up, it can form pentagon-based nanotubes which are semiconducting, regardless of their chirality. When stacked in different patterns, stable 3D twin structures of T12-carbon are generated with band gaps even larger than that of T12-carbon. The versatility of penta-graphene and its derivatives are expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and nanomechanics. PMID:25646451

  16. Penta-graphene: A new carbon allotrope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qian; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2015-02-24

    A 2D metastable carbon allotrope, penta-graphene, composed entirely of carbon pentagons and resembling the Cairo pentagonal tiling, is proposed. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations confirm that the new carbon polymorph is not only dynamically and mechanically stable, but also can withstand temperatures as high as 1000 K. Due to its unique atomic configuration, penta-graphene has an unusual negative Poisson's ratio and ultrahigh ideal strength that can even outperform graphene. Furthermore, unlike graphene that needs to be functionalized for opening a band gap, penta-graphene possesses an intrinsic quasi-direct band gap as large as 3.25 eV, close to that of ZnO and GaN. Equally important, penta-graphene can be exfoliated from T12-carbon. When rolled up, it can form pentagon-based nanotubes which are semiconducting, regardless of their chirality. When stacked in different patterns, stable 3D twin structures of T12-carbon are generated with band gaps even larger than that of T12-carbon. The versatility of penta-graphene and its derivatives are expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and nanomechanics.

  17. Penta-graphene: A new carbon allotrope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Qian; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2015-02-24

    A 2D metastable carbon allotrope, penta-graphene, composed entirely of carbon pentagons and resembling the Cairo pentagonal tiling, is proposed. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations confirm that the new carbon polymorph is not only dynamically and mechanically stable, but also can withstand temperatures as high as 1000 K. Due to its unique atomic configuration, penta-graphene has an unusual negative Poisson's ratio and ultrahigh ideal strength that can even outperform graphene. Furthermore, unlike graphene that needs to be functionalized for opening a band gap, penta-graphene possesses an intrinsic quasi-direct band gap as large as 3.25 eV, close to that of ZnO and GaN. Equally important, penta-graphene can be exfoliated from T12-carbon. When rolled up, it can form pentagon-based nanotubes which are semiconducting, regardless of their chirality. When stacked in different patterns, stable 3D twin structures of T12-carbon are generated with band gaps even larger than that of T12-carbon. The versatility of penta-graphene and its derivatives are expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and nanomechanics. PMID:25646451

  18. Anomalous carrier dynamics in bilayer graphene in presence of mechanical strain: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enamullah

    2016-05-01

    One of the optical response of charge carriers in bilayer graphene, anomalous Rabi oscillation is investigated theoretically in presence of mechanical strain. Rabi oscillation in extreme non-resonance regime is known as anomalous Rabi oscillation, has been predicted theoretically in single layer graphene by new technique known as asymptotic rotating wave approximation. In this article, we have shown a strong dependence of anomalous Rabi oscillations of charge carriers on the mechanical strain near the vanishing point of conduction and valance band.

  19. High-efficiency exfoliation of layered materials into 2D nanosheets in switchable CO2/Surfactant/H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Xu, Qun; Xu, Shanshan; Qi, Yuhang; Chen, Meng; Li, Hongxiang; Han, Buxing

    2015-01-01

    Layered materials present attractive and important properties due to their two-dimensional (2D) structure, allowing potential applications including electronics, optoelectronics, and catalysis. However, fully exploiting the outstanding properties will require a method for their efficient exfoliation. Here we present that a series of layered materials can be successfully exfoliated into single- and few-layer nanosheets using the driving forces coming from the phase inversion, i.e., from micelles to reverse micelles in the emulsion microenvironment built by supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2). The effect of variable experimental parameters including CO2 pressure, ethanol/water ratio, and initial concentration of bulk materials on the exfoliation yield have been investigated. Moreover, we demonstrate that the exfoliated 2D nanosheets have their worthwhile applications, for example, graphene can be used to prepare conductive paper, MoS2 can be used as fluorescent label to perform cellular labelling, and BN can effectively reinforce polymers leading to the promising mechanical properties. PMID:26568039

  20. Resonant Tunneling in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahazad, Babak; Lee, Kayoung; Kang, Sangwoo; Xue, Jiamin; Larentis, Stefano; Corbet, Christopher; Kim, Kyounghwan; Movva, Hema; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Register, Leonard; Banerjee, Sanjay; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2015-03-01

    We present the realization and characterization of independently contacted and rotationally aligned double bilayer graphene heterostructures, that show gate-tunable tunneling resonances and negative differential resistance in their interlayer current-voltage characteristics. Our devices are fabricated by successively stacking mechanically exfoliated bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride dielectric using a layer-by-layer transfer technique. The bilayers are rotationally aligned during the device fabrication by selecting flakes with straight edges, and using them as a reference for alignment. We determine the heterostructure energy band alignment at the tunneling resonance using the individual layer carrier densities, and including the chemical potential dependence on the carrier density. Our analysis show that the tunneling resonances occur when the charge neutrality points of the two bilayer graphene are energetically aligned, which suggests the resonances stem from the momentum conserving tunneling. This work has been supported by NRI-SWAN, ONR, and Intel.

  1. Polymer reinforcement using liquid-exfoliated boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Khan, Umar; May, Peter; O'Neill, Arlene; Bell, Alan P; Boussac, Elodie; Martin, Arnaud; Semple, James; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2013-01-21

    We have exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride by ultrasonication in solutions of polyvinylalcohol in water. The resultant nanosheets are sterically stabilised by adsorbed polymer chains. Centrifugation-based size-selection was used to give dispersions of nanosheets with aspect ratio (length/thickness) of ∼1400. Such dispersions can be used to produce polyvinylalcohol-BN composite films. Helium ion microscopy of fracture surfaces shows the nanosheets to be well dispersed and the composites to fail by pull-out. We find both modulus, Y, and strength, σ(B), of these composites to increase linearly with volume fraction, V(f), up to V(f)∼ 0.1 vol% BN before falling off. The rates of increase are extremely high; dY/dV(f) = 670 GPa and dσ(B)/dV(f) = 47 GPa. The former value matches theory based on continuum mechanics while the latter value is consistent with remarkably high polymer-filler interfacial strength. However, because the mechanical properties increase over such a narrow volume fraction range, the maximum values of both modulus and strength are only ∼40% higher than the pure polymer. This phenomenon has also been observed for graphene-filled composites and represents a serious hurdle to the production of high performance polymer-nanosheet composites.

  2. Electronic and mechanical properties of graphene-germanium interfaces grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Kiraly, Brian T.; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mannix, Andrew J.; Campbell, Gavin P.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.

    2015-10-27

    Epitaxially oriented wafer-scale graphene grown directly on semiconducting Ge substrates is of high interest for both fundamental science and electronic device applications. To date, however, this material system remains relatively unexplored structurally and electronically, particularly at the atomic scale. To further understand the nature of the interface between graphene and Ge, we utilize ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) along with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe interfacial atomic structure and chemistry. STS reveals significant differences in electronic interactions between graphene and Ge(110)/Ge(111), which is consistent with a model of stronger interaction on Ge(110)more » leading to epitaxial growth. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene is considerably strained after growth, with more point-to-point variation on Ge(111). Furthermore, this native strain influences the atomic structure of the interface by inducing metastable and previously unobserved Ge surface reconstructions following annealing. These nonequilibrium reconstructions cover >90% of the surface and, in turn, modify both the electronic and mechanical properties of the graphene overlayer. Finally, graphene on Ge(001) represents the extreme strain case, where graphene drives the reorganization of the Ge surface into [107] facets. From this study, it is clear that the interaction between graphene and the underlying Ge is not only dependent on the substrate crystallographic orientation, but is also tunable and strongly related to the atomic reconfiguration of the graphene–Ge interface.« less

  3. Direct coupling between charge current and spin polarization by extrinsic mechanisms in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chunli; Chong, Y. D.; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2016-08-01

    Spintronics—the all-electrical control of the electron spin for quantum or classical information storage and processing—is one of the most promising applications of the two-dimensional material graphene. Although pristine graphene has negligible spin-orbit coupling (SOC), both theory and experiment suggest that SOC in graphene can be enhanced by extrinsic means, such as functionalization by adatom impurities. We present a theory of transport in graphene that accounts for the spin-coherent dynamics of the carriers, including hitherto-neglected spin precession processes taking place during resonant scattering in the dilute impurity limit. We uncover an "anisotropic spin precession" (ASP) scattering process in graphene, which contributes a large current-induced spin polarization and modifies the standard spin Hall effect. ASP scattering arises from two dimensionality and extrinsic SOC, and apart from graphene, it can be present in other 2D materials or in the surface states of 3D materials with a fluctuating SOC. Our theory also yields a comprehensive description of the spin relaxation mechanisms present in adatom-decorated graphene, including Elliot-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel relaxation rates, the latter of which can become an amplification process in a certain parameter regime of the SOC disorder potential. Our work provides theoretical foundations for designing future graphene-based integrated spintronic devices.

  4. Electronic and mechanical properties of graphene-germanium interfaces grown by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kiraly, Brian T.; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mannix, Andrew J.; Campbell, Gavin P.; Bedzyk, Michael J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.

    2015-10-27

    Epitaxially oriented wafer-scale graphene grown directly on semiconducting Ge substrates is of high interest for both fundamental science and electronic device applications. To date, however, this material system remains relatively unexplored structurally and electronically, particularly at the atomic scale. To further understand the nature of the interface between graphene and Ge, we utilize ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) along with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe interfacial atomic structure and chemistry. STS reveals significant differences in electronic interactions between graphene and Ge(110)/Ge(111), which is consistent with a model of stronger interaction on Ge(110) leading to epitaxial growth. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene is considerably strained after growth, with more point-to-point variation on Ge(111). Furthermore, this native strain influences the atomic structure of the interface by inducing metastable and previously unobserved Ge surface reconstructions following annealing. These nonequilibrium reconstructions cover >90% of the surface and, in turn, modify both the electronic and mechanical properties of the graphene overlayer. Finally, graphene on Ge(001) represents the extreme strain case, where graphene drives the reorganization of the Ge surface into [107] facets. From this study, it is clear that the interaction between graphene and the underlying Ge is not only dependent on the substrate crystallographic orientation, but is also tunable and strongly related to the atomic reconfiguration of the graphene–Ge interface.

  5. Single-Nanowire Electrochemical Probe Detection for Internally Optimized Mechanism of Porous Graphene in Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Yan, Mengyu; Wang, Xuanpeng; Han, Chunhua; He, Liang; Wei, Xiujuan; Niu, Chaojiang; Zhao, Kangning; Tian, Xiaocong; Wei, Qiulong; Li, Zijia; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has been widely used to enhance the performance of energy storage devices due to its high conductivity, large surface area, and excellent mechanical flexibility. However, it is still unclear how graphene influences the electrochemical performance and reaction mechanisms of electrode materials. The single-nanowire electrochemical probe is an effective tool to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions in situ. Here, pure MnO2 nanowires, reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires, and porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires are employed to investigate the capacitance, ion diffusion coefficient, and charge storage mechanisms in single-nanowire electrochemical devices. The porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire delivers an areal capacitance of 104 nF/μm(2), which is 4.0 and 2.8 times as high as those of reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire and MnO2 nanowire, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. It is demonstrated that the reduced graphene oxide wrapping around the MnO2 nanowire greatly increases the electronic conductivity of the active materials, but decreases the ion diffusion coefficient because of the shielding effect of graphene. By creating pores in the graphene, the ion diffusion coefficient is recovered without degradation of the electron transport rate, which significantly improves the capacitance. Such single-nanowire electrochemical probes, which can detect electrochemical processes and behavior in situ, can also be fabricated with other active materials for energy storage and other applications in related fields.

  6. Single-Nanowire Electrochemical Probe Detection for Internally Optimized Mechanism of Porous Graphene in Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Yan, Mengyu; Wang, Xuanpeng; Han, Chunhua; He, Liang; Wei, Xiujuan; Niu, Chaojiang; Zhao, Kangning; Tian, Xiaocong; Wei, Qiulong; Li, Zijia; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has been widely used to enhance the performance of energy storage devices due to its high conductivity, large surface area, and excellent mechanical flexibility. However, it is still unclear how graphene influences the electrochemical performance and reaction mechanisms of electrode materials. The single-nanowire electrochemical probe is an effective tool to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions in situ. Here, pure MnO2 nanowires, reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires, and porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires are employed to investigate the capacitance, ion diffusion coefficient, and charge storage mechanisms in single-nanowire electrochemical devices. The porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire delivers an areal capacitance of 104 nF/μm(2), which is 4.0 and 2.8 times as high as those of reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire and MnO2 nanowire, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. It is demonstrated that the reduced graphene oxide wrapping around the MnO2 nanowire greatly increases the electronic conductivity of the active materials, but decreases the ion diffusion coefficient because of the shielding effect of graphene. By creating pores in the graphene, the ion diffusion coefficient is recovered without degradation of the electron transport rate, which significantly improves the capacitance. Such single-nanowire electrochemical probes, which can detect electrochemical processes and behavior in situ, can also be fabricated with other active materials for energy storage and other applications in related fields. PMID:26882441

  7. Strain and morphology of graphene membranes on responsive microhydrogel patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Shaina, P. R.; Jaiswal, Manu

    2014-11-10

    We study the configuration of atomically-thin graphene membranes on tunable microhydrogel patterns. The polyethylene oxide microhydrogel structures patterned by electron-beam lithography show increase in height, with a persistent swelling ratio up to ∼10, upon exposure to vapors of an organic solvent. We demonstrate that modifying the height fluctuations of the microhydrogel affects the strain and morphology of ultrathin graphene membrane over-layer. Raman spectroscopic investigations indicate that small lattice strains can be switched on in mechanically exfoliated few-layer graphene membranes that span these microhydrogel structures. In case of chemical-vapor deposited single-layer graphene, we observe Raman signatures of local depinning of the membranes upon swelling of microhydrogel pillars. We attribute this depinning transition to the competition between membrane-substrate adhesion energy and membrane strain energy, where the latter is tuned by hydrogel swelling.

  8. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  9. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  11. Synthesis of Graphene Films on Copper Foils by Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, graphene has advanced rapidly as one of the most promising materials changing human life. Development of production-worthy synthetic methodologies for the preparation of various types of graphene forms the basis for its investigation and applications. Graphene can be used in the forms of either microflake powders or large-area thin films. Graphene powders are prepared by the exfoliation of graphite or the reduction of graphene oxide, while graphene films are prepared predominantly by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a variety of substrates. Both metal and dielectric substrates have been explored; while dielectric substrates are preferred over any other substrate, much higher quality graphene large-area films have been grown on metal substrates such as Cu. The focus here is on the progress of graphene synthesis on Cu foils by CVD, including various CVD techniques, graphene growth mechanisms and kinetics, strategies for synthesizing large-area graphene single crystals, graphene transfer techniques, and, finally, challenges and prospects are discussed. PMID:26991960

  12. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  13. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Huang, Jiaxing; Nguyen, Sonbinh T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-08-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials.

  14. Enhanced mechanical and thermal properties of regenerated cellulose/graphene composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingwei; Qu, Lijun; Zhang, Xiansheng; Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Shifeng; Guo, Xiaoqing; Han, Guangting; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Yaning

    2014-10-13

    In this study, a wet spinning method was applied to fabricate regenerated cellulose fibers filled with low graphene loading which was systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, FTIR and XRD techniques. Subsequently, the mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting fibers were investigated. With only 0.2 wt% loading of graphene, a ∼ 50% improvement of tensile strength and 25% enhancement of Young's modulus were obtained and the modified Halpin-Tsai model was built to predict the mechanical properties of composite fibers. Thermal analysis of the composite fibers showed remarkably enhanced thermal stability and dynamic heat transfer performance of graphene-filled cellulose composite fiber, also, the presence of graphene oxide can significantly enhance the thermal conductivity of the composite fiber. This work provided a facile way to improve mechanical and thermal properties of regenerated cellulose fibers. The resultant composite fibers have potential application in thermal insulation and reinforced fibrous materials.

  15. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  16. Modulation of mechanical resonance by chemical potential oscillation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changyao; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Koshino, Mikito; Lee, Sunwoo; Gondarenko, Alexander; MacDonald, Allan H.; Kim, Philip; Hone, James

    2016-03-01

    The classical picture of the force on a capacitor assumes a large density of electronic states, such that the electrochemical potential of charges added to the capacitor is given by the external electrostatic potential and the capacitance is determined purely by geometry. Here we consider capacitively driven motion of a nano-mechanical resonator with a low density of states, in which these assumptions can break down. We find three leading-order corrections to the classical picture: the first of which is a modulation in the static force due to variation in the internal chemical potential; the second and third are changes in the static force and dynamic spring constant due to the rate of change of chemical potential, expressed as the quantum (density of states) capacitance. As a demonstration, we study capacitively driven graphene mechanical resonators, where the chemical potential is modulated independently of the gate voltage using an applied magnetic field to manipulate the energy of electrons residing in discrete Landau levels. In these devices, we observe large periodic frequency shifts consistent with the three corrections to the classical picture. In devices with extremely low strain and disorder, the first correction term dominates and the resonant frequency closely follows the chemical potential. The theoretical model fits the data with only one adjustable parameter representing disorder-broadening of the Landau levels. The underlying electromechanical coupling mechanism is not limited by the particular choice of material, geometry, or mechanism for variation in the chemical potential, and can thus be extended to other low-dimensional systems.

  17. One-pot exfoliation of graphite and synthesis of nanographene/dimesitylporphyrin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Bernal, M Mar; Pérez, Emilio M

    2015-01-01

    A simple one-pot process to exfoliate graphite and synthesize nanographene-dimesitylporphyrin hybrids has been developed. Despite the bulky mesityl groups, which are expected to hinder the efficient π-π stacking between the porphyrin core and graphene, the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite is significantly favored by the presence of the porphyrins. Metallation of the porphyrin further enhances this effect. The resulting graphene/porphyrin hybrids were characterized by spectroscopy (UV-visible, fluorescence, and Raman) and microscopy (STEM, scanning transmission electron microscopy).

  18. One-Pot Exfoliation of Graphite and Synthesis of Nanographene/Dimesitylporphyrin Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, M. Mar; Pérez, Emilio M.

    2015-01-01

    A simple one-pot process to exfoliate graphite and synthesize nanographene-dimesitylporphyrin hybrids has been developed. Despite the bulky mesityl groups, which are expected to hinder the efficient π–π stacking between the porphyrin core and graphene, the liquid-phase exfoliation of graphite is significantly favored by the presence of the porphyrins. Metallation of the porphyrin further enhances this effect. The resulting graphene/porphyrin hybrids were characterized by spectroscopy (UV-visible, fluorescence, and Raman) and microscopy (STEM, scanning transmission electron microscopy). PMID:25984598

  19. Modeling the mechanics of graphene-based polymer composite film measured by the bulge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Jun; Sun, You-yi; Li, Dian-sen; Cao, Yang; Wang, Zuo; Ma, Jing; Zhao, Gui-Zhe

    2015-10-01

    Graphene-based polymer composite films have wide-ranging potential applications, such as in sensors, electromagnetic shielding, absorbing materials, corrosion resistance and so on. In addition, the practical applications of graphene-based polymer composite films are closely related to their mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of graphene-based polymer composite films are difficult to characterize with tensile tests. In this paper, the bugle test was used to investigate the mechanical properties of graphene-based polymer composite films. The experimental results show that the Young’s modulus of polymer composite films increases non-linearly with an increase in the doping content of graphene, and viscoelastic deformation is induced under cyclic loading conditions. Moreover, in order to describe their mechanical behavior, an ‘Arruda-Boyce’ finite-strain constitutive model (modified BPA model), based on the strain amplification hypothesis, and a traditional ‘Arruda-Boyce’ model was proposed, which incorporated many of the features of previous theories. The numerical treatment of the modified BPA model associated with finite element analysis is also discussed. This new model is shown to be able to predict the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of graphene based polymer composite films measured by the bugle test effectively.

  20. Explosive thermal reduction of graphene oxide-based materials: mechanism and safety implications.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Guo, Fei; Hurt, Robert; Külaots, Indrek

    2014-06-01

    Thermal reduction of graphene oxide or graphite oxide (GO) is an important processing step in the fabrication of many graphene-based materials and devices. Here we show that some bulk solid GO samples can undergo explosive decomposition when small samples are heated slowly in inert gas environments, while others do not. These micro-explosions can occur for samples as small as few milligrams and are sufficiently energetic to cause laboratory equipment damage. Thermochemical analysis methods are used to understand the factors that lead to the explosive reduction mode. The studies show that the explosive mode of reduction is caused by the exothermicity of GO reduction coupled with a threshold sample mass/size that causes heat and mass transfer limitations leading to local temperature rise and a thermal runaway reaction. The explosive mode of reduction is not caused or promoted by interstitial water, and its onset temperature can be lowered by immersion in potassium hydroxide solution. By allowing early release of internal gas pressure, the explosive mode reduces the extent of surface area development in GO exfoliation from an optimum value of 1470 m(2)g(-1) obtained under non-explosive reduction conditions. Explosive reduction of bulk GO poses industrial safety hazards during large-scale storage, handling, and processing.

  1. Explosive thermal reduction of graphene oxide-based materials: mechanism and safety implications

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yang; Guo, Fei; Hurt, Robert; Külaots, Indrek

    2014-01-01

    Thermal reduction of graphene oxide or graphite oxide (GO) is an important processing step in the fabrication of many graphene-based materials and devices. Here we show that some bulk solid GO samples can undergo explosive decomposition when small samples are heated slowly in inert gas environments, while others do not. These micro-explosions can occur for samples as small as few milligrams and are sufficiently energetic to cause laboratory equipment damage. Thermochemical analysis methods are used to understand the factors that lead to the explosive reduction mode. The studies show that the explosive mode of reduction is caused by the exothermicity of GO reduction coupled with a threshold sample mass/size that causes heat and mass transfer limitations leading to local temperature rise and a thermal runaway reaction. The explosive mode of reduction is not caused or promoted by interstitial water, and its onset temperature can be lowered by immersion in potassium hydroxide solution. By allowing early release of internal gas pressure, the explosive mode reduces the extent of surface area development in GO exfoliation from an optimum value of 1470 m2g−1 obtained under non-explosive reduction conditions. Explosive reduction of bulk GO poses industrial safety hazards during large-scale storage, handling, and processing. PMID:25018560

  2. Mechanical strain induced valley-dependent quantum magnetotransport of Dirac particles in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Shengli; Liu, Daqing; Wang, Vei

    2015-12-01

    We have explored the mechanical strain effects on the magnetotransport in graphene with a 1D electrostatic periodic potential in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. We find that, in a strong magnetic field regime, the conductivity exhibits a superposition of the Shubnikov-de Haas and Weiss oscillations in each valley due to the electrical modulation. Especially, the strain removes the valley degeneracy of Landau levels in inversion symmetric Dirac cones. Accordingly, this causes the valley-dependence of the conductivity. These phenomena, absent in a freestanding graphene, are a consequence of the anomalous spectrum of carriers in a fully stained graphene.

  3. Geometry, mechanics, and electronics of singular structures and wrinkles in graphene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vitor M; Castro Neto, A H; Liang, H Y; Mahadevan, L

    2010-10-01

    As the thinnest atomic membrane, graphene presents an opportunity to combine geometry, elasticity, and electronics at the limits of their validity. We describe the transport and electronic structure in the neighborhood of conical singularities, the elementary excitations of the ubiquitous wrinkled and crumpled graphene. We use a combination of atomistic mechanical simulations, analytical geometry, and transport calculations in curved graphene, and exact diagonalization of the electronic spectrum to calculate the effects of geometry on electronic structure, transport, and mobility in suspended samples, and how the geometry-generated pseudomagnetic and pseudoelectric fields might disrupt Landau quantization.

  4. A novel mechanical cleavage method for synthesizing few-layer graphenes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A novel method to synthesize few layer graphene from bulk graphite by mechanical cleavage is presented here. The method involves the use of an ultrasharp single crystal diamond wedge to cleave a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite sample to generate the graphene layers. Cleaving is aided by the use of ultrasonic oscillations along the wedge. Characterization of the obtained layers shows that the process is able to synthesize graphene layers with an area of a few micrometers. Application of oscillation enhances the quality of the layers produced with the layers having a reduced crystallite size as determined from the Raman spectrum. Interesting edge structures are observed that needs further investigation. PMID:21711598

  5. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Nam, Youngwoo; Cole, Matthew T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-04-14

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000 °C growth temperature.

  6. Excitonic recombinations in h-BN: From bulk to exfoliated layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, A.; Loayza, J.; Berini, B.; Betz, A.; Plaçais, B.; Ducastelle, F.; Barjon, J.; Loiseau, A.

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphite are structurally similar but with very different properties. Their combination in graphene-based devices is now of intense research focus, and it becomes particularly important to evaluate the role played by crystalline defects on their properties. In this paper, the cathodoluminescence (CL) properties of hexagonal boron nitride crystallites are reported and compared to those of nanosheets mechanically exfoliated from them. First, the link between the presence of structural defects and the recombination intensity of trapped excitons, the so-called D series, is confirmed. Low defective h-BN regions are further evidenced by CL spectral mapping (hyperspectral imaging), allowing us to observe new features in the near-band-edge region, tentatively attributed to phonon replicas of exciton recombinations. Second, the h-BN thickness was reduced down to six atomic layers, using mechanical exfoliation, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy. Even at these low thicknesses, the luminescence remains intense and exciton recombination energies are not strongly modified with respect to the bulk, as expected from theoretical calculations, indicating extremely compact excitons in h-BN.

  7. The effect of graphene content and sliding speed on the wear mechanism of nickel-graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algul, H.; Tokur, M.; Ozcan, S.; Uysal, M.; Cetinkaya, T.; Akbulut, H.; Alp, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nickel-graphene metal matrix composite coatings were fabricated by pulse electrodeposition technique from a Watt's type electrolyte. Effect of the graphene concentration in the electrolyte on the microstructure, microhardness, tribological features of nanocomposite coatings were evaluated in details. Microhardness of the composite coating was measured using a Vicker's microhardness indenter. The surfaces of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectroscopy, EDS and XRD analysis were used to determine chemical composition and structure of composite coatings. The tribological behavior of the resultant composite coating was tested by a reciprocating ball-on disk method at constant load but varying sliding speeds for determination the wear loss and friction coefficient features against a counterface. The wear and friction variations of the electrodeposited nickel graphene nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel balls were carried out on a CSM Instrument. The friction and wear properties of the coatings were examined without any lubrication at room temperature in the ambient air. The change in wear mechanisms by changing graphene nanosheets content was also comprehensively studied.

  8. Mechanical and dye adsorption properties of graphene oxide/chitosan composite fibers prepared by wet spinning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Sun, Jiankun; Du, Qiuju; Zhang, Luhui; Yang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Shaoling; Xia, Yanzhi; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Linhua; Cao, Anyuan

    2014-02-15

    Graphene oxide/chitosan composite fibers were prepared by a wet spinning method, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Experimental results showed that the introduction of graphene oxide at 4 wt% loading can improve the tensile strengths of chitosan fibers. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effect of various parameters, such as the initial pH value, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature on adsorption of fuchsin acid dye. The Langmuir model was used to fit the experimental data of adsorption isotherm, and kinetic studies showed that the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second order model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of fuchsin acid dye on graphene oxide/chitosan fibers was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Our results indicate that the graphene oxide/chitosan fibers have excellent mechanical properties and can serve as a promising adsorbent for the removal of dyes from aqueous solutions.

  9. Metallic Nanoislands on Graphene as Highly Sensitive Transducers of Mechanical, Biological, and Optical Signals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an effect based on the wetting transparency of graphene; the morphology of a metallic film (≤20 nm) when deposited on graphene by evaporation depends strongly on the identity of the substrate supporting the graphene. This control permits the formation of a range of geometries, such as tightly packed nanospheres, nanocrystals, and island-like formations with controllable gaps down to 3 nm. These graphene-supported structures can be transferred to any surface and function as ultrasensitive mechanical signal transducers with high sensitivity and range (at least 4 orders of magnitude of strain) for applications in structural health monitoring, electronic skin, measurement of the contractions of cardiomyocytes, and substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, including on the tips of optical fibers). These composite films can thus be treated as a platform technology for multimodal sensing. Moreover, they are low profile, mechanically robust, semitransparent and have the potential for reproducible manufacturing over large areas. PMID:26765039

  10. Wrinkled bilayer graphene with wafer scale mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Javadi, Alireza; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-01

    Wafer-scale strained bilayer graphene is demonstrated by employing a silicon nitride (Si3N4) stressor layer. Different magnitudes of compressive stress up to 840 MPa were engineered by adjusting the Si3N4 deposition recipes, and different strain conditions were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The strained graphene displayed significant G peak shifts and G peak splitting with 16.2 cm-1 and 23.0 cm-1 of the G band and two-dimensional band shift, which corresponds to 0.26% of strain. Raman mapping of large regions of the graphene films found that the largest shifts/splitting occurred near the bilayer regions of the graphene films. The significance of our approach lies in the fact that it can be performed in a conventional microfabrication process, i.e., the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, and thus easily implemented for large scale production.

  11. Doping mechanisms in graphene-MoS{sub 2} hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, B. Lichtenstein, A. I.; Britnell, L.; Eckmann, A.; Novoselov, K. S.; Wehling, T. O.; Jalil, R.; Belle, B. D.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2013-12-16

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of charge doping and electronic potential landscapes in hybrid structures composed of graphene and semiconducting single layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). From first-principles simulations, we find electron doping of graphene due to the presence of rhenium impurities in MoS{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that MoS{sub 2} edges give rise to charge reordering and a potential shift in graphene, which can be controlled through external gate voltages. The interplay of edge and impurity effects allows the use of the graphene-MoS{sub 2} hybrid as a photodetector. Spatially resolved photocurrent signals can be used to resolve potential gradients and local doping levels in the sample.

  12. Stability and exfoliation of germanane: a germanium graphane analogue.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Elisabeth; Butler, Sheneve; Jiang, Shishi; Restrepo, Oscar D; Windl, Wolfgang; Goldberger, Joshua E

    2013-05-28

    Graphene's success has shown not only that it is possible to create stable, single-atom-thick sheets from a crystalline solid but that these materials have fundamentally different properties than the parent material. We have synthesized for the first time, millimeter-scale crystals of a hydrogen-terminated germanium multilayered graphane analogue (germanane, GeH) from the topochemical deintercalation of CaGe2. This layered van der Waals solid is analogous to multilayered graphane (CH). The surface layer of GeH only slowly oxidizes in air over the span of 5 months, while the underlying layers are resilient to oxidation based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The GeH is thermally stable up to 75 °C; however, above this temperature amorphization and dehydrogenation begin to occur. These sheets can be mechanically exfoliated as single and few layers onto SiO2/Si surfaces. This material represents a new class of covalently terminated graphane analogues and has great potential for a wide range of optoelectronic and sensing applications, especially since theory predicts a direct band gap of 1.53 eV and an electron mobility ca. five times higher than that of bulk Ge.

  13. Understanding the growth mechanism of graphene on Ge/Si(001) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Avila, J.; Baringhaus, J.; Colambo, I.; Dedkov, Yu S.; Herziger, F.; Lupina, G.; Maultzsch, J.; Schaffus, T.; Schroeder, T.; Kot, M.; Tegenkamp, C.; Vignaud, D.; Asensio, M.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The practical difficulties to use graphene in microelectronics and optoelectronics is that the available methods to grow graphene are not easily integrated in the mainstream technologies. A growth method that could overcome at least some of these problems is chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene directly on semiconducting (Si or Ge) substrates. Here we report on the comparison of the CVD and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of graphene on the technologically relevant Ge(001)/Si(001) substrate from ethene (C2H4) precursor and describe the physical properties of the films as well as we discuss the surface reaction and diffusion processes that may be responsible for the observed behavior. Using nano angle resolved photoemission (nanoARPES) complemented by transport studies and Raman spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report the direct observation of massless Dirac particles in monolayer graphene, providing a comprehensive mapping of their low-hole doped Dirac electron bands. The micrometric graphene flakes are oriented along two predominant directions rotated by 30° with respect to each other. The growth mode is attributed to the mechanism when small graphene “molecules” nucleate on the Ge(001) surface and it is found that hydrogen plays a significant role in this process. PMID:27531322

  14. Understanding the growth mechanism of graphene on Ge/Si(001) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, J; Lippert, G; Avila, J; Baringhaus, J; Colambo, I; Dedkov, Yu S; Herziger, F; Lupina, G; Maultzsch, J; Schaffus, T; Schroeder, T; Kot, M; Tegenkamp, C; Vignaud, D; Asensio, M-C

    2016-01-01

    The practical difficulties to use graphene in microelectronics and optoelectronics is that the available methods to grow graphene are not easily integrated in the mainstream technologies. A growth method that could overcome at least some of these problems is chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene directly on semiconducting (Si or Ge) substrates. Here we report on the comparison of the CVD and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of graphene on the technologically relevant Ge(001)/Si(001) substrate from ethene (C2H4) precursor and describe the physical properties of the films as well as we discuss the surface reaction and diffusion processes that may be responsible for the observed behavior. Using nano angle resolved photoemission (nanoARPES) complemented by transport studies and Raman spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report the direct observation of massless Dirac particles in monolayer graphene, providing a comprehensive mapping of their low-hole doped Dirac electron bands. The micrometric graphene flakes are oriented along two predominant directions rotated by 30° with respect to each other. The growth mode is attributed to the mechanism when small graphene "molecules" nucleate on the Ge(001) surface and it is found that hydrogen plays a significant role in this process. PMID:27531322

  15. Understanding the growth mechanism of graphene on Ge/Si(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Avila, J.; Baringhaus, J.; Colambo, I.; Dedkov, Yu S.; Herziger, F.; Lupina, G.; Maultzsch, J.; Schaffus, T.; Schroeder, T.; Kot, M.; Tegenkamp, C.; Vignaud, D.; Asensio, M.-C.

    2016-08-01

    The practical difficulties to use graphene in microelectronics and optoelectronics is that the available methods to grow graphene are not easily integrated in the mainstream technologies. A growth method that could overcome at least some of these problems is chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene directly on semiconducting (Si or Ge) substrates. Here we report on the comparison of the CVD and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of graphene on the technologically relevant Ge(001)/Si(001) substrate from ethene (C2H4) precursor and describe the physical properties of the films as well as we discuss the surface reaction and diffusion processes that may be responsible for the observed behavior. Using nano angle resolved photoemission (nanoARPES) complemented by transport studies and Raman spectroscopy as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we report the direct observation of massless Dirac particles in monolayer graphene, providing a comprehensive mapping of their low-hole doped Dirac electron bands. The micrometric graphene flakes are oriented along two predominant directions rotated by 30° with respect to each other. The growth mode is attributed to the mechanism when small graphene “molecules” nucleate on the Ge(001) surface and it is found that hydrogen plays a significant role in this process.

  16. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De'an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  17. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De’an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft. PMID:27618989

  18. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De’An; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-09-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft.

  19. Failure mechanism of monolayer graphene under hypervelocity impact of spherical projectile.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kang; Zhan, Haifei; Hu, De'an; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of graphene have enabled it as appealing candidate in the field of impact protection or protective shield. By considering a monolayer graphene membrane, in this work, we assessed its deformation mechanisms under hypervelocity impact (from 2 to 6 km/s), based on a serial of in silico studies. It is found that the cracks are formed preferentially in the zigzag directions which are consistent with that observed from tensile deformation. Specifically, the boundary condition is found to exert an obvious influence on the stress distribution and transmission during the impact process, which eventually influences the penetration energy and crack growth. For similar sample size, the circular shape graphene possesses the best impact resistance, followed by hexagonal graphene membrane. Moreover, it is found the failure shape of graphene membrane has a strong relationship with the initial kinetic energy of the projectile. The higher kinetic energy, the more number the cracks. This study provides a fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanisms of monolayer graphene under impact, which is crucial in order to facilitate their emerging future applications for impact protection, such as protective shield from orbital debris for spacecraft. PMID:27618989

  20. Lignin-assisted exfoliation of molybdenum disulfide in aqueous media and its application in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanshuang; Zhao, Chenyang; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Zhaolin; Lu, Xuehong

    2015-05-01

    In this article, alkali lignin (AL)-assisted direct exfoliation of MoS2 mineral into single-layer and few-layer nanosheets in water is reported for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the concentration of MoS2 nanosheets in the obtained dispersion can be as high as 1.75 +/- 0.08 mg mL-1, which is much higher than the typical reported concentrations (<1.0 mg mL-1) using synthetic polymers or compounds as surfactants. The stabilizing mechanism primarily lies in the electrostatic repulsion between negative charged AL, as suggested by zeta-potential measurements. When the exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets are applied as electrode materials for lithium ion batteries, they show much improved electrochemical performance compared with the pristine MoS2 mineral because of the enhanced ion and electron transfer kinetics. This facile, scalable and eco-friendly aqueous-based process in combination with renewable and ultra-low-cost lignin opens up possibilities for large-scale fabrication of MoS2-based nanocomposites and devices. Moreover, herein we demonstrate that AL is also an excellent surfactant for exfoliation of many other types of layered materials, including graphene, tungsten disulfide and boron nitride, in water, providing rich opportunities for a wider range of applications.In this article, alkali lignin (AL)-assisted direct exfoliation of MoS2 mineral into single-layer and few-layer nanosheets in water is reported for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the concentration of MoS2 nanosheets in the obtained dispersion can be as high as 1.75 +/- 0.08 mg mL-1, which is much higher than the typical reported concentrations (<1.0 mg mL-1) using synthetic polymers or compounds as surfactants. The stabilizing mechanism primarily lies in the electrostatic repulsion between negative charged AL, as suggested by zeta-potential measurements. When the exfoliated MoS2 nanosheets are applied as electrode materials for lithium ion batteries, they show much improved

  1. Peptide-Graphene Interactions Enhance the Mechanical Properties of Silk Fibroin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Koh, Leng-Duei; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Zhang, Yingyan; Yeo, Jingjie; Guan, Guijian; Han, Ming-Yong; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Studies reveal that biomolecules can form intriguing molecular structures with fascinating functionalities upon interaction with graphene. Then, interesting questions arise. How does silk fibroin interact with graphene? Does such interaction lead to an enhancement in its mechanical properties? In this study, using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we first examine the interaction of graphene with several typical peptide structures of silk fibroin extracted from different domains of silk fibroin, including pure amorphous (P1), pure crystalline (P2), a segment from N-terminal (P3), and a combined amorphous and crystalline segment (P4), aiming to reveal their structural modifications. Our study shows that graphene can have intriguing influences on the structures formed by the peptides with sequences representing different domains of silk fibroin. In general, for protein domains with stable structure and strong intramolecular interaction (e.g., β-sheets), graphene tends to compete with the intramolecular interactions and thus weaken the interchain interaction and reduce the contents of β-sheets. For the silk domains with random or less ordered secondary structures and weak intramolecular interactions, graphene tends to enhance the stability of peptide structures; in particular, it increases the contents of helical structures. Thereafter, tensile simulations were further performed on the representative peptides to investigate how such structure modifications affect their mechanical properties. It was found that the strength and resilience of the peptides are enhanced through their interaction with graphene. The present work reveals interesting insights into the interactions between silk peptides and graphene, and contributes in the efforts to enhance the mechanical properties of silk fibroin.

  2. In situ imaging and control of layer-by-layer femtosecond laser thinning of graphene.

    PubMed

    Li, D W; Zhou, Y S; Huang, X; Jiang, L; Silvain, J-F; Lu, Y F

    2015-02-28

    Although existing methods (chemical vapor deposition, mechanical exfoliation, etc.) are available to produce graphene, the lack of thickness control limits further graphene applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach to precisely thin graphene films to a specific thickness using femtosecond (fs) laser raster scanning. By using appropriate laser fluence and scanning times, graphene thinning with an atomic layer precision, namely layer-by-layer graphene removal, has been realized. The fs laser used was configured in a four-wave mixing (FWM) system which can be used to distinguish graphene layer thickness and count the number of layers using the linear relationship between the FWM signal intensity and the graphene thickness. Furthermore, FWM imaging has been successfully applied to achieve in situ, real-time monitoring of the fs laser graphene thinning process. This method can not only realize the large-scale thinning of graphene with atomic layer precision, but also provide in situ, rapid imaging capability of graphene for an accurate assessment of the number of layers.

  3. Superior Mobility in Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesized Graphene by Grain Size Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Nicholas; Dean, Cory; Meric, Inanc; van der Zande, Arend; Huang, Pinshane; Wang, Lei; Muller, David; Shepard, Kenneth; Hone, James

    2012-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) offers a promising method to produce large-area films of graphene, crucial for commercial realization of graphene-based applications. However, electron transport in CVD grown graphene has continued to fall short of the performance demonstrated by graphene derived from mechanical exfoliation. Lattice defects and grain boundaries developed during growth, structural defects and chemical contamination introduced during transfer, and charged scatterers present in sub-optimal dielectric substrates have all been identified as sources of disorder in CVD grown graphene devices. We grow CVD graphene and fabricate field-effect transistors, attempting to minimize potential sources of disorder. We reduce density of grain boundaries in CVD graphene by controlling domain sizes up to 250 microns. By transferring CVD graphene onto h-BN utilizing a dry-transfer method, we minimize trapped charges at the interface between graphene and in the underlying substrate. We report field-effect mobilities up to 110,000 cm2V-1s-1 and oscillations in magnetotransport measurements below 1 T, confirming the high quality and low disorder in our CVD graphene devices.

  4. Mechanical Deformation of Single- and Few- Layer Graphene on Micro-Scale-Grooved PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocklin, David; Scharfenberg, Scott; Chialvo, Cesar; Weaver, Richard; Goldbart, Paul; Mason, Nadya

    2009-11-01

    The physical properties of the material graphene are currently of wide interest. To explore their mechanical aspects, we placed graphene flakes, of thicknesses ranging from one to seven layers, on a rubbery PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) substrate containing microgrooves. We used Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging techniques to study the resulting deformations of the surface, and found that the graphene adhered to the sample and substantially flattened the profile of the grooves. We have examined this flattening effect within a model based on linear elasticity theory. Thus, we have been able to identify, at least tentatively, the point at which shear stress breaks the interlayer coupling and causes the graphene layers to slide against each other.

  5. Physisorption mechanism in graphene/noble metal (111)/Ni(111) heterostructures: An ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaddeli, Mohammad; Salehi, Hamdollah; Amiri, Peiman

    2016-08-01

    The 3D stacking of various 2D systems is an intelligent way of aiming to overcome the limitations usually faced by 2D systems. We study the adsorption of graphene on noble metal monolayers upon Ni (111) substrate, using density functional theory. The bonding mechanism at noble metal-graphene and noble metal-Ni interfaces is found to be physisorption and chemisorption, respectively. The bonding of graphene to Cu, Ag, and Au (111) monolayers is so weak that the conical shape of the Dirac point is preserved. The doping effects of a substrate lead to a small opening gap for gr/Cu/Ni and gr/Ag/Ni systems. These predictions are in agreement with experimental results. The intercalation of a noble metal monolayer between graphene and Ni (111) substrate changes the magnetic response from Ni surface and causes the formation of a ferrimagnetic system.

  6. Optimized growth of graphene on SiC: from the dynamic flip mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dandan; Liu, Lei; Chen, Wei; Chen, Xiaobo; Huang, Han; He, Jun; Feng, Yuan-Ping; Wee, A. T. S.; Shen, D. Z.

    2015-02-01

    Thermal decomposition of single-crystal SiC is one of the popular methods for growing graphene. However, the mechanism of graphene formation on the SiC surface is poorly understood, and the application of this method is also hampered by its high growth temperature. In this study, based on the ab initio calculations, we propose a vacancy assisted Si-C bond flipping model for the dynamic process of graphene growth on SiC. The fact that the critical stages during growth take place at different energy costs allows us to propose an energetic-beam controlled growth method that not only significantly lowers the growth temperature but also makes it possible to grow high-quality graphene with the desired size and patterns directly on the SiC substrate.

  7. Materials science. Dynamic mechanical behavior of multilayer graphene via supersonic projectile penetration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Loya, Phillip E; Lou, Jun; Thomas, Edwin L

    2014-11-28

    Multilayer graphene is an exceptional anisotropic material due to its layered structure composed of two-dimensional carbon lattices. Although the intrinsic mechanical properties of graphene have been investigated at quasi-static conditions, its behavior under extreme dynamic conditions has not yet been studied. We report the high-strain-rate behavior of multilayer graphene over a range of thicknesses from 10 to 100 nanometers by using miniaturized ballistic tests. Tensile stretching of the membrane into a cone shape is followed by initiation of radial cracks that approximately follow crystallographic directions and extend outward well beyond the impact area. The specific penetration energy for multilayer graphene is ~10 times more than literature values for macroscopic steel sheets at 600 meters per second.

  8. Unraveling the formation mechanism of graphitic nitrogen-doping in thermally treated graphene with ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Lian, Ke-Yan; Liu, Lingling; Wu, Yingchao; Qiu, Qi; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) has attractive properties that has been widely studied over the years. However, its possible formation process still remains unclear. Here, we propose a highly feasible formation mechanism of the graphitic-N doing in thermally treated graphene with ammonia by performing ab initio molecular dynamic simulations at experimental conditions. Results show that among the commonly native point defects in graphene, only the single vacancy 5–9 and divacancy 555–777 have the desirable electronic structures to trap N-containing groups and to mediate the subsequent dehydrogenation processes. The local structure of the defective graphene in combining with the thermodynamic and kinetic effect plays a crucial role in dominating the complex atomic rearrangement to form graphitic-N which heals the corresponding defect perfectly. The importance of the symmetry, the localized force field, the interaction of multiple trapped N-containing groups, as well as the catalytic effect of the temporarily formed bridge-N are emphasized, and the predicted doping configuration agrees well with the experimental observation. Hence, the revealed mechanism will be helpful for realizing the targeted synthesis of N-graphene with reduced defects and desired properties.

  9. Unraveling the formation mechanism of graphitic nitrogen-doping in thermally treated graphene with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Lian, Ke-Yan; Liu, Lingling; Wu, Yingchao; Qiu, Qi; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) has attractive properties that has been widely studied over the years. However, its possible formation process still remains unclear. Here, we propose a highly feasible formation mechanism of the graphitic-N doing in thermally treated graphene with ammonia by performing ab initio molecular dynamic simulations at experimental conditions. Results show that among the commonly native point defects in graphene, only the single vacancy 5-9 and divacancy 555-777 have the desirable electronic structures to trap N-containing groups and to mediate the subsequent dehydrogenation processes. The local structure of the defective graphene in combining with the thermodynamic and kinetic effect plays a crucial role in dominating the complex atomic rearrangement to form graphitic-N which heals the corresponding defect perfectly. The importance of the symmetry, the localized force field, the interaction of multiple trapped N-containing groups, as well as the catalytic effect of the temporarily formed bridge-N are emphasized, and the predicted doping configuration agrees well with the experimental observation. Hence, the revealed mechanism will be helpful for realizing the targeted synthesis of N-graphene with reduced defects and desired properties. PMID:27002190

  10. Unraveling the formation mechanism of graphitic nitrogen-doping in thermally treated graphene with ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Lian, Ke-Yan; Liu, Lingling; Wu, Yingchao; Qiu, Qi; Jiang, Jun; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (N-graphene) has attractive properties that has been widely studied over the years. However, its possible formation process still remains unclear. Here, we propose a highly feasible formation mechanism of the graphitic-N doing in thermally treated graphene with ammonia by performing ab initio molecular dynamic simulations at experimental conditions. Results show that among the commonly native point defects in graphene, only the single vacancy 5–9 and divacancy 555–777 have the desirable electronic structures to trap N-containing groups and to mediate the subsequent dehydrogenation processes. The local structure of the defective graphene in combining with the thermodynamic and kinetic effect plays a crucial role in dominating the complex atomic rearrangement to form graphitic-N which heals the corresponding defect perfectly. The importance of the symmetry, the localized force field, the interaction of multiple trapped N-containing groups, as well as the catalytic effect of the temporarily formed bridge-N are emphasized, and the predicted doping configuration agrees well with the experimental observation. Hence, the revealed mechanism will be helpful for realizing the targeted synthesis of N-graphene with reduced defects and desired properties. PMID:27002190

  11. Strain engineering for mechanical properties in graphene nanoribbons revisited: The warping edge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the strain engineering and the edge effect for mechanical properties in graphene nanoribbons. The free edges of the graphene nanoribbons are warped due to compressive edge stresses. There is a structural transformation for the free edges from the three-dimensional warping configuration to the two-dimensional planar structure at the critical strain ɛc = 0.7%, at which the applied mechanical stress is equal to the intrinsic compressive edge stress. This structural transformation leads to step-like changes in several mechanical properties studied in the present work, including the Young's modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the quality factor of nanomechanical resonators, and the phonon edge mode.

  12. Mechanisms of polarization switching in graphene oxides and poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graphene oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Guangping; Zhan, Ke; Han, Zhuo; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Polarization switching in graphene oxides (GOs) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-GO nanocomposite is investigated by piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM). The dynamical switching results reveal that GO films exhibit ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties with two-dimensional characteristics. Abnormal polarization switching is observed in PVDF-GO films, which is promising for electronic applications.

  13. An efficient and environment-friendly method of removing graphene oxide in wastewater and its degradation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao-Zhi; Li, Ting; Yuan, Yang; Xu, Jianqiang

    2016-06-01

    Graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have already existed in air, water and soil due to their popular application in functional materials. However, degradation of graphene and GO in wastewater has not been reported. Degradation of GO plays a key role in the elimination of graphene and GO in wastewater due to graphene being easily oxidized to GO. In this paper, GO was completely degraded to give CO2 by Photo-Fenton. The degradation intermediates were determined by UV-vis absorption spectra, elemental analysis (EA), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Experimental results showed that graphene oxide was completely degraded to give CO2 after 28 days. Based on UV, FT-IR, LC-MS spectra and EA data of these degradation intermediates, the degradation mechanisms of GO were supposed. This paper suggests an efficient and environment-friendly method to degrade GO and graphene.

  14. Micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials by a polymeric stamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz da Costa, M. C.; Ribeiro, H. B.; Kessler, F.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Fechine, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, an alternative technique to the traditional micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials is proposed, consisting of isolated flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide onto polymeric surfaces films. The set made up of polymer and flakes is fabricated by using a hot-press machine called polymeric stamp. The polymeric stamp was used to allocate flakes and also to allow the exfoliation process to take place just in one face of isolated flake. Optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy results showed that multilayers, bilayers and single layers of graphene and MoS2 were obtained by using a polymeric stamp as tool for micromechanical exfoliation. These crystals were more easily found because the exfoliation process concentrates them in well-defined locations. The results prove the effectiveness of the method by embedding two-dimensional materials into polymers to fabricate fewer layers crystals in a fast, economic and clean way.

  15. The Origin of Hierarchical Structure in Self-Assembled Graphene Oxide Papers and the Effect on Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Krishanu

    The quest for new materials with ever improving properties has motivated interest in bulk nanostructured materials. Graphene, a two-dimensional sheet of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms, has been of particular interest given its exceptional mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties. Graphene oxide is a chemically modified form of graphene in which the honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms is decorated with oxygen bearing functional groups. Graphene oxide represents a facile route for the production of large quantities of graphene based materials, is stable in aqueous and polar organic solvents and has the potential for further chemical modification. In this dissertation, the origin and influence of hierarchical structure on the mechanical properties of graphene oxide paper and graphene oxide paper based materials has been investigated. Free-standing papers derived from graphene oxide are of interest as structural materials due to their impressive mechanical properties. While studies have investigated the mechanical properties of graphene oxide papers, little is known about the formation mechanism. Using a series of flash-freezing experiments on graphene oxide papers undergoing formation, a stop-motion animation of the fabrication process was obtained. The results explain the origin of the hierarchical nature of graphene oxide papers and provide a method for the tailoring of graphene oxide based materials. An in depth study of fusion of graphene oxide papers demonstrates a simple single-step route for the fabrication of practical materials derived from graphene oxide papers. Fused papers retain the properties of constituent papers allowing for the fabrication of mechanical heterostructures that replicate the hierarchical nature of natural materials. The contribution of the hierarchical nature of graphene oxide papers to the mechanical properties was examined by comparing papers formed by two different mechanisms. The intermediate length scale structures

  16. Aqueous dispersions of few-layer-thick chemically modified magnesium diboride nanosheets by ultrasonication assisted exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Bedar, Amita; Kannan, Aadithya; Jasuja, Kabeer

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of graphene has led to a rising interest in seeking quasi two-dimensional allotropes of several elements and inorganic compounds. Boron, carbon's neighbour in the periodic table, presents a curious case in its ability to be structured as graphene. Although it cannot independently constitute a honeycomb planar structure, it forms a graphenic arrangement in association with electron-donor elements. This is exemplified in magnesium diboride (MgB2): an inorganic layered compound comprising boron honeycomb planes alternated by Mg atoms. Till date, MgB2 has been primarily researched for its superconducting properties; it hasn't been explored for the possibility of its exfoliation. Here we show that ultrasonication of MgB2 in water results in its exfoliation to yield few-layer-thick Mg-deficient hydroxyl-functionalized nanosheets. The hydroxyl groups enable an electrostatically stabilized aqueous dispersion and create a heterogeneity leading to an excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence. These chemically modified MgB2 nanosheets exhibit an extremely small absorption coefficient of 2.9 ml mg(-1) cm(-1) compared to graphene and its analogs. This ability to exfoliate MgB2 to yield nanosheets with a chemically modified lattice and properties distinct from the parent material presents a fundamentally new perspective to the science of MgB2 and forms a first foundational step towards exfoliating metal borides. PMID:26041686

  17. Aqueous dispersions of few-layer-thick chemically modified magnesium diboride nanosheets by ultrasonication assisted exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Bedar, Amita; Kannan, Aadithya; Jasuja, Kabeer

    2015-06-04

    The discovery of graphene has led to a rising interest in seeking quasi two-dimensional allotropes of several elements and inorganic compounds. Boron, carbon's neighbour in the periodic table, presents a curious case in its ability to be structured as graphene. Although it cannot independently constitute a honeycomb planar structure, it forms a graphenic arrangement in association with electron-donor elements. This is exemplified in magnesium diboride (MgB2): an inorganic layered compound comprising boron honeycomb planes alternated by Mg atoms. Till date, MgB2 has been primarily researched for its superconducting properties; it hasn't been explored for the possibility of its exfoliation. Here we show that ultrasonication of MgB2 in water results in its exfoliation to yield few-layer-thick Mg-deficient hydroxyl-functionalized nanosheets. The hydroxyl groups enable an electrostatically stabilized aqueous dispersion and create a heterogeneity leading to an excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence. These chemically modified MgB2 nanosheets exhibit an extremely small absorption coefficient of 2.9 ml mg(-1) cm(-1) compared to graphene and its analogs. This ability to exfoliate MgB2 to yield nanosheets with a chemically modified lattice and properties distinct from the parent material presents a fundamentally new perspective to the science of MgB2 and forms a first foundational step towards exfoliating metal borides.

  18. Aqueous dispersions of few-layer-thick chemically modified magnesium diboride nanosheets by ultrasonication assisted exfoliation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Bedar, Amita; Kannan, Aadithya; Jasuja, Kabeer

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of graphene has led to a rising interest in seeking quasi two-dimensional allotropes of several elements and inorganic compounds. Boron, carbon’s neighbour in the periodic table, presents a curious case in its ability to be structured as graphene. Although it cannot independently constitute a honeycomb planar structure, it forms a graphenic arrangement in association with electron-donor elements. This is exemplified in magnesium diboride (MgB2): an inorganic layered compound comprising boron honeycomb planes alternated by Mg atoms. Till date, MgB2 has been primarily researched for its superconducting properties; it hasn’t been explored for the possibility of its exfoliation. Here we show that ultrasonication of MgB2 in water results in its exfoliation to yield few-layer-thick Mg-deficient hydroxyl-functionalized nanosheets. The hydroxyl groups enable an electrostatically stabilized aqueous dispersion and create a heterogeneity leading to an excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence. These chemically modified MgB2 nanosheets exhibit an extremely small absorption coefficient of 2.9 ml mg−1 cm−1 compared to graphene and its analogs. This ability to exfoliate MgB2 to yield nanosheets with a chemically modified lattice and properties distinct from the parent material presents a fundamentally new perspective to the science of MgB2 and forms a first foundational step towards exfoliating metal borides. PMID:26041686

  19. Electric field effects in graphene/LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterostructures and nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Mengchen; Jnawali, Giriraj; Hsu, Jen-Feng; Dhingra, Shonali; Bi, Feng; Chen, Lu; D’Urso, Brian; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy; Lee, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Sangwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Ghahari, Fereshte; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Kim, Philip

    2015-06-01

    We report the development and characterization of graphene/LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterostructures. Complex-oxide heterostructures are created by pulsed laser deposition and are integrated with graphene using both mechanical exfoliation and transfer from chemical-vapor deposition on ultraflat copper substrates. Nanoscale control of the metal-insulator transition at the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface, achieved using conductive atomic force microscope lithography, is demonstrated to be possible through the graphene layer. LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}-based electric field effects using a graphene top gate are also demonstrated. The ability to create functional field-effect devices provides the potential of graphene-complex-oxide heterostructures for scientific and technological advancement.

  20. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Graphene-Germanium Interfaces Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Brian; Jacobberger, Robert; Mannix, Andrew; Campbell, Gavin; Bedzyk, Michael; Arnold, Michael; Hersam, Mark; Guisinger, Nathan

    Epitaxial graphene grown directly on semiconducting Ge wafers holds potential for fundamental science and electronics applications. However, since the initial demonstration, little work has been done on the structural and electronic properties of this system. To gain insight into the interface between graphene and Ge, we performed ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) along with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments to probe the atomic structure and chemistry at the interface. STS confirms stronger interfacial interaction on Ge(110), consistent with models of epitaxial growth. Raman spectroscopy shows that strain is highly prevalent after growth. Furthermore, the native strain modifies the atomic structure of the Germanium, inducing new and metastable Ge surface reconstructions following annealing. These reconstructions, in turn, modify both the electronic and mechanical properties of the graphene. Finally, graphene/Ge(001) represents the extremely strained case. Here graphene forces restructuring of the Ge surface into [107] facets. From this work, we see that the interaction between graphene and Ge is both dependent on the substrate crystallographic orientation and tunable.

  1. Energy efficient reduced graphene oxide additives: Mechanism of effective lubrication and antiwear properties

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhavana; Kumar, N.; Panda, Kalpataru; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized concentration of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in the lube is one of the important factors for effective lubrication of solid body contacts. At sufficiently lower concentration, the lubrication is ineffective and friction/wear is dominated by base oil. In contrast, at sufficiently higher concentration, the rGO sheets aggregates in the oil and weak interlayer sliding characteristic of graphene sheets is no more active for providing lubrication. However, at optimized concentration, friction coefficient and wear is remarkably reduced to 70% and 50%, respectively, as compared to neat oil. Traditionally, such lubrication is described by graphene/graphite particle deposited in contact surfaces that provides lower shear strength of boundary tribofilm. In the present investigation, graphene/graphite tribofilm was absent and existing traditional lubrication mechanism for the reduction of friction and wear is ruled out. It is demonstrated that effective lubrication is possible, if rGO is chemically linked with PEG molecules through hydrogen bonding and PEG intercalated graphene sheets provide sufficiently lower shear strength of freely suspended composite tribofilm under the contact pressure. The work revealed that physical deposition and adsorption of the graphene sheets in the metallic contacts is not necessary for the lubrication. PMID:26725334

  2. Mechanical and Electrostatic Properties of Freestanding Graphene Functionalized With Tin Oxide (SnO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Matthew; Xu, Peng; Barber, Steven; Schoelz, Kevin; Qi, Dejun; Thibado, Paul; Dong, Lifeng; Hansen, James

    2013-03-01

    Polymer/graphene blends have shown promise for building inexpensive and efficient heterojunction solar cells. It has been shown that efficiencies can be enhanced if the graphene membrane is functionalized by n-type inorganic nanocrystals, but it has proved difficult to directly chemically modify graphene. In this talk we present for the first time a two-step solution based technique which directly and uniformly deposits SnO2 nanoparticles onto a graphene membrane. Films are characterized using X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine elemental composition and density of coverage. A novel technique known as electrostatic manipulation scanning tunneling microscopy (EM-STM) is employed to characterize the affect of the nanoparticles on the mechanical and electrostatic properties of the functionalized graphene relative to pristine membranes. Evidence is presented that during the deposition stage graphene wraps around and encapsulates the nanoparticles. Financial support provided by the Taishan Overseas Scholar program, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (51172113), the Office of Naval Research under Grant No. N00014-10-1-0181 and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-0855358.

  3. Energy efficient reduced graphene oxide additives: Mechanism of effective lubrication and antiwear properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Bhavana; Kumar, N.; Panda, Kalpataru; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized concentration of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in the lube is one of the important factors for effective lubrication of solid body contacts. At sufficiently lower concentration, the lubrication is ineffective and friction/wear is dominated by base oil. In contrast, at sufficiently higher concentration, the rGO sheets aggregates in the oil and weak interlayer sliding characteristic of graphene sheets is no more active for providing lubrication. However, at optimized concentration, friction coefficient and wear is remarkably reduced to 70% and 50%, respectively, as compared to neat oil. Traditionally, such lubrication is described by graphene/graphite particle deposited in contact surfaces that provides lower shear strength of boundary tribofilm. In the present investigation, graphene/graphite tribofilm was absent and existing traditional lubrication mechanism for the reduction of friction and wear is ruled out. It is demonstrated that effective lubrication is possible, if rGO is chemically linked with PEG molecules through hydrogen bonding and PEG intercalated graphene sheets provide sufficiently lower shear strength of freely suspended composite tribofilm under the contact pressure. The work revealed that physical deposition and adsorption of the graphene sheets in the metallic contacts is not necessary for the lubrication.

  4. Equilibrium at the edge and atomistic mechanisms of graphene growth

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I.; Liu, Yuanyue; Yakobson, Boris I.

    2012-01-01

    The morphology of graphene is crucial for its applications, yet an adequate theory of its growth is lacking: It is either simplified to a phenomenological-continuum level or is overly detailed in atomistic simulations, which are often intractable. Here we put forward a comprehensive picture dubbed nanoreactor, which draws from ideas of step-flow crystal growth augmented by detailed first-principles calculations. As the carbon atoms migrate from the feedstock to catalyst to final graphene lattice, they go through a sequence of states whose energy levels can be computed and arranged into a step-by-step map. Analysis begins with the structure and energies of arbitrary edges to yield equilibrium island shapes. Then, it elucidates how the atoms dock at the edges and how they avoid forming defects. The sequence of atomic row assembly determines the kinetic anisotropy of growth, and consequently, graphene island morphology, explaining a number of experimental facts and suggesting how the growth product can further be improved. Finally, this analysis adds a useful perspective on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and its essential distinction from graphene. PMID:22949702

  5. Equilibrium at the edge and atomistic mechanisms of graphene growth.

    PubMed

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I; Liu, Yuanyue; Yakobson, Boris I

    2012-09-18

    The morphology of graphene is crucial for its applications, yet an adequate theory of its growth is lacking: It is either simplified to a phenomenological-continuum level or is overly detailed in atomistic simulations, which are often intractable. Here we put forward a comprehensive picture dubbed nanoreactor, which draws from ideas of step-flow crystal growth augmented by detailed first-principles calculations. As the carbon atoms migrate from the feedstock to catalyst to final graphene lattice, they go through a sequence of states whose energy levels can be computed and arranged into a step-by-step map. Analysis begins with the structure and energies of arbitrary edges to yield equilibrium island shapes. Then, it elucidates how the atoms dock at the edges and how they avoid forming defects. The sequence of atomic row assembly determines the kinetic anisotropy of growth, and consequently, graphene island morphology, explaining a number of experimental facts and suggesting how the growth product can further be improved. Finally, this analysis adds a useful perspective on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and its essential distinction from graphene. PMID:22949702

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Mechanical Properties of Ni-Coated Single Graphene Sheet and Their Embedded Aluminum Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Yang; Zha, Xin-Wei

    2010-07-01

    The effects of Ni coating on the mechanical behaviors of single graphene sheet and their embedded Al matrix composites under axial tension are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The results show that the Young's moduli and tensile strength of graphene obviously decrease after Ni coating. The results also show that the mechanical properties of Al matrix can be obviously increased by embedding a single graphene sheet. From the simulation, we also find that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the Ni-coated graphene/Al composite is obviously larger than those of the uncoated graphene/Al composite. The increased magnitude of the Young's modulus and tensile strength of graphene/Al composite are 52.27% and 32.32% at 0.01 K, respectively, due to Ni coating. By exploring the effects of temperature on the mechanical properties of single graphene sheet and their embedded Al matrix composites, it is found that the higher temperature leads to the lower critical strain and tensile strength.

  7. Laser induced modification of mechanical properties of nanostructures: graphene-water adsorbate-substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarov, P. A.; Frolov, V. D.; Zavedeev, E. V.; Khomich, A. A.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of laser induced modification of local mechanical properties of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition graphene on silicon substrate in air has been demonstrated. Nanosecond laser pulses (wavelength 532 nm) with focal spot diameter ~1 μm were used. Samples were placed and irradiated inside a scanning probe microscope (SPM) that allowed in situ studies of surface morphology and mechanical phase contrast in SPM tapping mode before and after multipulsed laser treatment. It was found that along with local profile transformation of graphene sheet (formation of nanopits and nanobumps), transformation of mechanical properties of graphene on a substrate structure took place. Such laser modified graphene area is larger than (but of the order of) the irradiation spot size. Its appearance is related to laser induced radial extension of an adsorbed water nanolayer intercalated between graphene and substrate. It is shown that the process of water layer lateral migration has a reversible character. This effect is proved by laser spot shift and sequential irradiation.

  8. The mechanism and process of spontaneous boron doping in graphene in the theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaohui; Zeng, Jing; Si, Mingsu; Lu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical model is presented that reveals the mechanism of spontaneous boron doping of graphene and is consistent with the microwave plasma experiment choosing trimethylboron as the doping source (Tang et al. (2012) [19]). The spontaneous boron doping originates from the synergistic effect of B and other groups (C, H, CH, CH2 or CH3) decomposing from trimethylboron. This work successfully explains the above experimental phenomenon and proposes a novel and feasible method aiming at B doping of graphene. The mechanism presented here may be also suitable for other two-dimensional carbon-based materials.

  9. Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons from amyloid templates by gallium vapor-assisted solid-phase graphitization

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhisa Dong, Tianchen; Kajiwara, Yuya; Takahashi, Teppei; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Hiyama, Takaki; Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-06-16

    Single- and double-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with widths of around 10 nm were synthesized directly onto an insulating substrate by solid-phase graphitization using a gallium vapor catalyst and carbon templates made of amyloid fibrils. Subsequent investigation revealed that the crystallinity, conductivity, and carrier mobility were all improved by increasing the temperature of synthesis. The carrier mobility of the GNR synthesized at 1050 °C was 0.83 cm{sup 2}/V s, which is lower than that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. This is considered to be most likely due to electron scattering by the defects and edges of the GNRs.

  10. Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons from amyloid templates by gallium vapor-assisted solid-phase graphitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Katsuhisa; Dong, Tianchen; Kajiwara, Yuya; Hiyama, Takaki; Takahashi, Teppei; Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Shiraki, Kentaro; Fujita, Jun-ichi

    2014-06-01

    Single- and double-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with widths of around 10 nm were synthesized directly onto an insulating substrate by solid-phase graphitization using a gallium vapor catalyst and carbon templates made of amyloid fibrils. Subsequent investigation revealed that the crystallinity, conductivity, and carrier mobility were all improved by increasing the temperature of synthesis. The carrier mobility of the GNR synthesized at 1050 °C was 0.83 cm2/V s, which is lower than that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. This is considered to be most likely due to electron scattering by the defects and edges of the GNRs.

  11. Nanoscale Mechanical Characterization of Graphene/Polymer Nanocomposites using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Minzhen

    Graphene materials, exhibiting outstanding mechanical properties, are excellent candidates as reinforcement in high-performance polymer nanocomposites. In this dissertation, advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques are applied to study the nanomechanics of graphene/polymer nanocomposites, specifically the graphene/polymer interfacial strength and the stress transfer at the interface. Two novel methods to directly characterize the interfacial strength between individual graphene sheets and polymers using AFM are presented and applied to a series of polymers and graphene sheets. The interfacial strength of graphene/polymer varies greatly for different combinations. The strongest interaction is found between graphene oxide (GO) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a strongly polar, water-based polymer. On the other hand, polystyrene, a non polar polymer, has the weakest interaction with GO. The interfacial bond strength is attributed to hydrogen bonding and physical adsorption. Further, the stress transfer in GO/PVA nanocomposites is studied quantitatively by monitoring the strain in individual GO sheet inside the polymer via AFM and Raman spectroscopy. For the first time, the strains of individual GO sheets in nanocomposites are imaged and quantified as a function of the applied external strains. The matrix strain is directly transferred to GO sheets for strains up to 8%. At higher strain levels, the onset of the nanocomposite failure and a stick-slip behavior is observed. This study reveals that GO is superior to pure graphene as reinforcement in nanocomposites. These results also imply the potential to make a new generation of nanocomposites with exceptional high strength and toughness. In the second part of this dissertation, AFM is used to study the structure of silk proteins and the morphology of spider silks. For the first time, shear-induced self-assembly of native silk fibroin is observed. The morphology of the Brown Recluse spider silk is investigated and a

  12. Stacking order dependent mechanical properties of graphene/MoS{sub 2} bilayer and trilayer heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, Robert M. E-mail: mahesh.neupane.ctr@mail.mil; Neupane, Mahesh R. E-mail: mahesh.neupane.ctr@mail.mil; Chantawansri, Tanya L.

    2015-08-17

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) are two-dimensional materials that show promise for flexible electronics and piezoelectric applications, but their weak mechanical strength is a barrier to practical use. In this work, we perform nanoindentation simulations using atomistic molecular dynamics to study the mechanical properties of heterostructures formed by combining MoS{sub 2} with graphene. We consider both bi- and tri-layer heterostructures formed with MoS{sub 2} either supported or encapsulated by graphene. Mechanical properties, such as Young's modulus, bending modulus, ultimate tensile strength, and fracture strain, are extracted from nanoindentation simulations and compared to the monolayer and homogeneous bilayer systems. We observed that the heterostructures, regardless of the stacking order, are mechanically more robust than the mono- and bi-layer MoS{sub 2}, mainly due to the mechanical reinforcement provided by the graphene layer. The magnitudes of ultimate strength and fracture strain are similar for both the bi- and tri-layer heterostructures, but substantially larger than either the mono- and bi-layer MoS{sub 2}. Our results demonstrate the potential of graphene-based heterostructures to improve the mechanical properties of TMDC materials.

  13. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, A.; Moser, J.; Chaste, J.; Zdrojek, M.; Wilson-Rae, I.; Bachtold, A.

    2011-06-01

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  14. Effect of structural defects and chemical functionalisation on the intrinsic mechanical properties of graphene.

    PubMed

    Güryel, Songül; Hajgató, Balázs; Dauphin, Yves; Blairon, Jean-Marie; Edouard Miltner, Hans; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul; Van Lier, Gregory

    2013-01-14

    Due to its unique mechanical properties, graphene can be applied for reinforcement in nanocomposites. We analyse the Young's modulus of graphene at the semi-empirical PM6 level of theory. The internal forces are calculated and the Young's modulus is predicted for a finite graphene sheet when external strain is applied on the system. These results are in a good agreement with theoretical and experimental results from the literature giving values of about 1 TPa for the Young's modulus. Stress-strain curves are computed for elongation up to 20%. In addition, the influence of the presence of a single vacancy, as well as for oxygenation of a vacancy, on the mechanical properties of graphene has been analysed. Our results indicate that when applying the deformation locally onto the system, higher local stress can be induced, as confirmed by Finite Element Analysis. Also, the presence of structural defects in the system will stiffen the system upon low strain, but reduces the elastic limit from more than 20% strain for pristine graphene to less than 10% strain when defects are present.

  15. Finite temperature effect on mechanical properties of graphene sheets with various grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Ge; Hong-Xiang, Sun; Yi-Jun, Guan; Gan-He, Zeng

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical properties of graphene sheets with various grain boundaries are studied by molecular dynamics method at finite temperatures. The finite temperature reduces the ultimate strengths of the graphenes with different types of grain boundaries. More interestingly, at high temperatures, the ultimate strengths of the graphene with the zigzag-orientation grain boundaries at low tilt angles exhibit different behaviors from those at lower temperatures, which is determined by inner initial stress in grain boundaries. The results indicate that the finite temperature, especially the high one, has a significant effect on the ultimate strength of graphene with grain boundaries, which gives a more in-depth understanding of their mechanical properties and could be useful for potential graphene applications. Project supported by the Nation Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11347219 and 11404147), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20140519), the Training Project of Young Backbone Teacher of Jiangsu University, the Advanced Talents of Jiangsu University, China (Grant No. 11JDG118), the Practice Innovation Training Program Projects for Industrial Center of Jiangsu University, China, and the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201308).

  16. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, S.; Hu, G.; Howe, R. C. T.; de Luca, A.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Ray, S. K.; Guha, P. K.; Hasan, T.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10-80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things.

  17. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing.

    PubMed

    Santra, S; Hu, G; Howe, R C T; De Luca, A; Ali, S Z; Udrea, F; Gardner, J W; Ray, S K; Guha, P K; Hasan, T

    2015-11-30

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10-80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things.

  18. CMOS integration of inkjet-printed graphene for humidity sensing

    PubMed Central

    Santra, S.; Hu, G.; Howe, R. C. T.; De Luca, A.; Ali, S. Z.; Udrea, F.; Gardner, J. W.; Ray, S. K.; Guha, P. K.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the integration of inkjet-printed graphene with a CMOS micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) microhotplate for humidity sensing. The graphene ink is produced via ultrasonic assisted liquid phase exfoliation in isopropyl alcohol (IPA) using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) polymer as the stabilizer. We formulate inks with different graphene concentrations, which are then deposited through inkjet printing over predefined interdigitated gold electrodes on a CMOS microhotplate. The graphene flakes form a percolating network to render the resultant graphene-PVP thin film conductive, which varies in presence of humidity due to swelling of the hygroscopic PVP host. When the sensors are exposed to relative humidity ranging from 10–80%, we observe significant changes in resistance with increasing sensitivity from the amount of graphene in the inks. Our sensors show excellent repeatability and stability, over a period of several weeks. The location specific deposition of functional graphene ink onto a low cost CMOS platform has the potential for high volume, economic manufacturing and application as a new generation of miniature, low power humidity sensors for the internet of things. PMID:26616216

  19. Facile synthesis and photoluminescence mechanism of graphene quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ping; Zhou, Ligang; Zhang, Shenli; Pan, Wei Shen, Wenzhong; Wan, Neng

    2014-12-28

    We report a facile hydrothermal synthesis of intrinsic fluorescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with two-dimensional morphology. This synthesis uses glucose, concentrate sulfuric acid, and deionized water as reagents. Concentrated sulfuric acid is found to play a key role in controlling the transformation of as-prepared hydrothermal products from amorphous carbon nanodots to well-crystallized GQDs. These GQDs show typical absorption characteristic for graphene, and have nearly excitation-independent ultraviolet and blue intrinsic emissions. Temperature-dependent PL measurements have demonstrated strong electron-electron scattering and electron-phonon interactions, suggesting a similar temperature behavior of GQDs to inorganic semiconductor quantum dots. According to optical studies, the ultraviolet emission is found to originate from the recombination of electron-hole pairs localized in the C=C bonds, while the blue emission is from the electron transition of sp{sup 2} domains.

  20. Negative differential resistance in boron nitride graphene heterostructures: physical mechanisms and size scaling analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Wan, Z; Xu, X; Patil, S R; Hetmaniuk, U; Anantram, M P

    2015-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is drawing increasing attention as an insulator and substrate material to develop next generation graphene-based electronic devices. In this paper, we investigate the quantum transport in heterostructures consisting of a few atomic layers thick hBN film sandwiched between graphene nanoribbon electrodes. We show a gate-controllable vertical transistor exhibiting strong negative differential resistance (NDR) effect with multiple resonant peaks, which stay pronounced for various device dimensions. We find two distinct mechanisms that are responsible for NDR, depending on the gate and applied biases, in the same device. The origin of first mechanism is a Fabry-Pérot like interference and that of the second mechanism is an in-plane wave vector matching when the Dirac points of the electrodes align. The hBN layers can induce an asymmetry in the current-voltage characteristics which can be further modulated by an applied bias. We find that the electron-phonon scattering suppresses the first mechanism whereas the second mechanism remains relatively unaffected. We also show that the NDR features are tunable by varying device dimensions. The NDR feature with multiple resonant peaks, combined with ultrafast tunneling speed provides prospect for the graphene-hBN-graphene heterostructure in the high-performance electronics. PMID:25991076

  1. Mechanism for excitation-dependent photoluminescence from graphene quantum dots and other graphene oxide derivates: consensus, debates and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhixing; Xu, Hao; Hao, Yanling

    2016-04-01

    Luminescent nanomaterials, with wide applications in biosensing, bioimaging, illumination and display techniques, have been consistently garnering enormous research attention. In particular, those with wavelength-controllable emissions could be highly beneficial. Carbon nanostructures, including graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and other graphene oxide derivates (GODs), with excitation-dependent photoluminescence (PL), which means their fluorescence color could be tuned simply by changing the excitation wavelength, have attracted lots of interest. However the intrinsic mechanism for the excitation-dependent PL is still obscure and fiercely debated presently. In this review, we attempt to summarize the latest efforts to explore the mechanism, including the quantum confinement effect, surface traps model, giant red-edge effect, edge states model and electronegativity of heteroatom model, as well as the newly developed synergistic model, to seek some clues to unravel the mechanism. Meanwhile the controversial difficulties for each model are further discussed. Besides this, the challenges and potential influences of the synthetic methodology and development of the materials are illustrated extensively to elicit more thought and constructive attempts toward their application.

  2. Microscopic mechanisms of graphene electrolytic delamination from metal substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fisichella, G.; Di Franco, S.; Roccaforte, F.; Giannazzo, F.; Ravesi, S.

    2014-06-09

    In this paper, hydrogen bubbling delamination of graphene (Gr) from copper using a strong electrolyte (KOH) water solution was performed, focusing on the effect of the KOH concentration (C{sub KOH}) on the Gr delamination rate. A factor of ∼10 decrease in the time required for the complete Gr delamination from Cu cathodes with the same geometry was found increasing C{sub KOH} from ∼0.05 M to ∼0.60 M. After transfer of the separated Gr membranes to SiO{sub 2} substrates by a highly reproducible thermo-compression printing method, an accurate atomic force microscopy investigation of the changes in Gr morphology as a function of C{sub KOH} was performed. Supported by these analyses, a microscopic model of the delamination process has been proposed, where a key role is played by graphene wrinkles acting as nucleation sites for H{sub 2} bubbles at the cathode perimeter. With this approach, the H{sub 2} supersaturation generated at the electrode for different electrolyte concentrations was estimated and the inverse dependence of t{sub d} on C{sub KOH} was quantitatively explained. Although developed in the case of Cu, this analysis is generally valid and can be applied to describe the electrolytic delamination of graphene from several metal substrates.

  3. Systemic Associations of Exfoliation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ritch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disease characterized by the production, deposition, and progressive accumulation of a white, fibrillar, extracellular material in many ocular tissues, most prominent on the anterior lens surface and pupillary border. Its prevalence increases steadily with age in all populations. It is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma worldwide and is a potentially reversible or even curable disease. First described in Finland in 1917 by Lindberg, it has long been associated with open-angle glaucoma. However, in recent years, it is being increasingly reported in conjunction with a multiplicity of both ocular and systemic disorders, and the number of these is expected to grow, particularly with investigations based on attempts to associate other diseases with those genes known to be associated with XFS. Despite the focus on XFS as a cause of open-angle glaucoma for nearly a century, in reality it is still only an ocular manifestation of a protean systemic disease. It is a unique disorder with extensive and often serious ocular and systemic manifestations and not, as it has long been termed, a "form" or "type" of glaucoma. This misconception has delayed research into the molecular and cellular processes involved in its development, and the underestimation of its overall importance and its underlying causative mechanisms have largely been long ignored. The purpose of this article is to review the systemic disorders which are becoming increasingly associated with XFS. Reviews of epidemiology, genetics, biomarkers, molecular mechanisms of development, and ocular findings may be found elsewhere. PMID:26886119

  4. Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangjun; Calizo, Irene; Hight Walker, Angela; PML, NIST Team

    We investigate the Fe-catalyzed etching of graphene layers in forming gas. Fe thin films are deposited by sputtering onto mechanically exfoliated graphene, few-layer graphene (FLG), and graphite flakes on a Si/SiO2 substrate. When the sample is rapidly annealed in forming gas, particles are produced due to the dewetting of the Fe thin film and those particles catalyze the etching of graphene layers. Monolayer graphene and FLG regions are severely damaged and that the particles catalytically etch channels in graphite. No etching is observed on graphite for the Fe thin film annealed in nitrogen. The critical role of hydrogen indicates that this graphite etching process is catalyzed by Fe particles through the carbon hydrogenation reaction. By comparing with the etched monolayer and FLG observed for the Fe film annealed in nitrogen, our Raman spectroscopy measurements identify that, in forming gas, the catalytic etching of monolayer and FLG is through carbon hydrogenation. During this process, Fe particles are catalytically active in the dissociation of hydrogen into hydrogen atoms and in the production of hydrogenated amorphous carbon through hydrogen spillover.

  5. Revealing the toughening mechanism of graphene-polymer nanocomposite through molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Shen, Jianxiang; Zheng, Zijian; Wu, Youping; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-07-24

    By employing united atom molecular dynamics simulation, we have investigated the effects of polymer-graphene interaction ε(np) volume fraction of grapheme φ thermodynamics of polymer matrix (rubbery versus glassy), interfacial interaction in the case of the same dispersion state, shape of nanoparticles (NPs) such as C60 CNT and graphene at the same loading on the toughening efficiency of polymer nanocomposites. By beginning with the pure polymer, we observe that a plateau stress occurs at long chain length because entangled polymer chains in fibrils cannot become broken. We find that the work needed to dissipate during the failure increases with the increase of ε(np) and φ and the yield point in the stress-strain behavior occurs at a smaller strain for an attractive NPs filled system compared to the pure case, attributed to the more mechanically heterogeneous environment. The thermodynamics of the polymer matrix (below and above Tg) seems to have a significant effect on the toughening efficiency of graphene sheets. In the case of the same dispersion state, stronger interfacial interaction always induces long and highly orientated polymer fibrils along the deformation direction, with graphene sheets being encapsulated in these fiber-like bundles. By characterizing the interaction energy between polymer-polymer and polymer-graphene as a function of the strain, we find that the separation of polymer chains from the graphene sheets cease immediately after the yield point, followed by the continuous propagation of the cavities by excluding surrounded polymer chains and graphene sheets together. We also find that at the same attractive interfacial interaction and same loading, the toughening efficiency exhibits the following order: graphene > CNT > C60 Generally, the toughening mechanism of graphene sheets results from the formation of long and highly orientated polymer fibrils to prevent the occurrence of the rupture, which can be greatly improved by the strong

  6. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive and stimuli-responsive binary network hydrogels enabled by superelastic graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Liu, Diyan; Wang, Yufei; Cheng, Chi; Zhou, Kun; Ding, Jie; Truong, Van-Tan; Li, Dan

    2014-05-28

    The architecture of the nanofiller phase in polymer nanocomposites matters! Polymer hydrogels that can combine stimuli-responsiveness with excellent electrically conductivity and mechanical strength can be fabricated by incorporation of the polymer into an ultralight and superelastic graphene aerogel to form a binary network. PMID:24634392

  7. Resonant Scattering off Magnetic Impurities in Graphene: Mechanism for Ultrafast Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, D.; Gmitra, M.; Fabian, J.

    We give a tutorial account of our recently proposed mechanism for spin relaxation based on spin-flip resonant scattering off local magnetic moments. The mechanism is rather general, working in any material with a resonant local moment, but we believe that its particular niche is graphene, whose measured spin relaxation time is 100-1000 ps. Conventional spin-orbit coupling based mechanisms (Elliott-Yafet or Dyakonov-Perel) would require large concentrations (1000 ppm) of impurities to explain this. Our mechanism needs only 1 ppm of resonant local moments, as these act as local spin hot spots: the resonant scatterers do not appear to substantially affect graphene's measured resistivity, but are dominating spin relaxation. In principle, the local moments can come from a variety of sources. Most likely would be organic molecule adsorbants or metallic adatoms. As the representative model, particularly suited for a tutorial, we consider hydrogen adatoms which are theoretically and experimentally demonstrated to yield local magnetic moments when chemisorbed on graphene. We introduce the scattering formalism and apply it to graphene, to obtain the T-matrix and spin-flip scattering rates using the generalized Fermi golden rule.

  8. A molecular dynamic simulation study of mechanical properties of graphene-polythiophene composite with Reax force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebi, Payman; Zaminpayma, Esmaeil

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we performed molecular dynamic simulations by Reax force field to study the mechanical properties of graphene-polythiophene nanocomposite. By computing elastic constant, breaking stress, breaking strain and Young's modulus from the stress-strain curve for the nanocomposites, we investigated effects of tension orientation, graphene loading to the polymer, temperature of nanocomposite and defect of graphene on these mechanical characters. It is found that mechanical characters of tension along the zigzag orientation are higher than other directions. Also, by increasing the weight concentration of graphene in composite, the Young's modulus and breaking strain increase. Our results showed that the Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature. Finally by applying defect on graphene structure, we found that one atom missing defect has lower Young's modulus. Also, by increasing the defects concentration, elastic modulus decreases gradually.

  9. Effect of charged impurities and morphology on oxidation reactivity of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mahito; Cullen, William; Einstein, Theodore; Fuhrer, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Chemical reactivity of single layer graphene supported on a substrate is observed to be enhanced over thicker graphene. Possible mechanisms for the enhancement are Fermi level fluctuations due to ionized impurities on the substrate, and structural deformation of graphene induced by coupling to the substrate geometry. Here, we study the substrate-dependent oxidation reactivity of graphene, employing various substrates such as SiO2, mica, SiO2 nanoparticle thin film, and hexagonal boron nitride, which exhibit different charged impurity concentrations and surface roughness. Graphene is prepared on each substrate via mechanical exfoliation and oxidized in Ar/O2 mixture at temperatures from 400-600 ^oC. After oxidation, the Raman spectrum of graphene is measured, and the Raman D to G peak ratio is used to quantify the density of point defects introduced by oxidation. We will discuss the correlations among the defect density in oxidized graphene, substrate charge inhomogeneity, substrate corrugations, and graphene layer thickness. This work has been supported by the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC under Grant No. DMR 05-20471 with supplemental funding from NRI, and NSF-DMR 08-04976.

  10. Insights into carbon nanotube and graphene formation mechanisms from molecular simulations: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, A. J.; Ding, F.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene over the last two decades has heralded a new era in physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. During this time, intense efforts have been made towards understanding the atomic-scale mechanisms by which these remarkable nanostructures grow. Molecular simulations have made significant contributions in this regard; indeed, they are responsible for many of the key discoveries and advancements towards this goal. Here we review molecular simulations of CNT and graphene growth, and in doing so we highlight the many invaluable insights gained from molecular simulations into these complex nanoscale self-assembly processes. This review highlights an often-overlooked aspect of CNT and graphene formation—that the two processes, although seldom discussed in the same terms, are in fact remarkably similar. Both can be viewed as a 0D → 1D → 2D transformation, which converts carbon atoms (0D) to polyyne chains (1D) to a complete sp2-carbon network (2D). The difference in the final structure (CNT or graphene) is determined only by the curvature of the catalyst and the strength of the carbon-metal interaction. We conclude our review by summarizing the present shortcomings of CNT/graphene growth simulations, and future challenges to this important area.

  11. Insights into carbon nanotube and graphene formation mechanisms from molecular simulations: a review.

    PubMed

    Page, A J; Ding, F; Irle, S; Morokuma, K

    2015-02-01

    The discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene over the last two decades has heralded a new era in physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. During this time, intense efforts have been made towards understanding the atomic-scale mechanisms by which these remarkable nanostructures grow. Molecular simulations have made significant contributions in this regard; indeed, they are responsible for many of the key discoveries and advancements towards this goal. Here we review molecular simulations of CNT and graphene growth, and in doing so we highlight the many invaluable insights gained from molecular simulations into these complex nanoscale self-assembly processes. This review highlights an often-overlooked aspect of CNT and graphene formation-that the two processes, although seldom discussed in the same terms, are in fact remarkably similar. Both can be viewed as a 0D → 1D → 2D transformation, which converts carbon atoms (0D) to polyyne chains (1D) to a complete sp(2)-carbon network (2D). The difference in the final structure (CNT or graphene) is determined only by the curvature of the catalyst and the strength of the carbon-metal interaction. We conclude our review by summarizing the present shortcomings of CNT/graphene growth simulations, and future challenges to this important area.

  12. The electro-mechanical responses of suspended graphene ribbons for electrostatic discharge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Rui; Chen, Qi; Xia, Ming; Ng, Jimmy; Wang, Albert; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a suspended graphene ribbon device for electrostatic discharge (ESD) applications. The device structure was proposed and fabricated after careful design considerations. Compared to the conventional ESD devices such as diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, the proposed device structure is believed to render several advantages including zero leakage, low parasitic effects, fast response, and high critical current density. A process flow was developed for higher yield and reliability of the suspended graphene ribbons. Direct current (DC) and transmission-line pulse (TLP) measurements were carried out to investigate the switching behavior of the device, which is crucial for ESD operation. DC measurements with a different configuration were used to assess the mechanical shape evolution of the graphene ribbon upon biasing. Finite Element Simulations were conducted and agreed well with the experimental results. Furthermore, the current carrying capability of non-suspended graphene ribbons was tested using TLP. It was found that the critical current density of graphene is higher than that of copper wires widely used as interconnects in integrated circuits (ICs).

  13. Screening of charged impurities as a possible mechanism for conductance change in graphene gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sang-Zi; Chen, Gugang; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2014-09-01

    In carbon nanotube and graphene gas sensing, the measured conductance change after the sensor is exposed to target molecules has been traditionally attributed to carrier density change due to charge transfer between the sample and the adsorbed molecule. However, this explanation has many problems when it is applied to graphene: The increased amount of Coulomb impurities should lead to decrease in carrier mobility which was not observed in many experiments, carrier density is controlled by the gate voltage in the experimental setup, and there are inconsistencies in the energetics of the charge transfer. In this paper we explore an alternative mechanism. Charged functional groups and dipolar molecules on the surface of graphene may counteract the effect of charged impurities on the substrate. Because scattering of electrons with these charged impurities has been shown to be the limiting factor in graphene conductivity, this leads to significant changes in the transport behavior. A model for the conductivity is established using the random phase approximation dielectric function of graphene and the first-order Born approximation for scattering. The model predicts optimal magnitudes for the charge and dipole moment which maximally screen a given charged impurity. The dipole screening is shown to be generally weaker than the charge screening although the former becomes more effective with higher gate voltage away from the charge neutrality point. The model also predicts that with increasing amount of adsorbates, the charge impurities eventually become saturated and additional adsorption always lead to decreasing conductivity.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Surface Enhanced Raman Mechanism of Pristine and Chemically Doped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Simin; Dos Santos, Maria C.; Lu, Ruitao; Elias, Ana L.; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-03-01

    It is demonstrated that graphene could be used as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate. Recently, our group has also shown that chemically doped graphene can improve the SERS signal of pristine graphene. Here we present an experimental and theoretical study on the SERS mechanism for both pristine (PG) and Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG). Large-area and highly-crystalline monolayer PG and NG sheets have been synthesized. Common molecules, such as Rhodamine B, Crystal Violet, Methylene Blue and Melamine were used as Raman probes using different laser excitation energies. It was observed that for each molecule, specific laser energy exhibits large intensity Raman signals when compared to others. More importantly, some signals can be detected even for concentrations as low as 10-8 M, which provides excellent molecular sensing properties. Then the system was modeled using DFT-B3LYP/6-31(d,p) and the Mulliken population analysis was used to calculate the net charge on the adsorbed molecules. By comparing the cases of PG and NG, our preliminary results suggest that stronger Raman enhancement of NG would likely be coming from the resonance of EF of graphene and the LUMO level of the adsorbed molecules.

  15. Graphene-Catalyzed Direct Friedel-Crafts Alkylation Reactions: Mechanism, Selectivity, and Synthetic Utility.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feng; Patel, Mehulkumar; Luo, Feixiang; Flach, Carol; Mendelsohn, Richard; Garfunkel, Eric; He, Huixin; Szostak, Michal

    2015-11-18

    Transition-metal-catalyzed alkylation reactions of arenes have become a central transformation in organic synthesis. Herein, we report the first general strategy for alkylation of arenes with styrenes and alcohols catalyzed by carbon-based materials, exploiting the unique property of graphenes to produce valuable diarylalkane products in high yields and excellent regioselectivity. The protocol is characterized by a wide substrate scope and excellent functional group tolerance. Notably, this process constitutes the first general application of graphenes to promote direct C-C bond formation utilizing polar functional groups anchored on the GO surface, thus opening the door for an array of functional group alkylations using benign and readily available graphene materials. Mechanistic studies suggest that the reaction proceeds via a tandem catalysis mechanism in which both of the coupling partners are activated by interaction with the GO surface. PMID:26496423

  16. Bio-inspired mechanics of highly sensitive stretchable graphene strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen; Yang, Tingting; Zhu, Hongwei; Zheng, Quanshui

    2015-04-01

    Graphene woven fabrics (GWFs) can sense large strain up to 10% with the highest gauge factors (105) thus far reported. This result promises key applications particularly in sensing strains of soft materials such as biological tissues, but the mechanism of such super gauge factor (SGF) property was not very clear. Through a bio-inspired Voronoi polycrystalline micromechanics model together with experimental validations, we show that the successive cracking, the "fish-scale" like network structure of GWFs, and the superlubricity between overlapped graphene flakes play crucial roles resulting in the SGF property. We also reveal the influences of overlapping width, graphene strip size, Poisson's ratio of the substrate material, size effect, interfacial resistance, and network size to the SGF property. These results can guide the design of GWFs with desired sensing performance.

  17. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Gupta, Sanjay D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-05-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  18. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and dynamical properties of graphene oxides: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Gupta, Sanjay D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-05-28

    We report the results of a theoretical study on the structural, electronic, mechanical, and vibrational properties of some graphene oxide models (GDO, a-GMO, z-GMO, ep-GMO and mix-GMO) at ambient pressure. The calculations are based on the ab-initio plane-wave pseudo potential density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximations for the exchange and correlation functional. The calculated values of lattice parameters, bulk modulus, and its first order pressure derivative are in good agreement with other reports. A linear response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive the phonon frequencies. We discuss the contribution of the phonons in the dynamical stability of graphene oxides and detailed analysis of zone centre phonon modes in all the above mentioned models. Our study demonstrates a wide range of energy gap available in the considered models of graphene oxide and hence the possibility of their use in nanodevices.

  19. Continuous production of nitrogen-functionalized graphene nanosheets for catalysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeeva Rao, Kodepelly; Senthilnathan, Jaganathan; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Yoshimura, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    This study reports the ``continuous production'' of high-quality, few-layer nitrogen-functionalized graphene nanosheets in aqueous solutions directly from graphite via a two-step method. The initial step utilizes our recently developed peroxide-mediated soft and green electrochemical exfoliation approach for the production of few-layer graphene nanosheets. The subsequent step, developed here, produces nitrogen-functionalized graphene nanosheets via selective alkylation/basic hydrolysis reactions using rather a simple nitrogen precursor bromoacetonitrile, which was never reported in the literature. A possible reaction mechanism of the nitrogen-functionalized graphene formation is proposed. The proposed method allows the quantification of the phenolic and hydroxyl functional groups of anodic few-layer graphene via the derivatization chemistry approach. Additionally, a nitrogen-functionalized graphene-gold nanocrystal hybrid is prepared using gold nanocrystals obtained via the microwave irradiation of H[AuCl4] and trisodium citrate solution. A systematic investigation demonstrates that the nitrogen-functionalized graphene-gold nanocrystal hybrid shows enhanced catalytic reduction of carbonyl compounds such as benzaldehyde.This study reports the ``continuous production'' of high-quality, few-layer nitrogen-functionalized graphene nanosheets in aqueous solutions directly from graphite via a two-step method. The initial step utilizes our recently developed peroxide-mediated soft and green electrochemical exfoliation approach for the production of few-layer graphene nanosheets. The subsequent step, developed here, produces nitrogen-functionalized graphene nanosheets via selective alkylation/basic hydrolysis reactions using rather a simple nitrogen precursor bromoacetonitrile, which was never reported in the literature. A possible reaction mechanism of the nitrogen-functionalized graphene formation is proposed. The proposed method allows the quantification of the phenolic

  20. Soliton-dependent plasmon reflection at bilayer graphene domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lili; Shi, Zhiwen; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Sheng; Kang, Ji-Hun; Joshi, Trinity; Jin, Chenhao; Ju, Long; Kim, Jonghwan; Lyu, Tairu; Shen, Yuen-Ron; Crommie, Michael; Gao, Hong-Jun; Wang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Layer-stacking domain walls in bilayer graphene are emerging as a fascinating one-dimensional system that features stacking solitons structurally and quantum valley Hall boundary states electronically. The interactions between electrons in the 2D graphene domains and the one-dimensional domain-wall solitons can lead to further new quantum phenomena. Domain-wall solitons of varied local structures exist along different crystallographic orientations, which can exhibit distinct electrical, mechanical and optical properties. Here we report soliton-dependent 2D graphene plasmon reflection at different 1D domain-wall solitons in bilayer graphene using near-field infrared nanoscopy. We observe various domain-wall structures in mechanically exfoliated graphene bilayers, including network-forming triangular lattices, individual straight or bent lines, and even closed circles. The near-field infrared contrast of domain-wall solitons arises from plasmon reflection at domain walls, and exhibits markedly different behaviours at the tensile- and shear-type domain-wall solitons. In addition, the plasmon reflection at domain walls exhibits a peculiar dependence on electrostatic gating. Our study demonstrates the unusual and tunable coupling between 2D graphene plasmons and domain-wall solitons.

  1. Large-Scale Production of Nanographite by Tube-Shear Exfoliation in Water.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Nicklas; Engström, Ann-Christine; Hummelgård, Magnus; Andres, Britta; Forsberg, Sven; Olin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The number of applications based on graphene, few-layer graphene, and nanographite is rapidly increasing. A large-scale process for production of these materials is critically needed to achieve cost-effective commercial products. Here, we present a novel process to mechanically exfoliate industrial quantities of nanographite from graphite in an aqueous environment with low energy consumption and at controlled shear conditions. This process, based on hydrodynamic tube shearing, produced nanometer-thick and micrometer-wide flakes of nanographite with a production rate exceeding 500 gh-1 with an energy consumption about 10 Whg-1. In addition, to facilitate large-area coating, we show that the nanographite can be mixed with nanofibrillated cellulose in the process to form highly conductive, robust and environmentally friendly composites. This composite has a sheet resistance below 1.75 Ω/sq and an electrical resistivity of 1.39×10-4 Ωm and may find use in several applications, from supercapacitors and batteries to printed electronics and solar cells. A batch of 100 liter was processed in less than 4 hours. The design of the process allow scaling to even larger volumes and the low energy consumption indicates a low-cost process. PMID:27128841

  2. Large-Scale Production of Nanographite by Tube-Shear Exfoliation in Water

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Ann-Christine; Hummelgård, Magnus; Andres, Britta; Forsberg, Sven; Olin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The number of applications based on graphene, few-layer graphene, and nanographite is rapidly increasing. A large-scale process for production of these materials is critically needed to achieve cost-effective commercial products. Here, we present a novel process to mechanically exfoliate industrial quantities of nanographite from graphite in an aqueous environment with low energy consumption and at controlled shear conditions. This process, based on hydrodynamic tube shearing, produced nanometer-thick and micrometer-wide flakes of nanographite with a production rate exceeding 500 gh-1 with an energy consumption about 10 Whg-1. In addition, to facilitate large-area coating, we show that the nanographite can be mixed with nanofibrillated cellulose in the process to form highly conductive, robust and environmentally friendly composites. This composite has a sheet resistance below 1.75 Ω/sq and an electrical resistivity of 1.39×10-4 Ωm and may find use in several applications, from supercapacitors and batteries to printed electronics and solar cells. A batch of 100 liter was processed in less than 4 hours. The design of the process allow scaling to even larger volumes and the low energy consumption indicates a low-cost process. PMID:27128841

  3. DNA-Assisted Exfoliation of Tungsten Dichalcogenides and Their Antibacterial Effect.

    PubMed

    Bang, Gyeong Sook; Cho, Suhyung; Son, Narae; Shim, Gi Woong; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2016-01-27

    This study reports a method for the facile and high-yield exfoliation of WX2 (X = S, Se) by sonication under aqueous conditions using single-stranded DNA (abbreviated as ssDNA) of high molecular weight. The ssDNA provided a high degree of stabilization and prevented reaggregation, and it enhanced the exfoliation efficiency of WX2 nanosheets due to adsorption on the WX2 surface and the electrostatic repulsion of sugars in the ssDNA backbone. The exfoliation yield was higher with ssDNA (80%-90%) than without (2%-4%); the yield with ssDNA was also higher than the value previously reported for aqueous exfoliation (∼10%). Given that two-dimensional nanomaterials have potential health and environmental applications, we investigated antibacterial activity of exfoliated WX2-ssDNA nanosheets, relative to graphene oxide (GO), and found that WSe2-ssDNA nanosheets had higher antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 cells than GO. Our method enables large-scale exfoliation in an aqueous environment in a single step with a short reaction time and under ambient conditions, and it can be used to produce surface-active or catalytic materials that have broad applications in biomedicine and other areas. PMID:26734845

  4. Production of ultra-thin nano-scaled graphene platelets from meso-carbon micro-beads

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-11-11

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets (NGPs) having an average thickness no greater than 50 nm, typically less than 2 nm, and, in many cases, no greater than 1 nm. The method comprises (a) intercalating a supply of meso-carbon microbeads (MCMBs) to produce intercalated MCMBs; and (b) exfoliating the intercalated MCMBs at a temperature and a pressure for a sufficient period of time to produce the desired NGPs. Optionally, the exfoliated product may be subjected to a mechanical shearing treatment, such as air milling, air jet milling, ball milling, pressurized fluid milling, rotating-blade grinding, or ultrasonicating. The NGPs are excellent reinforcement fillers for a range of matrix materials to produce nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  5. Verification of electron doping in single-layer graphene due to H{sub 2} exposure with thermoelectric power

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung Ju; Kang, Hojin; Soler-Delgado, David; Kim, Kyung Ho; Park, Yung Woo E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr; Park, Min; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Byung Hoon E-mail: kbh37@incheon.ac.kr; Kubatkin, Sergey

    2015-04-06

    We report the electron doping of single-layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) by means of dissociative hydrogen adsorption. The transfer characteristic showed n-type doping behavior similar to that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. Furthermore, we studied the thermoelectric power (TEP) of CVD-grown SLG before and after exposure to high-pressure H{sub 2} molecules. From the TEP results, which indicate the intrinsic electrical properties, we observed that the CVD-grown SLG is n-type doped without degradation of the quality after hydrogen adsorption. Finally, the electron doping was also verified by Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Preparation and mechanical characterization of polycaprolactone/graphene oxide biocomposite nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresti, Francesco; Maio, Andrea; Botta, Luigi; Scaffaro, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Biocomposite nanofiber scaffolds of polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with graphene oxide (GO) were prepared using electrospinning technology. Morphological and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized in dry and wet environment. The results showed that the successful incorporation of GO nanosheets into PCL polymer nanofibers improved their mechanical properties. Furthermore it was demonstrated the higher performance achieved when GO is filled at low concentration in the nanofibers.

  7. Prediction of structural and mechanical properties of atom-decorated porous graphene via density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Reza; Ajori, Shahram; Malakpour, Sina

    2016-04-01

    The considerable demand for novel materials with specific properties has motivated the researchers to synthesize supramolecular nanostructures through different methods. Porous graphene is the first two-dimensional hydrocarbon synthesized quite recently. This investigation is aimed at studying the mechanical properties of atom-decorated (functionalized) porous graphene by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculation within both local density approximations (LDA) and generalized gradient approximations (GGA). The atoms are selected from period 3 of periodic table as well as Li and O atom from period 2. The results reveal that metallic atoms and noble gases are adsorbed physically on porous graphene and nonmetallic ones form chemical bonds with carbon atom in porous graphene structure. Also, it is shown that, in general, atom decoration reduces the values of mechanical properties such as Young's, bulk and shear moduli as well as Poisson's ratio, and this reduction is more considerable in the case of nonmetallic atoms (chemical adsorption), especially oxygen atoms, as compared to metallic atoms and noble gases (physical adsorption).

  8. Line defects in Graphene: How doping cures the electronic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Daniel; Ratsch, Christian

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical properties. Intrinsic line defects such as local non-hexagonal reconstructions or grain boundaries, however, significantly reduce the tensile strength and destroy its unique electronic properties. Here, we address the properties of line defects in graphene from first-principles on the level of full-potential density functional theory, and assess doping as one strategy to strengthen such materials. We carefully disentangle the global and local effect of doping by comparing results from the virtual crystal approximation with those from local substitution of chemical species, in order to gain a detailed understanding of the breaking and stabilization mechanisms. We find that n-type doping or local substitution with electron rich species increases the ultimate tensile strength significantly. In particular, it can stabilize the defects beyond the ultimate tensile strength of the pristine material. We therefore propose that this should be a key strategy to strengthen graphenic materials. We find that doping can furthermore lead to semi-conducting behaviour along line defects, ultimately restoring the unique electronic properties of graphene.

  9. Charge density waves in exfoliated films of van der Waals materials: evolution of Raman spectrum in TiSe2.

    PubMed

    Goli, Pradyumna; Khan, Javed; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Lake, Roger K; Balandin, Alexander A

    2012-11-14

    A number of the charge-density-wave materials reveal a transition to the macroscopic quantum state around 200 K. We used graphene-like mechanical exfoliation of TiSe(2) crystals to prepare a set of films with different thicknesses. The transition temperature to the charge-density-wave state was determined via modification of Raman spectra of TiSe(2) films. It was established that the transition temperature can increase from its bulk value to ~240 K as the thickness of the van der Waals films reduces to the nanometer range. The obtained results are important for the proposed applications of such materials in the collective-state information processing, which require room-temperature operation.

  10. Reduced graphene oxide-induced recrystallization of NiS nanorods to nanosheets and the improved Na-storage properties.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qin; Xie, Jian; Zhu, Tiejun; Cao, Gaoshao; Zhao, Xinbing; Zhang, Shichao

    2014-04-01

    Preparation of two-dimensional (2D) graphene-like materials is currently an emerging field in materials science since the discovery of single-atom-thick graphene prepared by mechanical cleavage. In this work, we proposed a new method to prepare 2D NiS, where reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was found to induce the recrystallization of NiS from nanorods to nanosheets in a hydrothermal process. The process and mechanism of recrystallization have been clarified by various characterization techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characterization of ex situ NiS/rGO products by SEM and EDS mapping indicates that the recrystallization of NiS from nanorods to nanosheets is realized actually through an exfoliation process, while the characterization of in situ NiS/rGO products by SEM, TEM, and EDS mapping reveals the exfoliation process. The XPS result demonstrates that hydrothermally assisted chemical bonding occurs between NiS and rGO, which induces the exfoliation of NiS nanorods into nanosheets. The obtained NiS/rGO composite shows promising Na-storage properties.

  11. Fast and fully-scalable synthesis of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolhosseinzadeh, Sina; Asgharzadeh, Hamed; Seop Kim, Hyoung

    2015-05-01

    Exfoliation of graphite is a promising approach for large-scale production of graphene. Oxidation of graphite effectively facilitates the exfoliation process, yet necessitates several lengthy washing and reduction processes to convert the exfoliated graphite oxide (graphene oxide, GO) to reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Although filtration, centrifugation and dialysis have been frequently used in the washing stage, none of them is favorable for large-scale production. Here, we report the synthesis of RGO by sonication-assisted oxidation of graphite in a solution of potassium permanganate and concentrated sulfuric acid followed by reduction with ascorbic acid prior to any washing processes. GO loses its hydrophilicity during the reduction stage which facilitates the washing step and reduces the time required for production of RGO. Furthermore, simultaneous oxidation and exfoliation significantly enhance the yield of few-layer GO. We hope this one-pot and fully-scalable protocol paves the road toward out of lab applications of graphene.

  12. Fast and fully-scalable synthesis of reduced graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Abdolhosseinzadeh, Sina; Asgharzadeh, Hamed; Seop Kim, Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Exfoliation of graphite is a promising approach for large-scale production of graphene. Oxidation of graphite effectively facilitates the exfoliation process, yet necessitates several lengthy washing and reduction processes to convert the exfoliated graphite oxide (graphene oxide, GO) to reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Although filtration, centrifugation and dialysis have been frequently used in the washing stage, none of them is favorable for large-scale production. Here, we report the synthesis of RGO by sonication-assisted oxidation of graphite in a solution of potassium permanganate and concentrated sulfuric acid followed by reduction with ascorbic acid prior to any washing processes. GO loses its hydrophilicity during the reduction stage which facilitates the washing step and reduces the time required for production of RGO. Furthermore, simultaneous oxidation and exfoliation significantly enhance the yield of few-layer GO. We hope this one-pot and fully-scalable protocol paves the road toward out of lab applications of graphene. PMID:25976732

  13. Strategy and mechanism for controlling the direction of defect evolution in graphene: preparation of high quality defect healed and hierarchically porous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kecheng; Tian, Yin; Zhang, Yongzhi; Yang, Xiaodan; Bai, Chiyao; Luo, Yue; Zhao, Xiaosheng; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a novel approach for controlling the direction of defect evolution in graphene through intercalation of organic small molecules into graphite oxide (GO) combined with a one-pot microwave-assisted reaction is reported. By using ethanol as intercalator, the bulk production of high quality graphene with its defects being satisfactorily healed is achieved. The repair of defects using extraneous carbon atoms and the hybrid state of these carbon atoms are definitely demonstrated using isotopic tracing studies with 13C-labeled ethanol combined with 13C solid-state NMR. The defect healed graphene shows excellent crystallinity, extremely low oxygen content (C : O ratio of 23.8) and has the highest sheet conductivity (61 500 S m-1) compared to all other reported graphene products derived from GO. By using methanol or benzene as intercalators, hierarchically porous graphene with a self-supported 3-dimensional framework (~917 m2 g-1) containing both macropores and mesopores (2-5 nm) is obtained. This graphene possesses a distinctive amorphous carbon structure around the edge of the nanopores, which could be conducive to enhancing the lithium storage performance (up to 580 mA h g-1 after 300 cycles) when tested as an anode of lithium ion batteries, and might have promising applications in the field of electrode materials, catalysis, and separation, and so on. The mechanism involved for the controlled defect evolution is also proposed. The simple, ultrafast and unified strategy developed in this research provides a practical and effective approach to harness structural defects in graphene-based materials, which could also be expanded for designing and preparing other ordered carbon materials with specific structures.In this paper, a novel approach for controlling the direction of defect evolution in graphene through intercalation of organic small molecules into graphite oxide (GO) combined with a one-pot microwave-assisted reaction is reported. By using ethanol as

  14. Focusing on energy and optoelectronic applications: a journey for graphene and graphene oxide at large scale.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiangjian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-04-17

    Carbon is the only element that has stable allotropes in the 0th through the 3rd dimension, all of which have many outstanding properties. Graphene is the basic building block of other important carbon allotropes. Studies of graphene became much more active after the Geim group isolated "free" and "perfect" graphene sheets and demonstrated the unprecedented electronic properties of graphene in 2004. So far, no other individual material combines so many important properties, including high mobility, Hall effect, transparency, mechanical strength, and thermal conductivity. In this Account, we briefly review our studies of bulk scale graphene and graphene oxide (GO), including their synthesis and applications focused on energy and optoelectronics. Researchers use many methods to produce graphene materials: bottom-up and top-down methods and scalable methods such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and chemical exfoliation. Each fabrication method has both advantages and limitations. CVD could represent the most important production method for electronic applications. The chemical exfoliation method offers the advantages of easy scale up and easy solution processing but also produces graphene oxide (GO), which leads to defects and the introduction of heavy functional groups. However, most of these additional functional groups and defects can be removed by chemical reduction or thermal annealing. Because solution processing is required for many film and device applications, including transparent electrodes for touch screens, light-emitting devices (LED), field-effect transistors (FET), and photovoltaic devices (OPV), flexible electronics, and composite applications, the use of GO is important for the production of graphene. Because graphene has an intrinsic zero band gap, this issue needs to be tackled for its FET applications. The studies for transparent electrode related applications have made great progress, but researchers need to improve sheet resistance while

  15. Growing vertical ZnO nanorod arrays within graphite: efficient isolation of large size and high quality single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; E, Yifeng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2013-07-18

    We report a unique strategy for efficiently exfoliating large size and high quality single-layer graphene directly from graphite into DMF dispersions by growing ZnO nanorod arrays between the graphene layers in graphite.

  16. Manganese ion-assisted assembly of superparamagnetic graphene oxide microbowls

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Zhengshan; Xu, Chunxiang Li, Jitao; Zhu, Gangyi; Xu, Xiaoyong; Dai, Jun; Shi, Zengliang; Lin, Yi

    2014-03-24

    A facile manganese ion Mn(II)-assisted assembly has been designed to fabricate microbowls by using graphene oxide nanosheets as basic building blocks, which were exfoliated ultrasonically from the oxidized soot powders in deionized water. From the morphology evolution observations of transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope, a coordinating-tiling-collapsing manner is proposed to interpret the assembly mechanism based on attractive Van der Waals forces, π-π stacking, and capillary action. It is interesting to note that the as-prepared microbowls present a room temperature superparamagnetic behavior.

  17. Characterization of SiO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x} gate insulators for graphene based nanoelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tóvári, E.; Csontos, M. Kriváchy, T.; Csonka, S.; Fürjes, P.

    2014-09-22

    The structural and magnetotransport characterization of graphene nanodevices exfoliated onto Si/SiO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x} heterostructures are presented. Improved visibility of the deposited flakes is achieved by optimal tuning of the dielectric film thicknesses. The conductance of single layer graphene Hall-bar nanostructures utilizing SiO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x} gate dielectrics were characterized in the quantum Hall regime. Our results highlight that, while exhibiting better mechanical and chemical stability, the effect of non-stoichiometric SiN{sub x} on the charge carrier mobility of graphene is comparable to that of SiO{sub 2}, demonstrating the merits of SiN{sub x} as an ideal material platform for graphene based nanoelectromechanical applications.

  18. Beyond Graphene: Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Defective 2-D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Humberto

    One of the challenges in the production of 2-D materials is the synthesis of defect free systems which can achieve the desired properties for novel applications. However, the reality so far indicates that we need to deal with defective systems and understand their main features in order to perform defect engineering in such a way that we can engineer a new material. In this talk I discuss first, the introduction of defects in a hierarchic way starting from 2-D graphene to form giant Schwarzites or graphene foams, which also can exhibit further defects, thus we can have several levels of defectiveness. In this context, it will be shown that giant Schwarzites, depending on their symmetry, can exhibit Dirac-Fermion behavior and further, possess protected topological states as shown by other authors. Regarding the mechanical properties of these systems, it is possible to tune the Poisson Ratio by the addition of defects, thus shedding light to the explanation of the almost zero Poisson ratios in experimentally obtained graphene foams. Second, the idea of Haeckelites, a planar sp2 graphene-like structure with heptagons and pentagons, can be extended to transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with square and octagonal-like defects, finding semi-metallic behaviors with Dirac-Fermions, and even topological insulating properties. National Science Foundation (EFRI-1433311).

  19. Spin dynamics in bilayer graphene: Role of electron-hole puddles and Dyakonov-Perel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Adam, Shaffique; Roche, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We report on spin transport features which are unique to high quality bilayer graphene, in the absence of magnetic contaminants and strong intervalley mixing. The time-dependent spin polarization of a propagating wave packet is computed using an efficient quantum transport method. In the limit of vanishing effects of substrate and disorder, the energy dependence of the spin lifetime is similar to monolayer graphene with an M -shaped profile and minimum value at the charge neutrality point, but with an electron-hole asymmetry fingerprint. In sharp contrast, the incorporation of substrate-induced electron-hole puddles (characteristics of supported graphene either on SiO2 or hBN ) surprisingly results in a large enhancement of the low-energy spin lifetime and a lowering of its high-energy values. Such a feature, unique to the bilayer, is explained in terms of a reinforced Dyakonov-Perel mechanism at the Dirac point, whereas spin relaxation at higher energies is driven by pure dephasing effects. This suggests further electrostatic control of the spin transport length scales in graphene devices.

  20. Optomechanical coupling between a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Bosman, S. J.; Schneider, B. H.; Blanter, Y. M.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Steele, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    The combination of low mass density, high frequency and high quality factor, Q, of mechanical resonators made of two-dimensional crystals such as graphene make them attractive for applications in force/mass sensing and exploring the quantum regime of mechanical motion. Microwave optomechanics with superconducting cavities offers exquisite position sensitivity and enables the preparation and detection of mechanical systems in the quantum ground state. Here, we demonstrate coupling between a multilayer graphene resonator with quality factors up to 220,000 and a high-Q superconducting cavity. Using thermomechanical noise as calibration, we achieve a displacement sensitivity of 17 fm Hz-1/2. Optomechanical coupling is demonstrated by optomechanically induced reflection and absorption of microwave photons. We observe 17 dB of mechanical microwave amplification and signatures of strong optomechanical backaction. We quantitatively extract the cooperativity C, a characterization of coupling strength, from the measurement with no free parameters and find C = 8, which is promising for the quantum regime of graphene motion.

  1. Optomechanical coupling between a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Bosman, S J; Schneider, B H; Blanter, Y M; Castellanos-Gomez, A; Steele, G A

    2014-10-01

    The combination of low mass density, high frequency and high quality factor, Q, of mechanical resonators made of two-dimensional crystals such as graphene make them attractive for applications in force/mass sensing and exploring the quantum regime of mechanical motion. Microwave optomechanics with superconducting cavities offers exquisite position sensitivity and enables the preparation and detection of mechanical systems in the quantum ground state. Here, we demonstrate coupling between a multilayer graphene resonator with quality factors up to 220,000 and a high-Q superconducting cavity. Using thermomechanical noise as calibration, we achieve a displacement sensitivity of 17 fm Hz(-1/2). Optomechanical coupling is demonstrated by optomechanically induced reflection and absorption of microwave photons. We observe 17 dB of mechanical microwave amplification and signatures of strong optomechanical backaction. We quantitatively extract the cooperativity C, a characterization of coupling strength, from the measurement with no free parameters and find C = 8, which is promising for the quantum regime of graphene motion. PMID:25150717

  2. Microwave Assisted 2D Materials Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbin

    Two-dimensional materials have emerged as extremely important materials with applications ranging from energy and environmental science to electronics and biology. Here we report our discovery of a universal, ultrafast, green, solvo-thermal technology for producing excellent-quality, few-layered nanosheets in liquid phase from well-known 2D materials such as such hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), graphite, and MoS2. We start by mixing the uniform bulk-layered material with a common organic solvent that matches its surface energy to reduce the van der Waals attractive interactions between the layers; next, the solutions are heated in a commercial microwave oven to overcome the energy barrier between bulk and few-layers states. We discovered the minutes-long rapid exfoliation process is highly temperature dependent, which requires precise thermal management to obtain high-quality inks. We hypothesize a possible mechanism of this proposed solvo-thermal process; our theory confirms the basis of this novel technique for exfoliation of high-quality, layered 2D materials by using an as yet unknown role of the solvent.

  3. Extremely Efficient Liquid Exfoliation and Dispersion of Layered Materials by Unusual Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joong Tark; Jang, Jeong In; Kim, Haena; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Yoo, Hyung Keun; Woo, Jong Seok; Choi, Sua; Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2014-01-01

    Layered materials must be exfoliated and dispersed in solvents for diverse applications. Usually, highly energetic probe sonication may be considered to be an unfavourable method for the less defective exfoliation and dispersion of layered materials. Here we show that judicious use of ultrasonic cavitation can produce exfoliated transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets extraordinarily dispersed in non-toxic solvent by minimising the sonolysis of solvent molecules. Our method can also lead to produce less defective, large graphene oxide nanosheets from graphite oxide in a short time (within 10 min), which show high electrical conductivity (>20,000 S m−1) of the printed film. This was achieved by adjusting the ultrasonic probe depth to the liquid surface to generate less energetic cavitation (delivered power ~6 W), while maintaining sufficient acoustic shearing (0.73 m s−1) and generating additional microbubbling by aeration at the liquid surface. PMID:24875584

  4. Liquid Phase Exfoliation of Two-Dimensional Materials by Directly Probing and Matching Surface Tension Components.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianfeng; He, Yongmin; Wu, Jingjie; Gao, Caitian; Keyshar, Kunttal; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Yingchao; Ye, Mingxin; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2015-08-12

    Exfoliation of two-dimensional (2D) materials into mono- or few layers is of significance for both fundamental studies and potential applications. In this report, for the first time surface tension components were directly probed and matched to predict solvents with effective liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) capability for 2D materials such as graphene, h-BN, WS2, MoS2, MoSe2, Bi2Se3, TaS2, and SnS2. Exfoliation efficiency is enhanced when the ratios of the surface tension components of the applied solvent is close to that of the 2D material in question. We enlarged the library of low-toxic and common solvents for LPE. Our study provides distinctive insight into LPE and has pioneered a rational strategy for LPE of 2D materials with high yield.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  6. Nanoarchitectured materials composed of fullerene-like spheroids and disordered graphene layers with tunable mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Erik F; Yan, Hongping; Kono, Yoshio; Wen, Bin; Bai, Ligang; Shi, Feng; Zhang, Junfeng; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Wang, Yanbin; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Type-II glass-like carbon is a widely used material with a unique combination of properties including low density, high strength, extreme impermeability to gas and liquid and resistance to chemical corrosion. It can be considered as a carbon-based nanoarchitectured material, consisting of a disordered multilayer graphene matrix encasing numerous randomly distributed nanosized fullerene-like spheroids. Here we show that under both hydrostatic compression and triaxial deformation, this high-strength material is highly compressible and exhibits a superelastic ability to recover from large strains. Under hydrostatic compression, bulk, shear and Young's moduli decrease anomalously with pressure, reaching minima around 1-2 GPa, where Poisson's ratio approaches zero, and then revert to normal behaviour with positive pressure dependences. Controlling the concentration, size and shape of fullerene-like spheroids with tailored topological connectivity to graphene layers is expected to yield exceptional and tunable mechanical properties, similar to mechanical metamaterials, with potentially wide applications. PMID:25648723

  7. All-fiber photoacoustic gas sensor with graphene nano-mechanical resonator as the acoustic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanzhen, Tan; Fan, Yang; Jun, Ma; Hoi Lut, Ho; Wei, Jin

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical-fiber photoacoustic (PA) spectrometric gas sensor with a graphene nano-mechanical resonator as the acoustic detector. The acoustic detection is performed by a miniature ferrule-top nano-mechanical resonator with a ˜100-nm-thick, 2.5-mm-diameter multilayer graphene diaphragm. Experimental investigation showed that the performance of the PA gas sensor can be significantly enhanced by operating at the resonance of the grapheme diaphragm where a lower detection limit of 153 parts-per-billion (ppb) acetylene is achieved. The all-fiber PA sensor which is immune to electromagnetic interference and safe in explosive environments is ideally suited for real-world remote, space-limited applications and for multipoint detection in a multiplexed fiber optic sensor network.

  8. Nitroxide-Functionalized Graphene Oxide from Graphite Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Vega, Yazmin I.; Leyva-Porras, Cesar C.; Mireles, Marcela; Quevedo-López, Manuel; Macossay, Javier; Bonilla-Cruz, José

    2013-01-01

    A facile method for preparing functionalized graphene oxide single layers with nitroxide groups is reported herein. Highly oxidized graphite oxide (GO=90.6%) was obtained, slightly modifying an improved Hummer’s method. Oxoammonium salts (OS) were investigated to introduce nitroxide groups to GO, resulting in a one-step functionalization and exfoliation. The mechanisms of functionalization/exfoliation are proposed, where the oxidation of aromatic alcohols to ketone groups, and the formation of alkoxyamine species are suggested. Two kinds of functionalized graphene oxide layers (GOFT1 and GOFT2) were obtained by controlling the amount of OS added. GOFT1 and GOFT2 exhibited a high interlayer spacing (d0001 = 1.12nm), which was determined by X-ray diffraction. The presence of new chemical bonds C-N (~9.5 %) and O-O (~4.3 %) from nitroxide attached onto graphene layers were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Single-layers of GOFT1 were observed by HRTEM, exhibiting amorphous and crystalline zones at a 50:50 ratio; in contrast, layers of GOFT2 exhibited a fully amorphous surface. Fingerprint of GOFT1 single layers was obtained by electron diffraction at several tilts. Finally, the potential use of these materials within Nylon 6 matrices was investigated, where an unusual simultaneous increase in tensile stress, tensile strain and Young’s modulus was observed. PMID:24347671

  9. Cell-laden microengineered and mechanically tunable hybrid hydrogels of gelatin and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Ryon; Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Dang, Tram T; Topkaya, Seda Nur; Gao, Xiguang; Yang, Seung Yun; Jung, Sung Mi; Oh, Jong Hyun; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-11-26

    Incorporating graphene oxide inside GelMA hydrogels enhances their mechanical properties and reduces UV-induced cell damage while preserving their favorable characteristics for 3D cell encapsulation. NIH-3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in GO-GelMA microgels demonstrate excellent cellular viability, proliferation, spreading, and alignment. GO reinforcement combined with a multi-stacking approach offers a facile engineering strategy for the construction of complex artificial tissues.

  10. Enhanced mechanical properties of graphene/copper nanocomposites using a molecular-level mixing process.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jaewon; Yoon, Taeshik; Jin, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jinsup; Kim, Taek-Soo; Hong, Soon Hyung; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2013-12-10

    RGO flakes are homogeneously dispersed in a Cu matrix through a molecular-level mixing process. This novel fabrication process prevents the agglomeration of the RGO and enhances adhesion between the RGO and the Cu. The yield strength of the 2.5 vol% RGO/Cu nanocomposite is 1.8 times higher than that of pure Cu. The strengthening mechanism of the RGO is investigated by a double cantilever beam test using the graphene/Cu model structure.

  11. p-Phosphonic acid calix[8]arene assisted exfoliation and stabilization of 2D materials in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianjue; Boulos, Ramiz A; Eggers, Paul K; Raston, Colin L

    2012-12-01

    Exfoliated 2D materials including graphene, BN, MoS(2) and WS(2) are accessible in water over a wide range of pH for a synergistic process involving sonication in the presence of p-phosphonic acid calix[8]arene.

  12. Strategy and mechanism for controlling the direction of defect evolution in graphene: preparation of high quality defect healed and hierarchically porous graphene.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kecheng; Tian, Yin; Zhang, Yongzhi; Yang, Xiaodan; Bai, Chiyao; Luo, Yue; Zhao, Xiaosheng; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, a novel approach for controlling the direction of defect evolution in graphene through intercalation of organic small molecules into graphite oxide (GO) combined with a one-pot microwave-assisted reaction is reported. By using ethanol as intercalator, the bulk production of high quality graphene with its defects being satisfactorily healed is achieved. The repair of defects using extraneous carbon atoms and the hybrid state of these carbon atoms are definitely demonstrated using isotopic tracing studies with (13)C-labeled ethanol combined with (13)C solid-state NMR. The defect healed graphene shows excellent crystallinity, extremely low oxygen content (C : O ratio of 23.8) and has the highest sheet conductivity (61 500 S m(-1)) compared to all other reported graphene products derived from GO. By using methanol or benzene as intercalators, hierarchically porous graphene with a self-supported 3-dimensional framework (∼917 m(2) g(-1)) containing both macropores and mesopores (2-5 nm) is obtained. This graphene possesses a distinctive amorphous carbon structure around the edge of the nanopores, which could be conducive to enhancing the lithium storage performance (up to 580 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles) when tested as an anode of lithium ion batteries, and might have promising applications in the field of electrode materials, catalysis, and separation, and so on. The mechanism involved for the controlled defect evolution is also proposed. The simple, ultrafast and unified strategy developed in this research provides a practical and effective approach to harness structural defects in graphene-based materials, which could also be expanded for designing and preparing other ordered carbon materials with specific structures. PMID:25265966

  13. Granite Exfoliation, Cosumnes River Watershed, Somerset, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, I. Q.; Neiss-Cortez, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sierra Nevada foothills of California there are many exposed granite plutons within the greater Sierra Nevada batholith. As with most exposed parts of the batholith, these granite slabs exfoliate. It is important to understand exfoliation for issues of public safety as it can cause rock slides near homes, roads, and recreation areas. Through observation, measuring, and mapping we characterize exfoliation in our Cosumnes River watershed community.

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Friction Characteristics of Single-Layer MoS2 and Graphene Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Khac, Bien-cuong tran; Chung, Koo-hyun

    2016-05-01

    Atomically thin layered materials such as MoS2 and graphene have attracted a lot of interest as protective coating layers for micro- and nano-electromechanical devices based on their superior mechanical properties and chemical inertness. In this work, the frictional characteristics of single layer MoS2 and graphene prepared by the mechanical exfoliation method were quantitatively investigated using atomic force microscopy. The results showed that both MoS2 and graphene exhibited relatively low friction forces of 1-3 nN under normal forces ranging from 1 to 30 nN. However, a higher increase in the friction force as the normal force increased was observed in the case of MoS2. The differences in the adhesion characteristics and mechanical properties of atomically thin layered materials may influence the puckering of the layer, which in turn influences the frictional behavior. PMID:27483768

  15. Boron nitride colloidal solutions, ultralight aerogels and freestanding membranes through one-step exfoliation and functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Weiwei; Mochalin, Vadym N.; Liu, Dan; Qin, Si; Gogotsi, Yury; Chen, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing of aerogels and membranes from hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is much more difficult than from graphene or graphene oxides because of the poor dispersibility of h-BN in water, which limits its exfoliation and preparation of colloidal solutions. Here, a simple, one-step mechano-chemical process to exfoliate and functionalize h-BN into highly water-dispersible, few-layer h-BN containing amino groups is presented. The colloidal solutions of few-layer h-BN can have unprecedentedly high concentrations, up to 30 mg ml-1, and are stable for up to several months. They can be used to produce ultralight aerogels with a density of 1.4 mg cm-3, which is ~1,500 times less than bulk h-BN, and freestanding membranes simply by cryodrying and filtration, respectively. The material shows strong blue light emission under ultraviolet excitation, in both dispersed and dry state.

  16. An experimental investigation on the mechanical properties of the interface between large-sized graphene and a flexible substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Chaochen; Guo, Jiangang Song, Haibin; Xie, Haimei; Xue, Tao; Qin, Qinghua; Wu, Sen

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, the interfacial mechanical properties of large-sized monolayer graphene attached to a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate are investigated. Using a micro-tensile test and Raman spectroscopy, in situ measurements are taken to obtain the full-field deformation of graphene subjected to a uniaxial tensile loading and unloading cycle. The results of the full-field deformation are subsequently used to identify the status of the interface between the graphene and the substrate as one of perfect adhesion, one showing slide or partial debonding, and one that is fully debonded. The interfacial stress/strain transfer and the evolution of the interface from one status to another during the loading and unloading processes are discussed and the mechanical parameters, such as interfacial strength and interfacial shear strength, are obtained quantitatively demonstrating a relatively weak interface between large-sized graphene and PET.

  17. An experimental investigation on the mechanical properties of the interface between large-sized graphene and a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaochen; Xue, Tao; Guo, Jiangang; Qin, Qinghua; Wu, Sen; Song, Haibin; Xie, Haimei

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the interfacial mechanical properties of large-sized monolayer graphene attached to a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate are investigated. Using a micro-tensile test and Raman spectroscopy, in situ measurements are taken to obtain the full-field deformation of graphene subjected to a uniaxial tensile loading and unloading cycle. The results of the full-field deformation are subsequently used to identify the status of the interface between the graphene and the substrate as one of perfect adhesion, one showing slide or partial debonding, and one that is fully debonded. The interfacial stress/strain transfer and the evolution of the interface from one status to another during the loading and unloading processes are discussed and the mechanical parameters, such as interfacial strength and interfacial shear strength, are obtained quantitatively demonstrating a relatively weak interface between large-sized graphene and PET.

  18. Line defects in graphene: How doping affects the electronic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Daniel; Ratsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties. Intrinsic line defects such as local nonhexagonal reconstructions or grain boundaries, however, significantly reduce the tensile strength, but feature exciting electronic properties. Here, we address the properties of line defects in graphene from first principles on the level of full-potential density-functional theory, and assess doping as one strategy to strengthen such materials. We carefully disentangle the global and local effect of doping by comparing results from the virtual crystal approximation with those from local substitution of chemical species, in order to gain a detailed understanding of the breaking and stabilization mechanisms. We find that doping primarily affects the occupation of the frontier orbitals. Occupation through n -type doping or local substitution with nitrogen increases the ultimate tensile strength significantly. In particular, it can stabilize the defects beyond the ultimate tensile strength of the pristine material. We therefore propose this as a key strategy to strengthen graphenic materials. Furthermore, we find that doping and/or applying external stress lead to tunable and technologically interesting metal/semiconductor transitions.

  19. Preparation of reduced graphene oxide/gelatin composite films with reinforced mechanical strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenchao; Wang, Zhipeng; Liu, Yu; Li, Nan; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► We used and compared different proportion of gelatin and chitosan as reducing agents. ► The mechanical properties of the films are investigated, especially the wet films. ► The cell toxicity of the composite films as biomaterial is carried out. ► The water absorption capabilities of the composite films also studied. -- Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) was reduced by chitosan/gelatin solution and added to gelatin (Gel) to fabricate reduced graphene oxide/gelatin (RGO/Gel) films by a solvent-casting method using genipin as cross-linking agent. The structure and properties of the films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The addition of RGO increased the tensile strength of the RGO/Gel films in both dry and wet states, but decreased their elongation at break. The incorperation of RGO also decreased the swelling ability of the films in water. Cell cultures were carried out in order to test the cytotoxicity of the films. The cells grew and reproduced well on the RGO/Gel films, indicating that the addition of RGO has no negative effect on the compatibility of the gelatin. Therefore, the reduced graphene oxide/gelatin composite is a promising biomaterial with excellent mechanical properties and good cell compatibility.

  20. Lightweight, Superelastic, and Mechanically Flexible Graphene/Polyimide Nanocomposite Foam for Strain Sensor Application.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuyang; Peng, Qingyu; Ding, Yujie; Lin, Zaishan; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Ying; Xu, Fan; Li, Jianjun; Yuan, Ye; He, Xiaodong; Li, Yibin

    2015-09-22

    The creation of superelastic, flexible three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based architectures is still a great challenge due to structure collapse or significant plastic deformation. Herein, we report a facile approach of transforming the mechanically fragile reduced graphene oxide (rGO) aerogel into superflexible 3D architectures by introducing water-soluble polyimide (PI). The rGO/PI nanocomposites are fabricated using strategies of freeze casting and thermal annealing. The resulting monoliths exhibit low density, excellent flexibility, superelasticity with high recovery rate, and extraordinary reversible compressibility. The synergistic effect between rGO and PI endows the elastomer with desirable electrical conductivity, remarkable compression sensitivity, and excellent durable stability. The rGO/PI nanocomposites show potential applications in multifunctional strain sensors under the deformations of compression, bending, stretching, and torsion.

  1. Triangular Black Phosphorus Atomic Layers by Liquid Exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Kim, Yooseok; Kim, Hyeran; Bang, Junhyeok; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Jouhahn

    2016-01-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) is the most promising material among the two-dimensional materials due to its layered structure and the excellent semiconductor properties. Currently, thin BP atomic layers are obtained mostly by mechanical exfoliation of bulk BP, which limits applications in thin-film based electronics due to a scaling process. Here we report highly crystalline few-layer black phosphorus thin films produced by liquid exfoliation. We demonstrate that the liquid-exfoliated BP forms a triangular crystalline structure on SiO2/Si (001) and amorphous carbon. The highly crystalline BP layers are faceted with a preferred orientation of the (010) plane on the sharp edge, which is an energetically most favorable facet according to the density functional theory calculations. Our results can be useful in understanding the triangular BP structure for large-area applications in electronic devices using two-dimensional materials. The sensitivity and selectivity of liquid-exfoliated BP to gas vapor demonstrate great potential for practical applications as sensors. PMID:27026070

  2. Triangular Black Phosphorus Atomic Layers by Liquid Exfoliation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Kim, Yooseok; Kim, Hyeran; Bang, Junhyeok; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Jouhahn

    2016-01-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) is the most promising material among the two-dimensional materials due to its layered structure and the excellent semiconductor properties. Currently, thin BP atomic layers are obtained mostly by mechanical exfoliation of bulk BP, which limits applications in thin-film based electronics due to a scaling process. Here we report highly crystalline few-layer black phosphorus thin films produced by liquid exfoliation. We demonstrate that the liquid-exfoliated BP forms a triangular crystalline structure on SiO2/Si (001) and amorphous carbon. The highly crystalline BP layers are faceted with a preferred orientation of the (010) plane on the sharp edge, which is an energetically most favorable facet according to the density functional theory calculations. Our results can be useful in understanding the triangular BP structure for large-area applications in electronic devices using two-dimensional materials. The sensitivity and selectivity of liquid-exfoliated BP to gas vapor demonstrate great potential for practical applications as sensors. PMID:27026070

  3. Triangular Black Phosphorus Atomic Layers by Liquid Exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Kim, Yooseok; Kim, Hyeran; Bang, Junhyeok; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Jouhahn

    2016-03-30

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) is the most promising material among the two-dimensional materials due to its layered structure and the excellent semiconductor properties. Currently, thin BP atomic layers are obtained mostly by mechanical exfoliation of bulk BP, which limits applications in thin-film based electronics due to a scaling process. Here we report highly crystalline few-layer black phosphorus thin films produced by liquid exfoliation. We demonstrate that the liquid-exfoliated BP forms a triangular crystalline structure on SiO2/Si (001) and amorphous carbon. The highly crystalline BP layers are faceted with a preferred orientation of the (010) plane on the sharp edge, which is an energetically most favorable facet according to the density functional theory calculations. Our results can be useful in understanding the triangular BP structure for large-area applications in electronic devices using two-dimensional materials. The sensitivity and selectivity of liquid-exfoliated BP to gas vapor demonstrate great potential for practical applications as sensors.

  4. Triangular Black Phosphorus Atomic Layers by Liquid Exfoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Kim, Yooseok; Kim, Hyeran; Bang, Junhyeok; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Jouhahn

    2016-03-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) is the most promising material among the two-dimensional materials due to its layered structure and the excellent semiconductor properties. Currently, thin BP atomic layers are obtained mostly by mechanical exfoliation of bulk BP, which limits applications in thin-film based electronics due to a scaling process. Here we report highly crystalline few-layer black phosphorus thin films produced by liquid exfoliation. We demonstrate that the liquid-exfoliated BP forms a triangular crystalline structure on SiO2/Si (001) and amorphous carbon. The highly crystalline BP layers are faceted with a preferred orientation of the (010) plane on the sharp edge, which is an energetically most favorable facet according to the density functional theory calculations. Our results can be useful in understanding the triangular BP structure for large-area applications in electronic devices using two-dimensional materials. The sensitivity and selectivity of liquid-exfoliated BP to gas vapor demonstrate great potential for practical applications as sensors.

  5. Roller-style electrostatic printing of prepatterned few-layer-graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaogan; Giacometti, Valentina; Ismach, Ariel; Harteneck, Bruce D.; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Cabrini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic exfoliation of patterned few-layer-graphenes was demonstrated using a method compatible with high throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing. A patterned graphite template was placed on a roller and used to exfoliate patterned graphene on a planar substrate. The exfoliated graphene features were subsequently characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In comparison with previously demonstrated planar electrostatic exfoliation approach, the roller-style method can create a narrower distribution of thickness of few-layer-graphenes, which is attributed to the combinational action of tangential rolling friction and electrostatic forces. This roller-style electrostatic printing technique could be applied for roll-to-roll manufacturing of graphene-based devices in the future.

  6. Few layer graphene-polypropylene nanocomposites: the role of flake diameter.

    PubMed

    Vallés, Cristina; Abdelkader, Amr M; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    Graphene shows excellent potential as a structural reinforcement in polymer nanocomposites due to its exceptional mechanical properties. We have shown previously that graphene composites can be analysed using conventional composite theory with the graphene flakes acting as short fillers which have a critical length of ∼3 μm which is required for good reinforcement. Herein, polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites were prepared using electrochemically-exfoliated few layer graphene (FLG) with two different flake diameters (5 μm and 20 μm). The crystallization temperature and degree of crystallinity of the PP were found to increase with the loading of FLG, which suggests that the flakes acted as crystallisation nucleation sites. Mechanical testing showed that the 5 μm flakes behaved as short fillers and reinforced the PP matrix poorly. The modulus of the 20 μm flake composites, however, increased linearly with loading up to 20 wt%, without any of the detrimental aggregation effects seen in other graphene systems. The mechanical data were compared with our previous work on other graphene composite systems and the apparent need to balance the degree of functionalization to improve matrix compatibility whilst not encouraging aggregation is discussed.

  7. Role of different scattering mechanisms on the temperature dependence of transport in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Modak, Ranjan; Singh, Amandeep; Mukerjee, Subroto; Bid, Aveek

    2015-01-01

    Detailed experimental and theoretical studies of the temperature dependence of the effect of different scattering mechanisms on electrical transport properties of graphene devices are presented. We find that for high mobility devices the transport properties are mainly governed by completely screened short range impurity scattering. On the other hand, for the low mobility devices transport properties are determined by both types of scattering potentials - long range due to ionized impurities and short range due to completely screened charged impurities. The results could be explained in the framework of Boltzmann transport equations involving the two independent scattering mechanisms. PMID:26608479

  8. Mode-locked thulium-bismuth codoped fiber laser using graphene saturable absorber in ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Zen, D I M; Saidin, N; Damanhuri, S S A; Harun, S W; Ahmad, H; Ismail, M A; Dimyati, K; Halder, A; Paul, M C; Das, S; Pal, M; Bhadra, S K

    2013-02-20

    We demonstrate mode locking of a thulium-bismuth codoped fiber laser (TBFL) operating at 1901.6 nm, using a graphene-based saturable absorber (SA). In this work, a single layer graphene is mechanically exfoliated using the scotch tape method and directly transferred onto the surface of a fiber pigtail to fabricate the SA. The obtained Raman spectrum characteristic indicates that the graphene on the core surface has a single layer. At 1552 nm pump power of 869 mW, the mode-locked TBFL self starts to generate an optical pulse train with a repetition rate of 16.7 MHz and pulse width of 0.37 ps. This is a simple, low-cost, stable, and convenient laser oscillator for applications where eye-safe and low-photon-energy light sources are required, such as sensing and biomedical diagnostics.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of electrically conductive polyethylene-supported graphene films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple mechanical approach for low-density polyethylene film coating by multilayer graphene. The technique is based on the exfoliation of nanocrystalline graphite (few-layer graphene) by application of shear stress and allows to obtain thin graphene layers on the plastic substrate. We report on the temperature dependence of electrical resistance behaviors in films of different thickness. The experimental results suggest that the semiconducting behavior observed at low temperature can be described in the framework of the Efros-Shklovskii variable-range-hopping model. The obtained films exhibit good electrical conductivity and transparency in the visible spectral region. PACS 72.80.Vp; 78.67.Wj; 78.66.Qn; 85.40.Hp PMID:25288910

  10. Confocal microscopy and exfoliative cytology

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Shyam Prasad; Ramani, Pratibha; Nainani, Purshotam

    2013-01-01

    Context: Early detection of potentially malignant lesions and invasive squamous-cell carcinoma in the oral cavity could be greatly improved through techniques that permit visualization of subtle cellular changes indicative of the neoplastic transformation process. One such technique is confocal microscopy. Combining rapidity with reliability, an innovative idea has been put forward using confocal microscope in exfoliative cytology. Aims: The main objective of this study was to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis and the results were compared with that of the standard PAP stain. Settings and Design: Confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) stain, PAP (Papanicolaou) stain. The study was designed to assess confocal microscopy for cytological diagnosis. In the process, smears of patients with (clinically diagnosed and/or suspected) oral squamous cell carcinoma as well as those of controls (normal people) were stained with acridine orange and observed under confocal microscope. The results were compared with those of the standard PAP method. Materials and Methods: Samples of buccal mucosa smears from normal patients and squamous cell carcinoma patients were made, fixed in 100% alcohol, followed by AO staining. The corresponding set of smears was stained with PAP stain using rapid PAP stain kit. The results obtained were compared with those obtained with AO confocal microscopy. Results: The study had shown nuclear changes (malignant cells) in the smears of squamous cell carcinoma patients as increased intensity of fluorescence of the nucleus, when observed under confocal microscope. Acridine orange confocal microscopy showed good amount of sensitivity and specificity (93%) in identifying malignant cells in exfoliative cytological smears. Conclusion: Confocal microscopy was found to have good sensitivity in the identification of cancer (malignant) cells in exfoliative cytology, at par with the PAP method. The rapidity of processing and screening a

  11. Aromatic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D. K.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years graphene attracts the scientific and engineering communities due to its outstanding electronic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties and many potential applications. Recently, Popov et al. [1] have studied the properties of graphene and proved that it is aromatic but without fragrance. In this paper, we present a theory to prepare graphene with fragrance. This can be used as scented pencils, perfumes, room and car fresheners, cosmetics and many other useful household substances.

  12. Intrinsic device-to-device variation in graphene field-effect transistors on a Si/SiO2 substrate as a platform for discriminative gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Varezhnikov, Alexey; Augustin, Martin; Bruns, Michael; Sommer, Martin; Sysoev, Victor; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Arrays of nearly identical graphene devices on Si/SiO2 exhibit a substantial device-to-device variation, even in case of a high-quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or mechanically exfoliated graphene. We propose that such device-to-device variation could provide a platform for highly selective multisensor electronic olfactory systems. We fabricated a multielectrode array of CVD graphene devices on a Si/SiO2 substrate and demonstrated that the diversity of these devices is sufficient to reliably discriminate different short-chain alcohols: methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol. The diversity of graphene devices on Si/SiO2 could possibly be used to construct similar multisensor systems trained to recognize other analytes as well.

  13. Intrinsic device-to-device variation in graphene field-effect transistors on a Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate as a platform for discriminative gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, Alexey; Varezhnikov, Alexey; Sysoev, Victor; Augustin, Martin; Sommer, Martin; Bruns, Michael; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2014-01-06

    Arrays of nearly identical graphene devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} exhibit a substantial device-to-device variation, even in case of a high-quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or mechanically exfoliated graphene. We propose that such device-to-device variation could provide a platform for highly selective multisensor electronic olfactory systems. We fabricated a multielectrode array of CVD graphene devices on a Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate and demonstrated that the diversity of these devices is sufficient to reliably discriminate different short-chain alcohols: methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol. The diversity of graphene devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} could possibly be used to construct similar multisensor systems trained to recognize other analytes as well.

  14. Assisted deposition of nano-hydroxyapatite onto exfoliated carbon nanotube oxide scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, H.; Rosa, C. M. R.; Eliaz, N.; May, P. W.; Marciano, F. R.; Lobo, A. O.

    2015-05-01

    Electrodeposited nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) is more similar to biological apatite in terms of microstructure and dimension than apatites prepared by other processes. Reinforcement with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) enhances its mechanical properties and increases adhesion of osteoblasts. Here, we carefully studied nHAp deposited onto vertically aligned multi-walled CNT (VAMWCNT) scaffolds by electrodeposition and soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). VAMWCNTs are porous biocompatible scaffolds with nanometric porosity and exceptional mechanical and chemical properties. The VAMWCNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method, and then oxidized and exfoliated by oxygen plasma etching (OPE) to produce graphene oxide (GO) at the VAMWCNT tips. The attachment of oxygen functional groups was found to be crucial for nHAp nucleation during electrodeposition. A thin layer of plate-like and needle-like nHAp with high crystallinity was formed without any need for thermal treatment. This composite (henceforth referred to as nHAp-VAMWCNT-GO) served as the scaffold for in vitro biomineralization when soaked in the SBF, resulting in the formation of both carbonate-rich and carbonate-poor globular-like nHAp. Different steps in the deposition of biological apatite onto VAMWCNT-GO and during the short-term biomineralization process were analysed. Due to their unique structure and properties, such nano-bio-composites may become useful in accelerating in vivo bone regeneration processes.

  15. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  19. The effect of interlayer adhesion on the mechanical behaviors of macroscopic graphene oxide papers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun; Liu, Lu-Qi; Zu, Sheng-Zhen; Peng, Ke; Zhou, Ding; Han, Bao-Hang; Zhang, Zhong

    2011-03-22

    High mechanical performances of macroscopic graphene oxide (GO) papers are attracting great interest owing to their merits of lightweight and multiple functionalities. However, the loading role of individual nanosheets and its effect on the mechanical properties of the macroscopic GO papers are not yet well understood. Herein, we effectively tailored the interlayer adhesions of the GO papers by introducing small molecules, that is, glutaraldehyde (GA) and water molecules, into the gallery regions. With the help of in situ Raman spectroscopy, we compared the varied load-reinforcing roles of nanosheets, and further predicted the Young's moduli of the GO papers. Systematic mechanical tests have proven that the enhancement of the tensile modulus and strength of the GA-treated GO paper arose from the improved load-bearing capability of the nanosheets. On the basis of Raman and macroscopic mechanical tests, the influences of interlayer adhesions on the fracture mechanisms of the strained GO papers were inferred.

  20. Failure Processes in Embedded Monolayer Graphene under Axial Compression

    PubMed Central

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, Georgia; Sfyris, Dimitris; Parthenios, John; Pugno, Nicola; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Galiotis, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Exfoliated monolayer graphene flakes were embedded in a polymer matrix and loaded under axial compression. By monitoring the shifts of the 2D Raman phonons of rectangular flakes of various sizes under load, the critical strain to failure was determined. Prior to loading care was taken for the examined area of the flake to be free of residual stresses. The critical strain values for first failure were found to be independent of flake size at a mean value of –0.60% corresponding to a yield stress up to -6 GPa. By combining Euler mechanics with a Winkler approach, we show that unlike buckling in air, the presence of the polymer constraint results in graphene buckling at a fixed value of strain with an estimated wrinkle wavelength of the order of 1–2 nm. These results were compared with DFT computations performed on analogue coronene/PMMA oligomers and a reasonable agreement was obtained. PMID:24920340

  1. Commercialization of graphene-based technologies: a critical insight.

    PubMed

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Min-Quan; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Xu, Yi-Jun; Pagliaro, Mario

    2015-04-28

    Carbon in its single layer atomic morphology has exceptional thermal, optical, electronic and mechanical properties, which may form the basis for several functional products and enhanced technologies that go from electricity storage to polymer nanocomposites of so far unsurpassed characteristics. Due to the high cost, however, the current global production of graphene does not exceed 120 tonnes. New chemical and physical methods to exfoliate graphite, however, were recently engineered and commercialized, which open the route to massive adoption of graphene as the "enabler" of numerous important technologies, including enhanced electricity storage. This feature article presents an updated, critical overview that will be useful to nanochemistry and nanotechnology research practitioners and to entrepreneurs in advanced materials. PMID:25764997

  2. Commercialization of graphene-based technologies: a critical insight.

    PubMed

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Min-Quan; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Xu, Yi-Jun; Pagliaro, Mario

    2015-04-28

    Carbon in its single layer atomic morphology has exceptional thermal, optical, electronic and mechanical properties, which may form the basis for several functional products and enhanced technologies that go from electricity storage to polymer nanocomposites of so far unsurpassed characteristics. Due to the high cost, however, the current global production of graphene does not exceed 120 tonnes. New chemical and physical methods to exfoliate graphite, however, were recently engineered and commercialized, which open the route to massive adoption of graphene as the "enabler" of numerous important technologies, including enhanced electricity storage. This feature article presents an updated, critical overview that will be useful to nanochemistry and nanotechnology research practitioners and to entrepreneurs in advanced materials.

  3. [Staphylococcal epidermal exfoliation (Ritter's disease)].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Maldonado, R; Tamayo, L; Vazquez, V; Dominguez, J

    1976-01-01

    According to the authors the best designation of Ritter's disease would be "staphilococcic epidermal exfoliation" SEE. The physiopathological and agnoslogical basis for this denomination could be the following: 1st The "S. aureus" is the ehtiological agent of the SSE in man. The Koch postulates necessary to confirm this hypothesis have been accomplished. 2nd "Staphylococcus aureus" produces a thermostable toxin that is active indepently of the staphilococcus and gives rise to the separation of the cells of the stratum granulosus of the epidermis and eventually exfoliation in suckling babies and in the newborn mouse. 3rd The "Staphylococcus aureus" may be present on the skin or in other localisations such as the bowel or pharinx. 4th The viable "S. aureus" when administered subcutaneously to the adult mice gives rise to lesions clinically and histologically similar to the impetigo observed in children. 5th The "S. aureus" killed by means of autoclave (that is, the staphylococcic toxine by itself does not give rise to any lesion when administered to the healthy adult mouse). Neijther has the SEE been observed in healthy adult man. The authors reach the conclusion that the SSE and the toxic epidermal necrolysis are basically different according to the histopathology therapeutic response and prognosis and they must be considered as independant entities. PMID:138775

  4. Coatings of nanostructured pristine graphene-IrOx hybrids for neural electrodes: Layered stacking and the role of non-oxygenated graphene.

    PubMed

    Pérez, E; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2015-10-01

    The need to enhance charge capacity in neural stimulation-electrodes is promoting the formation of new materials and coatings. Among all the possible types of graphene, pristine graphene prepared by graphite electrochemical exfoliation, is used in this work to form a new nanostructured IrOx-graphene hybrid (IrOx-eG). Graphene is stabilized in suspension by IrOx nanoparticles without surfactants. Anodic electrodeposition results in coatings with much smaller roughness than IrOx-graphene oxide. Exfoliated pristine graphene (eG), does not electrodeposit in absence of iridium, but IrOx-nanoparticle adhesion on graphene flakes drives the process. IrOx-eG has a significantly different electronic state than graphene oxide, and different coordination for carbon. Electron diffraction shows the reflection features expected for graphene. IrOx 1-2 nm cluster/nanoparticles are oxohydroxo-species and adhere to 10nm graphene platelets. eG induces charge storage capacity values five times larger than in pure IrOx, and if calculated per carbon atom, this enhancement is one order magnitude larger than the induced by graphene oxide. IrOx-eG coatings show optimal in vitro neural cell viability and function as cell culture substrates. The fully straightforward electrochemical exfoliation and electrodeposition constitutes a step towards the application of graphene in biomedical systems, expanding the knowledge of pristine graphene vs. graphene oxide, in bioelectrodes.

  5. Dynamical strong coupling and parametric amplification of mechanical modes of graphene drums.

    PubMed

    Mathew, John P; Patel, Raj N; Borah, Abhinandan; Vijay, R; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical resonators are ubiquitous in modern information technology. With the possibility of coupling them to electromagnetic and plasmonic modes, they hold promise as the key building blocks in future quantum information technology. Graphene-based resonators are of interest for technological applications due to their high resonant frequencies, multiple mechanical modes and low mass. The tension-mediated nonlinear coupling between various modes of the resonator can be excited in a controllable manner. Here we engineer a graphene resonator with large frequency tunability at low temperatures, resulting in a large intermodal coupling strength. We observe the emergence of new eigenmodes and amplification of the coupled modes using red and blue parametric excitation, respectively. We demonstrate that the dynamical intermodal coupling is tunable. A cooperativity of 60 between two resonant modes of ∼100 MHz is achieved in the strong coupling regime. The ability to dynamically control the coupling between the high-frequency eigenmodes of a mechanical system opens up the possibility of quantum mechanical experiments at low temperatures. PMID:27294506

  6. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Shaygan, Mehrdad; Turner, Kevin T; Bargatin, Igor

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al2O3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young's modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young's modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed. PMID:26926386

  7. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Shaygan, Mehrdad; Turner, Kevin T.; Bargatin, Igor

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al2O3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young’s modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young’s modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed.

  8. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Shaygan, Mehrdad; Turner, Kevin T; Bargatin, Igor

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al2O3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young's modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young's modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed.

  9. Dynamical strong coupling and parametric amplification of mechanical modes of graphene drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, John P.; Patel, Raj N.; Borah, Abhinandan; Vijay, R.; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical resonators are ubiquitous in modern information technology. With the possibility of coupling them to electromagnetic and plasmonic modes, they hold promise as the key building blocks in future quantum information technology. Graphene-based resonators are of interest for technological applications due to their high resonant frequencies, multiple mechanical modes and low mass. The tension-mediated nonlinear coupling between various modes of the resonator can be excited in a controllable manner. Here we engineer a graphene resonator with large frequency tunability at low temperatures, resulting in a large intermodal coupling strength. We observe the emergence of new eigenmodes and amplification of the coupled modes using red and blue parametric excitation, respectively. We demonstrate that the dynamical intermodal coupling is tunable. A cooperativity of 60 between two resonant modes of ∼100 MHz is achieved in the strong coupling regime. The ability to dynamically control the coupling between the high-frequency eigenmodes of a mechanical system opens up the possibility of quantum mechanical experiments at low temperatures.

  10. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Margine, E R; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-01-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8-8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. PMID:26892805

  11. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margine, E. R.; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-02-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8-8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets.

  12. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Peng; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Yayun; Shi, Xiaoyang; Lü, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xi

    2015-11-01

    Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO) as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB) from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion) character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  13. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Margine, E. R.; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-01-01

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8–8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets. PMID:26892805

  14. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of TiO2-exfoliated graphite oxide composite using an ecofriendly graphite oxidation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon; de Souza, Thiago; Andrade, Luisa; Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa de; José, Humberto Jorge; Moreira, Regina de Fátima Peralta Muniz

    2015-12-01

    A simple and effective stepwise-method was developed to produce expanded exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO). Using a combination of ozone exposure and thermal treatment we demonstrate that a graphite surface can be modified to generate a graphene-like surface containing oxygen and sp3 carbon. This expanded exfoliated graphite oxide is useful for the production, through thermal treatment, of photocatalytic TiO2-EGO composites which are more active than those produce by the Hummers method. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2-EGO in methylene blue (MB) bleaching under UV light is enhanced in comparison with TiO2 P25.

  15. Recoverable Slippage Mechanism in Multilayer Graphene Leads to Repeatable Energy Dissipation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoding; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ruiz, Luis; Xia, Wenjie; Lee, Changgu; Kysar, Jeffrey W; Hone, James C; Keten, Sinan; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2016-02-23

    Understanding the deformation mechanisms in multilayer graphene (MLG), an attractive material used in nanodevices as well as in the reinforcement of nanocomposites, is critical yet challenging due to difficulties in experimental characterization and the spatiotemporal limitations of atomistic modeling. In this study, we combine nanomechanical experiments with coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations to elucidate the mechanisms of deformation and failure of MLG sheets. Elastic properties of graphene sheets with one to three layers are measured using film deflection tests. A nonlinear behavior in the force vs deflection curves for MLGs is observed in both experiments and simulations: during loading/unloading cycles, MLGs dissipate energy through a "recoverable slippage" mechanism. The CG-MD simulations further reveal an atomic level interlayer slippage process and suggest that the dissipated energy scales with film perimeter. Moreover, our study demonstrates that the finite shear strength between individual layers could explain the experimentally measured size-dependent strength with thickness scaling in MLG sheets. PMID:26783825

  16. Strain-induced crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized graphene sheet-filled natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbas, Bulent; Toki, Shigeyuki; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Chu, Benjamin; Register, Richard A.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Prud'homme, Robert K.; Adamson, Douglas H.

    2012-03-11

    The effects of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) on the mechanical properties and strain-induced crystallization of natural rubber (NR) are investigated. FGSs are predominantly single sheets of graphene with a lateral size of several hundreds of nanometers and a thickness of 1.5 nm. The effect of FGS and that of carbon black (CB) on the strain-induced crystallization of NR is compared by coupled tensile tests and X-ray diffraction experiments. Synchrotron X-ray scattering enables simultaneous measurements of stress and crystallization of NR in real time during sample stretching. The onset of crystallization occurs at significantly lower strains for FGS-filled NR samples compared with CB-filled NR, even at low loadings. Neat-NR exhibits strain-induced crystallization around a strain of 2.25, while incorporation of 1 and 4 wt % FGS shifts the crystallization to strains of 1.25 and 0.75, respectively. In contrast, loadings of 16 wt % CB do not significantly shift the critical strain for crystallization. Two-dimensional (2D) wide angle X-ray scattering patterns show minor polymer chain alignment during stretching, in accord with previous results for NR. Small angle X-ray scattering shows that FGS is aligned in the stretching direction, whereas CB does not show alignment or anisotropy. The mechanical properties of filled NR samples are investigated using cyclic tensile and dynamic mechanical measurements above and below the glass transition of NR.

  17. Fracture Mechanism and Toughness Optimization of Macroscopic Thick Graphene Oxide Film

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shibing; Chen, Bin; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-01-01

    Combined high strength and toughness of film materials are rather important for their industrial applications. As a new class of films, graphene oxide films (GOFs) attract intense attention in many applications but are frequently divergent, inconsistent, and poorly reproducible in their mechanical properties. In this study, we first demonstrate that different chemical compositions and assembly structures probably are responsible for the difference in elongations between cast GOFs and filtration GOFs. Comprehensive analysis of the morphologies and mechanical properties indicates that the enhanced elongation of the thick cast GOFs is mainly attributed to the presence of a unique skin-wrinkles-skin structure, which more easily forms in cast GOFs than in filtration counterparts. On the basis of this finding, we attempt to optimize the strength-toughness performance of the cast GOFs by adjusting their structures. With an appropriate thickness of 12.5 μm, the GOFs can achieve an ultrahigh toughness up to 4.37 MJ m−3, which is even comparable to the polymer-toughening graphene/GO-based paper-like materials. Such an optimization of the mechanical properties from the perspective of skin-wrinkles-skin structure appears to be a universal approach that could be extended to a variety of other film materials. PMID:26310835

  18. Engineering the Mechanical Properties of Monolayer Graphene Oxide at the Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Soler-Crespo, Rafael A; Gao, Wei; Xiao, Penghao; Wei, Xiaoding; Paci, Jeffrey T; Henkelman, Graeme; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2016-07-21

    The mechanical properties of graphene oxide (GO) are of great importance for applications in materials engineering. Previous mechanochemical studies of GO typically focused on the influence of the degree of oxidation on the mechanical behavior. In this study, using density functional-based tight binding simulations, validated using density functional theory simulations, we reveal that the deformation and failure of GO are strongly dependent on the relative concentrations of epoxide (-O-) and hydroxyl (-OH) functional groups. Hydroxyl groups cause GO to behave as a brittle material; by contrast, epoxide groups enhance material ductility through a mechanically driven epoxide-to-ether functional group transformation. Moreover, with increasing epoxide group concentration, the strain to failure and toughness of GO significantly increases without sacrificing material strength and stiffness. These findings demonstrate that GO should be treated as a versatile, tunable material that may be engineered by controlling chemical composition, rather than as a single, archetypical material. PMID:27356465

  19. Engineering the Mechanical Properties of Monolayer Graphene Oxide at the Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Soler-Crespo, Rafael A; Gao, Wei; Xiao, Penghao; Wei, Xiaoding; Paci, Jeffrey T; Henkelman, Graeme; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2016-07-21

    The mechanical properties of graphene oxide (GO) are of great importance for applications in materials engineering. Previous mechanochemical studies of GO typically focused on the influence of the degree of oxidation on the mechanical behavior. In this study, using density functional-based tight binding simulations, validated using density functional theory simulations, we reveal that the deformation and failure of GO are strongly dependent on the relative concentrations of epoxide (-O-) and hydroxyl (-OH) functional groups. Hydroxyl groups cause GO to behave as a brittle material; by contrast, epoxide groups enhance material ductility through a mechanically driven epoxide-to-ether functional group transformation. Moreover, with increasing epoxide group concentration, the strain to failure and toughness of GO significantly increases without sacrificing material strength and stiffness. These findings demonstrate that GO should be treated as a versatile, tunable material that may be engineered by controlling chemical composition, rather than as a single, archetypical material.

  20. Large-Scale Molecular Simulations on the Mechanical Response and Failure Behavior of a defective Graphene: Cases of 5–8–5 Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiwei; Yang, Baocheng; Yuan, Jinyun; Si, Yubing; Chen, Houyang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effect of defects on mechanical responses and failure behaviors of a graphene membrane is important for its applications. As examples, in this paper, a family of graphene with various 5–8–5 defects are designed and their mechanical responses are investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations. The dependence of fracture strength and strain as well as Young’s moduli on the nearest neighbor distance and defect types is examined. By introducing the 5–8–5 defects into graphene, the fracture strength and strain become smaller. However, the Young’s moduli of DL (Linear arrangement of repeat unit 5–8–5 defect along zigzag-direction of graphene), DS (a Slope angle between repeat unit 5–8–5 defect and zigzag direction of graphene) and DZ (Zigzag-like 5–8–5 defects) defects in the zigzag direction become larger than those in the pristine graphene in the same direction. A maximum increase of 11.8% of Young’s modulus is obtained. Furthermore, the brittle cracking mechanism is proposed for the graphene with 5–8–5 defects. The present work may provide insights in controlling the mechanical properties by preparing defects in the graphene, and give a full picture for the applications of graphene with defects in flexible electronics and nanodevices. PMID:26449655

  1. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness <5 layers). A negative graphite electrode can be electrochemically charged and expanded in an electrolyte of Li salts and organic solvents under high current density and exfoliated efficiently into few-layer graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper. PMID:21557613

  2. Structure-property relationships in graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Z.

    Graphene's unique combination of excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties can provide multi-functional reinforcement for polymer nanocomposites. However, poor dispersion of graphene in non-polar polyolefins limits its applications as a universal filler. Thus, the overall goal of this thesis was to improve graphene's dispersion in graphene/polyolefin nanocomposites and develop processing-structure-property relationships. A new polymer matrix was synthesized by blending polyethylene (PE) with oxidized polyethylene (OPE). Inclusion of OPE in PE produced miscible blends, but the miscibility decreased with increasing OPE loading. Meanwhile, the Young's modulus of blends increased with increasing OPE concentration, attributed to decreased long period order in PE and increased crystallinity. In addition, the miscibility of OPE in PE substantially reduced the viscosity of blends. Using thermally reduced graphene (TRG) produced by simultaneous thermal exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide, electrically conductive nanocomposites were manufactured by incorporating TRG in PE/OPE blends via solution blending. The rheological and electrical percolations decreased substantially to 0.3 and 0.13 vol% of TRG in PE/OPE/TRG nanocomposites compared to 1.0 and 0.3 vol% in PE/TRG nanocomposites. Improved dispersion of TRG in blends was attributed to increased TRG/polymer interactions, leading to high aspect ratio of the dispersed TRG. A universal Brownian dispersion mechanism for graphene was concluded similar to that of carbon nanotubes, following the Doi-Edwards theory. Furthermore, the improved dispersion of TRG correlated with the formation of surface fractals in PE/OPE/TRG nanocomposites, whereas the poor dispersion of TRG in PE led to the formation of only mass fractals. Moreover, graphene and carbon black (CB) were combined as a synergic filler for manufacturing electrically conductive PE nanocomposites. Smaller fractals were observed at lower CB

  3. Mechanical properties of graphene cantilever from atomic force microscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, R; Iraji Zad, A; Ahadian, M M

    2010-05-01

    We have studied the mechanical properties of a few-layer graphene cantilever (FLGC) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical properties of the suspended FLGC over an open hole have been derived from the AFM data. Force displacement curves using the Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov (DMT) and the massless cantilever beam models yield a Young modulus of E(c) approximately 37, E(a) approximately 0.7 TPa and a Hamakar constant of approximately 3 x 10( - 18) J. The threshold force to shear the FLGC was determined from a breaking force and modeling. In addition, we studied a graphene nanoribbon (GNR), which is a system similar to the FLGC; using density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane Young's modulus for the GNRs were calculated from the DFT outcomes approximately 0.82 TPa and the results were compared with the experiment. We found that the Young's modulus and the threshold shearing force are dependent on the direction of applied force and the values are different for zigzag edge and armchair edge GNRs.

  4. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-08-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm(-2) and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics. PMID:27396243

  5. Strain shielding from mechanically activated covalent bond formation during nanoindentation of graphene delays the onset of failure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Parks, David M

    2015-03-11

    Mechanical failure of an ideal crystal is dictated either by an elastic instability or a soft-mode instability. Previous interpretations of nanoindentation experiments on suspended graphene sheets,1,2 however, indicate an anomaly: the inferred strain in the graphene sheet directly beneath the diamond indenter at the measured failure load is anomalously large compared to the fracture strains predicted by both soft-mode and acoustic analyses. Through multiscale modeling combining the results of continuum, atomistic, and quantum calculations, and analysis of experiments, we identify a strain-shielding effect initiated by mechanochemical interactions at the graphene-indenter interface as the operative mechanism responsible for this anomaly. Transmission electron micrographs and a molecular model of the diamond indenter's tip suggest that the tip surface contains facets comprising crystallographic {111} and {100} planes. Ab initio and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations confirm that a covalent bond (weld) formation between graphene and the crystallographic {111} and {100} facets on the indenter's surface can be induced by compressive contact stresses of the order achieved in nanoindentation tests. Finite element analysis (FEA) and MD simulations of nanoindentation reveal that the shear stiction provided by the induced covalent bonding restricts relative slip of the graphene sheet at its contact with the indenter, thus initiating a local strain-shielding effect. As a result, subsequent to stress-induced bonding at the graphene-indenter interface, the spatial variation of continuing incremental strain is substantially redistributed, locally shielding the region directly beneath the indenter by limiting the buildup of strain while imparting deformation to the surrounding regions. The extent of strain shielding is governed by the strength of the shear stiction, which depends upon the level of hydrogen saturation at the indenter's surface. We show that at intermediate levels

  6. Current transport mechanism in graphene/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with various Al mole fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Bhishma; Seo, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Beo Deul; Cho, Jaehee

    2016-06-01

    The current transport mechanism of graphene formed on AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructures with various Al mole fractions (x = 0.15, 0.20, 0.30, and 0.40) is investigated. The current-voltage measurement from graphene to AlGaN/GaN shows an excellent rectifying property. The extracted Schottky barrier height of the graphene/AlGaN/GaN contacts increases with the Al mole fraction in AlGaN. However, the current transport mechanism deviates from the Schottky-Mott theory owing to the deterioration of AlGaN crystal quality at high Al mole fractions confirmed by reverse leakage current measurement.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Graphene Oxide Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Dikin,D.; Stankovich, S.; Zimney, E.; Piner, R.; Dommett, G.; Evmenenko, G.; Nguyen, S.; Ruoff, R.

    2007-01-01

    Free-standing paper-like or foil-like materials are an integral part of our technological society. Their uses include protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, electronic or optoelectronic components, and molecular storage. Inorganic 'paper-like' materials based on nanoscale components such as exfoliated vermiculite or mica platelets have been intensively studied and commercialized as protective coatings, high-temperature binders, dielectric barriers and gas-impermeable membranes. Carbon-based flexible graphite foils composed of stacked platelets of expanded graphite have long been used in packing and gasketing applications because of their chemical resistivity against most media, superior sealability over a wide temperature range, and impermeability to fluids. The discovery of carbon nanotubes brought about bucky paper, which displays excellent mechanical and electrical properties that make it potentially suitable for fuel cell and structural composite applications. Here we report the preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper, a free-standing carbon-based membrane material made by flow-directed assembly of individual graphene oxide sheets. This new material outperforms many other paper-like materials in stiffness and strength. Its combination of macroscopic flexibility and stiffness is a result of a unique interlocking-tile arrangement of the nanoscale graphene oxide sheets.

  8. Chemically bonded phosphorus/graphene hybrid as a high performance anode for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Hu, Shi; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost and natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel phosphorus/graphene nanosheet hybrid as a high performance anode for sodium-ion batteries through facile ball milling of red phosphorus and graphene stacks. The graphene stacks are mechanically exfoliated to nanosheets that chemically bond with the surfaces of phosphorus particles. This chemical bonding can facilitate robust and intimate contact between phosphorus and graphene nanosheets, and the graphene at the particle surfaces can help maintain electrical contact and stabilize the solid electrolyte interphase upon the large volume change of phosphorus during cycling. As a result, the phosphorus/graphene nanosheet hybrid nanostructured anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially be applied to other phosphorus-based alloy anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

  9. Graphene-based hybrid structures combined with functional materials of ferroelectrics and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Wenjing; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental studies and applications of 2-dimensional (2D) graphene may be deepened and broadened via combining graphene sheets with various functional materials, which have been extended from the traditional insulator of SiO2 to a versatile range of dielectrics, semiconductors and metals, as well as organic compounds. Among them, ferroelectric materials have received much attention due to their unique ferroelectric polarization. As a result, many attractive characteristics can be shown in graphene/ferroelectric hybrid systems. On the other hand, graphene can be integrated with conventional semiconductors and some newly-discovered 2D layered materials to form distinct Schottky junctions, yielding fascinating behaviours and exhibiting the potential for various applications in future functional devices. This review article is an attempt to illustrate the most recent progress in the fabrication, operation principle, characterization, and promising applications of graphene-based hybrid structures combined with various functional materials, ranging from ferroelectrics to semiconductors. We focus on mechanically exfoliated and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene sheets integrated in numerous advanced devices. Some typical hybrid structures have been highlighted, aiming at potential applications in non-volatile memories, transparent flexible electrodes, solar cells, photodetectors, and so on.

  10. Field Emission of Wet Transferred Suspended Graphene Fabricated on Interdigitated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong; Tao, Zhi; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wu, Shengqi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Suspended graphene (SG) membranes could enable strain-engineering of ballistic Dirac fermion transport and eliminate the extrinsic bulk disorder by annealing. When freely suspended without contact to any substrates, graphene could be considered as the ultimate two-dimensional (2D) morphology, leading to special field characteristics with the 2D geometrical effect and effectively utilized as an outstanding structure to explore the fundamental electronic or optoelectronic mechanism. In this paper, we report field emission characterization on an individual suspended few-layer graphene. A controllable wet transfer method is used to obtain the continuous and suspended graphene membrane on interdigitated gold electrodes. This suspended structure displays an overall field emission from the entirely surface, except for the variation in the emitting positions, acquiring a better enhancement than the exfoliated graphene on the conventional flat substrate. We also observe the transition process from space charge flow at low bias to the Fowler-Nordheim theory at high current emission regime. It could enable theoretical and experimental investigation of the typical electron emission properties of the 2D regime. Numerical simulations are also carried out to study the electrical properties of the suspended structure. Further improvement on the fabrication would realize low disorder, high quality, and large-scale suspended graphene devices. PMID:26795930

  11. Field Emission of Wet Transferred Suspended Graphene Fabricated on Interdigitated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong; Tao, Zhi; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wu, Shengqi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Suspended graphene (SG) membranes could enable strain-engineering of ballistic Dirac fermion transport and eliminate the extrinsic bulk disorder by annealing. When freely suspended without contact to any substrates, graphene could be considered as the ultimate two-dimensional (2D) morphology, leading to special field characteristics with the 2D geometrical effect and effectively utilized as an outstanding structure to explore the fundamental electronic or optoelectronic mechanism. In this paper, we report field emission characterization on an individual suspended few-layer graphene. A controllable wet transfer method is used to obtain the continuous and suspended graphene membrane on interdigitated gold electrodes. This suspended structure displays an overall field emission from the entirely surface, except for the variation in the emitting positions, acquiring a better enhancement than the exfoliated graphene on the conventional flat substrate. We also observe the transition process from space charge flow at low bias to the Fowler-Nordheim theory at high current emission regime. It could enable theoretical and experimental investigation of the typical electron emission properties of the 2D regime. Numerical simulations are also carried out to study the electrical properties of the suspended structure. Further improvement on the fabrication would realize low disorder, high quality, and large-scale suspended graphene devices.

  12. Probing weak localization in chemical vapor deposition graphene wide constriction using scanning gate microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, C.; Matsunaga, M.; Liu, F.-H.; Woo, T.-P.; Aoki, N.; Lin, L.-H.; Wu, B.-Y.; Ochiai, Y.; Liang, C.-T.

    2016-02-01

    Low-temperature scanning gate microscopy (LT-SGM) studies of graphene allow one to obtain important spatial information regarding coherent transport such as weak localization (WL) and universal conductance fluctuations. Although fascinating LT-SGM results on pristine graphene prepared by mechanical exfoliation have been reported in the literature, there appears to be a dearth of LT-SGM results on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene whose large scale and flexible substrate transferability make it an ideal candidate for coherent electronic applications. To this end, we have performed LT-SGM studies on CVD-grown graphene wide constriction (0.8 μm), which can be readily prepared by cost-effective optical lithography fully compatible with those in wafer foundry, in the WL regime. We find that the movable local gate can sensitively modulate the total conductance of the CVD graphene constriction possibly due to the intrinsic grain boundaries and merged domains, a great advantage for applications in coherent electronics. Moreover, such a conductance modulation by LT-SGM provides an additional, approximately magnetic-field-independent probe for studying coherent transport such as WL in graphene and spatial conductance variation.

  13. High photoresponsivity in an all-graphene p-n vertical junction photodetector.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Oh; Kim, Sung; Shin, Dong Hee; Kang, Soo Seok; Kim, Jong Min; Jang, Chan Wook; Joo, Soong Sin; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Ju Hwan; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2014-01-01

    Intensive studies have recently been performed on graphene-based photodetectors, but most of them are based on field effect transistor structures containing mechanically exfoliated graphene, not suitable for practical large-scale device applications. Here we report high-efficient photodetector behaviours of chemical vapor deposition grown all-graphene p-n vertical-type tunnelling diodes. The observed photodetector characteristics well follow what are expected from its band structure and the tunnelling of current through the interlayer between the metallic p- and n-graphene layers. High detectivity (~10(12) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1)) and responsivity (0.4~1.0 A W(-1)) are achieved in the broad spectral range from ultraviolet to near-infrared and the photoresponse is almost consistent under 6-month operations. The high photodetector performance of the graphene p-n vertical diodes can be understood by the high photocurrent gain and the carrier multiplication arising from impact ionization in graphene.

  14. Tuning the mechanical properties of graphene oxide paper and its associated polymer nanocomposites by controlling cooperative intersheet hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Compton, Owen C; Cranford, Steven W; Putz, Karl W; An, Zhi; Brinson, L Catherine; Buehler, Markus J; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2012-03-27

    The mechanical properties of pristine graphene oxide paper and paper-like films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-graphene oxide nanocomposite are investigated in a joint experimental-theoretical and computational study. In combination, these studies reveal a delicate relationship between the stiffness of these papers and the water content in their lamellar structures. ReaxFF-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the role of water molecules in modifying the mechanical properties of both pristine and nanocomposite graphene oxide papers, as bridge-forming water molecules between adjacent layers in the paper structure enhance stress transfer by means of a cooperative hydrogen-bonding network. For graphene oxide paper at an optimal concentration of ~5 wt % water, the degree of cooperative hydrogen bonding within the network comprising adjacent nanosheets and water molecules was found to optimally enhance the modulus of the paper without saturating the gallery space. Introducing PVA chains into the gallery space further enhances the cooperativity of this hydrogen-bonding network, in a manner similar to that found in natural biomaterials, resulting in increased stiffness of the composite. No optimal water concentration could be found for the PVA-graphene oxide nanocomposite papers, as dehydration of these structures continually enhances stiffness until a final water content of ~7 wt % (additional water cannot be removed from the system even after 12 h of annealing).

  15. Protein Induces Layer-by-Layer Exfoliation of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guijian; Zhang, Shuangyuan; Liu, Shuhua; Cai, Yongqing; Low, Michelle; Teng, Choon Peng; Phang, In Yee; Cheng, Yuan; Duei, Koh Leng; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Zheng, Yuangang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-05-20

    Here, we report a general and facile method for effective layer-by-layer exfoliation of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and graphite in water by using protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) to produce single-layer nanosheets, which cannot be achieved using other commonly used bio- and synthetic polymers. Besides serving as an effective exfoliating agent, BSA can also function as a strong stabilizing agent against reaggregation of single-layer nanosheets for greatly improving their biocompatibility in biomedical applications. With significantly increased surface area, single-layer MoS2 nanosheets also exhibit a much higher binding capacity to pesticides and a much larger specific capacitance. The protein exfoliation process is carefully investigated with various control experiments and density functional theory simulations. It is interesting to find that the nonpolar groups of protein can firmly bind to TMD layers or graphene to expose polar groups in water, facilitating the effective exfoliation of single-layer nanosheets in aqueous solution. The present work will enable to optimize the fabrication of various 2D materials at high yield and large scale, and bring more opportunities to investigate the unique properties of 2D materials and exploit their novel applications. PMID:25936424

  16. Tracking graphene by fluorescence imaging: a tool for detecting multiple populations of graphene in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidetti, G.; Cantelli, A.; Mazzaro, R.; Ortolani, L.; Morandi, V.; Montalti, M.

    2016-04-01

    Most methods used for the characterization of graphene produced by liquid phase exfoliation require the deposition of the liquid sample on a substrate and subsequent drying. Because of this or other post-synthetic treatments, the reliability of the data in describing the actual features of the graphene particles in the pristine solution becomes questionable. Hence there is a need for new methods that permit the study of graphene directly in solution. Fluorescence imaging is at present the most convenient and sensitive method to visualize nanosized objects in solution. Here we report the development of a new method for visualizing and tracking exfoliated graphene directly in solution using a conventional set-up for fluorescence microscopy. We functionalized a fluorescent surfactant typically used for exfoliating graphite in aqueous phase (Pluronic P123) with two different fluorophores, in order to make graphene detectable by fluorescence microscopy. The photophysical interactions between the fluorescent surfactant and graphene were investigated at the bulk level. Finally, fluorescence microscopy allowed us to track the carbon particles produced and to identify two different populations of particles with sizes of 265 +/- 25 and 1100 +/- 200 nm respectively. The correlation of these results with TEM and DLS data is discussed.Most methods used for the characterization of graphene produced by liquid phase exfoliation require the deposition of the liquid sample on a substrate and subsequent drying. Because of this or other post-synthetic treatments, the reliability of the data in describing the actual features of the graphene particles in the pristine solution becomes questionable. Hence there is a need for new methods that permit the study of graphene directly in solution. Fluorescence imaging is at present the most convenient and sensitive method to visualize nanosized objects in solution. Here we report the development of a new method for visualizing and tracking

  17. The intercalation and exfoliation of tungsten disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miremadi, B. K.; Morrison, S. R.

    1988-05-01

    The exfoliation of WS2, the separation of this layer compound into single molecular layers suspended in solution, was found more difficult than the exfoliation of MoS2 reported earlier. The difficulty was found to be the resistance of the WS2 to intercalation. By ultrasonic treatments while exposed to hexane plus n-butylithium, the lithium was found to intercalate, and exfoliation by immersion in water became possible. Restacking the WS2 by drying in a basic solution led to much larger crystallites than the as-received material, while flocculating by decreasing the pH led to small crystallites with a high density of edge planes. Nickel and aluminum inclusions lead to poor restacking, with no regular c spacing between WS2 basal planes. The more vigorous exfoliation procedure applied to MoS2 also leads to loss of regular c spacing (the x-ray diffraction pattern is essentially that of single molecular layers).

  18. A Graphene Fibriform Responsor for Sensing Heat, Humidity, and Mechanical Changes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Zhao, Yang; Cheng, Huhu; Qu, Liangti

    2015-12-01

    Controllable and sensitive perception of environmental changes is essential for the development of smart material and device systems. Herein, a multi-stimuli sensitive responsor has been fabricated on the base of the established double-helix core-sheath graphene-based microfibers (GFs). By combining the tunable conductivity and mechanical robustness of GF coated with graphitic carbon nitride (GF@GCN), a fibriform smart environmental responsor (SER) is prepared by water-assisted GFs-twisting strategy, which can accordingly present conductive state-dependent current responses upon exposure to a variety of stimuli. More importantly, this SER exhibits high current response to small perturbations induced by temperature variations, mechanical interactions, and relative humidity changes, thereby achieving an environmental perceptibility. Based on this finding, a multi-functional respiratory monitor has been built under the stimuli of the human breath. PMID:26457880

  19. Evidence of interfacial charge trapping mechanism in polyaniline/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Rakibul; Brun, Jean-François; Roussel, Frederick; Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Chan Yu King, Roch

    2015-08-03

    Relaxation mechanisms in polyaniline (PANI)/Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO) nanocomposites are investigated using broad band dielectric spectroscopy. The multilayered nanostructural features of the composites and the intimate interactions between PANI and RGO are evidenced by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Increasing the RGO fraction in the composites results in a relaxation process observed at a frequency of ca. 5 kHz. This mechanism is associated with an electrical charge trapping phenomenon occurring at the PANI/RGO interfaces. The dielectric relaxation processes are interpreted according to the Sillars approach and the results are consistent with the presence of conducting prolate spheroids (RGO) embedded into a polymeric matrix (PANI). Dielectric permittivity data are analyzed within the framework of the Kohlrausch-William-Watts model, evidencing a Debye-like relaxation process.

  20. Electronic and mechanical properties of hybrid graphene/h-BN nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Pooja, Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil

    2015-06-24

    The electronic and mechanical properties of one-dimensional super lattice which are composed of controlled domain size of graphene and h-BN nanoribbons with saturated and unsaturated edges are studied by means of the first-principles method. The results show that the studied zigzag- nanoribbons (Z-GBNNR) with unsaturated edges are half-metallic, while they transform into non-magnetic semiconductor on hydrogen passivations. On the other hand the band-gap of armchair-edges nanoribbons (A-GBNNR) get enhanced by the edges saturation. Furthermore, unsaturated edges A-GBNNR and saturated edges Z-GBNNR are found mechanically more stable. These results provide a fingerprint for their use in spintronics and electronics devices.