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Sample records for mechanics an overview

  1. Signal transduction mechanisms in plants: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Thompson, G. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview on recent advances in some of the basic signalling mechanisms that participate in a wide variety of stimulus-response pathways. The mechanisms include calcium-based signalling, G-protein-mediated-signalling and signalling involving inositol phospholipids, with discussion on the role of protein kinases and phosphatases interspersed. As a further defining feature, the article highlights recent exciting findings on three extracellular components that have not been given coverage in previous reviews of signal transduction in plants, extracellular calmodulin, extracellular ATP, and integrin-like receptors, all of which affect plant growth and development.

  2. Autonomous Mechanical Assembly on the Space Shuttle: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raibert, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    The space shuttle will be equipped with a pair of 50 ft. manipulators used to handle payloads and to perform mechanical assembly operations. Although current plans call for these manipulators to be operated by a human teleoperator. The possibility of using results from robotics and machine intelligence to automate this shuttle assembly system was investigated. The major components of an autonomous mechanical assembly system are examined, along with the technology base upon which they depend. The state of the art in advanced automation is also assessed.

  3. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance. PMID:26583117

  4. An Overview of Snow Photochemistry: Evidence, Mechanisms and Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannas, A. M.; Jones, A. E.; Dibb, J.; Ammann, M.; Anastasio, C.; Beine, H. J.; Bergin, M.; Bottenheim, J.; Boxe, C. S.; Carver, G.; Chen, G.; Crawford, J. H.; Domine, F.; Frey, M. M.; Guzman, M. I.; Heard, D. E.; Helmig, D.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Honrath, R. E.; Huey, L. G.; Hutterli, M.; Jacobi, H.-W.; Klan, P.; McConnell, J.; Plane, J.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that sunlit snow and ice plays an important role in processing atmospheric species. Photochemical production of a variety of chemicals has recently been reported to occur in snow/ice and the release of these photochemically generated species may significantly impact the chemistry of the overlying atmosphere. Nitrogen oxide and oxidant precursor fluxes have been measured in a number of snow covered environments, where in some cases the emissions significantly impact the overlying boundary layer. For example, photochemical ozone production (such as that occurring in polluted mid-latitudes) of 3-4 ppbv/day has been observed at South Pole, due to high OH and NO levels present in a relatively small boundary layer. Field and laboratory experiments have determined that the origin of the observed NOx flux is the photochemistry of nitrate within the snowpack, however some details of the mechanism have not yet been elucidated. A variety of low molecular weight organic compounds have been shown to be emitted from sunlit snowpacks, the source of which has been proposed to be either direct or indirect photo-oxidation of natural organic materials present in the snow. Although myriad studies have observed active processing of species within irradiated snowpacks, the fundamental chemistry occurring remains poorly understood. Here we consider the nature of snow at a fundamental, physical level; photochemical processes within snow and the caveats needed for comparison to atmospheric photochemistry; our current understanding of nitrogen, oxidant, halogen and organic photochemistry within snow; the current limitations faced by the field and implications for the future.

  5. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  6. An Overview of Autophagy: Morphology, Mechanism, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Parzych, Katherine R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Autophagy is a highly conserved eukaryotic cellular recycling process. Through the degradation of cytoplasmic organelles, proteins, and macromolecules, and the recycling of the breakdown products, autophagy plays important roles in cell survival and maintenance. Accordingly, dysfunction of this process contributes to the pathologies of many human diseases. Recent Advances: Extensive research is currently being done to better understand the process of autophagy. In this review, we describe current knowledge of the morphology, molecular mechanism, and regulation of mammalian autophagy. Critical Issues: At the mechanistic and regulatory levels, there are still many unanswered questions and points of confusion that have yet to be resolved. Future Directions: Through further research, a more complete and accurate picture of the molecular mechanism and regulation of autophagy will not only strengthen our understanding of this significant cellular process, but will aid in the development of new treatments for human diseases in which autophagy is not functioning properly. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 460–473. PMID:23725295

  7. Immunologic mechanisms in hypersensitivity reactions to metal ions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Büdinger, L; Hertl, M

    2000-02-01

    Metal ions such as Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, or Cr3+ are haptens with a high immunogenic potential, as contact dermatitis caused by ionic metals occurs in about 10-15% of the human population. Since alloys containing Ni2+, Co2+, and Cr3+ are components of implants in replacement surgery, dentures, orthodontic wires, and various other devices, adverse reactions to metal ions create serious problems in practical medicine as incompatibility reactions to metal-containing biomaterials. On the other hand, contact dermatitis to metal ions such as Ni2+ is a well-established model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of haptens by the immune system. Although many investigations have been performed to elucidate the molecular interactions causing contact hypersensitivity in man, many aspects remain to be clarified. This review will focus on the experimental data accumulated so far on the immunologic mechanisms responsible for the recognition of metal ions by T cells and eliciting adverse immune reactions causing contact dermatitis.

  8. Tribology and Mechanical Components Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of NASA Glenn Research Center's Tribology & Mechanical Components Branch is provided. Work in space mechanisms, seals, oil-free turbomachinery, and mechanical components is presented. An overview of current research for these technology areas is contained in this overview.

  9. Self-assembled and pyrolyzed carbon aerogels: an overview of their preparation mechanisms, properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahbakhsh, Ahmad; Bahramian, Ahmad Reza

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the synthesis conditions and mechanisms for the fabrication of different types of carbon aerogels, as well as the structural and functional properties of these materials, is presented here. In this overview, carbon aerogels are classified into three major categories: (i) conventional pyrolyzed organic-based carbon aerogels, which are products of the pyrolysis process of organic aerogels; (ii) self-assembled carbon aerogels, which are products of a reduction process; and (iii) nanocomposite carbon aerogels. Synthesis mechanisms for the sol-gel process of organic aerogels are reviewed using different mechanisms suggested in the literature. Moreover, the overall fabrication process of self-assembled carbon aerogels (graphene and carbon nanotube aerogels) is covered and the suggested mechanism for the gelation process of self-assembled carbon aerogels during the reduction process is investigated using reported mechanisms. The structural performance and functional properties (electrochemical and thermal properties) of different types of carbon aerogels are covered in detail. Moreover, different structural features of carbon aerogels and the influence of synthesis conditions on these structural characteristics are assessed and compared. Based on the literature results covered in this review paper, carbon aerogels are perfect candidates for the fabrication of ultra-low density supercapacitors, as well as thermal insulating materials.

  10. An overview of conflict.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jacinta

    2006-01-01

    Conflict is found in all aspects of society and nursing is not immune. Conflict is also found in critical care units. However, conflict within the nursing profession has traditionally generated negative feelings and many nurses use avoidance as a coping mechanism. This article will provide an overview of conflict, conflict management, and conflict resolution.

  11. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing mechanical properties of structural materials - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is presented to indicate the availability and application potentials of techniques for quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of structural materials. The purpose is to review NDE techniques that go beyond the usual emphasis on flow detection and characterization. Discussed are current and emerging NDE techniques that can verify and monitor entrinsic properties (e.g., tensile, shear, and yield strengths; fracture toughness, hardness, ductility; elastic moduli) and underlying microstructural and morphological factors. Most of the techniques described are, at present, neither widely applied nor widely accepted in commerce and industry because they are still emerging from the laboratory. The limitations of the techniques may be overcome by advances in applications research and instrumentation technology and perhaps by accommodations for their use in the design of structural parts.

  12. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing mechanical properties of structural materials: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Klima, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is presented to indicate the availability and application potentials of techniques for quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of structural materials. The purpose is to review NDE techniques that go beyond the usual emphasis on flaw detection and characterization. Discussed are current and emerging NDE techniques that can verify and monitor entrinsic properties (e.g., tensile, shear, and yield strengths; fracture toughness, hardness, ductility; elastic moduli) and underlying microstructural and morphological factors. Most of the techniques described are, at present, neither widely applied nor widely accepted in commerce and industry because they are still emerging from the laboratory. The limitations of the techniques may be overcome by advances in applications research and instrumentation technology and perhaps by accommodations for their use in the design of structural parts.

  13. An overview on internal geared mechanisms with small difference between teeth number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macovei (Cîrdei, S.; Doroftei, I.

    2015-11-01

    Internal gears with small difference between teeth number are most commonly encountered in planetary and differential mechanisms (eg. on automatic transmissions for vehicles). One of the advantages of this gear is the high transmission ratio. Their parallel axes make this gear perfect for the cases when a small deviation of the distance between axes is required. Automatic transmission allows internal gear function to high speed. In this, we present a short overview of internal gear with small difference between teeth number.

  14. An Overview of the Evidence and Mechanisms of Herb–Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fasinu, Pius S.; Bouic, Patrick J.; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Despite the lack of sufficient information on the safety of herbal products, their use as alternative and/or complementary medicine is globally popular. There is also an increasing interest in medicinal herbs as precursor for pharmacological actives. Of serious concern is the concurrent consumption of herbal products and conventional drugs. Herb–drug interaction (HDI) is the single most important clinical consequence of this practice. Using a structured assessment procedure, the evidence of HDI presents with varying degree of clinical significance. While the potential for HDI for a number of herbal products is inferred from non-human studies, certain HDIs are well established through human studies and documented case reports. Various mechanisms of pharmacokinetic HDI have been identified and include the alteration in the gastrointestinal functions with consequent effects on drug absorption; induction and inhibition of metabolic enzymes and transport proteins; and alteration of renal excretion of drugs and their metabolites. Due to the intrinsic pharmacologic properties of phytochemicals, pharmacodynamic HDIs are also known to occur. The effects could be synergistic, additive, and/or antagonistic. Poor reporting on the part of patients and the inability to promptly identify HDI by health providers are identified as major factors limiting the extensive compilation of clinically relevant HDIs. A general overview and the significance of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic HDI are provided, detailing basic mechanism, and nature of evidence available. An increased level of awareness of HDI is necessary among health professionals and drug discovery scientists. With the increasing number of plant-sourced pharmacological actives, the potential for HDI should always be assessed in the non-clinical safety assessment phase of drug development process. More clinically relevant research is also required in this area as current information on HDI is insufficient for clinical

  15. Osteoporosis: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, C. Conrad; Slemenda, Charles

    1987-01-01

    An overview of osteoporosis, its types, causes, diagnosis, and treatment is presented. Risk factors and bone mass measurement are also discussed. This article serves as an introduction to a symposium on osteoporosis containing five other articles in this issue. (MT)

  16. Cooling interventions for athletes: An overview of effectiveness, physiological mechanisms, and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Coen C. W. G.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Eijsvogels, Thijs M. H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise-induced increases in core body temperature could negative impact performance and may lead to development of heat-related illnesses. The use of cooling techniques prior (pre-cooling), during (per-cooling) or directly after (post-cooling) exercise may limit the increase in core body temperature and therefore improve exercise performance. The aim of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of current scientific knowledge in the field of pre-cooling, per-cooling and post-cooling. Based on existing studies, we will discuss 1) the effectiveness of cooling interventions, 2) the underlying physiological mechanisms and 3) practical considerations regarding the use of different cooling techniques. Furthermore, we tried to identify the optimal cooling technique and compared whether cooling-induced performance benefits are different between cool, moderate and hot ambient conditions. This article provides researchers, physicians, athletes and coaches with important information regarding the implementation of cooling techniques to maintain exercise performance and to successfully compete in thermally stressful conditions. PMID:28349095

  17. Cold electronics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschman, R. K.

    Low-temperature operation is being applied and contemplated for electronic systems ranging from single-transistor circuits for basic research to VLSI integrated circuits for ultra-fast computers. It is seen as both a means of extracting better performance from present technology and as an important ingredient of the next generation of devices and circuits. This overview is concerned with electronics based on semiconductors; for low temperatures the primary material is Si, although GaAs also has considerable potential, and the primary device is the field-effect transistor in various forms. Reduced temperature operation offers improvements in performance through improvement of materials-related properties such as electronic carrier mobility, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity. Substantial improvements in reliability are also expected since degradation mechanisms are thermally activated; however, this could be negated unless problems of thermal expansion mismatch and cycling are overcome. Refrigeration continues to be a central concern; mechanical cycles are still the mainstay and progress is being made in systems applicable to electronics, although further development is needed.

  18. Pharmaceutical cocrystals: an overview.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Ning; Li, Mingzhong; Schlindwein, Walkiria; Malek, Nazneen; Davies, Angela; Trappitt, Gary

    2011-10-31

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are emerging as a new class of solid drugs with improved physicochemical properties, which has attracted increased interests from both industrial and academic researchers. In this paper a brief and systematic overview of pharmaceutical cocrystals is provided, with particular focus on cocrystal design strategies, formation methods, physicochemical property studies, characterisation techniques, and recent theoretical developments in cocrystal screening and mechanisms of cocrystal formations. Examples of pharmaceutical cocrystals are also summarised in this paper.

  19. Digital Libraries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Candy

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the basic components of a digital library. Highlights include library collections; metadata; services, including information seeking and retrieval, reference query fulfillment, and user training; user interaction with digital libraries, including searching, browsing, and navigation; economic support; maintenance;…

  20. Futurism 1984: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Florence F.

    This overview of futurism defines it as a movement believing that a positive future world may be created through wise decision-making and futuristic planning. Present societal conditions have provided an impetus for a futuristic focus, and various authors, think tanks, techniques, and organizations have contributed to the wide acclaim and respect…

  1. Mountains: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the lessons from "Mountain: A Global Resource" that were developed by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and The Mountain Institute for use by NCSS members and their students. Provides an overview that introduces the mountains, mountain cultures, historical perceptions, and the geographical importance of…

  2. An Overview of Audacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Douglas Earl

    2014-01-01

    This article is an overview of the open source audio-editing and -recording program, Audacity. Key features are noted, along with significant features not included in the program. A number of music and music technology concepts are identified that could be taught and/or reinforced through using Audacity.

  3. Smart Structures, An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    USE ONLY (Leave ank ) COERD 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Smart Structures, An Overview F33615-90-C-321 I PE: 62201F PR: 2401 L AUTHOR(S) TA...Aeroelastic Control with Control Surface and Strain Actuation," Proceedings of the 33rd SDM Conference, Baltimore, MD, April 1991, pages 1817-1831. 2’ Ehlers

  4. Forensic odontology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Duane E

    2014-06-01

    This article is an overview of the field of forensic odontology, highlighting historical cases, with an emphasis on California cases, and briefly discussing some of the current techniques and issues in the field. As with all fields of dentistry, forensic odontology is adapting to new methodologies, changes in techniques, research findings and legal issues. Today's dentist who works in the forensic arena must face and understand these changes and advancements.

  5. Plant-derived natural medicines for the management of depression: an overview of mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Marzieh Sarbandi; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a serious widespread psychiatric disorder that affects approximately 17% of people all over the world. Exploring the neurological mechanisms of the antidepressant activity of plant-derived agents could have a crucial role in developing natural drugs for the management of depression. The aim of the present study is to review the neurological mechanisms of action of antidepressant plants and their constituents. For this purpose, electronic databases, including PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Cochrane Library, were searched from 1966 to October 2013. The results showed that several molecular mechanisms could be proposed for the antidepressant activity of medicinal plants and their constituents. Hypericum species could normalize brain serotonin level. Liquiritin and isoliquiritin from Glycyrrhiza uralensis rhizome act via the noradrenergic system. Rosmarinus officinalis and curcumin from Curcuma longa interact with D1 and D2 receptors as well as elevate the brain dopamine level. Sida tiagii and Aloysia gratissima involve γ-aminobutyric acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, respectively. Fuzi polysaccharide-1 from Aconitum carmichaeli could affect brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathways. Psoralidin from Psoralea corylifolia seed modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The total glycosides of Paeonia lactiflora demonstrate an inhibitory effect on both subtypes of monoamine oxidase. 3,6'-Di-o-sinapoyl-sucrose and tenuifoliside A from Polygala tenuifolia exhibit cytoprotective effects on neuronal cells. Further preclinical and clinical trials evaluating their safety, bioefficacy, and bioavailability are suggested to prove the valuable role of natural drugs in the management of depressive disorders.

  6. Insulin resistance and cancer risk: an overview of the pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, Biagio; Iiritano, Stefania; Nocera, Aurora; Possidente, Katiuscia; Nevolo, Maria T; Ventura, Valeria; Foti, Daniela; Chiefari, Eusebio; Brunetti, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is common in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes (T2D), in which circulating insulin levels are frequently increased. Recent epidemiological and clinical evidence points to a link between insulin resistance and cancer. The mechanisms for this association are unknown, but hyperinsulinaemia (a hallmark of insulin resistance) and the increase in bioavailable insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) appear to have a role in tumor initiation and progression in insulin-resistant patients. Insulin and IGF-I inhibit the hepatic synthesis of sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), whereas both hormones stimulate the ovarian synthesis of sex steroids, whose effects, in breast epithelium and endometrium, can promote cellular proliferation and inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, an increased risk of cancer among insulin-resistant patients can be due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage DNA contributing to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, it is possible that the abundance of inflammatory cells in adipose tissue of obese and diabetic patients may promote systemic inflammation which can result in a protumorigenic environment. Here, we summarize recent progress on insulin resistance and cancer, focusing on various implicated mechanisms that have been described recently, and discuss how these mechanisms may contribute to cancer initiation and progression.

  7. Quantum algorithms: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computers are designed to outperform standard computers by running quantum algorithms. Areas in which quantum algorithms can be applied include cryptography, search and optimisation, simulation of quantum systems and solving large systems of linear equations. Here we briefly survey some known quantum algorithms, with an emphasis on a broad overview of their applications rather than their technical details. We include a discussion of recent developments and near-term applications of quantum algorithms.

  8. An overview of multiphase cartilage mechanical modelling and its role in understanding function and pathology.

    PubMed

    Klika, Václav; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Chen, Ying-Chun; Brown, Cameron P

    2016-09-01

    There is a long history of mathematical and computational modelling with the objective of understanding the mechanisms governing cartilage׳s remarkable mechanical performance. Nonetheless, despite sophisticated modelling development, simulations of cartilage have consistently lagged behind structural knowledge and thus the relationship between structure and function in cartilage is not fully understood. However, in the most recent generation of studies, there is an emerging confluence between our structural knowledge and the structure represented in cartilage modelling. This raises the prospect of further refinement in our understanding of cartilage function and also the initiation of an engineering-level understanding for how structural degradation and ageing relates to cartilage dysfunction and pathology, as well as informing the potential design of prospective interventions. Aimed at researchers entering the field of cartilage modelling, we thus review the basic principles of cartilage models, discussing the underlying physics and assumptions in relatively simple settings, whilst presenting the derivation of relatively parsimonious multiphase cartilage models consistent with our discussions. We proceed to consider modern developments that start aligning the structure captured in the models with observed complexities. This emphasises the challenges associated with constitutive relations, boundary conditions, parameter estimation and validation in cartilage modelling programmes. Consequently, we further detail how both experimental interrogations and modelling developments can be utilised to investigate and reduce such difficulties before summarising how cartilage modelling initiatives may improve our understanding of cartilage ageing, pathology and intervention.

  9. An Overview of Combustion Mechanisms and Flame Structures for Advanced Solid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckstead, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) and cyclotretamethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are two solid ingredients often used in modern solid propellants. Although these two ingredients have very similar burning rates as monopropellants, they lead to significantly different characteristics when combined with binders to form propellants. Part of the purpose of this paper is to relate the observed combustion characteristics to the postulated flame structures and mechanisms for AP and HMX propellants that apparently lead to these similarities and differences. For AP composite, the primary diffusion flame is more energetic than the monopropellant flame, leading to an increase in burning rate over the monopropellant rate. In contrast the HMX primary diffusion flame is less energetic than the HMX monopropellant flame and ultimately leads to a propellant rate significantly less than the monopropellant rate in composite propellants. During the past decade the search for more energetic propellants and more environmentally acceptable propellants is leading to the development of propellants based on ingredients other than AP and HMX. The objective of this paper is to utilize the more familiar combustion characteristics of AP and HMX containing propellants to project the combustion characteristics of propellants made up of more advanced ingredients. The principal conclusion reached is that most advanced ingredients appear to burn by combustion mechanisms similar to HMX containing propellants rather than AP propellants.

  10. An Overview of the Mechanisms of Abnormal GABAergic Interneuronal Cortical Migration Associated with Prenatal Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shenoda, Botros B

    2017-02-03

    GABAergic Interneuronal migration constitutes an essential process during corticogenesis. Derived from progenitor cells located in the proliferative zones of the ventral telencephalon, newly generated GABAergic Interneuron migrate to their cortical destinations. Cortical dysfunction associated with defects in neuronal migration results in severe developmental consequences. There is growing evidence linking prenatal ethanol exposure to abnormal GABAergic interneuronal migration and subsequent cortical dysfunction. Investigating the pathophysiological mechanisms behind disrupted GABAergic interneuronal migration encountered with prenatal alcohol exposure is crucial for understanding and managing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. This review explores the molecular pathways regulating GABAergic interneuronal cortical migration that might be altered by prenatal ethanol exposure thus opening new avenues for further research in this topic.

  11. Mechanisms for the formation of Northeast China cold vortex and its activities and impacts: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yi; Shen, Baizhu; Li, Shangfeng; Liu, Gang; Yang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    In the mid 20th century, great efforts were made to investigate the formation process of high-latitude cold vortex, which is regarded as a major weather system in the atmospheric circulation. In the late 1970s, Chinese researchers noticed that the Northeast China cold vortex (NECV) is an active and frequently occurring weather system over Northeast Asia, which is generated under specific conditions of topography and land-sea thermal contrast on the local and regional scales. Thereby, the NECV study was broadened to include synoptic situations, mesoscale and dynamic features, the heavy rain process, etc. Since the 21st century, in the context of the global warming, more attention has been paid to studies of the mechanisms that cause the NECV variations during spring and early summer as well as the climatic impacts of the NECV system. Note that the NECV activity, frequent or not, not only affects local temperature and precipitation anomalies, but also regulates the amount of precipitation over northern China, the Huai River basin, and the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River. The NECV influence can even reach the Guangdong-Guangxi region. However, compared to the achievements for the blocking system study, theoretical studies with regard to the NECV system are still insufficient. Research activities regarding the mechanisms for the NECV formation, particularly theoretical studies using linear or weak nonlinear methods need to be strengthened in the future. Meanwhile, great efforts should be made to deepen our understanding of the relations of the NECV system to the oceanic thermal forcing, the low-frequency atmospheric variations over mid-high latitudes, and the global warming.

  12. Juvenile Spondyloarthritis: An Overview

    MedlinePlus

    Login/Register Site Feedback About Spondylitis Overview Types of Spondylitis For The Newly Diagnosed Could I Have Spondylitis? Treatment ... Vehicle Purchase from our Store Shop Cart Login Register About Spondylitis Overview Types of Spondylitis Ankylosing Spondylitis ...

  13. Zika virus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Gautam; Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus has been in the news for quite some time due to the ongoing recent outbreak in the Southern America, which started in December 2015. It has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization in February 2016 owing to its association with the congenital deformities, particularly microcephaly in infants borne to the infected mothers. The rapid spread of the virus throughout the United States of America and subsequently to Asia has raised serious international concerns. Its spread to countries neighboring India is a serious threat to the Indian population. This review article gives an overview about the virus, its diagnosis, clinical features, and the management. PMID:28217576

  14. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome: an overview of its epidemiology, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Sean S; Evans, Andrew H; Lees, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is a relatively recently described iatrogenic disturbance that may complicate long-term symptomatic therapy of Parkinson's disease. Patients with DDS develop an addictive pattern of dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) use, administering doses in excess of those required to control their motor symptoms. The prevalence of DDS in patients attending specialist Parkinson's disease centres is 3-4%. Amongst the behavioural disturbances associated with DDS are punding, which is a complex stereotyped behaviour, and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and compulsive eating. We review the risk factors and potential mechanisms for the development of DDS, including personality traits, potential genetic influences and Parkinson's disease-related cognitive deficits. Impulsive personality traits are prominent in patients developing DDS, and have been previously associated with the development of substance dependence. Candidate genes affecting the dopamine 'D(2)-like' receptor family have been associated with impulsive personality traits in addition to drug and nondrug addictions. Impaired decision making is implicated in addictive behaviours, and decision-making abilities can be influenced by dopaminergic medications. In Parkinson's disease, disruption of the reciprocal loops between the striatum and structures in the prefrontal cortex following dopamine depletion may predispose to DDS. The role of DRT in DDS is discussed, with particular reference to models of addiction, suggesting that compulsive drug use is due to progressive neuroadaptations in dopamine projections to the accumbens-related circuitry. Evidence for neuroadaptations and sensitization occurring in DDS include enhanced levodopa-induced ventral striatal dopamine release. Levodopa is still considered the most potent trigger for DDS in Parkinson's disease, but subcutaneous apomorphine and oral dopamine agonists may

  15. An Overview of Innovative Strategies for Fracture Mechanics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering fracture mechanics has played a vital role in the development and certification of virtually every aerospace vehicle that has been developed since the mid-20th century. NASA Langley Research Center s Durability, Damage Tolerance and Reliability Branch has contributed to the development and implementation of many fracture mechanics methods aimed at predicting and characterizing damage in both metallic and composite materials. This paper presents a selection of computational, analytical and experimental strategies that have been developed by the branch for assessing damage growth under monotonic and cyclic loading and for characterizing the damage tolerance of aerospace structures

  16. An Overview of the Use of Mechanical Turk in Behavioral Sciences: Implications for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Chitat; Holosko, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Crowdsourcing is a process in which a firm parcels out work to a "crowd" and offers payment for anyone within the crowd who completes the task determined by that firm. A growing number of behavioral scientists have begun using the Mechanical Turk (MTurk) to facilitate their research and practice, but there is apparently not one academic…

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of p53 Deregulation in Cancer: An Overview in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Ana B.; Rojas, Elizabeta A.; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Krzeminski, Patryk; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 pathway is inactivated in the majority of human cancers. Although this perturbation frequently occurs through the mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are other mechanisms that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, overexpression of important p53 negative regulators, such as murine double minute 2 (MDM2) or murine double minute 4 (MDM4), epigenetic deregulation, or even alterations in TP53 mRNA splicing. In this work, we will review the different mechanisms of p53 pathway inhibition in cancer with special focus on multiple myeloma (MM), the second most common hematological malignancy, with low incidence of p53 mutations/deletions but growing evidence of indirect p53 pathway deregulation. Translational implications for MM and cancer prognosis and treatment are also reviewed. PMID:27916892

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of p53 Deregulation in Cancer: An Overview in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Ana B; Rojas, Elizabeta A; Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Krzeminski, Patryk; Gutiérrez, Norma C

    2016-11-30

    The p53 pathway is inactivated in the majority of human cancers. Although this perturbation frequently occurs through the mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are other mechanisms that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, overexpression of important p53 negative regulators, such as murine double minute 2 (MDM2) or murine double minute 4 (MDM4), epigenetic deregulation, or even alterations in TP53 mRNA splicing. In this work, we will review the different mechanisms of p53 pathway inhibition in cancer with special focus on multiple myeloma (MM), the second most common hematological malignancy, with low incidence of p53 mutations/deletions but growing evidence of indirect p53 pathway deregulation. Translational implications for MM and cancer prognosis and treatment are also reviewed.

  19. Advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end products (AGEs and ALEs): an overview of their mechanisms of formation.

    PubMed

    Vistoli, G; De Maddis, D; Cipak, A; Zarkovic, N; Carini, M; Aldini, G

    2013-08-01

    Advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have a pathogenetic role in the development and progression of different oxidative-based diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurological disorders. AGEs and ALEs represent a quite complex class of compounds that are formed by different mechanisms, by heterogeneous precursors and that can be formed either exogenously or endogenously. There is a wide interest in AGEs and ALEs involving different aspects of research which are essentially focused on set-up and application of analytical strategies (1) to identify, characterize, and quantify AGEs and ALEs in different pathophysiological conditions; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of their biological effects; and (3) to discover compounds able to inhibit AGEs/ALEs damaging effects not only as biological tools aimed at validating AGEs/ALEs as drug target, but also as promising drugs. All the above-mentioned research stages require a clear picture of the chemical formation of AGEs/ALEs but this is not simple, due to the complex and heterogeneous pathways, involving different precursors and mechanisms. In view of this intricate scenario, the aim of the present review is to group the main AGEs and ALEs and to describe, for each of them, the precursors and mechanisms of formation.

  20. The Transition of Acute Postoperative Pain to Chronic Pain: An Integrative Overview of Research on Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C Richard; Vierck, Charles J

    2017-04-01

    The nature of the transition from acute to chronic pain still eludes explanation, but chronic pain resulting from surgery provides a natural experiment that invites clinical epidemiological investigation and basic scientific inquiry into the mechanisms of this transition. The primary purpose of this article is to review current knowledge and hypotheses on the transition from acute to persistent postsurgical pain, summarizing literature on clinical epidemiological studies of persistent postsurgical pain development, as well as basic neurophysiological studies targeting mechanisms in the periphery, spinal cord, and brain. The second purpose of this article is to integrate theory, information, and causal reasoning in these areas. Conceptual mapping reveals 5 classes of hypotheses pertaining to pain. These propose that chronic pain results from: 1) persistent noxious signaling in the periphery; 2) enduring maladaptive neuroplastic changes at the spinal dorsal horn and/or higher central nervous system structures reflecting a multiplicity of factors, including peripherally released neurotrophic factors and interactions between neurons and microglia; 3) compromised inhibitory modulation of noxious signaling in medullary-spinal pathways; 4) descending facilitatory modulation; and 5) maladaptive brain remodeling in function, structure, and connectivity. The third purpose of this article is to identify barriers to progress and review opportunities for advancing the field. This review reveals a need for a concerted, strategic effort toward integrating clinical epidemiology, basic science research, and current theory about pain mechanisms to hasten progress toward understanding, managing, and preventing persistent postsurgical pain.

  1. Acid rain and tree physiology: an overview of some possible mechanisms of response

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Several concepts which should be considered in addressing likely mechanisms by which acid deposition and air pollution in general can affect plant productivity are briefly discussed. These include: (1) multiple components of natural terrestrial systems may be affected; (2) plant response must be examined from a whole-plant perspective; (3) sensitivities of shoots and roots may differ markedly; (4) changing environmental availability and potential phytotoxicity of several trace elements should be examined; and (5) air pollution constitutes only one of many stresses which may contribute to forest declines. 6 references, 3 figures, 2 tables. (ACR)

  2. Antidepressants as analgesics: an overview of central and peripheral mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Sawynok, J; Esser, M J; Reid, A R

    2001-01-01

    Antidepressants, given systemically, are widely used for the treatment of various chronic and neuropathic pain conditions in humans. In animal studies, antidepressants exhibit analgesic properties in nociceptive, inflammatory and neuropathic test systems, with outcomes depending on the specific agent, the particular test, the route of administration and the treatment method used. Although early studies focused on central (i.e., supraspinal, spinal) actions, more recent studies have demonstrated a local peripheral analgesic effect of antidepressants. These peripheral actions raise the possibility that topical formulations of antidepressants may be a useful alternative drug delivery system for analgesia. Antidepressants exhibit a number of pharmacological actions: they block reuptake of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine, have direct and indirect actions on opioid receptors, inhibit histamine, cholinergic, 5-hydroxytryptamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, inhibit ion channel activity, and block adenosine uptake. The involvement of these mechanisms in both central and peripheral analgesia produced by antidepressants is considered. Data illustrating the preclinical peripheral analgesic actions of antidepressants are presented, as are some aspects of the mechanisms by which these actions occur. PMID:11212590

  3. Computational Aeroacoustics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of recent advances in computational aeroacoustics (CAA) is presented. CAA algorithms must not be dispersive and dissipative. It should propagate waves supported by the Euler equations with the correct group velocities. Computation domains are inevitably finite in size. To avoid the reflection of acoustic and other outgoing waves at the boundaries of the computation domain, it is required that special boundary conditions be imposed at the boundary region. These boundary conditions either absorb all the outgoing waves without reflection or allow the waves to exit smoothly. High-order schemes, invariably, supports spurious short waves. These spurious waves tend to pollute the numerical solution. They must be selectively damped or filtered out. All these issues and relevant computation methods are briefly reviewed. Jet screech tones are known to have caused structural fatigue in military combat aircrafts. Numerical simulation of the jet screech phenomenon is presented as an example of a successful application of CAA.

  4. Cellular and molecular immunological mechanisms in eosinophilic esophagitis: an updated overview of their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a pathophysiologically complex disorder driven by distinct, multiple mechanisms involving a large number of cells, molecules, and genes. Associated with food allergy from its initial descriptions, a key role for the Th2-type cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 in recruiting and activating eosinophils has been described. Epithelial cells have been recognized as major effectors in initiating EoE, both through their recruitment of iNKT cells towards the esophageal epithelium, which constitutes a major cytokine source, and through the release of eotaxin-3 and other chemoattractants. Epithelial and mesenchymal-released TSLP is a key regulator for which a connecting role between the adaptive and innate mucosal-associated immune response has been suggested. Finally, activated eosinophil- and mast cell-derived TGF β1 secretion is crucial in EoE-associated tissue remodeling.

  5. Antibacterial Derivatives of Marine Algae: An Overview of Pharmacological Mechanisms and Applications.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Emer; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen

    2016-04-22

    The marine environment is home to a taxonomically diverse ecosystem. Organisms such as algae, molluscs, sponges, corals, and tunicates have evolved to survive the high concentrations of infectious and surface-fouling bacteria that are indigenous to ocean waters. Both macroalgae (seaweeds) and microalgae (diatoms) contain pharmacologically active compounds such as phlorotannins, fatty acids, polysaccharides, peptides, and terpenes which combat bacterial invasion. The resistance of pathogenic bacteria to existing antibiotics has become a global epidemic. Marine algae derivatives have shown promise as candidates in novel, antibacterial drug discovery. The efficacy of these compounds, their mechanism of action, applications as antibiotics, disinfectants, and inhibitors of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria are reviewed in this article.

  6. Antibacterial Derivatives of Marine Algae: An Overview of Pharmacological Mechanisms and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Emer; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment is home to a taxonomically diverse ecosystem. Organisms such as algae, molluscs, sponges, corals, and tunicates have evolved to survive the high concentrations of infectious and surface-fouling bacteria that are indigenous to ocean waters. Both macroalgae (seaweeds) and microalgae (diatoms) contain pharmacologically active compounds such as phlorotannins, fatty acids, polysaccharides, peptides, and terpenes which combat bacterial invasion. The resistance of pathogenic bacteria to existing antibiotics has become a global epidemic. Marine algae derivatives have shown promise as candidates in novel, antibacterial drug discovery. The efficacy of these compounds, their mechanism of action, applications as antibiotics, disinfectants, and inhibitors of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria are reviewed in this article. PMID:27110798

  7. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and are utilized commercially. In this review, we used molecular pathway analysis to understand the toxicity and carcinogenic mechanisms of these metals. Our analyzed data showed that above-mentioned metallic substances induce oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell death processes, resulting in increase the risk of cancer and cancer-related diseases. Thus, we might think phytochelatin molecules and antioxidative phytochemical substances are helpful for prevention of heavy metal-induced cancer. PMID:26734585

  8. An Overview of the Predictor Standard Tools for Patient Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Acieh; Abdeyazdan, Gholamhossein; Davaridolatabadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Most patients staying in the intensive care unit (ICU) require respiratory support through a ventilator. Since prolonged mechanical ventilation and weaning from the ventilator without criteria or at the inappropriate time can result in many complications, it is required that patients be weaned off the ventilator as soon as possible. This study was conducted to investigate a few standard tools that predict successful and timely weaning of patients from the ventilator. In the literature, SOFA and APACHE II scores, along with various tools, including Burn, Morganroth, and Corgian, have been used in weaning patients from the ventilator. In most of these studies, the increase or decrease in the APACHE II score was correlated with the patient’s weaning time, and this score could be used as a criterion for weaning. Several authors have expressed their belief that the SOFA score in the ICU is a good indicator of the prognosis of patient’s weaning from the ventilator, length of stay, mortality, and rate of recovery. Several studies have compared SOFA and APACHE II scores and have shown that there is a positive correlation between the SOFA and APACHE II scores and that both mortality and dependence on the ventilator are related to these two scores. Another tool is Burn’s weaning program. A higher Burn score indicates successful weaning off of the ventilator, successful extubation, lower length of mechanical ventilation, and shorter stay in the hospital. However, the capabilities of the Morganroth scale and the Gluck and Corgian scoring systems were evaluated only for successful weaning off of the ventilator, and a decrease in the Morganroth and Gluck scores indicated successful weaning. PMID:27054004

  9. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  10. An Overview of Filicide

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Filicide, or the murder of one's own child, is an unfathomable crime. With Andrea Yates's return to trial in the summer of 2006, filicide once again came to the forefront of psychiatric issues in the media. One positive outcome that may be derived from this tragedy is practitioners' heightened awareness that parents may, for a variety of reasons, be compelled to kill their children. This article aims to educate mental health providers about the concept of filicide by presenting a broad overview of the topic, including a discussion of its history, definitions, classifications, outcomes, and the research surrounding it. This knowledge will hopefully bring about clinicians' increased exploration of patients' thoughts of harming their children, which may ultimately lead to the prevention of these senseless crimes. PMID:20805899

  11. Hydrocarbon bioremediation -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation is the process that transforms xenobiotics introduced into the environment to a less toxic or innocuous form, or mineralizes them to inorganic species. The processes can be carried out through either aerobic or anaerobic pathways by indigenous heterotrophs or by specially engineered organisms. For some xenobiotics, the process can also be carried out by cometabolic processes, which use another compound as the carbon and energy source. This technique can be applied either in situ or ex situ. An overview is presented of real-world applications of a variety of hydrocarbon bioremediation approaches, including biopiling, bioventing, bioslurping, landfarming, electrobioreclamation, and biovertical circulation wells. Problems in translating laboratory and field-scale pilot test data to full-scale operating systems are discussed. Such issues include biodegradation enhancement, nutrient and electron acceptor delivery, alternative electron acceptors, and integration of biological, chemical, and physical approaches to hydrocarbon remediation.

  12. Reactions of oxidatively activated arylamines with thiols: reaction mechanisms and biologic implications. An overview.

    PubMed Central

    Eyer, P

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amines belong to a group of compounds that exert their toxic effects usually after oxidative biotransformation, primarily in the liver. In addition, aromatic amines also undergo extrahepatic activation to yield free arylaminyl radicals. The reactive intermediates are potential promutagens and procarcinogens, and responsible for target tissue toxicity. Since thiols react with these intermediates at high rates, it is of interest to know the underlying reaction mechanisms and the toxicologic implications. Phenoxyl radicals from aminophenols and aminyl radicals from phenylenediamines quickly disproportionate to quinone imines and quinone diimines. Depending on the structure, Michael addition or reduction reactions with thiols may prevail. Products of sequential oxidation/addition reactions (e.g., S-conjugates of aminophenols) are occasionally more toxic than the parent compounds because of their higher autoxidizability and their accumulation in the kidney. Even after covalent binding of quinone imines to protein SH groups, the resulting thioethers are able to autoxidize. The quinoid thioethers can then cross-link the protein by addition to neighboring nucleophiles. The reactions of nitrosoarenes with thiols yield a so-called "semimercaptal" from which various branching reactions detach, depending on substituents. Compounds with strong pi-donors, like 4-nitrosophenetol, give a resonance-stabilized N-(thiol-S-yl)-arylamine cation that may lead to bicyclic products, thioethers, and DNA adducts. Examples of toxicologic implications of the interactions of nitroso compounds with thiols are given for nitrosoimidazoles, heterocyclic nitroso compounds from protein pyrolysates, and nitrosoarenes. These data indicate that interactions of activated arylamines with thiols may not be regarded exclusively as detoxication reactions. PMID:7889834

  13. An overview of degradable polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many degradable polymers are being investigated for research purpose or for possible commercial use. This overview provides a listing of the more important degradable polymers and their mechanisms of action. Some application areas, particularly in packaging, housewares, personal care, biomaterials, ...

  14. An overview of degradable polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many degradable polymers are being investigated for research purpose or for possible commercial use. This overview provides a listing of the more important degradable polymers and their mechanisms of action. Some application areas, particularly in packaging, housewares, personal care, biomaterials...

  15. Optical Aspects Of Underwater Windows With An Overview On Mechanical Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lones, Joe J.

    1980-03-01

    In recent years there has been an increased emphasis on ocean exploration by both government and private agencies of the world. A large portion of these marine activities involve human occupancy of pressure vessels, also known as hyperbaric chambers. The most common chambers of this type are diving submersibles and diver decompression chambers. As their' use by private agencies has grown, so has the requirement that the marine construction codes include more definitive guidelines in design and production of windows for the occupants to view thru the chamber walls.

  16. An Overview of Sub-Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Action of TTFields

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Jack A.; Wenger, Cornelia; Friesen, Douglas E.; Preto, Jordane

    2016-01-01

    Long-standing research on electric and electromagnetic field interactions with biological cells and their subcellular structures has mainly focused on the low- and high-frequency regimes. Biological effects at intermediate frequencies between 100 and 300 kHz have been recently discovered and applied to cancer cells as a therapeutic modality called Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields). TTFields are clinically applied to disrupt cell division, primarily for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this review, we provide an assessment of possible physical interactions between 100 kHz range alternating electric fields and biological cells in general and their nano-scale subcellular structures in particular. This is intended to mechanistically elucidate the observed strong disruptive effects in cancer cells. Computational models of isolated cells subject to TTFields predict that for intermediate frequencies the intracellular electric field strength significantly increases and that peak dielectrophoretic forces develop in dividing cells. These findings are in agreement with in vitro observations of TTFields’ disruptive effects on cellular function. We conclude that the most likely candidates to provide a quantitative explanation of these effects are ionic condensation waves around microtubules as well as dielectrophoretic effects on the dipole moments of microtubules. A less likely possibility is the involvement of actin filaments or ion channels. PMID:27845746

  17. An overview of Trilinos.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Kevin R.; Tuminaro, Raymond Stephen; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Hoekstra, Robert John; Phipps, Eric Todd; Kolda, Tamara Gibson; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Hu, Jonathan Joseph; Williams, Alan B.; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Howle, Victoria E.; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Willenbring, James M.; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2003-08-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to facilitate the design, development, integration and ongoing support of mathematical software libraries. In particular, our goal is to develop parallel solver algorithms and libraries within an object-oriented software framework for the solution of large-scale, complex multi-physics engineering and scientific applications. Our emphasis is on developing robust, scalable algorithms in a software framework, using abstract interfaces for flexible interoperability of components while providing a full-featured set of concrete classes that implement all abstract interfaces. Trilinos uses a two-level software structure designed around collections of packages. A Trilinos package is an integral unit usually developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. Packages exist underneath the Trilinos top level, which provides a common look-and-feel, including configuration, documentation, licensing, and bug-tracking. Trilinos packages are primarily written in C++, but provide some C and Fortran user interface support. We provide an open architecture that allows easy integration with other solver packages and we deliver our software to the outside community via the Gnu Lesser General Public License (LGPL). This report provides an overview of Trilinos, discussing the objectives, history, current development and future plans of the project.

  18. School Phobia: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, James E.; Sheperd, George

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses general features of school phobia and specific clinical and familial traits and characteristics. Included are overviews of theoretical explanations, types of school phobia, suggested methods of treatment, and their efficacy. (Author)

  19. (18)F-labeled positron emission tomographic radiopharmaceuticals in oncology: an overview of radiochemistry and mechanisms of tumor localization.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-11-01

    Molecular imaging is the visualization, characterization, and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in a living system. At present, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. Although [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging provides high specificity and sensitivity in several kinds of cancer and has many applications, it is important to recognize that FDG is not a "specific" radiotracer for imaging malignant disease. Highly "tumor-specific" and "tumor cell signal-specific" PET radiopharmaceuticals are essential to meet the growing demand of radioisotope-based molecular imaging technology. In the last 15 years, many alternative PET tracers have been proposed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies to characterize the tumor biology more appropriately. The potential clinical utility of several (18)F-labeled radiotracers (eg, fluoride, FDOPA, FLT, FMISO, FES, and FCH) is being reviewed by several investigators in this issue. An overview of design and development of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals, radiochemistry, and mechanism(s) of tumor cell uptake and localization of radiotracers are presented here. The approval of clinical indications for FDG-PET in the year 2000 by the Food and Drug Administration, based on a review of literature, was a major breakthrough to the rapid incorporation of PET into nuclear medicine practice, particularly in oncology. Approval of a radiopharmaceutical typically involves submission of a "New Drug Application" by a manufacturer or a company clearly documenting 2 major aspects of the drug: (1) manufacturing of PET drug using current good manufacturing practices and (2) the safety and effectiveness of a drug with specific indications. The potential routine clinical utility of (18)F-labeled PET radiopharmaceuticals depends also on

  20. Overview of Glenn Mechanical Components Branch Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrajsek, James

    2002-09-01

    Mr. James Zakrajsek, chief of the Mechanical Components Branch, gave an overview of research conducted by the branch. Branch members perform basic research on mechanical components and systems, including gears and bearings, turbine seals, structural and thermal barrier seals, and space mechanisms. The research is focused on propulsion systems for present and advanced aerospace vehicles. For rotorcraft and conventional aircraft, we conduct research to develop technology needed to enable the design of low noise, ultra safe geared drive systems. We develop and validate analytical models for gear crack propagation, gear dynamics and noise, gear diagnostics, bearing dynamics, and thermal analyses of gear systems using experimental data from various component test rigs. In seal research we develop and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. We perform experimental and analytical research to develop advanced thermal barrier seals and structural seals for current and next generation space vehicles. Our space mechanisms research involves fundamental investigation of lubricants, materials, components and mechanisms for deep space and planetary environments.

  1. An overview of MEDM.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-10-05

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical user interface to the EPICS control system and has also been used for other control systems. MEDM has two modes of operation, EDIT and EXECUTE. In its EDIT mode it provides the drawing tools needed to design control screens for operator interfaces. In its EXECUTE mode it manages those screens to communicate with the control system. MEDM provides a set of interface objects that falls into three main categories: (1) Monitors, such as text, meters, and plots; (2) Controllers, such as buttons, menus, and sliders; and (3) Drawing Objects, such as lines, rectangles, and images. Each of these objects has many options, allowing for the development of screens ranging from simple to quite sophisticated. MEDM has been developed over the last decade, primarily at Argonne National Laboratory, and is a large, well tested, extensively used program. It runs on most flavors of UNIX, VMS, and Windows 95/98/NT. It has been used to design thousands of control screens, such as the one shown in Fig. 1, at the Advanced Photon Source and other sites around the world. This paper presents an overview of MEDM and its features.

  2. Planetary Seismometers: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapmeyer, M.; Akito, A.; Bampasidis, G.; Banerdt, W. B.; Coustenis, A.; Fouch, M. J.; Garnero, E. J.; Khavroshkin, O.; Kobayashi, N.; Moussas, X.; Pike, W. T.; Seidensticker, K. J.; Solomonidou, A.; Yu, H.; Zakharov, A.

    2012-04-01

    Seismometers were part of lander payloads since the launch of Ranger 3 in early 1962, which was the first attempt to deliver scientific instruments to the surface of another celestial body. Since then, active and passive seismic experiments were conducted with great success on the Moon, and to a lesser extent on Mars and Venus. Proposals have been made or are in preparation for new experiments with single instruments or instrument networks on Venus, Moon, Mars, Phobos, Titan, Europa, and other bodies. One instrument (CASSE, sensitive for acoustic frequencies >= 30Hz) is currently flying to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on board of the Rosetta Mission. We give an overview of seismometers for use in planetary missions, including instruments of past and future missions. The focus is on the current developments as represented by the authors of the presentation. These encompass a Micro-Electromechanic System, several piezoelectric transducers that are able to resist strong decelerations, as well as new developments based on laser-interferometric sensing or hydrodynamic flow of electrolytic liquids.

  3. An Overview of Kinematic and Calibration Models Using Internal/External Sensors or Constraints to Improve the Behavior of Spatial Parallel Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Majarena, Ana C.; Santolaria, Jorge; Samper, David; Aguilar, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the literature on kinematic and calibration models of parallel mechanisms, the influence of sensors in the mechanism accuracy and parallel mechanisms used as sensors. The most relevant classifications to obtain and solve kinematic models and to identify geometric and non-geometric parameters in the calibration of parallel robots are discussed, examining the advantages and disadvantages of each method, presenting new trends and identifying unsolved problems. This overview tries to answer and show the solutions developed by the most up-to-date research to some of the most frequent questions that appear in the modelling of a parallel mechanism, such as how to measure, the number of sensors and necessary configurations, the type and influence of errors or the number of necessary parameters. PMID:22163469

  4. Lead poisoning: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  5. Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bhaskar; Bhartiya, Shibal; Sharma, Reetika; Arora, Tarun; Dada, Tanuj

    2012-01-01

    Given the obvious quality of life concerns with medical and surgical lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP), lasers have received considerable attention as a therapeutic modality for glaucoma. Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) is increasingly being used in clinical practice as both the primary procedure and as an adjunct to medical and surgical therapy. Preliminary published evidence suggests that SLT is an effective, compliance-free, repeatable and safe therapeutic modality having only minor, transient, self-limiting or easily controlled side effects with no sequelae. This review attempts a broad overview of the current knowledge of its mechanism, efficacy, indications and limitations, point out the knowledge lacunae that still exist with respect to this highly promising technology which has captured the attention of glaucoma surgeons all over the world.

  6. The School Office: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Presents an overview of the fundamental principles of school office design that remain constant despite changes in building technologies, and technological and spatial flexibility. Principles discussed include the school office and traffic patterns, security, and visitor reception requirements. (GR)

  7. An overview of three promising mechanical, optical, and biochemical engineering approaches to improve selective photothermolysis of refractory port wine stains.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Guillermo; Choi, Bernard; Broekgaarden, Mans; Yang, Owen; Yang, Bruce; Ghasri, Pedram; Chen, Jennifer K; Bezemer, Rick; Nelson, J Stuart; van Drooge, Anne Margreet; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Kelly, Kristen M; Heger, Michal

    2012-02-01

    During the last three decades, several laser systems, ancillary technologies, and treatment modalities have been developed for the treatment of port wine stains (PWSs). However, approximately half of the PWS patient population responds suboptimally to laser treatment. Consequently, novel treatment modalities and therapeutic techniques/strategies are required to improve PWS treatment efficacy. This overview therefore focuses on three distinct experimental approaches for the optimization of PWS laser treatment. The approaches are addressed from the perspective of mechanical engineering (the use of local hypobaric pressure to induce vasodilation in the laser-irradiated dermal microcirculation), optical engineering (laser-speckle imaging of post-treatment flow in laser-treated PWS skin), and biochemical engineering (light- and heat-activatable liposomal drug delivery systems to enhance the extent of post-irradiation vascular occlusion).

  8. Marine pollution: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentukevičienė, Marina; Brannvall, Evelina

    2008-01-01

    This overview of marine pollution follows the methodology as proposed below. Firstly, well-known databases (Science Direct, GeoRef, SpringerLINK, etc.) on technological research were studied. All collected references were divided into 27 sections following the key words associated with marine pollution, oil spills, alien species migration, etc. The most commercially promising research and development (R & D) activities seem to be market-oriented sections: detection of oil spills at sea, containment and recovery of floating oil at sea, detection of oil spills on land, disposal of oil and debris on land, alien species migration prevention from ballast water and underwater hull cleaning in water, NOx and SOx emissions, pollutions from ship-building and repair, and biogeochemical modelling. Great market demands for commercially patented innovations are very attractive for initiating new R & D projects.

  9. Tunable lasers- an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, B.D.; Buser, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    This overview of tunable lasers describes their applicability to spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and middle infrared ranges; to rapid on-line diagnostics by ultrashort cavity lasers; to exploration, by the free electron laser, for its wide tuning in the far infrared to submillimeter region; to remote detection, in areas such as portable pollution monitors, on-line chemical analyzers, auto exhaust analyzers, and production line controls; to photochemistry; and to other potential areas in diagnostics, communications, and medical and biological sciences. The following lasers are characterized by their tunability: solid state lasers, primarily alexandrite, with a tuning range of ca 1000 Angstroms; color center lasers; semiconductor lasers; dye lasers; gas lasers, where high-pressure CO/sub 2/ discharges are the best known example for a wide tunability range, and research is continuing in systems such as the alkali dimers; and, at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometers, the possibilities beyond Cerenkov and free electron lasers.

  10. SSME Curricula: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Gianmario; Barroero, Thiago; Pignatelli, Giovanni

    Services Science (SSME) is a reality. After the 2006 manifesto published by Communications of ACM several universities are launching SSME curricula. In order to give a well founded overview of SSME and related curricula, we first address SSME scope issues. Later on we summarize the main contents of the curriculum and particularly the learning approach in the core classes. As case studies, we describe the SSME curriculum of University of Peking and University of Pavia. Finally we consider results. Graduate service engineers are designers of IT-enabled services who know how to analyze and design business service chains and to identify, customize and integrate appropriate IT modules. Differently from traditional IT engineers, service engineers use a critical value based approach with a faster and comprehensive analysis

  11. Infectious diarrhea: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon; Surawicz, Christina M

    2014-08-01

    Diarrheal disease, which is most often caused by infectious pathogens, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in children. This is particularly true in developing countries. Recent outbreaks of infectious diarrhea in developed countries, including the USA, are often attributed to food handling and distribution practices and highlight the need for continued vigilance in this area. Another common cause of infectious diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), has historically been associated with the use of antibiotics and exposure to a health-care setting but is now increasingly common in the community in persons who lack the typical risk factors. Recent scientific advances have also led to new and proposed new therapies for infectious diarrhea, including fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for recurrent C. difficile infection (RCDI), probiotics for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and CDI, and the use of zinc supplementation in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Other therapies that have been in use for decades, such as the oral rehydration solution (ORS), continue to be the targets of scientific advancement in an effort to improve delivery and efficacy. Finally, post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is an increasingly recognized occurrence. Attempts to understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon are underway and may provide insight into potential treatment options.

  12. Cryptosporidiosis-an overview

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Gordon J; He, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium infect the gastrointestinal tract and lungs of a wide variety of animals, including humans. The majority of human infections are due to either Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis) and/or Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum). The parasite has a complex life cycle that includes both asexual and sexual stages. While there are invasive free living stages, proliferation and differentiation take place within a unique parasitrophorous vacuole under the host cell brush border but outside the host cell cytoplasm. Infection is spread by environmentally resistant spores that primarily contaminate drinking water and occasionally food sources, which may cause significant outbreaks of diarrhea that generally lasts less than 2 w in immunocompetent individuals. In immunodeficient or immunosuppressed individuals, diarrhea may be copious and can result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in AIDS patients. Although diagnosis is relatively simple, effective drug treatment, particulary for infections in immunodeficient patients, has not been uniformly successful. This overview summarizes the species known to infect humans, aspects of the parasite life cycle, sources of infection, the pathophysiology of cryptosporidiosis, the immune response to infection, diagnosis, treatment and some aspects of cryptosporidiosis in China. PMID:22685452

  13. Coronary Microvascular Disease in Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy Including an Overview on History, Pathology, and Other Proposed Pathogenic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marcos A.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Malvestio, Lygia M.; Celes, Mara R.; Campos, Erica C.; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Cibele M.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the short and bewildered history of Brazilian scientist Carlos Chagas's discovery and subsequent developments, the anatomopathological features of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an overview on the controversies surrounding theories concerning its pathogenesis, and studies that support the microvascular hypothesis to further explain the pathological features and clinical course of CCC. It is our belief that knowledge of this particular and remarkable cardiomyopathy will shed light not only on the microvascular involvement of its pathogenesis, but also on the pathogenetic processes of other cardiomyopathies, which will hopefully provide a better understanding of the various changes that may lead to an end-stage heart disease with similar features. This review is written to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Chagas disease. PMID:20824217

  14. Concrete Paving Blocks: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-11

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS C)gErE PAVING’ S0C4(S: At4N OVERVIEW 6. AUTHOR(S) tlCHfL K. AM U EUT5Av-T) C1 VI L...C13p c~cTE ePvI4G 3LCas PA\\I~f1EpJT W~f 40MIANCE (0~ PA ;Fs eAVrEENT DES 1I6M PVEA Y~~f~F C _S a~ 9L CONCRETE PAVING BLODCKS AN OVERVIEW by LT MCHAEL K...papers are published elsewhere. This report examines CBP’s from several perspectives in order to provide an overview of this alternative pavement

  15. An Overview of Lynx

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    through the C compiler without complaint. Programmers are in general unaware of the C back end. On the Butterfl \\. ever Lynx process allocates a...flags that are set. 23 4.2. Thy Cost of Message-Passing In our Butterfl \\ implementation of Lynx. the simplest remote operations complete in less than tAo...miliisc’ond>. To place this ugure in perspectuvc, a call to an empty procedure takes 10 microseconds on an mndi idu_! Butterfl \\ nude. An atomic tes

  16. Prostratin: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Miana, Ghulam Abbas; Riaz, Muhammad; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Paracha, Usman Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid class of molecules possesses a diverse therapeutic properties and potentials owing to their specific structural features. Prostratin and its derivatives are exemplified in this context to exhibit a variety of biological activities. In this review we discuss in detail the role of prostratin as potential therapeutic and underlying molecular mechanisms by which it accomplishes these activities. Prostratin [13-O-acetyl-12-deoxyphorbol] is a phorbol ester that was first isolated from Strathmore weed Pimelea prostrate, a small endemic New Zealand shrub, and characterized by Hecker in 1976. Structurally, prostratin contains four rings designated as A, B, C and D. Ring A is trans linked to the 7-membered ring B while Ring C is a 6 membered and is cis linked to the cyclopentane ring D. Chemical synthesis of this compound initiated with acidic hydrolysis of phorbol, a tigliane diterpene isolated from croton oil. Prostratin-containing extracts have been used by the Samoan healers to treat individuals with certain medical conditions such as jaundice. Importantly, these treatments are not associated with any significant side effect. Prostratin inhibits HIV-1 infections by down regulating HIV-1 cellular receptors through the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway and reduces the HIV-1 latency. Unlike other phorbol esters that induce carcinogenesis by activating PKC, prostratin does not induce tumors rather has shown tumor suppressing activity. Its ability to induce lytic gene expression supports a role for phorbol-ester regulated signaling pathways in Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpes-virus reactivation.

  17. Ankylosing spondylitis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Sieper, J; Braun, J; Rudwaleit, M; Boonen, A; Zink, A

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex, potentially debilitating disease that is insidious in onset, progressing to radiological sacroiliitis over several years. Patients with symptomatic AS lose productivity owing to work disability and unemployment, have a substantial use of healthcare resources, and reduced quality of life. The pathogenesis of AS is poorly understood. However, immune mediated mechanisms involving human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, inflammatory cellular infiltrates, cytokines (for example, tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin 10), and genetic and environmental factors are thought to have key roles. The detection of sacroiliitis by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography in the presence of clinical manifestations is diagnostic for AS, although the presence of inflammatory back pain plus at least two other typical features of spondyloarthropathy (for example, enthesitis and uveitis) is highly predictive of early AS. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) effectively relieve inflammatory symptoms and are presently first line drug treatment. However, NSAID treatment has only a symptomatic effect and probably does not alter the disease course. For symptoms refractory to NSAIDs, second line treatments, including corticosteroids and various disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, are employed but are of limited benefit. Emerging biological therapies target the inflammatory processes underlying AS, and thus, may favourably alter the disease process, in addition to providing symptom relief. PMID:12381506

  18. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, E; Farage, M; Maibach, H

    2013-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition of subjective cutaneous hyper-reactivity to environmental factors. Subjects experiencing this condition report exaggerated reactions when their skin is in contact with cosmetics, soaps and sun screens, and they often report worsening after exposure to dry and cold climate. Although no sign of irritation is commonly detected, itching, burning, stinging and a tight sensation are constantly present. Generally substances that are not commonly considered irritants are involved in this abnormal response.Sensitive skin and subjective irritation are widespread but still far from being completely defined and understood. A correlation between sensitive skin and constitutional anomalies and/or other triggering factors such as occupational skin diseases or chronic exposure to irritants has been hypothesized. Recent findings suggest that higher sensitivity can be due to different mechanisms. Hyper-reactors may have a thinner stratum corneum with a reduced corneocyte area causing a higher transcutaneous penetration of water-soluble chemicals. Alterations in vanilloid receptors and changes in neuronal transmission have been described. Monitoring skin parameters such as barrier function, proclivity to irritation, corneocyte size and sensorial transmission can also be useful to identify regional differences in skin sensitivity.

  19. Laundry detergents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Divya; Tyagi, V K

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays laundry detergents are becoming increasingly popular as they can be metered automatically into the washing machine, impart softness, antistaticness, resiliency to fabrics, mild to eyes and skins and shows good dispersibility in water. Because it is consumed when it is used, the sale of laundry detergent is a rather large business. There are many different kinds or brands of laundry detergent sold, many of them claiming some special qualities as selling points. A Laundry detergent composition is a formulated mixture of raw materials that can be classified into different types based on their properties and function in the final product. The different classes of raw materials are surfactants, builders, bleaching agents, enzymes, and minors which remove dirt, stain, and soil from surfaces or textiles gave them pleasant feel and odour. The physico-chemical properties of surfactants make them suitable for laundry purposes. Laundry detergent has traditionally been a powdered or granular solid, but the use of liquid laundry detergents has gradually increased over the years, and these days use of liquid detergent equals or even exceeds use of solid detergent. This review paper describes the history, composition, types, mechanism, consumption, environmental effects and consumption of laundry detergents.

  20. An overview of computer vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of computer vision is provided. Image understanding and scene analysis are emphasized, and pertinent aspects of pattern recognition are treated. The basic approach to computer vision systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the current existing systems and state-of-the-art issues and research requirements, who is doing it and who is funding it, and future trends and expectations are reviewed.

  1. Policy and Practice: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David K.; Ball, Deborah Loewenberg

    1990-01-01

    An overview of five case studies and ancillary essays on teacher implementation of the California Mathematics Curriculum Framework is provided. The dilemma of the teacher as the traditionalist versus the teacher as innovator is underscored. Research of this nature provides insights into how instructional policy and teaching practice affect each…

  2. Magellan battery operations: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul J.; Glueck, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    The Magellan Spacecraft's mission to map Venus's surface provides a unique application for Nickel-Cadmium batteries. An overview of the spacecraft, power subsystem, battery, and mission requirements are presented. The reliability and performance of the batteries were extensively studied with a comprehensive test and analysis program. Actual data for cruise and a limited number of mapping orbits is also presented.

  3. Counseling Reentry Women: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Mark H.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an overview of issues related to counseling women reentering the workforce. Suggests that counselors are in a strategic position to help women through the transition and conflicts associated with returning to work and discusses career barriers related to gender role stereotyping, current job trends for women, and expectations for women…

  4. An Overview. High Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report provides an overview of efforts undertaken by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) in 1990 to review and report on federal program areas its work identified as high risk because of vulnerabilities to waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. It reviews the current status of efforts to address these concerns. The six categories of…

  5. An Overview of Educational Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipson, Joseph

    As part of the activities establishing the National Institute of Education, a Planning Unit evolved to obtain advice from experts on what the objectives, activities, and organizational structures of the new organization should be. This overview, part of the Planning Unit studies, lists and analyzes educational problems. An introduction presents a…

  6. Hair Cosmetics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gavazzoni Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis

    2015-01-01

    Hair cosmetics are an important tool that helps to increase patient's adhesion to alopecia and scalp treatments. This article reviews the formulations and the mode of action of hair cosmetics: Shampoos, conditioners, hair straightening products, hair dyes and henna; regarding their prescription and safetiness. The dermatologist's knowledge of hair care products, their use, and their possible side effects can extend to an understanding of cosmetic resources and help dermatologists to better treat hair and scalp conditions according to the diversity of hair types and ethnicity. PMID:25878443

  7. Sustainability: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormsley, W. E.

    1990-01-01

    This article introduces a group of six papers on sustainability of programs for visually handicapped persons in developing countries. Sustainability is discussed from an anthropological perspective, noting the importance of a social soundness analysis and a social impact assessment, enemies of sustainability, and the need for broad local input in…

  8. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until…

  9. Friedreich ataxia: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Delatycki, M.; Williamson, R.; Forrest, S.

    2000-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia, an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease, is the most common of the inherited ataxias. The recent discovery of the gene that is mutated in this condition, FRDA, has led to rapid advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of Friedreich ataxia. About 98% of mutant alleles have an expansion of a GAA trinucleotide repeat in intron 1 of the gene. This leads to reduced levels of the protein, frataxin. There is mounting evidence to suggest that Friedreich ataxia is the result of accumulation of iron in mitochondria leading to excess production of free radicals, which then results in cellular damage and death. Currently there is no known treatment that alters the natural course of the disease. The discovery of the FRDA gene and its possible function has raised hope that rational therapeutic strategies will be developed.


Keywords: Friedreich ataxia; FRDA gene PMID:10633128

  10. Conservative mastectomies: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Maurizio Bruno; Catanuto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Conservative mastectomies provide removal of the entire breast parenchyma, saving the outer covering of the mammary gland with the possibility of performing an immediate reconstruction preserving women body image. We rationalised and systematically organized our reconstructive algorythms giving a new different light to mastectomies, the so-called “conservative mastectomies”, an oxymoron indicating skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM), nipple-areola complex-sparing mastectomies (NSM) and skin-reducing mastectomies (SRM). Eventhough randomized controlled trials comparing conservative mastectomies with traditional mastectomy and breast conserving surgery would be auspicable in order to achieve higher levels of evidence, we could confidently conclude that conservative mastectomies offer the psychological advantages of good cosmesis and maintenance of woman body image without compromising the oncological safety of mastectomy. PMID:26645000

  11. An Overview of SAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensalem, Saddek; Ganesh, Vijay; Lakhnech, Yassine; Munoz, Cesar; Owre, Sam; Ruess, Harald; Rushby, John; Rusu, Vlad; Saiedi, Hassen; Shankar, N.

    2000-01-01

    To become practical for assurance, automated formal methods must be made more scalable, automatic, and cost-effective. Such an increase in scope, scale, automation, and utility can be derived from an emphasis on a systematic separation of concerns during verification. SAL (Symbolic Analysis Laboratory) attempts to address these issues. It is a framework for combining different tools to calculate properties of concurrent systems. The heart of SAL is a language, developed in collaboration with Stanford, Berkeley, and Verimag for specifying concurrent systems in a compositional way. Our instantiation of the SAL framework augments PVS with tools for abstraction, invariant generation, program analysis (such as slicing), theorem proving, and model checking to separate concerns as well as calculate properties (i.e., perform, symbolic analysis) of concurrent systems. We. describe the motivation, the language, the tools, their integration in SAL/PAS, and some preliminary experience of their use.

  12. An Overview of Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Garza, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Hair loss is a topic of enormous public interest and understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of various alopecias will likely make a large impact on patients’ lives. The investigation of alopecias also provides important insight in the basic sciences; for instance, the abundance of stem cell populations and regenerative cycles that characterize a hair follicle render it an excellent model for the study of stem cell biology. This review seeks to provide a concise summary of the major alopecias with regard to presentation and management, and correlate these to recent advances in relevant research on pathogenesis. PMID:24591533

  13. Global Biogeochemistry: an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B., III

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic biogeochemical equilibria among the major pools of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus represented by terrestrial biomes, the world's oceans, and the troposphere are disturbed. Since even the most rapid processes of adjustments among the reservoirs take decades, new equilibria are far from established. These human-induced perturbations and the system's subsequent responses constitute an on-going biogeochemical experiment at the global level. Current and new information must be combined in a way that allows testing of various hypotheses about the workings of global biogeochemical systems. This enables assessment of current knowledge and evaluation of the gaps.

  14. Rocket astronomy - an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, H.

    The history of rocket astronomy is retold, with emphasis on solar investigations. The use of captured V-2 rockets after World War II was followed by the Aerobee, which exceeded the V-2's altitude and was more reliable. The V-2 has made first-generation investigations in X-ray and UV photometry, which was followed by studies of the solar cycle X-ray variablity, the X-ray corona, and solar flares. Nike rockets played an important role in these investigations. The role of rockets in galactic X-ray astronomy is briefly described.

  15. Polycarbosilanes - An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-14

    2 SICH2An chain is one in which there is no strong preference for any conf nmat I: mos are of Identical energy [32b1. Also studied was the stress...V.I.Zav’yalov, Izv. Akad. Nauk S.S.S.R., Ser. Khim., (1966) 584 [5631. (b) N.S. Nametkin, L.E. Gusel’nikov, V.M. Vdovin, P.L. Grinberg , V.I.Zav’yalov...1967) 1068. 22. D. Seyferth and J. Mercer, unpublished work, 1976. 23. N.S. Nametkin, V.M. Vdovin and P.L. Grinberg , Izy. Akad. Nauk SSSR. Ser. Khim

  16. Family travel: an overview.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Paediatric travel medicine involves the education of parents about the numerous health and safety issues related to traveling with infants and young children--whether overseas or a weekend at a local lake. It includes providing children with vaccines and medications, giving telephone advice to parents while they are traveling, and treating children should they come home ill. Practitioners must be knowledgeable about such varied topics like avoiding diarrhoea, infant safety seats for air travel, altitude sickness, sun exposure, waterfront safety, insect protection, dealing with hot and cold environments, and at what age it is safe to begin scuba diving, to name just a very few. Practitioners must also know when adult recommendations can--and cannot--be adapted for children; that vaccine doses, needle size, and injection site may vary with the size of the child; and the answers to hundreds of everyday questions such as how to administer an essential but bitter tasting medication to an uncooperative child--and what to do when the child refuses to take the medication or vomits it.

  17. Epididymitis: An Overview.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, John R; Panchal, Bethany

    2016-11-01

    Inflammation of the epididymis, or epididymitis, is commonly seen in the outpatient setting. Etiology and treatment are based on patient age and the likely causative organisms. Epididymitis presents as the gradual onset of posterior scrotal pain that may be accompanied by urinary symptoms such as dysuria and urinary frequency. Physical findings include a swollen and tender epididymis with the testis in an anatomically normal position. Although the etiology is largely unknown, reflux of urine into the ejaculatory ducts is considered the most common cause of epididymitis in children younger than 14 years. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis are the most common pathogens in sexually active males 14 to 35 years of age, and a single intramuscular dose of ceftriaxone with 10 days of oral doxycycline is the treatment of choice in this age group. In men who practice insertive anal intercourse, an enteric organism is also likely, and ceftriaxone with 10 days of oral levofloxacin or ofloxacin is the recommended treatment regimen. In men older than 35 years, epididymitis is usually caused by enteric bacteria transported by reflux of urine into the ejaculatory ducts secondary to bladder outlet obstruction; levofloxacin or ofloxacin alone is sufficient to treat these infections. Because untreated acute epididymitis can lead to infertility and chronic scrotal pain, recognition and therapy are vital to reduce patient morbidity.

  18. Marine Toxins: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    Oceans provide enormous and diverse space for marine life. Invertebrates are conspicuous inhabitants in certain zones such as the intertidal; many are soft-bodied, relatively immobile and lack obvious physical defenses. These animals frequently have evolved chemical defenses against predators and overgrowth by fouling organisms. Marine animals may accumulate and use a variety of toxins from prey organisms and from symbiotic microorganisms for their own purposes. Thus, toxic animals are particularly abundant in the oceans. The toxins vary from small molecules to high molecular weight proteins and display unique chemical and biological features of scientific interest. Many of these substances can serve as useful research tools or molecular models for the design of new drugs and pesticides. This chapter provides an initial survey of these toxins and their salient properties.

  19. Managing change: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, N M; Riley, R T

    2000-01-01

    As increasingly powerful informatics systems are designed, developed, and implemented, they inevitably affect larger, more heterogeneous groups of people and more organizational areas. In turn, the major challenges to system success are often more behavioral than technical. Successfully introducing such systems into complex health care organizations requires an effective blend of good technical and good organizational skills. People who have low psychological ownership in a system and who vigorously resist its implementation can bring a "technically best" system to its knees. However, effective leadership can sharply reduce the behavioral resistance to change-including to new technologies-to achieve a more rapid and productive introduction of informatics technology. This paper looks at four major areas-why information system failures occur, the core theories supporting change management, the practical applications of change management, and the change management efforts in informatics.

  20. Sensitive skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive skin is less tolerant to frequent and prolonged use of cosmetics and toiletries. It is self-diagnosed and typically unaccompanied by any obvious physical signs of irritation. With the change in lifestyle and also with increased opportunity to use many new brands of cosmetics and toiletries, there has been an increase in females complaining of unique sensation in their facial skin. Sensitive skin presents as smarting, burning, stinging, itching, and/or tight sensation in their facial skin. The condition is found in more than 50% of women and 40% of men, creating a sizable demand for products designed to minimize skin sensitivity. Good numbers of invasive and non-invasive tests are designed to evaluate and predict the sensitive skin. Management includes guidelines for selecting suitable cosmetics and toiletries in sensitive skin individuals.

  1. Tularemia vaccines - an overview.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Julie A; Moise, Leonard; Gregory, Stephen H; De Groot, Anne S

    2007-10-01

    F tularensis is among of the most virulent pathogens known, yet it remains poorly understood. Correlates of protection involve robust CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, and the production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-12. Novel approaches may be required to develop a safe vaccine that achieves these correlates. In contrast to other types of vaccines, epitope-based vaccines combine targeted biologic activity with the practical advantages of platform independence, scalable synthesis and manufacturing. These advantages, coupled with the proof of principle achieved with an epitope-based tularemia vaccine, suggest that this approach might be applied more widely to develop vaccines against other pathogens, intracellular bacteria most notably.

  2. [Nasopharyngeal cancers, an overview].

    PubMed

    Jardel, Pauline; Thariat, Juliette; Blanchard, Pierre; Elloumi, Fatma; Toumi, Nabil; Bensadoun, René-Jean; Frikha, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel; Bourhis, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Cancer of the nasopharynx is an uncommon malignancy in France (incidence  =  0.5/year/100,000 men) but is endemic in areas like in South-East Asia. Exclusive radiation therapy used to be the standard and results in local control rates for T3-T4 tumors around 50-75 %. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves tumor coverage with a sparing of organs at risk and has to be privileged. Concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT achieved significant survival benefice with 5-year overall survival above 75 %. Concurrent radiochemotherapy with platinum is the most frequent scheme but induction and adjuvant chemotherapies are discussed to reduce distant failure: studies are currently ongoing. Follow-up aims to detect early local failures with a chance of cure and to manage long-term toxicities.

  3. Optical scatter: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, John C.

    1991-12-01

    Optical scatter is a bothersome source of optical noise, limits resolution and reduces system throughput. However, it is also an extremely sensitive metrology tool. It is employed in a wide variety of applications in the optics industry (where direct scatter measurement is of concern) and is becoming a popular indirect measurement in other industries where its measurement in some form is an indicator of another component property - like roughness, contamination or position. This paper presents a brief review of the current state of this technology as it emerges from university and government laboratories into more general industry use. The bidirectional scatter distribution function (or BSDF) has become the common format for expressing scatter data and is now used almost universally. Measurements made at dozens of laboratories around the country cover the spectrum from the uv to the mid- IR. Data analysis of optical component scatter has progressed to the point where a variety of analysis tools are becoming available for discriminating between the various sources of scatter. Work has progressed on the analysis of rough surface scatter and the application of these techniques to some challenging problems outside the optical industry. Scatter metrology is acquiring standards and formal test procedures. The available scatter data base is rapidly expanding as the number and sophistication of measurement facilities increases. Scatter from contaminants is continuing to be a major area of work as scatterometers appear in vacuum chambers at various laboratories across the country. Another area of research driven by space applications is understanding the non-topographic sources of mid-IR scatter that are associated with Beryllium and other materials. The current flurry of work in this growing area of metrology can be expected to continue for several more years and to further expand to applications in other industries.

  4. Uralian magmatism: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fershtater, G. B.; Montero, P.; Borodina, N. S.; Pushkarev, E. V.; Smirnov, V. N.; Bea, F.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is an attempt to summarize current knowledge of Uralian magmatism, focusing on those aspects relevant for understanding its geodynamic evolution. The Urals consist of three tectonomagmatic domains: a Suture Sector, in the west, and two N-S imbricated Island-Arc Continental Sectors in the east. The Suture Sector comprises lower Palaeozoic mafic-ultramafic complexes which show eastward impoverishment in LILE, thus reflecting the transition of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle of the Russian plate to the suboceanic lithospheric mantle of the subducted Uralian palaeo-ocean. The two Island-Arc Continental Sectors represent the transition from oceanic to continental environments in the middle and south Urals. Collisional magmatism started in the Silurian and persisted till the Permian, migrating progressively eastward and increasing in abundance of LILE and {87Sr }/{86Sr initial}. Magmatic polarity is very similar to that of modern subduction zones and indicates that the subducted slab was dipping eastward during that period. The Northern and Southern Island-Arc Continental Sectors show many similarities regarding the nature and spatial-temporal distribution of magmatism, but there are also some important differences which probably indicate somewhat different geodynamic regimes. In the Northern Sector, Carboniferous tonalite-granodiorite batholiths have features compatible with an origin by melting of the oceanic crust in the subducted slab. In the Southern Sector, however, Carboniferous tonalite-granodiorite batholiths have features more consistent with a melting event within the lower continental crust above the subduction zone than with melting within the subducted slab. Upper Carboniferous-Permian granites have high {87Sr }/{86Sr initial} in the north (e.g., 0.7120 in the Murzinka batholith) but very low {87Sr }/{86Sr initial} in the south (e.g., 0.7045 in the Dzhabyk batholith) in spite of rocks from both batholiths being equally peraluminous and

  5. Food nanotechnology - an overview.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Bhupinder S

    2010-05-04

    Food nanotechnology is an area of emerging interest and opens up a whole universe of new possibilities for the food industry. The basic categories of nanotechnology applications and functionalities currently in the development of food packaging include: the improvement of plastic materials barriers, the incorporation of active components that can deliver functional attributes beyond those of conventional active packaging, and the sensing and signaling of relevant information. Nano food packaging materials may extend food life, improve food safety, alert consumers that food is contaminated or spoiled, repair tears in packaging, and even release preservatives to extend the life of the food in the package. Nanotechnology applications in the food industry can be utilized to detect bacteria in packaging, or produce stronger flavors and color quality, and safety by increasing the barrier properties. Nanotechnology holds great promise to provide benefits not just within food products but also around food products. In fact, nanotechnology introduces new chances for innovation in the food industry at immense speed, but uncertainty and health concerns are also emerging. EU/WE/global legislation for the regulation of nanotechnology in food are meager. Moreover, current legislation appears unsuitable to nanotechnology specificity.

  6. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  7. Brucellosis: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Corbel, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Brucellosis remains a major zoonosis worldwide. Although many countries have eradicated Brucella abortus from cattle, in some areas Brucella melitensis has emerged as a cause of infection in this species as well as in sheep and goats. Despite vaccination campaigns with the Rev 1 strain, B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis. Brucella suis is also emerging as an agent of infection in cattle, thus extending its opportunities to infect humans. The recent isolation of distinctive strains of Brucella from marine mammals has extended its ecologic range. Molecular genetic studies have demonstrated phylogenetic affiliation to Agrobacterium, Phyllobacterium, Ochrobactrum, and Rhizobium. Polymerase chain reaction and gene probe development may provide more effective typing methods. Pathogenicity is related to production of lipopolysaccharides containing a poly N-formyl perosamine O chain, CuZn superoxide dismutase, erythrlose phosphate dehydrogenase, stress-induced proteins related to intracellular survival, and adenine and guanine monophosphate inhibitors of phagocyte functions. Protective immunity is conferred by antibody to lipopolysaccharide and T-cell-mediated macrophage activation triggered by protein antigens. Diagnosis still centers on isolation of the organism and serologic test results, especially enzyme immunoassay, which is replacing other methods. Polymerase chain reaction is also under evaluation. Therapy is based on tetracyclines with or without rifampicin, aminoglycosides, or quinolones. No satisfactory vaccines against human brucellosis are available, although attenuated purE mutants appear promising. PMID:9204307

  8. Veterinary homeopathy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vockeroth, W G

    1999-08-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies, including homeopathy, have a definite place in veterinary medicine today. The public is demanding access to a full range of conventional and complementary therapies, and the best scenario is to have all therapies available, for there is a place and a need for all of them in the right situation. In my own practice, I use both alternative and conventional therapies, as well as referring patients to specialists, for services such as ultrasound and surgery. I believe that the wave of the future is to have veterinarians skilled in both complementary and conventional therapies, and to have veterinary practitioners who are well enough educated to be able to treat the majority of their patients, but who are willing to refer to the appropriate "specialist," if the case and the client demand it. Veterinarians are definitely becoming more aware of the need for and showing more interest in alternative medicine. There are currently several associations in North America for veterinarians with an interest in complementary therapies. In 1998, the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS) boasted 1400 members, and the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) over 800 (1). There are professional courses in veterinary acupuncture, chiropractic, and homeopathy, all 150-200 hours in length, which provide a good basic understanding of these modalities. In most of these modalities, there is also advanced training. Conventional teaching institutions are recognizing the need to have veterinarians well versed in all aspects of veterinary medicine. Colorado State University has offered elective courses for students and on-site courses for practitioners on alternative therapies for 3 years (1). These are designed to teach veterinarians what the alternative modalities are, whether they are effective, and what it takes to become qualified to practise them. The overriding goal in most veterinarians' minds is to heal animals and

  9. Veterinary homeopathy: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Vockeroth, W G

    1999-01-01

    Complementary and alternative therapies, including homeopathy, have a definite place in veterinary medicine today. The public is demanding access to a full range of conventional and complementary therapies, and the best scenario is to have all therapies available, for there is a place and a need for all of them in the right situation. In my own practice, I use both alternative and conventional therapies, as well as referring patients to specialists, for services such as ultrasound and surgery. I believe that the wave of the future is to have veterinarians skilled in both complementary and conventional therapies, and to have veterinary practitioners who are well enough educated to be able to treat the majority of their patients, but who are willing to refer to the appropriate "specialist," if the case and the client demand it. Veterinarians are definitely becoming more aware of the need for and showing more interest in alternative medicine. There are currently several associations in North America for veterinarians with an interest in complementary therapies. In 1998, the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS) boasted 1400 members, and the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) over 800 (1). There are professional courses in veterinary acupuncture, chiropractic, and homeopathy, all 150-200 hours in length, which provide a good basic understanding of these modalities. In most of these modalities, there is also advanced training. Conventional teaching institutions are recognizing the need to have veterinarians well versed in all aspects of veterinary medicine. Colorado State University has offered elective courses for students and on-site courses for practitioners on alternative therapies for 3 years (1). These are designed to teach veterinarians what the alternative modalities are, whether they are effective, and what it takes to become qualified to practise them. The overriding goal in most veterinarians' minds is to heal animals and

  10. An overview of systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kathy A; Weeks, Susan Mace

    2014-12-01

    Systematic review is an invaluable tool for the practicing clinician. A well-designed systematic review represents the latest and most complete information available on a particular topic or intervention. This article highlights the key elements of systematic review, what it is and is not, and provides an overview of several reputable organizations supporting the methodological development and conduct of systematic review. Important aspects for evaluating the quality of a systematic review are also included.

  11. The Manhattan Project: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    August 2017 will mark the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the United States Army's Manhattan Engineer District, which oversaw the development and deployment of the first generation of nuclear weapons during World War II. In this talk I give an overview of the Manhattan Project, touching on its historical context, genesis, organization, facilities, accomplishments, challenges encountered, and legacies. I will also comment briefly on some of its lesser-known aspects and the persistent popular mythologies that still surround it.

  12. High Performance Fortran: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zosel, M.E.

    1992-12-23

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF). This group of industry, academic, and user representatives has been meeting to define a set of extensions for Fortran dedicated to the special problems posed by a very high performance computers, especially the new generation of parallel computers. The paper describes the HPFF effort and its goals and gives a brief description of the functionality of High Performance Fortran (HPF).

  13. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  14. Multiphase inverse modeling: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1998-03-01

    Inverse modeling is a technique to derive model-related parameters from a variety of observations made on hydrogeologic systems, from small-scale laboratory experiments to field tests to long-term geothermal reservoir responses. If properly chosen, these observations contain information about the system behavior that is relevant to the performance of a geothermal field. Estimating model-related parameters and reducing their uncertainty is an important step in model development, because errors in the parameters constitute a major source of prediction errors. This paper contains an overview of inverse modeling applications using the ITOUGH2 code, demonstrating the possibilities and limitations of a formalized approach to the parameter estimation problem.

  15. An SAE high speed ring bus overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, Brian W.; Shih, Hubert

    An overview of the protocols and important features of the SAE high-speed ring bus (HSRB) standard is presented here, along with the functional design of a typical ring interface unit architecture. The counterrotating ring topology, with both loopback and bypass mechanisms, provides the high degree of fault tolerance desirable in many military and avionic systems. The error-detection, fault-detection, and recovery mechanisms are briefly described to illustrate the robustness of the HSRB system. The reserved-priority token-passing protocol is shown to provide efficient and deterministic performance, uselful in real-time applications where messages must be transmitted predictably, quickly, and reliably.

  16. US PWR steam generator management: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, C.S. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    This paper provides an overview on the status of steam generator management activities in US PWRs, and includes: (1) an overview of the impact of steam generator problems; (2) a brief discussion of historical damage trends and the current damage mechanism of most concern; (3) a discussion of the elements of {open_quotes}steam generator management{close_quotes}; and (4) a description of the approach being followed to implement a degradation-specific protocol for tubing inspection and repair. This paper was prepared in conjunction with another paper presented during the Plenary Session of this Conference, {open_quotes}Steam Generator Degradation: Current Mitigation Strategies for Controlling Corrosion{close_quotes}, and is provided as a supplement to that material.

  17. Aviation combustion toxicology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K

    2010-01-01

    Aviation combustion toxicology is a subspecialty of the field of aerospace toxicology, which is composed of aerospace and toxicology. The term aerospace, that is, the environment extending above and beyond the surface of the Earth, is also used to represent the combined fields of aeronautics and astronautics. Aviation is another term interchangeably used with aerospace and aeronautics and is explained as the science and art of operating powered aircraft. Toxicology deals with the adverse effects of substances on living organisms. Although toxicology borrows knowledge from biology, chemistry, immunology, pathology, physiology, and public health, the most closely related field to toxicology is pharmacology. Economic toxicology, environmental toxicology, and forensic toxicology, including combustion toxicology, are the three main branches of toxicology. In this overview, a literature search for the period of 1960-2007 was performed and information related to aviation combustion toxicology collected. The overview included introduction; combustion, fire, and smoke; smoke gas toxicity; aircraft material testing; fire gases and their interactive effects; result interpretation; carboxyhemoglobin and blood cyanide ion levels; pyrolytic products of aircraft engine oils, fluids, and lubricants; and references. This review is anticipated to be an informative resource for aviation combustion toxicology and fire-related casualties.

  18. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  19. Vehicle environment interactions - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    The advent of Space Shuttle Orbital operations utilizing science and technology payloads has led to a renewal of interest of vehicle-environmental interactions in low earth orbit. The first science payload on STS-3 showed an interaction on the surface of the Orbiter which, although it had been detected earlier on unmanned spacecraft, quickened interest in the possible impact of this phenomena on future missions. Subsequent flights have yielded data on a wide variety of interaction phenomena resulting from the large size of the Orbiter and its outgassing characteristics. These drivers have given rise to modifications in the neutral gas and plasma environments of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The physics of the interactions result in the generation of disturbed wave fields, optical emissions and particle distributions in the vicinity of the Orbiter. In this overview, the present observations, suggested interpretations and open questions will be addressed.

  20. An overview of job embeddedness.

    PubMed

    Reitz, O Ed; Anderson, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Nursing turnover in health care organizations is a considerable problem that needs to be reframed within the context of "nurse retention" and "job embeddedness" (JE). A construct from the business literature, JE has been associated with "retention" or "antiwithdrawal." Conversely, turnover encompasses the process of quitting. This distinction is significant. JE represents a mediating construct between various "on-the-job" (organizational) factors, "off-the-job" (community) factors, and employee retention. This article presents an overview of JE including the dimensions, the related concepts of turnover and retention, and associated research. JE may be used to develop specific nurse-retention strategies following careful organizational and community assessment. With the current and looming nursing shortage, perhaps it is time for health care institutions to consider the adaptation of JE tenets.

  1. An Overview of Climatic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Johnson, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) addresses some climatic elements with emphasis on atmospheric composition, including gas radiative characteristics. Solar radiation is discussed with considerable information on the mathematical and statistical formulae. On a worldwide basis, temperature and precipitation for the globe are discussed along with interaction in drought. Also included is the simultaneous interaction with winds, humidity, and solar radiation. Volcanology gets minimum treatment. The oceans and seas are treated in chart form along with the interrelationship of oceanic currents and El Nino and La Nina, and ENSO phenomena. Upper air circulations are discussed. Various cloud formations up to 85-95 km altitude are described. Information on tornadoes and hurricanes is also included. One section is devoted to the climate physical-chemical elements. A short discussion is given on the importance for the quality of data and/or information in descriptions of the climate. This TP presents only an overview or survey of these and other various climatic elements.

  2. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    van Uden, D J P; van Laarhoven, H W M; Westenberg, A H; de Wilt, J H W; Blanken-Peeters, C F J M

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This multimodal therapeutic approach has significantly improved patient survival. However, the median overall survival among women with IBC is still poor. By elucidating the biologic characteristics of IBC, new treatment options may become available. We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature on IBC through computerized literature searches. The objective of the current review is to present an overview of the literature related to the biology, imaging and multidisciplinary treatment of inflammatory breast cancer.

  3. Laser Crosslink Subsystem - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deadrick, R. B.; Deckelman, W. F.

    1992-06-01

    The Laser Crosslink Subsystem (LCS) is a full duplex laser communications terminal in production at McDonnell Douglas Electronics Systems Company. The LCS will provide a data crosslink for geosynchronous satellites. This paper provides an overview of the system design and major elements followed by a brief program history. One LCS is installed on each satellite. The system utilizes a solid state diode pumped Neodymium YAG laser and direct pulse detection to provide 1.28 Mbps data transmission in one direction on the link and 4 Kbps in the other. A single eight inch gimballed telescope provides both the transmit and receive antenna function. After autonomously acquiring, the 200 Hz bandwidth fine tracking system maintains pointing of the 10 microrad optical beam. The LCS began development in 1981. Since then, each of its assemblies has completed-flight qualification testing. The first integrated production unit successfully completed environmental and performance qualification testing in 1990.

  4. The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Sarah A. Lister...REPORT DATE 12 JUN 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview...18 The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Congressional Research Service Summary On April 29, 2009, in response to the global spread of a new

  5. The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-06

    CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Sarah A. Lister...REPORT DATE 06 AUG 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview...Z39-18 The 2009 Influenza Pandemic: An Overview Congressional Research Service Summary On June 11, 2009, in response to the global spread of a new

  6. [An overview of researches on underlying mechanisms of acupuncture therapy by functional magnetic resonance imaging in recent 5 years].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai-Zhen; Chang, Jing-Ling; Zhu, Dan; Gao, Ying

    2012-04-01

    In the present paper, the authors review the development of researches on acupuncture therapy with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in recent 5 years in both China and foreign countries. The current researches mainly involve 1) specificity of efficacies of acupoints, 2) mechanisms of acupuncture intervention underlying improvement of various clinical conditions or illnesses, 3) individual difference of the subjects, and 4) sustained efficacies of acupuncture. In the early stage, researches on acupuncture therapy mostly focus on the immediate efficacy and the specificity of efficacies of acupoints. Along with the actuality of sustained effect of acupuncture, new test design paradigms agreeable with clinical practice are necessary in the future. In addition, more attentions about the stability of the tested results should be paid.

  7. 6. Overview of bay with geared mechanism to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Overview of bay with geared mechanism to northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  8. 12. Overview of bay with hydraulic mechanism northwest Mississippi ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Overview of bay with hydraulic mechanism northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  9. 11. Overview of bay with hydraulic mechanism to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Overview of bay with hydraulic mechanism to northeast - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  10. 5. Overview of bay with geared mechanism to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Overview of bay with geared mechanism to northeast - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  11. An Energy Overview of Peru

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2003-10-20

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site -- each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Peru. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit.

  12. An Energy Overview of Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2003-10-20

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site -- each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Venezuela. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit.

  13. An Overview of Biofield Devices

    PubMed Central

    Muehsam, David; Chevalier, Gaétan; Barsotti, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Advances in biophysics, biology, functional genomics, neuroscience, psychology, psychoneuroimmunology, and other fields suggest the existence of a subtle system of “biofield” interactions that organize biological processes from the subatomic, atomic, molecular, cellular, and organismic to the interpersonal and cosmic levels. Biofield interactions may bring about regulation of biochemical, cellular, and neurological processes through means related to electromagnetism, quantum fields, and perhaps other means of modulating biological activity and information flow. The biofield paradigm, in contrast to a reductionist, chemistry-centered viewpoint, emphasizes the informational content of biological processes; biofield interactions are thought to operate in part via low-energy or “subtle” processes such as weak, nonthermal electromagnetic fields (EMFs) or processes potentially related to consciousness and nonlocality. Biofield interactions may also operate through or be reflected in more well-understood informational processes found in electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrocardiographic (ECG) data. Recent advances have led to the development of a wide variety of therapeutic and diagnostic biofield devices, defined as physical instruments best understood from the viewpoint of a biofield paradigm. Here, we provide a broad overview of biofield devices, with emphasis on those devices for which solid, peer-reviewed evidence exists. A subset of these devices, such as those based upon EEG- and ECG-based heart rate variability, function via mechanisms that are well understood and are widely employed in clinical settings. Other device modalities, such a gas discharge visualization and biophoton emission, appear to operate through incompletely understood mechanisms and have unclear clinical significance. Device modes of operation include EMF-light, EMF-heat, EMF-nonthermal, electrical current, vibration and sound, physical and mechanical, intentionality and nonlocality

  14. The FETCH experiment: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, D.; Branger, H.; Bouffies-Cloché, S.; Despiau, S.; Drennan, W. M.; Dupuis, H.; Durand, P.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Estournel, C.; Eymard, L.; Flamant, C.; Graber, H. C.; GuéRin, C.; Kahma, K.; Lachaud, G.; LefèVre, J.-M.; Pelon, J.; Pettersson, H.; Piguet, B.; Queffeulou, P.; Tailliez, D.; Tournadre, J.; Weill, A.

    2003-03-01

    The "flux, etat de la mer, et télédétection en conditions de fetch variable" (FETCH) was aimed at studying the physical processes associated with air-sea exchanges and mesoscale oceanic circulation in a coastal region dominated by frequent strong offshore winds. The experiment took place in March-April 1998 in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Gulf of Lion). Observations were collected with the R/V L'Atalante, with an air-sea interaction spar (ASIS) buoy, with waverider buoys, and with research aircraft equipped for in situ and remote sensing measurements. The present paper is an introduction to the following special section, which groups 12 papers (including this one) presenting results on turbulent flux measurements at the ocean surface, on the behavior of the marine atmospheric boundary layer, on the ocean waves characteristics, on the ocean circulation, and on remote sensing of surface parameters. This overview presents the background and objectives of FETCH, the experimental setup and operations, and the dominant atmospheric and oceanic conditions and introduces the different papers of the special section.

  15. Friedreich's ataxia 1979: an overview.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, A

    1979-05-01

    This overview summarizes the investigations carried out during the second part of Phase Two of the Quebec Cooperative Study of Friedreich's Ataxia. These investigations outline in more details the fundamental role played by an abnormality in the fatty acid composition (deficient linoleic acid, 18:2) of the cholesterol esters of high density lipoproteins (HDL) in the phenotypic expression of the disease. They postulate a defective incorporation of linoleic acid to surface phosphatidylcholine of chylomicrons and consequent relative and absolute decreases in lipoprotein protein components because of overpacking with defective cholesteryl esters. Secondarily to these changes, the postulated lack of activation of the lipoamide dehydrogenase (LAD) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex could result in slow pyruvate oxidation, glucose intolerance, deficient synthesis of acetylcholine, and depletion of glutamic and aspartic acid pools. In parallel, abnormal phosphatidyl-choline molecules could be incorporated to membranes, resulting in specific defects in some functions of these membranes, including transport of calcium and/or taurine and myelinization. The framework of an understanding of Friedreich's ataxia is now available, but much fundamental and clinical work remains to be done to fill in and prove each one of these postulated steps.

  16. Behind the Link between Copper and Angiogenesis: Established Mechanisms and an Overview on the Role of Vascular Copper Transport Systems.

    PubMed

    Urso, Emanuela; Maffia, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis critically sustains the progression of both physiological and pathological processes. Copper behaves as an obligatory co-factor throughout the angiogenic signalling cascades, so much so that a deficiency causes neovascularization to abate. Moreover, the progress of several angiogenic pathologies (e.g. diabetes, cardiac hypertrophy and ischaemia) can be tracked by measuring serum copper levels, which are being increasingly investigated as a useful prognostic marker. Accordingly, the therapeutic modulation of body copper has been proven effective in rescuing the pathological angiogenic dysfunctions underlying several disease states. Vascular copper transport systems profoundly influence the activation and execution of angiogenesis, acting as multi-functional regulators of apparently discrete pro-angiogenic pathways. This review concerns the complex relationship among copper-dependent angiogenic factors, copper transporters and common pathological conditions, with an unusual accent on the multi-faceted involvement of the proteins handling vascular copper. Functions regulated by the major copper transport proteins (CTR1 importer, ATP7A efflux pump and metallo-chaperones) include the modulation of endothelial migration and vascular superoxide, known to activate angiogenesis within a narrow concentration range. The potential contribution of prion protein, a controversial regulator of copper homeostasis, is discussed, even though its angiogenic involvement seems to be mainly associated with the modulation of endothelial motility and permeability.

  17. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  18. An overview of elevated temperature damage mechanisms and fatigue behavior of a unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.; Gayda, John

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a unidirectionally reinforced titanium matrix composite (TMC), SiC/Ti-15-3, was thoroughly characterized to support life prediction modeling of advanced TMC disks designed for gas turbine engine applications. The results of this coupon-level experimental investigation are reviewed. On a stress basis, the isothermal fatigue behavior of the (0 deg) TMC revealed significant improvements over the unreinforced matrix. In contrast, the (90 deg) TMC exhibited degraded properties and lives for similar comparisons. This was attributed to the weak fiber/matrix interfacial bond. Encasing the (0 deg) TMC with a Ti-15-3 case did not affect isothermal fatigue lives at higher strain levels. However, at lower strain levels, rapid initiation and propagation of large fatigue cracks in the case degraded the fatigue lives. Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) lives were significantly reduced for the (0 deg) TMC when compared to isothermal lives. At high strains, in-phase TMF produced extremely short lives. This degradation was attributed to fiber overload failures brought about by stress relaxation in the matrix. At low strains, out-of-phase TMF conditions became life limiting. Environment-assisted surface cracking was found to accelerate fatigue failure. This produced extensive matrix damage with minimal fiber damage. For the (90 deg) TMC, TMF conditions did not promote an additional degradation in cyclic life beyond that observed under isothermal conditions.

  19. Contamination protective coatings: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirich, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    Tailored protective coatings have the potential for tremendous technical and affordability benefits to ground, air and space systems because of their ability to reduce surface contamination, minimize icing, reduce friction, and to reduce corrosion for a wide variety of applications and missions. The thermal and radiation environment of space systems also pose unique challenges to protective coatings because of the space environment's large temperature variations, the plasma environment and solar UV and Xrays. Contamination may accumulate on sensors inhibiting accurate and timely data acquisition and their efficiency can be seriously affected by contamination buildup. For polymeric materials, not all properties are affected to the same degree by radiation but are often localized at a specific molecular bond. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic coating approaches may be important to address specific design requirements. Hydrophilic materials are composed of polar molecules and have been used to defog glass and enable oil spots to be swept away with water. Hydrophobic molecules tend to be nonpolar and thus prefer other neutral molecules and nonpolar solvents. Hydrophobic molecules often cluster and are difficult to wet with liquids. This paper presents an overview of various types of contamination that adheres to critical air and space surfaces and potential coatings phenomenology that may be used to eliminate contamination.

  20. Plague in Tanzania: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ziwa, Michael H; Matee, Mecky I; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kilonzo, Bukheti S

    2013-10-01

    Human plague remains a public health concern in Tanzania despite its quiescence in most foci for years, considering the recurrence nature of the disease. Despite the long-standing history of this problem, there have not been recent reviews of the current knowledge on plague in Tanzania. This work aimed at providing a current overview of plague in Tanzania in terms of its introduction, potential reservoirs, possible causes of plague persistence and repeated outbreaks in the country. Plague is believed to have been introduced to Tanzania from the Middle East through Uganda with the first authentication in 1886. Xenopsylla brasiliensis, X. cheopis, Dinopsyllus lypusus, and Pulex irritans are among potential vectors while Lophuromys spp, Praomys delectorum, Graphiurus murinus, Lemniscomys striatus, Mastomys natalensis, and Rattus rattus may be the potential reservoirs. Plague persistence and repeated outbreaks in Tanzania are likely to be attributable to a complexity of factors including cultural, socio-economical, environmental and biological. Minimizing or preventing people's proximity to rodents is probably the most effective means of preventing plague outbreaks in humans in the future. In conclusion, much has been done on plague diagnosis in Tanzania. However, in order to achieve new insights into the features of plague epidemiology in the country, and to reorganize an effective control strategy, we recommend broader studies that will include the ecology of the pathogen, vectors and potential hosts, identifying the reservoirs, dynamics of infection and landscape ecology.

  1. Sustainable land application: an overview.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, G A; Elliott, H A; Basta, N T; Bastian, R K; Pierzynski, G M; Sims, R C; Smith, J E

    2005-01-01

    Man has land-applied societal nonhazardous wastes for centuries as a means of disposal and to improve the soil via the recycling of nutrients and the addition of organic matter. Nonhazardous wastes include a vast array of materials, including manures, biosolids, composts, wastewater effluents, food-processing wastes, industrial by-products; these are collectively referred to herein as residuals. Because of economic restraints and environmental concerns about land-filling and incineration, interest in land application continues to grow. A major lesson that has been learned, however, is that the traditional definition of land application that emphasizes applying residuals to land in a manner that protects human and animal health, safeguards soil and water resources, and maintains long-term ecosystem quality is incomplete unless the earning of public trust in the practices is included. This overview provides an introduction to a subset of papers and posters presented at the conference, "Sustainable Land Application," held in Orlando, FL, in January 2004. The USEPA, USDA, and multiple national and state organizations with interest in, and/or responsibilities for, ensuring the sustainability of the practice sponsored the conference. The overriding conference objectives were to highlight significant developments in land treatment theory and practice, and to identify future research needs to address critical gaps in the knowledge base that must be addressed to ensure sustainable land application of residuals.

  2. An overview of coronal seismology.

    PubMed

    De Moortel, I

    2005-12-15

    The idea of exploiting observed oscillations as a diagnostic tool for determining the physical conditions of the coronal plasma was first suggested several decades ago (Roberts et al. 1984 Astrophys. J. 279, 857). Until recently, the application of this idea has been very limited by a lack of high-quality observations of coronal oscillations. However, during the last few years, this situation has changed dramatically, especially due to space-based observations by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and waves and oscillations have now been observed in a wide variety of solar structures, such as coronal loops, polar plumes and prominences. This paper will briefly summarize MHD wave theory, which forms the basis for coronal seismology, as well as present an overview of the variety of recently observed waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The present state of coronal seismology will also be discussed. Currently, the uncertainty associated with the obtained parameters is still considerable and, hence, the results require a cautious interpretation. However, these examples do show that coronal seismology is rapidly being transformed from a theoretical possibility to a viable technique.

  3. Nicotine Replacement Therapy: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wadgave, Umesh; Nagesh, L

    2016-01-01

    Today tobacco use is the single greatest preventable cause of death in the world. Tobacco use is often incorrectly perceived to be solely a personal choice. This is contradicted by the fact that when fully aware of the health impact, most tobacco users want to quit but find it difficult to stop due to the addictiveness of nicotine. Henceforth, Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) came into existence which temporarily replaces much of the nicotine from tobacco to reduce motivation to consume tobacco and nicotine withdrawal symptoms, thus easing the transition from cigarette smoking to complete abstinence. Various alternative nicotine sources (gum, transdermal patch, nasal spray, inhaler and sublingual tablets/lozenges) have been incorporated into tobacco cessation programs. Recent research is more focusing on rapid delivery of nicotine (Nicotine preloading, true pulmonary inhaler) and immunological approaches (nicotine vaccine) to tackle nicotine dependence. These NRTs are in general well tolerated and have minimal adverse effects. The review aims to summarize literature on various modes of nicotine replacement therapy methods currently used to treat nicotine dependence, and to give an overview about future possible approaches to treat tobacco use disorder. PMID:27610066

  4. An Overview of Testosterone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, O Danny; Tillman, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Millions of men, as a result of the natural aging process, injury, illness, and medical therapies, experience a decline in testosterone levels that necessitate a need for testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). The signs and symptoms of testosterone decline may occur gradually, and low testosterone levels may be misdiagnosed as other medical conditions. Over the past two decades, there has been an increase in testing of testosterone levels and the use of TST. With so many men now on TST, it is essential for health care professionals to know the signs and symptoms, the causes of testosterone decline, how testosterone deficiency is diagnosed, what pathological changes are associated with testosterone decline, and the benefits and risks of TST. In addition, health care providers need to be aware of the various forms of testosterone available as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. This article provides a brief overview of testosterone deficiency, TST treatment options and guidelines, and the risks and benefits associated with of TST.

  5. Gender reassignment surgery: an overview.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Bellringer, James

    2011-05-01

    Gender reassignment (which includes psychotherapy, hormonal therapy and surgery) has been demonstrated as the most effective treatment for patients affected by gender dysphoria (or gender identity disorder), in which patients do not recognize their gender (sexual identity) as matching their genetic and sexual characteristics. Gender reassignment surgery is a series of complex surgical procedures (genital and nongenital) performed for the treatment of gender dysphoria. Genital procedures performed for gender dysphoria, such as vaginoplasty, clitorolabioplasty, penectomy and orchidectomy in male-to-female transsexuals, and penile and scrotal reconstruction in female-to-male transsexuals, are the core procedures in gender reassignment surgery. Nongenital procedures, such as breast enlargement, mastectomy, facial feminization surgery, voice surgery, and other masculinization and feminization procedures complete the surgical treatment available. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health currently publishes and reviews guidelines and standards of care for patients affected by gender dysphoria, such as eligibility criteria for surgery. This article presents an overview of the genital and nongenital procedures available for both male-to-female and female-to-male gender reassignment.

  6. An Energy Overview of Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2003-08-13

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy maintained a web site that was meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consisted of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There were also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site -- each of these was a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Bolivia.

  7. Hypermedia Concepts and Research: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, John K.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of hypermedia, including a history of hypertext and multimedia, and discusses how they have been combined into the term hypermedia; a cognitive overview; dual coding and cue summation; and theories related to learners, including field dependence-independence, memory, and metacognition. Contains 156 references. (LRW)

  8. The Nordic seas: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drange, Helge; Dokken, Trond; Furevik, Tore; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Berger, Wolfgang; Nesje, Atle; Arild Orvik, Kjell; Skagseth, Øystein; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Østerhus, Svein

    The aim of this overview paper is to provide a brief synthesis of the five review papers contained in the monograph. Prevailing southwesterly winds, oceanic flow patterns, and oceanic summer heat storage make the temperatures of the Nordic Seas region 10—20°C above the mean temperature of locations at similar latitudes. The combination of the large heat import from the south plus the polar location implies that the region is prone to natural climate variations and is particularly vulnerable for external forcings. Indeed, proxy data for the Holocene epoch reveal large, high-frequency climate fluctuations, as well as long-term variations spanning the "Medieval Warm Period" and the "Little Ice Age". In phase with a strengthening of the westerly winds since the 1960s, several oceanic key variables show trends unprecedented in available instrumental records, some of which extend back 50—100 years. State-of-the-art climate models indicate that several of the changes may be linked to increased forcing of greenhouse gases and are therefore likely to be sustained or even amplified in the future. Furthermore, the marine cycling of carbon, and through that the major greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, is closely linked to the climate state of the region. The Nordic Seas region is, as one of few ocean locations, a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide throughout the year. With the rapid developments in data acquisition, computational resources, and societal concerns for climate change and environmental issues, the review papers give an updated account of the present knowledge of the complex climate states of the Nordic Seas and how the Nordic Seas influence the climate outside the region.

  9. An overview of city analytics

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Desmond J.; Batty, Michael; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Greetham, Danica Vukadinović; Grindrod, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the 14 articles in the Royal Society Open Science themed issue on City Analytics. To provide a high-level, strategic, overview, we summarize the topics addressed and the analytical tools deployed. We then give a more detailed account of the individual contributions. Our overall aims are (i) to highlight exciting advances in this emerging, interdisciplinary field, (ii) to encourage further activity and (iii) to emphasize the variety of new, public-domain, datasets that are available to researchers. PMID:28386454

  10. Nickel hydrogen batteries: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A LeRC innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass,volume, and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a reduction in

  11. Welding of Aluminum Alloys to Steels: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    95] K. Kimapong1, T. Watanabe, Effect of welding process parameters on mechanical property of FSW lap joint between aluminum alloy and steel ...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release. 1 UNCLASSIFIED Welding of aluminum alloys to steels : an overview M. Mazar...welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels . The microstructural development, mechanical properties and application of the joints are discussed

  12. Overview of dynamical mechanisms of secular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenniger, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Gravity-bound isolated systems, from stars, planetary systems, star clusters to galaxies, share common properties where evolution is the rule. Typically if they start forming at a well defined epoch they tend to change significantly over a timescale comparable to their present age. So evolution is never truly stopped, it just proceeds slower and slower: after a rapid, violent phase a slower, secular phase follows. In galactic astronomy for many decades the paradigm was rather that after a short violent time galaxies would settle in a stable steady state just consuming gas into stars. Actually today it appears that the progressive appearance of galaxy systematic morphologies and the slowing pace of mergers indicate that common intrinsic dynamical factors continue to shape galaxies towards similar properties irrespective of their largely different formation histories and initial conditions. Newtonian physics supplemented by a weakly dissipative component provides an amazing amount of explanations for the galaxy properties, like exponential stellar disks, spirals, bars, and peanut-shaped bulges. The purpose of this talk is to review these mechanisms of dynamical secular evolution.

  13. Toxicology of solanine: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, R R; Bowie, W C

    1983-02-01

    Solanine is a toxic glycoalkaloid known to accumulate under certain conditions in potato plant, sprouts and tuber in levels which, if ingested, may cause poisoning in humans and farm animals. However, ingested solanine is relatively less toxic than the parenterally administered compound, probably because of its poor absorption, rapid excretion and hydrolysis to less toxic solanine in stomach. Nevertheless, solanine poisoning may cause a gastrointestinal, nervous and exanthematous syndrome severe enough to be fatal. Implications of solanine toxicity in farm animals and humans are discussed in this overview.

  14. Digital Noise Reduction: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Ruth; Chiou, Li-Kuei

    2006-01-01

    Digital noise reduction schemes are being used in most hearing aids currently marketed. Unlike the earlier analog schemes, these manufacturer-specific algorithms are developed to acoustically analyze the incoming signal and alter the gain/output characteristics according to their predetermined rules. Although most are modulation-based schemes (ie, differentiating speech from noise based on temporal characteristics), spectral subtraction techniques are being applied as well. The purpose of this article is to overview these schemes in terms of their differences and similarities. PMID:16959731

  15. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S; Veers, P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring based on presentations from a condition monitoring workshop organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2009 and on additional references.

  16. The NASA Geodynamics Program: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This NASA Geodynamics Program overview collectively examines the history, scientific basis, status, and results of the NASA Program and outlines plans for the next five to eight years. It is intended as an informative nontechnical discussion of geodynamics research.

  17. Results of coronal hole research: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the last 10 years of coronal hole research, in particular since 1970, is presented. The findings of the early investigations and the more recent results obtained with Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount instrumentation are discussed.

  18. An overview of advanced nonvolatile memory technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dressendorfer, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    This report is an overview of advanced nonvolatile memory technologies. The memory technologies discussed are: floating gate nonvolatile memory technologies; SNOS nonvolatile technology; ferroelectric technology; and thin film magnetic memories.

  19. An overview of gravitational physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, Jaime; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this review is on the response of humans and animals to the effects of the near weightless condition occurring aboard orbiting spacecraft. Gravity is an omnipresent force that has been a constant part of our lives and of the evolution of all living species. Emphasis is placed on the general mechanisms of adaptation to altered gravitational fields and vectors, i.e., both hypo- and hypergravity. A broad literature review of gravitational biology was conducted and the general state of our knowledge in this area is discussed. The review is specifically targeted at newcomers to the exciting and relatively new area of space and gravitational biology.

  20. Energy efficient drivepower: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ula, Sadrul; Birnbaum, Larry E.; Jordan, Don

    Energy efficiency is a major concern to industry for a variety of reasons. Operating expenses and public relations are just two of these. While a lot of effort has been expended in the area of electrical energy efficiency, the area of concern in the report, most papers use a limited approach when examining the opportunities for efficiency improvement. However, use of a systems approach--examining the entire power train system from when electrical power first enters a facility to the final output is presented. This type of approach to electrical energy efficiency can improve the overall efficiency by a significant amount. There are many methods of driving mechanical loads such as waste steam (steam turbine), centralized hydraulic systems, and compressed air. Only electric-drive systems were analyzed. Depending on the application and facilities, these other methods may be a viable alternative to electric drivepower systems. The document assumes that the reader has an understanding of the basic concepts, practices, and terminology used in electrical and mechanical engineering. The reader should be familiar with terms such as voltage, current, dc power, ac power, power factor, horse power, torque, angular velocity, kilowatt-hours, efficiency, harmonics, and gear ratio.

  1. Cyclic Cushing's syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Albiger, Nora Maria Elvira; Scaroni, Carla M; Mantero, Franco

    2007-11-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a disorder in which glucocorticoid levels are alternately normal and high, the latter occurring in episodes that can last from a few days to several months. It is more common in children than in adults. Cyclic CS may be either of the two different forms of CS (ACTH-dependent or -independent CS). Clinically, it may present with one or many symptoms, depending on the duration of disease activity and the timing of the fluctuations. A serotoninergic influence, cyclic changes in central dopaminergic tone, spontaneous episodic hemorrhage in the tumor, and the action of inflammatory cytokines with antitumor properties are some of the mechanisms suggested to explain the physiopathology of this phenomenon but the exact mechanism remains to be clarified. The cyclic pattern of hypercortisolism can delay the final diagnosis of CS and make it difficult to interpret the results of dynamic tests. Patients may have paradoxical responses to dexamethasone that can reflect increasing or decreasing levels of endogenous activity. Hormone assessments have to be repeated periodically when a diagnosis of CS is suspected. The cyclic pattern can also interfere with medical treatment because patients may show unexpected clinical and biochemical signs of hypocortisolism when cortisol secretion cyclically returns to normal, so an accurate follow-up is mandatory in these patients.

  2. An overview of internet biosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Hartley, D M; Nelson, N P; Arthur, R R; Barboza, P; Collier, N; Lightfoot, N; Linge, J P; van der Goot, E; Mawudeku, A; Madoff, L C; Vaillant, L; Walters, R; Yangarber, R; Mantero, J; Corley, C D; Brownstein, J S

    2013-11-01

    Internet biosurveillance utilizes unstructured data from diverse web-based sources to provide early warning and situational awareness of public health threats. The scope of source coverage ranges from local media in the vernacular to international media in widely read languages. Internet biosurveillance is a timely modality that is available to government and public health officials, healthcare workers, and the public and private sector, serving as a real-time complementary approach to traditional indicator-based public health disease surveillance methods. Internet biosurveillance also supports the broader activity of epidemic intelligence. This overview covers the current state of the field of Internet biosurveillance, and provides a perspective on the future of the field.

  3. Prosthetic valve endocarditis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gnann, J W; Dismukes, W E

    1983-12-01

    Infection of an intracardiac prosthesis, the incidence of which is about 2.5% among patients having undergone valve replacement, is a serious complication with considerable morbidity and mortality. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), with an onset within 60 days of valve replacement, accounts for approximately one-third of all cases, while the remaining two-thirds, occur more than two months postoperatively (late prosthetic valve endocarditis). Prosthetic valve endocarditis is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis, less frequently by viridans streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and gram-negative bacilli. The most likely pathogenetic mechanisms in prosthetic valve endocarditis are intraoperative contamination and postoperative infections at extracardiac sites. Prominent clinical features include fever, new or changing heart murmurs, leukocytosis, anemia and hematuria. The etiologic microorganism can be isolated in more than 90% of all cases. Patients with proven prosthetic valve endocarditis should be examined daily to detect signs of congestive heart failure and changes in murmurs; electrocardiographic monitoring is essential for documentation of arrhythmias. With limitations, echocardiography, especially two-dimensional, may help to demonstrate vegetations or valvular dehiscence. Cinefluoroscopy may reveal loosening or dehiscence of the sewing ring or impaired motion of a radio-opaque poppet due to thrombus or vegetation. Cardiac catheterization, not always necessary even when surgical intervention is anticipated, may provide valuable information on the degree of dysfunction, multiple valve involvement, left ventricular function and extent of concomitant coronary artery disease. In patients with mechanical valves, prosthetic valve endocarditis may be associated with a high incidence of valve ring and myocardial abscesses; the reported frequency of valve ring abscesses is lower with porcine heterografts. Infections on mechanical valves

  4. An overview of chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Beltrani, Vincent S

    2002-10-01

    Acknowledging urticaria as a symptom of mast cell degranulation is stressed. The biology of the mast cell, and the recognized immunologic and non-immunologic mast cell secretagogues are individually discussed along with mechanisms of activation and mediators released. The major, preformed mediator histamine in the skin produces a prototypic, short-lived urticaria, however, the clinical spectrum and pattern of "hives" indicate that other mediators contribute to the polymorphism and variable behavior of this symptom. The clinical assessment is almost exclusively restricted to the history and physical examination. Features to review and examine are presented. The cause of "acute" urticaria is identifiable (by history) in the majority of patients, and except for hives that accompany an anaphylactic reaction, these patients rarely present to the physician for care. The persistent, or "chronic" hiver whose history cannot elicit a cause, is rarely triggered by an individual trigger, despite extensive professional evaluation. Evidence to support changing the chronological, "acute" and "chronic" classification of urticaria to "identifiable" and "non-identifiable" triggered urticaria is discussed, as is the futility of extensive, costly laboratory work-ups. The natural history of urticaria reveals that management should be directed toward allowing the patient to maintain an acceptable quality of life (with or without some urticaria), until the episode resolves.

  5. An overview of health forecasting.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    Health forecasting is a novel area of forecasting, and a valuable tool for predicting future health events or situations such as demands for health services and healthcare needs. It facilitates preventive medicine and health care intervention strategies, by pre-informing health service providers to take appropriate mitigating actions to minimize risks and manage demand. Health forecasting requires reliable data, information and appropriate analytical tools for the prediction of specific health conditions or situations. There is no single approach to health forecasting, and so various methods have often been adopted to forecast aggregate or specific health conditions. Meanwhile, there are no defined health forecasting horizons (time frames) to match the choices of health forecasting methods/approaches that are often applied. The key principles of health forecasting have not also been adequately described to guide the process. This paper provides a brief introduction and theoretical analysis of health forecasting. It describes the key issues that are important for health forecasting, including: definitions, principles of health forecasting, and the properties of health data, which influence the choices of health forecasting methods. Other matters related to the value of health forecasting, and the general challenges associated with developing and using health forecasting services are discussed. This overview is a stimulus for further discussions on standardizing health forecasting approaches and methods that will facilitate health care and health services delivery.

  6. Human saliva proteome: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-06-01

    Human saliva contains a rich mixture of biomolecules. Proteins are a major component of this mixture. Given their role as the molecular effectors within biological systems, ranging from catalysis to transport to structure, proteins have great potential as biomarkers of health and disease. The ability to collect these salivary biomarkers easily using non-invasive means makes saliva proteins even more attractive for diagnostic applications. Thousands of proteins are now to be known to be present in human saliva - discovered using proteomic technologies. Emerging technologies are now making it possible to go beyond large-scale cataloging of salivary proteins. These include approaches to catalog protein contributions from the community of microorganisms residing in the oral cavity (metaproteomics) that may reflect the health state of the human host. New mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods are also emerging, shifting the emphasis from large-scale discovery experiments to hypothesis-driven assays for profiling proteins of interest within saliva, enabling validation of their association with specific health conditions. This paper provides a brief overview of efforts to catalog the proteome of human saliva. Recent developments making possible characterization of the metaproteome of human saliva will be discussed, and technologies driving new mass spectrometry-based assays for targeted analysis of proteins within complex samples, such as saliva.

  7. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Cardenas, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Maroto, Federico; Alvarez-Bermejo, Jose Antonio; Manzano-Agugliaro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS) meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years. PMID:28335417

  8. St. John's wort - an overview.

    PubMed

    Linde, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    This article aims to summarize the current state of knowledge on St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) which is one of the oldest and best investigated medicinal herbs. Dried alcoholic extracts are the most important preparations on the market although a variety of other preparations are available. Depressive disorders according to modern diagnostic standards are the best known and most widely investigated indication although the more traditional, broader indication of 'psycho-vegetative disorders, depressive disorders, anxiety and/or nervous agitation', including diagnoses such as somatoform disorders, might more adequately describe what Hypericum extracts are actually used for by many practitioners. The exact mechanisms of action are still unclear, but the available research clearly shows that various bioactive constituents contribute to the clinical effects reported, often in a synergistic manner. Hypericum extracts have consistently shown activity in pharmacological models related to antidepressant effects. Randomized clinical trials show that Hypericum extracts are more effective than placebo and similarly effective as standard antidepressants while having better tolerability in the acute treatment of major depressive episodes. The most important risk associated with Hypericum extracts are interactions with other drugs. Therefore, physicians need to be informed whether their patients take St. John's wort products. If the risk of interactions is adequately taken into account, high quality Hypericum extracts are an effective and safe tool in the hand of qualified health profession-als in primary care.

  9. Chikungunya virus infection: an overview.

    PubMed

    Caglioti, Claudia; Lalle, Eleonora; Castilletti, Concetta; Carletti, Fabrizio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Bordi, Licia

    2013-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, first isolated in Tanzania in 1952. The main vectors are mosquitoes from the Aedes species. Recently, the establishment of an envelope mutation increased infectivity for A. albopictus. CHIKV has recently re-emerged causing millions of infections in countries around the Indian Ocean characterized by climate conditions favourable to high vector density. Importation of human cases to European regions with high density of suitable arthropod vectors (such as A. albopictus) may trigger autochthonous outbreaks. The clinical signs of CHIKV infection include non-specific flu-like symptoms, and a characteristic rash accompanied by joint pain that may last for a long time after the resolution of the infection. The death rate is not particularly high, but excess mortality has been observed in concomitance with large CHIKV outbreaks. Deregulation of innate defense mechanisms, such as cytokine inflammatory response, may participate in the main clinical signs of CHIKV infection, and the establishment of persistent (chronic) disease. There is no specific therapy, and prevention is the main countermeasure. Prevention is based on insect control and in avoiding mosquito bites in endemic countries. Diagnosis is based on the detection of virus by molecular methods or by virus culture on the first days of infection, and by detection of an immune response in later stages. CHIKV infection must be suspected in patients with compatible clinical symptoms returning from epidemic/endemic areas. Differential diagnosis should take into account the cross-reactivity with other viruses from the same antigenic complex (i.e. O'nyong-nyong virus).

  10. Exercise and asthma: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Stefano R. Del; Firinu, Davide; Bjermer, Leif; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2015-01-01

    The terms ‘exercise-induced asthma’ (EIA) and ‘exercise-induced bronchoconstriction’ (EIB) are often used interchangeably to describe symptoms of asthma such as cough, wheeze, or dyspnoea provoked by vigorous physical activity. In this review, we refer to EIB as the bronchoconstrictive response and to EIA when bronchoconstriction is associated with asthma symptoms. EIB is a common occurrence for most of the asthmatic patients, but it also affects more than 10% of otherwise healthy individuals as shown by epidemiological studies. EIA and EIB have a high prevalence also in elite athletes, especially within endurance type of sports, and an athlete's asthma phenotype has been described. However, the occurrence in elite athletes shows that EIA/EIB, if correctly managed, may not impair physical activity and top sports performance. The pathogenic mechanisms of EIA/EIB classically involve both osmolar and vascular changes in the airways in addition to cooling of the airways with parasympathetic stimulation. Airways inflammation plays a fundamental role in EIA/EIB. Diagnosis and pharmacological management must be carefully performed, with particular consideration of current anti-doping regulations, when caring for athletes. Based on the demonstration that the inhaled asthma drugs do not improve performance in healthy athletes, the doping regulations are presently much less strict than previously. Some sports are at a higher asthma risk than others, probably due to a high environmental exposure while performing the sport, with swimming and chlorine exposure during swimming as one example. It is considered very important for the asthmatic child and adolescent to master EIA/EIB to be able to participate in physical activity on an equal level with their peers, and a precise early diagnosis with optimal treatment follow-up is vital in this aspect. In addition, surprising recent preliminary evidences offer new perspectives for moderate exercise as a potential therapeutic

  11. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  12. An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-03-24

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The oil and gas industry has led in most of the attempts to develop this type of telemetry system; however, very substantial efforts have also been made through government sponsored work in the geothermal industry. None of these previous attempts have lead to a commercial telemetry system. Conceptually, the problem looks easy. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quite low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal Waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested

  13. An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center is presented. The following subject areas are covered: research objectives and long term perspective of the Center; current status and operational philosophy; and brief description of Center projects (combustion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, materials compatibility, turbomachinery, and advanced propulsion concepts).

  14. Energy Efficient Drivepower: An Overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Ula, Sadrul; Birnbaum, Larry E.; Jordan, Don

    1993-05-01

    This report examines energy efficiency in drivepower systems. Only systems where the prime movers are electrical motors are discussed. A systems approach is used to examine all major aspects of drivepower, including motors, controls, electrical tune-ups, mechanical efficiency, maintenance, and management. Potential annual savings to the US society of $25 to $50 billion are indicated. The report was written for readers with a semi-technical background.

  15. Surface Characterization Techniques: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    To understand the benefits that surface modifications provide, and ultimately to devise better ones, it is necessary to study the physical, mechanical, and chemical changes they cause. This chapter surveys classical and leading-edge developments in surface structure and property characterization methodologies. The primary emphases are on the use of these techniques as they relate to surface modifications, thin films and coatings, and tribological engineering surfaces and on the implications rather than the instrumentation.

  16. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  17. An interim overview of LDEF materials findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Brad A.

    1992-01-01

    The flight and retrieval of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) provided an opportunity for the study of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment and long-duration space environmental effects (SEE) on materials that is unparalleled in the history of the U.S. Space Program. The remarkable flight attitude stability of LDEF enables specific analyses of various individual and combined effects of LEO environmental parameters on identical materials on the same space vehicle. This paper provides an overview of the interim LDEF materials findings of the Principal Investigators and the Materials Special Investigation Group. In general, the LDEF data is remarkably consistent; LDEF will provide a 'benchmark' for materials design data bases for satellites in low-Earth orbit. Some materials were identified to be encouragingly resistant to LEO SEE for 5.8 years; other 'space qualified' materials displayed significant environmental degradation. Molecular contamination was widespread; LDEF offers an unprecedented opportunity to provide a unified perspective of unmanned LEO spacecraft contamination mechanisms. New material development requirements for long-term LEO missions have been identified and current ground simulation testing methods/data for new, durable materials concepts can be validated with LDEF results. LDEF findings are already being integrated into the design of Space Station Freedom.

  18. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  19. Information Resources Management: An Overview for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Evelyn H.

    This paper presents an overview of the emerging information resources management (IRM) concept and suggests reasons why IRM would be a useful framework for educational institutions. An introductory look at current information problems precedes a review of definitions of information and IRM in the literature, and a definition of IRM as used in this…

  20. Dictionaries of African Sign Languages: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaling, Constanze H.

    2012-01-01

    This article gives an overview of dictionaries of African sign languages that have been published to date most of which have not been widely distributed. After an introduction into the field of sign language lexicography and a discussion of some of the obstacles that authors of sign language dictionaries face in general, I will show problems…

  1. OVERVIEW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROSENBERG, SHELDON

    THIS OVERVIEW CHAPTER INTRODUCES THE FORTHCOMING "DEVELOPMENTS IN APPLIED PSYCHOLINGUISTICS RESEARCH," S. ROSENBERG AND J.H. KOPLIN, EDITORS, WHICH WILL BE PUBLISHED IN 1968 BY MACMILLAN COMPANY. IT WAS DESIGNED TO SERVE AN INTEGRATIVE FUNCTION--TO IDENTIFY SOME OF THE MAJOR IDEAS AND CONCERNS OF THE CONTRIBUTORS, TO IDENTIFY SOME OF THEIR…

  2. Carbon-carbon - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D.

    1988-01-01

    In nonoxidizing high-temperature environments, carbon-carbon composites retain room temperature properties to more than 2225 C; in oxidizing environments, the variety of coatings thus far developed limits maximum operating temperatures to about 1600 C. The high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion of these composites renders them ideal for applications encountering thermal shocks. In addition, the variety of fibers, weave patterns, and layup procedures that can be used for the composites allows mechanical properties to be carefully tailored over a wide range to fit the application in question.

  3. An overview of biopulping consortia research

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, M.; Lirk, T.K.

    1996-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of a 8-year biopulping research effort conducted under the auspices of two biopulping consortia, involving the Universities of Wisconsin and Minnesota, the Forest Products Laboratory, and the industry. Biopulping, defined as the fungal pretreatment of wood chips for pulping, is an environmentally benign process that saves at least 30% electrical energy during mechanical refining, and improves paper quality in a 2-week period during laboratory trials. A rapid method of evaluating the benefits of biopulping has been found using the Simons staining procedures. We have identified a white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora which is effective on both hardwood and softwood species. This fungus can perform biopulping effectively if chips are steamed using the atmospheric steam for a very short period of time prior to fungal inoculation. Also, one of the major costs during the scale-up of biopulping is inoculum production. To this end, we have reduced the amount of inoculum dramatically (from 3 kg to 0.25 g dry weight of fungus per ton of dry wood) by adding corn steep liquor to the mycelial suspension. Current research is focused on large-scale decontamination of chips and maintenance of suitable temperature, aeration and moisture in chip piles so that biopulping can become a successful industrial process.

  4. Models of carcinogenesis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Vineis, Paolo; Schatzkin, Arthur; Potter, John D.

    2010-01-01

    At least five coherent models of carcinogenesis have been proposed in the history of cancer research in the last century. Model 1 is mainly centered around mutations, and its main focus is on the chemical environment, radiation and viruses. Model 2 has to do mainly with genome instability and it focuses on familiality. Model 3 is based on non-genotoxic mechanisms, and clonal expansion and epigenetics are its main features. We propose a fourth model, which can encompass the previous three, based on the concept of a ‘Darwinian’ cell selection (we clarify that the term Darwinian needs to be used cautiously, being a short cut for ‘somatic cellular selection’). Finally, a fifth model has recently become popular, based on the concept of ‘tissue organization’. We describe examples of the five models and how they have been formalized mathematically. The five models largely overlap, both scientifically and historically, but for the sake of clarity, it is useful to treat them separately. We also argue that the five models can be included into a simpler scheme, i.e. two types of models: (i) biological changes in the epithelium alone lead to malignancy and (ii) changes in stroma/extracellular matrix are necessary (along with changes in epithelium) for malignancy. Our description, though simplified, looks realistic, it is able to capture the historical sequence of carcinogenesis theories in the last century and can serve as a frame to make research hypotheses more explicit. PMID:20430846

  5. Creating Smart-er Cities: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwinkle, Sam; Cruickshank, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The following offers an overview of what it means for cities to be "smart." It draws the supporting definitions and critical insights into smart cities from a series of papers presented at the 2009 Trans-national Conference on Creating Smart(er) Cities. What the papers all have in common is their desire to overcome the all too often…

  6. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  7. Observing System Simulation Experiments: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) will be given, with focus on calibration and validation of OSSE frameworks. Pitfalls and practice will be discussed, including observation error characteristics, incestuousness, and experimental design. The potential use of OSSEs for investigation of the behaviour of data assimilation systems will be explored, including some results from experiments using the NASAGMAO OSSE.

  8. An overview of the Keck Interferometer Nuller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, Eugen

    2003-01-01

    The first high dynamic range interferometry mode planned to come on line at the Keck Observatory is mid-infrared nulling interferometry. In this paper, an overview is given of the goals and experimental configuration of the Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN).

  9. Brain Research and Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kenneth L.

    An overview of some educational implications of brain related research indicates that new insights can be gained from brain research. Four areas of study appear to be promising. First, the study of the evolution of the brain involves theories derived mostly from sociobiology, which is the study of the social behavior of animals, including humans…

  10. Managing Strategic Change: An Executive Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to develop the critical-thinking skills needed to make efficient and effective decisions, managers and leaders need to be well...Designing Organizations. (4th ed.) Illinois: Irwin. Schermerhorn , J. R., Jr. (2001). Management . New York: John Wiley and... MANAGING STRATEGIC CHANGE: AN EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW June 2003 ROBERT M. MURPHY, Ph.D

  11. Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Erin; Goodwin, Lloyd R., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy medications can reduce the likelihood of relapse, decrease craving intensity and severity of withdrawal symptoms, and bolster the likelihood of achieving and maintaining recovery goals for many individuals seeking recovery from alcohol dependence. An overview of the benefits and concerns of integrating pharmacotherapeutic…

  12. Assessment and Learning Technologies: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Treasa; Rushby, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Assessment pervades the learning process. This paper provides an overview of the application of technology to support and enhance diagnostic, formative and summative assessment. The focus is on examining how it can replace what already exists, improve the functionality, catalyse a redesign of the process and in some circumstances, make possible…

  13. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  14. Early Childhood Music Education Research: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a short commentary on the "state of play" in early childhood music education research to accompany the articles published in this special issue. It provides an international overview of recent research trends in this field, with examples drawn from Europe, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East, East and South Africa and…

  15. Students with Attention Deficit Disorders: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.; Rohena, Elba

    2003-01-01

    This article provides the American Psychiatric Association's definition of attention deficit disorder (ADD) and then gives an overview of ADD by considering the three types of ADD, the developmental impact of ADD, factors contributing to ADD, identification and assessment of students with ADD (emphasizing multimethod and consideration of…

  16. Gulfnet in Saudi Arabia: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khulaifi, M.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Gulfnet Academic network, set in the context of development in Saudi Arabia and the establishment of King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Goals and objectives of KACST are presented, Gulfnet members in the Gulf States are listed, and Gulfnet management, services, and facilities are discussed. (JKP)

  17. NEMS - National Energy Modeling System: An Overview

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2009 a summary description of NEMS and each of its components. NEMS is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of energy markets for the midterm period through 2030. The NEMS is used to produce the Annual Energy Outlook.

  18. Input, Interaction and Output: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan; Mackey, Alison

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of what has come to be known as the "Interaction Hypothesis," the basic tenet of which is that through input and interaction with interlocutors, language learners have opportunities to notice differences between their own formulations of the target language and the language of their conversational…

  19. An overview of problematic internet use.

    PubMed

    Spada, Marcantonio M

    2014-01-01

    Problematic Internet use (PIU), which has become a global social issue, can be broadly conceptualized as an inability to control one's use of the Internet which leads to negative consequences in daily life. The aim of this paper is to give a brief overview of the gradually evolving body of literature on PIU. This shows that the definitions and diagnostic criteria that have been proposed, and the assessment tools that have been developed, stress similarities between PIU, addictive behaviours and impulse-control disorders. Disagreements regarding diagnostic criteria and the lack of large epidemiological studies have resulted in difficulties in establishing the prevalence of PIU in the general population. Studies suggest high comorbidity rates between PIU and numerous psychiatric disorders highlighting the importance of focusing on comorbidity in treatment. There is growing evidence that genetic, personality and individual differences in automatic and controlled aspects of self-regulation may promote the development of PIU. Pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments specific to PIU have received limited testing in large, rigorous studies however preliminary evidence suggests that both psychotropic medications (Escitalopram, Naltrexone and Methylphenidate) and cognitive behaviour therapy may have some utility in the treatment of PIU. More research is needed on areas which remain unclear and contribute to the prognosis of PIU, in particular the temporal relationships between psychiatric disorder and PIU, mechanisms of comorbidity and the more subtle psychological changes that occur through Internet use.

  20. Middle Ear Implantable Hearing Devices: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, David S.; Young, Jadrien A.; Wanna, George B.; Glasscock, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Hearing loss affects approximately 30 million people in the United States. It has been estimated that only approximately 20% of people with hearing loss significant enough to warrant amplification actually seek assistance for amplification. A significant interest in middle ear implants has emerged over the years to facilitate patients who are noncompliant with conventional hearing aides, do not receive significant benefit from conventional aides, or are not candidates for cochlear implants. From the initial studies in the 1930s, the technology has greatly evolved over the years with a wide array of devices and mechanisms employed in the development of implantable middle ear hearing devices. Currently, these devices are generally available in two broad categories: partially or totally implantable using either piezoelectric or electromagnetic systems. The authors present an up-to-date overview of the major implantable middle ear devices. Although the current devices are largely in their infancy, indications for middle ear implants are ever evolving as promising studies show good results. The totally implantable devices provide the user freedom from the social and practical difficulties of using conventional amplification. PMID:19762429

  1. PUFA-derived endocannabinoids: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Maria Grazia

    2013-11-01

    Following on from the discovery of cannabinoid receptors, of their endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and of the biosynthetic and metabolic enzymes of the endocannabinoids, significant progress has been made towards the understanding of the role of the endocannabinoid system in both physiological and pathological conditions. Endocannabinoids are mainly n-6 long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) derivatives that are synthesised by neuronal cells and inactivated via a two-step process that begins with their transport from the extracellular to the intracellular space and culminates in their intracellular degradation by hydrolysis or oxidation. Although the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids have been well characterised, the processes involved in their cellular uptake are still a subject of debate. Moreover, little is yet known about the roles of endocannabinoids derived from n-3 LCPUFA such as EPA and DHA. Here, I provide an overview of what is currently known about the mechanisms for the biosynthesis and inactivation of endocannabinoids, together with a brief analysis of the involvement of the endocannabinoids in both food intake and obesity. Owing to limited space, recent reviews will be often cited instead of original papers.

  2. Decontamination of radionuclides from skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tazrart, Anissa; Bérard, Philippe; Leiterer, Alexandra; Ménétrier, Florence

    2013-08-01

    The accident in Fukushima has emphasized the need to increase the capacity of health protection for exposed workers, first responders, and the general public in a major accident situation with release of radioactivity. Skin contamination is one of the most probable risks following major nuclear or radiological incidents, but this risk also exists and incidents can happen in industry, research laboratories, or in nuclear medicine departments. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the products currently used after skin contamination in order to highlight the needs and ways to improve the medical management of victims. From this review, it can be observed that the current use of these radiological decontamination products is essentially based on empiricism. In addition, some of these products are harsh and irritating, even toxic, possibly damaging the skin barrier. In some emergency situations in which clean water is in short supply, most of the current products cannot be used. Research on the mechanisms of action of decontaminating products is needed to develop a decontamination strategy.

  3. Theatre for Development: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nogueira, Marcia Pompeo

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the term Theatre for Development (TFD) by addressing the theatre practice developed by a group of women in Mundemba Sub-Division, Cameroon, which was presented in Anne Tanyi-Tang's article "Theatre for Change: An Analysis of Two Performances by Women in Mundemba Sub-Division" in an earlier issue of this journal. Considers…

  4. Chemistry without borders: An overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As chemistry becomes more globalized, it is important for an organization to be interconnected and adaptable, and for an individual to keep up with changes and latest scientific findings and keep options open. Many of the challenges and the opportunities of globalization are in the areas of jobs, re...

  5. Cyclic Cushing's syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mantero, Franco; Scaroni, Carla M; Albiger, Nora M E

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome (CS) involves rhythmic fluctuations in ACTH secretion resulting in a cyclic variation of adrenal steroid production. In the majority of cases, cyclic CS is caused by an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, but it can also be due to ectopic ACTH production or an adrenal adenoma. This condition should be strongly suspected in patients with symptoms or signs of hypercortisolism but normal cortisol levels and paradoxical responses to the dexamethasone test, that may reflect an increasing or decreasing endogenous hormone activity. Dynamic tests are best interpreted if they are performed during a sustained period of hypercortisolism. Sometimes, it is necessary to confirm the diagnosis over lengthy periods of observation. Responses to treatment must be closely monitored, interpreted and evaluated with caution because of the potential variations in steroidogenesis. An original case report of a cyclic Cushing's syndrome is presented in this review.

  6. MARKAL-MACRO: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Goldstein, G.A.; Lee, J.; Marcuse, W.; Morris, S.C. ); Manne, A.S. ); Wene, C.O. Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg )

    1992-11-12

    MARKAL-MACRO is an experiment in model linkage. This new tool is intended as an improvement over existing methods for energy policy assessment. It is designed specifically for estimating the costs and analyzing alternative technologies and policies proposed for reducing environmental risks such as global climate change or regional air pollution. The greenhouse gas debate illustrates the usefulness of linked energy-economy models. A central issue is the coupling between economic growth, the level of energy demands, and the evolution of an energy system to supply these demands. The debate is often connected with alternative modeling approaches. The competing philosophies may be labeled [open quotes]top-down macroeconomic[close quotes] and [open quotes]bottom-up engineering[close quotes] perspectives. Do macroeconomic models, with their descriptions of effects within the total economy but few technical details on the energy system, tend to overestimate future energy demands Conversely, do engineering models, ignoring feedbacks to the general economy and non-technical market factors but containing rich descriptions of technology options, tend to take too optimistic a view of conservation and the use of renewable energy sources Or is the principal difference that the engineering models ignore new sources of energy demands, and that the macroeconomic models ignore saturation effects for old categories of demands An efficient modeling tool must have the scope and detail to match the width and depth of the policy problem being analyzed. In order to respond to major environmental risks (e.g., the possibility of global climate changes), there must be long-range, fundamental changes in the energy system. For an analysis of these changes and an understanding of their nature, the modeling tool must be able to capture the complex network of relations within the energy system, as well as the opportunities of new or improved technologies.

  7. MARKAL-MACRO: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Goldstein, G.A.; Lee, J.; Marcuse, W.; Morris, S.C.; Manne, A.S.; Wene, C.O. |

    1992-11-12

    MARKAL-MACRO is an experiment in model linkage. This new tool is intended as an improvement over existing methods for energy policy assessment. It is designed specifically for estimating the costs and analyzing alternative technologies and policies proposed for reducing environmental risks such as global climate change or regional air pollution. The greenhouse gas debate illustrates the usefulness of linked energy-economy models. A central issue is the coupling between economic growth, the level of energy demands, and the evolution of an energy system to supply these demands. The debate is often connected with alternative modeling approaches. The competing philosophies may be labeled {open_quotes}top-down macroeconomic{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}bottom-up engineering{close_quotes} perspectives. Do macroeconomic models, with their descriptions of effects within the total economy but few technical details on the energy system, tend to overestimate future energy demands? Conversely, do engineering models, ignoring feedbacks to the general economy and non-technical market factors but containing rich descriptions of technology options, tend to take too optimistic a view of conservation and the use of renewable energy sources? Or is the principal difference that the engineering models ignore new sources of energy demands, and that the macroeconomic models ignore saturation effects for old categories of demands? An efficient modeling tool must have the scope and detail to match the width and depth of the policy problem being analyzed. In order to respond to major environmental risks (e.g., the possibility of global climate changes), there must be long-range, fundamental changes in the energy system. For an analysis of these changes and an understanding of their nature, the modeling tool must be able to capture the complex network of relations within the energy system, as well as the opportunities of new or improved technologies.

  8. An overview of vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S L; Alghwiri, A A; Alghadir, A

    2016-01-01

    Data related to the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation and its evolution as an intervention are provided. Concepts and various treatment strategies are described, with explanations of why people with uncompensated peripheral and central vestibular disorders might improve with rehabilitation. Various tests and measures are described that are commonly used to examine patients and determine their level of ability to participate in their environment. Factors that affect recovery, both positively and negatively, are described in order to better prognosticate recovery. A case utilizing many of the principles discussed is included to provide insight into how to utilize vestibular rehabilitation with a person with an uncompensated peripheral vestibular loss.

  9. An overview of frenal attachments

    PubMed Central

    Priyanka, M.; Sruthi, R.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Emmadi, Pamela; Ambalavanan, N.

    2013-01-01

    Frenal attachments are thin folds of mucous membrane with enclosed muscle fibers that attach the lips to the alveolar mucosa and underlying periosteum. Most often, during the oral examination of the patient the dentist gives very little importance to the frenum, for assessing its morpholology and attachment. However, it has been seen that an abnormal frenum can be an indicator of a syndrome. This paper highlights the different frenal attachments seen in association with various syndromic as well as non-syndromic conditions. PMID:23633765

  10. New Futures School: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaston, Caroline

    New Futures School (NFS), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is a comprehensive program for adolescent parents. NFS is an alternative school of the Albuquerque Public Schools and is supported by a non-profit, community-based organization, New Futures, Inc. There are two departments of the NFS in-school program: the Perinatal Program, serving the…

  11. VOLUMETRIC TANK TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the technical findings of an EPA study on volumetric tank testing. It describes the results of the EPA study, which evaluated the viability of volumetric tank tests as a means of detecting leaks in underground storage tanks. It explains the accuracy requi...

  12. VOLUMETRIC TANK TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the technical findings of an EPA study on volumetric tank testing. The results of this study, which evaluated the viability of volumetric tank tests as a means of detecting leaks in underground storage tanks, are described. Also, the accuracy requirements s...

  13. POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments act as sinks for contaminants, where they may build up to toxic levels. Sediments containing toxic levels of contaminants pose a risk to aquatic life, human health, and wildlife. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that demonstrates chemicals in sediments are re...

  14. Soviet Military Doctrine: An Overview,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    toay, an gai best be summ~~aie savctigteetbhmn fmltr foce vlh anfgh, uviean ’na uur vt Duigte eid1r417, h oiesrpd- ul tary 1htorists ever since the mid...from even a marginal military superiority over one’s opponent. In 1972, retired Soviet Army Colonel V. M. Kulish noted: • • . it. must bj borne in

  15. Job Satisfaction: An International Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    An international comparison of job satisfaction levels strongly suggests that the idea of job satisfaction as a gauge of well-being at the workplace should be rejected, but that workers' reactions to aspects of their jobs may be meaningful. The article presents data from national surveys of managers, workers, and trade unions to explain this…

  16. An overview of spin physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1991-07-01

    Spin physics is playing an increasingly important role in high energy experiments and theory. This review looks at selected topics in high energy spin physics that were discussed at the 9th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at Bonn in September 1990.

  17. Federal Advisory Committees: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-16

    initiating a tradition of presidential use of outside expertise when, in 1794 , he appointed an ad hoc group of commissioners to investigate the Whiskey ... Rebellion .7 Since 1842, Congress has legislated control over federal advisory bodies — mostly by limiting funding and committee member pay. In 1842...reports aggregated advisory body information to Congress annually.12 7 " Whiskey Insurrection in

  18. An Overview of Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    This booklet presents information regarding the history, incidence, and effects of Down Syndrome. The first chapter, presenting an historical perspective of the condition, provides information on counseling parents of Down Syndrome children, and the chromosome structures seen in Down Syndrome patients. The next chapter discusses medical aspects in…

  19. Workers' compensation law: an overview.

    PubMed

    Yorker, B

    1994-09-01

    1. The workers' compensation system provides benefits to workers who are injured or made ill in the course of employment or their dependents regardless of fault. 2. The current workers' compensation laws benefit both the employer and the employee; however, workers' compensation is an exclusive remedy which bars recovery through a negligence lawsuit. 3. Workers' compensation regulations interact with other federal statutes such as the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Family Medical Leave Act. 4. Workers' compensation covers occupational injuries and occupational diseases, which may include cumulative trauma and mental stress claims. Nurses may be instrumental in evaluating and planning for an injured employee's return to work and occasionally in detecting fraudulent claims.

  20. Canine histiocytic neoplasia: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Fulmer, Amanda K.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2007-01-01

    Canine histiocytic neoplasms include cutaneous histiocytoma, as well as localized and disseminated histiocytic sarcoma. These tumors have variable biologic behavior, although the malignant disorders often have a poor prognosis. Immunohistochemistry plays an essential role in differentiating histiocytic tumors from other neoplasias that may have similar histological appearances. This allows a definitive diagnosis to be established and provides a more accurate prediction of prognosis. This article reviews the biologic behavior, diagnosis, and treatment of histiocytic tumors in the dog. PMID:17987966

  1. Transplantation in Africa - an overview.

    PubMed

    Muller, Elmi

    Africa is underdeveloped in terms of treatment options for patients with end-stage renal failure. Economic growth and corresponding increases in health expenditures in the African region mean that we can confidently anticipate increased demand for organ transplantation within the region over the next few years. Renal failure in Africa occurs mainly due to glomerular nephropathies, hypertension, diabetes, and HIV. For the subset of the population that might be considered medically suitable for transplantation, demand for transplantation is tightly constrained by the availability of specialist physicians and surgeons, pathology facilities, capacity to achieve acceptable graft outcomes, cultural and religious attitudes towards organ donation, trust in the health system, and the extent to which patients are able to meet the costs of surgery and ongoing immunosuppression. There are currently several countries in Africa which are building up living-related-donor transplantation. Active living-donor transplantation already takes place in South Africa, Tunisia, and Sudan, but deceased donation is only available in South Africa. Whereas living-donor transplantation might be successfully driven by a motivated individual and a single institution, deceased-donor transplantation requires dialysis programs, tissue typing and crossmatching facilities, an organ procurement program, an on-call surgical team, capacity to fund this infrastructure, and an appropriate legislative framework. A significant and recurring barrier to transplantation in the African region is the high cost of transplantation and follow-up care, and, in particular, the cost of maintenance immunosuppression. A positive environment that could potentially change this scenario will have to include governmental funding, academic support to clinicians as well as a legislative framework, which is still needed in many African countries.

  2. LORAN-C, an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrall, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    LORAN-C a highly accurate radio navigation positioning system which operates at an assigned frequency of 10 kHz, and provides phase-coded pulses to develop hyperbolic time-difference lines-of-position (LOP's) was evaluated. LORAN-C provides precise time and time interval to within plus or minus 5 microseconds of UTC. The steps taken to plan, install, operate, and maintain the LORAN-C system up to the year 2000 are discussed. Topics included in the discussion were: theory of operation, timing, chain lanning, group repetition interval, coding delay versus emission delay, chain calibration, chart verification, system accuracy, signal reliability, and future developments.

  3. Intermediate tax sanctions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Peregrine, M W

    1997-07-01

    New federal tax law applies intermediate tax sanctions when tax-exempt organizations enter into so-called excess benefit transactions with corporate insiders. The sanctions take the form of a two-tiered penalty excise tax, which is assessed not on the tax-exempt organization itself but on the insider who receives the excess benefit and the organizational managers and board members who knowingly participate in an improper transaction. The intermediate tax sanctions, therefore, present tax-planning challenges for tax-exempt hospitals and integrated delivery systems as well as for 501(c)(4) HMOs. Forthcoming treasury regulations are expected to add clarity to the new law.

  4. Sexuality and aging. An overview.

    PubMed

    Comfort, A; Dial, L K

    1991-02-01

    To summarize our ramblings, we want to highlight the following points as you deal with the topic of sexuality and aging: 1. Sexuality, the mix of physical and relational behaviors that gives us both parenting and bonding, is lifelong, extending well beyond the reproductive years, and a normal factor in self-esteem and satisfaction. 2. Aged individuals need sexually and medically what people in general want and need, and the idea of an acceptable decline into a sexless state is insulting. 3. An immense amount of information is available to assist seniors in dealing with physical and emotional problems relating to sexuality, and much can be done by showing sensitivity and by breaking down the habits of concealing problems or attributing them to the demon of age. 4. In sexuality, as well as in all other areas, we need to recognize that older individuals will be present at society's table in increasing numbers and with increasing expectations, and it is up to society to make them welcome--now, because they include our parents, and in the future, because they will include ourselves.

  5. Decapod crustacean chelipeds: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, P; Balasundaram, C; Schmitz, B

    2000-09-01

    The structure, growth, differentiation and function of crustacean chelipeds are reviewed. In many decapod crustaceans growth of chelae is isometric with allometry level reaching unity till the puberty moult. Afterwards the same trend continues in females, while in males there is a marked spurt in the level of allometry accompanied by a sudden increase in the relative size of chelae. Subsequently they are differentiated morphologically into crusher and cutter making them heterochelous and sexually dimorphic. Of the two, the major chela is used during agonistic encounters while the minor is used for prey capture and grooming. Various biotic and abiotic factors exert a negative effect on cheliped growth. The dimorphic growth pattern of chelae can be adversely affected by factors such as parasitic infection and substrate conditions. Display patterns of chelipeds have an important role in agonistic and aggressive interactions. Of the five pairs of pereiopods, the chelae are versatile organs of offence and defence which also make them the most vulnerable for autotomy. Regeneration of the autotomized chelipeds imposes an additional energy demand called "regeneration load" on the incumbent, altering energy allocation for somatic and/or reproductive processes. Partial withdrawal of chelae leading to incomplete exuviation is reported for the first time in the laboratory and field in Macrobrachium species.

  6. Wildfire on Karst: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleborn, K.; Lupingna, A.; Flemons, I.; Nagra, G.; Treble, P. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Baker, A.; Tozer, M.; Fairchild, I. J.; Baker, A.; Meehan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires dramatically change the surface environment by removing vegetation and soil microbial communities and altering soil structure and geochemistry. Karst subsurface processes such as dissolution, cave formation and speleothem deposition are sensitive to environmental change, which is precisely why speleothems have been widely used as recorders of surface and climate change at an annual to millennial temporal scale. The effect of fire on karst processes is poorly understood. We hypothesise that a wildfire induced change at the surface will impact karst dissolution and precipitation processes. Firstly, sterilisation of the soil by heating causes a reduction in soil CO2 concentration which is a key component in dissolution processes. Secondly, removal of vegetation alters surface albedo and soil water storage properties. This could change the hydrology and isotopic signature of speleothem-forming drip water. We also hypothesise that a wildfire will produce a unique biogeochemical signature due to a change in the organic and inorganic properties of soil, which can be transported into speleothem forming drip water. Fire changes the organic matter character which is an important component in the mobilisation and transport of trace metals. Combustion of vegetation results in addition of ash derived minerals to the soil. Quantifying the biogeochemical signature from a burnt landscape will enable us to determine whether this wildfire signature is preserved in speleothems. This would provide the opportunity to use speleothems as recorders of fire history for the first time. Determining the impact of fire on karst processes would inform fire management and karst conservation policies.

  7. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  8. Neural stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parati, E A; Pozzi, S; Ottolina, A; Onofrj, M; Bez, A; Pagano, S F

    2004-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells are present in the majority of mammalian tissues where they are a renewable source of specialized cells. According to the several biological portions from which multipotent stem cells can be derived, they are characterized as a) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolated from the pluripotent inner-cell mass of the pre-implantation blastocyste-stage embryo; b) multipotent fetal stem cells (FSCs) from aborted fetuses; and c) adult stem cells (ASCs) localized in small zones of several organs known as "niche" where a subset of tissue cells and extracellular substrates can indefinitely house one or more stem cells and control their self-renewal and progeny production in vivo. ECSs have an high self-renewing capacity, plasticity and pluripotency over the years. Pluripotency is a property that makes a stem cell able to give rise to all cell type found in the embryo and adult animals.

  9. Federal budget process: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizzell, Virgil A., Jr.

    Much geophysical research funding originates from the federal government, and many who obtain federal funding consider the executive branch to be its source. In fact, the federal budget results from a complex ballet between the executive and legislative branches. Because it is both little understood and essential to our work, this report will review the fundamentals of the three-year budgetary process.The Constitution assigns the power of the purse to the Congress. Before the 1920s, executive branch agencies and departments submitted their own separate budgets to Congress, and deliberate planning and priority setting was minimal. In 1921 Congress empowered the president to submit an executive branch budget reflecting his priorities for the next fiscal year. Following this protocol, former President Reagan submitted his budget for Fiscal Year 1990 in January, and President Bush outlined his FY'90 priorities in February.

  10. Inhaled anesthetics: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Francis X; Bacon, Douglas R; Smith, Hugh M

    2005-09-01

    Inhalational agents have played a pivotal role in anesthesia history. The first publicly demonstrated anesthetic of the modern era, diethyl ether, was an inhalational anesthetic. The attributes of a good agent, ability to rapidly induce anesthesia, with limited side effects has led research efforts for over a hundred and fifty years. The explosion hazard was largely conquered with the development of the halogenated agents in the 1950s. Rapid emergence, with limited nausea and vomiting continue to drive discovery efforts, yet the 'modern' agents continue to improve upon those in the past. The future holds promise, but perhaps the most interesting contrast over time is the ability to rapidly introduce new agents into practice. From James Young Simpson's dinner table one evening to the operating suite the next day, modern agents take decades from first synthesis to clinical introduction.

  11. Trichosanthes dioica Roxb.: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Satyendra; Manvi; Gupta, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Trichosanthes, a genus of family Cucurbitaceae, is an annual or perennial herb distributed in tropical Asia and Australia. Pointed gourd (Trichosanthes dioica Roxb.) is known by a common name of parwal and is cultivated mainly as a vegetable. Juice of leaves of T. dioica is used as tonic, febrifuge, in edema, alopecia, and in subacute cases of enlargement of liver. In Charaka Samhita, leaves and fruits find mention for treating alcoholism and jaundice. A lot of pharmacological work has been scientifically carried out on various parts of T. dioica, but some other traditionally important therapeutical uses are also remaining to proof till now scientifically. According to Ayurveda, leaves of the plant are used as antipyretic, diuretic, cardiotonic, laxative, antiulcer, etc. The various chemical constituents present in T. dioica are vitamin A, vitamin C, tannins, saponins, alkaloids, mixture of noval peptides, proteins tetra and pentacyclic triterpenes, etc. PMID:22654406

  12. Ionic liquids--an overview.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Harry Donald Brooke

    2011-01-01

    A virtually unprecedented exponential burst of activity resulted following the publication, in 1998, of an article by Michael Freeman (Freemantle, M. Chemical & Engineering News, 1998, March 30, 32), which speculated on the role and contribution that ionic liquids (ILs) might make in the future on the development of clean technology. Up until that time only a handful of researchers were routinely engaged in the study of ILs but frenzied activity followed that continues until the present day. Scientists from all disciplines related to Chemistry have now embarked on studies, including theoreticians who are immersed in the aim of improving the "designer role" so that they can tailor ILs to deliver specified properties. This article, whilst not in any sense attempting to be exhaustive, highlights the main features which characterise ILs, presenting these in a form readily assimilated by newcomers to this area of research. An extensive glossary is featured in this article as well as a chronological list which charts the major areas of development. What follows consists of a number of sections briefly describing the role of lLs as solvents, hypergolic fuels, their use in some electrochemical devices such as solar cells and lithium batteries and their use in polymerisation reactions, followed by a concise summary of some of the other roles that they are capable of playing. The role of empirical, volume-based thermodynamics procedures, as well as large scale computational studies on ILs is also highlighted. These developments which are described are remarkable in that they have been achieved in less than a decade and a half although knowledge of these materials has existed for much longer.

  13. The SOHO Mission: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, V.; Fleck, B.; Poland, A. I.

    1995-12-01

    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) is a space mission that forms part of the Solar-Terrestrial Science Program (STSP), developed in a collaborative effort by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The STSP constitutes the first “cornerstone” of ESA's long-term programme known as “Space Science — Horizon 2000”. The principal scientific objectives of the SOHO mission are a) to reach a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of the solar interior using techniques of helioseismology, and b) to gain better insight into the physical processes that form and heat the Sun's corona, maintain it and give rise to its acceleration into the solar wind. To achieve these goals, SOHO carries a payload consisting of 12 sets of complementary instruments. SOHO is a three-axis stabilized spacecraft with a total mass of 1850 kg; 1150 W of power will be provided by the solar panels. The payload weighs about 640 kg and will consume 450 W in orbit. SOHO will be launched by an ATLAS II-AS and will be placed in a halo orbit around the Sun-Earth L1 Lagrangian point where it will be continuously pointing to Sun centre with an accuracy of 10 arcsec. Pointing stability will be better than 1 arcsec over 15 min intervals. The SOHO payload produces a continuous science data stream of 40 kbits/s which will be increased by 160 kbits/s whenever the solar oscillations imaging instrument is operated in its highrate mode. Telemetry will be received by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). Planning, coordination and operation of the spacecraft and the scientific payload will be conducted from the Experiment Operations Facility (EOF) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  14. Particle acceleration at collisionless shocks: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Li Gang; Webb, G.M.; Le Roux, J.A.; Florinski, V.; Ao, X.; Rice, W.K.M.

    2005-08-01

    An overview of shock acceleration is presented, focusing primarily on interplanetary shocks and the termination shock as examples. An extended discussion of recent advances in modeling real solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events is presented. When the energy of accelerated particles becomes very large, their back reaction on the flow can result in a shock that is significantly mediated, and as an example, we consider some results for the termination shock.

  15. Telemedicine and burns: an overview.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Dibo, S A; Janom, H H

    2014-06-30

    Access to specialized burn care is becoming more difficult and is being restricted by the decreasing number of specialized burn centers. It is also limited by distance and resources for many patients, particularly those living in poverty or in rural medically underserved communities. Telemedicine is a rapidly evolving technology related to the practice of medicine at a distance through rapid access to remote medical expertise by telecommunication and information technologies. Feasibility of telemedicine in burn care has been demonstrated by various centers. Its use facilitates the delivery of care to patients with burn injuries of all sizes. It allows delivery of acute care and can be appropriately used for a substantial portion of the long-term management of patients after a burn by guiding less-experienced surgeons to treat and follow-up patients more appropriately. Most importantly, it allows better effective triage which reduces unnecessary time and resource demanding referrals that might overwhelm system capacities. However, there are still numerous barriers to the implementation of telemedicine, including technical difficulties, legal uncertainties, limited financial support, reimbursement issues, and an inadequate evidence base of its value and efficiency.

  16. Food nanotechnology – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, Bhupinder S

    2010-01-01

    Food nanotechnology is an area of emerging interest and opens up a whole universe of new possibilities for the food industry. The basic categories of nanotechnology applications and functionalities currently in the development of food packaging include: the improvement of plastic materials barriers, the incorporation of active components that can deliver functional attributes beyond those of conventional active packaging, and the sensing and signaling of relevant information. Nano food packaging materials may extend food life, improve food safety, alert consumers that food is contaminated or spoiled, repair tears in packaging, and even release preservatives to extend the life of the food in the package. Nanotechnology applications in the food industry can be utilized to detect bacteria in packaging, or produce stronger flavors and color quality, and safety by increasing the barrier properties. Nanotechnology holds great promise to provide benefits not just within food products but also around food products. In fact, nanotechnology introduces new chances for innovation in the food industry at immense speed, but uncertainty and health concerns are also emerging. EU/WE/global legislation for the regulation of nanotechnology in food are meager. Moreover, current legislation appears unsuitable to nanotechnology specificity. PMID:24198465

  17. Anogenital Pruritus – An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anogenital pruritus is defined as intense itching, acute or chronic, affecting the anal, perianal, perineal and genital skin, which is a dominant problem in the course of various cutaneous and systemic conditions. It is one of the common, extremely annoying symptom for which patients attend the Dermatology Outpatient Department (OPD). Anogenital skin is highly sensitive to soaps, perfumes, clothing and superficial trauma and it is more prone for itchy dermatoses as a result of warmth, friction, lack of aeration, sweating and occlusive inner garments. Anogenital pruritus is associated with a wide spectrum of diseases which includes localized infections, infestations, inflammatory dermatoses, allergic and irritant conditions, anorectal diseases, systemic causes, nutritional disorders, psychological and when the cause cannot be found out it is often termed idiopathic. Patients are highly reluctant in consulting the physician for anogenital itch in the early stage, they usually present at a later stage with either atypical manifestations or depigmentation and lichenification, secondary to constant scratching. They often resort to over the counter topical agents, particularly combination products which contain topical steroids. The irrational use of such products results in complications like skin atrophy, striae, incognito etc. A proper clinical history, clinical examination, investigations like scrapping for fungus and itch mite, skin biopsy, patch test and relevant blood investigations to rule out systemic conditions should be carried out, when needed, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis, before treating the patient. PMID:27190932

  18. Epididymitis and orchitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Trojian, Thomas H; Lishnak, Timothy S; Heiman, Diana

    2009-04-01

    Epididymitis and orchitis are commonly seen in the outpatient setting. Men between 14 and 35 years of age are most often affected, and Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the most common pathogens in this age group. In other age groups, coliform bacteria are the primary pathogens. Men with epididymitis and orchitis typically present with a gradual onset of scrotal pain and symptoms of lower urinary tract infection, including fever. This presentation helps differentiate epididymitis and orchitis from testicular torsion, which is a surgical emergency. Typical physical findings include a swollen, tender epididymis or testis located in the normal anatomic position with an intact ipsilateral cremasteric reflex. Laboratory studies, including urethral Gram stain, urinalysis and culture, and polymerase chain reaction assay for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, help guide therapy. Initial outpatient therapy is empirical and targets the most common pathogens. When C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae are suspected, ceftriaxone and doxycycline are recommended. When coliform bacteria are suspected, ofloxacin or levofloxacin is recommended.

  19. Continuous Risk Management: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hammer, Theodore F.

    1999-01-01

    Software risk management is important because it helps avoid disasters, rework, and overkill, but more importantly because it stimulates win-win situations. The objectives of software risk management are to identify, address, and eliminate software risk items before they become threats to success or major sources of rework. In general, good project managers are also good managers of risk. It makes good business sense for all software development projects to incorporate risk management as part of project management. The Software Assurance Technology Center (SATC) at NASA GSFC has been tasked with the responsibility for developing and teaching a systems level course for risk management that provides information on how to implement risk management. The course was developed in conjunction with the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, then tailored to the NASA systems community. This is an introductory tutorial to continuous risk management based on this course. The rational for continuous risk management and how it is incorporated into project management are discussed. The risk management structure of six functions is discussed in sufficient depth for managers to understand what is involved in risk management and how it is implemented. These functions include: (1) Identify the risks in a specific format; (2) Analyze the risk probability, impact/severity, and timeframe; (3) Plan the approach; (4) Track the risk through data compilation and analysis; (5) Control and monitor the risk; (6) Communicate and document the process and decisions.

  20. Echolocation in humans: an overview.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Lore; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2016-11-01

    Bats and dolphins are known for their ability to use echolocation. They emit bursts of sounds and listen to the echoes that bounce back to detect the objects in their environment. What is not as well-known is that some blind people have learned to do the same thing, making mouth clicks, for example, and using the returning echoes from those clicks to sense obstacles and objects of interest in their surroundings. The current review explores some of the research that has examined human echolocation and the changes that have been observed in the brains of echolocation experts. We also discuss potential applications and assistive technology based on echolocation. Blind echolocation experts can sense small differences in the location of objects, differentiate between objects of various sizes and shapes, and even between objects made of different materials, just by listening to the reflected echoes from mouth clicks. It is clear that echolocation may enable some blind people to do things that are otherwise thought to be impossible without vision, potentially providing them with a high degree of independence in their daily lives and demonstrating that echolocation can serve as an effective mobility strategy in the blind. Neuroimaging has shown that the processing of echoes activates brain regions in blind echolocators that would normally support vision in the sighted brain, and that the patterns of these activations are modulated by the information carried by the echoes. This work is shedding new light on just how plastic the human brain is. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:382-393. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1408 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  2. An overview of FTU results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, P.; Alessi, E.; Amicucci, L.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Barbato, E.; Belli, F.; Bertocchi, A.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Briguglio, S.; Bruschi, A.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Cianfarani, C.; Cirant, S.; Crisanti, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Angelis, R.; Di Matteo, L.; Di Troia, C.; Esposito, B.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Fogaccia, G.; Frigione, D.; Fusco, V.; Gabellieri, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Grossetti, G.; Grosso, G.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Iannone, F.; Krivska, A.; Kroegler, H.; Lazzaro, E.; Lontano, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Marchetto, C.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Milovanov, A.; Minelli, D.; Mirizzi, F. C.; Moro, G. A.; Napoli, F.; Nowak, S.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pacella, D.; Panaccione, L.; Panella, M.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Podda, S.; Pizzuto, A.; Pucella, G.; Ramogida, G.; Ravera, G.; Romano, A.; Sozzi, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Viola, B.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.; Zonca, F.; Aquilini, M.; Cefali, P.; Di Ferdinando, E.; Di Giovenale, S.; Giacomi, G.; Gravanti, F.; Grosso, A.; Mellera, V.; Mezzacappa, M.; Pensa, A.; Petrolini, P.; Piergotti, V.; Raspante, B.; Rocchi, G.; Sibio, A.; Tilia, B.; Torelli, C.; Tulli, R.; Vellucci, M.; Zannetti, D.

    2013-10-01

    Since the 2010 IAEA-FEC Conference, FTU has exploited improvements in cleaning procedures and in the density control system to complete a systematic exploration of access to high-density conditions in a wide range of plasma currents and magnetic fields. The line-averaged densities at the disruptive limit increased more than linearly with the toroidal field, while no dependence on plasma current was found; in fact, the maximum density of 4.3 × 1020 m-3 was reached at B = 8 T even at the minimum current of 0.5 MA, corresponding to twice the Greenwald limit. The lack of plasma current dependence was due to the increase in density peaking with the safety factor. Experiments with the 140 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system were focused on the sawtooth (ST) period control and on the commissioning of a new launcher with real-time steering capability that will act as the front-end actuator of a real-time system for ST period control and tearing mode stabilization. Various ECRH and electron cyclotron current-drive modulation schemes were used; with the fastest one, the ST period synchronized with an 8 ms modulation period. The observed period variations were simulated using the JETTO code with a critical shear model for the crash trigger. The new launcher was of the plug-in type, allowing quick insertion and connection to the transmission line. Both beam characteristics and steering speed were in line with design expectation. Experimental results on the connection between improved coupling of lower hybrid waves in high-density plasmas and reduced wave spectral broadening were interpreted by fully kinetic, non-linear model calculations. A dual-frequency, time-of-flight diagnostic for the measurement of density profiles was developed and successfully tested. Fishbone-like instabilities driven by energetic electrons were simulated by the hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic XHMGC code.

  3. The transvaal sequence: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Schweitzer, J. K.; Bosch, P. J. A.; Schereiber, U. M.; Van Deventer, J. L.; Hatton, C. J.

    1993-02-01

    The 15 000 m of relatively unmetamorphosed clastic and chemical sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the 2550-2050 Ma Transvaal Sequence as preserved within the Transvaal and correlated Griqualand West basins of South Africa, and in the Kanye basin of Botswana are described. Immature clastic sedimentary and largely andesitic volcanic rocks of the Wolkberg, Godwan and Buffelsfontein Groups and the Bloempoort and Wachteenbeetje Formations probably represent rift-related sequences of Ventersdorp age. The thin sandstones of the Black Reef Formation, developed at the base of both the Kanye and Transvaal basin successions and correlated with the basal Vryburg siltstones of the Griqualand West Sequence, are considered here to be the basal unit of the Transvaal Sequence. The Black Reef fluvial deposits grade up into the epeiric marine carbonates of the Malmani Subgroup. These stromatolitic dolomites and interdbedded cherts were laid down within a steepened carbonate ramp setting; transgressions from an initial Griqualand West compartment towards the northeast covered both the Kanye and Transvaal basins. Iron formations of the succeeding Penge Formation and Griqualand West correlates are envisaged as relatively shallow water shelf deposits within the carbonate platform model; siliceous breccias of the Kanye basin are interpreted as reflecting subaerial brecciation of exposed silica gels. The Duitschland Formation overlying the Penge iron formations is seen as a final, regressive clastic and chemical sedimentary deposits as the Malmani-Penge sea retreated from the Transvaal basin. The interbedded sandstones and mudstones of the uncomformity-bounded Pretoria Group probably represent a combination of alluvial fan and fluviodeltaic complexes debouching into the largely lacustrine Transvaal and Kanye basins. A strong glacial influence in the lower Pretoria Group is reflected in the correlated Makganyene diamicities of the Griqualand West Sequence. Sedimentation across all three

  4. The ESCOMPTE program: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, B.; Durand, P.; Cachier, H.; Drobinski, Ph.; Fréjafon, E.; Kottmeier, C.; Perros, P. E.; Peuch, V.-H.; Ponche, J.-L.; Robin, D.; Saı̈d, F.; Toupance, G.; Wortham, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the "Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emissions" (ESCOMPTE) program is presented. The ESCOMPTE program is used to produce a relevant set of data for testing and evaluating regional pollution models. It includes high-resolution (in space and time) atmospheric emission inventories and field experiments, and covers an area of 120×120 km, centered over the Marseilles-Berre area in the southeast of France during Summer 2001. This region presents a high occurrence of photochemical pollution events, which result from numerous industrial and urban sources of primary pollutants. From the dynamical characteristics of the area, sea-breeze circulation and channeling effects due to terrain features highly influence the location of the pollutant plumes. ESCOMPTE will provide a highly documented framework for dynamics and chemistry studies. Campaign strategies and experimental set up are described. During the planning phase, existing modeling results helped defining the experimental design. The campaign involved surface measurement networks, remote sensing, ship-borne, balloon-borne, and airplane measurements. Mean standard meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes, ozone, ozone precursors, photochemically active trace gases, and aerosols were measured. Five intensive observation periods (IOPs) were documented using a wide spectrum of instruments, involving aircraft (7) (one of them equipped with a Doppler lidar, the others for in situ meteorological and chemical measurements), constant volume balloons (33), ozone lidars (5), wind profilers (15 sodars and radars), Doppler scanning lidar (1), radiosonde systems (at 4 locations), instrumented ships (2). In addition to the air quality networks from environmental agencies, 15 supplementary ground stations equipped for chemistry and/or meteorology and/or surface flux measurements, were operational. All instruments were calibrated and compared during a

  5. Habitability and Life - an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredehöft, J. H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The search for habitable planets has seen a significant boost, since much effort was invested into development of newer and more powerful techniques of detecting such planetary bodies. This search is fuelled by the interest that is sparked by its help in answering the bigger question of the origin of life on Earth and its abundance in the universe. Traditionally a planetary body has been deemed habitable when it provides conditions under which water is liquid. This led to the formulation of a habitable zone across stars, in which liquid water can exist. [1] Liquid water remains to this day the single most important feature in the search for life. There have been various suggestions of life being present in waterless environments like liquid hydrocarbons or even liquid ammonia, but how exactly a living system under such conditions might work, no one can satisfactorily explain. [2] A very important point in this context that is not often raised is that while water might be a favourable medium in which to live and certainly a major constituent of all living organism we know of, water alone is not alive and it will not spontaneously evolve into life. It would thus seem that apart from the presence of liquid water there a number of other, minor, necessary ingredients to life that determine whether a planet is habitable (meaning capable of sustaining life) or whether it is also capable of providing the starting grounds for the evolution of living systems. These other ingredients are determined by the minimum requirements of life itself. They include the molecular components of the most primitive encasing of an organism, the most primitive molecules needed for something like a metabolism and the most primitive way of storing information. [3] In addition to these molecular components, life must be able to utilise a source of energy to drive chemical reactions. Observations of various extremophiles on Earth utilising all kinds disequilibria suggest that these can

  6. The potential hazards of xenotransplantation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Magre, S; Patience, C

    2005-04-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular the transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human recipients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and microbial factors involved in xenotransplantation. The issues reviewed include the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology, and the rejection mechanism and attempts to overcome this immunological challenge. The authors discuss advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection through the creation of genetically modified pigs, more suited to the human micro-environment. Finally, in regard to microbial hazards, the authors review possible viral infections originating from pigs.

  7. An Overview of Epigenetics in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ashley E.; Adamian, Maria; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Science has evolved since the inception of the Human Genome Project to demonstrate that disease and health conditions evolve from a genetic/genomic element influenced by a multitude of factors (lifestyle, environment, etc.). Epigenetic changes to the genome are biochemical alterations to the DNA that do not change an individuals genome but do change and influence gene expression. As all nurses are trained in the biological sciences the profession is prepared to conduct and integrate epigenetic-focused nursing research into practice. The purpose of this paper is to (a) discuss current epigenetic nursing research; (b) provide an overview of how epigenetic research relates to nursing practice; (c) list recommendations; and (d) provide epigenetic online resources for nursing research. An overview of major epigenetic studies in nursing (specific to childbirth studies, preeclampsia, metabolic syndrome, immunotherapy cancer, and pain) will be provided as with recommendations on next steps. PMID:24295192

  8. An Observational Overview of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Battaglia, M.; Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, W.; Milligan, R. O.; Hudson, H. S.; Krucker, S.; Phillips, K.; Bone, L.; Veronig, A.; Caspi, A.; Temmer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview of solar flares and associated phenomena, drawing upon a wide range of observational data primarily from the RHESSI era. Following an introductory discussion and overview of the status of observational capabilities, the article is split into topical sections which deal with different areas of flare phenomena (footpoints and ribbons, coronal sources, relationship to coronal mass ejections) and their interconnections. We also discuss flare soft X-ray spectroscopy and the energetics of the process. The emphasis is to describe the observations from multiple points of view, while bearing in mind the models that link them to each other and to theory. The present theoretical and observational understanding of solar flares is far from complete, so we conclude with a brief discussion of models, and a list of missing but important observations.

  9. Total Quality Management (TQM), an Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    TYPE AND DATES COVERED ISeptember 1991 In-Hfouse 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM), AN OVERVIEW PE - 62702F PR...proposed a 14 step approach to quality : 1. Management commitment 2. Quality improvement team 3. Quality measurement (defect rates) 4. Cost of quality ...evaluation 5 . Quality awareness 6. Corrective action 7. Ad hoc committee for zero defects program 8. Supervisor training 9. Zero defects day 10. Goal

  10. Jobs and the environment: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodstein, Eban

    1996-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of economic research on the relationship between environmental protection and employment. The paper addresses, first, the impact of existing regulation on overall employment rates, shutdowns and layoffs, and regulation-induced capital flight from developed countries. Second, the paper provides a framework for evaluating claims that, over the longer run, environmental protection measures will boost overall employment and provide the foundation for a robust, sustainable economy.

  11. The Chemical Heat Pump Program. An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzina, A.

    1982-03-01

    A brief overview of the Chemical Heat Pump Program is presented. Program background, rationale, technology description, and research and development needs are addressed. Chemical heat pumps comprise reversible reactions which can be driven by low grade heat. Thermal energy is absorbed in one direction and librated in the reverse direction: thus, serving as a basis for system designs applicable to space conditioning or process heat management and offering the capability for high density energy storage as an integral part of the system.

  12. Lasers In Physical Evidence Examination: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    A recent application of fluorescence that is perhaps largely unknown outside law enforcement involves the utilization of laser excited fluorescence (LEF) in forensic science. In this overview, the focus is on LEF applicaton to development of latent fingerprints. Other areas of criminalistics, such as document examination and fiber analysis will be dealt with briefly only. To bring the technical reader, who likely has little familiarity with the fingerprint field, up to stream, a historical introduction precedes the description of current procedures for laser detection of latent fingerprints which is followed by a brief outline of current areas of research in the fingerprint area and application of lasers to other types of evidence examination. The overview concludes with an assessment of the current state and utilization growth prognosis of lasers in criminalistics.

  13. Forensic acoustics: An overview of the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissenburger, J. T.

    2003-10-01

    There is a potential role for the acoustical expert in litigation. The technical issues may involve aeroacoustics, underwater acoustics, physical effects of sound, environmental acoustics, noise, architectural acoustics, physiological acoustics, speech and hearing, music, psychoacoustics and/or bioacoustics. This brief paper offers an overview of the process of being an expert, the qualifications to be an expert and what is expected of an expert. The six general phases of an expert's involvement-retention, investigation, discovery, deposition, preparation, trial-are addressed. Some antidotal experiences are presented.

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

  15. Membrane Technologies in Wine Industry: An Overview.

    PubMed

    El Rayess, Youssef; Mietton-Peuchot, Martine

    2016-09-09

    Membrane processes are increasingly reported for various applications in wine industry such as microfiltration, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis, but also emerging processes as bipolar electrodialysis and membrane contactor. Membrane-based processes are playing a critical role in the field of separation/purification, clarification, stabilization, concentration, and de-alcoholization of wine products. They begin to be an integral part of the winemaking process. This review will provide an overview of recent developments, applications, and published literature in membrane technologies applied in wine industry.

  16. Results from the BEAST experiment: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, T.; Beast Team

    We present the recent results of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements obtained with the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST). BEAST is a 2.2 meter off-axis telescope, currently configured with an 8 element mixed Q (38-45 GHz) and Ka (25-35 GHz) focal plane and a modulating flat mirror. It was designed to operate both from high altitude balloons and from the ground. We present an overview of the recent BEAST results, including maps of CMB anisotropies, CMB power spectrum, and Galactic foreground contamination estimates.

  17. Hate crimes against gay males: an overview.

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G

    2004-03-01

    As the United States has become more multicultural and diverse, there has been an increase in violence motivated by hate. Hate crimes against gay males are the most prevalent of the hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Hate crimes have their roots in normative, individual, and societal attitudes and ideologies that lead to intimidation, bullying, teasing, physical assault, rape, and murder. This paper provides an overview of the issues specific to hate crime assaults against gay males. Mental health nurses may find this knowledge useful in developing further nursing inquiry, education, and clinical practice related to hate crime and violence prevention.

  18. Ocean thermal energy conversion: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-11-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential; either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. An overview of the OTEC technology is provided.

  19. Thyroid cancer cell lines: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Saiselet, Manuel; Floor, Sébastien; Tarabichi, Maxime; Dom, Geneviève; Hébrant, Aline; van Staveren, Wilma C. G.; Maenhaut, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Human thyroid cancer cell lines are the most used models for thyroid cancer studies. They must be used with detailed knowledge of their characteristics. These in vitro cell lines originate from differentiated and dedifferentiated in vivo human thyroid tumors. However, it has been shown that mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines were closer to dedifferentiated in vivo thyroid tumors (anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, ATC) than to differentiated ones. Here an overview of the knowledge of these models was made. The mutational status of six human thyroid cancer cell lines (WRO, FTC133, BCPAP, TPC1, K1, and 8505C) was in line with previously reported findings for 10 genes frequently mutated in thyroid cancer. However, the presence of a BRAF mutation (T1799A: V600E) in WRO questions the use of this cell line as a model for follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC). Next, to investigate the biological meaning of the modulated mRNAs in these cells, a pathway analysis on previously obtained mRNA profiles was performed on five cell lines. In five cell lines, the MHC class II pathway was down-regulated and in four of them, ribosome biosynthesis and translation pathways were up-regulated. mRNA expression profiles of the cell lines were also compared to those of the different types of thyroid cancers. Three datasets originating from different microarray platforms and derived from distinct laboratories were used. This meta-analysis showed a significant higher correlation between the profiles of the thyroid cancer cell lines and ATC, than to differentiated thyroid tumors (i.e., PTC or FTC) specifically for DNA replication. This already observed higher correlation was obtained here with an increased number of in vivo tumors and using different platforms. In summary, this would suggest that some papillary thyroid carcinoma or follicular thyroid carcinoma (PTC or FTC) cell lines (i.e., TPC-1) might have partially lost their original DNA synthesis/replication regulation mechanisms during

  20. Compostability of bioplastic packaging materials: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kale, Gaurav; Kijchavengkul, Thitisilp; Auras, Rafael; Rubino, Maria; Selke, Susan E; Singh, Sher Paul

    2007-03-08

    Packaging waste accounted for 78.81 million tons or 31.6% of the total municipal solid waste (MSW) in 2003 in the USA, 56.3 million tons or 25% of the MSW in 2005 in Europe, and 3.3 million tons or 10% of the MSW in 2004 in Australia. Currently, in the USA the dominant method of packaging waste disposal is landfill, followed by recycling, incineration, and composting. Since landfill occupies valuable space and results in the generation of greenhouse gases and contaminants, recovery methods such as reuse, recycling and/or composting are encouraged as a way of reducing packaging waste disposal. Most of the common materials used in packaging (i.e., steel, aluminum, glass, paper, paperboard, plastics, and wood) can be efficiently recovered by recycling; however, if packaging materials are soiled with foods or other biological substances, physical recycling of these materials may be impractical. Therefore, composting some of these packaging materials is a promising way to reduce MSW. As biopolymers are developed and increasingly used in applications such as food, pharmaceutical, and consumer goods packaging, composting could become one of the prevailing methods for disposal of packaging waste provided that industry, governments, and consumers encourage and embrace this alternative. The main objective of this article is to provide an overview of the current situation of packaging compostability, to describe the main mechanisms that make a biopolymer compostable, to delineate the main methods to compost these biomaterials, and to explain the main standards for assessing compostability, and the current status of biopolymer labeling. Biopolymers such as polylactide and poly(hydroxybutyrate) are increasingly becoming available for use in food, medical, and consumer goods packaging applications. The main claims of these new biomaterials are that they are obtained from renewable resources and that they can be biodegraded in biological environments such as soil and compost

  1. Kynurenine pathway and disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Königsberg, Mina; Santamaría, Abel

    2007-12-01

    Kynurenine pathway is gaining more and more attention every day in biomedical research since this catabolic route for tryptophan decomposition is not only implicated in different neurological disorders, but also possesses neuroactive metabolites with different biological properties, such as pro-oxidant and antioxidant regulators. Thus, the intensive research on this metabolic pathway is helping us to understand those mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative events during the occurrence of pathological process in the central nervous system (CNS), thereby allowing the design of potential therapies for those disorders involving excitotoxic, oxidative and inflammatory components. Here we intend to provide a brief overview on the relevance of this route for several CNS disorders, and discuss recent information on the different biological properties of the neuroactive metabolites of this pathway and their significance for further research.

  2. Superconducting Radio Frequency Technology: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting RF cavities are becoming more often the choice for larger scale particle accelerator projects such as linear colliders, energy recovery linacs, free electron lasers or storage rings. Among the many advantages compared to normal conducting copper structures, the superconducting devices dissipate less rf power, permit higher accelerating gradients in CW operation and provide better quality particle beams. In most cases these accelerating cavities are fabricated from high purity bulk niobium, which has superior superconducting properties such as critical temperature and critical magnetic field when compared to other superconducting materials. Research during the last decade has shown, that the metallurgical properties--purity, grain structure, mechanical properties and oxidation behavior--have significant influence on the performance of these accelerating devices. This contribution attempts to give a short overview of the superconducting RF technology with emphasis on the importance of the material properties of the high purity niobium.

  3. Honey and wound healing: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lee, David S; Sinno, Sammy; Khachemoune, Amor

    2011-06-01

    Honey has been used to treat wounds throughout the ages. This practice was rooted primarily in tradition and folklore until the late 19th century, when investigators began to characterize its biologic and clinical effects. This overview explores both historic and current insights into honey in its role in wound care. We describe the proposed antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and physiologic mechanisms of action, and review the clinical evidence of the efficacy of honey in a variety of acute and chronic wound types. We also address additional considerations of safety, quality, and the cost effectiveness of medical-grade honeys. In summary, there is biologic evidence to support the use of honey in modern wound care, and the clinical evidence to date also suggests a benefit. However, further large, well designed, clinical trials are needed to confirm its therapeutic effects.

  4. Computer-assisted cartography: an overview.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, S.C.; Starr, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment of the current status of computer-assisted cartography, in part, is biased by one's view of the cartographic process as a whole. From a traditional viewpoint we are concerned about automating the mapping process; from a progressive viewpoint we are concerned about using the tools of computer science to convey spatial information. On the surface these viewpoints appear to be in opposition. However, it is postulated that in the final analysis, they face the same goal. This overview uses the perspectives from two viewpoints to depict the current state of computer-assisted cartography and speculate on future goals, trends, and challenges.-Authors

  5. Retail video analytics: an overview and survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Jonathan; Fan, Quanfu; Gabbur, Prasad; Haas, Norman; Pankanti, Sharath; Trinh, Hoang

    2013-03-01

    Today retail video analytics has gone beyond the traditional domain of security and loss prevention by providing retailers insightful business intelligence such as store traffic statistics and queue data. Such information allows for enhanced customer experience, optimized store performance, reduced operational costs, and ultimately higher profitability. This paper gives an overview of various camera-based applications in retail as well as the state-ofthe- art computer vision techniques behind them. It also presents some of the promising technical directions for exploration in retail video analytics.

  6. Landsat 7 Science Data Processing: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiss, Robert J.; Daniel, Nathaniel E.; Derrick, Deborah K.

    2000-01-01

    The Landsat 7 Science Data Processing System, developed by NASA for the Landsat 7 Project, provides the science data handling infrastructure used at the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center (EDC) Landsat Data Handling Facility (DHF) of the United States Department of Interior, United States Geological Survey (USGS) located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This paper presents an overview of the Landsat 7 Science Data Processing System and details of the design, architecture, concept of operation, and management aspects of systems used in the processing of the Landsat 7 Science Data.

  7. Contemporary health care economics: an overview.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Ong, Michael K; Tabbush, Victor; Hagigi, Farhad; Martin, Neil A

    2014-11-01

    Economic evaluations provide a decision-making framework in which outcomes (benefits) and costs are assessed for various alternative options. Although the interest in complete and partial economic evaluations has increased over the past 2 decades, the quality of studies has been marginal due to methodological challenges or incomplete cost determination. This paper provides an overview of the main types of complete and partial economic evaluations, reviews key methodological elements to be considered for any economic evaluation, and reviews concepts of cost determination. The goal is to provide the clinician neurosurgeon with the knowledge and tools needed to appraise published economic evaluations and to direct high-quality health economic evaluations.

  8. Survey of independent inventors: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Whalley, P.

    1992-12-01

    Independent inventors are important but little-researched members of the US technical community. The survey reported on here is the first in modern times to attempt to provide a profile of the US independent inventor that goes beyond a single geographical or organizational locale. The report that follows provides an overview of the demographics, practices and concerns of the modern US inventor as represented by the members of leading US inventor organizations. It is by no means comprehensive but seeks to be indicative of the issues raised in the survey each which will be dealt with more comprehensively in future publications.

  9. THEORY IN RELIGION AND AGING: AN OVERVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Jeff; Chatters, Linda M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of theory in religion, aging, and health. It offers both a primer on theory and a roadmap for researchers. Four “tenses” of theory are described—distinct ways that theory comes into play in this field: grand theory, mid-range theory, use of theoretical models, and positing of constructs which mediate or moderate putative religious effects. Examples are given of both explicit and implicit uses of theory. Sources of theory for this field are then identified, emphasizing perspectives of sociologists and psychologists, and discussion is given to limitations of theory. Finally, reflections are offered as to why theory matters. PMID:20087662

  10. Likelihood Ratio Gradient Estimation: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    LIKEIHOD RTIO RADENTTechnical Report LIKEIHOD RAIO RADINT6. PERMN~Gw ORG. REPORT NUMBER ESTIMATION: AN OVERVIEW 7. AuTmOR(e) 6. CONTRACT Olt GRANT...distribution F. and ser- vice distribution F. are unknown. Suppose that one is given The situation described above in the single-server queueing data X , X ... X .. fr th, inter-arriva’ t:rns .4i . observations context is typical of many sLaListcal problems that arise in the Y ,...,Y_ for the service

  11. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  12. Neural-type robotics-an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Chande, A.; De Claris, N.; Newcomb, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Neural-type robotics is the field of robotics where intelligence and control functions are carried out by neural-type signal processors, the latter being electronic microsystems that emulate biological neural systems. Areas of application include intelligent industrial and medical robots for varying environments and prosthetic robotic devices, such as artificial organs, for the handicapped. This paper gives an overview of the field including the structure of generic neural-type systems, a review of the rather limited past accomplishments, a survey of the present undertakings, many of which are just under initiation, and a look at the very promising future with its vast implications. 14 references.

  13. An overview of the Keck Interferometer Nuller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, Eugen

    2003-10-01

    The first high dynamic range interferometry mode planned to come on line at the Keck Observatory is mid-infrared nulling interferometry. In this paper, an overview is given of the goals and experimental configuration of the Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN). After an introduction to the science enabled by mid-infrared nulling interferometry on the Keck Interferometer's baseline, a system level overview of the experiment is provided, which includes a discussion of the optical path-length matching and stabilization approaches. This is followed by brief tours of both the nulling beam-combiner breadboard and the mid-infrared camera to be used in the experiment. The paper concludes with a discussion of the performance levels attained to date with the mid-infrared nullers built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These symmetric nullers, all based on the modified Mach-Zehnder beamcombiner configuration, have now experimentally verified the predicted dual-polarization nulling capability of a reversed beamsplitter pair arrangement. To date, the JPL nulling beamcombiners have nulled broadband thermal mid-infrared radiation to the 10-4 level, and monochromatic (10.6 μm CO2 laser) radiation to the 10-6 level.

  14. Assessment formats in dental medicine: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard-Szep, Susanne; Güntsch, Arndt; Pospiech, Peter; Söhnel, Andreas; Scheutzel, Petra; Wassmann, Torsten; Zahn, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    Aim: At the annual meeting of German dentists in Frankfurt am Main in 2013, the Working Group for the Advancement of Dental Education (AKWLZ) initiated an interdisciplinary working group to address assessments in dental education. This paper presents an overview of the current work being done by this working group, some of whose members are also actively involved in the German Association for Medical Education's (GMA) working group for dental education. The aim is to present a summary of the current state of research on this topic for all those who participate in the design, administration and evaluation of university-specific assessments in dentistry. Method: Based on systematic literature research, the testing scenarios listed in the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives (NKLZ) have been compiled and presented in tables according to assessment value. Results: Different assessment scenarios are described briefly in table form addressing validity (V), reliability (R), acceptance (A), cost (C), feasibility (F), and the influence on teaching and learning (EI) as presented in the current literature. Infoboxes were deliberately chosen to allow readers quick access to the information and to facilitate comparisons between the various assessment formats. Following each description is a list summarizing the uses in dental and medical education. Conclusion: This overview provides a summary of competency-based testing formats. It is meant to have a formative effect on dental and medical schools and provide support for developing workplace-based strategies in dental education for learning, teaching and testing in the future. PMID:27579365

  15. Planck AN Overview of the Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passvogel, T.; Crone, G.; Piersanti, O.; Guillaume, B.; Tauber, J.; Reix, J.-M.; Banos, T.; Rideau, P.; Collaudin, B.

    2010-04-01

    The two science missions Herschel, an observatory-type mission, and Planck, a survey mission, are combined in one program within ESA's long-term science program. This paper deals with Planck. The objective for Planck is to image systematically the whole sky simultaneously with two scientific instruments in nine frequency channels between 30 and 900 GHz to unravel the temperature fluctuations, i.e. the anisotropy, of the cosmic background radiation. Both satellites, have been launched together from the European Space Port in Kourou, French Guiana, on a single Ariane 5 launcher, the orbits will be Lissajous orbits around the 2nd Lagrange Point, ``so called'' L2 of the Earth-Sun system. This paper gives an overview of the Planck spacecraft including the scientific instruments and the on ground testing.

  16. The Atacama Compact Array: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, S.; Wilson, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    When completed, ALMA will comprise a 12-meter diameter antennas array (12-m Array) of a minimum of fifty antennas, and the ACA (Atacama Compact Array), composed of four 12-meter diameter antennas and twelve 7-meter diameter antennas. Out of the fifty antennas of the 12-m Array, one-half are provided by the North American partners of ALMA, the other half by the European partners. The sixteen antennas that will comprise the ACA are provided by the East Asian Partners of ALMA. In the last issue of the ALMA Science Newsletter, we outlined the testing of the prototype ALMA 12-meter diameter antennas and the procurement process for these antennas. In that article, only a short account was given of the antennas for the Atacama Compact Array (ACA). In the following we give an overview of the ACA, starting with an introduction to imaging using interferometers.

  17. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  18. Group-based trajectory modeling: an overview.

    PubMed

    Nagin, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of a group-based statistical methodology for analyzing developmental trajectories - the evolution of an outcome over age or time. Across all application domains, this group-based statistical method lends itself to the presentation of findings in the form of easily understood graphical and tabular data summaries. In so doing, the method provides statistical researchers with a tool for figuratively painting a statistical portrait of the predictors and consequences of distinct trajectories of development. Data summaries of this form have the great advantage of being accessible to nontechnical audiences and quickly comprehensible to audiences that are technically sophisticated. Examples of the application of the method are provided. A detailed account of the statistical underpinnings of the method and a full range of applications are provided by the author in a previous study.

  19. Air pollution and horticulture: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, D.C.

    1983-10-01

    An overview is presented of some of the general effects of pollutants on plants, as well as an approach for assessing these effects. The nature of effects can range from no effects at low doses to a reduced growth or yield at higher atmospheric concentrations. In addition to the dose of the pollutant, the degree of response is governed by a number of internal and external factors. Relative number and size of stomata have marked effect on pollutant uptake by the plant; therefore, environmental conditions exert a strong influence on pollutant-induced responses. Future research should focus on determining if the pollutant doses that now occur in areas of horticultural production cause effects and, if so, whether the effects constitute injury.

  20. Ebstein Anomaly: An Overview for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstad, Christine M; Hecker-Fernandes, Jill Renee; Fernandes, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Many nurses have probably never encountered this anomaly, with very few able to accurately depict the pathological anatomy of the condition. As technology further develops, providers are better equipped to recognize and manage Ebstein anomaly. There are important considerations for nurses when caring for an individual with Ebstein anomaly. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the condition exploring the pathophysiology, how patients typically present, and how to effectively care for a patient with Ebstein anomaly regarding medical and surgical courses of treatment. It is important for nurses to have a resource to reference on Ebstein anomaly, and the majority of current literature is solely based for medical providers. Furthermore, Ebstein patients may be seen on a variety of units in the hospital beyond cardiology (i.e., pregnant patient with a diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly).

  1. Conotoxins Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lebbe, Eline K. M.; Peigneur, Steve; Wijesekara, Isuru; Tytgat, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Marine snails of the genus Conus are a large family of predatory gastropods with an unparalleled molecular diversity of pharmacologically active compounds in their venom. Cone snail venom comprises of a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins which act on a wide variety of ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium- (NaV), potassium- (KV), and calcium- (CaV) channels as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which are classified as ligand-gated ion channels. The mode of action of several conotoxins has been the subject of investigation, while for many others this remains unknown. This review aims to give an overview of the knowledge we have today on the molecular pharmacology of conotoxins specifically interacting with nAChRs along with the structure–function relationship data. PMID:24857959

  2. An overview of the neuron ring model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taber, Rod

    1991-01-01

    The Neuron Ring model employs an avalanche structure with two important distinctions at the neuron level. Each neuron has two memory latches; one traps maximum neuronal activation during pattern presentation, and the other records the time of latch content change. The latches filter short term memory. In the process, they preserve length 1 snapshots of activation theory history. The model finds utility in pattern classification. Its synaptic weights are first conditioned with sample spectra. The model then receives a test or unknown signal. The objective is to identify the sample closest to the test signal. Class decision follows complete presentation of the test data. The decision maker relies exclusively on the latch contents. Presented here is an overview of the Neuron Ring at the seminar level.

  3. Automatic target recognition in acoustics: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, John R.

    2002-11-01

    Automatic target recognition (ATR) constitutes one of the major uses for acoustical signal processing. ATR is employed in manned systems for operator workload reduction and performance improvement, as well as in autonomous applications. An overview of some of the major components involved in the architecture of such systems is provided. Feature extraction is the most critical step of ATR and is necessarily application specific. Generic feature selection and ranking methods are presented, including heuristic search and information-theoretic measures. Basic pattern recognition definitions and techniques are reviewed. Commonly used classification paradigms include classical statistical formulations, both parametric and nonparametric, and neural nets; support vector machines and nonmetric methods such as decision forests are some alternative techniques that have received recent attention. A few practical issues often encountered when constructing recognition systems, including training data requirements, ground truth labeling, and performance evaluation methodologies and metrics, are also addressed.

  4. Workforce competencies in behavioral health: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Paris, Manuel; Adger, Hoover; Collins, Frank L; Finn, Cherry V; Fricks, Larry; Gill, Kenneth J; Haber, Judith; Hansen, Marsali; Ida, D J; Kaplan, Linda; Northey, William F; O'Connell, Maria J; Rosen, Anita L; Taintor, Zebulon; Tondora, Janis; Young, Alexander S

    2005-01-01

    Competency-based training approaches are being used more in healthcare to guide curriculum content and ensure accountability and outcomes in the educational process. This article provides an overview of the state of competency development in the field of behavioral health. Specifically, it identifies the groups and organizations that have conducted and supported this work, summarizes their progress in defining and assessing competencies, and discusses both the obstacles and future directions for such initiatives. A major purpose of this article is to provide a compendium of current competency efforts so that these might inform and enhance ongoing competency development in the varied behavioral health disciplines and specialties. These varied resources may also be useful in identifying the core competencies that are common to the multiple disciplines and specialties.

  5. Voyager Observations in the Heliosheath: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 are in the northern and southern latitudes and 119 and 97 AU from the sun, deep within the heliosheath where the interaction between the interstellar and solar winds is evolving rapidly with increasing distance. The Voyagers observe the direction and speed of the solar wind plasma as it approaches the heliopause, the evolution of the magnetic field intensity and the latitudinal extension of the heliospheric current sheet, and the changing intensities of termination shock particles, anomalous cosmic rays, and cosmic rays. Observations indicate that Voyager 1 entered a new region in the heliosheath at 113 AU with essentially no outward plasma flow and small, declining non-radial flows. This doldrums-like pattern suggests that Voyager 1 is nearing the heliopause. An overview of recent observations, interpretations, and estimates of the distance to the heliopause will be discussed.

  6. The Solar-A mission - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawara, Y.; Takano, T.; Kato, T.; Kosugi, T.; Tsuneta, S.; Watanabe, T.; Kondo, I.; Uchida, Y.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Solar-A spacecraft, launched in August 1991, is presented. This mission is dedicated primarily to the study of solar flares, especially of high-energy phenomena observed in the X- and gamma-ray ranges. With a coordinated set of instruments, including hard X-ray and soft X-ray imaging telescopes as well as spectrometers with advanced capabilities, it is expected to reveal many new aspects of flares and help better understand their physics, supporting international collaboration with ground-based observatories as well as theoretical investigations. The scientific instruments of Solar-A, especially the soft X-ray telescope, require sophisticated control of flight operations to exploit their capabilities with the constraints of the telemetry data rate and the capacity of the data recorder; this is achieved by the 'data processor' unit. Objectives include flare-related phenomena, dynamical phenomena not necessarily related to flares, and global coronal structure.

  7. Molecular genetics of dyslexia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Castillo, Amaia; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E

    2013-11-01

    Dyslexia is a highly heritable learning disorder with a complex underlying genetic architecture. Over the past decade, researchers have pinpointed a number of candidate genes that may contribute to dyslexia susceptibility. Here, we provide an overview of the state of the art, describing how studies have moved from mapping potential risk loci, through identification of associated gene variants, to characterization of gene function in cellular and animal model systems. Work thus far has highlighted some intriguing mechanistic pathways, such as neuronal migration, axon guidance, and ciliary biology, but it is clear that we still have much to learn about the molecular networks that are involved. We end the review by highlighting the past, present, and future contributions of the Dutch Dyslexia Programme to studies of genetic factors. In particular, we emphasize the importance of relating genetic information to intermediate neurobiological measures, as well as the value of incorporating longitudinal and developmental data into molecular designs.

  8. Complementary therapies for depression: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Rand, J I; Stevinson, C

    1998-11-01

    Depression is one of the most common reasons for using complementary and alternative therapies. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the evidence available on the treatment of depression with complementary therapies. Systematic literature searches were performed using several databases, reference list searching, and inquiry to colleagues. Data extraction followed a predefined protocol. The amount of rigorous scientific data to support the efficacy of complementary therapies in the treatment of depression is extremely limited. The areas with the most evidence for beneficial effects are exercise, herbal therapy (Hypericum perforatum), and, to a lesser extent, acupuncture and relaxation therapies. There is a need for further research involving randomized controlled trials into the efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies in the treatment of depression.

  9. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  10. An overview of fast multipole methods

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.; Baty, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    A number of physics problems may be cast in terms of Hilbert-Schmidt integral equations. In many cases, the integrals tend to be zero over a large portion of the domain of interest. All of the information is contained in compact regions of the domain which renders their use very attractive from the standpoint of efficient numerical computation. Discrete representation of these integrals leads to a system of N elements which have pair-wise interactions with one another. A direct solution technique requires computational effort which is O(N{sup 2}). Fast multipole methods (FMM) have been widely used in recent years to obtain solutions to these problems requiring a computational effort of only O(Nln N) or O(N). In this paper we present an overview of several variations of the fast multipole method along with examples of its use in solving a variety of physical problems.

  11. Marine Polysaccharides in Pharmaceutical Applications: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Laurienzo, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The enormous variety of polysaccharides that can be extracted from marine plants and animal organisms or produced by marine bacteria means that the field of marine polysaccharides is constantly evolving. Recent advances in biological techniques allow high levels of polysaccharides of interest to be produced in vitro. Biotechnology is a powerful tool to obtain polysaccharides from a variety of micro-organisms, by controlling the growth conditions in a bioreactor while tailoring the production of biologically active compounds. Following an overview of the current knowledge on marine polysaccharides, with special attention to potential pharmaceutical applications and to more recent progress on the discovering of new polysaccharides with biological appealing characteristics, this review will focus on possible strategies for chemical or physical modification aimed to tailor the final properties of interest. PMID:20948899

  12. Diagnostic instruments for behavioural addiction: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Ulrike; Kirschner, Nina Ellen; Grüsser, Sabine M.

    2007-01-01

    In non-substance-related addiction, the so-called behavioural addiction, no external psychotropic substances are consumed. The psychotropic effect consists of the body’s own biochemical processes induced only by excessive activities. Until recently, knowledge was limited with respect to clinically relevant excessive reward-seeking behaviour, such as pathological gambling, excessive shopping and working which meet diagnostic criteria of dependent behaviour. To date, there is no consistent concept for diagnosis and treatment of excessive reward-seeking behaviour, and its classification is uncertain. Therefore, a clear conceptualization of the so-called behavioural addictions is of great importance. The use of adequate diagnostic instruments is necessary for successful therapeutical implications. This article provides an overview of the current popular diagnostic instruments assessing the different forms of behavioural addiction. Especially in certain areas there are only few valid and reliable instruments available to assess excessive rewarding behaviours that fulfill the criteria of addiction. PMID:19742294

  13. An overview of Japanese occupational health.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, M R; Frumkin, H

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Japanese occupational health and evaluates the current situation from three perspectives. Major occupational health hazards are assessed using four sources of data, showing patterns similar to those found in other advanced industrial societies. Institutional structures for occupational health policy are then examined, illustrating strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese legal and administrative systems. Trade union activities are presented, indicating the constraints of enterprise unions, and the tendency for a greater orientation toward compensation than prevention. Significant occupational health problems persist among marginal workers in Japan, including women and various minority groups. The analysis demonstrates a record for occupational health in Japan considerably more mixed than the conventional view. PMID:2968056

  14. Mobile multimedia understanding applications: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, mobile devices are quickly reaching almost every corner of our daily life in a variety of forms: personal media players, smart phones, netbooks, and tablets. Besides the more powerful, smaller, and more versatile hardware, another driving force is the vast number of software applications ("apps") on those mobile devices. A number of mobile apps employ intelligent multimedia understanding (MU) technologies. This paper gives an overview of such apps. The focus is not on the underlying MU techniques, which are already covered by a huge amount of literature. Instead, it attempts to shed some light on the junction of mobile apps and MU. For this purpose, it addresses a number of important aspects: unique requirements and characteristics of MU-related apps, values brought in by MU, typical MU technologies, various system architectures, available development tools, and related standards.

  15. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  16. Physiological changes induced by chromium stress in plants: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Shamsul; Khalique, Gulshan; Irfan, Mohammad; Wani, Arif Shafi; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the mechanism of chromium (Cr) stress in plants. Toxic effects of Cr on plant growth and development depend primarily on its valence state. Cr(VI) is highly toxic and mobile whereas Cr(III) is less toxic. Cr-induced oxidative stress involves induction of lipid peroxidation in plants that cause severe damage to cell membranes which includes degradation of photosynthetic pigments causing deterioration in growth. The potential of plants with the adequacy to accumulate or to stabilize Cr compounds for bioremediation of Cr contamination has gained engrossment in recent years.

  17. Photosystem II and photosynthetic oxidation of water: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Goussias, Charilaos; Boussac, Alain; Rutherford, A William

    2002-01-01

    Conceptually, photosystem II, the oxygen-evolving enzyme, can be divided into two parts: the photochemical part and the catalytic part. The photochemical part contains the ultra-fast and ultra-efficient light-induced charge separation and stabilization steps that occur when light is absorbed by chlorophyll. The catalytic part, where water is oxidized, involves a cluster of Mn ions close to a redox-active tyrosine residue. Our current understanding of the catalytic mechanism is mainly based on spectroscopic studies. Here, we present an overview of the current state of knowledge of photosystem II, attempting to delineate the open questions and the directions of current research. PMID:12437876

  18. An Overview of Spray-On Foam Insulation Applications on the Space Shuttle's External Tank: Foam Applications and Foam Shedding Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Rogers, Patrick R.; Sparks, Scotty S.

    2006-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) concluded that the cause of the tragic loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia and its crew was a breach in the thermal protection system on the leading edge of the left wing. The breach was initiated by a piece of insulating foam that separated from the left bipod ramp of the External Tank and struck the wing in the vicinity of the lower half of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon panel No. 8 at 81.9 seconds after launch. The CAIB conclusion has spawned numerous studies to identify the cause of and factors influencing foam shedding and foam debris liberation from the External Tank during ascent. The symposium on the Thermo-mechanics and Fracture of Space Shuttle External Tank Spray-On Foam Insulation is a collection of presentations that discuss the physics and mechanics of the ET SOFI with the objective of improving analytical and numerical methods for predicting foam thermo-mechanical and fracture behavior. This keynote presentation sets the stage for the presentations contained in this symposium by introducing the audience to the various types of SOFI applications on the Shuttle s External Tank and by discussing the various mechanisms that are believed to be the cause of foam shedding during the Shuttle s ascent to space

  19. Plasmonic Solar Cells: From Rational Design to Mechanism Overview.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon Hee; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Seokhyoung; Quan, Li Na; Chung, Kyungwha; Kim, Dong Ha

    2016-12-28

    Plasmonic effects have been proposed as a solution to overcome the limited light absorption in thin-film photovoltaic devices, and various types of plasmonic solar cells have been developed. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art progress on the design and fabrication of plasmonic solar cells and their enhancement mechanism. The working principle is first addressed in terms of the combined effects of plasmon decay, scattering, near-field enhancement, and plasmonic energy transfer, including direct hot electron transfer and resonant energy transfer. Then, we summarize recent developments for various types of plasmonic solar cells based on silicon, dye-sensitized, organic photovoltaic, and other types of solar cells, including quantum dot and perovskite variants. We also address several issues regarding the limitations of plasmonic nanostructures, including their electrical, chemical, and physical stability, charge recombination, narrowband absorption, and high cost. Next, we propose a few potentially useful approaches that can improve the performance of plasmonic cells, such as the inclusion of graphene plasmonics, plasmon-upconversion coupling, and coupling between fluorescence resonance energy transfer and plasmon resonance energy transfer. This review is concluded with remarks on future prospects for plasmonic solar cell use.

  20. An overview of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy.

    PubMed

    Madonna, M B; Arensman, R M

    1997-01-01

    A brief overview of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and its use in infants and children is presented. The history, selection, operative procedure, daily management and complications are discussed. The international results are shown.

  1. Commonalities in biological pathways, genetics, and cellular mechanism between Alzheimer Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases: An in silico-updated overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Greig, Nigel H; Choi, Inho

    2017-02-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and well-studied neurodegenerative disease (ND). Biological pathways, pathophysiology and genetics of AD show commonalities with other NDs viz. Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD), Prion Disease and Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Many of the NDs, sharing the common features and molecular mechanisms suggests that pathology may be directly comparable and be implicated in disease prevention and development of highly effective therapies. In this review, a brief description of pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and available treatment of various NDs have been explored with special emphasis on AD. Commonalities in these fatal NDs provide support for therapeutic advancements and enhance the understanding of disease manifestation. The studies concentrating on the commonalities in biological pathways, cellular mechanisms and genetics may provide the scope to researchers to identify few novel common target/s for disease prevention and development of effective common drugs for multi-neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. An overview of GNSS remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kegen; Rizos, Chris; Burrage, Derek; Dempster, Andrew G.; Zhang, Kefei; Markgraf, Markus

    2014-12-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals are always available, globally, and the signal structures are well known, except for those dedicated to military use. They also have some distinctive characteristics, including the use of L-band frequencies, which are particularly suited for remote sensing purposes. The idea of using GNSS signals for remote sensing - the atmosphere, oceans or Earth surface - was first proposed more than two decades ago. Since then, GNSS remote sensing has been intensively investigated in terms of proof of concept studies, signal processing methodologies, theory and algorithm development, and various satellite-borne, airborne and ground-based experiments. It has been demonstrated that GNSS remote sensing can be used as an alternative passive remote sensing technology. Space agencies such as NASA, NOAA, EUMETSAT and ESA have already funded, or will fund in the future, a number of projects/missions which focus on a variety of GNSS remote sensing applications. It is envisaged that GNSS remote sensing can be either exploited to perform remote sensing tasks on an independent basis or combined with other techniques to address more complex applications. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art of this relatively new and, in some respects, underutilised remote sensing technique. Also addressed are relevant challenging issues associated with GNSS remote sensing services and the performance enhancement of GNSS remote sensing to accurately and reliably retrieve a range of geophysical parameters.

  3. New Strategies Toward Edible Vaccines: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Aryamvally, Anjali; Gunasekaran, Vignesh; Narenthiran, Keerthana Ragavi; Pasupathi, Rathinasabapathi

    2016-04-11

    With the ever growing population, advancements in edible vaccines and related technologies have seen a rise in popularity. Antigenic peptides incorporated into an edible part of a plant can be administered raw as a vaccine. While conventional vaccines have improved the quality of life by drastically reducing the onset of diseases, edible vaccines are able to perform the same with greater accessibility and at an affordable price. Low cost of production, ease of storage, transportation and administration are some of the many reasons behind the push for the development of edible vaccines. This article aims at giving an overview of the different plant systems used to produce vaccines in various experiments, as well as the merits and demerits of using that particular expression system. Further, the article elaborates on the problems faced in the production of edible vaccines and the measures adopted to surpass them. The major obstacle in the process is attaining a sufficiently large concentration of foreign antigen in the plant system. The article discusses various plant expression systems like banana, rice, alfalfa, mushroom, potato, tomato, pea, tobacco, and maize. When these were reviewed, it was found that the inability to produce the desired antigen concentration was one of the primary reasons why edible vaccines sometimes fail to generate the desired level of immune response in the recipient. We conclude with a promising solution to the problem by incorporating nano-technological advancements to the already existing protocols for edible vaccine development.

  4. OVERVIEW OF AN INTEGRATIVE SAMPLER FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Anthropogenic pollution is recognized as a global problem contributing to degradation of ecosystem quality, to loss of numerous plant and animal species, and to adverse impacts on human health. There is an increasing realization that a holistic hazard assessment of complex environmental contaminant mixtures requires data on the concentrations of hydrophilic organic contaminants as well. An approach to provide a time-weighted average (TWA) assessment is critical in understanding organism exposure to the complex mixture of pollutants present in the environment. A recently developed device, the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS), is designed to integratively sample the more polar waterborne organic chemicals. Laboratory trials and field deployments have demonstrated that the POCIS is very effective for sequestering hydrophilic chemicals such as antibiotics, hormones, other pharmaceutically derived chemicals, polar pesticides, surfactants, etc. Environmentally derived sample extracts from the integrative samplers are readily amenable for assays utilizing bio-indicator tests. An overview of the POCIS and selected environmental applications will be presented. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and

  5. An Overview of Landing Gear Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.

    1999-01-01

    One of the problems facing the aircraft community is landing gear dynamics, especially shimmy and brake-induced vibration. Although neither shimmy nor brake-induced vibrations are usually catastrophic, they can lead to accidents due to excessive wear and shortened life of gear parts and contribute to pilot and passenger discomfort. Recently, NASA has initiated an effort to increase the safety of air travel by reducing the number of accidents by a factor of five in ten years. This safety initiative has spurred an increased interest in improving landing gear design to minimize shimmy and brake-induced vibration that are still largely misunderstood phenomena. In order to increase the understanding of these problems, a literature survey was performed. The major focus of the paper is to summarize work documented from the last ten years to highlight the latest efforts in solving these vibration problems. Older publications are included to understand the longevity of the problem and the findings from earlier researchers. The literature survey revealed a variety of analyses, testing, modeling, and simulation of aircraft landing gear. Experimental validation and characterization of shimmy and brake-induced vibration of aircraft landing gear are also reported. This paper presents an overview of the problem documented in the references together with a history of landing gear dynamic problems and solutions. Based on the assessment of this survey, recommendations of the most critically needed enhancements to the state of the art are given.

  6. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  7. The CNES Balloon Program : an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debouzy, G.; Cazaux, C.

    The CNES (French Space Agency) Balloon Program continues to support the scientific community providing enhanced measurements capabilities across different kind of balloons: zero pressure balloon (80 % of activities), Infra-Red Montgolfiere (MIR) and superpressure balloon. For ENVISAT satellite validation, CNES has set up with ESA an important international balloon program with six dedicated campaigns, in 2002 - 2004 period, from mid-latitude; northern and tropical balloon launch facilities. In the framework of an European program, CNES participates to HIBISCUS project by organizing balloon campaigns (2003 & 2004) in tropical region with the launches of zero-pressure balloon, MIR and superpressure balloon from the same facility. In cooperation with US, CNES is preparing the VORCORE project which consists to study the atmospheric circulation of Antarctica polar vortex, using superpressure balloons launched from the Mac-Murdo station. This paper will present the CNES balloon activities in the 2002-2004 period, mainly focused on atmospheric chemistry, will give an overview of balloon technology development, and will present also the JAXA / CNES cooperation for the HSFD shuttle drop from stratospheric balloons with a first flight realized in 2003.

  8. An overview of the HIBISCUS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommereau, J.-P.; Garnier, A.; Held, G.; Gomes, A.-M.; Goutail, F.; Durry, G.; Borchi, F.; Hauchecorne, A.; Montoux, N.; Cocquerez, P.; Letrenne, G.; Vial, F.; Hertzog, A.; Legras, B.; Pisso, I.; Pyle, J. A.; Harris, N. R. P.; Jones, R. L.; Robinson, A.; Hansford, G.; Eden, L.; Gardiner, T.; Swann, N.; Knudsen, B.; Larsen, N.; Nielsen, J.; Christensen, T.; Cairo, F.; Pirre, M.; Marécal, V.; Huret, N.; Riviére, E.; Coe, H.; Grosvenor, D.; Edvarsen, K.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Ricaud, P.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Godefroy, M.; Seran, E.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.

    2007-02-01

    HIBISCUS was a field campaign for investigating the impact of deep convection on the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) and the Lower Stratosphere, which took place during the Southern Hemisphere summer in February-March 2004 in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Its objective was to provide a set of new observational data on meteorology, tracers of horizontal and vertical transport, water vapour, clouds, and chemistry in the tropical UT/LS from balloon observations at local scale over a land convective area, as well as at global scale using circumnavigating long-duration balloons. Overall, the composition of the TTL, the region between 14 and 19 km of intermediate lapse rate between the almost adiabatic upper troposphere and the stable stratosphere, appears highly variable. Tracers and ozone measurements performed at both the local and the global scale indicate a strong quasi-horizontal isentropic exchange with the lowermost mid-latitude stratosphere suggesting that the barrier associated to the tropical jet is highly permeable at these levels in summer. But the project also provides clear indications of strong episodic updraught of cold air, short-lived tracers, low ozone, humidity and ice particles across the lapse rate tropopause at about 15 km, up to 18 or 19 km at 420-440 K potential levels in the lower stratosphere, suggesting that, in contrast to oceanic convection penetrating little the stratosphere, fast daytime developing land convective systems could be a major mechanism in the troposphere-stratosphere exchange at the global scale. The present overview is meant to provide the background of the project, as well as overall information on the instrumental tools available, on the way they have been used within the highly convective context of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone, and a brief summary of the results, which will be detailed in several other papers of this special issue.

  9. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  10. User support services and network application development: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, J. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the user support services and network application development. The overview consists of the background, elements of NASA Science Internet (NSI) with GSFC responsibility, GSFC element objectives, and a summary of current status and plans. A conclusion of the overview is that refinement to the objectives and plans of the NSI elements under GSFC responsibility is ongoing and will continue to be influenced by user input/feedback through meetings with NSIUWG and user discipline programs, etc.

  11. Control strategies for smart prosthetic hand technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Naidu, D; Chen, Cheng-Hung; Perez, Alba; Schoen, Marco P

    2008-01-01

    A chronological overview of the applications of control theory to prosthetic hand is presented. The overview focuses on hard computing or control techniques such as multivariable feedback, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive and robust and soft computing or control techniques such as artificial intelligence, neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms and on the fusion of hard and soft control techniques. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

  12. Overview of an Algorithm Plugin Package (APP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linda, M.; Tilmes, C.; Fleig, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Science software that runs operationally is fundamentally different than software that runs on a scientist's desktop. There are complexities in hosting software for automated production that are necessary and significant. Identifying common aspects of these complexities can simplify algorithm integration. We use NASA's MODIS and OMI data production systems as examples. An Algorithm Plugin Package (APP) is science software that is combined with algorithm-unique elements that permit the algorithm to interface with, and function within, the framework of a data processing system. The framework runs algorithms operationally against large quantities of data. The extra algorithm-unique items are constrained by the design of the data processing system. APPs often include infrastructure that is vastly similar. When the common elements in APPs are identified and abstracted, the cost of APP development, testing, and maintenance will be reduced. This paper is an overview of the extra algorithm-unique pieces that are shared between MODAPS and OMIDAPS APPs. Our exploration of APP structure will help builders of other production systems identify their common elements and reduce algorithm integration costs. Our goal is to complete the development of a library of functions and a menu of implementation choices that reflect common needs of APPs. The library and menu will reduce the time and energy required for science developers to integrate algorithms into production systems.

  13. HIV-1 Entry Inhbitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an overview of HIV-1 entry inhibitors, with a focus on chemokine receptor antagonists. Recent findings Entry of HIV-1 into target cells is an ordered multi-step process involving attachment, co-receptor binding and fusion. Inhibitors of each step have been identified and shown to have antiviral activity in clinical trials. Phase 1-2 trials of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule attachment inhibitors have demonstrated activity in HIV-1-infected subjects, but none has progressed to later phase clinical trials. The post-attachment inhibitor ibalizumab has shown activity in phase 1 and 2 trials; further studies are anticipated. The CCR5 antagonists maraviroc (now been approved for clinical use) and vicriviroc (in phase 3 trials) have shown significant benefit in controlled trials in treatment-experienced subjects; additional CCR5 antagonists are in various stages of clinical development. Targeting CXCR4 has proven to be more challenging. Although proof of concept has been demonstrated in phase 1-2 trials of two compounds, neither proved suitable for chronic administration. Little progress has been reported in developing longer acting or orally bioavailable fusion inhibitors. Summary ACCR5 antagonist and a fusion inhibitor are approved for use as HIV-1 entry inhibitors. Development of drugs targeting other steps in HIV-1 entry is ongoing. PMID:19339945

  14. An Overview of Landing Gear Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.

    1999-01-01

    One of the problems facing the aircraft community is landing gear dynamics, especially shimmy and brake-induced vibration. Shimmy and brake-induced vibrations can lead to accidents due to excessive wear and shortened life of gear parts and contribute to pilot and passenger discomfort. To increase understanding of these problems, a literature survey was performed. The major focus is on work from the last ten years. Some older publications are included to understand the longevity of the problem and the background from earlier researchers. The literature survey includes analyses, testing, modeling, and simulation of aircraft landing gear; and experimental validation and characterization of shimmy and brake-induced vibration of aircraft landing gear. The paper presents an overview of the problem, background information, and a history of landing gear dynamics problems and solutions. Based on the survey an assessment and recommendations of the most critically needed enhancements to the state of the art will be presented. The status of Langley work contributing to this activity will be given.

  15. Systemic Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Dhruti; Puttanna, Amar; Balagopal, Viswanatha

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are common medications, used in respiratory medicine for controlling conditions such as asthma and other obstructive airway diseases. The systemic effects of oral corticosteroids are well known and established; inhaled steroids have been known to cause relatively minor and localized adverse effects such as oral candidiasis. However, less attention has been paid to their systemic effects. Although currently there is a paucity of prospective studies demonstrating the systemic effects of inhaled corticosteroids, there are numerous retrospective studies adding evidence to this link. Inhaled corticosteroids can affect the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, bone density and growth, eyes, skin and immunity including an increased risk of pneumonia. Clinicians are recommended to aim for the lowest possible dose to avoid these systemic side effects. Fluticasone is more likely to cause systemic effects compared to budesonide. Newer ICS molecules such as ciclesonide may be more beneficial in reducing such systemic complications on prolonged use. This paper provides an updated overview of the common systemic effects encountered with ICS treatment. PMID:25674175

  16. MRSA in Austria--an overview.

    PubMed

    Krziwanek, K; Luger, C; Sammer, B; Stumvoll, S; Stammler, M; Sagel, U; Witte, W; Mittermayer, H

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of predominant and sporadic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains in large regions of Austria, and to compare the results with those from other European countries. In total, 1439 MRSA isolates, collected routinely between January 1996 and June 2006 from five Austrian federal provinces, were investigated. The isolates were confirmed as MRSA using mecA/femA multiplex PCR assays. Genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), which are characteristic of community-acquired MRSA, were also detected by PCR. Subtyping was performed using SmaI macrorestriction digestion of genomic DNA, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and cluster analysis. Isolates that could not be assigned to clusters were further analysed by spa typing and/or multilocus sequence typing. The predominant clones detected in Austria were ST228 (southern German epidemic clone), ST5 (Rhine-Hessen MRSA), the ST8 Austrian clone and CC8/ST8. Whereas the frequencies of lineages corresponding to ST247, ST45 and ST22 remained comparably low, an increase in the frequency of lineages corresponding to ST5 and to ST228 was recorded. Overall, 20 different MRSA types and 321 subtypes were recognised according to PFGE analysis. The prevalence of different strains varied considerably in the different Austrian regions. When compared to other European countries, the situation in Austria was most similar to that found in Germany.

  17. An overview of South African psychology.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Saths; Nicholas, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    This overview of psychology in South Africa presents a concise and historical account of its science and practice, from its early origins in the late nineteenth century to the present, and traces seminal influences on the discipline. It is a review of how psychology in South Africa developed over more than a century to become one of the most popular subjects in universities and an established and recognized profession, whose members play a variety of roles in the South African polity and larger society. The impact that apartheid racism had on key aspects of psychology's development is traversed, and the influences that previous ruling party politics had on professional psychological organizations are delineated. The unification of psychology under the Psychological Society of South Africa, a few months before the advent of democracy in South Africa, is explicated. The protection of the title of psychologist in law and certain other changes in the legislative environment, enabling a greater role for psychologists, are reported. The primary research sites for psychology and its funding and the main university psychology programs are described, as are the requirements for registration and licensure. The genesis and the importance of the work of internationally acclaimed South African psychologists, such as J. Wolpe and A. A. Lazarus, are contextualized. With the increased participation of progressive black psychologists in leadership and research in the past two decades, a transformed psychology has the potential to play a significant role in addressing human issues confronting South Africa.

  18. An Overview of CC Coherent Pion Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Neutrino cross-sections are a critical component to any neutrino measurement. With the modern neutrino experiments aiming to measure precision parameters, such as those in long-baseline oscillation experiments, the need for a detailed understanding of neutrino interactions has become even more important. Within this landscape remains a number of experimental challenges in the regime of low energy neutrino cross-sections. This talk will give an overview of recent publications on Charged Current-Coherent Pion Production (CC-Coh Pion) results from a number of experimental collaborations. Specifically, the lack of observation from the SciBooNE and T2K collaborations to observe CC-Coh Pion below one GeV in contrast to the observation of this signature at higher energies by other experiments. The work presented here is a part of the beginning steps to a reanalysis of the SciBooNE data using a modern neutrino generator in order to better understand the previous results. There will be included details of a liquid Argon purification system that is being built at UTA, and of plans for a ``Baby Time Projection Chamber (TPC)'' which will also be built at UTA, and the instrumentation and detector methods used in their construction. The closing is a look to the future for a new analysis at low neutrino energies utilizing Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) based at Fermilab.

  19. The National Energy Modeling System: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period of 1990 to 2010. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system. The second chapter describes the modeling structure. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. Additional background on the development of the system is provided in Appendix A of this report, which describes the EIA modeling systems that preceded NEMS. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA.

  20. An Overview of Downhole Imaging Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthi, S. M.

    In this presentation we give an overview of downhole imaging tools that can be used to image the borehole wall and its vicinity with a variety of physical methods. Among these are ultrasonic scans with a rotating transducer that performs a pulse-echo mea- surement in rapid succession. This gives a transit time and a reflected amplitude image of the borehole wall. Electrical imaging is done with a whole family of measurements that operate mostly in the low AC range. All of them feature a number of electrodes that is inversely proportional to the desired resolution and depth of investigation. They image layering, fracturing and other heterogeneities in the rocks traversed by the bore- hole. Some of these images can be recorded and transmitted to the surface in real-time while the well is being drilled. Imaging using nuclear methods is also possible, for ex- ample for the natural radioactivity, density, or neutron porosity of the rock. However, these devices have generally low spatial resolutions. Finally, optical imaging is pos- sible in translucent and slightly opaque muds with a downhole video camera. Recent developments have resulted in a device that can withstand high pressures and temper- atures and that transmits live video images to the surface in real-time. This method has the highest resolution but is of limited applicability in the oil industry where gener- ally opaque muds are used. These images can be successfully used to determined the structural and intrinsic properties of rock traversed by a borehole.

  1. NASA's Virtual Product Laboratory: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, Jerry; Blonski, Slawomir; Cao, Chang-Yong; McConnell, Ken; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki

    1999-01-01

    The Virtual Product Laboratory (VPL) developed by NASA's Commercial Remote Sensing Program at the John C. Stennis Space Center is a tool that enables simulation, design, and verification of remote sensing systems within a software (virtual) environment. The VPL can serve industry, government, and university communities by providing a means to conduct system trade studies, optimization, visual modeling, and data product simulations entirely in a virtual environment. The VPL can serve as a complete end-to-end simulation tool capable of producing system and subsystem performance characterizations, system optimization, and simulated data products or as a means of evaluating any one component of a remote sensing system. In this paper, we present an overview of the VPL capabilities. The VPL functional areas include Requirements, Design & Analysis, Simulation, Project Management, Knowledge Base, and Help. A description of each function along with the tools and techniques used to accomplish these functions will be provided. When possible, sample VPL displays and products will be used in the presentation.

  2. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  3. The masticatory system--an overview.

    PubMed

    Soboļeva, Una; Lauriņa, Lija; Slaidiņa, Anda

    2005-01-01

    Masticatory muscle physiology has been evaluated mostly from electromyographic recordings. However, electromyography coupled with jaw-tracking devices has provided much more information of the correlation between jaw movements and muscle activity. Knowledge of how the mandible moves during mastication has greatly influenced procedures in clinical dentistry. The aim of this overview is to give basic description of the classical studies of the physiology, function and neural control principles of the mastication. Mastication is the action of breaking down of food, preparatory to deglutition. This breaking-down action is highly organized complex of neuromuscular and digestive activities. The duration and forces developed in the power stroke vary within and between individuals and for the type of the food being chewed. It has been suggested that the observation of masticatory movements may be of diagnostic value for assessing disorders of the stomatognathic system, but there is not clear evidence to show significant differences. The action of masticatory muscles during chewing varies between subjects in amplitude, onset timing, and duration of the chewing cycle. Since tooth guidance has an enormous influence on muscle activity during chewing and swallowing, it is advisable to make restorations compatible with the functional movement patterns of the patient rather than expect the patterns of the mastication to adapt to the new made restorations.

  4. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, S; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC]) and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches. PMID:25593358

  5. Assessing comorbidity using claims data: an overview.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Warren, Joan L; Legler, Julie M

    2002-08-01

    Comorbidity, additional disease beyond the condition under study that increases a patient's total burden of illness, is one dimension of health status. For investigators working with observational data obtained from administrative databases, comorbidity assessment may be a useful and important means of accounting for differences in patients' underlying health status. There are multiple ways of measuring comorbidity. This paper provides an overview of current approaches to and issues in assessing comorbidity using claims data, with a particular focus on established indices and the SEER-Medicare database. In addition, efforts to improve measurement of comorbidity using claims data are described, including augmentation of claims data with medical record, patient self-report, or health services utilization data; incorporation of claims data from sources other than inpatient claims; and exploration of alternative conditions, indices, or ways of grouping conditions. Finally, caveats about claims data and areas for future research in claims-based comorbidity assessment are discussed. Although the use of claims databases such as SEER-Medicare for health services and outcomes research has become increasingly common, investigators must be cognizant of the limitations of comorbidity measures derived from these data sources in capturing and controlling for differences in patient health status. The assessment of comorbidity using claims data is a complex and evolving area of investigation.

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis virulence factors: an integrative overview

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    The elusive nature of Trichomonas vaginalis, the most common, non-viral, sexually transmitted pathogen has hampered our knowledge of its significance for human health for over 150 years. The combination of epidemiology, molecular cell biology, immunology and more recently genomics and other allied omics data, are all contributing at shedding new light onto what is increasingly recognised as a significant human pathogen leading to important health sequelae due to multifaceted interactions with its human host, the human microbiota, bacterial pathogens and viruses. The integrations of these various data are contributing in important ways to refining our understanding of the parasite pathobiology and virulent factors. Indeed, it is increasingly recognised that to rationalise the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for human pathogens it is important to integrate the broadest possible spectrum of human-microbial-parasite-virus interactions in relation to qualitative and quantitative variations in the human innate and adaptive defence responses. This short review aims at providing an integrative overview of T vaginalis virulent factors by taking into account the importance of the human-microbiota-parasite-virus interplay in human health. It also highlights selected cellular characteristics of the parasite often overlooked in the biological and medical literature. PMID:23694938

  7. The problem of active SETI: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, Paolo

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper (originally presented at the First IAA Symposium on Searching for Life Signatures hold at the UNESCO on 22-26 September 2008) I try to summarize the results of all my previous studies on active SETI and its possible dangers for us, also considering some new topics, in order to provide a possibly complete overview of the whole matter. First, I try to evaluate the possible risks of an indirect contact with aliens, from the social, cultural, and religious point of view; then, the possible risks related with receiving information about alien science and technology; finally, the risk that active SETI could increase the probability of a physical contact with hostile aliens. My conclusion is that active SETI is very unlikely to be dangerous for us, but, at present, such a possibility cannot be completely excluded. Surprisingly, it turns out that a very important point to be assessed in order to improve our evaluation of active SETI is the pace of our technological progress. Some suggestions about the policy that international community should adopt towards active SETI are also included.

  8. Foetal therapy, what works? An overview.

    PubMed

    Mellander, Mats; Gardiner, Helena

    2014-10-01

    The update course in foetal cardiology held by the Fetal Working Group of the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology in Istanbul in May 2012 included a session on foetal cardiac therapy. In the introductory overview to this symposium, we critically examine the level of evidence supporting or refuting proposed foetal cardiac therapies including transplacental treatment of foetal tachyarrhythmias, steroid treatment in foetal atrioventricular block, and foetal aortic valvuloplasty. In summary, the evidence for the efficiency and safety of currently available foetal cardiac therapies is low, with no therapy based on a randomised controlled trial. Transplacental treatment of foetal tachycardia is generally accepted as effective and safe, based on extensive and widespread clinical experience; however, there is no consensus on which drugs are the most effective in different electrophysiological situations. Randomised studies may be able to resolve this, but this is complicated because tachyarrhythmias are relatively rare conditions, the foetus is not accessible for direct treatment, and it is the healthy mother who accepts treatment she does not need on behalf of her foetus. The indications for steroid treatment in foetal atrioventricular block and for foetal valvuloplasty are even more controversial. Although randomised trials would be desirable, the practical issues of recruiting sufficient sample sizes and controlling for variation in practice across multiple sites is not to be underestimated. Multicentre registries, analysed free of bias, may be an alternative way to improve the evidence base of foetal cardiac therapy.

  9. Electronic waste management approaches: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kiddee, Peeranart; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H

    2013-05-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. This paper presents an overview of toxic substances present in e-waste, their potential environmental and human health impacts together with management strategies currently being used in certain countries. Several tools including life cycle assessment (LCA), material flow analysis (MFA), multi criteria analysis (MCA) and extended producer responsibility (EPR) have been developed to manage e-wastes especially in developed countries. The key to success in terms of e-waste management is to develop eco-design devices, properly collect e-waste, recover and recycle material by safe methods, dispose of e-waste by suitable techniques, forbid the transfer of used electronic devices to developing countries, and raise awareness of the impact of e-waste. No single tool is adequate but together they can complement each other to solve this issue. A national scheme such as EPR is a good policy in solving the growing e-waste problems.

  10. An Overview of Video Description: History, Benefits, and Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Jaclyn; Vizenor, Katie; Miele, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the historical context in which video description services have evolved in the United States, a summary of research demonstrating benefits to people with vision loss, an overview of current video description guidelines, and information about current software programs that are available to produce video…

  11. Energy, evolution, and human diseases: an overview.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jesse; Szulc, Alessandra L; Danoff, Ann

    2011-04-01

    In the symposium entitled "Transcriptional controls of energy sensing," the authors presented recent advances on 1) AMP kinase, an intracellular energy sensor; 2) PGC-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α), a transcriptional co-activator that has powerful effects on mitochondria; 3) methylation and demethylation in response to metabolic fluctuations; and 4) FGF21 (fibroblast growth factor 21) as an emerging hormone-like intercellular metabolic coordinator. This introduction places these advances within a broad overview of energy sensing and energy balance, with a focus on human evolution and disease. Four key elements of human biology are analyzed: 1) elevated body temperature; 2) complex prolonged reproductive pathways; 3) emergence of 4 large, well-defined fat depots, each with its own functional role; and 4) an immune system that is often up-regulated by nutrition-related signals, independent of the actual presence of a pathogen. We propose that an overactive immune system, including the "metabolic syndrome," was adopted evolutionarily in the distant past to help hold out against unconquerable infections such as tuberculosis, malaria, and trypanosomiasis. This immune activation is advantageous in the absence of other disease management methods, especially under conditions in which life expectancy is short. The inflammation has become a major agent of pathology in wealthy populations in whom the pathogens are a minor threat and life expectancy is long. The "Conclusions" section sketches cautiously how understanding the molecules involved in energy sensing and energy balance may lead to specific therapies for obesity and diabetes and for their complications.

  12. Why pesticides could be a common cause of prostate and breast cancers in the French Caribbean Island, Martinique. An overview on key mechanisms of pesticide-induced cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau-Ossondo, M; Rabia, N; Jos-Pelage, J; Marquet, L M; Isidore, Y; Saint-Aimé, C; Martin, M; Irigaray, P; Belpomme, D

    2009-07-01

    Prostate and breast cancers have become very frequent in Martinique. We previously conducted a multifactorial analysis in the French Caribbean Island, Martinique, in order to elucidate the aetiology of prostate cancer. Using a linear regression analysis, we found that the growth curves of incidence rates for Martinique and metropolitan France have been significantly diverging since 1983. Although a Caribbean genetic susceptibility factor may be involved in prostate carcinogenesis: this factor, because it could not have changed during the observation period, cannot per se account for the growing incidence of this cancer in the island. We therefore suggested that among possible environmental factors, the intensive and prolonged exposure to Carcinogenic, Mutagenic and/or Reprotoxic (CMR) or presumed CMR pesticides may account for the observed growing incidence of prostate cancer and thus may be involved in prostate carcinogenesis. In this study, we further attempt to show that due to their carcinogenic properties, pesticides and especially organochlorine pesticides may in fact be causally implicated in the growing incidence of prostate cancer in Martinique. Also, we suggest that CMR or presumed CMR pesticides may be causally involved in the growing incidence of breast cancer through a common endocrine disruption mechanism. We therefore propose that protective medical recommendations should be immediately set up and carried out by general practitioners, paediatricians, obstetricians, gynaecologists and urologists; and that public health measures of primary precaution and prevention should be urgently taken in close collaboration with health professionals in order to protect population, more especially pregnant women and children, with the final objective perhaps that these medical recommendations and public health measures will stop Martinique's cancer epidemic.

  13. The m1A(58) modification in eubacterial tRNA: An overview of tRNA recognition and mechanism of catalysis by TrmI.

    PubMed

    Dégut, Clément; Ponchon, Luc; Folly-Klan, Marcia; Barraud, Pierre; Tisné, Carine

    2016-03-01

    The enzymes of the TrmI family catalyze the formation of the m(1)A58 modification in tRNA. We previously solved the crystal structure of the Thermus thermophilus enzyme and conducted a biophysical study to characterize the interaction between TrmI and tRNA. TrmI enzymes are active as a tetramer and up to two tRNAs can bind to TrmI simultaneously. In this paper, we present the structures of two TrmI mutants (D170A and Y78A). These residues are conserved in the active site of TrmIs and their mutations result in a dramatic alteration of TrmI activity. Both structures of TrmI mutants revealed the flexibility of the N-terminal domain that is probably important to bind tRNA. The structure of TrmI Y78A catalytic domain is unmodified regarding the binding of the SAM co-factor and the conformation of residues potentially interacting with the substrate adenine. This structure reinforces the previously proposed role of Y78, i.e. stabilize the conformation of the A58 ribose needed to hold the adenosine in the active site. The structure of the D170A mutant shows a flexible active site with one loop occupying in part the place of the co-factor and the second loop moving at the entrance to the active site. This structure and recent data confirms the central role of D170 residue binding the amino moiety of SAM and the exocyclic amino group of adenine. Possible mechanisms for methyl transfer are then discussed.

  14. The initiation and effects of plasma contact activation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lisha; Wu, Mingyi; Zhao, Jinhua

    2017-03-01

    The plasma contact system sits atop the intrinsic coagulation cascade and plasma kallikrein-kinin pathway, and in vivo its activation contributes, respectively, to coagulation and inflammation mainly via two downstream pathways. This system has been widely investigated, its activation mechanisms by negatively charged surfaces and the interactions within its components, factor XII, prekallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen are well understood at the biochemical level. However, as most of the activators that have been discovered by in vitro experiments are exogenous, the physiological activators and roles of the contact system have remained unclear and controversial. In the last two decades, several physiological activators have been identified, and a better understanding of its roles and its connection with other signaling pathways has been obtained from in vivo studies. In this article, we present an overview of the contact pathway with a focus on the activation mechanisms, natural stimuli, possible physiological roles, potential risks of its excessive activation, remaining questions and future prospects.

  15. Supersymmetry in physics: an algebraic overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P.

    1983-01-01

    In 1970, while attempting to generalize the Veneziano model (string model) to include fermions, I introduced a new algebraic structure which turned out to be a graded Lie algebra; it was used as a spectrum-generating algebra. This approach was soon after generalized to include interactions, yielding a complete model of fermions and boson (RNS model). In an unrelated work in the Soviet Union, it was shown how to generalize the Poincare group to include fermionic charges. However it was not until 1974 that an interacting field theory invariant under the Graded Poincare group in 3 + 1 dimensions was built (WZ model). Supersymmetric field theories turned out to have less divergent ultraviolet behavior than non-supersymmetric field theories. Gravity was generalized to include supersymmetry, to a theory called supergravity. By now many interacting local field theories exhibiting supersymmetry have been built and studied from 1 + 1 to 10 + 1 dimensions. Supersymmetric local field theories in less than 9 + 1 dimensions, can be understood as limits of multilocal (string) supersymmetric theories, in 9 + 1 dimensions. On the other hand, graded Lie algebras have been used in non-relativistic physics as approximate symmetries of Hamiltonians. The most striking such use so far helps comparing even and odd nuclei energy levels. It is believed that graded Lie algebras can be used whenever paired and unpaired fermions excitations can coexist. In this overview of a tremendously large field, I will only survey finite graded Lie algebras and their representations. For non-relativistic applications, all of GLA are potentially useful, while for relativistic applications, only these which include the Poincare group are to be considered.

  16. Adherence in ulcerative colitis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Anna; Castiglione, Fabiana; Nardone, Olga Maria; Colombo, Giorgio L

    2017-01-01

    Medication adherence is an important challenge while treating chronic illnesses, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), that require a long-term management to induce and maintain clinical remission. This review provides an overview of the role that medication adherence plays in the routine management of UC, with a focus on the results of a recent Italian study reporting the perception of patients with UC regarding adherence to treatment. A literature analysis was conducted on topics, such as measurement of adherence in real practice, causes, risk factors and consequences of non-adherence and strategies, to raise patients’ adherence. Most of the data refer to adherence to 5-aminosalicylic acid, and standard of care for the induction and maintenance of remission in UC. The adherence rate to 5-aminosalicylic acid is low in clinical practice, thus resulting in fivefold higher risk of relapse, likely increased risk of colorectal cancer, reduced quality of life and higher health care costs for in- and outpatient settings. There are various causes affecting non-adherence to therapy: forgetfulness, high cost of drugs, lack of understanding of the drug regimen – which are sometimes due to insufficient explanation by the specialist – anxiety created by possible adverse events, lack of confidence in physicians’ judgment and complex dosing regimen. The last aspect negatively influences adherence to medication both in clinical trial settings and in real-world practice. Regarding this feature, mesalamine in once-daily dosage may be preferable to medications with multiple doses per day because the simplification of treatment regimens improves adherence. PMID:28260866

  17. An Empirical Comparison of Web Overview Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunk, Benjamin D.; Bidgood, Sara

    2000-01-01

    Examined two different methods of creating overviews of Web sites and gauged their effectiveness at performing known-item searches. Discusses results of a usability study with 30 university students, which compared conventional sitemaps to InXight's Site Lens hyperbolic tree tool, and suggests future work. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/LRW)

  18. Business Ownership and Management: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivas, Louis, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Includes six articles: "Overview" (Olivas); "Preparing Women for Entrepreneurial Opportunities" (Ownby, Rhea); "The Business Plan: Key to Realism in Teaching Entrepreneurship" (Smith, Steward); "In Search of Praise" (Frame); "Communication and the Entrepreneur" (Inman); and "Preparing Potential Entrepreneurs for Tomorrow's World" (Clodfelter).…

  19. Child Welfare in 25 States: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Child Advocacy (DHEW/OHD), Washington, DC.

    This overview presents a summary of the major findings of a 25-state survey of child welfare service delivery systems, as studied by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. in association with the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) during the period of November 1975 through February 1976. The initial products of the survey were 25 state profiles; these…

  20. Bilingual Education in Ohio: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catheline, Michael

    This overview of bilingual education ih Ohio includes profiles of bilingual programs in Youngstown, Toledo, Cleveland, and Athens. Current practices in these programs are considered with regard to funding, identification and assessment of students, instructional models, materials, the cultural component of instruction, parental involvement, and…

  1. An Overview of American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Sandy; Kurose, Charles; McPherson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This overview of postsecondary education in the United States reviews the dramatic changes over the past fifty years in the students who go to college, the institutions that produce higher education, and the ways it is financed. The article, by Sandy Baum, Charles Kurose, and Michael McPherson, creates the context for the articles that follow on…

  2. Charter Schools in Texas: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Francisco; Slate, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we analyzed the literature regarding charter schools in the State of Texas. We specifically examined the evolution of the charter school movement in Texas. Moreover, data regarding the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of charter schools in Texas were discussed. Our overview of Texas charter schools, given their widespread presence in…

  3. An Overview of Three PCDC Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horbaly, Marilyn; And Others

    This report provides in matrix form a comprehensive overview of three Parent Child Development Centers (PCDC) projects located in Birmingham, Houston, and New Orleans. The report is divided into five sections. In Section I, the introduction, a brief description is given of the study's purpose. Section II provides demographic data from each of the…

  4. Electronic waste management approaches: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kiddee, Peeranart; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Human toxicity of hazardous substances in e-waste. ► Environmental impacts of e-waste from disposal processes. ► Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) to and solve e-waste problems. ► Key issues relating to tools managing e-waste for sustainable e-waste management. - Abstract: Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. This paper presents an overview of toxic substances present in e-waste, their potential environmental and human health impacts together with management strategies currently being used in certain countries. Several tools including Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Material Flow Analysis (MFA), Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) have been developed to manage e-wastes especially in developed countries. The key to success in terms of e-waste management is to develop eco-design devices, properly collect e-waste, recover and recycle material by safe methods, dispose of e-waste by suitable techniques, forbid the transfer of used electronic devices to developing countries, and raise awareness of the impact of e-waste. No single tool is adequate but together they can complement each other to solve this issue. A national scheme such as EPR is a good policy in solving the growing e-waste problems.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of fibrates: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Several cardiovascular drugs exert anti-inflammatory effects and accumulating data suggest that fibrates also share this property. This review summarizes the mechanisms implicated in the anti-inflammatory actions of fibrates. We also provide an overview of the existing clinical studies addressing the effects of fibrates on markers of inflammation. Several, but not all, studies reported that fibrates exert anti-inflammatory actions. The small number of patients included in some studies, as well as differences in diagnoses and duration of follow up might partly explain this discrepancy. It is also possible that fibrates differ substantially in terms of anti-inflammatory effects. It is not clear whether an anti-inflammatory action of fibrates is clinically relevant. Future studies should assess whether the anti-inflammatory actions of fibrates (or for that matter, other drugs) will translate into a reduced risk of vascular disease.

  6. Microbial biofilms in intertidal systems: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.

    2000-07-01

    Intertidal marine systems are highly dynamic systems which are characterized by periodic fluctuations in environmental parameters. Microbial processes play critical roles in the remineralization of nutrients and primary production in intertidal systems. Many of the geochemical and biological processes which are mediated by microorganisms occur within microenvironments which can be measured over micrometer spatial scales. These processes are localized by cells within a matrix of extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), collectively called a "microbial biofilm". Recent examinations of intertidal systems by a range of investigators using new approaches show an abundance of biofilm communities. The purpose of this overview is to examine recent information concerning the roles of microbial biofilms in intertidal systems. The microbial biofilm is a common adaptation of natural bacteria and other microorganisms. In the fluctuating environments of intertidal systems, biofilms form protective microenvironments and may structure a range of microbial processes. The EPS matrix of biofilm forms sticky coatings on individual sediment particles and detrital surfaces, which act as a stabilizing anchor to buffer cells and their extracellular processes during the frequent physical stresses (e.g., changes in salinity and temperature, UV irradiation, dessication). EPS is an operational definition designed to encompass a range of large microbially-secreted molecules having widely varying physical and chemical properties, and a range of biological roles. Examinations of EPS using Raman and Fourier-transform infared spectroscopy, and atomic-force microscopy suggest that some EPS gels possess physical and chemical properties which may hasten the development of sharp geochemical gradients, and contribute a protective effect to cells. Biofilm polymers act as a sorptive sponge which binds and concentrates organic molecules and ions close to cells. Concurrently, the EPS appear to localize

  7. Data Streams: An Overview and Scientific Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Charu C.

    In recent years, advances in hardware technology have facilitated the ability to collect data continuously. Simple transactions of everyday life such as using a credit card, a phone, or browsing the web lead to automated data storage. Similarly, advances in information technology have lead to large flows of data across IP networks. In many cases, these large volumes of data can be mined for interesting and relevant information in a wide variety of applications. When the volume of the underlying data is very large, it leads to a number of computational and mining challenges: With increasing volume of the data, it is no longer possible to process the data efficiently by using multiple passes. Rather, one can process a data item at most once. This leads to constraints on the implementation of the underlying algorithms. Therefore, stream mining algorithms typically need to be designed so that the algorithms work with one pass of the data. In most cases, there is an inherent temporal component to the stream mining process. This is because the data may evolve over time. This behavior of data streams is referred to as temporal locality. Therefore, a straightforward adaptation of one-pass mining algorithms may not be an effective solution to the task. Stream mining algorithms need to be carefully designed with a clear focus on the evolution of the underlying data. Another important characteristic of data streams is that they are often mined in a distributed fashion. Furthermore, the individual processors may have limited processing and memory. Examples of such cases include sensor networks, in which it may be desirable to perform in-network processing of data stream with limited processing and memory [1, 2]. This chapter will provide an overview of the key challenges in stream mining algorithms which arise from the unique setup in which these problems are encountered. This chapter is organized as follows. In the next section, we will discuss the generic challenges that

  8. Role of Pharmacovigilance in India: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Suke, Sanvidhan G; Kosta, Prabhat; Negi, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance (PV) plays a key role in the healthcare system through assessment, monitoring and discovery of interactions amongst drugs and their effects in human. Pharmaceutical and biotechnological medicines are designed to cure, prevent or treat diseases; however, there are also risks particularly adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can cause serious harm to patients. Thus, for safety medication ADRs monitoring required for each medicine throughout its life cycle, during development of drug such as pre-marketing including early stages of drug design, clinical trials, and post-marketing surveillance. PV is concerns with the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of ADRs. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics are an indispensable part of the clinical research. Variation in the human genome is a cause of variable response to drugs and susceptibility to diseases are determined, which is important for early drug discovery to PV. Moreover, PV has traditionally involved in mining spontaneous reports submitted to national surveillance systems. The research focus is shifting toward the use of data generated from platforms outside the conventional framework such as electronic medical records, biomedical literature, and patient-reported data in health forums. The emerging trend in PV is to link premarketing data with human safety information observed in the post-marketing phase. The PV system team obtains valuable additional information, building up the scientific data contained in the original report and making it more informative. This necessitates an utmost requirement for effective regulations of the drug approval process and conscious pre and post approval vigilance of the undesired effects, especially in India. Adverse events reported by PV system potentially benefit to the community due to their proximity to both population and public health practitioners, in terms of language and knowledge, enables easy contact with reporters by electronically. Hence, PV

  9. Role of Pharmacovigilance in India: An overview.

    PubMed

    Suke, Sanvidhan G; Kosta, Prabhat; Negi, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance (PV) plays a key role in the healthcare system through assessment, monitoring and discovery of interactions amongst drugs and their effects in human. Pharmaceutical and biotechnological medicines are designed to cure, prevent or treat diseases; however, there are also risks particularly adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can cause serious harm to patients. Thus, for safety medication ADRs monitoring required for each medicine throughout its life cycle, during development of drug such as pre-marketing including early stages of drug design, clinical trials, and post-marketing surveillance. PV is concerns with the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of ADRs. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics are an indispensable part of the clinical research. Variation in the human genome is a cause of variable response to drugs and susceptibility to diseases are determined, which is important for early drug discovery to PV. Moreover, PV has traditionally involved in mining spontaneous reports submitted to national surveillance systems. The research focus is shifting toward the use of data generated from platforms outside the conventional framework such as electronic medical records, biomedical literature, and patient-reported data in health forums. The emerging trend in PV is to link premarketing data with human safety information observed in the post-marketing phase. The PV system team obtains valuable additional information, building up the scientific data contained in the original report and making it more informative. This necessitates an utmost requirement for effective regulations of the drug approval process and conscious pre and post approval vigilance of the undesired effects, especially in India. Adverse events reported by PV system potentially benefit to the community due to their proximity to both population and public health practitioners, in terms of language and knowledge, enables easy contact with reporters by electronically. Hence, PV

  10. Poland: An energy and environmental overview

    SciTech Connect

    Szpunar, C.B.; Bhatti, N.; Buehring, W.A.; Streets, D.G. ); Balandynowicz, H.W. . Inst. Podstawowych Problemow Techniki)

    1990-10-01

    Poland's reliance on coal as its primary source of energy imposes heavy environmental costs on its economy and population. Specifically, many of Poland's air and water pollution problems can be traced to the high energy intensity of Polish industrial production. This overview presents environment and energy information for Poland. Topics discussed include: energy resources, production and use; energy production, trade and use; environmental quality and impacts; and control strategies. 109 refs., 25 figs., 40 tabs.

  11. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    Hz) demonstrates a perfect experimental environment for unperturbed investigations of scientific phenomena. Motivated by these prospects many national and international groups have initialized research programs taking advantage of this drop tower facility. In respect thereof the spectrum of research fields and technologies in space-related conditions can be continuously enhanced at ZARM. In the first of our two talks we will give you an overview about the inner structure of ZARM, as well as the service and the operation offered by the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH). The ZARM FAB mbH owned by the State Government of Bremen is a public company maintaining the drop tower facility and supporting experimentalists in scientific and technical questions before, during and after their drop or catapult campaigns. In detail, we will present you important technical drop tower informations, our support and the idea, how you can proceed with your microgravity-related experiment including all your requirements to successfully accomplish an entire drop or catapult campaign. In summary, we will illustrate the complete procedure, how to drop or to catapult an experiment capsule at the Drop Tower Bremen.

  12. Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; ODonnell, Patricia M.

    1996-01-01

    This article on nickel-hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel-hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results, and trends. There is more than one nickel-hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV), Common Pressure Vessel (CPV), bipolar, and low-pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel-cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous Earth orbit applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000-10,000 cycles at 60 - 80 % DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep Depths of Discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low-cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume, and cost. A key is to develop a lightweight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A CPV nickel-hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume, and manufacturing costs. A 10-A-h CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short-lived Clementine spacecraft. A bipolar nickel -hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 % DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high-pulse power capability. A low-pressure aerospace nickel-metal-hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design that has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a reduction in manufacturing cost.

  13. An overview of macroautophagy in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2016-05-08

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved dynamic pathway that functions primarily in a degradative manner. A basal level of macroautophagy occurs constitutively, but this process can be further induced in response to various types of stress including starvation, hypoxia and hormonal stimuli. The general principle behind macroautophagy is that cytoplasmic contents can be sequestered within a transient double-membrane organelle, an autophagosome, which subsequently fuses with a lysosome or vacuole (in mammals, or yeast and plants, respectively), allowing for degradation of the cargo followed by recycling of the resulting macromolecules. Through this basic mechanism, macroautophagy has a critical role in cellular homeostasis; however, either insufficient or excessive macroautophagy can seriously compromise cell physiology, and thus, it needs to be properly regulated. In fact, a wide range of diseases are associated with dysregulation of macroautophagy. There has been substantial progress in understanding the regulation and molecular mechanisms of macroautophagy in different organisms; however, many questions concerning some of the most fundamental aspects of macroautophagy remain unresolved. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about macroautophagy mainly in yeast, including the mechanism of autophagosome biogenesis, the function of the core macroautophagic machinery, the regulation of macroautophagy and the process of cargo recognition in selective macroautophagy, with the goal of providing insights into some of the key unanswered questions in this field.

  14. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  15. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  16. An overview of modal-based damage identification methods

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of methods that examine changes in measured vibration response to detect, locate, and characterize damage in structural and mechanical systems. The basic idea behind this technology is that modal parameters (notably frequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping) are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, damping, and stiffness). Therefore, changes in the physical properties will cause detectable changes in the modal properties. The motivation for the development of this technology is first provided. The methods are then categorized according to various criteria such as the level of damage detection provided, model-based vs. non-model-based methods and linear vs. nonlinear methods. This overview is limited to methods that can be adapted to a wide range of structures (i.e., are not dependent on a particular assumed model form for the system such as beam-bending behavior and methods and that are not based on updating finite element models). Next, the methods are described in general terms including difficulties associated with their implementation and their fidelity. Past, current and future-planned applications of this technology to actual engineering systems are summarized. The paper concludes with a discussion of critical issues for future research in the area of modal-based damage identification.

  17. An overview of neural function and feedback control in human communication.

    PubMed

    Hood, L J

    1998-01-01

    The speech and hearing mechanisms depend on accurate sensory information and intact feedback mechanisms to facilitate communication. This article provides a brief overview of some components of the nervous system important for human communication and some electrophysiological methods used to measure cortical function in humans. An overview of automatic control and feedback mechanisms in general and as they pertain to the speech motor system and control of the hearing periphery is also presented, along with a discussion of how the speech and auditory systems interact.

  18. WEAVE an overview and status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Dalton, G.; Trager, S.; Aguerri, A. L.; Carrasco, E.; Vallenari, A.; Abrams, D. C.; Middleton, K.; Sayède, F.

    2016-12-01

    The WHT Enhanced Area Velocity Explorer is a high multiplex, multi-object spectrograph that will equip the prime focus of the WHT 4.2m telescope. The instrument is currently in the construction phase and several components have already been procured. I will give a short overview of the instrument and of the project and its status. The French participation is done through CNRS - Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers and the technical activity is carried out, at this stage, at GEPI, Observatoire de Paris.

  19. Supersymmetry and R-parity: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2015-08-01

    This article provides a brief overview of some of the theoretical aspects of R-parity violation (RPV) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and its extensions. Both spontaneous and explicit RPV models are discussed and some consequences are outlined. In particular, it is emphasized that the simplest supersymmetric theories based on local B-L predict that R-parity must be a broken symmetry, a fact which makes a compelling case for taking R-parity breaking seriously in discussions of supersymmetry phenomenology. Invited article for the Richard Arnowitt memorial focus issue

  20. Formal Methods at Intel - An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Intel has invested heavily in formal methods, which are now deployed in several domains: hardware, software, firmware, protocols etc. Many different formal methods tools and techniques are in active use, including symbolic trajectory evaluation, temporal logic model checking, SMT-style combined decision procedures, and interactive higher-order logic theorem proving. I will try to give a broad overview of some of the formal methods activities taking place at Intel, and describe the challenges of extending formal verification to new areas and of effectively using multiple formal techniques in combination

  1. An Overview Of Current Research At The Environmental Protection Agency

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the current research at the Environmental Protection Agency. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT ROGER B. YEARDLEY, JR., LAND REMEDIATION AND POLLUTION CONTROL DIVISION, 513-569-7548.

  2. OVERVIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, TO 8750 PIT WITH DRILL SETTING AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, TO 8750 PIT WITH DRILL SETTING AN EXPLOSIVE CHARGE TO REMOVE OVERBURDEN AND ACCESS COAL SEAMS LOCATED 200 FEET BELOW FOR STRIPPING. - Drummond Coal Company Cedrum Mine, 8750 Pit, County Road 124, Townley, Walker County, AL

  3. An Overview of the Human Systems Integration Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the Human Systems Integration Division, and will highlight some of the human performance modeling efforts undertaken in previously presented MIDAS human performance modeling efforts.

  4. 1. ELEVATION OF CRANE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, WITH AN OVERVIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ELEVATION OF CRANE, LOOKING NORTHWEST, WITH AN OVERVIEW OF UPSTREAM (EAST) - Cabot Station Electric Generating Plant, Gantry Crane, Montague City Road, Turners Falls vicinity, Montague, Franklin County, MA

  5. An Overview of Landfill Gas Energy in the United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview of the current landfill gas (LFG) energy industry including background information on LFG and why EPA formed LMOP, charts and data, helpful links to more information, and project case studies.

  6. Job Corps, AmeriCorps, and Peace Corps: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Job Corps, AmeriCorps, and the Peace Corps including purpose, individual qualifications for entry, program highlights, and advantages and disadvantages of serving in one of them. (JOW)

  7. An overview of instrumentation capabilities for Scientific ballooning in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarajan, Anand; Reddy Vizapur, Anmi; Rao Tanneeru, Venkateswara; Bangaru, Kapardhi; Trivedi, Dharmesh; Rodi, Ashish; Ojha, Devendra; Koli, Santosh

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR-BF) in India, launches scientific balloons for research in the field of astronomy, astrobiology and atmospheric sciences. TIFR-BF not only has the capability to design, fabricate and launch zero-pressure balloons, but also provide operational and engineering support for launching them. The Control Instrumentation Group (CIG) at the balloon facility handles all electronics related to telemetry, telecommand, tracking, real-time data display, data storage, air-safety and payload recovery. In the recent past, it has designed and developed customized electronics and payload orientation mechanism to meet specific experimental objectives. Small, inexpensive and rugged industrial grade radio data modems were successfully deployed in balloon flights for low bit rate data and image telemetry. This paper will provide an overview and in-flight performance of some of the recent developments in instrumentation and electronics systems. Our plans for future upgradations will also be discussed.

  8. An Overview of Bayesian Methods for Neural Spike Train Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neural spike train analysis is an important task in computational neuroscience which aims to understand neural mechanisms and gain insights into neural circuits. With the advancement of multielectrode recording and imaging technologies, it has become increasingly demanding to develop statistical tools for analyzing large neuronal ensemble spike activity. Here we present a tutorial overview of Bayesian methods and their representative applications in neural spike train analysis, at both single neuron and population levels. On the theoretical side, we focus on various approximate Bayesian inference techniques as applied to latent state and parameter estimation. On the application side, the topics include spike sorting, tuning curve estimation, neural encoding and decoding, deconvolution of spike trains from calcium imaging signals, and inference of neuronal functional connectivity and synchrony. Some research challenges and opportunities for neural spike train analysis are discussed. PMID:24348527

  9. An overview of recent patents on musculoskeletal interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rohit T; Browe, Daniel P; Lowe, Christopher J; Freeman, Joseph W

    2016-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues, e.g., between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article, we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose.

  10. Pathogenesis of Chronic Urticaria: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria is not well delineated and the treatment is palliative as it is not tied to the pathomechanism. The centrality of mast cells and their inappropriate activation and degranulation as the key pathophysiological event are well established. The triggering stimuli and the complexity of effector mechanisms remain speculative. Autoimmune origin of chronic urticaria, albeit controversial, is well documented. Numerical and behavioral alterations in basophils accompanied by changes in signaling molecule expression and function as well as aberrant activation of extrinsic pathway of coagulation are other alternative hypotheses. It is also probable that mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis through mechanisms that extend beyond high affinity IgE receptor stimulation. An increasing recognition of chronic urticaria as an immune mediated inflammatory disorder related to altered cytokine-chemokine network consequent to immune dysregulation resulting from disturbed innate immunity is emerging as yet another pathogenic explanation. It is likely that these different pathomechanisms are interlinked rather than independent cascades, acting either synergistically or sequentially to produce clinical expression of chronic urticaria. Insights into the complexities of pathogenesis may provide an impetus to develop safer, efficacious, and targeted immunomodulators and biological treatment for severe, refractory chronic urticaria. PMID:25120565

  11. Pathogenesis of chronic urticaria: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic urticaria is not well delineated and the treatment is palliative as it is not tied to the pathomechanism. The centrality of mast cells and their inappropriate activation and degranulation as the key pathophysiological event are well established. The triggering stimuli and the complexity of effector mechanisms remain speculative. Autoimmune origin of chronic urticaria, albeit controversial, is well documented. Numerical and behavioral alterations in basophils accompanied by changes in signaling molecule expression and function as well as aberrant activation of extrinsic pathway of coagulation are other alternative hypotheses. It is also probable that mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis through mechanisms that extend beyond high affinity IgE receptor stimulation. An increasing recognition of chronic urticaria as an immune mediated inflammatory disorder related to altered cytokine-chemokine network consequent to immune dysregulation resulting from disturbed innate immunity is emerging as yet another pathogenic explanation. It is likely that these different pathomechanisms are interlinked rather than independent cascades, acting either synergistically or sequentially to produce clinical expression of chronic urticaria. Insights into the complexities of pathogenesis may provide an impetus to develop safer, efficacious, and targeted immunomodulators and biological treatment for severe, refractory chronic urticaria.

  12. Radiation Diffusion:. AN Overview of Physical and Numerical Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Frank

    2005-12-01

    An overview of the physical and mathematical foundations of radiation transport is given. Emphasis is placed on how the diffusion approximation and its transport corrections arise. An overview of the numerical handling of radiation diffusion coupled to matter is also given. Discussions center on partial temperature and grey methods with comments concerning fully implicit methods. In addition finite difference, finite element and Pert representations of the div-grad operator is also discussed

  13. Radiation Diffusion: An Overview of Physical and Numerical Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F R

    2005-01-14

    An overview of the physical and mathematical foundations of radiation transport is given. Emphasis is placed on how the diffusion approximation and its transport corrections arise. An overview of the numerical handling of radiation diffusion coupled to matter is also given. Discussions center on partial temperature and grey methods with comments concerning fully implicit methods. In addition finite difference, finite element and Pert representations of the div-grad operator is also discussed

  14. White spot syndrome virus: an overview on an emergent concern

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Paz, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous and extremely abundant in the marine environment. One of such marine viruses, the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), has emerged globally as one of the most prevalent, widespread and lethal for shrimp populations. However, at present there is no treatment available to interfere with the unrestrained occurrence and spread of the disease. The recent progress in molecular biology techniques has made it possible to obtain information on the factors, mechanisms and strategies used by this virus to infect and replicate in susceptible host cells. Yet, further research is still required to fully understand the basic nature of WSSV, its exact life cycle and mode of infection. This information will expand our knowledge and may contribute to developing effective prophylactic or therapeutic measures. This review provides a state-of-the-art overview of the topic, and emphasizes the current progress and future direction for the development of WSSV control strategies. PMID:20181325

  15. White spot syndrome virus: an overview on an emergent concern.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Paz, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous and extremely abundant in the marine environment. One of such marine viruses, the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), has emerged globally as one of the most prevalent, widespread and lethal for shrimp populations. However, at present there is no treatment available to interfere with the unrestrained occurrence and spread of the disease. The recent progress in molecular biology techniques has made it possible to obtain information on the factors, mechanisms and strategies used by this virus to infect and replicate in susceptible host cells. Yet, further research is still required to fully understand the basic nature of WSSV, its exact life cycle and mode of infection. This information will expand our knowledge and may contribute to developing effective prophylactic or therapeutic measures. This review provides a state-of-the-art overview of the topic, and emphasizes the current progress and future direction for the development of WSSV control strategies.

  16. Circular RNAs in Cardiovascular Disease: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Xinyu; Zhao, Yifan; Chen, Wei; Gan, Tianyi

    2017-01-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA), a novel type of endogenous noncoding RNA (ncRNA), has become a research hotspot in recent years. CircRNAs are abundant and stably exist in creatures, and they are found with covalently closed loop structures in which they are quite different from linear RNAs. Nowadays, an increasing number of scientists have demonstrated that circRNAs may have played an essential role in the regulation of gene expression, especially acting as miRNA sponges, and have described the potential mechanisms of several circRNAs in diseases, hinting at their clinical therapeutic values. In this review, the authors summarized the current understandings of the biogenesis and properties of circRNAs and their functions and role as biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28210621

  17. ANS severe accident program overview & planning document

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) severe accident document was developed to provide a concise and coherent mechanism for presenting the ANS SAP goals, a strategy satisfying these goals, a succinct summary of the work done to date, and what needs to be done in the future to ensure timely licensability. Guidance was received from various bodies [viz., panel members of the ANS severe accident workshop and safety review committee, Department of Energy (DOE) orders, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for ALWRs and advanced reactors, ACRS comments, world-wide trends] were utilized to set up the ANS-relevant SAS goals and strategy. An in-containment worker protection goal was also set up to account for the routine experimenters and other workers within containment. The strategy for achieving the goals is centered upon closing the severe accident issues that have the potential for becoming certification issues when assessed against realistic bounding events. Realistic bounding events are defined as events with an occurrency frequency greater than 10{sup {minus}6}/y. Currently, based upon the level-1 probabilistic risk assessment studies, the realistic bounding events for application for issue closure are flow blockage of fuel element coolant channels, and rapid depressurization-related accidents.

  18. Overview of the postulated mechanisms linking cancer and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Hugo; Falanga, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Blood coagulation appears to play an important role in the occurrence of cancer and its effects may be twofold. First, in patients with cancer, blood coagulation is activated in the direction of a prothrombotic state. Second, a procoagulant environment may promote cancer in different ways. In this chapter we discuss some of the mechanisms that may be involved in this interplay between coagulation and cancer. Blood coagulation proteins interact with cells in the vasculature to maintain hemostasis. However, many proteins that are involved in coagulation and anticoagulation, as well as fibrinolysis, are also found in extravascular tissues. In different organs, these proteins may be involved in cell-signaling mechanisms, through interaction with cell receptors like protease-activated receptors (PARs). Such interactions may drive inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation. The potential procarcinogenic actions of proteases like thrombin may be counteracted by the anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory actions of the protein C-thrombomodulin mechanism. In the blood of cancer patients, the balance is usually shifted towards a procoagulant direction. The resulting excess thrombin- and fibrin-forming activity promotes venous thrombosis and may in the extravascular compartment stimulate cancer progression. The activation of platelets and their interaction with leukocytes may propagate this process. In addition to the therapeutic modulation of the prothrombotic environment, the induction of specific anticoagulant proteins including thrombomodulin may have effects on tumor growth or dissemination, but the nature of these effects still remains hard to predict. The interplay between cancer and blood coagulation merits further experimental and clinical research.

  19. [People with learning disabilities: an overview of the facts].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of some basic facts about people with learning disabilities. The prevalence (1-3% worldwide) and stability of the incidence are described, as well as the causes and possible medical comorbidities.- People with learning disabilities are at significantly greater risk of developing cognitive and medical problems compared with the average population. Lastly, an overview of actual chronic care costs is given, as well as actual participation possibilities for people with learning disabilities.

  20. Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome: An Updated Overview.

    PubMed

    El Hayek, Samer; Bitar, Lynn; Hamdar, Layal H; Mirza, Fadi G; Daoud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common metabolic and reproductive disorders among women of reproductive age. Women suffering from PCOS present with a constellation of symptoms associated with menstrual dysfunction and androgen excess, which significantly impacts their quality of life. They may be at increased risk of multiple morbidities, including obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease (CVD), infertility, cancer, and psychological disorders. This review summarizes what the literature has so far provided from guidelines to diagnosis of PCOS. It will also present a general overview about the morbidities associated with this disease, specifically with its more severe classic form. Finally, the review will stress on the various aspects of treatment and screening recommendations currently used in the management of this condition.

  1. Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    El Hayek, Samer; Bitar, Lynn; Hamdar, Layal H.; Mirza, Fadi G.; Daoud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common metabolic and reproductive disorders among women of reproductive age. Women suffering from PCOS present with a constellation of symptoms associated with menstrual dysfunction and androgen excess, which significantly impacts their quality of life. They may be at increased risk of multiple morbidities, including obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease (CVD), infertility, cancer, and psychological disorders. This review summarizes what the literature has so far provided from guidelines to diagnosis of PCOS. It will also present a general overview about the morbidities associated with this disease, specifically with its more severe classic form. Finally, the review will stress on the various aspects of treatment and screening recommendations currently used in the management of this condition. PMID:27092084

  2. Space Environment Effects on Materials : An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.

    2006-01-01

    A general overview on the space environment and its effects on materials is presented. The topics include: 1) Impact of Space Effects on Spacecraft Costs; 2) Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft by Source; 3) Primary Source of Space Effects: The Sun; 4) The Earth's Environment; 5) Trapped Radiation Belts; 6) Aurora Are Everywhere; 7) Spacecraft Interactions; 8) Atmospheric Effects; 9) Contaminant Effects on Materials; 10) Meteoroid/Debris Effects on Materials; 11) Spacecraft Surface Charging; 12) Surface Discharge Effects; 13) Internal Electrostatic Discharge--Satellite Killer; 14) Plasma Interactions DS-1 Ion Engines; 15) Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Systems and Materials; 16) Total Ionizing Dose Effects Total Ionizing Dose Effects; 17) Man-Made Sources of Space Effects Man-Made Sources of Space Effects; and 18) Space Environments Versus Interactions.

  3. Hydroxycinnamic acid antioxidants: an electrochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, José; Gaspar, Alexandra; Garrido, E Manuela; Garrido, Jorge; Borges, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids (such as ferulic, caffeic, sinapic, and p-coumaric acids) are a group of compounds highly abundant in food that may account for about one-third of the phenolic compounds in our diet. Hydroxycinnamic acids have gained an increasing interest in health because they are known to be potent antioxidants. These compounds have been described as chain-breaking antioxidants acting through radical scavenging activity, that is related to their hydrogen or electron donating capacity and to the ability to delocalize/stabilize the resulting phenoxyl radical within their structure. The free radical scavenger ability of antioxidants can be predicted from standard one-electron potentials. Thus, voltammetric methods have often been applied to characterize a diversity of natural and synthetic antioxidants essentially to get an insight into their mechanism and also as an important tool for the rational design of new and potent antioxidants. The structure-property-activity relationships (SPARs) correlations already established for this type of compounds suggest that redox potentials could be considered a good measure of antioxidant activity and an accurate guideline on the drug discovery and development process. Due to its magnitude in the antioxidant field, the electrochemistry of hydroxycinnamic acid-based antioxidants is reviewed highlighting the structure-property-activity relationships (SPARs) obtained so far.

  4. Pathogenicity of vibrios in fish: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Li; Woo, Norman Y. S.

    2003-10-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio are ubiquitously distributed in the marine environment. Due to the rapid expansion of intensive mariculture and the consequent deterioration of culture conditions, more and more Vibrio spp. have been recognized as pathogenic agents in outbreaks of vibriosis, a serious epizootic disease affecting most wild and farmed fish species worldwide, which has become the most important limiting factor for the development of intensive mariculture industry. Attempts have been made to understand the pathogenicity of vibrios in host fish with the ultimate aim of elucidating the best means for disease control. After an extensive literature survey of the recent advances in the field of fish vibriosis, the pathological changes, virulence factors and associated potential pathogenic mechanisms, transmission routes and related environmental factors involved in outbreak of vibriosis, as well as the controlling strategies are reviewed in the present paper.

  5. An overview of biological macromolecule crystallization.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Merlino, Antonello; Vergara, Alessandro; Sica, Filomena

    2013-05-31

    The elucidation of the three dimensional structure of biological macromolecules has provided an important contribution to our current understanding of many basic mechanisms involved in life processes. This enormous impact largely results from the ability of X-ray crystallography to provide accurate structural details at atomic resolution that are a prerequisite for a deeper insight on the way in which bio-macromolecules interact with each other to build up supramolecular nano-machines capable of performing specialized biological functions. With the advent of high-energy synchrotron sources and the development of sophisticated software to solve X-ray and neutron crystal structures of large molecules, the crystallization step has become even more the bottleneck of a successful structure determination. This review introduces the general aspects of protein crystallization, summarizes conventional and innovative crystallization methods and focuses on the new strategies utilized to improve the success rate of experiments and increase crystal diffraction quality.

  6. An Overview of Biological Macromolecule Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Irene Russo; Merlino, Antonello; Vergara, Alessandro; Sica, Filomena

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of the three dimensional structure of biological macromolecules has provided an important contribution to our current understanding of many basic mechanisms involved in life processes. This enormous impact largely results from the ability of X-ray crystallography to provide accurate structural details at atomic resolution that are a prerequisite for a deeper insight on the way in which bio-macromolecules interact with each other to build up supramolecular nano-machines capable of performing specialized biological functions. With the advent of high-energy synchrotron sources and the development of sophisticated software to solve X-ray and neutron crystal structures of large molecules, the crystallization step has become even more the bottleneck of a successful structure determination. This review introduces the general aspects of protein crystallization, summarizes conventional and innovative crystallization methods and focuses on the new strategies utilized to improve the success rate of experiments and increase crystal diffraction quality. PMID:23727935

  7. An Overview of Stationary Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect

    DR Brown; R Jones

    1999-03-23

    Technology developments occurring in the past few years have resulted in the initial commercialization of phosphoric acid (PA) fuel cells. Ongoing research and development (R and D) promises further improvement in PA fuel cell technology, as well as the development of proton exchange membrane (PEM), molten carbonate (MC), and solid oxide (SO) fuel cell technologies. In the long run, this collection of fuel cell options will be able to serve a wide range of electric power and cogeneration applications. A fuel cell converts the chemical energy of a fuel into electrical energy without the use of a thermal cycle or rotating equipment. In contrast, most electrical generating devices (e.g., steam and gas turbine cycles, reciprocating engines) first convert chemical energy into thermal energy and then mechanical energy before finally generating electricity. Like a battery, a fuel cell is an electrochemical device, but there are important differences. Batteries store chemical energy and convert it into electrical energy on demand, until the chemical energy has been depleted. Depleted secondary batteries may be recharged by applying an external power source, while depleted primary batteries must be replaced. Fuel cells, on the other hand, will operate continuously, as long as they are externally supplied with a fuel and an oxidant.

  8. Cholera Epidemiology in Nigeria: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Adagbada, Ajoke Olutola; Adesida, Solayide Abosede; Nwaokorie, Francisca Obiageri; Niemogha, Mary-Theresa; Coker, Akitoye Olusegun

    2012-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium, Vibrio cholera. Choleragenic V. cholera O1 and O139 are the only causative agents of the disease. The two most distinguishing epidemiologic features of the disease are its tendency to appear in explosive outbreaks and its predisposition to causing pandemics that may progressively affect many countries and spread into continents. Despite efforts to control cholera, the disease continues to occur as a major public health problem in many developing countries. Numerous studies over more than a century have made advances in the understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients, but the mechanism of emergence of new epidemic strains, and the ecosystem supporting regular epidemics, remain challenging to epidemiologists. In Nigeria, since the first appearance of epidemic cholera in 1972, intermittent outbreaks have been occurring. The later part of 2010 was marked with severe outbreak which started from the northern part of Nigeria, spreading to the other parts and involving approximately 3,000 cases and 781 deaths. Sporadic cases have also been reported. Although epidemiologic surveillance constitutes an important component of the public health response, publicly available surveillance data from Nigeria have been relatively limited to date. Based on existing relevant scientific literature on features of cholera, this paper presents a synopsis of cholera epidemiology emphasising the situation in Nigeria. PMID:22937199

  9. An overview of packet-switching communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggestad, H. M.

    1984-04-01

    A brief introduction is provided to an alternative computer-based technique for connecting a source to a destination, one which is not an evolutionary improvement in circuit switching but a radical departure from traditional techniques, namely packet switching. It is noted that this mechanism is becoming firmly established as a method for communicating digital data. Advances are also being made rapidly in the transmission of voice by this means, and packet switching may in fact be ideal for some future systems in which voice and data are fully integrated. The distinguishing feature of a packet-switched system is that a computer organizes outgoing digital information into segments which make their way independently to the receiving stations. Here, other computers reassemble them into replicas of the original message. One of the objectives conveniently achieved by packet systems is robustness with respect to blockage on particular links in the network. It is pointed out that two significant limitations affect the design and use of packet-switched systems; one is the need for substantial computer processing and bit manipulation at the network nodes, the other is accumulation of delay for real-time traffic.

  10. An overview of San Francisco Bay PORTS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; McKinnie, David; English, Chad; Smith, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    The Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) provides observations of tides, tidal currents, and meteorological conditions in real-time. The San Francisco Bay PORTS (SFPORTS) is a decision support system to facilitate safe and efficient maritime commerce. In addition to real-time observations, SFPORTS includes a nowcast numerical model forming a San Francisco Bay marine nowcast system. SFPORTS data and nowcast numerical model results are made available to users through the World Wide Web (WWW). A brief overview of SFPORTS is presented, from the data flow originated at instrument sensors to final results delivered to end users on the WWW. A user-friendly interface for SFPORTS has been designed and implemented. Appropriate field data analysis, nowcast procedures, design and generation of graphics for WWW display of field data and nowcast results are presented and discussed. Furthermore, SFPORTS is designed to support hazardous materials spill prevention and response, and to serve as resources to scientists studying the health of San Francisco Bay ecosystem. The success (or failure) of the SFPORTS to serve the intended user community is determined by the effectiveness of the user interface.

  11. Health and society in Chukotka: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Dudarev, Alexey A.; Chupakhin, Valery S.; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s. PMID:23518623

  12. Health and society in Chukotka: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dudarev, Alexey A; Chupakhin, Valery S; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s.

  13. Automotive shredder residue (ASR) management: An overview.

    PubMed

    Cossu, R; Lai, T

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of statistical data, approximately 6.5 million tons of ELVs were produced in Europe in 2011. ELVs are processed according to a treatment scheme comprising three main phases: depollution, dismantling and shredding. The ferrous fraction represents about 70-75% of the total shredded output, while nonferrous metals represent about 5%. The remaining 20-25% is referred to as automotive shredder residue (ASR). ASR is largely landfilled due to its heterogeneous and complex matrix. With a start date of January 1st 2015, the European Directive 2000/53/EC establishes the reuse and recovery of a minimum of 95% ELV total weight. To reach these targets various post-shredder technologies have been developed with the aim of improving recovery of materials and energy from ASR. In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of different management options of ELVs, the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology has been applied taking into account the potential implication of sustainable design of vehicles and treatment of residues after shredding of ELVs. Findings obtained reveal that a combination of recycling and energy recovery is required to achieve European targets, with landfilling being viewed as the least preferred option. The aim of this work is to provide a general overview of the recent development of management of ELVs and treatment of ASR with a view to minimizing the amount of residues disposed of in landfill.

  14. An Overview of Suicide Research in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Jiang, Chao; Jia, Shuhua; Wieczorek, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Chinese suicide research did not start until the end of 1970s, when China opened its door to the West through reforming its economy. Although limited Chinese suicide research conducted overseas is published and known to the West, studies conducted by Chinese researchers and published in Chinese language, which may be of more significance, are rarely known or cited in the West. Further, researchers in China with direct observation of the suicidal environment may understand the suicide differently than scholars overseas with second hand information, and therefore derive different explanations of Chinese suicide. This current study overviews suicide research conducted in China and published in Chinese during the past two decades and compares the findings with what has been reported in Western publications. Six research books and 429 journal articles are reviewed. As units of analyses, all journal articles are quantified with 151 variables analyzed. Results support findings of previous studies in terms of the suicide rates by gender, age, and rural/urban location. A unique phenomenon in Chinese suicide noticed in the study is that married Chinese are at higher risk of suicide than the non-married. Hypotheses for future research are suggested based on the articles reviewed. PMID:20686645

  15. An Overview of an Experimental Demonstration Aerotow Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Bowers, Albion H.; Lokos, William A.; Peters, Todd L.; Gera, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An overview of an experimental demonstration of aerotowing a delta-wing airplane with low-aspect ratio and relatively high wing loading is presented. Aerotowing of future space launch configurations is a new concept, and the objective of the work described herein is to demonstrate the aerotow operation using an airplane configuration similar to conceptual space launch vehicles. Background information on the use of aerotow for a space launch vehicle is presented, and the aerotow system used in this demonstration is described. The ground tests, analytical studies, and flight planning used to predict system behavior and to enhance flight safety are detailed. The instrumentation suite and flight test maneuvers flown are discussed, preliminary performance is assessed, and flight test results are compared with the preflight predictions.

  16. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds. PMID:23620848

  17. Bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kesarwani, Kritika; Gupta, Rajiv; Mukerjee, Alok

    2013-04-01

    Recently, the use of herbal medicines has been increased all over the world due to their therapeutic effects and fewer adverse effects as compared to the modern medicines. However, many herbal drugs and herbal extracts despite of their impressive in-vitro findings demonstrates less or negligible in-vivo activity due to their poor lipid solubility or improper molecular size, resulting in poor absorption and hence poor bioavailability. Nowadays with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems open the door towards the development of enhancing bioavailability of herbal drug delivery systems. For last one decade many novel carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, transferosomes, ethosomes, lipid based systems etc. have been reported for successful modified delivery of various herbal drugs. Many herbal compounds including quercetin, genistein, naringin, sinomenine, piperine, glycyrrhizin and nitrile glycoside have demonstrated capability to enhance the bioavailability. The objective of this review is to summarize various available novel drug delivery technologies which have been developed for delivery of drugs (herbal), and to achieve better therapeutic response. An attempt has also been made to compile a profile on bioavailability enhancers of herbal origin with the mechanism of action (wherever reported) and studies on improvement in drug bioavailability, exhibited particularly by natural compounds.

  18. Zika virus and pregnancy: An overview.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Newton Sérgio; de Carvalho, Beatriz Freitas; Dóris, Bruna; Silverio Biscaia, Evellyn; Arias Fugaça, Cyllian; de Noronha, Lúcia

    2017-02-01

    In May 2015, the first episodes of Zika virus infection of the Latin America were confirmed in Brazil, where currently 196 976 cases were reported. The main route of transmission occurs by Aedes mosquitoes, and the most common symptoms are maculopapular rash, fever, conjunctivitis, polyarthralgia, and periarticular edema. However, the infection is asymptomatic in 80% of the cases. The congenital infection is characterized when the transmission to the fetus occurs during pregnancy, but the mechanisms of how the virus infects the placenta remain unclear. Anatomopathological findings were described in first- and third-trimester human placentas; however, the major affected tissue of the baby is the neural. Several clinical situations were listed in these fetuses, such as neurological, ophthalmological, auditory, and articular alterations. The World Health Organization proposed a new congenital syndrome caused by Zika virus. The virus has an important neurotropism and the main manifestation observed in the syndrome is microcephaly, which is usually severe and associated with other neurological injuries. The appearance of sudden rash in pregnant women determines immediate investigation through RT-PCR and serological analysis. Moreover, the prevention consists in using repellents and avoiding endemic areas, considering that the vaccine is still under development.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gezgen, G; Roach, E C; Kizilarslanoglu, M C; Petekkaya, I; Altundag, K

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening cancer in women and the most important cause of cancer-related deaths among women. This disease is on the rise in Turkey. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and high blood sugar. Several studies have examined the association of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome with breast cancer. More recent studies have shown it to be an independent risk factor for breast cancer. It has also been associated with poorer prognosis, increased incidence, a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Basic research studies are now in progress to illuminate the molecular pathways and mechanisms that are behind this correlation. Given the fact that all of the components of metabolic syndrome are modifiable risk factors, preventive measures must be established to improve the outcome of breast cancer patients. In this review we set the background by taking into account previous studies which have identified the components of metabolic syndrome individually as breast cancer risk factors. Then we present the latest findings which elaborate possible explanations regarding how metabolic syndrome as a single entity may affect breast cancer risk.

  20. Multi-finger Prehension: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the available experimental evidence on what people do when they grasp an object with several digits and then manipulate it. In addition to the Introduction, the paper includes three parts each addressing a specific aspect of multi-finger prehension. Part II discusses manipulation forces, i.e. the resultant force and moment of force exerted on the object, and the digits contribution to such force production. Part III deals with internal forces defined as forces that cancel each other and do not disturb object equilibrium. The role of the internal forces in maintaining the object stability is discussed with respect to such issues as slip prevention, tilt prevention and resistance to perturbations. Part IV is devoted to the motor control of prehension. It covers such topics as prehension synergies, chain effects, the principle of superposition, inter-finger connection matrices and reconstruction of neural commands, mechanical advantage of the fingers, and the simultaneous digit adjustment to several mutually reinforcing or conflicting demands. PMID:18782719

  1. Targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rawat, A; Vaidya, B; Khatri, K; Goyal, A K; Gupta, P N; Mahor, S; Paliwal, R; Rai, S; Vyas, S P

    2007-09-01

    During the last decade, intracellular drug delivery has become an emerging area of research in the medical and pharmaceutical field. Many therapeutic agents such as drugs and DNA/oligonucleotides can be delivered not just to the cell but also to a particular compartment of that cell to achieve better activity e.g. proapoptotic drugs to the mitochondria, antibiotics and enzymes to the lysosomes and various anticancer drugs and gene to the nucleus. The lipidic nature of biological membrans is the major obstacle to the intracellular delivery of macromolecular and ionic drugs. Additionally, after endocytosis, the lysosome, the major degradation compartment, needs to be avoided for better activity. To avoid these problems, various carriers have been investigated for efficient intracellular delivery, either by direct entry to cytoplasm or by escaping the endosomal compartment. These include cell penetrating peptides, and carrier systems such as liposomes, cationic lipids and polymers, polymeric nanoparticles, etc. Various properties of these carriers, including size, surface charge, composition and the presence of cell specific ligands, alter their efficacy and specificity towards particular cells. This review summarizes various aspects of targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics including pathways, mechanisms and approaches. Various carrier constructs having potential for targeted intracellular delivery are also been discussed.

  2. An overview of white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Charpinet, S.; Randall, S. K.; Van Grootel, V.

    2013-03-01

    We present a brief summary of what is currently known about white dwarf stars, with an emphasis on their evolutionary and internal properties. As is well known, white dwarfs represent the end products of stellar evolution for the vast majority of stars and, as such, bear the signatures of past events (such as mass loss, mixing phases, loss and redistribution of angular momentum, and thermonuclear burning) that are of essential importance in the evolution of stars in general. In addition, white dwarf stars represent ideal testbeds for our understanding of matter under extreme conditions, and work on their constitutive physics (neutrino production rates, conductive and radiative opacities, interior liquid/solid equations of state, partially ionized and partially degenerate envelope equations of state, diffusion coefficients, line broadening mechanisms) is still being actively pursued. Given a set of constitutive physics, cooling white dwarfs can be used advantageously as cosmochronometers. Moreover, the field has been blessed by the existence of four distinct families of pulsating white dwarfs, each mapping a different evolutionary phase, and this allows the application of the asteroseismological method to probe and test their internal structure and evolutionary state. We set the stage for the reviews that follow on cooling white dwarfs as cosmochronometers and physics laboratories, as well as on the properties of pulsating white dwarfs and the asteroseismological results that can be inferred.

  3. Social network site addiction - an overview.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Cecilie Schou; Pallesen, Ståle

    2014-01-01

    Research into frequent, excessive, and compulsive social network activity has increased the last years, in which terms such as "social network site addiction" and "Facebook addiction" have been used interchangeably. The aim of this review is to offer more knowledge and better understanding of social network site addiction (SNS-addiction) among researchers as well as clinicians by presenting a narrative overview of the research field in terms of definition, measurement, antecedents, consequences, and treatment as well as recommendations for future research efforts. Seven different measures of SNS-addiction have been developed, although they have to a very little extent been validated against each other. The small number of studies conducted so far on this topic suggests that SNS-addiction is associated with health-related, academic, and interpersonal problems/issues. However such studies have relied on a simple cross-sectional study design. It is therefore hard to draw any conclusions about potential causality and long-term effects at this point, beyond hypothetical speculations. Empirical studies suggest that SNS-addiction is caused by dispositional factors (e.g., personality, needs, self-esteem), although relevant explanatory socio-cultural and behavioral reinforcement factors remain to be empirically explored. No well-documented treatment for SNS-addiction exists, but knowledge gained from Internet addiction treatment approaches might be transferable to SNS-addiction. Overall, the research on this topic is in its infancy, and as such the SNS-addiction construct needs further conceptual and empirical exploration. There is a great demand for studies using careful longitudinal designs and studies which include objective measures of both behavior and health based on broad representative samples.

  4. Migration in south Asia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, R

    1983-01-01

    Past studies on migration patterns and flows in south Asia have been based on limited data. The present overview is based on a detailed study of census and survey data reaching back to the early 1950's. The study incorporates the thinking of several research scholars who have dealt with specialized areas of migration in individual countries, and in the region as a whole. The interrelationships between migration and development are considered in a final chapter, with special mention of future trends, associated with traditional practices and historical circumstances. Migration will be of great importance in the coming decades. The activities of "sons of soil" anti-migrant movements and anti-migrant legislation have had little, if any, effect on migration flows. As the population increases in villages and towns and jobs become scarce, migration is likely to become even more of a political issue. Less politically volatile is circulation between village and town or between villages, whereby the migrants can have access to resources in 2 or more places. This option may play a critical role in the continued survival of much of the population in the future. This has been perhaps the most important factor in explaining the relatively slow rate of urbanization in south Asia as it allowed the rural people to take advantage of the towns without causing a massive and permanent transfer of population. The numbers who practice this "bilocality" are therefore likely to increase and migrants will continue to make up more significant proportions of the urban populations than their contribution to urban growth would suggest owing to the importance of "turnover migration." However, this circulation is not a new phenomenon: India and the other countries of south Asia have been characterized by tremendous mobility of population through circulation for considerable time but both its volume, and the distances over which it occurs are likely to increase as these countries develop.

  5. Matera Laser Ranging Observatory (MLRO): An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Decker, Winfield M.; Crooks, Henry A.; Bianco, Giuseppe

    1993-06-01

    The Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) is currently under negotiation with the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) of the Allied Signal Aerospace Company (ASAC) to build a state-of-the-art laser ranging observatory for the Centro di Geodesia Spaziale, in Matera, Italy. The contract calls for the delivery of a system based on a 1.5 meter afocal Cassegrain astronomical quality telescope with multiple ports to support a variety of experiments for the future, with primary emphasis on laser ranging. Three focal planes, viz. Cassegrain, Coude, and Nasmyth will be available for these experiments. The open telescope system will be protected from dust and turbulence using a specialized dome which will be part of the building facilities to be provided by ASI. The fixed observatory facility will be partitioned into four areas for locating the following: laser, transmit/receive optics, telescope/dome enclosure, and the operations console. The optical tables and mount rest on a common concrete pad for added mechanical stability. Provisions will be in place for minimizing the effects of EMI, for obtaining maximum cleanliness for high power laser and transmit optics, and for providing an ergonomic environment fitting to a state-of-the-art multipurpose laboratory. The system is currently designed to be highly modular and adaptable for scaling or changes in technology. It is conceived to be a highly automated system with superior performance specifications to any currently operational system. Provisions are also made to adapt and accommodate changes that are of significance during the course of design and integration.

  6. Matera Laser Ranging Observatory (MLRO): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Decker, Winfield M.; Crooks, Henry A.; Bianco, Giuseppe

    1993-01-01

    The Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) is currently under negotiation with the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) of the Allied Signal Aerospace Company (ASAC) to build a state-of-the-art laser ranging observatory for the Centro di Geodesia Spaziale, in Matera, Italy. The contract calls for the delivery of a system based on a 1.5 meter afocal Cassegrain astronomical quality telescope with multiple ports to support a variety of experiments for the future, with primary emphasis on laser ranging. Three focal planes, viz. Cassegrain, Coude, and Nasmyth will be available for these experiments. The open telescope system will be protected from dust and turbulence using a specialized dome which will be part of the building facilities to be provided by ASI. The fixed observatory facility will be partitioned into four areas for locating the following: laser, transmit/receive optics, telescope/dome enclosure, and the operations console. The optical tables and mount rest on a common concrete pad for added mechanical stability. Provisions will be in place for minimizing the effects of EMI, for obtaining maximum cleanliness for high power laser and transmit optics, and for providing an ergonomic environment fitting to a state-of-the-art multipurpose laboratory. The system is currently designed to be highly modular and adaptable for scaling or changes in technology. It is conceived to be a highly automated system with superior performance specifications to any currently operational system. Provisions are also made to adapt and accommodate changes that are of significance during the course of design and integration.

  7. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    PubMed

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  8. An overview of American higher education.

    PubMed

    Baum, Sandy; Kurose, Charles; McPherson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This overview of postsecondary education in the United States reviews the dramatic changes over the past fifty years in the students who go to college, the institutions that produce higher education, and the ways it is financed. The article, by Sandy Baum, Charles Kurose, and Michael McPherson, creates the context for the articles that follow on timely issues facing the higher education community and policy makers. The authors begin by observing that even the meaning of college has changed. The term that once referred primarily to a four-year period of academic study now applies to virtually any postsecondary study--academic or occupational, public or private, two-year or four-year-- that can result in a certificate or degree. They survey the factors underlying the expansion of postsecondary school enrollments; the substantial increases in female, minority, disadvantaged, and older students; the development of public community colleges; and the rise of for-profit colleges. They discuss the changing ways in which federal and state governments help students and schools defray the costs of higher education as well as more recent budget tensions that are now reducing state support to public colleges. And they review the forces that have contributed to the costs of producing higher education and thus rising tuitions. The authors also cite evidence on broad measures of college persistence and outcomes, including low completion rates at community and for-profit colleges, the increasing need for remedial education for poorly prepared high school students, and a growing gap between the earnings of those with a bachelor's degree and those with less education. They disagree with critics who say that investments in higher education, particularly for students at the margin, no longer pay off. A sustained investment in effective education at all levels is vital to the nation's future, they argue. But they caution that the American public no longer seems willing to pay more for

  9. Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE): An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, A. R.; Blomquist, B.; Huebert, B.; Howell, S.; Clarke, T.; Hudson, J.; Faloona, I.; Wang, Y.; Mauldin, R. L.; Heikes, B.; Merrill, J.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE) was a study of the chemistry of sulfur in a cloud free region of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The experiment was conducted aboard the NSF C130 just east of Christmas Island during August and early September of 2007 in the prevailing southeasterly trade wind flow. PASE is envisioned as the first of a series of experiments focused on developing an understanding of how the chemistry of sulfur affects climate in general but especially with respect to its impact on cloud chemistry and physics. Being the first of this series, PASE was focused on (but not limited to) clear air to narrow the scope of the science to control costs and to reflect the fact that most of the available instrumentation cannot make effective measurements in clouds. PASE is unique in that it brought together several instruments (SO2, DMS, O3 and H2O) that make measurements fast enough to permit the computation of vertical fluxes by eddy covariance allowing the flux terms in chemical budgets to be determined quantitatively. The PASE instrument payload also made a large suite of slower measurements including but not limited to OH, HO2, RO2, H2SO4, methane sulfonic acid (MSA), H2O2, CH3COOH, thermally resolved CN(>15nm), ultrafine CN (>3 nm), bulk aerosol composition, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The high rate instruments enabled quantification of the vertical exchange that could be generalized to estimate the mixing of the slower analytes. One of the surprising results from PASE was the large and very steady levels of CCN observed throughout the experiment. Furthermore, the vertical gradient indicated that boundary layer venting via shallow convection was a persistent sink of the CCN. Taken in concert the unique data set renders a picture of marine air that has not been purged by precipitation in a long while, allowing it to build up large amounts of volatile sulfur in the condensed phase and providing a superb environment to investigate

  10. Validation and Comprehension: An Integrated Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendeou, Panayiota

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I review and discuss the work presented in this special issue while focusing on a number of issues that warrant further investigation in validation research. These issues pertain to the nature of the validation processes, the processes and mechanisms that support validation during comprehension, the factors that influence…

  11. Occupancy Chargeback: An Overview of Different Models and a Glimpse of 'One' Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Garry; Mozjerin, Con

    2001-01-01

    Presents an overview of factors motivating the occupancy chargeback movement on today's campuses. Examines the two basic models with particular reference to RMIT University (Australia), and discusses what associated support mechanisms may be required. Concluding comments address activity-based costing. (GR)

  12. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs.

  13. Fractures of Distal Radius: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  14. Neurotoxicity of ecstasy (MDMA): an overview.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Schmued, Larry

    2010-08-01

    "Ecstasy" (MDMA) is a powerful hallucinogenic drug which has raised concern worldwide because of its high abuse liability. A plethora of studies have demonstrated that MDMA has the potential to induce neurotoxicity both in human and laboratory animals. Although research on MDMA has been carried out by many different laboratories, the mechanism underlying MDMA induced toxicity has not been fully elucidated. MDMA has the ability to reduce serotonin levels in terminals of axons in the cortex of rats and mice. Recently we have shown that it also has the potential to produce degenerate neurons in discrete areas of the brain such as insular and parietal cortex, thalamus, tenia tecta and bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST). Acute effects of MDMA can result in a constellation of changes including arrthymias, hypertension, hyperthermia, serotonin (5-HT) syndrome, liver problems, seizures and also long lasting neurocognitive impairments including mood disturbances. In human MDMA abusers, there is evidence for reduction of serotonergic biochemical markers. Several factors may contribute to the MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, especially hyperthermia. Other factors potentially influencing MDMA toxicity include monoamine oxidase metabolism of dopamine and serotonin, nitric oxide generation, glutamate excitotoxicity, serotonin 2A receptor agonism and the formation of MDMA neurotoxic metabolites. In this review we will cover the following topics: pharmacological mechanisms, metabolic pathways and acute effects in laboratory animals, as well as in humans, with special attention on the mechanism and pathology of MDMA induced neurotoxicity.

  15. An overview on plant cuticle biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Eva; Cuartero, Jesús; Heredia, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    Plant biomechanics combines the principles of physics, chemistry and engineering to answer questions about plant growth, development and interaction with the environment. The epidermal-growth-control theory, postulated in 1867 and verified in 2007, states that epidermal cells determine the rate of organ elongation since they are under tension, while inner tissues are under compression. The lipid cuticle layer is deposited on the surface of outer epidermal cell walls and modifies the chemical and mechanical nature of these cell walls. Thus, the plant cuticle plays a key role in plant interaction with the environment and in controlling organ expansion. Rheological analyses indicate that the cuticle is a mostly viscoelastic and strain-hardening material that stiffens the comparatively more elastic epidermal cell walls. Cuticle stiffness can be attributed to polysaccharides and flavonoids present in the cuticle whereas a cutin matrix is mainly responsible for its extensibility. Environmental conditions such as temperature and relative humidity have a plasticizing effect on the mechanical properties of cuticle since they lower cuticle stiffness and strength. The external appearance of agricultural commodities, especially fruits, is of great economic value. Mechanical properties of the cuticle can have a positive or negative effect on disorders like fruit cracking, fungal pathogen penetration and pest infestation. Cuticle rheology has significant variability within a species and thus can be subjected to selection in order to breed cultivars resistant to pests, infestation and disorders.

  16. Overview of Traumatic Brain Injury: An Immunological Context

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinov, Damir; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) afflicts people of all ages and genders, and the severity of injury ranges from concussion/mild TBI to severe TBI. Across all spectrums, TBI has wide-ranging, and variable symptomology and outcomes. Treatment options are lacking for the early neuropathology associated with TBIs and for the chronic neuropathological and neurobehavioral deficits. Inflammation and neuroinflammation appear to be major mediators of TBI outcomes. These systems are being intensively studies using animal models and human translational studies, in the hopes of understanding the mechanisms of TBI, and developing therapeutic strategies to improve the outcomes of the millions of people impacted by TBIs each year. This manuscript provides an overview of the epidemiology and outcomes of TBI, and presents data obtained from animal and human studies focusing on an inflammatory and immunological context. Such a context is timely, as recent studies blur the traditional understanding of an “immune-privileged” central nervous system. In presenting the evidence for specific, adaptive immune response after TBI, it is hoped that future studies will be interpreted using a broader perspective that includes the contributions of the peripheral immune system, to central nervous system disorders, notably TBI and post-traumatic syndromes. PMID:28124982

  17. Digital Libraries and Digitisation: An Overview and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikowski, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of some of the main areas surrounding the broad topic of "Digital Libraries". This includes the advantages and costs of digitisation; the traditional and digital library; the library community and digitisation; and an examination of various digital library projects. It is not exhaustive, but hopefully, it provides…

  18. The Construct of Androgyny: An Overview and Implications for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eman, Virginia A.; Morse, Benjamin W.

    The concept of androgyny refers to the psychological wholeness of a person defined as the ability of an individual to identify with both masculine and feminine characteristics, depending on their appropriateness in various situations. This paper presents an overview of the construct of androgyny, describes the Bem Sex Role Inventory as a measure…

  19. Mucoadhesive drug delivery system: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Bindu M.; Mohammed, Zulkar N. K.; Nath, Ravinder A.; Banji, David

    2010-01-01

    Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems interact with the mucus layer covering the mucosal epithelial surface, and mucin molecules and increase the residence time of the dosage form at the site of absorption. The drugs which have local action or those which have maximum absorption in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) require increased duration of stay in GIT. Thus, mucoadhesive dosage forms are advantageous in increasing the drug plasma concentrations and also therapeutic activity. In this regard, this review covers the areas of mechanisms and theories of mucoadhesion, factors influencing the mucoadhesive devices and also various mucoadhesive dosage forms. PMID:22247877

  20. Hybrid Ceramic Matrix Fibrous Composites: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naslain, R.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic-Matrix Composites (CMCs) consist of a ceramic fiber architecture in a ceramic matrix, bonded together through a thin interphase. The present contribution is limited to non-oxide CMCs. Their constituents being oxidation-prone, they are protected by external coatings. We state here that CMCs display a hybrid feature, when at least one of their components is not homogeneous from a chemical or microstructural standpoint. Hybrid fiber architectures are used to tailor the mechanical or thermal CMC-properties whereas hybrid interphases, matrices and coatings to improve CMC resistance to aggressive environments.

  1. Fluid mechanics of eating, swallowing and digestion - overview and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Engmann, Jan; Burbidge, Adam S

    2013-02-26

    From a very simplistic viewpoint, the human digestive system can be regarded as a long tube (with dramatic variations in diameter, cross-section, wall properties, pumping mechanisms, regulating valves and in-line sensors). We single out a few fluid mechanical phenomena along the trajectory of a food bolus from the mouth to the small intestine and discuss how they influence sensorial perception, safe transport, and nutrient absorption from a bolus. The focus is on lubrication flows between the tongue and palate, the oropharyngeal stage of swallowing and effects of flow on absorption in the small intestine. Specific challenges and opportunities in this research area are highlighted.

  2. Temporal bone arrangements in turtles: an overview.

    PubMed

    Werneburg, Ingmar

    2012-06-01

    The temporal region of turtles is characterized by significant anatomical diversity. Turtles show a pure anapsid morphotype that exhibits various different marginal reductions known as emarginations. As a result of this diversity, turtles can be taken as a model by which to understand the processes that may have resulted in the highly debated anatomy of the amniote temporal region in general. In this review on almost forgotten literature, I summarize ten potential factors that may act on the skull to shape the temporal region of turtles. These are: (1) phylogenetic constraints, (2) skull weights, (3) type of food, (4) skull dimensions, (5) muscle bulging, (6) ear anatomy and jaw muscle bending mechanisms, (7) extent and nature of muscle attachment sites, (8) internal forces within the jaw adductor chamber, (9) environmental pressure, and (10) neck bending mechanisms. Particular focus is laid on the interrelationship of the jaw musculature and the dermatocranial armour, which were assumed to influence each other to a certain degree. In the literature, cranial dimensions were assumed to influence temporal bone formation within major tetrapod groups. Among these, turtles seem to represent a kind of intermixture, a phenomenon that may be reflected in their specific anatomy. The references presented should be understood as product of the scientific environment in which they developed and the older literature does not always insist current empirical demands. However, the intuitive and creative ideas and the comprehensive anatomical considerations of these authors may inspire future studies in several fields related to this topic.

  3. An overview of the association between allergy and cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michelle C; Chen, Yue; Krewski, Daniel; Ghadirian, Parviz

    2006-06-15

    Numerous epidemiological studies have evaluated some aspect of the association between a history of allergy and cancer occurrence. In this article, an overview of the epidemiological evidence is presented with a discussion of a number of methodological issues important in this area of study. Literature searches were conducted using the MEDLINE database from 1966 through to August 2005 to identify articles that explored a personal history of allergic disorders as a risk factor for cancer. Although it is difficult to draw conclusions between allergy and cancer at many sites because of insufficient evidence or a lack of consistency both within and among studies completed to date, strong inverse associations have been reported for pancreatic cancer and glioma, whereas lung cancer was positively associated with asthma. Additional studies are needed to confirm these finding and to address the limitations of previous studies, including the validity and reliability of exposure measures and control for confounding. Further, large prospective studies using cancer incidence would be particularly useful, including studies using biological markers of allergic status to reduce potential misclassification and to confirm the results of previous studies based on self-report. There is also a need for further basic research to clarify a potential mechanism, should an association exist.

  4. Open peer review at four STEM journals: an observational overview.

    PubMed

    Ford, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Open peer review, peer review where authors' and reviewers' identities are disclosed to one another, is a growing trend in scholarly publishing. Through observation of four journals in STEM disciplines, PLOS One, Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics, PeerJ, and F1000Research, an observational overview is conducted. The overview relies on defined characteristics of open peer review. Results show that despite differing open peer review implementations, each journal retains editorial involvement in scholarly publishing. Further, the analysis shows that only one of these implementations is fully transparent in its peer review and decision making process. Finally, the overview contends that journals should clearly outline peer review and editorial processes in order to allow for open peer review to be better understood and adopted by authors, reviewers, editors, and readers of science communications.

  5. Remote conditioning the heart overview: translatability and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Redington, Andrew; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2015-01-01

    Conditioning the heart to resist predictable and unpredictable ischaemia–reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the fastest growing areas of bench to bedside research within cardiology. Basic science has provided important insights into signalling pathways and protective mechanisms in the heart, and a growing number of clinical studies have, with important exceptions, shown the potential applicability and beneficial effect of various mechanical conditioning strategies achieved by intermittent short-lasting-induced ischaemia of the heart itself or a remote tissue. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) in particular has been utilized in a number of clinical settings with promising results. However, while many novel ‘downstream’ mechanisms of RIC have been discovered, translation to pharmacological conditioning has not yet been convincingly demonstrated in clinical studies. One explanation for this apparent failure may be that most pharmacological approaches mimic a single instrument in a complex orchestra activated by mechanical conditioning. Recent studies, however, provide important insights into upstream events occurring in RIC, which may allow for development of drugs activating more complex systems of biological organ protection. With this review, we will systematically examine the first generation of pharmacological cardioprotection studies and then provide a summary of the recent discoveries in basic science that could illuminate the path towards more advanced approaches in the next generation of pharmacological agents that may work by reproducing the diverse effects of RIC, thereby providing protection against IR injury. PMID:25219984

  6. Phase transitions: An overview with a view

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.

    1997-10-01

    The dynamics of phase transitions plays a crucial role in the so- called interface between high energy particle physics and cosmology. Many of the interesting results generated during the last fifteen years or so rely on simplified assumptions concerning the complex mechanisms typical of nonequilibrium field theories. After reviewing well-known results concerning the dynamics of first and second order phase transitions, I argue that much is yet to be understood, in particular in situations where homogeneous nucleation theory does not apply. I present a method to deal with departures from homogeneous nucleation, and compare its efficacy with numerical simulations. Finally, I discuss the interesting problem of matching numerical simulations of stochastic field theories with continuum models.

  7. Bone substitutes in 2003: an overview.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cnockaert, N; Cornu, O

    2003-01-01

    The authors review the various bone substitutes which are currently available on the market place in Belgium. After describing the requirements for clinical use of such materials, they compare the biological and mechanical values of bone autografts, bone allografts, demineralised bone, xenografts, coral and synthetic materials such as calcium sulfate, calcium phosphate, ionic cement and bioactive glass. They stress the current paucity of data pertaining to the biological value of these materials and call for in vivo validation tests. They also review biomolecules such as BMP-2 or OP-1, whose osteoinductive properties are currently under investigation. Finally, they present the emergent field of cell therapy, in which osteoprogenitor cells are isolated from the patient's bone marrow and reinjected after in vitro cultivation. They stress the therapeutic and medicolegal problems raised by the combination of medical devices, grafts, medicinal products and cells, all of which have a different status within the complex European legal framework.

  8. Radar response of vegetation: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Dobson, M. Craig

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a number of viewgraphs on surface and vegetation backscattering. A classification of vegetation based on general scattering properties is presented. Radar scattering mechanisms are discussed, and backscattering and reflection coefficients for soil back scattering models are given. Radar response to vegetation is presented, with the objectives to discriminate and classify vegetation; to estimate biomass, leaf area index (LAI), and soil moisture; and to monitor changes, including deforestation and growth. Both theory and observation (laboratory, field, air SAR, and European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) observations) are used to present backscatter coefficients and other data for various vegetation types. ERS-1 results include class statistics, comparison with theory, and biomass response and seasonal variation (LAI) for deciduous and coniferous forests.

  9. Fog research in China: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shengjie; Lu, Chunsong; Yu, Huaying; Zhao, Lijuan; Lü, Jingjing

    2010-05-01

    Fog can adversely affect human activity directly and indirectly, resulting in large losses both in terms of the local economy and lives. Much effort has been devoted to studies of fog across many areas of China, and in that context this paper aims to summarize climatic characteristics and review fog field experiments and their major results relating to fog mechanisms, physical properties and chemical characteristics. Progress in the application of remote sensing techniques and numerical simulation in fog research are also discussed. In particular, the effects of urbanization and industrialization on fog are highlighted. To end, perspectives on future fog research are outlined. The goal of this review paper is to introduce fog research in China to the global academic community and thus promote international collaboration on fog research. This is important because most papers on fog in China are published in Chinese, which are unreadable for the vast majority of non-Chinese researchers.

  10. Roles of the gut in the metabolic syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Fändriks, L

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors (central obesity, hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and arterial hypertension), indicating an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. The gastrointestinal tract is seldom discussed as an organ system of principal importance for metabolic diseases. The present overview connects various metabolic research lines into an integrative physiological context in which the gastrointestinal tract is included. Strong evidence for the involvement of the gut in the metabolic syndrome derives from the powerful effects of weight-reducing (bariatric) gastrointestinal surgery. In fact, gastrointestinal surgery is now recommended as a standard treatment option for type 2 diabetes in obesity. Several gut-related mechanisms that potentially contribute to the metabolic syndrome will be presented. Obesity can be caused by hampered release of satiety-signalling gut hormones, reduced meal-associated energy expenditure and microbiota-assisted harvest of energy from nondigestible food ingredients. Adiposity per se is a well-established risk factor for hyperglycaemia. In addition, a leaky gut mucosa can trigger systemic inflammation mediating peripheral insulin resistance that together with a blunted incretin response aggravates the hyperglycaemic state. The intestinal microbiota is strongly associated with obesity and the related metabolic disease states, although the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Enterorenal signalling has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension and postprandial triglyceride-rich chylomicrons; in addition, intestinal cholesterol metabolism probably contributes to atherosclerosis. It is likely that in the future, the metabolic syndrome will be treated according to novel pharmacological principles interfering with gastrointestinal functionality.

  11. Adaptation in the auditory system: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, David; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2014-01-01

    The early stages of the auditory system need to preserve the timing information of sounds in order to extract the basic features of acoustic stimuli. At the same time, different processes of neuronal adaptation occur at several levels to further process the auditory information. For instance, auditory nerve fiber responses already experience adaptation of their firing rates, a type of response that can be found in many other auditory nuclei and may be useful for emphasizing the onset of the stimuli. However, it is at higher levels in the auditory hierarchy where more sophisticated types of neuronal processing take place. For example, stimulus-specific adaptation, where neurons show adaptation to frequent, repetitive stimuli, but maintain their responsiveness to stimuli with different physical characteristics, thus representing a distinct kind of processing that may play a role in change and deviance detection. In the auditory cortex, adaptation takes more elaborate forms, and contributes to the processing of complex sequences, auditory scene analysis and attention. Here we review the multiple types of adaptation that occur in the auditory system, which are part of the pool of resources that the neurons employ to process the auditory scene, and are critical to a proper understanding of the neuronal mechanisms that govern auditory perception.

  12. Krill products: an overview of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Burri, Lena; Johnsen, Line

    2015-05-07

    Many animal studies have been performed with krill oil (KO) and this review aims to summarize their findings and give insight into the mechanism of action of KO. Animal models that have been used in studies with KO include obesity, depression, myocardial infarction, chronic low-grade and ulcerative inflammation and are described in detail. Moreover, studies with KO in the form of krill powder (KP) and krill protein concentrate (KPC) as a mix of lipids and proteins are mentioned and compared to the effects of KO. In addition, differences in tissue uptake of the long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), when delivered in either phospholipid or triglyceride form, are addressed and the differential impact the delivery form has on gene expression profiles is explained. In our outlook, we try to highlight the potential of KO and KP supplementation in clinical settings and discuss health segments that have a high potential of showing krill product specific health benefits and warrant further clinical investigations.

  13. The role of medical simulation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Kevin

    2006-09-01

    Robotic surgery and medical simulation have much in common: both use a mechanized interface that provides visual "patient" reactions in response to the actions of the health care professional (although simulation also includes touch feedback); both use monitors to visualize the progression of the procedure; and both use computer software applications through which the health care professional interacts. Both technologies are experiencing rapid adoption and are viewed as modalities that allow physicians to perform increasingly complex minimally invasive procedures while enhancing patient safety. A review of the literature and industry developments concludes that medical simulators can be useful tools in determining a physician's understanding and use of best practices, management of patient complications, appropriate use of instruments and tools, and overall competence in performing procedures. Future use of these systems depends on their impact on patient safety, procedure completion time and cost efficiency. The sooner simulation training can be used to support developing technologies and procedures, the earlier, and typically the better, the results. Continued studies are needed to identify and ensure the ongoing applicability of these systems for both training and certification.

  14. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  15. An overview of second generation biofuel technologies.

    PubMed

    Sims, Ralph E H; Mabee, Warren; Saddler, Jack N; Taylor, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The recently identified limitations of 1st-generation biofuels produced from food crops (with perhaps the exception of sugarcane ethanol) have caused greater emphasis to be placed on 2nd-generation biofuels produced from ligno-cellulosic feedstocks. Although significant progress continues to be made to overcome the technical and economic challenges, 2nd-generation biofuels production will continue to face major constraints to full commercial deployment. The logistics of providing a competitive, all-year-round, supply of biomass feedstock to a commercial-scale plant is challenging, as is improving the performance of the conversion process to reduce costs. The biochemical route, being less mature, probably has a greater cost reduction potential than the thermo-chemical route, but here a wider range of synthetic fuels can be produced to better suit heavy truck, aviation and marine applications. Continued investment in research and demonstration by both public and private sectors, coupled with appropriate policy support mechanisms, are essential if full commercialisation is to be achieved within the next decade. After that, the biofuel industry will grow only at a steady rate and encompass both 1st- and 2nd-generation technologies that meet agreed environmental, sustainability and economic policy goals.

  16. Subsidence and the petroleum industry: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.F.; Powley, D.E.

    1988-02-01

    About 35 oil and gas fields are known to be associated with surface subsidence, the result of fluid withdrawal and consequent pressure drop and reservoir compaction. Such fields are located worldwide, mostly in clastic rocks but also in chalks. The effects mainly are of vertical displacement, often accompanied by some horizontal strain. Subsidence may be caused by tectonism, surface loading and vibration, mineral reactions with water, or fluid withdrawal, but mostly results from extraction of oil, gas, or, most importantly, ground water. Subsidence is measured at the surface through leveling with bench marks and in the subsurface from casing collar depths or with radioactive bullets in borehole walls. Rates of subsidence can be as much as 2 ft/year; surface subsidence commonly lags behind cumulative production. Prediction of subsidence can be done rather accurately within a producing field or group of fields, or within the same stratum in a particular province, once the problem is understood, but is very difficult in a frontier area unless carefully considered before drilling. Once recognized, subsidence can be prevented or partially rectified by reinjection to replace extracted fluids, thus restoring formation pressure and consequent compaction. Compaction itself may serve as a production drive mechanism. Subsidence may cause such adverse effects as bent or broken casing, settling of drilling platforms, broken pipelines, and flooding of surface facilities.

  17. An overview of flux braiding experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wilmot-Smith, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    In a number of papers dating back to the 1970s, Parker has hypothesized that, in a perfectly ideal environment, complex photospheric motions acting on a continuous magnetic field will result in the formation of tangential discontinuities corresponding to singular currents. I review direct numerical simulations of the problem and find that the evidence points to a tendency for thin but finite-thickness current layers to form, with thickness exponentially decreasing in time. Given a finite resistivity, these layers will eventually become important and cause the dynamical process of energy release. Accordingly, a body of work focuses on evolution under continual boundary driving. The coronal volume evolves into a highly dynamic but statistically steady state where quantities have a temporally and spatially intermittent nature and where the Poynting flux and dissipation are decoupled on short time scales. Although magnetic braiding is found to be a promising coronal heating mechanism, much work remains to determine its true viability. Some suggestions for future study are offered. PMID:25897088

  18. EMERGING CONTAMINANTS: AN OVERVIEW OF ON-GOING RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation covers an overview of research on emerging contaminants on-going at

    U.S. EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory in Las Vegas. Due to the

    improvements and sophistication of recent analytical instruments, increasing numbers of

    chemicals a...

  19. The Equinox Transition Study - An overview. [thermosphere/ionosphere dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. C., Jr.; Crowley, G.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is presented of the Equinox Transition Study (ETS), including the historical perspective, the experimental philosophy, and the results of the analysis. The broad scientific aim of ETS is to understand the electromechanical response of the thermosphere/ionosphere system to variable high-latitude forcing. Some of the results obtained from ETS are summarized.

  20. Home Education in Germany: An Overview of the Contemporary Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegler, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the situation of home education in Germany. The first results from a predominantly qualitative research project are presented. This combines participant observation, content analysis and qualitative interviews for a thorough sociological analysis of the German home education movement. Compulsory school attendance…

  1. An overview of the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, W.; Ogden, D.; Wright, D.

    1982-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) project is reviewed. A technical description of the CTS spacecraft and its cognate hardware and operations is included. A historical treatise of the CTS project is provided. Also presented is an overview of the CTS experiments and demonstrations conducted during the course of the project.

  2. An overview of flight computer technologies for future NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of current developments by several US Government Agencies and associated programs, towards high-performance single board computers for use in space. Three separate projects will be described; two that are based on the Power PC processor, and one based on the Pentium processor.

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on selected optical materials: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtenson, G.R.; White, R.H.

    1992-07-30

    This report gives an overview of the effects of ionizing radiation on optical materials that may be used in spacecraft sensors. It introduces the relevant phenomena and indicates were more detailed information can be found. The topics covered include radiation induced absorption in ultraviolet transmitting materials, ordinary optical glasses, cerium stabilized optical glasses, and infrared transmitting materials; bleaching and annealing, and radioluminesence.

  4. An overview of tested and analyzed NTP concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the Space Exploration Initiative are discussed, and the technologies which enable their attainment are evaluated. The main driving technology is the propulsion system; for interplanetary missions, the safest and most affordable is a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system. This paper presents an overview of the NTP systems which have received detailed conceptual design and, for several, testing.

  5. Telescope simulators for Hubble: an overview of optical designs.

    PubMed

    Davila, P; Wood, H J; Atcheson, P D; Saunders, R; Sullivan, J; Vaughan, A H; Saisse, M

    1993-04-01

    Various optical configurations for Hubble Space Telescope simulators have been proposed, and some are being built for use as verification tools to characterize the performance of second-generation instruments during ground testing. We describe the Hubble Space Telescope, present an overview of three optical designs for simulators, and discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of each configuration.

  6. Online Student Services: An Overview of the Provision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNickle, Cathy

    This paper presents an overview of online student services being used by 19 vocational education and training (VET) and higher education institutions in Australia. Information was gathered though site visits between July and September 2000 about online support services for prospective students, enrolling students, enrolled students, and graduating…

  7. The Law on Reduction In Force: An Overview and Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    This chapter provides an overview of legislation and litigation relating to reduction in force (RIF) with a focus on cases decided since 1980. State statutes continue to be the primary source of the law concerning RIF, so a table is provided for these statutes and their various provisions. These statutes include the dismissla-type, and the less…

  8. Advances in water resources assessment with SWAT - an overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper introduces a Special Issue containing 12 research articles which present current applications of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for water resources assessment. Firstly, an overview of selected recently published articles with application of SWAT is given. The articles address ...

  9. An Overview of NASA Automotive Component Reliability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The results of NASAs studies into the appropriateness of using US Automotive electronic parts in NASA spaceflight systems will be presented. The first part of the presentation provides an overview of the United States Automotive Electronics Councils AECQ standardization program, the second part provides a summary of the results of NASAs procurement and testing experiences and other lessons learned along with preliminary test results.

  10. An Overview Of NASA Automotive Component Reliability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The results of NASAs studies into the appropriateness of using US Automotive electronic parts in NASA spaceflight systems will be presented. The first part of the presentation provides an overview of the United States Automotive Electronics Councils AECQ standardization program, the second part provides a summary of the results of NASAs procurement and testing experiences and other lessons learned along with preliminary test results.

  11. Natural Language Processing in Game Studies Research: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagal, Jose P.; Tomuro, Noriko; Shepitsen, Andriy

    2012-01-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) is a field of computer science and linguistics devoted to creating computer systems that use human (natural) language as input and/or output. The authors propose that NLP can also be used for game studies research. In this article, the authors provide an overview of NLP and describe some research possibilities…

  12. End-of-Life Care: An Overview for Professional Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, James L.; Crow, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Although "End-of-Life Care for Terminally Ill Clients" is a section of the "ACA Code of Ethics" (American Counseling Association, 2005), neither the "Code" nor the counseling literature provides much direction for counselors who work with clients who are dying and with the clients' loved ones. The authors provide counselors with an overview of the…

  13. Bullying in Schools: An Overview. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Ken; Tombari, Martin L.; Bennett, Laurie J.; Dunkle, Jason B.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers from the National Center for School Engagement conducted a series of studies to explore the connections between bullying in schools, school attendance and engagement, and academic achievement. This bulletin provides an overview of the studies funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), a summary of the…

  14. The Resource Requirements Prediction Model 1 (RRPM-1): An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulko, Warren W.

    This paper provides a brief overview of the conceptual approach used in the initial version of the WICHE Resource Requirements Prediction Model (RRPM-1). RRPM-1 is an institutional-oriented, computer-based model which simulates the cost of operating a college campus over a 3- to 10-year time frame. The model may be viewed as a management tool to…

  15. An Overview of Discourse Analysis and Its Usefulness in TESOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Geraldine Veronica

    This paper provides an overview of discourse analysis from a linguistic point of view, discussing why it is relevant to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). It focuses on the following: discourse and discourse analysis; discourse analysis and TESOL; approaches to discourse analysis; systemic functional linguistics; theme and…

  16. Student Team Learning: An Overview and Practical Guide. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    This manual provides descriptions of five cooperative learning methods: (1) Student Teams-Achievement Divisions (STAD); (2) Teams-Games-Tournaments (TGT); (3) Jigsaw; (4) Team Accelerated Instruction (TAI); and (5) Cooperative Integrated Reading and Composition (CIRC). For each of these methods, an overview offers a description of the procedures…

  17. Parts Selection for Space Systems - An Overview and Radiation Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the selection of electronic parts for aerospace systems from a space radiation perspective. The topics include: 1) The Trade Space Involved with Part Selection; 2) Understanding Risk; 3) Technical/Design Aspects; 4) Programmatic Overview; 5) Radiation Perspective; 6) Reliability Considerations; 7) An Example Ad hoc Battle; and 8) Sources of Radiation Data.

  18. An overview of the communications technology satellite project: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, W.; Ogden, D.; Wright, D.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) project, a joint venture between NASA and the Canadian Department of Communications is given. A brief technical description of the CTS spacecraft and its cognate hardware and operations, a history of the CTS project, and a list of the CTS experiments and demonstrations conducted during the course of the project are given.

  19. An Overview of the Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkins, Arthur M.; And Others

    The Native American (NATAM) Curriculum Series, designed to serve non-Indian teachers conducting classrooms without American Indian students present, is described in this overview. Presented in outline form are samples of the units prepared by public school teachers from the Columbia Heights, Minnesota, school system who were enrolled in an Indian…

  20. Counseling Families of Children with Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yousef, Jamal M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The impact that counseling can have on a family with a child with diabetes mellitus is discussed. The benefits for the child's psychosocial adjustment and development are highlighted. An overview of the challenges a family with a diabetic child faces is provided and the counselor's role in assisting such families is emphasized. (CR)

  1. The reductive decyanation reaction: an overview and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the reductive decyanation reaction with a special interest for recent developments. This transformation allows synthetic chemists to take advantages of the nitrile functional group before its removal. Mechanistic details and applications to organic synthesis are provided. PMID:28326136

  2. European Design Types for 21st Century Schools: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigolon, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a critical overview of European school building design types, based on an analysis of morphologies and spatial layouts. The different design types are evaluated in function of specific didactic and social needs. (Contains 1 figure, 18 footnotes, a bibliography and 2 online resources.)

  3. Multi-wavelength analysis of young pulsars: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritz, J. M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Buchner, S. J.

    Young pulsars emit a broad spectrum of radiation that range from radio to gamma ray energies. These pulsars are considered as rotation powered pulsars that spin rapidly and are strongly magnetized. Following the discovery of pulsars nearly four decades ago, the population of known pulsars already reached a number of roughly two thousand. This known population of pulsars includes both millisecond and normal pulsars that were discovered by several telescopes. We analyze both HartRAO radio data and Fermi gamma ray data of the Vela pulsar. We also explore a proposed method of probing the electron column density of the instellar gas through analyzing the gamma ray diffuse data associated with the Fermi two-year observation. This paper serves as an overview of gamma ray and radio timing analysis of bright young pulsars with respect to the use of open source timing analysis tools (Tempo2, Psrchive, Enrico and the Fermi tools). We reason that the multi-wavelength picture of pulsars can help clarify questions regarding the origin of pulsed radiation emission mechanisms in several energy bands, but that radio observations will prove adequate for timing noise analysis, given the accurate and long radio data sets. The process of identifying gravitational waves in timing data, rests on gaining a deeper insight into the timing noise phenomena.

  4. Wear of hot rolling mill rolls: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuzic, S.; Strafford, K. N.; Subramanian, C.; Savage, G.

    1994-08-01

    Rolling is today one of the most important industrial processes because a greater volume of material is worked by rolling than by any other technique. Roll wear is a multiplex process where mechanical and thermal fatigue combines with impact, abrasion, adhesion and corrosion, which all depend on system interactions rather than material characteristics only. The situation is more complicated in section rolling because of the intricacy of roll geometry. Wear variables and modes are reviewed along with published methods and models used in the study and testing of roll wear. This paper reviews key aspects of roll wear control - roll material properties, roll pass design, and system factors such as temperature, loads and sliding velocity. An overview of roll materials is given including adamites, high Cr materials, high speed tool steels and compound rolls. Non-uniform wear, recognized as the most detrimental phenomenon in section rolling, can be controlled by roll pass design. This can be achieved by computer-aided graphical and statistical analyses of various pass series. Preliminary results obtained from pilot tests conducted using a two-disc hot wear rig and a scratch tester are discussed.

  5. An overview on the reactors to study drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gomes, I B; Simões, M; Simões, L C

    2014-10-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can cause pipe degradation, changes in the water organoleptic properties but the main problem is related to the public health. Biofilms are the main responsible for the microbial presence in drinking water (DW) and can be reservoirs for pathogens. Therefore, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation and behavior is of utmost importance in order to create effective control strategies. As the study of biofilms in real DWDS is difficult, several devices have been developed. These devices allow biofilm formation under controlled conditions of physical (flow velocity, shear stress, temperature, type of pipe material, etc), chemical (type and amount of nutrients, type of disinfectant and residuals, organic and inorganic particles, ions, etc) and biological (composition of microbial community - type of microorganism and characteristics) parameters, ensuring that the operational conditions are similar as possible to the DWDS conditions in order to achieve results that can be applied to the real scenarios. The devices used in DW biofilm studies can be divided essentially in two groups, those usually applied in situ and the bench top laboratorial reactors. The selection of a device should be obviously in accordance with the aim of the study and its advantages and limitations should be evaluated to obtain reproducible results that can be transposed into the reality of the DWDS. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the main reactors used in DW biofilm studies, describing their characteristics and applications, taking into account their main advantages and limitations.

  6. Experimental Studies with Nematodes in Ecotoxicology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hägerbäumer, Arne; Höss, Sebastian; Heininger, Peter; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    With respect to their high abundances, their role as intermediaries between microorganisms and higher trophic levels, and their ubiquitous occurrence in all habitats, nematodes are of strong potential interest as environmental indicators. Ecotoxicological methods to evaluate the risk of anthropogenic pollutants on ecosystems require both in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests to investigate either mechanisms or pathways of toxicity and to set accurate toxicity thresholds. For this, the interest in nematodes as model organisms in ecotoxicology increased over the past few decades and existing appropriate experimental methods are reviewed in this manuscript. An overview of the various existing ecotoxicological tools for nematodes, ranging from molecular laboratory methods to experimental model ecosystem approaches, and their role as indicator organisms is given. The reviewed studies, approaches that range from species-based to community-based methods, reveal exciting possibilities for the future use of nematodes in ecotoxicological studies. Suitable ecotoxicological tools and ecological indices for nematodes should be integrated in weight-of-evidence approaches for assessing the ecological risk of contamination. PMID:25861113

  7. An overview of anticancer activity of Garcinia and Hypericum.

    PubMed

    Brito, Lavínia de C; Rangel Berenger, Ana Luiza; Figueiredo, Maria Raquel

    2017-03-28

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide (approximately 8.2 million cases/year) and, over the next two decades, a 70% increase in new cancer cases is expected. Through analysis of the available drugs between the years of 1930 and 2014, it was found that 48% were either natural products or their derivatives. This proportion increased to 66% when semi-synthetic products were included. The family Clusiaceae Juss. (Malpighiales) includes approximately 1000 species distributed throughout all tropical and temperate regions. The phytochemical profile of this family includes many chemicals with interesting pharmacological activities, including anticancer activities. This study includes an overview of the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of secondary metabolites from Garcinia and Hypericum and the mechanisms involved in this activity. Hypericum no longer belong to Clusiaceae family, but was considered in the past by taxonomists, due to similarities with this family. Research in the area has shown that several compounds belonging to different chemical classes exhibit activity in several tumor cell lines in different experimental models. This review shows the significant antineoplasic activity of these compounds, in particular of these two genera and validates the importance of natural products in the search for anticancer drugs.

  8. Microbial Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminants: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nilanjana; Chandran, Preethy

    2011-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems today is hydrocarbon contamination resulting from the activities related to the petrochemical industry. Accidental releases of petroleum products are of particular concern in the environment. Hydrocarbon components have been known to belong to the family of carcinogens and neurotoxic organic pollutants. Currently accepted disposal methods of incineration or burial insecure landfills can become prohibitively expensive when amounts of contaminants are large. Mechanical and chemical methods generally used to remove hydrocarbons from contaminated sites have limited effectiveness and can be expensive. Bioremediation is the promising technology for the treatment of these contaminated sites since it is cost-effective and will lead to complete mineralization. Bioremediation functions basically on biodegradation, which may refer to complete mineralization of organic contaminants into carbon dioxide, water, inorganic compounds, and cell protein or transformation of complex organic contaminants to other simpler organic compounds by biological agents like microorganisms. Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. This paper presents an updated overview of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by microorganisms under different ecosystems. PMID:21350672

  9. Resources Management System (RMS): An Overview.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Intellignece 56, Other Command Intelligence AG: SC, Procurement Operations SAG’S iS, Inspection and resting * 2S, Quality/Reliabilitv Assurance 3R, Supply System...a legal require- ment to pay for goods or services. An expense is a cost of operating an activity, or a cost of doing business . rn RMS this can lead

  10. Bilingual Education and the Law: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Joseph

    There have been four major court decisions affecting bilingual education: Lau v. Nichols, Serna v. Portales, Aspira v. the New York Board of Education and Keyes v. Denver School District No. 1. Lau v. Nichols was an action brought by non-English-speaking Chinese-origin students claiming to be denied an education because they could not comprehend…

  11. HONO fluxes from soil surfaces: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Sörgel, Matthias; Tamm, Alexandra; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Cheng, Yafang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) contributes up to 80% of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) radicals and is also linked to health risks through reactions with tobacco smoke forming carcinogens. Field and modeling results suggested a large unknown HONO source in the troposphere during daytime. By measuring near ground HONO mixing ratio, up to 30% of HONO can be released from forest, rural and urban ground as well as snow surfaces. This source has been proposed to heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on humic acid surfaces or nitric acid photolysis. Laboratory studies showed that HONO emissions from bulk soil samples can reach 258 ng m-2 s-1 (in term of nitrogen), which corresponding to 1.1 × 1012 molecules cm-2 s-1and ˜ 100 times higher than most of the field studies, as measured by a dynamic chamber system. The potential mechanisms for soil HONO emissions include chemical equilibrium of acid-base reaction and gas-liquid partitioning between soil nitrite and HONO, but the positive correlation of HONO fluxes with pH (largest at neutral and slightly alkaline) points to the dominance of the formation process by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In general soil surface acidity, nitrite concentration and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria mainly regulate the HONO release from soil. A recent study showed that biological soil crusts in drylands can also emit large quantities of HONO and NO, corresponding to ˜20% of global nitrogen oxide emissions from soils under natural vegetation. Due to large concentrations of microorganisms in biological soil crusts, particularly high HONO and NO emissions were measured after wetting events. Considering large areas of arid and arable lands as well as peatlands, up to 70% of global soils are able to emitting HONO. However, the discrepancy between large soil HONO emissions measured in lab and low contributions of HONO flux from ground surfaces in field as well as the role of microorganisms should be further investigated.

  12. Periodontal disease: an overview for physicians.

    PubMed

    Fenesy, K E

    1998-01-01

    with severe congenital defects of hematological origin, and alterations in neutrophil chemotaxis function. Periodontitis may also be associated with systemic conditions such as metabolic disorders (diabetes mellitus, female hormonal alterations), drug-induced disorders, hematologic disorders/leukemia, and immune system disorders. These systemic disorders have been documented as capable of affecting the periodontium and/or treatment of periodontal disease. In order to rationally treat and prevent periodontal disease, we need to know the etiologic agents for specific patients, and the mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis in periodontitis. In systemic diseases in which the periodontal tissues are affected as well, early detection and carefully managed therapeutics with the physician and periodontist working together may prove beneficial to the patient's general health and quality of life.

  13. Galileo probe battery program - An historical overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, S. J.; Taenaka, R. K.; Van Ess, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Galileo Probe mission to Jupiter required the selection of a battery module design that exceeded the known state of the art in 1977. The choice of the lithium-sulfur dioxide system, a technology then under development for nonaerospace applications necessitated an extensive cell and module development program that ultimately resulted in a space-qualified product that satisfies the severe constraints and requirements of the Galileo mission. The development program drew on the data base and experience then available from other government-sponsored lithium-sulfur dioxide programs and is an example of multiapplication synergism that can be derived from industry and government cooperation.

  14. Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonthier, Misty; Lyon, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS), particularly when diagnosed prior to the age of 13, is considered to be especially rare and severe. This article provides an in-depth look into its symptomatology, general course, long-term functioning, diagnostic criteria, and methods of assessing the disorder. It also includes discussions of the various…

  15. Electromagnetic Pulse and Civil Preparedness: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-21

    for below-grade shelter spaces must be dealt with using alternative approaches. An equivalent evaluation of telephone, radio, fire ... water and other specialized systems is needed. A low-cost, layman-oriented methodology (not using testing) for appraising vulnerability of

  16. Safe Computing: An Overview of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2001-01-01

    A computer virus is a program that replicates itself, in conjunction with an additional program that can harm a computer system. Common viruses include boot-sector, macro, companion, overwriting, and multipartite. Viruses can be fast, slow, stealthy, and polymorphic. Anti-virus products are described. (MLH)

  17. Facts for Education Advocates: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Educators act as advocates every day, and an advocate's greatest tool is credible information. The College Board and the Alliance for Excellent Education are pleased to announce a series of jointly produced fact sheets intended to arm educators and others with information they can use in advocating for their students, professions, and…

  18. An Overview of Online Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    For over the past years, online education has been quite an option for several learners who have a hard time in going to school campuses due to several reasons such as financial resources or having a hectic schedule. There are several individuals who prefer to continue their higher educational learning through online system. Since, online…

  19. Food allergy animal models: an overview.

    PubMed

    Helm, Ricki M

    2002-05-01

    Specific food allergy is characterized by sensitization to innocuous food proteins with production of allergen-specific IgE that binds to receptors on basophils and mast cells. Upon recurrent exposure to the same allergen, an allergic response is induced by mediator release following cross-linking of cell-bound allergen-specific IgE. The determination of what makes an innocuous food protein an allergen in predisposed individuals is unknown; however, mechanistic and protein allergen predictive models are being actively investigated in a number of animal models. Currently, there is no animal model that will actively profile known food allergens, predict the allergic potential of novel food proteins, or demonstrate clinically the human food allergic sensitization/allergic response. Animal models under investigation include mice, rats, the guinea pig, atopic dog, and neonatal swine. These models are being assessed for production of IgE, clinical responses to re-exposure, and a ranking of food allergens (based on potency) including a nonfood allergen protein source. A selection of animal models actively being investigated that will contribute to our understanding of what makes a protein an allergen and future predictive models for assessing the allergenicity of novel proteins is presented in this review.

  20. DATA FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project described here, entitled Data for Environmental Modeling (D4EM), is the development of a comprehensive set of software tools that allow an environmental model developer to automatically populate model input files with environmental data available from...

  1. An Overview of Lattice-Gas Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    irreversible. There- fore, the CAM-8 dissipates heat like any conventional computer even though the Szilard entropy of the lattice gas is unchanged, but an...Reviews of Modern Physics, 49(3):435–479, 1977. [37] Leo P. Kadanoff and Jack Swift. Transport coefficients near the critical point: A master-equation

  2. The Borderline Personality--An Adlerian Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattner, Leo

    The person with a borderline personality is considered to be neither neurotic nor psychotic, but to exist somewhere in between these two diagnostic categories. Psychoanalytic theorists who have researched the phenomenon of the borderline personality have shifted their emphasis away from Freud's instinct psychology and toward an ego psychology…

  3. An Overview of the Energy Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Edward A.; Wewerka, Eugene M.

    1975-01-01

    Concludes that coal will be the major U.S. energy source in the near future despite the significant problems associated with an increase in coal consumption. Provides advantages and disadvantages for the four major long-term energy sources: nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, geothermal sources, and solar energy. (MLH)

  4. An Overview of Clarkson's Technical Communications Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkman, Patricia R.

    The technical communications program at Clarkson College (New York) offers students 23 courses in subjects ranging from interpersonal behavior to engineering and scientific report writing to computer documentation and the development of technical manuals. With the help of an advisor, each student works out a course of study appropriate to his or…

  5. Public Domain Generic Tools: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erjavec, Tomaz

    This paper presents an introduction to language engineering software, especially for computerized language and text corpora. The focus of the paper is on small and relatively independent pieces of software designed for specific, often low-level language analysis tasks, and on tools in the public domain. Discussion begins with the application of…

  6. [An overview of care in orthogeriatrics].

    PubMed

    Bekhtaoui, Mohamed; Pelerin, Laure; Blond, Hélène; Vincent, Alice; Cudennec, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    The management of fractures in elderly people requires specific technical care. In addition to the knowledge of the risk factors of the occurrence of these fractures, their management is based on surgical, medical and paramedical care. The nurses, physiotherapists and occupational therapists have an essential role to play in terms of care, rehabilitation and prevention.

  7. An overview of adult-learning processes.

    PubMed

    Russell, Sally S

    2006-10-01

    Part of being an effective instructor involves understanding how adults learn best. Theories of adult education are based on valuing the prior learning and experience of adults. Adult learners have different learning styles which must be assessed prior to initiating any educational session. Health care providers can maximize teaching moments by incorporating specific adult-learning principles and learning styles into their teaching strategies.

  8. The Values Awareness Teaching Strategy; An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalis, Gus T.; Strasser, Ben B.

    The transcript of a values awareness lesson in communicable diseases is presented to illustrate the two stages of a typical values class--introducing the lesson and implementing the lesson. In this case, an overhead slide-transparency is used (along with prefacing remarks) to lead the class into considering those whom a gonorrhea-infected youth…

  9. The Measurement of Developmental Variables: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santmire, Toni E.

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss ways in which developmental psychology suffers from the lack of an appropriate technology of measurement and statistical analysis. The paper begins by noting that developmental psychology is the study of change; that individuals develop through a succession of "stages" which are separated by…

  10. An Overview of Astrobiology and Computational Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This talk will provide an introduction to the goals of the Astrobiology program and outline some areas of interest to theoreticians and computer modelers. The contents of the talk will be I taken from the Astrobiology Roadmap, reports to the Astrobiology Institute and information, available from the Center for Computational Astrobiology web site (http://cca.arc.nasa.gov).

  11. Open-Access Electronic Textbooks: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovadia, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Given the challenging economic climate in the United States, many academics are looking to open-access electronic textbooks as a way to provide students with traditional textbook content at a more financially advantageous price. Open access refers to "the free and widely available information throughout the World Wide Web. Once an article's…

  12. Occlusal concepts in full mouth rehabilitation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Bhawana; Ladha, Komal; Lalit, Aaruti; Dwarakananda Naik, B

    2014-12-01

    Restoration of occlusion in patients with severely worn dentition is a challenging situation as every case is unique in itself. There is great apprehension involved in reconstructing debilitated dentition due to widely divergent views concerning the choice of an appropriate occlusal scheme for successful full mouth rehabilitation. This article is an overview of the various occlusal concepts/philosophies in full mouth rehabilitation which will help the clinician select an appropriate occlusal scheme for an individual case.

  13. Mechanical Overview of the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.; McClelland, Ryan S.

    2009-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory (IXO) is a new collaboration between NASA, ESA, and JAXA which is under study for launch in 2020. IXO will be a large 6600 kilogram Great Observatory-class mission which will build upon the legacies of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. It combines elements from NASA's Constellation-X program and ESA's XEUS program. The observatory will have a 20-25 meter focal length, which necessitates the use of a deployable instrument module. Currently the project is actively trading configurations and layouts of the various instruments and spacecraft components. This paper will provide a snapshot of the latest observatory configuration under consideration and summarize the observatory from the mechanical engineering perspective.

  14. An Overview of Recent Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Hicks

    2011-12-01

    The unique capabilities of the CLAS detector to measure exclusive meson electroproduction off protons, with almost complete coverage of the final hadron phase space, has extended our knowledge of excited baryon structure. Consistent results from Np and Npp final states provide convincing evidence for reliable extraction of N* electrocouplings. Theoretical analyses of these results, using self-consistent dynamical calculations using an internal quark core and an external meson-baryon cloud suggest that meson-baryon dressing amplitudes need to be included. The meson-baryon dressing was already shown to be necessary to get agreement between calculations and data on the D resonance transition magnetic moment at low Q{sup 2}. Similarly, a new measurement of the transition magnetic moment for strange baryons also disagrees with quark models, suggesting the need for meson-baryon dressings. In the near future, the CLAS detector will be replaced with CLAS12, providing new high-precision data.

  15. The tectonics of Venus: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    While the Pioneer Venus altimeter, Earth-based radar observatories, and the Venera 15-16 orbital imaging radars provided views of large-scale tectonic features on Venus at ever-increasing resolution, the radar images from Magellan constitute an improvement in resolution of at least an order of magnitude over the best previously available. A summary of early Magellan observations of tectonic features on Venus was published, but data available at that time were restricted to the first month of mapping and represented only about 15 percent of the surface of the planet. Magellan images and altimetry are now available for more than 95 percent of the Venus surface. Thus a more global perspective may be taken on the styles and distribution of lithospheric deformation on Venus and their implications for the tectonic history of the planet.

  16. Observed changes in seasons: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. H.; Menzel, A.

    2002-11-01

    Within the last decade the study of phenology has taken on a new legitimacy in the area of climate change research. A growing literature reveals that a change in the timing of natural events is occurring in a wide range of locations and affecting a wide range of species. Changes in spring have been those most commonly reported, with the emphasis on an advance in spring linked to an increase in temperature. Detection of change in autumn is hampered by a smaller pool of available data, events that are harder to define (such as leaf coloration), and various influencing environmental factors triggering autumnal phases. Despite this, the general pattern may be towards a delay in autumn. Plant, animal and abiotic responses, especially in spring, are quite similar. Thus, it would appear that winter is being squeezed at both ends, and this effect, of increasing the growing season, should become more pronounced in the face of predicted global warming.

  17. Functional activities of the amygdala: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Rasia-Filho, A A; Londero, R G; Achaval, M

    2000-01-01

    Research to date into the amygdala shows that it has an integrative role in behavioural, vegetative and endocrine activities of animals in their relation with their environment. Animal studies show that amygdala has a role in emotional response, integrating input signals and initiating activities related to them. Different nuclei seem to have different effects. A complete picture of the functional roles of the amygdala is unavailable, and it has been suggested that the amygdala is functionally and anatomically heterogeneous. Amygdaloid subnuclei appear to have a role in the modulation of fear, in memory and attention, and in some sexual and sex-related behaviour of rats. In humans, functional magnetic resonance imaging shows that the amygdala responds preferentially to emotionally charged stimuli. Bilateral amygdala damage in humans can compromise the recognition of fear in facial expressions, an important ability in social judgement. Future study of the amygdala promises to shed light on emotional disorders in humans. PMID:10721680

  18. Chemical heat pump program: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzina, A.

    Chemical heat pumps comprise reversible reactions which can be driven by low grade heat. Thermal energy is absorbed in one direction and liberated in the reverse direction; thus, serving as a basis for system designs applicable to space conditioning or process heat management and offering the capability for high density energy storage as an integral part of the system. The program background, rationale, technology, and research and development needs are described.

  19. Zinc, aging, and immunosenescence: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Ángel Julio Romero

    2015-01-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in many biochemical pathways and participates in several cell functions, including the immune response. This review describes the role of zinc in human health, aging, and immunosenescence. Zinc deficiency is frequent in the elderly and leads to changes similar to those that occur in oxidative inflammatory aging (oxi-inflamm-aging) and immunosenescence. The possible benefits of zinc supplementation to enhance immune function are discussed. PMID:25661703

  20. An overview of unconstrained free boundary problems

    PubMed Central

    Figalli, Alessio; Shahgholian, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a survey concerning unconstrained free boundary problems of type where B1 is the unit ball, Ω is an unknown open set, F1 and F2 are elliptic operators (admitting regular solutions), and is a functions space to be specified in each case. Our main objective is to discuss a unifying approach to the optimal regularity of solutions to the above matching problems, and list several open problems in this direction. PMID:26261367