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Sample records for mechanistic feature-scale profile

  1. Mechanistic Feature-Scale Profile Simulation of SiO2LPCVD by TEOS Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    CALE, TIMOTHY S.; LABUN, ANDREW H.; MOFFAT, HARRY K.

    1999-09-13

    Simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in submicron features typical of semiconductor devices has been facilitated by extending the EVOLVE thin film etch and deposition simulation code to use thermal reaction mechanisms expressed in the Chemkin format. This allows consistent coupling between EVOLVE and reactor simulation codes that use Chemkin. In an application of a reactor-scale simulation code providing surface fluxes to a feature-scale simulation code, a proposed reaction mechanism for TEOS pyrolysis to deposit SiO{sub 2}, which had been applied successfully to reactor-scale simulation, is seen not to predict the low step coverage over trenches observed under short reactor residence time conditions. An apparent discrepancy between the mechanism and profile-evolution observations is a reduced degree of sensitivity of the deposition rate to the presence of reaction products, i.e., the byproduct inhibition effect is underpredicted. The cause of the proposed mechanism's insensitivity to byproduct inhibition is investigated with the combined reactor and topography simulators first by manipulating the surface to volume ratio of a simulated reactor and second by calibrating parameters in the proposed mechanism such as the calculated free energies of surface molecules. The conclusion is that the byproduct inhibition can not be enhanced to fit profile evolution data without comprising agreement with reactor scale data by simply adjusting mechanism parameters. Thus, additional surface reaction channels seem to be required to reproduce simultaneously experimental reactor-scale growth rates and experimental step coverages.

  2. Mechanistic simulation of the vertical soil organic matter profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, M.; Beer, C.; Reichstein, M.; Hoosbeek, M.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a large global pool of carbon that may play a considerable role for future climate. The vertical distribution of SOM in the profile may be important due to depth-dependence of physical, chemical, and biological conditions, and links to physical processes such as heat and moisture transport. The aim of this thesis is to develop a dynamic and mechanistic representation of the vertical SOM profile that can be applied for large scale simulations as a part of global ecosystem and earth system models. A model structure called SOMPROF was developed that dynamically simulates the SOM profile based on above and below ground litter input, decomposition, bioturbation, and liquid phase transport. Furthermore, three organic surface horizons are explicitly represented. Since the organic matter transport processes have been poorly quantified in the past and are difficult to observe directly, the model was calibrated with a Bayesian approach for two contrasting temperate forest sites in Europe. Different types of data were included in the parameter estimation, including: organic carbon stocks and concentrations, respiration rates, and excess lead-210 activity. The calibrations yielded good fits to the observations, and showed that the two sites differ considerably with respect to the relevance of the different processes. These differences agree well with expectations based on local conditions. However, the results also demonstrate the difficulties arising from convolution of the processes. Several parameters are poorly constrained and for one of the sites, several distinct regions in parameter space exist that yield acceptable fit. In a subsequent study it was found that radiocarbon observations can offer much additional constraint on several parameters, most importantly on the turnover rate of the slowest SOM fraction. Additionally, for one site, a prognostic simulation until 2100 was performed using the resulting a posteriori parameter

  3. Mechanistic modeling of microbial interactions at pore to profile scale resolve methane emission dynamics from permafrost soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-05-01

    The sensitivity of polar regions to raising global temperatures is reflected in rapidly changing hydrological processes associated with pronounced seasonal thawing of permafrost soil and increased biological activity. Of particular concern is the potential release of large amounts of soil carbon and stimulation of other soil-borne greenhouse gas emissions such as methane. Soil methanotrophic and methanogenic microbial communities rapidly adjust their activity and spatial organization in response to permafrost thawing and other environmental factors. Soil structural elements such as aggregates and layering affect oxygen and nutrient diffusion processes thereby contributing to methanogenic activity within temporal anoxic niches (hot spots). We developed a mechanistic individual-based model to quantify microbial activity dynamics in soil pore networks considering transport processes and enzymatic activity associated with methane production in soil. The model was upscaled from single aggregates to the soil profile where freezing/thawing provides macroscopic boundary conditions for microbial activity at different soil depths. The model distinguishes microbial activity in aerate bulk soil from aggregates (or submerged profile) for resolving methane production and oxidation rates. Methane transport pathways by diffusion and ebullition of bubbles vary with hydration dynamics. The model links seasonal thermal and hydrologic dynamics with evolution of microbial community composition and function affecting net methane emissions in good agreement with experimental data. The mechanistic model enables systematic evaluation of key controlling factors in thawing permafrost and microbial response (e.g., nutrient availability and enzyme activity) on long-term methane emissions and carbon decomposition rates in the rapidly changing polar regions.

  4. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  5. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  6. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation.

    PubMed

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B; Jansson, Janet K; Fredricks, David N; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date, analyses of such multi-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here, we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites' abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributing to the shifts. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome data sets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that contribute significantly to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which the predicted variation negatively correlates with the measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome data sets reveals similar trends, including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step toward a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in health and disease.

  7. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Sanchez, Laura M.

    2015-12-22

    ABSTRACT

    Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date, analyses of such multi-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here, we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites’ abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributing to the shifts. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome data sets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that contribute significantly to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which the predicted variation negatively correlates with the measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome data sets reveals similar trends, including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step toward a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in

  8. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date, analyses of such multi-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here, we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites’ abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributing to the shifts. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome data sets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that contribute significantly to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which the predicted variation negatively correlates with the measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome data sets reveals similar trends, including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step toward a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in health and disease

  9. Mechanistic characterization of a 2-thioxanthine myeloperoxidase inhibitor and selectivity assessment utilizing click chemistry--activity-based protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jessica; Spath, Samantha N; Pabst, Brandon; Carpino, Philip A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Xing, Gang; Speers, Anna E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Ahn, Kay

    2013-12-23

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme peroxidase that catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid. Despite a high level of interest in MPO as a therapeutic target, there have been limited reports about MPO inhibitors that are suitable for evaluating MPO in pharmacological studies. 2-Thioxanthine, 3-(2-ethoxypropyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-purin-6(9H)-one (A), has recently been reported to inhibit MPO by covalently modifying the heme prosthetic group. Here we report a detailed mechanistic characterization demonstrating that A possesses all the distinguishing features of a mechanism-based inactivator. A is a time-dependent MPO inhibitor and displays saturable inactivation kinetics consistent with a two-step mechanism of inactivation and a potency (k(inact)/K(I) ratio) of 8450 ± 780 M⁻¹ s⁻¹. MPO inactivation by A is dependent on MPO catalysis and is protected by substrate. A reduces MPO compound I to compound II with a second-order rate constant of (0.801 ± 0.056) × 10⁶ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, and its irreversible inactivation of MPO occurs prior to release of the activated inhibitory species. Despite its relatively high selectivity against a broad panel of more than 100 individual targets, including enzymes, receptors, transporters, and ion channels, we demonstrate that A labels multiple other protein targets in the presence of MPO. By synthesizing an alkyne analogue of A and utilizing click chemistry-activity-based protein profiling, we present that the MPO-activated inhibitory species can diffuse away to covalently modify other proteins, as reflected by the relatively high partition ratio of A, which we determined to be 15.6. This study highlights critical methods that can guide the discovery and development of next-generation MPO inhibitors.

  10. Profile of SB-204269, a mechanistically novel anticonvulsant drug, in rat models of focal and generalized epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Upton, Neil; Blackburn, Tom P; Campbell, Colin A; Cooper, Duncan; Evans, Martyn L; Herdon, Hugh J; King, Penny D; Ray, Alison M; Stean, Tania O; Chan, Wai N; Evans, John M; Thompson, Mervyn

    1997-01-01

    test/ED50 in the MES test) for SB-204269 of >31, as compared to equivalent values of only 7 and 13 for carbamazepine and lamotrigine, respectively. At concentrations (⩾10 μM) well above those required to produce anticonvulsant activity in vivo (i.e. 0.1 μM in brain), SB-204269 did not interact with many of the well known mechanistic targets for established antiepileptic drugs (e.g. Na+ channels or GABAergic neurotransmission). Subsequent studies have shown that the anticonvulsant properties of SB-204269 are likely to be mediated by a novel stereospecific binding site present in the CNS. The overall efficacy profile in rodent seizure models, together with a minimal liability for inducing neurological impairment and an apparently unique mechanism of action, highlight the therapeutic potential of SB-204269 for the treatment of refractory partial and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. PMID:9283703

  11. Mechanistic modeling of thermo-hydrological processes and microbial interactions at pore to profile scales resolve methane emission dynamics from permafrost soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    The sensitivity of the Earth's polar regions to raising global temperatures is reflected in rapidly changing hydrological processes with pronounced seasonal thawing of permafrost soil and increased biological activity. Of particular concern is the potential release of large amounts of soil carbon and the stimulation of other soil-borne GHG emissions such as methane. Soil methanotrophic and methanogenic microbial communities rapidly adjust their activity and spatial organization in response to permafrost thawing and a host of other environmental factors. Soil structural elements such as aggregates and layering and hydration status affect oxygen and nutrient diffusion processes thereby contributing to methanogenic activity within temporal anoxic niches (hotspots or hot-layers). We developed a mechanistic individual based model to quantify microbial activity dynamics within soil pore networks considering, hydration, temperature, transport processes and enzymatic activity associated with methane production in soil. The model was the upscaled from single aggregates (or hotspots) to quantifying emissions from soil profiles in which freezing/thawing processes provide macroscopic boundary conditions for microbial activity at different soil depths. The model distinguishes microbial activity in aerate bulk soil from aggregates (or submerged parts of the profile) for resolving methane production and oxidation rates. Methane transport pathways through soil by diffusion and ebullition of bubbles vary with hydration dynamics and affect emission patterns. The model links seasonal thermal and hydrologic dynamics with evolution of microbial community composition and function affecting net methane emissions in good agreement with experimental data. The mechanistic model enables systematic evaluation of key controlling factors in thawing permafrost and microbial response (e.g., nutrient availability, enzyme activity, PH) on long term methane emissions and carbon decomposition rates

  12. Staphylococcus aureus TargetArray: Comprehensive Differential Essential Gene Expression as a Mechanistic Tool To Profile Antibacterials▿ ¶

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H. Howard; Trawick, John D.; Haselbeck, Robert J.; Forsyth, R. Allyn; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Archer, Rich; Patterson, Joe; Allen, Molly; Froelich, Jamie M.; Taylor, Ian; Nakaji, Danny; Maile, Randy; G. C., Kedar; Pilcher, Marshall; Brown-Driver, Vickie; McCarthy, Melissa; Files, Amy; Robbins, David; King, Paula; Sillaots, Susan; Malone, Cheryl; Zamudio, Carlos S.; Roemer, Terry; Wang, Liangsu; Youngman, Philip J.; Wall, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The widespread emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and a lack of new pharmaceutical development have catalyzed a need for new and innovative approaches for antibiotic drug discovery. One bottleneck in antibiotic discovery is the lack of a rapid and comprehensive method to identify compound mode of action (MOA). Since a hallmark of antibiotic action is as an inhibitor of essential cellular targets and processes, we identify a set of 308 essential genes in the clinically important pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 446 strains differentially expressing these genes were constructed in a comprehensive platform of sensitized and resistant strains. A subset of strains allows either target underexpression or target overexpression by heterologous promoter replacements with a suite of tetracycline-regulatable promoters. A further subset of 236 antisense RNA-expressing clones allows knockdown expression of cognate targets. Knockdown expression confers selective antibiotic hypersensitivity, while target overexpression confers resistance. The antisense strains were configured into a TargetArray in which pools of sensitized strains were challenged in fitness tests. A rapid detection method measures strain responses toward antibiotics. The TargetArray antibiotic fitness test results show mechanistically informative biological fingerprints that allow MOA elucidation. PMID:20547796

  13. Metabolomic profiling in Selaginella lepidophylla at various hydration states provides new insights into the mechanistic basis of desiccation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yobi, Abou; Wone, Bernard W M; Xu, Wenxin; Alexander, Danny C; Guo, Lining; Ryals, John A; Oliver, Melvin J; Cushman, John C

    2013-03-01

    Selaginella lepidophylla is one of only a few species of spike mosses (Selaginellaceae) that have evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) or the ability to 'resurrect' from an air-dried state. In order to understand the metabolic basis of DT, S. lepidophylla was subjected to a five-stage, rehydration/dehydration cycle, then analyzed using non-biased, global metabolomics profiling technology based on GC/MS and UHLC/MS/MS(2) platforms. A total of 251 metabolites including 167 named (66.5%) and 84 (33.4%) unnamed compounds were characterized. Only 42 (16.7%) and 74 (29.5%) of compounds showed significantly increased or decreased abundance, respectively, indicating that most compounds were produced constitutively, including highly abundant trehalose, sucrose, and glucose. Several glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates showed increased abundance at 100% relative water content (RWC) and 50% RWC. Vanillate, a potent antioxidant, was also more abundant in the hydrated state. Many different sugar alcohols and sugar acids were more abundant in the hydrated state. These polyols likely decelerate the rate of water loss during the drying process as well as slow water absorption during rehydration, stabilize proteins, and scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, nitrogen-rich and γ-glutamyl amino acids, citrulline, and nucleotide catabolism products (e.g. allantoin) were more abundant in the dry states, suggesting that these compounds might play important roles in nitrogen remobilization during rehydration or in ROS scavenging. UV-protective compounds such as 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionate, apigenin, and naringenin, were more abundant in the dry states. Most lipids were produced constitutively, with the exception of choline phosphate, which was more abundant in dry states and likely plays a role in membrane hydration and stabilization. In contrast, several polyunsaturated fatty acids were more abundant in the hydrated states

  14. A Feature-Scale Greenwood-Williamson Model for Metal Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qinzhi; Chen, Lan

    2013-08-01

    In this work, a new feature-scale model is proposed for investigating the interaction between the wafer pattern and individual pad asperities in the process of chemical mechanical planarization (CMP). Based on the contact mechanics equation and the modified Greenwood-Williamson (GW) model which captures the evolution of feature curvature and the modification of the pad asperity height distribution, the discrete convolution and fast Fourier transform (DC-FFT) technique is adopted and combined with the Picard iteration method to calculate the direct contact pressure distribution between the wafer surface and the polishing pad. The computed pressure is then used to determine the local removal rate of the underlying patterns and predict the evolution of the wafer surface profile. Furthermore, the method is extended to capture the metal dishing as the feature size changes. It is shown that the present model can avoid the false simulated results produced by directly applying the original GW model for CMP when the feature size approaches zero. Otherwise, the calculated surface profile and dishing values of pattern geometries are in good agreement with the experimental data. Therefore, this model can not only be used to simulate the evolution of the wafer surface for global planarization at lower technology nodes, but can also be applied to provide some basic design rules for improving the process parameters and reducing the time and cost for developing new architectures.

  15. Mechanistic information from volume profiles for water exchange and complex-formation reactions of aquated Ni(II). pH, buffer and medium effects.

    PubMed

    Gazzaz, Hanaa Asaad; Ember, Erika; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2009-11-21

    Rate and activation parameters for the complex-formation reaction of Ni(2+) with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethyl aniline (PADA) were studied as a function of pH in different buffers in both aqueous and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle solutions. In aqueous Tris buffer solution, the forward and backward rate constants increased with increasing pH, while the complex-formation constant decreased due to a larger increase in the backward rate constant. The activation entropy, DeltaS(#), and activation volume, DeltaV(#), changed with increasing pH from positive to negative values, suggesting an apparent changeover from a dissociative to a more associative mechanism. Complex-formation reactions with 2,2'-bipyridine in Tris buffer showed almost no increase in the forward and backward rate constants on increasing the pH, but the DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) values became more negative. N-ethylmorpholine buffer showed no pH effect on the rate constants and activation parameters. Water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) were also studied as a function of pH under the same conditions. The reported rate and activation parameters for water exchange in Tris and N-ethylmorpholine buffers are consistent with those found for the complex-formation reactions of Ni(2+) with PADA. The observed pH and buffer effects for both the complex-formation and water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) can be accounted for in terms of the formation of a Ni(2+)-Tris complex in Tris buffer and general base catalysis by the buffer components. In SDS micelle solution, the complex-formation reaction with PADA was much faster than in aqueous solution, but the increase in rate constant with increasing pH was less significant, while DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) became more positive, pointing to a more dissociative mechanism. For SDS micelle solutions there was no effect on the water exchange rate constant or activation volume. Mechanistic interpretations are offered for all observed pH, buffer and medium

  16. The criterion validity of the Borderline Personality Features Scale for Children in an adolescent inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bonny; Sharp, Carla; Ha, Carolyn

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the criterion validity of the Borderline Personality Features Scale for Children (BPFS-C) by assessing the performance of the self-report and a newly developed parent report version of the measure (BPFS-P) in detecting a borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnosis in adolescent inpatients. This study also examined parent-child agreement and the internal consistency of the BPFS subscales. An inpatient sample of adolescents (n = 51) ranging from ages 12-18 completed the BPFS and were administered the Child Interview for DSM-IV Borderline Personality Disorder (CI-BPD) by trained clinical research staff. ROC analyses revealed that the BPFS-C has high accuracy (AUC = .931; Se = .856; Sp = .840) in discriminating adolescents with a diagnosis of BPD, as measured by the CI-BPD, while the BPFS-P has moderate accuracy (AUC = .795; Se = .733; Sp = .720). Parent-child agreement on total scores was significant (r = .687; p < .005). Cronbach's alphas suggested internal consistency for the four subscales of the BPFS. These findings support the criterion validity of this measure, particularly the self-report version, in adolescent inpatient settings.

  17. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macintosh, Henry G.

    An introduction to profiles is presented with examples provided to permit an overall appraisal of the potential of profiles, of the principles upon which they might be based, and of the problems that will have to be overcome if their potential is to be realized in practice. The larger scale examples of profiles discussed are the Scottish Pupil…

  18. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  19. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  20. Assessing uncertainty in mechanistic models

    Treesearch

    Edwin J. Green; David W. MacFarlane; Harry T. Valentine

    2000-01-01

    Concern over potential global change has led to increased interest in the use of mechanistic models for predicting forest growth. The rationale for this interest is that empirical models may be of limited usefulness if environmental conditions change. Intuitively, we expect that mechanistic models, grounded as far as possible in an understanding of the biology of tree...

  1. Feature scale model of Si etching in SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/HBr plasma and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Belen, Rodolfo Jun; Gomez, Sergi; Kiehlbauch, Mark; Aydil, Eray S.

    2006-03-15

    We have developed a semiempirical feature scale model of Si etching in SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/HBr plasma. Surface kinetics are modeled using parameters that describe F-based Si etching in SF{sub 6} and SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} plasmas and Br-based Si etching in HBr plasma. The kinetic parameters in the model are constrained by matching simulated feature profiles with those experimentally obtained at various feed gas compositions. Excellent agreement between experiments and simulations is obtained. The combined experimental and profile simulation study reveals that the addition of HBr to SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2} plasmas results in improved sidewall passivation and elimination of the mask undercut. The vertical etch rate increases as a result of F and Br fluxes focusing toward the bottom of the feature by reflections from passivated sidewalls. Addition of SF{sub 6} to HBr discharge increases the etch rate through chemical etching that produces volatile SiBr{sub 4-x}F{sub x} etch products and ion-enhanced chemical sputtering of fluorinated and brominated Si surfaces by F-containing ions.

  2. From mechanistic to functional behaviorism.

    PubMed

    Moxley, R A

    1992-11-01

    A shift from mechanistic behaviorism to functional behaviorism is presented against the background of two historical traditions, one with an emphasis on form, the other with an emphasis on function. Skinner's work, which made more contributions to a functional behaviorism than to a mechanistic behaviorism, exemplifies this shift. The two traditions and an account of Skinner's development of functional relations are presented in order to show Skinner's contributions to aligning modern behavior analysis with the functional tradition.

  3. From filters to features: scale-space analysis of edge and blur coding in human vision.

    PubMed

    Georgeson, Mark A; May, Keith A; Freeman, Tom C A; Hesse, Gillian S

    2007-10-19

    To make vision possible, the visual nervous system must represent the most informative features in the light pattern captured by the eye. Here we use Gaussian scale-space theory to derive a multiscale model for edge analysis and we test it in perceptual experiments. At all scales there are two stages of spatial filtering. An odd-symmetric, Gaussian first derivative filter provides the input to a Gaussian second derivative filter. Crucially, the output at each stage is half-wave rectified before feeding forward to the next. This creates nonlinear channels selectively responsive to one edge polarity while suppressing spurious or "phantom" edges. The two stages have properties analogous to simple and complex cells in the visual cortex. Edges are found as peaks in a scale-space response map that is the output of the second stage. The position and scale of the peak response identify the location and blur of the edge. The model predicts remarkably accurately our results on human perception of edge location and blur for a wide range of luminance profiles, including the surprising finding that blurred edges look sharper when their length is made shorter. The model enhances our understanding of early vision by integrating computational, physiological, and psychophysical approaches.

  4. Mechanistic insights into a novel chromone-appended Cu(II) anticancer drug entity: in vitro binding profile with DNA/RNA substrates and cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 and HepG2 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Imtiyaz; Arjmand, Farukh; Tabassum, Sartaj; Toupet, Loic; Khan, Rais Ahmad; Siddiqui, Maqsood Ahmad

    2015-06-14

    A new chromone-appended Cu(ii) drug entity () was designed and synthesized as a potential anticancer chemotherapeutic agent. The structural elucidation was carried out thoroughly by elemental analysis, FT-IR, EPR, ESI-MS and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Complex resulted from the in situ methoxylation reaction of the 3-formylchromone ligand and its subsequent complexation with the copper nitrate salt in a 2 : 1 ratio, respectively. crystallized in the monoclinic P21/c space group possessing the lattice parameters, a = 8.75 Å, b = 5.07 Å, c = 26.22 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 96.3° per unit cell. Furthermore, in vitro interaction studies of with ct-DNA and tRNA were carried out which suggested more avid binding propensity towards the RNA target via intercalative mode, which was reflected from its Kb, K and Ksv values. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay was carried out on the pBR322 plasmid DNA substrate, to ascertain the cleaving ability and the mechanistic pathway in the presence of additives, and the results revealed the efficient cleaving ability of via the oxidative pathway. In vitro cell growth inhibition via the MTT assay was carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of complex and IC50 values were found to be in the range of 5-10 μg mL(-1) in HepG2 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines, which were found to be much lower than the IC50 values of previously reported similar Cu(ii) complexes. Additionally, in the presence of , reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) levels in the tested cancer cell lines increased significantly, coupled with reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Thus, our results suggested that ROS plays an important role in cell apoptosis induced by the Cu(ii) complex and validates its potential to act as a robust anticancer drug entity.

  5. Food for Thought ... Mechanistic Validation

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Thomas; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Stephens, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Validation of new approaches in regulatory toxicology is commonly defined as the independent assessment of the reproducibility and relevance (the scientific basis and predictive capacity) of a test for a particular purpose. In large ring trials, the emphasis to date has been mainly on reproducibility and predictive capacity (comparison to the traditional test) with less attention given to the scientific or mechanistic basis. Assessing predictive capacity is difficult for novel approaches (which are based on mechanism), such as pathways of toxicity or the complex networks within the organism (systems toxicology). This is highly relevant for implementing Toxicology for the 21st Century, either by high-throughput testing in the ToxCast/ Tox21 project or omics-based testing in the Human Toxome Project. This article explores the mostly neglected assessment of a test's scientific basis, which moves mechanism and causality to the foreground when validating/qualifying tests. Such mechanistic validation faces the problem of establishing causality in complex systems. However, pragmatic adaptations of the Bradford Hill criteria, as well as bioinformatic tools, are emerging. As critical infrastructures of the organism are perturbed by a toxic mechanism we argue that by focusing on the target of toxicity and its vulnerability, in addition to the way it is perturbed, we can anchor the identification of the mechanism and its verification. PMID:23665802

  6. Assessment of Borderline Personality Features in Population Samples: Is the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features Scale Measurement Invariant across Sex and Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Distel, Marijn A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more often diagnosed in women than in men, and symptoms tend to decline with age. Using a large community sample, the authors investigated whether sex and age differences in four main features of BPD, measured with the "Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features" scale (PAI-BOR; Morey,…

  7. Assessment of Borderline Personality Features in Population Samples: Is the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features Scale Measurement Invariant across Sex and Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Distel, Marijn A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more often diagnosed in women than in men, and symptoms tend to decline with age. Using a large community sample, the authors investigated whether sex and age differences in four main features of BPD, measured with the "Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features" scale (PAI-BOR; Morey,…

  8. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  9. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  10. Transitioning from AOP to IATA - Exploiting mechanistic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. . Slide presentation at satellite meeting of the QSAR2016 Meeting on How to Transition from AOP to IATA-Exploiting mechanistic insight for practical decision making. .

  11. A generalized mechanistic codon model.

    PubMed

    Zaheri, Maryam; Dib, Linda; Salamin, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Models of codon evolution have attracted particular interest because of their unique capabilities to detect selection forces and their high fit when applied to sequence evolution. We described here a novel approach for modeling codon evolution, which is based on Kronecker product of matrices. The 61 × 61 codon substitution rate matrix is created using Kronecker product of three 4 × 4 nucleotide substitution matrices, the equilibrium frequency of codons, and the selection rate parameter. The entities of the nucleotide substitution matrices and selection rate are considered as parameters of the model, which are optimized by maximum likelihood. Our fully mechanistic model allows the instantaneous substitution matrix between codons to be fully estimated with only 19 parameters instead of 3,721, by using the biological interdependence existing between positions within codons. We illustrate the properties of our models using computer simulations and assessed its relevance by comparing the AICc measures of our model and other models of codon evolution on simulations and a large range of empirical data sets. We show that our model fits most biological data better compared with the current codon models. Furthermore, the parameters in our model can be interpreted in a similar way as the exchangeability rates found in empirical codon models. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Mechanistic insights into nicotine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Michael; De Biasi, Mariella

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is responsible for over 400,000 premature deaths in the United States every year, making it the leading cause of preventable death. In addition, smoking-related illness leads to billions of dollars in healthcare expenditures and lost productivity annually. The public is increasingly aware that successfully abstaining from smoking at any age can add years to one’s life and reduce many of the harmful effects of smoking. Although the majority of smokers desire to quit, only a small fraction of attempts to quit are actually successful. The symptoms associated with nicotine withdrawal are a primary deterrent to cessation and they need to be quelled to avoid early relapse. This review will focus on the neuroadaptations caused by chronic nicotine exposure and discuss how those changes lead to a withdrawal syndrome upon smoking cessation. Besides examining how nicotine usurps the endogenous reward system, we will discuss how the habenula is part of a circuit that plays a critical role in the aversive effects of high nicotine doses and nicotine withdrawal. We will also provide an updated summary of the role of various nicotinic receptor subtypes in the mechanisms of withdrawal. This growing knowledge provides mechanistic insights into current and future smoking cessation therapies. PMID:21782803

  13. Negative mechanistic reasoning in medical intervention assessment.

    PubMed

    Jerkert, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, mechanistic reasoning has been assigned a negligible role in standard EBM (evidence-based medicine) literature, although some recent authors have argued for an upgrade. Even so, the mechanistic reasoning that has received attention has almost exclusively been positive--both in an epistemic sense of claiming that there is a mechanistic chain and in a health-related sense of there being claimed benefits for the patient. Negative mechanistic reasoning has been neglected, both in the epistemic and in the health-related sense. I distinguish three main types of negative mechanistic reasoning and subsume them under a new definition of mechanistic reasoning in the context of assessing medical interventions. This definition is wider than a previous suggestion in the literature. Each negative type corresponds to a range of evidential strengths, and it is argued that there are differences with respect to typical evidential strengths. The variety of negative mechanistic reasoning should be acknowledged in EBM, and it presents a serious challenge to proponents of so-called medical hierarchies of evidence.

  14. Submarine Glacial Geomorphology of the Continental Shelf East of the Antarctic Peninsula: Variable Feature-Scales and Overprinting Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jennifer; Wellner, Julia; Lavoie, Caroline; Domack, Eugene; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2015-04-01

    profiles across each of these sets of features, we highlight that only two sets are actually mega-scale glacial lineations. The other two are actually sets of sub parallel iceberg furrows that are interpreted to have come from calving at a nearby grounding line. Additional crosscutting flow patterns are observed in the area of the Seal Nunataks, between the Larsen A and B embayments. Flow indicators are oriented directly offshore (~E-W), parallel to the Nunataks; this flow pattern is interpreted to be from LGM time. Additional flow indicators go from the Nunataks to the northeast, into the Larsen A embayment; however, a similar flow pattern is not observed on the south side of the Seal Nunataks. This pattern is interpreted as more recent flow and thus reorganization of the flow pattern as the grounding line retreated.

  15. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  16. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  17. Reductive photocarboxylation of phenanthrene: A mechanistic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaitchik, A.V.; Rodgers, M.A.J.; Neckers, D.C.

    1996-02-09

    Mechanistic aspects of photochemicl reactions between phenathrene and carbon dioxide while in the presence of N,N-dimethylaniline was studied. Five products were produced as characterized by NMR and GC-MS. The authors related changes in product yields to changes in reaction conditions. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects.

    PubMed

    Maino, James L; Kearney, Michael R

    2015-11-22

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg(-1)) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes.

  19. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  20. Applying mechanistic models in bioprocess development.

    PubMed

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Bodla, Vijaya Krishna; Carlquist, Magnus; Heins, Anna-Lena; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist V

    2013-01-01

    The available knowledge on the mechanisms of a bioprocess system is central to process analytical technology. In this respect, mechanistic modeling has gained renewed attention, since a mechanistic model can provide an excellent summary of available process knowledge. Such a model therefore incorporates process-relevant input (critical process variables)-output (product concentration and product quality attributes) relations. The model therefore has great value in planning experiments, or in determining which critical process variables need to be monitored and controlled tightly. Mechanistic models should be combined with proper model analysis tools, such as uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. When assuming distributed inputs, the resulting uncertainty in the model outputs can be decomposed using sensitivity analysis to determine which input parameters are responsible for the major part of the output uncertainty. Such information can be used as guidance for experimental work; i.e., only parameters with a significant influence on model outputs need to be determined experimentally. The use of mechanistic models and model analysis tools is demonstrated in this chapter. As a practical case study, experimental data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentations are used. The data are described with the well-known model of Sonnleitner and Käppeli (Biotechnol Bioeng 28:927-937, 1986) and the model is analyzed further. The methods used are generic, and can be transferred easily to other, more complex case studies as well.

  1. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  2. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  3. Testing mechanistic models of growth in insects

    PubMed Central

    Maino, James L.; Kearney, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Insects are typified by their small size, large numbers, impressive reproductive output and rapid growth. However, insect growth is not simply rapid; rather, insects follow a qualitatively distinct trajectory to many other animals. Here we present a mechanistic growth model for insects and show that increasing specific assimilation during the growth phase can explain the near-exponential growth trajectory of insects. The presented model is tested against growth data on 50 insects, and compared against other mechanistic growth models. Unlike the other mechanistic models, our growth model predicts energy reserves per biomass to increase with age, which implies a higher production efficiency and energy density of biomass in later instars. These predictions are tested against data compiled from the literature whereby it is confirmed that insects increase their production efficiency (by 24 percentage points) and energy density (by 4 J mg−1) between hatching and the attainment of full size. The model suggests that insects achieve greater production efficiencies and enhanced growth rates by increasing specific assimilation and increasing energy reserves per biomass, which are less costly to maintain than structural biomass. Our findings illustrate how the explanatory and predictive power of mechanistic growth models comes from their grounding in underlying biological processes. PMID:26609084

  4. A mechanistic approach to tracing anthropometric charts: the extended mechanistic growth function method.

    PubMed

    Spada, Elena; Gilli, Giulio; Coscia, Alessandra; Milani, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    The Extended Mechanistic Growth Function (EMGF) method (Clementi et al. [1999]: Am J Med Genet 87:317-323) is a possible alternative to the Cole and Green LMS method ([1992] Stat Med 11:1305-1319) to construct cross-sectional anthropometric charts. It differs from the technique used by Kuczmarski et al. ([2002]: Vital Health Stat 11:1-190) to trace the CDC growth charts in that all centiles are simultaneously fitted with a single function. The aim of this study is to show how an EMGF model can be designed. To illustrate the structure and properties of the EMGF method, the data of the Italian Neonatal Study (Bertino et al. [2010]: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 51:353-361) were analyzed. The dataset included the birth weight of 45,272 single liveborn babies with gestational ages ranging from 23 to 42 weeks. The EMGF method consists of three steps. In the preliminary step, selected age-dependent raw centiles of the anthropometric trait are computed. In the smoothing step, all centiles are simultaneously fitted with a growth function extended with the inclusion of a few extra parameters. In the transformation step, estimates of the age-dependent L (skewness), M (median), and S (coefficient of variation) parameters are derived. A four-parameter generalized logistic function, extended with five parameters to model between-sex differences, distance between centiles and their slope, was found to fit the raw centiles of birth weight distribution with a residual standard deviation of 51.3 g. The EMGF method represents a bridge to link cross-sectional and longitudinal studies and allows us to identify milestones of the median growth in a population in the same way used for individual profiles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A windows based mechanistic subsidence prediction model for longwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.; Beheler, P.; Khair, A.W.

    1996-12-31

    The previously developed Mechanistic Subsidence Prediction Model (MSPM) has been incorporated into the graphical interface environment of MS Windows. MSPM has the unique capability of predicting maximum subsidence, angle of draw and the subsidence profile of a longwall panel at various locations for both the transverse and longitudinal orientations. The resultant enhanced model can be operated by individuals with little knowledge of subsidence prediction theories or little computer programming experience. In addition, predictions of subsidence can be made in a matter of seconds without the need to develop input data files or use the keyboard in some cases. The predictions are based upon the following input parameters: panel width, mining height, overburden depth, rock quality designation, and percent hard rock in the immediate roof, main roof and the entire overburden. The recently developed enhanced model has the capability to compare predictions in a graphical format for one half of the predicted subsidence profile based upon changes in input parameters easily and instantly on the same screen. In addition another screen can be obtained from a pull down menu where the operator can compare predictions for the entire subsidence profiles. This paper presents the background of the subsidence prediction model and the methodology of the enhanced model development. The paper also presents comparisons of subsidence predictions for several different sets of input parameters in addition to comparisons of the subsidence predictions with actual field data.

  6. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  7. Toward mechanistic classification of enzyme functions.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    Classification of enzyme function should be quantitative, computationally accessible, and informed by sequences and structures to enable use of genomic information for functional inference and other applications. Large-scale studies have established that divergently evolved enzymes share conserved elements of structure and common mechanistic steps and that convergently evolved enzymes often converge to similar mechanisms too, suggesting that reaction mechanisms could be used to develop finer-grained functional descriptions than provided by the Enzyme Commission (EC) system currently in use. Here we describe how evolution informs these structure-function mappings and review the databases that store mechanisms of enzyme reactions along with recent developments to measure ligand and mechanistic similarities. Together, these provide a foundation for new classifications of enzyme function.

  8. New mechanistic interpretations for nitrone reactivity.

    PubMed

    Merino, Pedro; Tejero, Tomás; Delso, Ignacio; Matute, Rosa

    2017-03-22

    The reactivity of nitrones in cycloadditions and related reactions is revisited by introducing a topological perspective. In particular, the study of electron localization function (ELF) along a reaction pathway allows evaluating bond reorganization showing that in several cases the bonds are formed in a sequential way, the second one being formed once the first one is already formed. Both classical 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions and Mannich-type reactions revealed unexpected features often underestimated in classical mechanistic studies.

  9. Mechanistic materials modeling for nuclear fuel performance

    DOE PAGES

    Tonks, Michael R.; Andersson, David; Phillpot, Simon R.; ...

    2017-03-15

    Fuel performance codes are critical tools for the design, certification, and safety analysis of nuclear reactors. However, their ability to predict fuel behavior under abnormal conditions is severely limited by their considerable reliance on empirical materials models correlated to burn-up (a measure of the number of fission events that have occurred, but not a unique measure of the history of the material). In this paper, we propose a different paradigm for fuel performance codes to employ mechanistic materials models that are based on the current state of the evolving microstructure rather than burn-up. In this approach, a series of statemore » variables are stored at material points and define the current state of the microstructure. The evolution of these state variables is defined by mechanistic models that are functions of fuel conditions and other state variables. The material properties of the fuel and cladding are determined from microstructure/property relationships that are functions of the state variables and the current fuel conditions. Multiscale modeling and simulation is being used in conjunction with experimental data to inform the development of these models. Finally, this mechanistic, microstructure-based approach has the potential to provide a more predictive fuel performance capability, but will require a team of researchers to complete the required development and to validate the approach.« less

  10. A mechanistic analysis of the Birch Reduction.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Howard E

    2012-02-21

    The Birch Reduction is one of the main reactions of organic chemistry. The reaction involves the reaction of dissolving metals in ammonia with aromatic compounds to produce 1,4-cyclohexadienes. Discovered by Arthur Birch in 1944, the reaction occupies 300 pages in Organic Reactions to describe its synthetic versatility. Thus, it is remarkable that the reaction mechanism has been so very controversial and only relatively recently has been firmly established. Perhaps this is not that surprising, since the reaction also has many unusual and esoteric mechanistic facets. Here, I provide a description of how I have applied ever-evolving levels of quantum mechanics and a novel experimental test to understand details of the mechanism and the origins of the selectivities observed in the Birch reduction. The reaction involves an initial radical anion resulting from introduction of an electron from the blue liquid ammonia solution of free electrons formed by the dissolution of Li or related metals. This radical anion is protonated by an alcohol and then further reduced to a carbanion. Finally, the carbanion is protonated using a second proton to afford a nonconjugated cyclohexadiene. The regiochemistry depends on substituents present. With 18 resonance structures in the case of anisole radical anion, prediction of the initial protonation site would seem difficult. Nevertheless, computational methods from Hückel theory through modern density functional calculations do correctly predict the site of protonation. An esoteric test established this mechanism experimentally. The nature of the carbanion also is of mechanistic interest, and the preponderance of the resonance structure shown was revealed from Hückel calculations involving variable bond orders. For the trianion from benzoic acid, parallel questions about structure are apparent, and have been answered. Some mechanistic questions are answered experimentally and some by modern computations. Recently, our mechanistic

  11. The cross-informant concordance and concurrent validity of the Borderline Personality Features Scale for Children in a community sample of boys.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Mosko, Orion; Chang, Bonny; Ha, Carolyn

    2011-07-01

    The Borderline Personality Disorder Features Scale for Children (BPFSC) is currently the only dimensional measure specifically developed to assess borderline features in children and adolescents. Few studies have investigated this measure for its concurrent validity and concordance between youth self-report and parent-report versions. To this end, the current study had two aims: (1) to investigate the cross-informant concordance (youth self-report vs. parent-report) of the BPFSC; and (2) to examine the concurrent validity of the BPFSC by showing that youth scoring high on the BPFSC also show poor clinical and psychosocial functioning, as measured by a standard Axis I scale. A community sample (N = 171) of boys between the ages of 8 and 18 completed the BPFSC and a self-report measure of Axis I psychopathology. Parents completed a newly developed parent-report version of the BPFSC (BPFSP) and a standard measure of Axis I psychopathology to index clinical and psychosocial functioning. Findings confirmed expectations. Modest concordance between parent- and self-report ratings were found. In addition, youth with borderline features showed poorer clinical and psychosocial functioning in all domains, especially where externalizing problems were concerned. Concurrent validity and modest parent-child concordance were demonstrated for the BPFSC. The BPFSC and BPFSP show promise as dimensional measures to assess borderline features in boys. However, a criterion validity study is needed before the measure can be used.

  12. Mechanistic considerations in small fish carcinogenicity testing.

    PubMed

    Law, J M

    2001-01-01

    Historically, small fish species have proven useful both as environmental sentinels and as versatile test animals in toxicity and carcinogenicity bioassays. They can be bred in large numbers, have low maintenance and bioassay costs, and have a low background incidence of tumors. However, more mechanistic information is needed to help validate the information garnered from these models and to keep pace with other more fully developed animal models. This paper focuses on mechanistic considerations when using small fish models for carcinogenicity testing. Several small aquarium fish species have proven useful. The Japanese medaka is perhaps the best characterized small fish model for carcinogenicity testing; however, the zebrafish is emerging as an important model because it is well characterized genetically. Both route and methodology of exposure may affect the outcome of the study. Most studies have been conducted by introducing the test compound into the ambient water, but dietary exposures and embryo microinjection have also been used. Other considerations in study design include use of an initiating carcinogen, such as diethlynitrosamine, and differences in xenobiotic metabolism, such as the fact that fish CYP2B is refractory to phenobarbital induction. The small size of these models has perhaps limited some types of mechanistic studies, such as formation and repair of DNA adducts in response to carcinogen exposure. However, improved analytical methods are allowing greater resolution and should be applied to small fish species. Slide-based methods such as immunohistochemistry are an important adjunct to routine histopathology and should be included in study design. However, there is a need for development of more species-specific antibodies for fish research. There is also a need for more fish-specific data on cytokines, serum biochemistry, and oncogenes to strengthen the use of these important test models.

  13. Mechanistic studies of carbon monoxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy, G.L.

    1990-06-12

    The progress made during the current grant period (1 January 1988--1 April 1990) in three different areas of research is summarized. The research areas are: (1) oxidatively-induced double carbonylation reactions to form {alpha}-ketoacyl complexes and studies of the reactivity of the resulting compounds, (2) mechanistic studies of the carbonylation of nitroaromatics to form isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas, and (3) studies of the formation and reactivity of unusual metallacycles and alkylidene ligands supported on binuclear iron carbonyl fragments. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mechanistic facility safety and source term analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-06-09

    A PC-based computer program was created for facility safety and source term analysis at Hanford The program has been successfully applied to mechanistic prediction of source terms from chemical reactions in underground storage tanks, hydrogen combustion in double contained receiver tanks, and proccss evaluation including the potential for runaway reactions in spent nuclear fuel processing. Model features include user-defined facility room, flow path geometry, and heat conductors, user-defined non-ideal vapor and aerosol species, pressure- and density-driven gas flows, aerosol transport and deposition, and structure to accommodate facility-specific source terms. Example applications are presented here.

  15. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distribution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  16. Composite Nanomechanics: A Mechanistic Properties Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Handler, Louis M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique mechanistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The theory is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations hav e been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to predict 25 properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are pr esented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical sig nificance. Most of the results show smooth distributions. Results for matrix-dependent properties show bimodal through-the-thickness distr ibution with discontinuous changes from mode to mode.

  17. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  18. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved—with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement—epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain‐sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed. PMID:27391380

  19. Tear gas: an epidemiological and mechanistic reassessment.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Craig; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Svendsen, Erik R; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-08-01

    Deployments of tear gas and pepper spray have rapidly increased worldwide. Large amounts of tear gas have been used in densely populated cities, including Cairo, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, Manama (Bahrain), and Hong Kong. In the United States, tear gas was used extensively during recent riots in Ferguson, Missouri. Whereas tear gas deployment systems have rapidly improved-with aerial drone systems tested and requested by law enforcement-epidemiological and mechanistic research have lagged behind and have received little attention. Case studies and recent epidemiological studies revealed that tear gas agents can cause lung, cutaneous, and ocular injuries, with individuals affected by chronic morbidities at high risk for complications. Mechanistic studies identified the ion channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 as targets of capsaicin in pepper spray, and of the tear gas agents chloroacetophenone, CS, and CR. TRPV1 and TRPA1 localize to pain-sensing peripheral sensory neurons and have been linked to acute and chronic pain, cough, asthma, lung injury, dermatitis, itch, and neurodegeneration. In animal models, transient receptor potential inhibitors show promising effects as potential countermeasures against tear gas injuries. On the basis of the available data, a reassessment of the health risks of tear gas exposures in the civilian population is advised, and development of new countermeasures is proposed.

  20. Appropriateness of mechanistic and non-mechanistic models for the application of ultrafiltration to mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Henry; Ghosehajra, Malay

    2007-07-01

    This study asks two questions: (1) How appropriate is the use of a basic filtration equation to the application of ultrafiltration of mixed waste, and (2) How appropriate are non-parametric models for permeate rates (volumes)? To answer these questions, mechanistic and non-mechanistic approaches are developed for permeate rates and volumes associated with an ultrafiltration/mixed waste system in dia-filtration mode. The mechanistic approach is based on a filtration equation which states that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. The coefficients associated with this linear regression are composed of physical/chemical parameters of the system and based the mass balance equation associated with the membrane and associated developing cake layer. For several sets of data, a high correlation is shown that supports the assertion that t/V vs. V is a linear relationship. It is also shown that non-mechanistic approaches, i.e., the use of regression models to are not appropriate. One models considered is Q(p) = a*ln(Cb)+b. Regression models are inappropriate because the scale-up from a bench scale (pilot scale) study to full-scale for permeate rates (volumes) is not simply the ratio of the two membrane surface areas. (authors)

  1. Natural Variation of Plant Metabolism: Genetic Mechanisms, Interpretive Caveats, and Evolutionary and Mechanistic Insights1

    PubMed Central

    Soltis, Nicole E.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Combining quantitative genetics studies with metabolomics/metabolic profiling platforms, genomics, and transcriptomics is creating significant progress in identifying the causal genes controlling natural variation in metabolite accumulations and profiles. In this review, we discuss key mechanistic and evolutionary insights that are arising from these studies. This includes the potential role of transport and other processes in leading to a separation of the site of mechanistic causation and metabolic consequence. A reilluminated observation is the potential for genomic variation in the organelle to alter phenotypic variation alone and in epistatic interaction with the nuclear genetic variation. These studies are also highlighting new aspects of metabolic pleiotropy both in terms of the breadth of loci altering metabolic variation as well as the potential for broader effects on plant defense regulation of the metabolic variation than has previously been predicted. We also illustrate caveats that can be overlooked when translating quantitative genetics descriptors such as heritability and per-locus r2 to mechanistic or evolutionary interpretations. PMID:26272883

  2. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  3. Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer: A Mechanistic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cifarelli, V; Hursting, SD

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 35% of adults and 20% of children in the United States are obese, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Obesity is an established risk factor for many cancers, and obesity-associated metabolic perturbations often manifest in Type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or the metabolic syndrome. As part of the growth-promoting, proinflammatory microenvironment of the obese and/or diabetic state, crosstalk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via metabolically-regulated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators to enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This review synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the associations between obesity, diabetes and cancer, with particular emphasis on enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes. These interrelated pathways represent mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-diabetes-cancer link, and several diabetes drugs, such as metformin and rosiglitazone, are being intensely studied for repurposing as cancer chemopreventive agents.

  4. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  5. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  6. Mechanistic investigations of the ethylene tetramerisation reaction.

    PubMed

    Overett, Matthew J; Blann, Kevin; Bollmann, Annette; Dixon, John T; Haasbroek, Daleen; Killian, Esna; Maumela, Hulisani; McGuinness, David S; Morgan, David H

    2005-08-03

    The unprecedented selective tetramerisation of ethylene to 1-octene was recently reported. In the present study various mechanistic aspects of this novel transformation were investigated. The unusually high 1-octene selectivity in chromium-catalyzed ethylene tetramerisation reactions is caused by the unique extended metallacyclic mechanism in operation. Both 1-octene and higher 1-alkenes are formed by further ethylene insertion into a metallacycloheptane intermediate, whereas 1-hexene is formed by elimination from this species as in other reported trimerisation reactions. This is supported by deuterium labeling studies, analysis of the molar distribution of 1-alkene products, and identification of secondary co-oligomerization reaction products. In addition, the formation of two C6 cyclic products, methylenecyclopentane and methylcyclopentane, is discussed, and a bimetallic disproportionation mechanism to account for the available data is proposed.

  7. Mechanistic interplay between ceramide and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Federico; Morine, Melissa J.; Kahramanoğulları, Ozan; Raichur, Suryaprakash; Schneider, Hans-Christoph; Crowther, Daniel; Priami, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Recent research adds to a growing body of literature on the essential role of ceramides in glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, while the mechanistic interplay between various components of ceramide metabolism remains to be quantified. We present an extended model of C16:0 ceramide production through both the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways. We verify our model with a combination of published models and independent experimental data. In silico experiments of the behavior of ceramide and related bioactive lipids in accordance with the observed transcriptomic changes in obese/diabetic murine macrophages at 5 and 16 weeks support the observation of insulin resistance only at the later phase. Our analysis suggests the pivotal role of ceramide synthase, serine palmitoyltransferase and dihydroceramide desaturase involved in the de novo synthesis and the salvage pathways in influencing insulin resistance versus its regulation. PMID:28112248

  8. Refined pipe theory for mechanistic modeling of wood development.

    PubMed

    Deckmyn, Gaby; Evans, Sam P; Randle, Tim J

    2006-06-01

    We present a mechanistic model of wood tissue development in response to changes in competition, management and climate. The model is based on a refinement of the pipe theory, where the constant ratio between sapwood and leaf area (pipe theory) is replaced by a ratio between pipe conductivity and leaf area. Simulated pipe conductivity changes with age, stand density and climate in response to changes in allocation or pipe radius, or both. The central equation of the model, which calculates the ratio of carbon (C) allocated to leaves and pipes, can be parameterized to describe the contrasting stem conductivity behavior of different tree species: from constant stem conductivity (functional homeostasis hypothesis) to height-related reduction in stem conductivity with age (hydraulic limitation hypothesis). The model simulates the daily growth of pipes (vessels or tracheids), fibers and parenchyma as well as vessel size and simulates the wood density profile and the earlywood to latewood ratio from these data. Initial runs indicate the model yields realistic seasonal changes in pipe radius (decreasing pipe radius from spring to autumn) and wood density, as well as realistic differences associated with the competitive status of trees (denser wood in suppressed trees).

  9. Polymerization kinetics of wheat gluten upon thermosetting. A mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Domenek, Sandra; Morel, Marie-Hélène; Bonicel, Joëlle; Guilbert, Stéphane

    2002-10-09

    Size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography analysis was carried out on wheat gluten-glycerol blends subjected to different heat treatments. The elution profiles were analyzed in order to follow the solubility loss of protein fractions with specific molecular size. Owing to the known biochemical changes involved during the heat denaturation of gluten, a mechanistic mathematical model was developed, which divided the protein denaturation into two distinct reaction steps: (i) reversible change in protein conformation and (ii) protein precipitation through disulfide bonding between initially SDS-soluble and SDS-insoluble reaction partners. Activation energies of gluten unfolding, refolding, and precipitation were calculated with the Arrhenius law to 53.9 kJ x mol(-1), 29.5 kJ x mol(-1), and 172 kJ x mol(-1), respectively. The rate of protein solubility loss decreased as the cross-linking reaction proceeded, which may be attributed to the formation of a three-dimensional network progressively hindering the reaction. The enhanced susceptibility to aggregation of large molecules was assigned to a risen reaction probability due to their higher number of cysteine residues and to the increased percentage of unfolded and thereby activated proteins as complete protein refolding seemed to be an anticooperative process.

  10. Intriguing mechanistic labyrinths in gold(i) catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Obradors, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Many mechanistically intriguing reactions have been developed in the last decade using gold(i) as catalyst. Here we review the main mechanistic proposals in gold-catalysed activation of alkynes and allenes, in which this metal plays a central role by stabilising a variety of complex cationic intermediates. PMID:24176910

  11. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the

  12. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Junaid A. B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper ‘On dynamic equilibrium in the heart’, Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms – sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self‐sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non‐uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non‐coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  13. Mechanistic simulation of line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biafore, John J.; Smith, Mark D.; Robertson, Stewart A.; Graves, Trey

    2007-03-01

    Physically-based photoresist models, such as those in PROLITH, have been very successful in describing photolithography from a continuum standpoint. These models allow engineers to accurately predict the final resist CD on the wafer and to analyze process robustness. However, as the critical dimension continues to shrink, yield-limiting phenomena are observed that are related to the molecular nature and reaction kinetics of photoresist materials. An example of these phenomena is line-edge roughness (LER). In this paper, the origin of LER is hypothesized to be caused by fluctuations occurring in the initial position of the reactants, fluctuations during the exposure process (shot noise) and fluctuations occurring during thermally-induced reaction-diffusion (post-exposure bake). We have developed a lattice-based mechanistic simulator to better understand the stochastic nature of reactant initial position, the exposure step, the importance of the discrete nature of the reactants, the coupling to the deprotection kinetics and the deep complexity evident in the diffusion-limited acid-quencher reaction.

  14. Semiconductor photocatalysis--mechanistic and synthetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Horst

    2013-01-14

    Preceding work on photoelectrochemistry at semiconductor single-crystal electrodes has formed the basis for the tremendous growth in the three last decades in the field of photocatalysis at semiconductor powders. The reason for this is the unique ability of inorganic semiconductor surfaces to photocatalyze concerted reduction and oxidation reactions of a large variety of electron-donor and -acceptor substrates. Whereas great attention was paid to water splitting and the exhaustive aerobic degradation of pollutants, only a small amount of research also explored synthetic aspects. After introducing the basic mechanistic principles, standard experiments for the preparation and characterization of visible light active photocatalysts as well as the investigation of reaction mechanisms are discussed. Novel atom-economic C-C and C-N coupling reactions illustrate the relevance of semiconductor photocatalysis for organic synthesis, and demonstrate that the multidisciplinary field combines classical photochemistry with electrochemistry, solid-state chemistry, and heterogeneous catalysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mechanistic Reactive Burn Modeling of Solid Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Y.Horie; Y.Hamate; D.Greening

    2003-04-01

    This report describes a computational framework for reactive burn modeling of solid explosives and the development of a test case where physical mechanisms represent RDX or RDX-based materials. The report is a sequel to LA-13794-MS, ''A Unifying Framework for Hot Spots and the Ignition of Energetic Materials,'' where we proposed a new approach to the building of a general purpose model that captures the essential features of the three primary origins of hot-spot formation: void collapse, shear banding, friction. The purpose of the present report is to describe the continuing task of coupling the unifying hot-spot model to hydrodynamic calculations to develop a mechanistic reactive burn model. The key components of the coupling include energy localization, the growth of hot spots, overall hot-spot behavior, and a phase-averaged mixture equation of state (EOS) in a Mie-Grueneisen form. The nucleation and growth of locally heated regions is modeled by a phenomenological treatment as well as a statistical model based on an exponential size distribution. The Mie-Grueneisen form of the EOS is one of many possible choices and is not a critical selection for implementing the model. In this report, model calculations are limited to proof-of-concept illustrations for shock loading. Results include (1) shock ignition and growth-to-detonation, (2) double shock ignition, and (3) quenching and reignition. A comparative study of Pop-plots is discussed based on the statistical model.

  16. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio; Klein, David J

    2014-06-09

    Direct hemoperfusion therapy with polymyxin B immobilized fiber cartridge (PMX-DHP) is an established strategy in the treatment of septic shock in Japan and parts of Western Europe. PMX-DHP is currently the subject of a pivotal North American randomized controlled trial (EUPHRATES) in patients with septic shock and confirmed endotoxemia, as measured by the endotoxin activity assay. The major mechanism of action of this therapy is the removal of circulating endotoxin. High affinity binding of circulating endotoxin by the PMX-DHP column may decrease circulating endotoxin levels by up to 90% after two standard treatments. Basic research has shown reductions in circulating cytokine levels and in renal tubular apoptosis. Clinical research has shown that PMX-DHP therapy results in hemodynamic improvements, improvements in oxygenation, renal function, and reductions in mortality. Further research is needed to further define additional patient populations with endotoxemia that may benefit from PMX-DHP therapy as well as to further elucidate dosing, timing, and additional information on mechanisms of action. This review will present the mechanistic rationale for this targeted strategy of endotoxin removal using PMX-DHP in endotoxemic septic patients, highlighting both the specific effects of the therapy and the evidence accumulated so far of clinical improvement following this therapy in terms of recovery of organ function.

  17. Polymyxin B hemoperfusion: a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct hemoperfusion therapy with polymyxin B immobilized fiber cartridge (PMX-DHP) is an established strategy in the treatment of septic shock in Japan and parts of Western Europe. PMX-DHP is currently the subject of a pivotal North American randomized controlled trial (EUPHRATES) in patients with septic shock and confirmed endotoxemia, as measured by the endotoxin activity assay. The major mechanism of action of this therapy is the removal of circulating endotoxin. High affinity binding of circulating endotoxin by the PMX-DHP column may decrease circulating endotoxin levels by up to 90% after two standard treatments. Basic research has shown reductions in circulating cytokine levels and in renal tubular apoptosis. Clinical research has shown that PMX-DHP therapy results in hemodynamic improvements, improvements in oxygenation, renal function, and reductions in mortality. Further research is needed to further define additional patient populations with endotoxemia that may benefit from PMX-DHP therapy as well as to further elucidate dosing, timing, and additional information on mechanisms of action. This review will present the mechanistic rationale for this targeted strategy of endotoxin removal using PMX-DHP in endotoxemic septic patients, highlighting both the specific effects of the therapy and the evidence accumulated so far of clinical improvement following this therapy in terms of recovery of organ function. PMID:25043934

  18. A mechanistic damage model for ligaments.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeff M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2017-08-16

    The accuracy of biomechanical models is predicated on the realism by which they represent their biomechanical tissues. Unfortunately, most models use phenomenological ligament models that neglect the behaviour in the failure region. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to test whether a mechanistic model of ligamentous tissue portrays behaviour representative of actual ligament failure tests. The model tracks the time-evolution of a population of collagen fibres in a theoretical ligament. Each collagen fibre is treated as an independent linear cables with constant stiffness. Model equations were derived by assuming these fibres act as a continuum and applying a conservation law akin to Huxley's muscle model. A breaking function models the rate of collagen fibre breakage at a given displacement, and was chosen to be a linear function for this preliminary analysis. The model was fitted to experimental average curves for the cervical anterior longitudinal ligament. In addition, the model was cyclically loaded to test whether the tissue model behaves similarly. The model agreed very well with experiment with an RMS error of 14.23 N and an R(2) of 0.995. Cyclic loading exhibited a reduction in force similar to experimental data. The proposed model showcases behaviour reminiscent of actual ligaments being strained to failure and undergoing cyclic load. Future work could incorporate viscous effects, or validate the model further by testing it in various loading conditions. Characterizing the breaking function more accurately would also lead to better results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alkylation of phenol: a mechanistic view.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qisheng; Chakraborty, Deb; Faglioni, Francesco; Muller, Rick P; Goddard, William A; Harris, Thomas; Campbell, Curt; Tang, Yongchun

    2006-02-16

    The current work utilizes the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) to develop a molecular level of the mechanistic understanding on the phenol alkylation in the presence of a cation-exchange resin catalyst, Amberlyst-15. The catalyst is modeled with the benzene sulfonic acid, and the effect of this acid on olefins such as isopropene (i-Pr) and tributene (t-Bu) in a phenol solution mimics the experimental condition. A neutral-pathway mechanism is established to account for early-stage high concentration of the phenolic ether observed in experiments. The mechanism involves an exothermic reaction between olefin and the benzene sulfonic acid to form ester followed by three reaction pathways leading to direct O-alkylation, o-C-alkylation, and p-C-alkylation. Our calculations conclude that O-alkylation to form the phenolic ether is the most energetically favorable in the neutral condition. An ionic rearrangement mechanism describes intramolecular migrations of the alkyl group from the phenolic ether to form C-alkylphenols, while the positively charged protonation significantly lowers transition barriers for these migrations. The ionic rearrangement mechanism accounts for high yields of o-C-alkylphenol and p-C-alkylphenol. Competition between the H atom and the alkyl R group at the substitutive site of the protonated ortho configuration is found to be the determining factor to the ortho/para ratio of C-alkylation products.

  20. Somatodendritic dopamine release: recent mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Margaret E.; Patel, Jyoti C.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in motor, reward and cogitative pathways, with DA dysfunction implicated in disorders including Parkinson's disease and addiction. Located in midbrain, DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta project via the medial forebrain bundle to the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen), and DA neurons in the adjacent ventral tegmental area project to the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) and prefrontal cortex. In addition to classical vesicular release from axons, midbrain DA neurons exhibit DA release from their cell bodies and dendrites. Somatodendritic DA release leads to activation of D2 DA autoreceptors on DA neurons that inhibit their firing via G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ channels. This helps determine patterns of DA signalling at distant axonal release sites. Somatodendritically released DA also acts via volume transmission to extrasynaptic receptors that modulate local transmitter release and neuronal activity in the midbrain. Thus, somatodendritic release is a pivotal intrinsic feature of DA neurons that must be well defined in order to fully understand the physiology and pathophysiology of DA pathways. Here, we review recent mechanistic aspects of somatodendritic DA release, with particular emphasis on the Ca2+ dependence of release and the potential role of exocytotic proteins. PMID:26009764

  1. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA): piloting ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Modem methods in molecular biology and advanced computational tools show promise in elucidating complex interactions that occur between genes and environmental factors in diseases such as asthma; however appropriately designed studies are critical for these methods to reach their full potential. Objective: We used a case-control study to investigate whether genomic data (blood gene expression), viewed together with a spectrum of exposure effects and susceptibility markers (blood, urine and nail), can provide a mechanistic explanation for the increased susceptibility of asthmatics to ambient air pollutants. Methods: We studied 205 non-asthmatic and asthmatic children, (9-12 years of age) who participated in a clinical study in Detroit, Michigan. The study combines a traditional epidemiological design with an integrative approach to investigate the environmental exposure of children to indoor-outdoor air. The study includes measurements of internal dose (metals, allergen specific IgE, PAH and VOC metabolites) and clinical measures of health outcome (immunological, cardiovascular and respiratory). Results: Expected immunological indications of asthma have been obtained. In addition, initial results from our analyses point to the complex nature of childhood health and risk factors linked to metabolic syndrome (obesity, blood pressure and dyslipidemia). For example, 31% and 34% of the asthmatic MICA subjects were either overweight (BMI > 25) o

  2. A metabonomic approach for mechanistic exploration of pre-clinical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann

    2010-12-30

    Metabonomics involves the application of advanced analytical tools to profile the diverse metabolic complement of a given biofluid or tissue. Subsequent statistical modelling of the complex multivariate spectral profiles enables discrimination between phenotypes of interest and identifies panels of discriminatory metabolites that represent candidate biomarkers. This review article presents an overview of recent developments in the field of metabonomics with a focus on application to pre-clinical toxicology studies. Recent research investigations carried out as part of the international COMET 2 consortium project on the hepatotoxic action of the aminosugar, galactosamine (galN) are presented. The application of advanced, high-field NMR spectroscopy is demonstrated, together with complementary application of a targeted mass spectrometry platform coupled with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Much novel mechanistic information has been gleaned on both the mechanism of galN hepatotoxicity in multiple biofluids and tissues, and on the protection afforded by co-administration of glycine and uridine. The simultaneous identification of both the metabolic fate of galN and its associated endogenous consequences in spectral profiles is demonstrated. Furthermore, metabonomic assessment of inter-animal variability in response to galN presents enhanced mechanistic insight on variable response phentoypes and is relevant to understanding wider aspects of individual variability in drug response. This exemplar highlights the analytical and statistical tools commonly applied in metabonomic studies and notably, the approach is applicable to the study of any toxin/drug or intervention of interest. The metabonomic approach holds considerable promise and potential to significantly advance our understanding of the mechanistic bases for adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenosine as a probing tool for the mechanistic study of acupuncture treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-You; Li, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Chun-Mei; Wang, Jia-Lu; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-11-01

    To date, acupuncture has been widely used despite a lack of solid clinical evidence in the East and West. However, there are few validated in vitro models for the mechanistic studies of acupuncture. We hypothesized that adenosine could be used as a probing tool in the mechanistic studies of acupuncture because of its critical role in the action of acupuncture. Subsequently, we tested this hypothesis using both in vitro and in vivo experiments. First, we found that adenosine stimulation mimicked the effect of acupuncture on microRNA profiling (including miR-339, miR-145 and miR-451) and protein level (including Sirt2) in nerve growth factor-induced differentiated PC12 cells. These miRNA and proteins have been found to be regulated by acupuncture treatment in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Next, we found that adenosine stimulation downregulated miR-339 expression through adenosine A1 receptor-mediated pathway. Finally, we showed that the concentration of adenosine was actually decreased in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats after acupuncture treatment at Taichong acupoint. Taken together, these findings suggest that adenosine could be used as a useful probing tool for acupuncture mechanistic studies, while more validation studies are certainly warranted. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Ligand interactions with galactose oxidase: mechanistic insights.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, M M; Whittaker, J W

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between galactose oxidase and small molecules have been explored using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to detect complex formation and characterize the products. Anions bind directly to the cupric center in both active and inactive galactose oxidase, converting to complexes with optical and EPR spectra that are distinctly different from those of the starting aquo enzyme. Azide binding is coupled to stoichiometric proton uptake by the enzyme, reflecting the generation of a strong base (pKa > 9) in the active site anion adduct. At low temperature, the aquo enzyme converts to a form that exhibits the characteristic optical and EPR spectra of an anion complex, apparently reflecting deprotonation of the coordinated water. Anion binding results in a loss of the optical transition arising from coordinated tyrosine, implying displacement of the axial tyrosine ligand on forming the adduct. Nitric oxide binds to galactose oxidase, forming a specific complex exhibiting an unusual EPR spectrum with all g values below 2. The absence of Cu splitting in this spectrum and the observation that the cupric EPR signal from the active site metal ion is not significantly decreased in the complex suggest a nonmetal interaction site for NO in galactose oxidase. These results have been interpreted in terms of a mechanistic scheme where substrate binding displaces a tyrosinate ligand from the active site cupric ion, generating a base that may serve to deprotonate the coordinated hydroxyl group of the substrate, activating it for oxidation. The protein-NO interactions may probe a nonmetal O2 binding site in this enzyme. PMID:8386015

  5. Mechanistic basis of infertility of mouse intersubspecific hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Gregorova, Sona; Mihola, Ondrej; Anger, Martin; Sebestova, Jaroslava; Denny, Paul; Simecek, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    According to the Dobzhansky–Muller model, hybrid sterility is a consequence of the independent evolution of related taxa resulting in incompatible genomic interactions of their hybrids. The model implies that the incompatibilities evolve randomly, unless a particular gene or nongenic sequence diverges much faster than the rest of the genome. Here we propose that asynapsis of heterospecific chromosomes in meiotic prophase provides a recurrently evolving trigger for the meiotic arrest of interspecific F1 hybrids. We observed extensive asynapsis of chromosomes and disturbance of the sex body in >95% of pachynemas of Mus m. musculus × Mus m. domesticus sterile F1 males. Asynapsis was not preceded by a failure of double-strand break induction, and the rate of meiotic crossing over was not affected in synapsed chromosomes. DNA double-strand break repair was delayed or failed in unsynapsed autosomes, and misexpression of chromosome X and chromosome Y genes was detected in single pachynemas and by genome-wide expression profiling. Oocytes of F1 hybrid females showed the same kind of synaptic problems but with the incidence reduced to half. Most of the oocytes with pachytene asynapsis were eliminated before birth. We propose the heterospecific pairing of homologous chromosomes as a preexisting condition of asynapsis in interspecific hybrids. The asynapsis may represent a universal mechanistic basis of F1 hybrid sterility manifested by pachytene arrest. It is tempting to speculate that a fast-evolving subset of the noncoding genomic sequence important for chromosome pairing and synapsis may be the culprit. PMID:23329330

  6. Mechanistic Insights into Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Asymmetric Iron Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenberg, Jessica

    Our group has been focused on replacing toxic and expensive precious metal catalysts with iron for the synthesis of enantiopure compounds for industrial applications. During an investigation into the mechanism of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation with our first generation iron-(P-N-N-P) catalysts we found substantial evidence for zero-valent iron nanoparticles coated in chiral ligand acting as the active site. Extensive experimental and computational experiments were undertaken which included NMR, DFT, reaction profile analysis, substoichiometric poisoning, electron microscope imaging, XPS and multiphasic analysis, all of which supported the fact that NPs were the active species in catalysis. Reversibility of this asymmetric reaction on the nanoparticle surface was then probed using oxidative kinetic resolution of racemic alcohols, yielding modest enantiopurity and high turnover frequencies (TOF) for a range of aromatic alcohols. Efficient dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane for hydrogen evolution and the formation of B-N oligomers was also shown using the NP system, yielding highly active systems, with a maximum TOF of 3.66 H2/s-1 . We have also begun to focus on the development of iron catalysts for asymmetric direct hydrogenation of ketones using hydrogen gas. New chiral iron-(P-N-P) catalysts were developed and shown to be quite active and selective for a wide range of substrates. Mechanistic investigations primarily using NMR and DFT indicated that a highly active trans-dihydride species was being formed during catalyst activation. Lastly, a new library of chiral P-N-P and P-NH-P ligands were developed, as well as their corresponding iron complexes, some of which show promise for the development of future generations of active asymmetric direct hydrogenation catalysts.

  7. Application of Mechanistic Toxicology Data to Ecological Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ongoing evolution of knowledge and tools in the areas of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and systems biology holds significant promise for reducing uncertainties associated with ecological risk assessment. As our understanding of the mechanistic basis of responses of organ...

  8. Application of Mechanistic Toxicology Data to Ecological Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ongoing evolution of knowledge and tools in the areas of molecular biology, bioinformatics, and systems biology holds significant promise for reducing uncertainties associated with ecological risk assessment. As our understanding of the mechanistic basis of responses of organ...

  9. Explanation and inference: mechanistic and functional explanations guide property generalization.

    PubMed

    Lombrozo, Tania; Gwynne, Nicholas Z

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generalize from the known to the unknown is central to learning and inference. Two experiments explore the relationship between how a property is explained and how that property is generalized to novel species and artifacts. The experiments contrast the consequences of explaining a property mechanistically, by appeal to parts and processes, with the consequences of explaining the property functionally, by appeal to functions and goals. The findings suggest that properties that are explained functionally are more likely to be generalized on the basis of shared functions, with a weaker relationship between mechanistic explanations and generalization on the basis of shared parts and processes. The influence of explanation type on generalization holds even though all participants are provided with the same mechanistic and functional information, and whether an explanation type is freely generated (Experiment 1), experimentally provided (Experiment 2), or experimentally induced (Experiment 2). The experiments also demonstrate that explanations and generalizations of a particular type (mechanistic or functional) can be experimentally induced by providing sample explanations of that type, with a comparable effect when the sample explanations come from the same domain or from a different domains. These results suggest that explanations serve as a guide to generalization, and contribute to a growing body of work supporting the value of distinguishing mechanistic and functional explanations.

  10. Predicting interactions from mechanistic information: Can omic data validate theories?

    SciTech Connect

    Borgert, Christopher J.

    2007-09-01

    To address the most pressing and relevant issues for improving mixture risk assessment, researchers must first recognize that risk assessment is driven by both regulatory requirements and scientific research, and that regulatory concerns may expand beyond the purely scientific interests of researchers. Concepts of 'mode of action' and 'mechanism of action' are used in particular ways within the regulatory arena, depending on the specific assessment goals. The data requirements for delineating a mode of action and predicting interactive toxicity in mixtures are not well defined from a scientific standpoint due largely to inherent difficulties in testing certain underlying assumptions. Understanding the regulatory perspective on mechanistic concepts will be important for designing experiments that can be interpreted clearly and applied in risk assessments without undue reliance on extrapolation and assumption. In like fashion, regulators and risk assessors can be better equipped to apply mechanistic data if the concepts underlying mechanistic research and the limitations that must be placed on interpretation of mechanistic data are understood. This will be critically important for applying new technologies to risk assessment, such as functional genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. It will be essential not only for risk assessors to become conversant with the language and concepts of mechanistic research, including new omic technologies, but also, for researchers to become more intimately familiar with the challenges and needs of risk assessment.

  11. Explanation and inference: mechanistic and functional explanations guide property generalization

    PubMed Central

    Lombrozo, Tania; Gwynne, Nicholas Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generalize from the known to the unknown is central to learning and inference. Two experiments explore the relationship between how a property is explained and how that property is generalized to novel species and artifacts. The experiments contrast the consequences of explaining a property mechanistically, by appeal to parts and processes, with the consequences of explaining the property functionally, by appeal to functions and goals. The findings suggest that properties that are explained functionally are more likely to be generalized on the basis of shared functions, with a weaker relationship between mechanistic explanations and generalization on the basis of shared parts and processes. The influence of explanation type on generalization holds even though all participants are provided with the same mechanistic and functional information, and whether an explanation type is freely generated (Experiment 1), experimentally provided (Experiment 2), or experimentally induced (Experiment 2). The experiments also demonstrate that explanations and generalizations of a particular type (mechanistic or functional) can be experimentally induced by providing sample explanations of that type, with a comparable effect when the sample explanations come from the same domain or from a different domains. These results suggest that explanations serve as a guide to generalization, and contribute to a growing body of work supporting the value of distinguishing mechanistic and functional explanations. PMID:25309384

  12. From formamide to purine: an energetically viable mechanistic reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Springsteen, Greg; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-02-28

    A step-by-step mechanistic pathway following the transformation of formamide to purine through a five-membered ring intermediate has been explored by density functional theory computations. The highlight of the mechanistic route detailed here is that the proposed pathway represents the simplest reaction pathway. All necessary reactants are generated from a single starting compound, formamide, through energetically viable reactions. Several important reaction steps are involved in this mechanistic route: formylation-dehydration, Leuckart reduction, five- and six-membered ring-closure, and deamination. On the basis of the study of noncatalytic pathways, catalytic water has been found to provide energetically viable step-by-step mechanistic pathways. Among these reaction steps, five-member ring-closure is the rate-determining step. The energy barrier (ca. 42 kcal/mol) of this rate-control step is somewhat lower than the rate-determining step (ca. 44 kcal/mol) for a pyrimidine-based pathway reported previously. The mechanistic pathway reported herein is less energetically demanding than for previously proposed routes to adenine.

  13. Why did Jacques Monod make the choice of mechanistic determinism?

    PubMed

    Loison, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    The development of molecular biology placed in the foreground a mechanistic and deterministic conception of the functioning of macromolecules. In this article, I show that this conception was neither obvious, nor necessary. Taking Jacques Monod as a case study, I detail the way he gradually came loose from a statistical understanding of determinism to finally support a mechanistic understanding. The reasons of the choice made by Monod at the beginning of the 1950s can be understood only in the light of the general theoretical schema supported by the concept of mechanistic determinism. This schema articulates three fundamental notions for Monod, namely that of the rigidity of the sequence of the genetic program, that of the intrinsic stability of macromolecules (DNA and proteins), and that of the specificity of molecular interactions.

  14. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  15. Radical behaviorism and scientific frameworks. From mechanistic to relational accounts.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, M

    1992-11-01

    A substantial portion of B. F. Skinner's scholarship was devoted to developing methods and terms for a scientific study of behavior. Three concepts central to scientific accounts--cause, explanation, and theory--are examined to illustrate the distinction between mechanistic and relational frameworks and radical behaviorism's relationship to those frameworks. Informed by a scientific tradition that explicitly rejects mechanistic interpretations, radical behaviorism provides a distinctive stance in contemporary psychology. The present analysis suggests that radical behaviorism makes closer contact with the "new world view" advocated by physicists and philosophers of science than does much of contemporary psychology.

  16. Mechanistic Models of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    showed that the balance of moments through the weld plug was not possible under steady state conditions and realistic temperature profiles. This led to some consideration of a quasi-steady oscillating process. Later when force measurements became available some models were modified and new ones were proposed.

  17. Mechanistic investigation of a hemostatic keratin biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmany, Maria Bahawdory

    biomaterial surfaces. While other groups have discussed keratin's capacity to specifically adhere cells, this work was the first to utilize function blocking antibodies to deduce the specific receptors involved in mediating the cell-keratin interaction. To explore keratin's role in the second arm of coagulation, the clotting cascade, we followed the kinetic behavior of fibrin generation in the presence and absence of keratin. Confirmed with samples of plasma and a purified system of fibrinogen and thrombin, we observed an increased rate of fibrin polymerization in the presence of keratin proteins. The final goal of this project was to utilize a Chinese hamster ovary cell line to more specifically explore integrin-mediated cell interactions with keratin biomaterials in a controlled, biologically relevant system. Together, this work provides key details regarding keratin's hemostatic characteristics, providing the foundations for further development and optimizing of the material's unique characteristics for use as a hemostatic agent. More broadly, application of the CHO cell model could provide a useful tool for developing a receptor-ligand profile for keratin biomaterials.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MECHANISTIC GROUND SPRAYER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last ten years the Spray Drift Task Force (SDTF), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USDA Agricultural Research Service, and USDA Forest Service cooperated in the refinement and evaluation of a mechanistically-based aerial spray model (contained within AGDISP and ...

  19. Mechanistically Consistent Reduced Models of Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Terán-Romero, Luis; Silber, Mary; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Designing genetic networks with desired functionalities requires an accurate mathematical framework that accounts for the essential mechanistic details of the system. Here, we formulate a time-delay model of protein translation and mRNA degradation by systematically reducing a detailed mechanistic model that explicitly accounts for the ribosomal dynamics and the cleaving of mRNA by endonucleases. We exploit various technical and conceptual advantages that our time-delay model offers over the mechanistic model to probe the behavior of a self-repressing gene over wide regions of parameter space. We show that a heuristic time-delay model of protein synthesis of a commonly used form yields a notably different prediction for the parameter region where sustained oscillations occur. This suggests that such heuristics can lead to erroneous results. The functional forms that arise from our systematic reduction can be used for every system that involves transcription and translation and they could replace the commonly used heuristic time-delay models for these processes. The results from our analysis have important implications for the design of synthetic gene networks and stress that such design must be guided by a combination of heuristic models and mechanistic models that include all relevant details of the process. PMID:23663853

  20. A simple mechanistic model to interpret the effects of narcotics.

    PubMed

    Baas, J; Spurgeon, D; Broerse, M

    2015-01-01

    In this research we will show the advantages of using a time-independent dose metric in a mechanistic model to evaluate toxic effects for different narcotic compounds on different species. We will show how different already existing QSARs can be combined within a mechanistic framework to 1) make predictions of lethal thresholds; 2) show some limitations in the use of existing QSARs; 3) show how a mechanistic framework solves some conceptual problems in current approaches and 4) show how such a framework can be used to be of aid in an experimental setup in predicting the outcome of a survival experiment. The approach we chose is based on the simplest mechanistic model available, a scaled one-compartment model to describe uptake and elimination and hazard model to link the exposure to effects on survival. Within this theoretical framework a prediction for an internal threshold for effects on survival of 3 mmol/kg bw can be made, which should be similar for different species and independent of the partitioning characteristics of the toxicant. To demonstrate this, a threshold for 51 different species was derived, which indeed appeared to lie in a relatively small range, typically between 1 and 10 mmol/kg bw.

  1. A Mechanistic Model for Predicting Lung Inflammogenicity of Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Burello, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    This study presents a mechanistic model for identifying oxide nanoparticles that induce a high level of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, an important marker for lung inflammogenicity. The model is based on 4 nanoparticles' physicochemical properties, ie, the reactivity, surface charge, wettability, and dissolution. First, I calculate these properties and show that theoretical values reproduce acceptably the experimental measurements. Then, I combine these properties with mechanistic knowledge to build a classification model for the prediction of acute invivo lung inflammogenicity, measured as the total number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. The model uses reactivity and dissolution properties of nanoparticles as toxicological initiating events, whereas surface charge and wettability are characteristics involved in the interactions between the nanoparticles and the lung surfactant, eventually leading to increased cellular uptake and bioaccumulation. The model is validated on a set of 43 oxide nanoparticles tested invivo to confirm that acute lung inflammation can be described using this mechanistic framework. In addition, I also develop a linear regression model for insoluble nanoparticles to quantitatively predict the polymorphonuclear neutrophil count as a function of reactivity and surface charge. The proposed models are based on mechanistic knowledge and can support the development of adverse outcome pathways, risk assessment frameworks and safe design strategies at early stages of material's R&D. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MECHANISTIC GROUND SPRAYER MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last ten years the Spray Drift Task Force (SDTF), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USDA Agricultural Research Service, and USDA Forest Service cooperated in the refinement and evaluation of a mechanistically-based aerial spray model (contained within AGDISP and ...

  4. Bridging Mechanistic and Phenomenological Models of Complex Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Transtrum, Mark K.; Qiu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The inherent complexity of biological systems gives rise to complicated mechanistic models with a large number of parameters. On the other hand, the collective behavior of these systems can often be characterized by a relatively small number of phenomenological parameters. We use the Manifold Boundary Approximation Method (MBAM) as a tool for deriving simple phenomenological models from complicated mechanistic models. The resulting models are not black boxes, but remain expressed in terms of the microscopic parameters. In this way, we explicitly connect the macroscopic and microscopic descriptions, characterize the equivalence class of distinct systems exhibiting the same range of collective behavior, and identify the combinations of components that function as tunable control knobs for the behavior. We demonstrate the procedure for adaptation behavior exhibited by the EGFR pathway. From a 48 parameter mechanistic model, the system can be effectively described by a single adaptation parameter τ characterizing the ratio of time scales for the initial response and recovery time of the system which can in turn be expressed as a combination of microscopic reaction rates, Michaelis-Menten constants, and biochemical concentrations. The situation is not unlike modeling in physics in which microscopically complex processes can often be renormalized into simple phenomenological models with only a few effective parameters. The proposed method additionally provides a mechanistic explanation for non-universal features of the behavior. PMID:27187545

  5. Rearrangements of Allylic Sulfinates to Sulfones: A Mechanistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David B.; Mollard, Paul; Voigtritter, Karl R.; Ball, Jenelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Most current organic chemistry textbooks are organized by functional groups and those of us who teach organic chemistry use functional-group organization in our courses but ask students to learn organic chemistry from a mechanistic approach. To enrich and extend the chemical understanding and knowledge of pericyclic-type reactions for chemistry…

  6. MECHANISTIC AND SOURCE UNDERSTANDING OF PCDD/F FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses mechanistic and source understanding of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) formation. (NOTE: Considerable research effort has been expended over the last 15-plus years to understand how combustion sources result in formation of PCDDs/F...

  7. A mechanistic assessment of nutrient flushing at the catchment scale

    Treesearch

    Willem J. van Verseveld; Jeffrey J. McDonnell; Kate Lajtha

    2008-01-01

    This paper mechanistically assesses the flushing mechanism of DOC, DON, and DIN at the hillslope and catchment scales during two storm events, in a small catchment (WS10), H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the western Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Using a combination of natural tracer and hydrometric data, and end-member mixing analysis, we were able to describe the...

  8. Mechanistic investigation on the formation of indolizines from 2-enynylpyridines.

    PubMed

    Lahoz, Inma R; Sicre, Cristina; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Silva López, Carlos; Cid, María-Magdalena

    2009-11-05

    2,3,7-Trisubstituted indolizines were obtained from E- or Z-2-enynyl-4-substituted pyridines. The mechanistic pathway involves a base-catalyzed double-bond isomerization, if the E-isomer is the starting material, followed by a concerted pseudocoarctate cyclization.

  9. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  10. Rearrangements of Allylic Sulfinates to Sulfones: A Mechanistic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, David B.; Mollard, Paul; Voigtritter, Karl R.; Ball, Jenelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Most current organic chemistry textbooks are organized by functional groups and those of us who teach organic chemistry use functional-group organization in our courses but ask students to learn organic chemistry from a mechanistic approach. To enrich and extend the chemical understanding and knowledge of pericyclic-type reactions for chemistry…

  11. MECHANISTIC AND SOURCE UNDERSTANDING OF PCDD/F FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses mechanistic and source understanding of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) formation. (NOTE: Considerable research effort has been expended over the last 15-plus years to understand how combustion sources result in formation of PCDDs/F...

  12. Antimalarial benzoheterocyclic 4-aminoquinolines: Structure-activity relationship, in vivo evaluation, mechanistic and bioactivation studies.

    PubMed

    Ongarora, Dennis S B; Strydom, Natasha; Wicht, Kathryn; Njoroge, Mathew; Wiesner, Lubbe; Egan, Timothy J; Wittlin, Sergio; Jurva, Ulrik; Masimirembwa, Collen M; Chibale, Kelly

    2015-09-01

    A novel class of benzoheterocyclic analogues of amodiaquine designed to avoid toxic reactive metabolite formation was synthesized and evaluated for antiplasmodial activity against K1 (multidrug resistant) and NF54 (sensitive) strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of highly promising analogues, the most potent of which had IC50s in the nanomolar range against both strains. The compounds further demonstrated good in vitro microsomal metabolic stability while those subjected to in vivo pharmacokinetic studies had desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo antimalarial efficacy in Plasmodium berghei infected mice was evaluated for four compounds, all of which showed good activity following oral administration. In particular, compound 19 completely cured treated mice at a low multiple dose of 4×10mg/kg. Mechanistic and bioactivation studies suggest hemozoin formation inhibition and a low likelihood of forming quinone-imine reactive metabolites, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A framework for recognizing mechanistic reasoning in student scientific inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Rosemary S.

    A central ambition of science education reform is to help students develop abilities for scientific inquiry. Education research is thus rightly focused on defining what constitutes "inquiry" and developing tools for assessing it. There has been progress with respect to particular aspects of inquiry, namely student abilities for controlled experimentation and scientific argumentation. However, we suggest that in addition to these frameworks for assessing the structure of inquiry we need frameworks for analyzing the substance of that inquiry. In this work we draw attention to and evaluate the substance of student mechanistic reasoning. Both within the history and philosophy of science and within science education research, scientific inquiry is characterized in part as understanding the causal mechanisms that underlie natural phenomena. The challenge for science education, however, is that there has not been the same progress with respect to making explicit what constitutes mechanistic reasoning as there has been in making explicit other aspects of inquiry. This dissertation attempts to address this challenge. We adapt an account of mechanism in professional research science to develop a framework for reliably recognizing mechanistic reasoning in student discourse. The coding scheme articulates seven specific aspects of mechanistic reasoning and can be used to systematically analyze narrative data for patterns in student thinking. It provides a tool for detecting quality reasoning that may be overlooked by more traditional assessments. We apply the mechanism coding scheme to video and written data from a range of student inquiries, from large group discussions among first grade students to the individual problem solving of graduate students. While the primary result of this work is the coding scheme itself and the finding that it provides a reliable means of analyzing transcript data for evidence of mechanistic thinking, the rich descriptions we develop in each case

  14. Answering evolutionary questions: a guide for mechanistic biologists

    PubMed Central

    Masel, Joanna; Promislow, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary The questions and methods of molecular biology and evolutionary biology are clearly distinct, yet a unified approach can lead to deep insights. Unfortunately, attempts to unify these approaches are fraught with pitfalls. In this informal series of questions and answers, we offer the mechanistically oriented biologist a set of steps to come up with evolutionarily reasonable and meaningful hypotheses. We emphasize the critical power and importance of carefully constructed null hypotheses, and we illustrate our ideas with examples representing a range of topics, from the biology of aging, to protein structure, to speciation, and more. We also stress the importance of mathematics as the lingua franca for biologists of all stripes, and encourage mechanistic biologists to seek out quantitative collaborators to build explicit mathematical models, making their assumptions explicit, and their logic clear and testable. Biologists in all realms of inquiry stand to gain from strong bridges between our disciplines. PMID:27151396

  15. Mechanistic Fermentation Models for Process Design, Monitoring, and Control.

    PubMed

    Mears, Lisa; Stocks, Stuart M; Albaek, Mads O; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist V

    2017-08-21

    Mechanistic models require a significant investment of time and resources, but their application to multiple stages of fermentation process development and operation can make this investment highly valuable. This Opinion article discusses how an established fermentation model may be adapted for application to different stages of fermentation process development: planning, process design, monitoring, and control. Although a longer development time is required for such modeling methods in comparison to purely data-based model techniques, the wide range of applications makes them a highly valuable tool for fermentation research and development. In addition, in a research environment, where collaboration is important, developing mechanistic models provides a platform for knowledge sharing and consolidation of existing process understanding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanistic pathway modeling for industrial biotechnology: challenging but worthwhile.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    Mechanistic (also called kinetic) models quantitatively describe dynamic and steady states of biochemical pathways. They are based on network structure (stoichiometry), regulatory information (enzyme inhibitors and activators) and the corresponding reaction kinetics. Although this approach to understand and predict the behavior of biochemical networks has now been in use for almost half a century, its experimental foundation has dramatically changed in the data-rich age of systems biology. Large mechanistic models, ranging up to the genome scale, are now being built and lots of data are available to validate and test them. From the broad scope of possible modeling applications, this survey focuses on the recent developments and central problems of metabolic network modeling in the field of bioprocess development for industrial biotechnology.

  17. Mechanistic model for catalytic recombination during aerobraking maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Several mechanistic models are developed to predict recombination coefficients for use in heat shield design for reusable surface insulation (RSI) on aerobraking vehicles such as space shuttles. The models are applied over a temperature range of 300 to 1800 K and a stagnation pressure range of 0 to 3,000 Pa. A four parameter model in temperature was found to work best; however, several models (including those with atom concentrations at the surface) were also investigated. Mechanistic models developed with atom concentration terms may be applicable when sufficient data becomes available. The requirement is shown for recombination experiments in the 300 to 1000 K and 1500 to 1850 K temperature range, with deliberate concentration variations.

  18. Millifluidics for Chemical Synthesis and Time-resolved Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Biswas, Sanchita; Navin, Chelliah V.; Yamane, Dawit G.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Procedures utilizing millifluidic devices for chemical synthesis and time-resolved mechanistic studies are described by taking three examples. In the first, synthesis of ultra-small copper nanoclusters is described. The second example provides their utility for investigating time resolved kinetics of chemical reactions by analyzing gold nanoparticle formation using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The final example demonstrates continuous flow catalysis of reactions inside millifluidic channel coated with nanostructured catalyst. PMID:24327099

  19. New mechanistic studies on the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction

    PubMed Central

    List, Benjamin; Hoang, Linh; Martin, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction has stimulated considerable debate, and despite limited experimental data, at least five different mechanisms have been proposed. Complementary to recent theoretical studies we have initiated an experimental program with the goal of clarifying some of the basic mechanistic questions concerning the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction. Here we summarize our discoveries in this area and provide further evidence for the involvement of enamine intermediates. PMID:15073330

  20. Mechanistic insights into cyclooxygenase irreversible inactivation by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Lazzarato, Loretta

    2009-06-01

    A mechanistic hypothesis for the acetylation of cyclooxygenase (COX) by aspirin is proposed on the basis of a QM/MM study. This mechanism is consistent with previous experimental findings by other investigators. Ser 530 appears to be acetylated under intramolecular general base catalysis provided by the carboxylate moiety of aspirin, while Tyr 385 plays a crucial role in orienting and polarizing the acetyl group.

  1. Explaining the Atypical Reaction Profiles of Heme Enzymes with a Novel Mechanistic Hypothesis and Kinetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Manoj, Kelath Murali; Baburaj, Arun; Ephraim, Binoy; Pappachan, Febin; Maviliparambathu, Pravitha Parapurathu; Vijayan, Umesh K.; Narayanan, Sivaprasad Valiyaveettil; Periasamy, Kalaiselvi; George, Ebi Ashley; Mathew, Lazar T.

    2010-01-01

    Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO) characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP), uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation) of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model) was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the “steady state kinetics” of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates) is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s) affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of “the product of interest” in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of “substrate concentration at maximum observed rate”. The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes. PMID:20498847

  2. Mechanistic profiling of the siRNA delivery dynamics of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Stefano; Cun, Dongmei; Remaut, Katrien; Bunker, Matt; Zhang, Jianxin; Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Yaghmur, Anan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Nielsen, Hanne M; Foged, Camilla

    2015-03-10

    Understanding the delivery dynamics of nucleic acid nanocarriers is fundamental to improve their design for therapeutic applications. We investigated the carrier structure-function relationship of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) consisting of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocarriers modified with the cationic lipid dioleoyltrimethyl-ammoniumpropane (DOTAP). A library of siRNA-loaded LPNs was prepared by systematically varying the nitrogen-to-phosphate (N/P) ratio. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) combined with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies suggested that the siRNA-loaded LPNs are characterized by a core-shell structure consisting of a PLGA matrix core coated with lamellar DOTAP structures with siRNA localized both in the core and in the shell. Release studies in buffer and serum-containing medium combined with in vitro gene silencing and quantification of intracellular siRNA suggested that this self-assembling core-shell structure influences the siRNA release kinetics and the delivery dynamics. A main delivery mechanism appears to be mediated via the release of transfection-competent siRNA-DOTAP lipoplexes from the LPNs. Based on these results, we suggest a model for the nanostructural characteristics of the LPNs, in which the siRNA is organized in lamellar superficial assemblies and/or as complexes entrapped in the polymeric matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Home range analysis using a mechanistic home range model

    SciTech Connect

    Moorcroft, P.R. . Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Lewis, M.A. . Dept. of Mathematics) Crabtree, R.L. . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources)

    1999-07-01

    The traditional models used to characterize animal home ranges have no mechanistic basis underlying their descriptions of space use, and as a result, the analysis of animal home ranges has primarily been a descriptive endeavor. In this paper, the authors characterize coyote (Canis latrans) home range patterns using partial differential equations for expected space use that are formally derived from underlying descriptions of individual movement behavior. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that mechanistic models have been used to characterize animal home ranges. The results provide empirical support for a model formulation of movement response to scent marks, and suggest that having relocation data for individuals in adjacent groups is necessary to capture the spatial arrangement of home range boundaries. The authors then show how the model fits can be used to obtain predictions for individual movement and scent marking behavior and to predict changes in home range patterns. More generally, the findings illustrate how mechanistic models permit the development of a predictive theory for the relationship between movement behavior and animal spatial distribution.

  4. Structural and mechanistic aspects of Amt/Rh proteins.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Arnaud; Lupo, Domenico; Li, Xiao-Dan; Merrick, Mike; Chami, Mohamed; Ripoche, Pierre; Winkler, Fritz K

    2007-06-01

    Amt/Rh proteins, which mediate movement of ammonium across cell membranes, are spread throughout the three kingdoms of life. Most functional studies on various members of the family have been performed using cellular assays in heterologous expression systems, which are, however, not very well suited for detailed mechanistic studies. Although now generally considered to be ammonia conducting channels, based on a number of experimental studies and structural insights, the possibility remains that some plant Amts facilitate net ammonium ion transport. The Escherichia coli channel AmtB has become the model system of choice for analysis of the mechanism of ammonia conductance, increasingly also through molecular dynamics simulations. Further progress in a more detailed mechanistic understanding of these proteins requires a reliable in vitro assay using purified protein, allowing quantitative kinetic measurements under a variety of experimental conditions for different Amt/Rh proteins, including mutants. Here, we critically review the existing functional data in the context of the most interesting and unresolved mechanistic questions and we present our results, obtained using an in vitro assay set up with the purified E. coli channel AmtB.

  5. Chemical diversity approach for evaluating mechanistic relatedness among toxicological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Pollack, N; Cunningham, A R; Klopman, G; Rosenkranz, H S

    1999-12-01

    The CASE/MULTICASE structure-activity relationship (SAR) system was used to assess a new procedure to investigate the mechanistic relatedness of various toxicological endpoints. The method consisted of predicting the activity of 10,000 randomly selected chemicals using validated and characterized SAR models from a variety of biological and toxicological endpoints. The prevalence of chemicals predicted to possess the ability to induce two or more toxicological effects simultaneously should provide a measure of the mechanistic relatedness of these phenomena. Eight toxicological endpoints were predicted and the results were compared to predictions based on an eye irritation SAR model. Allergic contact dermatitis demonstrated a 29.6% greater than expected overlap between expected and observed results (p < 0.001). Similar results were seen for respiratory hypersensitivity (33.1%), sensory irritation (28.9%), cell toxicity (25.9%), and Ah receptor binding (19.8%). A lesser degree of overlap was seen between eye irritation and Salmonella mutagenicity (11.5%) and the inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication (6.7%). Moreover, a negative overlap, suggesting possibly an antagonistic phenomena, was observed between eye irritation and alpha 2 mu-induced nephropathy. These results indicate that this method can provide a useful tool to investigate mechanistic relatedness between diverse toxicological endpoints.

  6. From the exposome to mechanistic understanding of chemical ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Current definitions of the exposome expand beyond the initial idea to consider the totality of exposure and aim to relate to biological effects. While the exposome has been established for human health, its principles can be extended to include broader ecological issues. The assessment of exposure is tightly interlinked with hazard assessment. OBJECTIVES: We explore if mechanistic understanding of the causal links between exposure and adverse effects on human health and the environment can be improved by integrating the exposome approach with the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept - a framework to structure and organize the sequence of toxicological events from an initial molecular interaction of a chemical to an adverse outcome.METHODS: This review was informed by a Workshop organized by the Integrated Project EXPOSOME at the UFZ Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig, Germany. DISCUSSION: The exposome encompasses all chemicals, including exogenous chemicals and endogenous compounds that are produced in response to external factors. By complementing the exposome research with the AOP concept, we can achieve a better mechanistic understanding, weigh the importance of various components of the exposome, and determine primary risk drivers. The ability to interpret multiple exposures and mixture effects at the mechanistic level requires a more holistic approach facilitated by the exposome concept.CONCLUSION: Incorporating the AOP conc

  7. Lipid Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  8. State Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State-Federal Information Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA.

    State-by-state public policy profiles are provided by the Council for Exceptional Children's State-Federal Information Clearinghouse. These profiles summarize the present legal base for the delivery of educational services to handicapped children in the United States. Included in each profile is information from various avenues used to establish…

  9. Mechanistic modeling of ion-exchange process chromatography of charge variants of monoclonal antibody products.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijesh; Leweke, Samuel; von Lieres, Eric; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-12-24

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is universally accepted as the optimal method for achieving process scale separation of charge variants of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutic. These variants are closely related to the product and a baseline separation is rarely achieved. The general practice is to fractionate the eluate from the IEX column, analyze the fractions and then pool the desired fractions to obtain the targeted composition of variants. This is, however, a very cumbersome and time consuming exercise. A mechanistic model that is capable of simulating the peak profile will be a much more elegant and effective way to make a decision on the pooling strategy. This paper proposes a mechanistic model, based on the general rate model, to predict elution peak profile for separation of the main product from its variants. The proposed approach uses inverse fit of process scale chromatogram for estimation of model parameters using the initial values that are obtained from theoretical correlations. The packed bed column has been modeled along with the chromatographic system consisting of the mixer, tubing and detectors as a series of dispersed plug flow and continuous stirred tank reactors. The model uses loading ranges starting at 25% to a maximum of 70% of the loading capacity and hence is applicable to process scale separations. Langmuir model has been extended to include the effects of salt concentration and temperature on the model parameters. The extended Langmuir model that has been proposed uses one less parameter than the SMA model and this results in a significant ease of estimating the model parameters from inverse fitting. The proposed model has been validated with experimental data and has been shown to successfully predict peak profile for a range of load capacities (15-28mg/mL), gradient lengths (10-30CV), bed heights (6-20cm), and for three different resins with good accuracy (as measured by estimation of residuals). The model has been also

  10. Hepatic signaling by the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2)

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Demirkan, Gokhan; Boylan, Joan M.; Mihaylova, Maria M.; Peng, Tao; Ferreira, Jonathan; Neretti, Nicola; Salomon, Arthur; Sabatini, David M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) exists in two complexes that regulate diverse cellular processes. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), the canonical target of rapamycin, has been well studied, whereas the physiological role of mTORC2 remains relatively uncharacterized. In mice in which the mTORC2 component Rictor is deleted in liver [Rictor-knockout (RKO) mice], we used genomic and phosphoproteomic analyses to characterize the role of hepatic mTORC2 in vivo. Overnight food withdrawal followed by refeeding was used to activate mTOR signaling. Rapamycin was administered before refeeding to specify mTORC2-mediated events. Hepatic mTORC2 regulated a complex gene expression and post-translational network that affects intermediary metabolism, ribosomal biogenesis, and proteasomal biogenesis. Nearly all changes in genes related to intermediary metabolic regulation were replicated in cultured fetal hepatocytes, indicating a cell-autonomous effect of mTORC2 signaling. Phosphoproteomic profiling identified mTORC2-related signaling to 144 proteins, among which were metabolic enzymes and regulators. A reduction of p38 MAPK signaling in the RKO mice represents a link between our phosphoproteomic and gene expression results. We conclude that hepatic mTORC2 exerts a broad spectrum of biological effects under physiological conditions. Our findings provide a context for the development of targeted therapies to modulate mTORC2 signaling.—Lamming, D. W., Demirkan, G., Boylan, J. M., Mihaylova, M. M., Peng, T., Ferreira, J., Neretti, N., Salomon, A., Sabatini, D. M., Gruppuso, P. A. Hepatic signaling by the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2). PMID:24072782

  11. Differential Site Accessibility Mechanistically Explains Subcellular-Specific N-Glycosylation Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ling Yen; Lin, Chi-Hung; Fanayan, Susan; Packer, Nicolle H.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Glycoproteins perform extra- and intracellular functions in innate and adaptive immunity by lectin-based interactions to exposed glyco-determinants. Herein, we document and mechanistically explain the formation of subcellular-specific N-glycosylation determinants on glycoproteins trafficking through the shared biosynthetic machinery of human cells. LC-MS/MS-based quantitative glycomics showed that the secreted glycoproteins of eight human breast epithelial cells displaying diverse geno- and phenotypes consistently displayed more processed, primarily complex type, N-glycans than the high-mannose-rich microsomal glycoproteins. Detailed subcellular glycome profiling of proteins derived from three breast cell lines (MCF7/MDA468/MCF10A) demonstrated that secreted glycoproteins displayed significantly more α-sialylation and α1,6-fucosylation, but less α-mannosylation, than both the intermediately glycan-processed cell-surface glycoproteomes and the under-processed microsomal glycoproteomes. Subcellular proteomics and gene ontology revealed substantial presence of endoplasmic reticulum resident glycoproteins in the microsomes and confirmed significant enrichment of secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins in the respective subcellular fractions. The solvent accessibility of the glycosylation sites on maturely folded proteins of the 100 most abundant putative N-glycoproteins observed uniquely in the three subcellular glycoproteomes correlated with the glycan type processing thereby mechanistically explaining the formation of subcellular-specific N-glycosylation. In conclusion, human cells have developed mechanisms to simultaneously and reproducibly generate subcellular-specific N-glycosylation using a shared biosynthetic machinery. This aspect of protein-specific glycosylation is important for structural and functional glycobiology and discussed here in the context of the spatio-temporal interaction of glyco-determinants with lectins central to infection and immunity

  12. Mechanistic insight into the ribosome biogenesis functions of the ancient protein KsgA

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Keith; Rife, Jason P.; Culver, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Summary While the general blueprint of ribosome biogenesis is evolutionarily conserved, most details have diverged considerably. A striking exception to this divergence is the universally conserved KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family, which modifies two adjacent adenosines in the terminal helix of small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA). While localization of KsgA on 30S subunits (SSUs) and genetic interaction data have suggested that KsgA acts as a ribosome biogenesis factor, mechanistic details and a rationale for its extreme conservation are still lacking. To begin to address these questions we have characterized the function of E. coli KsgA in vivo using both a ksgA deletion strain and a methyltransferase deficient form of this protein. Our data reveals cold sensitivity and altered ribosomal profiles are associated with a ΔksgA genotype in E. coli. Our work also indicates that loss of KsgA alters 16S rRNA processing. These findings allow KsgAs role in SSU biogenesis to be integrated into the network of other identified factors. Moreover, a methyltransferase-inactive form of KsgA, which we show to be deleterious to cell growth, profoundly impairs ribosome biogenesis prompting discussion of KsgA as a possible anti-microbial drug target. These unexpected data suggest that methylation is a second layer of function for KsgA and that its critical role is as a supervisor of biogenesis of SSUs in vivo. These new findings and this proposed regulatory role offer a mechanistic explanation for the extreme conservation of the KsgA/Dim1p enzyme family. PMID:18990185

  13. In Silico, Experimental, Mechanistic Model for Extended-Release Felodipine Disposition Exhibiting Complex Absorption and a Highly Variable Food Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sean H. J.; Jackson, Andre J.; Hunt, C. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and explore new, in silico experimental methods for deciphering complex, highly variable absorption and food interaction pharmacokinetics observed for a modified-release drug product. Toward that aim, we constructed an executable software analog of study participants to whom product was administered orally. The analog is an object- and agent-oriented, discrete event system, which consists of grid spaces and event mechanisms that map abstractly to different physiological features and processes. Analog mechanisms were made sufficiently complicated to achieve prespecified similarity criteria. An equation-based gastrointestinal transit model with nonlinear mixed effects analysis provided a standard for comparison. Subject-specific parameterizations enabled each executed analog’s plasma profile to mimic features of the corresponding six individual pairs of subject plasma profiles. All achieved prespecified, quantitative similarity criteria, and outperformed the gastrointestinal transit model estimations. We observed important subject-specific interactions within the simulation and mechanistic differences between the two models. We hypothesize that mechanisms, events, and their causes occurring during simulations had counterparts within the food interaction study: they are working, evolvable, concrete theories of dynamic interactions occurring within individual subjects. The approach presented provides new, experimental strategies for unraveling the mechanistic basis of complex pharmacological interactions and observed variability. PMID:25268237

  14. Systematic interpolation method predicts protein chromatographic elution from batch isotherm data without a detailed mechanistic isotherm model.

    PubMed

    Creasy, Arch; Barker, Gregory; Yao, Yan; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-09-01

    Predicting protein elution for overloaded ion exchange columns requires models capable of describing protein binding over broad ranges of protein and salt concentrations. Although approximate mechanistic models are available, they do not always have the accuracy needed for precise predictions. The aim of this work is to develop a method to predict protein chromatographic behavior from batch isotherm data without relying on a mechanistic model. The method uses a systematic empirical interpolation (EI) scheme coupled with a lumped kinetic model with rate parameters determined from HETP measurements for non-binding conditions, to numerically predict the column behavior. For two experimental systems considered in this work, predictions based on the EI scheme are in excellent agreement with experimental elution profiles under highly overloaded conditions without using any adjustable parameters. A qualitative study of the sensitivity of predicting protein elution profiles to the precision, granularity, and extent of the batch adsorption data shows that the EI scheme is relatively insensitive to the properties of the dataset used, requiring only that the experimental ranges of protein and salt concentrations overlap those under which the protein actually elutes from the column and possess a ± 10% measurement precision.

  15. In silico, experimental, mechanistic model for extended-release felodipine disposition exhibiting complex absorption and a highly variable food interaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sean H J; Jackson, Andre J; Hunt, C Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and explore new, in silico experimental methods for deciphering complex, highly variable absorption and food interaction pharmacokinetics observed for a modified-release drug product. Toward that aim, we constructed an executable software analog of study participants to whom product was administered orally. The analog is an object- and agent-oriented, discrete event system, which consists of grid spaces and event mechanisms that map abstractly to different physiological features and processes. Analog mechanisms were made sufficiently complicated to achieve prespecified similarity criteria. An equation-based gastrointestinal transit model with nonlinear mixed effects analysis provided a standard for comparison. Subject-specific parameterizations enabled each executed analog's plasma profile to mimic features of the corresponding six individual pairs of subject plasma profiles. All achieved prespecified, quantitative similarity criteria, and outperformed the gastrointestinal transit model estimations. We observed important subject-specific interactions within the simulation and mechanistic differences between the two models. We hypothesize that mechanisms, events, and their causes occurring during simulations had counterparts within the food interaction study: they are working, evolvable, concrete theories of dynamic interactions occurring within individual subjects. The approach presented provides new, experimental strategies for unraveling the mechanistic basis of complex pharmacological interactions and observed variability.

  16. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), inflammation, and endothelial progenitor cells-New mechanistic insights of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Statins have been shown to favorably affect the prognosis of patients with risk factors to atherosclerosis-both as a primary and a secondary prevention. The beneficial effects observed with statin therapy are not merely related to changes in lipid profile but also are due to a positive effect on vascular inflammation and on immune-modulation of T lymphocytes and endothelial progenitor stem cells (EPCs). This dual effect has been demonstrated mainly in clinical trials where a change in endothelial function was observed within hours, much earlier than the effects of statins on the lipid profile (weeks). Based on all the knowledge that we have today questions were raised as to the mechanistic pathways that may explain the process of atherosclerosis and through this pathway to find better solutions and therapies to prevent and fight atherosclerosis. Our review will focus on the new updates in the field of inflammation and stem cells in vascular biology-in relation with atherosclerosis.

  17. Mechanistic species distribution modeling reveals a niche shift during invasion.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Daniel S; Scalone, Romain; Štefanić, Edita; Bullock, James M

    2017-04-02

    Niche shifts of non-native plants can occur when they colonize novel climatic conditions. However, the mechanistic basis for niche shifts during invasion is poorly understood and has rarely been captured within species distribution models. We quantified the consequence of between-population variation in phenology for invasion of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.) across Europe. Ragweed is of serious concern because of its harmful effects as a crop weed and because of its impact on public health as a major aeroallergen. We developed a forward mechanistic species distribution model based on responses of ragweed development rates to temperature and photoperiod. The model was parameterized and validated from the literature and by re-analyzing data from a reciprocal common garden experiment in which native and invasive populations were grown within and beyond the current invaded range. It could therefore accommodate between-population variation in the physiological requirements for flowering, and predict the potentially-invaded ranges of individual populations. Northern-origin populations that were established outside the generally-accepted climate envelope of the species had lower thermal requirements for bud development, suggesting local adaptation of phenology had occurred during the invasion. The model predicts that this will extend the potentially-invaded range northwards and increase the average suitability across Europe by 90% in the current climate and 20% in the future climate. Therefore, trait variation observed at the population scale can trigger a climatic niche shift at the biogeographic scale. For ragweed, earlier flowering phenology in established northern populations could allow the species to spread beyond its current invasive range, substantially increasing its risk to agriculture and public health. Mechanistic species distribution models offer the possibility to represent niche shifts by varying the traits and niche responses of individual

  18. Advanced Reach Tool (ART): development of the mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Fransman, Wouter; Van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Tischer, Martin; Schneider, Thomas; Schinkel, Jody; Kromhout, Hans; Warren, Nick; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe. The ART mechanistic model is based on a conceptual framework that adopts a source receptor approach, which describes the transport of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and defines seven independent principal modifying factors: substance emission potential, activity emission potential, localized controls, segregation, personal enclosure, surface contamination, and dispersion. ART currently differentiates between three different exposure types: vapours, mists, and dust (fumes, fibres, and gases are presently excluded). Various sources were used to assign numerical values to the multipliers to each modifying factor. The evidence used to underpin this assessment procedure was based on chemical and physical laws. In addition, empirical data obtained from literature were used. Where this was not possible, expert elicitation was applied for the assessment procedure. Multipliers for all modifying factors were peer reviewed by leading experts from industry, research institutes, and public authorities across the globe. In addition, several workshops with experts were organized to discuss the proposed exposure multipliers. The mechanistic model is a central part of the ART tool and with advancing knowledge on exposure, determinants will require updates and refinements on a continuous basis, such as the effect of worker behaviour on personal exposure, 'best practice' values that describe the maximum achievable effectiveness of control measures, the intrinsic emission potential of various solid objects (e.g. metal, glass, plastics, etc.), and extending the applicability domain to certain types of exposures (e.g. gas, fume, and fibre exposure).

  19. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  20. Mechanistic systems modeling to guide drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian J.; Papin, Jason A.; Musante, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    A crucial question that must be addressed in the drug development process is whether the proposed therapeutic target will yield the desired effect in the clinical population. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies place a large investment on research and development, long before confirmatory data are available from human trials. Basic science has greatly expanded the computable knowledge of disease processes, both through the generation of large omics data sets and a compendium of studies assessing cellular and systemic responses to physiologic and pathophysiologic stimuli. Given inherent uncertainties in drug development, mechanistic systems models can better inform target selection and the decision process for advancing compounds through preclinical and clinical research. PMID:22999913

  1. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery. PMID:25981301

  2. Opioid receptors: Structural and mechanistic insights into pharmacology and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Filizola, Marta

    2015-09-15

    Opioid receptors are important drug targets for pain management, addiction, and mood disorders. Although substantial research on these important subtypes of G protein-coupled receptors has been conducted over the past two decades to discover ligands with higher specificity and diminished side effects, currently used opioid therapeutics remain suboptimal. Luckily, recent advances in structural biology of opioid receptors provide unprecedented insights into opioid receptor pharmacology and signaling. We review here a few recent studies that have used the crystal structures of opioid receptors as a basis for revealing mechanistic details of signal transduction mediated by these receptors, and for the purpose of drug discovery.

  3. A mechanistic, stochastic, population model of egg production.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S A; Gous, R M

    2007-04-01

    1. A mechanistic, stochastic egg production model is presented. Mean age at first egg may be predicted from the lighting programme applied during rearing, using the Bristol-Reading model (Lewis et al., 2002). 2. Rate of ovulation is determined by an amended version of the mathematical model of the ovulatory cycle, originally proposed by Etches and Schoch (1984). 3. Oviposition times are estimated from ovulation times. 4. Yolk, albumen and shell weights are calculated using allometric functions. 5. The model predicts egg production of a theoretical flock of laying hens for a full laying year, including random occurrences of double-yolked and soft-shelled eggs and internal ovulations.

  4. Mechanistic equations for membrane transport of multicomponent solutions.

    PubMed

    Suchanek, G

    2006-03-01

    In the present article, mechanistic equations for membrane transport of N + 1-component solutions have been derived. The major specific investigation result is the introduction - for ternary solutions - of two diffusion coefficients omega(d1) and omega(d2) for solutes, as well as two cross coefficients omega(d12) and omega(d21) for these solutes. The latter parameters may be treated as coefficients of interdiffusion. The expansion of the description of substance transport to include the N + 1-component solutions does not formulate any additional physical phenomena other than those which are formulated by the transport equations for three-component solutions.

  5. Mechanistic modeling of CHF in forced-convection subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Podowski, M.Z.; Alajbegovic, A.; Kurul, N.; Drew, D.A.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Because of the complexity of phenomena governing boiling heat transfer, the approach to solve practical problems has traditionally been based on experimental correlations rather than mechanistic models. The recent progress in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), combined with improved experimental techniques in two-phase flow and heat transfer, makes the use of rigorous physically-based models a realistic alternative to the current simplistic phenomenological approach. The objective of this paper is to present a new CFD model for critical heat flux (CHF) in low quality (in particular, in subcooled boiling) forced-convection flows in heated channels.

  6. Modeling skin sensitization potential of mechanistically hard-to-be-classified aniline and phenol compounds with quantum mechanistic properties.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qin; Wang, Lirong; Mu, Ying; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2014-12-24

    Advanced structure-activity relationship (SAR) modeling can be used as an alternative tool for identification of skin sensitizers and in improvement of the medical diagnosis and more effective practical measures to reduce the causative chemical exposures. It can also circumvent ethical concern of using animals in toxicological tests, and reduce time and cost. Compounds with aniline or phenol moieties represent two large classes of frequently skin sensitizing chemicals but exhibiting very variable, and difficult to predict, potency. The mechanisms of action are not well-understood. A group of mechanistically hard-to-be-classified aniline and phenol chemicals were collected. An in silico model was established by statistical analysis of quantum descriptors for the determination of the relationship between their chemical structures and skin sensitization potential. The sensitization mechanisms were investigated based on the features of the established model. Then the model was utilized to analyze a subset of FDA approved drugs containing aniline and/or phenol groups for prediction of their skin sensitization potential. A linear discriminant model using the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (ϵHOMO) as the descriptor yielded high prediction accuracy. The contribution of ϵHOMO as a major determinant may suggest that autoxidation or free radical binding could be involved. The model was further applied to predict allergic potential of a subset of FDA approved drugs containing aniline and/or phenol moiety. The predictions imply that similar mechanisms (autoxidation or free radical binding) may also play a role in the skin sensitization caused by these drugs. An accurate and simple quantum mechanistic model has been developed to predict the skin sensitization potential of mechanistically hard-to-be-classified aniline and phenol chemicals. The model could be useful for the skin sensitization potential predictions of a subset of FDA approved drugs.

  7. Modeling of batch sorber system: kinetic, mechanistic, and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vishal

    2016-09-01

    The present investigation has dealt with the biosorption of copper and zinc ions on the surface of egg-shell particles in the liquid phase. Various rate models were evaluated to elucidate the kinetics of copper and zinc biosorptions, and the results indicated that the pseudo-second-order model was more appropriate than the pseudo-first-order model. The curve of the initial sorption rate versus the initial concentration of copper and zinc ions also complemented the results of the pseudo-second-order model. Models used for the mechanistic modeling were the intra-particle model of pore diffusion and Bangham's model of film diffusion. The results of the mechanistic modeling together with the values of pore and film diffusivities indicated that the preferential mode of the biosorption of copper and zinc ions on the surface of egg-shell particles in the liquid phase was film diffusion. The results of the intra-particle model showed that the biosorption of the copper and zinc ions was not dominated by the pore diffusion, which was due to macro-pores with open-void spaces present on the surface of egg-shell particles. The thermodynamic modeling reproduced the fact that the sorption of copper and zinc was spontaneous, exothermic with the increased order of the randomness at the solid-liquid interface.

  8. The coefficient of restitution of pressurized balls: a mechanistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgallas, Alex; Landry, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Pressurized, inflated balls used in professional sports are regulated so that their behaviour upon impact can be anticipated and allow the game to have its distinctive character. However, the dynamics governing the impacts of such balls, even on stationary hard surfaces, can be extremely complex. The energy transformations, which arise from the compression of the gas within the ball and from the shear forces associated with the deformation of the wall, are examined in this paper. We develop a simple mechanistic model of the dependence of the coefficient of restitution, e, upon both the gauge pressure, P_G, of the gas and the shear modulus, G, of the wall. The model is validated using the results from a simple series of experiments using three different sports balls. The fits to the data are extremely good for P_G > 25 kPa and consistent values are obtained for the value of G for the wall material. As far as the authors can tell, this simple, mechanistic model of the pressure dependence of the coefficient of restitution is the first in the literature. *%K Coefficient of Restitution, Dynamics, Inflated Balls, Pressure, Impact Model

  9. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  10. New web-based applications for mechanistic case diagramming.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R; Haugen, Thomas H; Kreiter, Clarence D

    2014-01-01

    The goal of mechanistic case diagraming (MCD) is to provide students with more in-depth understanding of cause and effect relationships and basic mechanistic pathways in medicine. This will enable them to better explain how observed clinical findings develop from preceding pathogenic and pathophysiological events. The pedagogic function of MCD is in relating risk factors, disease entities and morphology, signs and symptoms, and test and procedure findings in a specific case scenario with etiologic pathogenic and pathophysiological sequences within a flow diagram. In this paper, we describe the addition of automation and predetermined lists to further develop the original concept of MCD as described by Engelberg in 1992 and Guerrero in 2001. We demonstrate that with these modifications, MCD is effective and efficient in small group case-based teaching for second-year medical students (ratings of ~3.4 on a 4.0 scale). There was also a significant correlation with other measures of competency, with a 'true' score correlation of 0.54. A traditional calculation of reliability showed promising results (α =0.47) within a low stakes, ungraded environment. Further, we have demonstrated MCD's potential for use in independent learning and TBL. Future studies are needed to evaluate MCD's potential for use in medium stakes assessment or self-paced independent learning and assessment. MCD may be especially relevant in returning students to the application of basic medical science mechanisms in the clinical years.

  11. From Data Patterns to Mechanistic Models in Acute Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M.; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches in order to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the Society’s approach: i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiological signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data, and ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control, and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience, and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  12. Surgery for malignant gliomas: mechanistic reasoning and slippery statistics.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick; Ellison, David W; Mendelow, A David

    2005-07-01

    Current surgical treatment of malignant gliomas largely depends on mechanistic reasoning and data collected in non-randomised studies. Technological advance has enabled more accurate resection of tumours and preservation of eloquent brain areas but ethical considerations have restricted randomised trials on the efficacy of surgery to one small trial that found a 3 month survival advantage for patients over age 65 years who received surgery and interim analysis of a larger trial. There is an argument for surgery as a palliative measure in patients with symptoms caused by mechanisms that are surgically remediable. Whether there is any survival advantage from surgery in patients other than those with immediately life-threatening, surgically remediable complications, such as raised intracranial pressure, is unclear. The available data show that if such an advantage does exist, it is modest at best. Adjuvant treatments given surgically are being studied. Chemotherapy wafers are the most prominent of the adjuvant treatments but the evidence available is insufficient to recommend their use in routine practice. In this review we examine the prevailing mechanistic model and observational data; we assess how these are applied and the priorities they indicate for future research.

  13. Splicing in immune cells-mechanistic insights and emerging topics.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Annalisa; Glasmacher, Elke

    2017-04-01

    Differential splicing of mRNAs not only enables regulation of gene expression levels, but also ensures a high degree of gene-product diversity. The extent to which splicing of mRNAs is utilized as a mechanism in immune cells has become evident within the last few years. Still, only a few of these mechanisms have been well studied. In this review, we discuss some of the best-understood mechanisms, for instance the differential splicing of CD45 in T cells, as well as immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Beyond that we provide general mechanistic insights on how, when and where this process takes place and discuss the current knowledge regarding these topics in immune cells. We also highlight some of the reported links to immune-related diseases, genome-wide sequencing studies that revealed thousands of differentially spliced transcripts, as well as splicing studies on immune cells that remain mechanistically not fully understood. We thereby display potential emerging topics for future studies centered on splicing mechanisms in immune cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society for Immunology.

  14. Photosynthetic water oxidation vs. mitochondrial oxygen reduction: distinct mechanistic parallels.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Todd P

    2011-08-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (PSII-OEC) and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) not only catalyze anti-parallel reactions (the OEC oxidizes water to dioxygen, whereas CcO reduces dioxygen to water), they also share a number of uncanny molecular and mechanistic similarities. Both feature a redox-active polymetallic cluster that includes a key tyrosine, and both utilize a two-phase mechanism. In one phase the polymetallic cluster undergoes four sequential one-electron transfers: In the PSII-OEC, four successive photooxidations of the photosystem II reaction center P680 (to P680(+)) allows acceptance of 4 × 1e- from the Mn(4)Ca cluster; in CcO, four reduced cytochrome c Fe(2+) cations donate 4 × 1e- to the bimetallic center. In the second phase for each enzyme, the polymetallic cluster undergoes a single four-electron transfer with the O(2)/2 H(2)O redox couple. Intriguing mechanistic similarities between these two complex redox enzymes first delineated over a decade ago by Hoganson/Proshlyakov/Babcock et al. are updated and expanded in this article.

  15. Noncanonical IFN Signaling: Mechanistic Linkage of Genetic and Epigenetic Events

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Chulbul M.

    2016-01-01

    The canonical model of cytokine signaling via the JAK/STAT pathway dominates our view of signal transduction but provides no insight into the significance of the simultaneous presence of activated JAKs and STATs in the nucleus of cells treated with cytokines. Such a mechanistic shortcoming challenges the usefulness of the model in its present form. Focusing on the interferon (IFN) cytokines, we have developed a noncanonical model of IFN signaling that naturally connects activated JAKs and STATs at or near response elements of genes that are activated by the IFNs. Specifically, cells treated with IFNγ showed association of activated STAT1α and JAK2 at the GAS element of genes activated by IFNγ. For IFNα treated cells, the association involved activated STAT1α and TYK2 JAK kinase at the ISRE promoter. The power of the noncanonical model is that it provides mechanistic insight into specific gene activation at the level of the associated epigenetics, akin to that of steroid/steroid receptor signaling. PMID:28077919

  16. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    PubMed

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE.

  17. A mechanistic PK/PD model for two anti-IL13 antibodies explains the difference in total IL-13 accumulation observed in clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Kasaian, Marion; Heatherington, Anne C.; Jones, Hannah M.; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT IMA-638 and IMA-026 are humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target non-overlapping epitopes of IL-13. Separate first-in-human single ascending dose studies were conducted for each mAb. These studies had similar study designs, but mild to moderate asthmatics were recruited for the IMA-638 study and healthy subjects were recruited for the IMA-026 study. IMA-638 and IMA-026 showed similar pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, but very different total IL-13 (free and drug bound IL-13) profiles; free IL13 was not measured. IMA-026 treatment induced a dose-dependent accumulation of total IL-13, while IMA-638 treatment led to a much smaller accumulation without any clear dose-response. To understand the differences between the two total IL-13 profiles and to predict the free IL-13 profiles for each mAb treatment, a mechanistic PK/pharmacodynamic model was developed. PK-related parameters were first fit to the mean PK profiles of each mAb separately; thereafter, the target-related parameters were fit to both total IL-13 profiles simultaneously. The IL-13 degradation rate was assumed to be the same for asthma patients and healthy subjects. The model suggests that an approximately 100× faster elimination of IL-13-IMA-638 complex than IL-13-IMA-026 complex could be responsible for the differences observed in total IL-13 profiles for the two mAbs. Furthermore, the model predicts that IMA-638 administration results in greater and more prolonged free IL-13 inhibition than equivalent dosing of IMA-026 despite similar binding KD and PK profile. In conclusion, joint modeling of two similar molecules provided mechanistic insight that the elimination rate of mAb-target complex can regulate the degree of free target inhibition. PMID:27049478

  18. Conservative or reactive? Mechanistic chemical perspectives on organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fixation by terrestrial and marine primary production has a fundamental seasonal effect on the atmospheric carbon content and it profoundly contributes to long-term carbon storage in form of organic matter (OM) in soils, water, and sediments. The efficacy of this sequestration process strongly depends on the degree of OM persistence. Therefore, one of the key issues in dissolved and particulate OM research is to assess the stability of reservoirs and to quantify their contribution to global carbon fluxes. Incubation experiments are helpful to assess OM stability during the first, early diagenetic turnover induced by sunlight or microbes. However, net carbon fluxes within the global carbon cycle also act on much longer time scales, which are not amenable in experiments. It is therefore critical to improve our mechanistic understanding to be able to assess potential future changes in the organic matter cycle. This session contribution highlights some achievements and open questions in the field. An improved mechanistic understanding of OM turnover particularly depends on the molecular characterization of biogeochemical processes and their kinetics: (i) in soils and sediments, aggregation/disaggregation of OM is primarily controlled by its molecular composition. Hence, the chemical composition determines the transfer of organic carbon from the large particulate to the small dissolved organic matter reservoir - an important substrate for microbial metabolism. (ii) In estuaries, dissolved organic carbon gradients usually suggest conservative behavior, whereas molecular-level studies reveal a substantial chemical modification of terrestrial DOM along the land-ocean interface. (iii) In the ocean, previous studies have shown that the recalcitrance of OM depends on bulk concentration and energy yield. However, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in combination with radiocarbon analyses also emphasized that stability is tightly connected to molecular composition

  19. Mechanistic Perspectives on Organic Photoredox Catalysis for Aromatic Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Majek, Michal; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2016-10-18

    Photoredox catalysis has emerged as a powerful tool for the utilization of visible light to drive chemical reactions between organic molecules that exhibit two rather ubiquitous properties: colorlessness and redox-activity. The photocatalyst, however, requires significant absorption in the visible spectrum and reversible redox activity. This very general framework has led to the development of several new modes of reactivity based on electron and energy transfer steps between photoexcited catalyst states and various organic molecules. In the past years, major effort has been devoted to photoredox-catalytic aromatic substitutions involving an initial reductive activation of various aryl electrophiles by the photocatalyst, which opens a new entry into selective arene functionalizations within organic synthesis endeavors. This, however, has led to a unilateral emphasis of synthetic developments including catalyst modifications, substrate scope studies, and combinations with other chemical processes. This Account summarizes recent reports of new protocols for the synthesis of aromatic esters, thioethers, boronates, sulfonates, heterobiaryls, deuteroarenes, and other functionalized arenes under mild photoredox conditions with organic dyes. On the other hand, mechanistic studies were largely neglected. This Account emphasizes the most relevant experiments and techniques, which can greatly assist in the exploration of the mechanistic foundation of aromatic photoredox substitutions and the design of new chemical reactivities. The nature and physicochemical properties of the employed organic dyes, the control of its acid-base chemistry, the choice of the irradiation sources, and the concentrations of substrates and dyes are demonstrated to decisively affect the activity of organic photocatalysts, the chemo- and regioselectivities of reactions, and the operating mechanisms. Several methods of distinction between photocatalytic and radical chain processes are being discussed

  20. A new mechanistic framework to predict OCS fluxes in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauze, Joana; Ogee, Jérôme; Launois, Thomas; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Van Diest, Heidi; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    A better description of the amplitude of photosynthetic and respiratory gross CO2 fluxes at large scales is needed to improve our predictions of the current and future global CO2 cycle. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulphur gas in the atmosphere and has been proposed as a new tracer of gross photosynthesis, as the uptake of COS from the atmosphere is dominated by the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme abundant in leaves that also catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. However, soils also exchange COS with the atmosphere and there is growing evidence that this flux must also be accounted for in atmospheric budgets. In this context a new mechanistic description of soil-atmosphere COS exchange is clearly needed. Soils can take up COS from the atmosphere as the soil biota also contain CA, and COS emissions from soils have also been reported in agricultural fields or anoxic soils. Previous studies have also shown that soil COS fluxes present an optimum soil water content and soil temperature. Here we propose a new mechanistic framework to predict the fluxes of COS between the soils and the atmosphere. We describe the COS soil budget by a first-order reaction-diffusion-production equation, assuming that the hydrolysis of COS by CA is total and irreversible. To describe COS diffusion through the soil matrix, we use different formulations of soil air-filled pore space and temperature, depending on the turbulence level above the soil surface. Using this model we are able to explain the observed presence of an optimum temperature for soil COS uptake and show how this optimum can shift to cooler temperatures in the presence of soil COS emissions. Our model can also explain the observed optimum with soil moisture content previously described in the literature (e.g. Van Diest & Kesselmeier, 2008) as a result of diffusional constraints on COS hydrolysis. These diffusional constraints are also responsible for the response of COS uptake to soil

  1. Model-Based Analysis of Biopharmaceutic Experiments To Improve Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling: An Integrated in Vitro in Vivo Extrapolation Perspective Using Ketoconazole as a Model Drug.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Shriram M; Ruff, Aaron; Kostewicz, Edmund S; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Turner, David B; Jamei, Masoud

    2017-08-25

    Mechanistic modeling of in vitro data generated from metabolic enzyme systems (viz., liver microsomes, hepatocytes, rCYP enzymes, etc.) facilitates in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIV_E) of metabolic clearance which plays a key role in the successful prediction of clearance in vivo within physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. A similar concept can be applied to solubility and dissolution experiments whereby mechanistic modeling can be used to estimate intrinsic parameters required for mechanistic oral absorption simulation in vivo. However, this approach has not widely been applied within an integrated workflow. We present a stepwise modeling approach where relevant biopharmaceutics parameters for ketoconazole (KTZ) are determined and/or confirmed from the modeling of in vitro experiments before being directly used within a PBPK model. Modeling was applied to various in vitro experiments, namely: (a) aqueous solubility profiles to determine intrinsic solubility, salt limiting solubility factors and to verify pKa; (b) biorelevant solubility measurements to estimate bile-micelle partition coefficients; (c) fasted state simulated gastric fluid (FaSSGF) dissolution for formulation disintegration profiling; and (d) transfer experiments to estimate supersaturation and precipitation parameters. These parameters were then used within a PBPK model to predict the dissolved and total (i.e., including the precipitated fraction) concentrations of KTZ in the duodenum of a virtual population and compared against observed clinical data. The developed model well characterized the intraluminal dissolution, supersaturation, and precipitation behavior of KTZ. The mean simulated AUC0-t of the total and dissolved concentrations of KTZ were comparable to (within 2-fold of) the corresponding observed profile. Moreover, the developed PBPK model of KTZ successfully described the impact of supersaturation and precipitation on the systemic plasma concentration profiles of

  2. Perspectives on the Application of Mechanistic Information in Chemical Hazard and Dose-Response Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview summarizes several EPA Assessment publications reviewing approaches for applying mechanistic information in human health risk assessment and exploring opportunities for progress in this area.

  3. Perspectives on the Application of Mechanistic Information in Chemical Hazard and Dose-Response Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview summarizes several EPA Assessment publications reviewing approaches for applying mechanistic information in human health risk assessment and exploring opportunities for progress in this area.

  4. Micelle confined mechanistic pathway for 4-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindita; Debnath, Biplab; Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Aditya, Teresa; Pal, Tarasankar

    2017-05-01

    The model 4-nitrophenol reduction has been carried out by different groups in presence of metallic or even non-metallic catalyst elaborating different mechanistic aspects. In the present investigation, we have thoroughly studied the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol in a completely metal free homogeneous condition. The introduction of a non-fluorescent probe unequivocally generates a fluorescent molecule that indirectly justifies the anion radical stabilization in the micelle. The reduction mechanism under metal-free condition was proposed and the concept of stabilization of anion radical transition state of 4-nitrophenol at the positively charged Stern layer of anionic micelle was established. The plausible reduction mechanism has also enlightened the graphene-like conducting property of Stern layer of the homogeneous micellar system. Furthermore, the confinement effect for catalysis has also been authenticated by supporting experimental evidences. The borrowed concept of catalysis in confinement drives the catalytic study to a new era of catalysis.

  5. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  6. Mechanistic model for void distribution in flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A problem of discharging of an initially subcooled liquid from a high pressure condition into a low pressure environment is quite important in several industrial systems such as nuclear reactors and chemical reactors. A new model for the flashing process is proposed here based on the wall nucleation theory, bubble growth model and drift-flux bubble transport model. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites is used. The model predictions in terms of the void fraction are compared to Moby Dick and BNL experimental data. It shows that satisfactory agreements could be obtained from the present model without any floating parameter to be adjusted with data. This result indicates that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic prediction of the flashing phenomenon is possible based on the present wall nucleation based model. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Enhancer function: mechanistic and genome-wide insights come together.

    PubMed

    Plank, Jennifer L; Dean, Ann

    2014-07-03

    Enhancers establish spatial or temporal patterns of gene expression that are critical for development, yet our understanding of how these DNA cis-regulatory elements function from a distance to increase transcription of their target genes and shape the cellular transcriptome has been gleaned primarily from studies of individual genes or gene families. High-throughput sequencing studies place enhancer-gene interactions within the 3D context of chromosome folding, inviting a new look at enhancer function and stimulating provocative new questions. Here, we integrate these whole-genome studies with recent mechanistic studies to illuminate how enhancers physically interact with target genes, how enhancer activity is regulated during development, and the role of noncoding RNAs transcribed from enhancers in their function.

  8. Halogenation of aromatic compounds: thermodynamic, mechanistic and ecological aspects.

    PubMed

    Dolfing, J

    1998-10-15

    Biological halogenation of aromatic compounds implies the generation of reducing equivalents in the form of e.g. NADH. Thermodynamic calculations show that coupling the halogenation step to a step in which the reducing equivalents are oxidized with a potent oxidant such as O2 or N2O makes the halogenation reaction thermodynamically feasible without the input of additional energy in the form of e.g. NADH. In a current model on the halogenation of tryptophan to 7-chloro-L-tryptophan NADH and O2 are proposed as co-substrates in a reaction in which the aromatic compound is oxidized via an epoxide as intermediate. The thermodynamic calculations thus indicate that such a route hinges on mechanistic insights but has no thermodynamic necessity. Furthermore the calculations suggest that halogenation of tryptophan and other aromatic compounds should be possible with N2O, and possibly even with nitrate replacing O2 as the oxidant.

  9. Obesity, energy balance, and cancer: a mechanistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Hursting, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 36 % of adults and 20 % of children in the USA are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2). Obesity, which is accompanied by metabolic dysregulation often manifesting in the metabolic syndrome, is an established risk factor for many cancers. Within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory environment of the obese state, cross talk between macrophages, adipocytes, and epithelial cells occurs via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that may enhance cancer risk and/or progression. This chapter synthesizes the evidence on key biological mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with particular emphasis on obesity-associated enhancements in growth factor signaling, inflammation, and vascular integrity processes, as well as obesity-dependent microenvironmental perturbations, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These interrelated pathways represent possible mechanistic targets for disrupting the obesity-cancer link.

  10. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-05

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  11. A mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a simple mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction of Landau. For the simple case of a Langmuir wave in a Vlasov plasma, the non-resonant electrons satisfy an oscillator equation that is driven resonantly by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons, and in the case of wave damping, this complex driver field is of a phase to reduce the oscillation amplitude. The wave-particle resonant interaction also occurs in waves governed by 2D E × B drift dynamics, such as a diocotron wave. In this case, the bare electric field from the resonant electrons causes E × B drift motion back in the core plasma, reducing the amplitude of the wave.

  12. From patterns to emerging processes in mechanistic urban ecology.

    PubMed

    Shochat, Eyal; Warren, Paige S; Faeth, Stanley H; McIntyre, Nancy E; Hope, Diane

    2006-04-01

    Rapid urbanization has become an area of crucial concern in conservation owing to the radical changes in habitat structure and loss of species engendered by urban and suburban development. Here, we draw on recent mechanistic ecological studies to argue that, in addition to altered habitat structure, three major processes contribute to the patterns of reduced species diversity and elevated abundance of many species in urban environments. These activities, in turn, lead to changes in animal behavior, morphology and genetics, as well as in selection pressures on animals and plants. Thus, the key to understanding urban patterns is to balance studying processes at the individual level with an integrated examination of environmental forces at the ecosystem scale.

  13. A mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-05-15

    This paper provides a simple mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction of Landau. For the simple case of a Langmuir wave in a Vlasov plasma, the non-resonant electrons satisfy an oscillator equation that is driven resonantly by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons, and in the case of wave damping, this complex driver field is of a phase to reduce the oscillation amplitude. The wave-particle resonant interaction also occurs in waves governed by 2D E × B drift dynamics, such as a diocotron wave. In this case, the bare electric field from the resonant electrons causes E × B drift motion back in the core plasma, reducing the amplitude of the wave.

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels.

    PubMed

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A; Shaikh, Amir Y; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF.

  15. Mechanistic Investigations into the Application of Sulfoxides in Carbohydrate Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brabham, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The utility of sulfoxides in a diverse range of transformations in the field of carbohydrate chemistry has seen rapid growth since the first introduction of a sulfoxide as a glycosyl donor in 1989. Sulfoxides have since developed into more than just anomeric leaving groups, and today have multiple roles in glycosylation reactions. These include as activators for thioglycosides, hemiacetals, and glycals, and as precursors to glycosyl triflates, which are essential for stereoselective β‐mannoside synthesis, and bicyclic sulfonium ions that facilitate the stereoselective synthesis of α‐glycosides. In this review we highlight the mechanistic investigations undertaken in this area, often outlining strategies employed to differentiate between multiple proposed reaction pathways, and how the conclusions of these investigations have and continue to inform upon the development of more efficient transformations in sulfoxide‐based carbohydrate synthesis. PMID:26744250

  16. Mechanistic Role of Thioredoxin 2 in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaofei; Chen, Haixuan; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2) is a pivotal mitochondrial protein that regulates redox signaling. The mitochondrial Trx2 is expressed ubiquitously, but it is found at the highest levels in metabolically active tissues like the heart. Global gene knockout of Trx2 results in embryonic lethality, likely due to the increased cellular oxidative stress. Moreover, mice with cardiac-specific Trx2 deletion develop spontaneous dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), correlating with increased apoptosis stress kinase-1 (ASK1) signaling and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a common mechanism in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Our results show that Trx2 is essential for maintaining cardiac function. In this chapter, we summarize the key mechanistic role of Trx2 in preserving cardiac function by suppressing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and by inhibiting ASK1-dependent apoptosis in heart failure. Trx2 and ASK1 represent promising targets to develop therapeutic strategies for the treatment of DCM and heart failure.

  17. Calorie restriction and cancer prevention: a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most potent broadly acting dietary interventions for inducing weight loss and for inhibiting cancer in experimental models. Translation of the mechanistic lessons learned from research on CR to cancer prevention strategies in human beings is important given the high prevalence of excess energy intake, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in many parts of the world and the established links between obesity-associated metabolic perturbations and increased risk or progression of many types of cancer. This review synthesizes findings on the biological mechanisms underlying many of the anticancer effects of CR, with emphasis on the impact of CR on growth factor signaling pathways, inflammation, cellular and systemic energy homeostasis pathways, vascular perturbations, and the tumor microenvironment. These CR-responsive pathways and processes represent targets for translating CR research into effective cancer prevention strategies in human beings. PMID:24280167

  18. Antidepressants and gabapentinoids in neuropathic pain: Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Mélanie; Salvat, Eric; Muller, André; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2016-12-03

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is generally chronic and challenging to treat. The recommended pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes the use of some antidepressants, such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (amitriptyline…) or serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors (duloxetine…), and/or anticonvulsants such as the gabapentinoids gabapentin or pregabalin. Antidepressant drugs are not acute analgesics but require a chronic treatment to relieve neuropathic pain, which suggests the recruitment of secondary downstream mechanisms as well as long-term molecular and neuronal plasticity. Noradrenaline is a major actor for the action of antidepressant drugs in a neuropathic pain context. Mechanistic hypotheses have implied the recruitment of noradrenergic descending pathways as well as the peripheral recruitment of noradrenaline from sympathetic fibers sprouting into dorsal root ganglia; and importance of both α2 and β2 adrenoceptors have been reported. These monoamine re-uptake inhibitors may also indirectly act as anti-proinflammatory cytokine drugs; and their therapeutic action requires the opioid system, particularly the mu (MOP) and/or delta (DOP) opioid receptors. Gabapentinoids, which target the voltage-dependent calcium channels α2δ-1 subunit, inhibit calcium currents, thus decreasing the excitatory transmitter release and spinal sensitization. Gabapentinoids also activate the descending noradrenergic pain inhibitory system coupled to spinal α2 adrenoceptors. Gabapentinoid treatment may also indirectly impact on neuroimmune actors, like proinflammatory cytokines. These drugs are effective against neuropathic pain both with acute administration at high dose and with repeated administration. This review focuses on mechanistic knowledge concerning chronic antidepressant treatment and gabapentinoid treatment in a neuropathic pain context. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by

  19. Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases: Mechanistic Insights and Unsolved Problems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two hallmarks of assembly line polyketide synthases have motivated an interest in these unusual multienzyme systems, their stereospecificity and their capacity for directional biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic origins of these two remarkable features, using the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase as a prototype. Of the 10 stereocenters in 6-deoxyerythronolide B, the stereochemistry of nine carbon atoms is directly set by ketoreductase domains, which catalyze epimerization and/or diastereospecific reduction reactions. The 10th stereocenter is established by the sequential action of three enzymatic domains. Thus, the problem has been reduced to a challenge in mainstream enzymology, where fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the structural basis for this exquisite stereochemical control by relatively well-defined active sites. In contrast, testable mechanistic hypotheses for the phenomenon of vectorial biosynthesis are only just beginning to emerge. Starting from an elegant theoretical framework for understanding coupled vectorial processes in biology [Jencks, W. P. (1980) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 51, 75–106], we present a simple model that can explain assembly line polyketide biosynthesis as a coupled vectorial process. Our model, which highlights the important role of domain–domain interactions, not only is consistent with recent observations but also is amenable to further experimental verification and refinement. Ultimately, a definitive view of the coordinated motions within and between polyketide synthase modules will require a combination of structural, kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational tools and could be one of the most exciting frontiers in 21st Century enzymology. PMID:24779441

  20. Informing phenomenological structural bone remodelling with a mechanistic poroelastic model.

    PubMed

    Villette, Claire C; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2016-02-01

    Studies suggest that fluid motion in the extracellular space may be involved in the cellular mechanosensitivity at play in the bone tissue adaptation process. Previously, the authors developed a mesoscale predictive structural model of the femur using truss elements to represent trabecular bone, relying on a phenomenological strain-based bone adaptation algorithm. In order to introduce a response to bending and shear, the authors considered the use of beam elements, requiring a new formulation of the bone adaptation drivers. The primary goal of the study presented here was to isolate phenomenological drivers based on the results of a mechanistic approach to be used with a beam element representation of trabecular bone in mesoscale structural modelling. A single-beam model and a microscale poroelastic model of a single trabecula were developed. A mechanistic iterative adaptation algorithm was implemented based on fluid motion velocity through the bone matrix pores to predict the remodelled geometries of the poroelastic trabecula under 42 different loading scenarios. Regression analyses were used to correlate the changes in poroelastic trabecula thickness and orientation to the initial strain outputs of the beam model. Linear (R(2) > 0.998) and third-order polynomial (R(2) > 0.98) relationships were found between change in cross section and axial strain at the central axis, and between beam reorientation and ratio of bending strain to axial strain, respectively. Implementing these relationships into the phenomenological predictive algorithm for the mesoscale structural femur has the potential to produce a model combining biofidelic structure and mechanical behaviour with computational efficiency.

  1. Assembly line polyketide synthases: mechanistic insights and unsolved problems.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Chaitan; Herschlag, Daniel; Cane, David E; Walsh, Christopher T

    2014-05-13

    Two hallmarks of assembly line polyketide synthases have motivated an interest in these unusual multienzyme systems, their stereospecificity and their capacity for directional biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic origins of these two remarkable features, using the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase as a prototype. Of the 10 stereocenters in 6-deoxyerythronolide B, the stereochemistry of nine carbon atoms is directly set by ketoreductase domains, which catalyze epimerization and/or diastereospecific reduction reactions. The 10th stereocenter is established by the sequential action of three enzymatic domains. Thus, the problem has been reduced to a challenge in mainstream enzymology, where fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the structural basis for this exquisite stereochemical control by relatively well-defined active sites. In contrast, testable mechanistic hypotheses for the phenomenon of vectorial biosynthesis are only just beginning to emerge. Starting from an elegant theoretical framework for understanding coupled vectorial processes in biology [Jencks, W. P. (1980) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 51, 75-106], we present a simple model that can explain assembly line polyketide biosynthesis as a coupled vectorial process. Our model, which highlights the important role of domain-domain interactions, not only is consistent with recent observations but also is amenable to further experimental verification and refinement. Ultimately, a definitive view of the coordinated motions within and between polyketide synthase modules will require a combination of structural, kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational tools and could be one of the most exciting frontiers in 21st Century enzymology.

  2. Mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Priyank; Al-Hadrami, Fathiya; Atekwana, Estella A.; Atekwana, Eliot A.

    2014-07-01

    Nondestructive acoustics methods can be used to monitor in situ biofilm growth in porous media. In practice, however, acoustic methods remain underutilized due to the lack of models that can translate acoustic data into rock properties in the context of biofilm. In this paper we present mechanistic models of biofilm growth in porous media. The models are used to quantitatively interpret arrival times and amplitudes recorded in the 29 day long Davis et al. (2010) physical scale biostimulation experiment in terms of biofilm morphologies and saturation. The model pivots on addressing the sediment elastic behavior using the lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for grain mixing and Gassmann substitution for fluid saturation. The time-lapse P wave velocity (VP; a function of arrival times) is explained by a combination of two rock models (morphologies); "load bearing" which assumes the biofilm as an additional mineral in the rock matrix and "pore filling" which assumes the biofilm as an additional fluid phase in the pores. The time-lapse attenuation (QP-1; a function of amplitudes), on the other hand, can be explained adequately in two ways; first, through squirt flow where energy is lost from relative motion between rock matrix and pore fluid, and second, through an empirical function of porosity (φ), permeability (κ), and grain size. The squirt flow model-fitting results in higher internal φ (7% versus 5%) and more oblate pores (0.33 versus 0.67 aspect ratio) for the load-bearing morphology versus the pore-filling morphology. The empirical model-fitting results in up to 10% increase in κ at the initial stages of the load-bearing morphology. The two morphologies which exhibit distinct mechanical and hydraulic behavior could be a function of pore throat size. The biofilm mechanistic models developed in this study can be used for the interpretation of seismic data critical for the evaluation of biobarriers in bioremediation, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and CO2

  3. Mechanistic Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kinesin Kar3*S

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Andrew T.; Sproul, Lisa R.; Sontag, Christopher A.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Correia, John J.; Gilbert, Susan P.

    2005-01-01

    Kar3 is a minus-end-directed microtubule motor that is implicated in meiotic and mitotic spindle function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To date, the only truncated protein of Kar3 that has been reported to promote unidirectional movement in vitro is GSTKar3. This motor contains an NH2-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag followed by the Kar3 sequence that is predicted to form an extended α-helical coiled-coil. The α-helical domain leads into the neck linker and COOH-terminal motor domain. Kar3 does not homodimerize with itself but forms a heterodimer with either Cik1 or Vik1, both of which are non-motor polypeptides. We evaluated the microtubule-GSTKar3 complex in comparison to the microtubule-Kar3 motor domain complex to determine the distinctive mechanistic features required for GSTKar3 motility. Our results indicate that ATP binding was significantly faster for GSTKar3 than that observed previously for the Kar3 motor domain. In addition, microtubule-activated ADP release resulted in an intermediate that bound ADP weakly in contrast to the Kar3 motor domain, suggesting that after ADP release, the microtubule-GSTKar3 motor binds ATP in preference to ADP. The kinetics also showed that GST-Kar3 readily detached from the microtubule rather than remaining bound for multiple ATP turnovers. These results indicate that the extended α-helical domain NH2-terminal to the catalytic core provides the structural transitions in response to the ATPase cycle that are critical for motility and that dimerization is not specifically required. This study provides the foundation to define the mechanistic contributions of Cik1 and Vik1 for Kar3 force generation and function in vivo. PMID:15385545

  4. Parameter and uncertainty estimation for mechanistic, spatially explicit epidemiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Flavio; Schaefli, Bettina; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological models can be a crucially important tool for decision-making during disease outbreaks. The range of possible applications spans from real-time forecasting and allocation of health-care resources to testing alternative intervention mechanisms such as vaccines, antibiotics or the improvement of sanitary conditions. Our spatially explicit, mechanistic models for cholera epidemics have been successfully applied to several epidemics including, the one that struck Haiti in late 2010 and is still ongoing. Calibration and parameter estimation of such models represents a major challenge because of properties unusual in traditional geoscientific domains such as hydrology. Firstly, the epidemiological data available might be subject to high uncertainties due to error-prone diagnosis as well as manual (and possibly incomplete) data collection. Secondly, long-term time-series of epidemiological data are often unavailable. Finally, the spatially explicit character of the models requires the comparison of several time-series of model outputs with their real-world counterparts, which calls for an appropriate weighting scheme. It follows that the usual assumption of a homoscedastic Gaussian error distribution, used in combination with classical calibration techniques based on Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, is likely to be violated, whereas the construction of an appropriate formal likelihood function seems close to impossible. Alternative calibration methods, which allow for accurate estimation of total model uncertainty, particularly regarding the envisaged use of the models for decision-making, are thus needed. Here we present the most recent developments regarding methods for parameter and uncertainty estimation to be used with our mechanistic, spatially explicit models for cholera epidemics, based on informal measures of goodness of fit.

  5. Toxic neuropathies: Mechanistic insights based on a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2015-06-02

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) and acrylamide (ACR) are considered to be prototypical among chemical toxicants that cause central-peripheral axonopathies characterized by distal axon swelling and degeneration. Because the demise of distal regions was assumed to be causally related to the onset of neurotoxicity, substantial effort was devoted to deciphering the respective mechanisms. Continued research, however, revealed that expression of the presumed hallmark morphological features was dependent upon the daily rate of toxicant exposure. Indeed, many studies reported that the corresponding axonopathic changes were late developing effects that occurred independent of behavioral and/or functional neurotoxicity. This suggested that the toxic axonopathy classification might be based on epiphenomena related to dose-rate. Therefore, the goal of this mini-review is to discuss how quantitative morphometric analyses and the establishment of dose-dependent relationships helped distinguish primary, mechanistically relevant toxicant effects from non-specific consequences. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss how knowledge of neurotoxicant chemical nature can guide molecular-level research toward a better, more rational understanding of mechanism. Our discussion will focus on HD, the neurotoxic γ-diketone metabolite of the industrial solvents n-hexane and methyl-n-butyl ketone. Early investigations suggested that HD caused giant neurofilamentous axonal swellings and eventual degeneration in CNS and PNS. However, as our review will point out, this interpretation underwent several iterations as the understanding of γ-diketone chemistry improved and more quantitative experimental approaches were implemented. The chemical concepts and design strategies discussed in this mini-review are broadly applicable to the mechanistic studies of other chemicals (e.g., n-propyl bromine, methyl methacrylate) that cause toxic neuropathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxic Neuropathies: Mechanistic Insights Based On A Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    LoPachin, Richard M.; Gavin, Terrence

    2014-01-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) and acrylamide (ACR) are considered to be prototypical among chemical toxicants that cause central-peripheral axonopathies characterized by distal axon swelling and degeneration. Because the demise of distal regions was assumed to be causally related to the onset of neurotoxicity, substantial effort was devoted to deciphering the respective mechanisms. Continued research, however, revealed that expression of the presumed hallmark morphological features was dependent upon the daily rate of toxicant exposure. Indeed, many studies reported that the corresponding axonopathic changes were late developing effects that occurred independent of behavioral and/or functional neurotoxicity. This suggested that the toxic axonopathy classification might be based on epiphenomena related to dose-rate. Therefore, the goal of this mini-review is to discuss how quantitative morphometric analyses and the establishment of dose-dependent relationships helped distinguish primary, mechanistically relevant toxicant effects from non-specific consequences. Perhaps more importantly, we will discuss how knowledge of neurotoxicant chemical nature can guide molecular-level research toward a better, more rational understanding of mechanism. Our discussion will focus on HD, the neurotoxic γ-diketone metabolite of the industrial solvents n-hexane and methyl-n-butyl ketone. Early investigations suggested that HD caused giant neurofilamentous axonal swellings and eventual degeneration in CNS and PNS. However, as our review will point out, this interpretation underwent several iterations as the understanding of γ-diketone chemistry improved and more quantitative experimental approaches were implemented. The chemical concepts and design strategies discussed in this mini-review are broadly applicable to the mechanistic studies of other chemicals (e.g., n-propyl bromine, methyl methacrylate) that cause toxic neuropathies. PMID:25218479

  7. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally. PMID:24459184

  8. Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibition in heart failure: mechanistic action and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J; DeVore, Adam D; Velazquez, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly common syndrome associated with high mortality and economic burden, and there has been a paucity over the past decade of new pharmacotherapies that improve outcomes. However, recent data from a large randomized controlled trial compared the novel agent LCZ696, a dual-acting angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi), with the well established angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril and found significant reduction in mortality among the chronic reduced ejection fraction HF population. Preclinical and clinical data suggest that neprilysin inhibition provides beneficial outcomes in HF patients by preventing the degradation of natriuretic peptides and thereby promoting natriuresis and vasodilatation and counteracting the negative cardiorenal effects of the up-regulated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Agents such as omapatrilat combined neprilysin and ACE inhibition but had increased rates of angioedema. Goals of an improved safety profile provided the rationale for the development of the ARNi LCZ696. Along with significant reductions in mortality and hospitalizations, clinical trials suggest that LCZ696 may improve surrogate markers of HF severity. In this paper, we review the preclinical and clinical data that led to the development of LCZ696, the understanding of the underlying mechanistic action, and the robust clinical impact that LCZ696 may have in the near future.

  9. Ion-Pairing Contribution to the Liposomal Transport of Topotecan as Revealed by Mechanistic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Fugit, Kyle D; Anderson, Bradley D

    2017-04-01

    Actively loaded liposomal formulations of anticancer agents have been widely explored due to their high drug encapsulation efficiencies and prolonged drug retention. Mathematical models to predict and optimize drug loading and release kinetics from these nanoparticle formulations would be useful in their development and may allow researchers to tune release profiles. Such models must account for the driving forces as influenced by the physicochemical properties of the drug and the microenvironment, and the liposomal barrier properties. This study employed mechanistic modeling to describe the active liposomal loading and release kinetics of the anticancer agent topotecan (TPT). The model incorporates ammonia transport resulting in generation of a pH gradient, TPT dimerization, TPT lactone ring-opening and -closing interconversion kinetics, chloride transport, and transport of TPT-chloride ion-pairs to describe the active loading and release kinetics of TPT in the presence of varying chloride concentrations. Model-based predictions of the kinetics of active loading at varying loading concentrations of TPT and release under dynamic dialysis conditions were in reasonable agreement with experiments. These findings identify key attributes to consider in optimizing and predicting loading and release of liposomal TPT that may also be applicable to liposomal formulations of other weakly basic pharmaceuticals.

  10. Catalytic Enantioselective [2,3]-Rearrangements of Allylic Ammonium Ylides: A Mechanistic and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A mechanistic study of the isothiourea-catalyzed enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangement of allylic ammonium ylides is described. Reaction kinetic analyses using 19F NMR and density functional theory computations have elucidated a reaction profile and allowed identification of the catalyst resting state and turnover-rate limiting step. A catalytically relevant catalyst–substrate adduct has been observed, and its constitution elucidated unambiguously by 13C and 15N isotopic labeling. Isotopic entrainment has shown the observed catalyst–substrate adduct to be a genuine intermediate on the productive cycle toward catalysis. The influence of HOBt as an additive upon the reaction, catalyst resting state, and turnover-rate limiting step has been examined. Crossover experiments have probed the reversibility of each of the proposed steps of the catalytic cycle. Computations were also used to elucidate the origins of stereocontrol, with a 1,5-S···O interaction and the catalyst stereodirecting group providing transition structure rigidification and enantioselectivity, while preference for cation−π interactions over C–H···π is responsible for diastereoselectivity. PMID:28230365

  11. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-02-11

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally.

  12. Catalytic Enantioselective [2,3]-Rearrangements of Allylic Ammonium Ylides: A Mechanistic and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas H; Walden, Daniel M; Taylor, James E; Brueckner, Alexander C; Johnston, Ryne C; Cheong, Paul Ha-Yeon; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; Smith, Andrew D

    2017-03-10

    A mechanistic study of the isothiourea-catalyzed enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangement of allylic ammonium ylides is described. Reaction kinetic analyses using (19)F NMR and density functional theory computations have elucidated a reaction profile and allowed identification of the catalyst resting state and turnover-rate limiting step. A catalytically relevant catalyst-substrate adduct has been observed, and its constitution elucidated unambiguously by (13)C and (15)N isotopic labeling. Isotopic entrainment has shown the observed catalyst-substrate adduct to be a genuine intermediate on the productive cycle toward catalysis. The influence of HOBt as an additive upon the reaction, catalyst resting state, and turnover-rate limiting step has been examined. Crossover experiments have probed the reversibility of each of the proposed steps of the catalytic cycle. Computations were also used to elucidate the origins of stereocontrol, with a 1,5-S···O interaction and the catalyst stereodirecting group providing transition structure rigidification and enantioselectivity, while preference for cation-π interactions over C-H···π is responsible for diastereoselectivity.

  13. Allosteric Modulation of Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptors: Mechanistic Insight through Metadynamics and Essential Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grazioso, Giovanni; Sgrignani, Jacopo; Capelli, Romina; Matera, Carlo; Dallanoce, Clelia; De Amici, Marco; Cavalli, Andrea

    2015-12-28

    Increasing attention has recently been devoted to allosteric modulators, as they can provide inherent advantages over classic receptor agonists. In the field of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), the main advantage is that allosteric modulators can trigger pharmacological responses, limiting receptor desensitization. Most of the known allosteric ligands are "positive allosteric modulators" (PAMs), which increase both sensitivity to receptor agonists and current amplitude. Intriguingly, some allosteric modulators are also able to activate the α7 receptor (α7-nAChR) even in the absence of orthosteric agonists. These compounds have been named "ago-allosteric modulators" and GAT107 has been studied in depth because of its unique mechanism of action. We here investigate by molecular dynamics simulations, metadynamics, and essential dynamics the activation mechanism of α7-nAChR, in the presence of different nicotinic modulators. We determine the free energy profiles associated with the closed-to-open motion of the loop C, and we highlight mechanistic differences observed in the presence of different modulators. In particular, we demonstrate that GAT107 triggers conformational motions and cross-talk similar to those observed when the α7-nACh receptor is in complex with both an agonist and an allosteric modulator.

  14. Biophysical Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Rh positive Worrisome results from other prenatal tests Your health care provider might also recommend a biophysical profile if ... the test and at regular intervals during the test. Your health care provider or a member of your health care ...

  15. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  16. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  17. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents profiles of three leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Robert Mills Gagne, Florida State University; Robert Heinich, Indiana University; and Charles Francis Schuller, University of Georgia. (SLW)

  18. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  19. Predictive Analysis of Mechanistic Triggers and Mitigation Strategies for Pathological Scarring in Skin Wounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-12

    of January 12, 2017. This information is current as Scarring in Skin Wounds and Mitigation Strategies for Pathological Predictive Analysis of...Predictive Analysis of Mechanistic Triggers and Mitigation Strategies for Pathological Scarring in Skin Wounds Sridevi Nagaraja,* Lin Chen,† Jian Zhou...problem of increasing prevalence, with poorly understood mechanistic triggers and limited therapeutic options. In this study , we employed an

  20. A Mechanistic Approach for the Prediction of Critical Power in BWR Fuel Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandraker, Dinesh Kumar; Vijayan, Pallipattu Krishnan; Sinha, Ratan Kumar; Aritomi, Masanori

    The critical power corresponding to the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) or dryout condition is an important design parameter for the evaluation of safety margins in a nuclear fuel bundle. The empirical approaches for the prediction of CHF in a rod bundle are highly geometric specific and proprietary in nature. The critical power experiments are very expensive and technically challenging owing to the stringent simulation requirements for the rod bundle tests involving radial and axial power profiles. In view of this, the mechanistic approach has gained momentum in the thermal hydraulic community. The Liquid Film Dryout (LFD) in an annular flow is the mechanism of CHF under BWR conditions and the dryout modeling has been found to predict the CHF quite accurately for a tubular geometry. The successful extension of the mechanistic model of dryout to the rod bundle application is vital for the evaluation of critical power in the rod bundle. The present work proposes the uniform film flow approach around the rod by analyzing individual film of the subchannel bounded by rods with different heat fluxes resulting in different film flow rates around a rod and subsequently distributing the varying film flow rates of a rod to arrive at the uniform film flow rate as it has been found that the liquid film has a strong tendency to be uniform around the rod. The FIDOM-Rod code developed for the dryout prediction in BWR assemblies provides detailed solution of the multiple liquid films in a subchannel. The approach of uniform film flow rate around the rod simplifies the liquid film cross flow modeling and was found to provide dryout prediction with a good accuracy when compared with the experimental data of 16, 19 and 37 rod bundles under BWR conditions. The critical power has been predicted for a newly designed 54 rod bundle of the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). The selected constitutive models for the droplet entrainment and deposition rates validated for the dryout in tube were

  1. Hydroxyl radical induced oxidation of theophylline in water: a kinetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Sunil Paul, M M; Aravind, U K; Pramod, G; Saha, A; Aravindakumar, C T

    2014-08-14

    Oxidative destruction and mineralization of emerging organic pollutants by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH) is a well established area of research. The possibility of generating hazardous by-products in the case of ˙OH reaction demands extensive investigations on the degradation mechanism. A combination of pulse radiolysis and steady state photolysis (H2O2/UV photolysis) followed by high resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) analysis have been employed to explicate the kinetic and mechanistic features of the destruction of theophylline, a model pharmaceutical compound and an identified pollutant, by ˙OH in the present study. The oxidative destruction of this molecule, for intermediate product studies, was initially achieved by H2O2/UV photolysis. The transient absorption spectrum corresponding to the reaction of ˙OH with theophylline at pH 6, primarily caused by the generation of (T8-OH)˙, was characterised by an absorption band at 330 nm (k2 = (8.22 ± 0.03) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)). A significantly different spectrum (λmax: 340 nm) was observed at highly alkaline pH (10.2) due to the deprotonation of this radical (pKa∼ 10.0). Specific one electron oxidants such as sulphate radical anions (SO4˙(-)) and azide radicals (N3˙) produce the deprotonated form (T(-H)˙) of the radical cation (T˙(+)) of theophylline (pKa 3.1) with k2 values of (7.51 ± 0.04) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) and (7.61 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) respectively. Conversely, oxide radicals (O˙(-)) react with theophylline via a hydrogen abstraction protocol with a rather slow k2 value of (1.95 ± 0.02) × 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The transient spectral studies were complemented by the end product profile acquired by HRMS analysis. Various transformation products of theophylline induced by ˙OH were identified by this technique which include derivatives of uric acids (i, iv & v) and xanthines (ii, iii & vi). Further breakdown of the early formed product due to ˙OH attack leads to

  2. Mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling of ephedrine, norephedrine and caffeine in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Csajka, C; Haller, C A; Benowitz, N L; Verotta, D

    2005-01-01

    Aim The combination of ephedrine and caffeine has been used in herbal products for weight loss and athletic performance-enhancement, but the pharmacokinetic profiles of these compounds have not been well characterized. This study aimed to develop a mechanistic model describing ephedrine, norephedrine, and caffeine pharmacokinetics and their interactions in healthy subjects. Methods The pharmacokinetic model was developed based on the simultaneous modelling using plasma samples gathered from two clinical trials. The treatments consisted of single-doses of pharmaceutical caffeine and ephedrine, given alone or together, and an herbal formulation containing both caffeine and ephedrine. We used a mixed-effect statistical model and the program NONMEM to take account of intersubject variability. Results Three hundred and seventy-nine ephedrine, 352 norephedrine, 417 caffeine plasma concentrations and 40 ephedrine urine concentrations were obtained from 24 subjects. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption described the caffeine data. Caffeine clearance was 0.083 l min−1 (CV 38%) and decreased to 0.038 l min−1 in presence of oral contraceptive therapy, its volume of distribution was 38.6 l (CV 20%) and its absorption rate constant was 0.064 l min−1 (CV 50%). A four-compartment model described the pharmocokinetics of ephedrine and norephedrine. Ephedrine was eliminated mostly renally, with a clearance of 0.34 l min−1 (CV 11%), and a volume of distribution of 181 l (CV 19%). Nonlinearity in the conversion of ephedrine to norephedrine was observed. Different models showed that the simultaneous administration of caffeine, or the amount of caffeine in the absorption compartment, was associated with a slower rate of absorption of ephedrine. A 32% greater relative bioavailability of herbal compared with pharmaceutical ephedrine administration was observed. Conclusions We describe a mechanistic model for ephedrine, norephedrine and caffeine pharmacokinetics and

  3. Predicting subsurface uranium transport: Mechanistic modeling constrained by experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottman, Michael; Schenkeveld, Walter D. C.; Kraemer, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) munitions and their widespread use throughout conflict zones around the world pose a persistent health threat to the inhabitants of those areas long after the conclusion of active combat. However, little emphasis has been put on developing a comprehensive, quantitative tool for use in remediation and hazard avoidance planning in a wide range of environments. In this context, we report experimental data on U interaction with soils and sediments. Here, we strive to improve existing risk assessment modeling paradigms by incorporating a variety of experimental data into a mechanistic U transport model for subsurface environments. 20 different soils and sediments from a variety of environments were chosen to represent a range of geochemical parameters that are relevant to U transport. The parameters included pH, organic matter content, CaCO3, Fe content and speciation, and clay content. pH ranged from 3 to 10, organic matter content from 6 to 120 g kg-1, CaCO3 from 0 to 700 g kg-1, amorphous Fe content from 0.3 to 6 g kg-1 and clay content from 4 to 580 g kg-1. Sorption experiments were then performed, and linear isotherms were constructed. Sorption experiment results show that among separate sets of sediments and soils, there is an inverse correlation between both soil pH and CaCO¬3 concentration relative to U sorptive affinity. The geological materials with the highest and lowest sorptive affinities for U differed in CaCO3 and organic matter concentrations, as well as clay content and pH. In a further step, we are testing if transport behavior in saturated porous media can be predicted based on adsorption isotherms and generic geochemical parameters, and comparing these modeling predictions with the results from column experiments. The comparison of these two data sets will examine if U transport can be effectively predicted from reactive transport modeling that incorporates the generic geochemical parameters. This work will serve to show

  4. Simulations of Enhancer Evolution Provide Mechanistic Insights into Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Thyago; Samee, Md. Abul Hassan; Kazemian, Majid; Pham, Hannah N.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in models of regulatory sequence evolution. However, existing models specifically designed for regulatory sequences consider the independent evolution of individual transcription factor (TF)–binding sites, ignoring that the function and evolution of a binding site depends on its context, typically the cis-regulatory module (CRM) in which the site is located. Moreover, existing models do not account for the gene-specific roles of TF-binding sites, primarily because their roles often are not well understood. We introduce two models of regulatory sequence evolution that address some of the shortcomings of existing models and implement simulation frameworks based on them. One model simulates the evolution of an individual binding site in the context of a CRM, while the other evolves an entire CRM. Both models use a state-of-the art sequence-to-expression model to predict the effects of mutations on the regulatory output of the CRM and determine the strength of selection. We use the new framework to simulate the evolution of TF-binding sites in 37 well-studied CRMs belonging to the anterior–posterior patterning system in Drosophila embryos. We show that these simulations provide accurate fits to evolutionary data from 12 Drosophila genomes, which includes statistics of binding site conservation on relatively short evolutionary scales and site loss across larger divergence times. The new framework allows us, for the first time, to test hypotheses regarding the underlying cis-regulatory code by directly comparing the evolutionary implications of the hypothesis with the observed evolutionary dynamics of binding sites. Using this capability, we find that explicitly modeling self-cooperative DNA binding by the TF Caudal (CAD) provides significantly better fits than an otherwise identical evolutionary simulation that lacks this mechanistic aspect. This hypothesis is further supported by a statistical analysis of the distribution of intersite

  5. A new mechanistic framework to predict OCS fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogée, Jérôme; Sauze, Joana; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Genty, Bernard; Van Diest, Heidi; Launois, Thomas; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Estimates of photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes at large scales are needed to improve our predictions of the current and future global CO2 cycle. Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been proposed as a new tracer of photosynthetic gross primary productivity (GPP), as the uptake of OCS from the atmosphere is dominated by the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme abundant in leaves that also catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. However soils also exchange OCS with the atmosphere, which complicates the retrieval of GPP from atmospheric budgets. Indeed soils can take up large amounts of OCS from the atmosphere as soil microorganisms also contain CA, and OCS emissions from soils have been reported in agricultural fields or anoxic soils. To date no mechanistic framework exists to describe this exchange of OCS between soils and the atmosphere, but empirical results, once upscaled to the global scale, indicate that OCS consumption by soils dominates OCS emission and its contribution to the atmospheric budget is large, at about one third of the OCS uptake by vegetation, also with a large uncertainty. Here, we propose a new mechanistic model of the exchange of OCS between soils and the atmosphere that builds on our knowledge of soil CA activity from CO2 oxygen isotopes. In this model the OCS soil budget is described by a first-order reaction-diffusion-production equation, assuming that the hydrolysis of OCS by CA is total and irreversible. Using this model we are able to explain the observed presence of an optimum temperature for soil OCS uptake and show how this optimum can shift to cooler temperatures in the presence of soil OCS emission. Our model can also explain the observed optimum with soil moisture content previously described in the literature as a result of diffusional constraints on OCS hydrolysis. These diffusional constraints are also responsible for the response of OCS uptake to soil weight and

  6. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    How will migrating birds respond to changes in the environment under climate change? What are the implications for migratory success under the various accelerated climate change scenarios as forecast by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change? How will reductions or increased variability in the number or quality of wetland stop-over sites affect migratory bird species? The answers to these questions have important ramifications for conservation biology and wildlife management. Here, we describe the use of continental scale simulation modeling to explore how spatio-temporal changes along migratory flyways affect en-route migration success. We use an individually based, biophysical, mechanistic, bird migration model to simulate the movement of shorebirds in North America as a tool to study how such factors as drought and wetland loss may impact migratory success and modify migration patterns. Our model is driven by remote sensing and climate data and incorporates important landscape variables. The energy budget components of the model include resting, foraging, and flight, but presently predation is ignored. Results/Conclusions We illustrate our model by studying the spring migration of sandpipers through the Great Plains to their Arctic breeding grounds. Why many species of shorebirds have shown significant declines remains a puzzle. Shorebirds are sensitive to stop-over quality and spacing because of their need for frequent refueling stops and their opportunistic feeding patterns. We predict bird "hydrographs that is, stop-over frequency with latitude, that are in agreement with the literature. Mean stop-over durations predicted from our model for nominal cases also are consistent with the limited, but available data. For the shorebird species simulated, our model predicts that shorebirds exhibit significant plasticity and are able to shift their migration patterns in response to changing drought conditions. However, the question remains as to whether this

  7. A new mechanistic framework to predict OCS fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogée, J.; Sauze, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Genty, B.; Van Diest, H.; Launois, T.; Wingate, L.

    2015-09-01

    Estimates of photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes at large scales is needed to improve our predictions of the current and future global CO2 cycle. Carbonyl sulphide (OCS) is the most abundant sulphur gas in the atmosphere and has been proposed as a new tracer of photosynthesis (GPP), as the uptake of OCS from the atmosphere is dominated by the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme abundant in leaves that also catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. But soils also exchange OCS with the atmosphere which complicates the retrieval of GPP from atmospheric budgets. Indeed soils can take up large amounts of OCS from the atmosphere as soil microorganisms also contain CA, and OCS emissions from soils have been reported in agricultural fields or anoxic soils. To date no mechanistic framework exists to describe this exchange of OCS between soils and the atmosphere but empirical results, once upscaled to the global scale, indicate that OCS consumption by soils dominates over production and its contribution to the atmospheric budget is large, at about one third of the OCS uptake by vegetation, with also a large uncertainty. Here, we propose a new mechanistic model of the exchange of OCS between soils and the atmosphere that builds on our knowledge of soil CA activity from CO2 oxygen isotopes. In this model the OCS soil budget is described by a first-order reaction-diffusion-production equation, assuming that the hydrolysis of OCS by CA is total and irreversible. Using this model we are able to explain the observed presence of an optimum temperature for soil OCS uptake and show how this optimum can shift to cooler temperatures in the presence of soil OCS emissions. Our model can also explain the observed optimum with soil moisture content previously described in the literature as a result of diffusional constraints on OCS hydrolysis. These diffusional constraints are also responsible for the response of OCS uptake to soil weight and depth observed previously. In

  8. A new mechanistic framework to predict OCS fluxes from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogee, J.; Sauze, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Genty, B.; Whelan, M.; Launois, T.; Wingate, L.

    2015-12-01

    A better description of the amplitude of photosynthetic and respiratory gross CO2 fluxes at large scales is needed to improve our predictions of the current and future global CO2 cycle. Carbonyl sulphide (OCS) has been proposed as a new tracer of gross photosynthesis (GPP), as the uptake of OCS from the atmosphere is dominated by the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme abundant in leaves that also catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. But soils also exchange OCS with the atmosphere which complicates the retrieval of GPP from atmospheric budgets. Indeed soils can take up large amounts of OCS from the atmosphere as soil microorganisms also contain CA, and OCS emissions from soils have been reported in agricultural or anoxic soils. To date no mechanistic framework exists to describe this exchange of OCS between soils and the atmosphere but empirical results, once up-scaled to the global scale, indicate that OCS consumption by soils dominates over production and its contribution to the atmospheric budget is large, at about one third of the OCS uptake by vegetation, with also a large uncertainty. Here, we propose a new mechanistic model of the exchange of OCS between soils and the atmosphere that builds on our knowledge of soil CA activity from CO2 oxygen isotopes. In this model the OCS soil budget is described by a first-order reaction-diffusion-production equation, assuming that the hydrolysis of OCS by CA is total and irreversible. Using this model we are able to explain the observed presence of an optimum temperature for soil OCS uptake and show how this optimum can shift to cooler temperatures in the presence of soil OCS emissions. Our model can also explain the observed optimum with soil moisture content previously described in the literature as a result of diffusional constraints on OCS hydrolysis. In order to simulate the exact OCS uptake rates and patterns observed on several soils collected from a range of biomes, different CA activities

  9. Kinetic and Mechanistic Investigations of Atom Abstraction Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Philip Stanford

    1990-01-01

    reaction does not contribute significantly to the observed ozone depletion over Antarctica. These deviations bring the predictive power of the trends into question. The valuable mechanistic insight gained from trend comparisons is shown to outweigh the loss of predictive power, as these trends provide a benchmark for the mechanistic understanding of atom abstraction reactions.

  10. Modeling Bird Migration under Climate Change: A Mechanistic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    2009-01-01

    How will migrating birds respond to changes in the environment under climate change? What are the implications for migratory success under the various accelerated climate change scenarios as forecast by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change? How will reductions or increased variability in the number or quality of wetland stop-over sites affect migratory bird species? The answers to these questions have important ramifications for conservation biology and wildlife management. Here, we describe the use of continental scale simulation modeling to explore how spatio-temporal changes along migratory flyways affect en-route migration success. We use an individually based, biophysical, mechanistic, bird migration model to simulate the movement of shorebirds in North America as a tool to study how such factors as drought and wetland loss may impact migratory success and modify migration patterns. Our model is driven by remote sensing and climate data and incorporates important landscape variables. The energy budget components of the model include resting, foraging, and flight, but presently predation is ignored. Results/Conclusions We illustrate our model by studying the spring migration of sandpipers through the Great Plains to their Arctic breeding grounds. Why many species of shorebirds have shown significant declines remains a puzzle. Shorebirds are sensitive to stop-over quality and spacing because of their need for frequent refueling stops and their opportunistic feeding patterns. We predict bird "hydrographs that is, stop-over frequency with latitude, that are in agreement with the literature. Mean stop-over durations predicted from our model for nominal cases also are consistent with the limited, but available data. For the shorebird species simulated, our model predicts that shorebirds exhibit significant plasticity and are able to shift their migration patterns in response to changing drought conditions. However, the question remains as to whether this

  11. Application of spectral deconvolution and inverse mechanistic modelling as a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brestrich, Nina; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-03-11

    In chromatographic protein purification, process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors can lead to deviations of the expected elution behavior of product and contaminants and can result in a decreased pool purity or yield. A different elution behavior of all or several involved species leads to a deviating chromatogram. The causes for deviations are however hard to identify by visual inspection and complicate the correction of a problem in the next cycle or batch. To overcome this issue, a tool for root cause investigation in protein chromatography was developed. The tool combines a spectral deconvolution with inverse mechanistic modelling. Mid-UV spectral data and Partial Least Squares Regression were first applied to deconvolute peaks to obtain the individual elution profiles of co-eluting proteins. The individual elution profiles were subsequently used to identify errors in process parameters by curve fitting to a mechanistic chromatography model. The functionality of the tool for root cause investigation was successfully demonstrated in a model protein study with lysozyme, cytochrome c, and ribonuclease A. Deviating chromatograms were generated by deliberately caused errors in the process parameters flow rate and sodium-ion concentration in loading and elution buffer according to a design of experiments. The actual values of the three process parameters and, thus, the causes of the deviations were estimated with errors of less than 4.4%. Consequently, the established tool for root cause investigation is a valuable approach to rapidly identify process variations, aging of columns, or processing errors. This might help to minimize batch rejections or contribute to an increased productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanistic insights into cognate substrate discrimination during proofreading in translation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tanweer; Kamarthapu, Venu; Kruparani, Shobha P; Deshmukh, Mandar V; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan

    2010-12-21

    Editing/proofreading by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is an important quality control step in the accurate translation of the genetic code that removes noncognate amino acids attached to tRNA. Defects in the process of editing result in disease conditions including neurodegeneration. While proofreading, the cognate amino acids larger by a methyl group are generally thought to be sterically rejected by the editing modules as envisaged by the "Double-Sieve Model." Strikingly using solution based direct binding studies, NMR-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, with an editing domain of threonyl-tRNA synthetase, we show that the cognate substrate can gain access and bind to the editing pocket. High-resolution crystal structural analyses reveal that functional positioning of substrates rather than steric exclusion is the key for the mechanism of discrimination. A strategically positioned "catalytic water" molecule is excluded to avoid hydrolysis of the cognate substrate using a "RNA mediated substrate-assisted catalysis mechanism" at the editing site. The mechanistic proof of the critical role of RNA in proofreading activity is a completely unique solution to the problem of cognate-noncognate selection mechanism.

  13. Mechanistic modeling of insecticide risks to breeding birds in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Insecticide usage in the United States is ubiquitous in urban, suburban, and rural environments. In evaluating data for an insecticide registration application and for registration review, scientists at the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) assess the fate of the insecticide and the risk the insecticide poses to the environment and non-target wildlife. At the present time, current USEPA risk assessments do not include population-level endpoints. In this paper, we present a new mechanistic model, which allows risk assessors to estimate the effects of insecticide exposure on the survival and seasonal productivity of birds known to use agricultural fields during their breeding season. The new model was created from two existing USEPA avian risk assessment models, the Terrestrial Investigation Model (TIM v.3.0) and the Markov Chain Nest Productivity model (MCnest). The integrated TIM/MCnest model has been applied to assess the relative risk of 12 insecticides used to control corn pests on a suite of 31 avian species known to use cornfields in midwestern agroecosystems. The 12 insecticides that were assessed in this study are all used to treat major pests of corn (corn root worm borer, cutworm, and armyworm). After running the integrated TIM/MCnest model, we found extensive differences in risk to birds among insecticides, with chlorpyrifos and malathion (organophosphates) generally posing the greatest risk, and bifenthrin and ë-cyhalothrin (

  14. Ultrasound enhanced ethanol production from Parthenium hysterophorus: A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Sarma, Shyamali; Agarwal, Mayank; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-01-01

    This study presents mechanistic investigations in ultrasound-assisted bioethanol fermentation using Parthenium hysterophorus biomass. Ultrasound (35 kHz, 10% duty cycle) has been used for sonication. Experimental results were fitted to mathematical model; the kinetic and physiological parameters in the model were obtained using Genetic Algorithm (GA) based optimization. In control experiments (mechanical shaking), maximum ethanol titer of 10.93 g/L and cell mass concentration of 5.26 g/L was obtained after 18 h. In test experiments (mechanical shaking and intermittent sonication), ethanol titer of 12.14 g/L and cell mass concentration of 5.7 g/L was obtained in 10h. This indicated ∼ 2 × enhanced productivity of ethanol and cell mass with sonication. Trends in model parameters obtained after fitting of model to experimental data essentially revealed that beneficial influence of ultrasound on fermentation is a manifestation of enhanced trans-membrane transportation and dilution of toxic substances due to strong micro-convection induced by ultrasound. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction, and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  16. Mechanistic rationales for targeting interleukin-17A in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Raychaudhuri, Smriti K

    2017-03-08

    The term spondyloarthritis (SpA) is used to describe a group of inflammatory autoimmune diseases, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, with common genetic risk factors and clinical features. SpA is clinically distinct from rheumatoid arthritis and typically affects the spine, sacroiliac joints, entheses, and, less commonly, peripheral joints. Although the pathogenesis of SpA is not fully understood, recent findings have identified the interleukin (IL)-17 pathway as a key mediator of disease pathogenesis. Clinical evidence for the efficacy of IL-17A inhibition by biologic agents was initially shown in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis, another autoimmune disease mediated by the IL-17 pathway. Subsequently, similar positive efficacy for inhibition of IL-17A was seen in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Inhibition of IL-17A may also improve cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities often found in patients with SpA because studies have linked these disorders to the IL-17 pathway. In this review, we will examine key preclinical studies that demonstrated the mechanistic role of IL-17A in the development SpA and discuss how these observations were translated into clinical practice.

  17. Mechanistic aspects of photooxidation of polyhydroxylated molecules on metal oxides.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. M.; Sevilla, M. D.; Chemerisov, S.

    2011-03-24

    Polyhydroxylated molecules, including natural carbohydrates, are known to undergo photooxidation on wide-gap transition-metal oxides irradiated by ultraviolet light. In this study, we examine mechanistic aspects of this photoreaction on aqueous TiO{sub 2}, {alpha}-FeOOH, and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and site-selective deuteration. We demonstrate that the carbohydrates are oxidized at sites involved in the formation of oxo bridges between the chemisorbed carbohydrate molecule and metal ions at the oxide surface. This bridging inhibits the loss of water (which is the typical reaction of the analogous free radicals in bulk solvent) promoting instead a rearrangement that leads to elimination of the formyl radical. For natural carbohydrates, the latter reaction mainly involves carbon-1, whereas the main radical products of the oxidation are radical arising from H atom loss centered on carbon-1, -2, and -3 sites. Photoexcited TiO{sub 2} oxidizes all of the carbohydrates and polyols, whereas {alpha}-FeOOH oxidizes some of the carbohydrates, and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is unreactive. These results serve as a stepping stone for understanding the photochemistry on mineral surfaces of more complex biomolecules such as nucleic acids.

  18. Mechanistic Investigation on ROS Resistance of Phosphorothioated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Shi, Ting; Bai, Linquan; Liang, Jingdan; Wang, Zhijun; Deng, Zixin; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorothioated DNA (PT-DNA) exhibits a mild anti-oxidant property both in vivo and in vitro. It was found that 8-OHdG and ROS levels were significantly lower in dnd+ (i.e. S+) E. coli., compared to a dnd− (i.e. S−) strain. Furthermore, different from traditional antioxidants, phosphorothioate compound presents an unexpectedly high capacity to quench hydroxyl radical. Oxidative product analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantum mechanistic computation supported its unique anti-oxidant characteristic of the hydroxyl selectivity: phosphorothioate donates an electron to either hydroxyl radical or guanine radical derived from hydroxyl radical, leading to a PS• radical; a complex of PS• radical and OH− (i.e. the reductive product of hydroxyl radical) releases a highly reductive HS• radical, which scavenges more equivalents of oxidants in the way to high-covalent sulphur compounds such as sulphur, sulphite and sulphate. The PS-PO conversion (PS and PO denote phosphorus-sulphur and phosphorus-oxygen compounds, respectively) made a switch of extremely oxidative OH• to highly reductive HS• species, endowing PT-DNA with the observed high capacity in hydroxyl-radical neutralization. This plausible mechanism provides partial rationale as to why bacteria develop the resource-demanding PT modification on guanine-neighboring phosphates in genome. PMID:28216673

  19. Thermal hydrogen-atom transfer from methane: A mechanistic exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) constitutes a key process in a broad range of chemical transformations as it covers heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic reactions. While open-shell metal oxo species [MO]rad are no longer regarded as being involved in the heterogeneously catalyzed oxidative coupling of methane (2CH4 + → C2H6 + H2O), these reagents are rather versatile in bringing about (gas-phase) hydrogen-atom transfer, even from methane at ambient conditions. In this mini-review, various mechanistic scenarios will be presented, and it will be demonstrated how these are affected by the composition of the metal-oxide cluster ions. Examples will be discussed, how 'doping' the clusters permits the control of the charge and spin situation at the active site and, thus, the course of the reaction. Also, the interplay between supposedly inert support material and the active site - the so-called 'aristocratic atoms' - of the gas-phase catalyst will be addressed. Finally, gas-phase HAT from methane will be analyzed in the broader context of thermal activation of inert Csbnd H bonds by metal-oxo species.

  20. The mechanistic studies of acupuncture and moxibustion in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2011-03-01

    Traditional Chinese acupuncture has a history of over 2500 years. It is effective in the treatment of many conditions with few side effects. The best known mechanism is via endogenous opiates and their receptors. In addition to opioids, researchers have focused on the role of central monoamimergic systems. Acupuncture therapy is used not only to relieve pain but also to treat various medical conditions in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Some experiments have revealed a relationship between acupuncture and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Besides, electroacupuncture (EA) can modulate the imbalance between innate and acquired immune systems. This review is focusing on the mechanistic studies of acupuncture that my colleagues and I have performed in Taiwan in recent years. We found that EA analgesia was closely related to not only the serotonergic neurons but also the adrenergic neurons in the central nervous system. The electrophysiological recordings suggested the involvement of the cerebral cortex in acupuncture. Local somatothermal stimulation inhibited the motility of sphincter of Oddi and internal anal sphincter through nitrergic neural release of nitric oxide. Mild local heat stress upregulated hepatic gene expression of heat shock protein 70 and protected the liver from subsequent ischemia-reperfusion injury. These studies supplement the knowledge of the mechanism of acupuncture.

  1. Mechanistic aspects of photooxidation of polyhydroxylated molecules on metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Shkrob, Ilya A.; Marin, Timothy M.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxylated molecules, including natural carbohydrates, are known to undergo photooxidation on wide-gap transition metal oxides irradiated by ultraviolet light. In this study, we examine mechanistic aspects of this photoreaction on aqueous TiO2, α-FeOOH, and α-Fe2O3 particles using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and site-selective deuteration. We demonstrate that the carbohydrates are oxidized at sites involved in the formation of oxo-bridges between the chemisorbed carbohydrate molecule and metal ions at the oxide surface. This bridging inhibits the loss of water (which is the typical reaction of the analogous free radicals in bulk solvent) promoting instead a rearrangement that leads to elimination of the formyl radical. For natural carbohydrates, the latter reaction mainly involves carbon-1, whereas the main radical products of the oxidation are radical arising from H atom loss centered on carbon-1, -2, and -3 sites. Photoexcited TiO2 oxidizes all of the carbohydrates and polyols, whereas α-FeOOH oxidizes some of the carbohydrates, and α-Fe2O3 is unreactive. These results serve as a stepping stone for understanding the photochemistry on mineral surfaces of more complex biomolecules such as nucleic acids. PMID:21532934

  2. Mechanistic Differences Leading to Infectious and Sterile Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Faranak; Sheller, Samantha; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a physiologic component of pregnancy and parturition. Overwhelming intrauterine inflammatory load promotes quiescent feto-maternal tissues into a contractile phenotype. Like inflammation, oxidative stress is an inevitable component of both pregnancy and parturition. Pathologic activation of host innate immune response to adverse pregnancy conditions can lead to premature activation of inflammatory and oxidative stress. Inflammation and oxidative stress markers seen with both sterile and infectious inflammation are often similar; therefore, it is difficult to understand causality of conditions like spontaneous preterm birth. This review demonstrates potential mechanistic pathways of activation of sterile and infectious inflammation. We demonstrate the activation of two unique pathways of inflammation by factors that are well-documented proxies for oxidative stress (cigarette smoke extract) and infection (lipopolysaccharide). Sterile inflammation seen after exposure to an oxidative stress inducer is due to cellular elemental damage resulting in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced cellular senescence. Infectious inflammation is through activation of transcription factor NF-κB and independent of oxidative stress-associated damages and p38 MAPK-induced senescence. Understanding the differences in the inflammatory pathway activation by various risk factors is important to design better screening, diagnostic and intervention strategies to reduce the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  3. Mechanistic modeling of destratification in cryogenic storage tanks using ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, T K; Mohanan, Srijith; Nagarajan, R

    2014-01-01

    Stratification is one of the main causes for vaporization of cryogens and increase of tank pressure during cryogenic storage. This leads subsequent problems such as cavitation in cryo-pumps, reduced length of storage time. Hence, it is vital to prevent stratification to improve the cost efficiency of storage systems. If stratified layers exist inside the tank, they have to be removed by suitable methods without venting the vapor. Sonication is one such method capable of keeping fluid layers mixed. In the present work, a mechanistic model for ultrasonic destratification is proposed and validated with destratification experiments done in water. Then, the same model is used to predict the destratification characteristics of cryogenic liquids such as liquid nitrogen (LN₂), liquid hydrogen (LH₂) and liquid ammonia (LNH₃). The destratification parameters are analysed for different frequencies of ultrasound and storage pressures by considering continuous and pulsed modes of ultrasonic operation. From the results, it is determined that use of high frequency ultrasound (low-power/continuous; high-power/pulsing) or low frequency ultrasound (continuous operation with moderate power) can both be effective in removing stratification.

  4. Enzymatic Halogenation and Dehalogenation Reactions: Pervasive and Mechanistically Diverse.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Miles, Zachary D; Winter, Jaclyn M; Eustáquio, Alessandra S; El Gamal, Abrahim A; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-01-20

    Naturally produced halogenated compounds are ubiquitous across all domains of life where they perform a multitude of biological functions and adopt a diversity of chemical structures. Accordingly, a diverse collection of enzyme catalysts to install and remove halogens from organic scaffolds has evolved in nature. Accounting for the different chemical properties of the four halogen atoms (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine) and the diversity and chemical reactivity of their organic substrates, enzymes performing biosynthetic and degradative halogenation chemistry utilize numerous mechanistic strategies involving oxidation, reduction, and substitution. Biosynthetic halogenation reactions range from simple aromatic substitutions to stereoselective C-H functionalizations on remote carbon centers and can initiate the formation of simple to complex ring structures. Dehalogenating enzymes, on the other hand, are best known for removing halogen atoms from man-made organohalogens, yet also function naturally, albeit rarely, in metabolic pathways. This review details the scope and mechanism of nature's halogenation and dehalogenation enzymatic strategies, highlights gaps in our understanding, and posits where new advances in the field might arise in the near future.

  5. Fine particulate matter air pollution and atherosclerosis: Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yuntao; Sun, Qinghua

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids and fibrous plaque in the arteries. Its etiology is very complicated and its risk factors primarily include genetic defects, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, lack of exercise, and infection. Recent studies suggest that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution may also contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. The present review integrates current experimental evidence with mechanistic pathways whereby PM2.5 exposure can promote the development of atherosclerosis. PM2.5-mediated enhancement of atherosclerosis is likely due to its pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory effects, involving multiple organs, different cell types, and various molecular mediators. Studies about the effects of PM2.5inhalation on atherosclerosis may yield a better understanding of the link between air pollution and major cardiovascular diseases, and provide useful information for policy makers to determine acceptable levels of PM2.5 air quality. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanistic modelling of the drying behaviour of single pharmaceutical granules.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; De Beer, Thomas; Gernaey, Krist V; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Fonteyne, Margot; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; Nopens, Ingmar

    2012-04-01

    The trend to move towards continuous production processes in pharmaceutical applications enhances the necessity to develop mechanistic models to understand and control these processes. This work focuses on the drying behaviour of a single wet granule before tabletting, using a six-segmented fluidised bed drying system, which is part of a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line. The drying model is based on a model described by Mezhericher et al. and consists of two submodels. In the first drying phase (submodel 1), the surface water evaporates, while in the second drying phase (submodel 2), the water inside the granule evaporates. The second submodel contains an empirical power coefficient, β. A sensitivity analysis was performed to study the influence of parameters on the moisture content of single pharmaceutical granules, which clearly points towards the importance of β on the drying behaviour. Experimental data with the six-segmented fluidised bed dryer were collected to calibrate β. An exponential dependence on the drying air temperature was found. Independent experiments were done for the validation of the drying model.

  7. Mechanistic understanding of monosaccharide-air flow battery electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Daniel M.; Tsang, Tsz Ho; Chetty, Leticia; Aloi, Sekotilani; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Recently, an inexpensive monosaccharide-air flow battery configuration has been demonstrated to utilize a strong base and a mediator redox dye to harness electrical power from the partial oxidation of glucose. Here the mechanistic understanding of glucose oxidation in this unique glucose-air power source is further explored by acid-base titration experiments, 13C NMR, and comparison of results from chemically different redox mediators (indigo carmine vs. methyl viologen) and sugars (fructose vs. glucose) via studies using electrochemical techniques. Titration results indicate that gluconic acid is the main product of the cell reaction, as supported by evidence in the 13C NMR spectra. Using indigo carmine as the mediator dye and fructose as the energy source, an abiotic cell configuration generates a power density of 1.66 mW cm -2, which is greater than that produced from glucose under similar conditions (ca. 1.28 mW cm -2). A faster transition from fructose into the ene-diol intermediate than from glucose likely contributed to this difference in power density.

  8. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII.

    PubMed

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2015-04-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  9. Sleep, immunity, and circadian clocks: a mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Thomas; Bollinger, Annalena; Oster, Henrik; Solbach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    The lack of sufficient amounts of sleep is a hallmark of modern living, and it is commonly perceived that in the long run this makes us sick. An increasing amount of scientific data indicate that sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on immune function. Conversely, immune responses feedback on sleep phase and architecture. Several studies have investigated the impact of short-term sleep deprivation on different immune parameters, whereas only a few studies have addressed the influence of sleep restriction on the immune system. In many cases, sleep deprivation and restriction impair immune responses by disrupting circadian rhythms at the level of immune cells, which might be a consequence of disrupted endocrine and physiological circadian rhythms. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the circadian regulation of immunity, but recent studies have suggested that local as well as central circadian clocks drive the rhythms of immune function. In this review, we present a mechanistic model which proposes that sleep (through soluble factors and body temperature) primes immune cells on the one hand, and, on the other hand, provides a timing signal for hematopoietic circadian clocks. We hypothesize that chronic sleep disruption desynchronizes these clocks and, through this mechanism, deregulates immune responses. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Mechanistic insights into acyclovir-polyethylene glycol 20000 binary dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Venkateskumar, Krishnamoorthy; Parasuraman, Subramani; Gunasunderi, Raju; Sureshkumar, Krishnan; Nayak, M. Muralidhar; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Kassen, Khoo; Kai, Heng Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to provide a mechanistic insight into solubility enhancement and dissolution of acyclovir (ACY) by polyethylene glycol20000 (PEG20000). Materials and Methods: Solid dispersions with differing ratios of drug (ACY) and carrier (PEG20000) were prepared and evaluated by phase solubility, in vitro release studies, kinetic analysis, in situ perfusion, and in vitro permeation studies. Solid state characterization was also done by Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis and surface morphology was assessed by Polarizing Microscopic Image (PMI) analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analysis. Results: Thermodynamic parameters proved the solubilization effect of carrier. The aqueous solubility and dissolution of ACY were increased in all samples. Formation of solid solution, crystallinity reduction, and absence of interaction between drug and carrier was proved by XRD, DSC, and FTIR analysis. The particle size reduction and change in surface morphology were confirmed by SEM and AFM and analysis. The permeation coefficient and amount of drug diffused was higher in samples as compared to ACY. The stability was high in dispersions, and it was proved by NMR analysis. Conclusion: The mechanical insights into the enhancement of solubility and dissolution could be used as a platform to improve the aqueous solubility for other poor water soluble drugs. PMID:28123988

  11. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-07-26

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size.

  12. Analytical techniques for mechanistic characterization of EUV photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzeskowiak, Steven; Narasimhan, Amrit; Murphy, Michael; Ackerman, Christian; Kaminsky, Jake; Brainard, Robert L.; Denbeaux, Greg

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5 nm) lithography is the prospective technology for high volume manufacturing by the microelectronics industry. Significant strides towards achieving adequate EUV source power and availability have been made recently, but a limited rate of improvement in photoresist performance still delays the implementation of EUV. Many fundamental questions remain to be answered about the exposure mechanisms of even the relatively well understood chemically amplified EUV photoresists. Moreover, several groups around the world are developing revolutionary metal-based resists whose EUV exposure mechanisms are even less understood. Here, we describe several evaluation techniques to help elucidate mechanistic details of EUV exposure mechanisms of chemically amplified and metal-based resists. EUV absorption coefficients are determined experimentally by measuring the transmission through a resist coated on a silicon nitride membrane. Photochemistry can be evaluated by monitoring small outgassing reaction products to provide insight into photoacid generator or metal-based resist reactivity. Spectroscopic techniques such as thin-film Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can measure the chemical state of a photoresist system pre- and post-EUV exposure. Additionally, electrolysis can be used to study the interaction between photoresist components and low energy electrons. Collectively, these techniques improve our current understanding of photomechanisms for several EUV photoresist systems, which is needed to develop new, better performing materials needed for high volume manufacturing.

  13. Mechanistic modelling of toxicokinetic processes within Myriophyllum spicatum.

    PubMed

    Heine, S; Schmitt, W; Schäffer, A; Görlitz, G; Buresová, H; Arts, G; Preuss, T G

    2015-02-01

    Effects of chemicals are, in most cases, caused by internal concentrations within organisms which rely on uptake and elimination kinetics. These processes might be key components for assessing the effects of time-variable exposure of chemicals which regularly occur in aquatic systems. However, the knowledge of toxicokinetic patterns caused by time-variable exposure is limited, and gaining such information is complex. In this work, a previously developed mechanistic growth model of Myriophyllum spicatum is coupled with a newly developed toxicokinetic part, providing a model that is able to predict uptake and elimination of chemicals, as well as distribution processes between plant compartments (leaves, stems, roots) of M. spicatum. It is shown, that toxicokinetic patterns, at least for most of the investigated chemicals, can be calculated in agreement with experimental observations, by only calibrating two chemical- specific parameters, the cuticular permeability and a plant/water partition coefficient. Through the model-based determination of the cuticular permeabilities of Isoproturon, Iofensulfuron, Fluridone, Imazamox and Penoxsulam, their toxicokinetic pattern can be described with the model approach. For the use of the model for predicting toxicokinetics of other chemicals, where experimental data is not available, equations are presented that are based on the log (P oct/wat) of a chemical and estimate parameters that are necessary to run the model. In general, a method is presented to analyze time-variable exposure of chemicals more in detail without conducting time and labour intensive experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MECHANISTIC AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HELICASE ACTION ON DAMAGED DNA

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases catalytically unwind structured nucleic acids in a nucleoside-triphosphate-dependent and directionally specific manner, and are essential for virtually all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. ATPase-driven helicases which translocate along nucleic acids play a role in damage recognition or unwinding of a DNA tract containing the lesion. Although classical biochemical experiments provided evidence that bulky covalent adducts inhibit DNA unwinding catalyzed by certain DNA helicases in a strand-specific manner (i.e. , block to DNA unwinding restricted to adduct residence in the strand the helicase translocates), recent studies suggest more complex arrangements that may depend on the helicase under study, its assembly in a protein complex, and the type of structural DNA perturbation. Moreover, base and sugar phosphate backbone modifications exert effects on DNA helicases that suggest specialized tracking mechanisms. As a component of the replication stress response, the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA) may serve to enable eukaryotic DNA helicases to overcome certain base lesions. Helicases play important roles in DNA damage signaling which also involve their partnership with RPA. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of mechanistic and biological aspects of helicase action on damaged DNA. PMID:20574162

  15. A mechanistic stochastic framework for regulating bacterial cell division

    PubMed Central

    Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    How exponentially growing cells maintain size homeostasis is an important fundamental problem. Recent single-cell studies in prokaryotes have uncovered the adder principle, where cells add a fixed size (volume) from birth to division, irrespective of their size at birth. To mechanistically explain the adder principle, we consider a timekeeper protein that begins to get stochastically expressed after cell birth at a rate proportional to the volume. Cell-division time is formulated as the first-passage time for protein copy numbers to hit a fixed threshold. Consistent with data, the model predicts that the noise in division timing increases with size at birth. Intriguingly, our results show that the distribution of the volume added between successive cell-division events is independent of the newborn cell size. This was dramatically seen in experimental studies, where histograms of the added volume corresponding to different newborn sizes collapsed on top of each other. The model provides further insights consistent with experimental observations: the distribution of the added volume when scaled by its mean becomes invariant of the growth rate. In summary, our simple yet elegant model explains key experimental findings and suggests a mechanism for regulating both the mean and fluctuations in cell-division timing for controlling size. PMID:27456660

  16. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules.

  17. Warming will affect phytoplankton differently: evidence through a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Huertas, I Emma; Rouco, Mónica; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2011-12-07

    Although the consequences of global warming in aquatic ecosystems are only beginning to be revealed, a key to forecasting the impact on aquatic communities is an understanding of individual species' vulnerability to increased temperature. Despite their microscopic size, phytoplankton support about half of the global primary production, drive essential biogeochemical cycles and represent the basis of the aquatic food web. At present, it is known that phytoplankton are important targets and, consequently, harbingers of climate change in aquatic systems. Therefore, investigating the capacity of phytoplankton to adapt to the predicted warming has become a relevant issue. However, considering the polyphyletic complexity of the phytoplankton community, different responses to increased temperature are expected. We experimentally tested the effects of warming on 12 species of phytoplankton isolated from a variety of environments by using a mechanistic approach able to assess evolutionary adaptation (the so-called ratchet technique). We found different degrees of tolerance to temperature rises and an interspecific capacity for genetic adaptation. The thermal resistance level reached by each species is discussed in relation to their respective original habitats. Our study additionally provides evidence on the most resistant phytoplankton groups in a future warming scenario.

  18. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J.; Glaser, Sarah M.; Grant, Sue C. H.; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Richards, Laura J.; Schnute, Jon T.; Sugihara, George

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner–recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts. PMID:25733874

  19. Recent Structural and Mechanistic Insights into Endplate Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Gao, Fan; Lee, Won Yong; Mukhtasimova, Nuriya; Wang, Hai-Long; Engel, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Voluntary movement mediated by skeletal muscle relies on endplate acetylcholine receptors (AChR) to detect nerve-released ACh and depolarize themuscle fiber. Recent structural and mechanistic studies of the endplate AChR have catalyzed a leap in our understanding of the molecular steps in this chemical-to-electrical transduction process. Studies of acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) give insight into ACh recognition, the first step in activation of the AChR. An atomic structural model of the Torpedo AChR at a resolution of 0.4 nm, together with single-ion channel recording methods, allow tracing of the link between the agonist binding event and gating of the ion channel, as well as determination of how the channel moves when it opens to allow flow of cations. Structural models of the human AChR enable precise mapping of disease-causing mutations, while studies of the speed with which single AChR channels open and close cast light on pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:18567853

  20. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ali, A. A.; Fisher, R.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Rogers, A.; McDowell, N. G.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc,max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25oC) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55% of the variation in observed Vc,max25 and 65% of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc,max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc,max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.

  1. Mechanistic insight into sonochemical biodiesel synthesis using heterogeneous base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effect of ultrasound on transesterification reaction is well known. Heterogeneous (or solid) catalysts for biodiesel synthesis have merit that they do not contaminate the byproduct of glycerol. In this paper, we have attempted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasound-enhanced biodiesel synthesis with the base-catalyst of CaO. A statistical design of experiments (Box-Behnken) was used to identify the influence of temperature, alcohol to oil molar ratio and catalyst loading on transesterification yield. The optimum values of these parameters for the highest yield were identified through Response Surface Method (with a quadratic model) and ANOVA. These values are: temperature=62 °C, molar ratio=10:1 and catalyst loading=6 wt.%. The activation energy was determined as 82.3 kJ/mol, which is higher than that for homogeneous catalyzed system (for both acidic and basic catalyst). The experimental results have been analyzed vis-à-vis simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics. Due to 3-phase heterogeneity of the system, the yield was dominated by intrinsic kinetics, and the optimum temperature for the highest yield was close to boiling point of methanol. At this temperature, the influence of cavitation bubbles (in terms of both sonochemical and sonophysical effect) is negligible, and ultrasonic micro-streaming provided necessary convection in the system. The influence of all parameters on the reaction system was found to be strongly inter-dependent.

  2. AIR POLLUTION, INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH: A POTENTIAL MECHANISTIC LINK

    PubMed Central

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G.; O´Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth. PMID:24382337

  3. Spectroscopic and Mechanistic Investigations of Dehaloperoxidase B from Amphitrite ornata†

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Jennifer; D’Antonio, Edward L.; Thompson, Matthew K.; Bowden, Edmond F.; Franzen, Stefan; Smirnova, Tatyana; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2010-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from the terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata is a bifunctional enzyme that possesses both hemoglobin and peroxidase activities. Of the two DHP isoenzymes identified to date, much of the recent focus has been on DHP A, whereas very little is known pertaining to the activity, substrate specificity, mechanism of function, or spectroscopic properties of DHP B. Herein, we report the recombinant expression and purification of DHP B, as well as the details of our investigations into its catalytic cycle using biochemical assays, stopped-flow UV-visible, resonance Raman and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies, and spectroelectrochemistry. Our experimental design reveals mechanistic insights and kinetic descriptions of the dehaloperoxidase mechanism which have not been previously reported for isoenzyme A. Namely, we demonstrate a novel reaction pathway in which the products of the oxidative dehalogenation of trihalophenols (dihaloquinones) are themselves capable of inducing formation of oxyferrous DHP B, and an updated catalytic cycle for DHP is proposed. We further demonstrate that unlike the traditional monofunctional peroxidases, the oxyferrous state in DHP is a peroxidase competent starting species, which suggests that the ferric oxidation state may not be an obligatory starting point for the enzyme. The data presented herein provide a link between the peroxidase and oxygen transport activities which furthers our understanding of how this bifunctional enzyme is able to unite its two inherent functions in one system. PMID:20545299

  4. Mechanistic evaluation of virus clearance by depth filtration.

    PubMed

    Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Fogle, Jace; Patnaik, Purbasa; Kowle, Ron; Chen, Dayue

    2015-01-01

    Virus clearance by depth filtration has not been well-understood mechanistically due to lack of quantitative data on filter charge characteristics and absence of systematic studies. It is generally believed that both electrostatic interactions and sized based mechanical entrapment contribute to virus clearance by depth filtration. In order to establish whether the effectiveness of virus clearance correlates with the charge characteristics of a given depth filter, a counter-ion displacement technique was employed to determine the ionic capacity for several depth filters. Two depth filters (Millipore B1HC and X0HC) with significant differences in ionic capacities were selected and evaluated for their ability to eliminate viruses. The high ionic capacity X0HC filter showed complete porcine parvovirus (PPV) clearance (eliminating the spiked viruses to below the limit of detection) under low conductivity conditions (≤2.5 mS/cm), achieving a log10 reduction factor (LRF) of > 4.8. On the other hand, the low ionic capacity B1HC filter achieved only ∼2.1-3.0 LRF of PPV clearance under the same conditions. These results indicate that parvovirus clearance by these two depth filters are mainly achieved via electrostatic interactions between the filters and PPV. When much larger xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) was used as the model virus, complete retrovirus clearance was obtained under all conditions evaluated for both depth filters, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms other than just electrostatic interactions in XMuLV clearance.

  5. Mechanistic solutions to the opening of the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1994-01-01

    Two mechanistic models-which are unlike the traditional plate-tectonic landfill models used for most proposed Pangea reconstructions of the Yucatán block-relate the Mesozoic opening of the Gulf of Mexico directly to the movement of the North and South American plates: (1) a previous piggyback model in which Yucatán moves with South America out of the western gulf and (2) a new edge-driven model in which the motion of the Yucatán block is caused by forces applied to its margins by the movement of the North and South American plates. In the second model, Yucatán moves out of the northern Gulf of Mexico as a gear or roller bearing. On the basis of magnetic edge anomalies around the gulf, this edge-driven model predicts that from the Bathonian to Tithonian (~170 to ~50 Ma), Yucatán was rotated ~60° counterclockwise as a rigid block between North and South America with rift propagation and extension occurring simultaneously in the Gulf of Mexico and Yucatán Basin.

  6. Mechanistic perspectives on cancer chemoprevention/chemotherapeutic effects of thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Juthika; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Aruoma, Okezie I; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The bioactive natural products (plant secondary metabolites) are widely known to possess therapeutic value for the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases including cancer. Thymoquinone (2-methyl-5-isopropyl-1,4-benzoquinone; TQ), a monoterpene present in black cumin seeds, exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and antitumor effects. TQ inhibits experimental carcinogenesis in a wide range of animal models and has been shown to arrest the growth of various cancer cells in culture as well as xenograft tumors in vivo. The mechanistic basis of anticancer effects of TQ includes the inhibition of carcinogen metabolizing enzyme activity and oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules, attenuation of inflammation, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells, blockade of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. TQ shows synergistic and/or potentiating anticancer effects when combined with clinically used chemotherapeutic agents. At the molecular level, TQ targets various components of intracellular signaling pathways, particularly a variety of upstream kinases and transcription factors, which are aberrantly activated during the course of tumorigenesis.

  7. Equation-free mechanistic ecosystem forecasting using empirical dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hao; Beamish, Richard J; Glaser, Sarah M; Grant, Sue C H; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Richards, Laura J; Schnute, Jon T; Sugihara, George

    2015-03-31

    It is well known that current equilibrium-based models fall short as predictive descriptions of natural ecosystems, and particularly of fisheries systems that exhibit nonlinear dynamics. For example, model parameters assumed to be fixed constants may actually vary in time, models may fit well to existing data but lack out-of-sample predictive skill, and key driving variables may be misidentified due to transient (mirage) correlations that are common in nonlinear systems. With these frailties, it is somewhat surprising that static equilibrium models continue to be widely used. Here, we examine empirical dynamic modeling (EDM) as an alternative to imposed model equations and that accommodates both nonequilibrium dynamics and nonlinearity. Using time series from nine stocks of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) from the Fraser River system in British Columbia, Canada, we perform, for the the first time to our knowledge, real-data comparison of contemporary fisheries models with equivalent EDM formulations that explicitly use spawning stock and environmental variables to forecast recruitment. We find that EDM models produce more accurate and precise forecasts, and unlike extensions of the classic Ricker spawner-recruit equation, they show significant improvements when environmental factors are included. Our analysis demonstrates the strategic utility of EDM for incorporating environmental influences into fisheries forecasts and, more generally, for providing insight into how environmental factors can operate in forecast models, thus paving the way for equation-free mechanistic forecasting to be applied in management contexts.

  8. Circadian rhythms and addiction: mechanistic insights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Logan, Ryan W; Williams, Wilbur P; McClung, Colleen A

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug-induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction.

  9. A brief review of exercise, bipolar disorder, and mechanistic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel; Turner, Alyna; Lauder, Sue; Gigler, Margaret E.; Berk, Lesley; Singh, Ajeet B.; Pasco, Julie A.; Berk, Michael; Sylvia, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite evidence that exercise has been found to be effective in the treatment of depression, it is unclear whether these data can be extrapolated to bipolar disorder. Available evidence for bipolar disorder is scant, with no existing randomized controlled trials having tested the impact of exercise on depressive, manic or hypomanic symptomatology. Although exercise is often recommended in bipolar disorder, this is based on extrapolation from the unipolar literature, theory and clinical expertise and not empirical evidence. In addition, there are currently no available empirical data on program variables, with practical implications on frequency, intensity and type of exercise derived from unipolar depression studies. The aim of the current paper is to explore the relationship between exercise and bipolar disorder and potential mechanistic pathways. Given the high rate of medical co-morbidities experienced by people with bipolar disorder, it is possible that exercise is a potentially useful and important intervention with regard to general health benefits; however, further research is required to elucidate the impact of exercise on mood symptomology. PMID:25788889

  10. Mechanistic modeling of broth temperature in outdoor photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Quentin; Shilton, Andy; Fringer, Oliver B; Muñoz, Raul; Guieysse, Benoit

    2010-03-15

    This study presents the first mechanistic model describing broth temperature in column photobioreactors as a function of static (location, reactor geometry) and dynamic (light irradiance, air temperature, wind velocity) parameters. Based on a heat balance on the liquid phase the model predicted temperature in a pneumatically agitated column photobioreactor (1 m(2) illuminated area, 0.19 m internal diameter, 50 L gas-free cultivation broth) operated outdoor in Singapore to an accuracy of 2.4 °C at the 95% confidence interval over the entire data set used (104 measurements from 7 different batches). Solar radiation (0 to 200 W) and air convection (-30 to 50 W)were the main contributors to broth temperature change. The model predicted broth temperature above 40 °C will be reached during summer months in the same photobioreactor operated in California, a value well over the maximum temperature tolerated by most commercial algae species. Accordingly, 18,000 and 5500 GJ year(-1) ha(-1) of heat energy must be removed to maintain broth temperature at or below 25 and 35 °C, respectively, assuming a reactor density of one reactor per square meter. Clearly, the significant issue of temperature control must be addressed when evaluating the technical feasibility, costs, and sustainability of large-scale algae production.

  11. Simplified mechanistic models of gene regulation for analysis and design

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Edward J.; Stan, Guy-Bart; Arpino, James A. J.; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Simplified mechanistic models of gene regulation are fundamental to systems biology and essential for synthetic biology. However, conventional simplified models typically have outputs that are not directly measurable and are based on assumptions that do not often hold under experimental conditions. To resolve these issues, we propose a ‘model reduction’ methodology and simplified kinetic models of total mRNA and total protein concentration, which link measurements, models and biochemical mechanisms. The proposed approach is based on assumptions that hold generally and include typical cases in systems and synthetic biology where conventional models do not hold. We use novel assumptions regarding the ‘speed of reactions’, which are required for the methodology to be consistent with experimental data. We also apply the methodology to propose simplified models of gene regulation in the presence of multiple protein binding sites, providing both biological insights and an illustration of the generality of the methodology. Lastly, we show that modelling total protein concentration allows us to address key questions on gene regulation, such as efficiency, burden, competition and modularity. PMID:26063825

  12. A mechanistic physicochemical model of carbon dioxide transport in blood.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, David P; Robbins, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    A number of mathematical models have been produced that, given the Pco2 and Po2 of blood, will calculate the total concentrations for CO2 and O2 in blood. However, all these models contain at least some empirical features, and thus do not represent all of the underlying physicochemical processes in an entirely mechanistic manner. The aim of this study was to develop a physicochemical model of CO2 carriage by the blood to determine whether our understanding of the physical chemistry of the major chemical components of blood together with their interactions is sufficiently strong to predict the physiological properties of CO2 carriage by whole blood. Standard values are used for the ionic composition of the blood, the plasma albumin concentration, and the hemoglobin concentration. All Km values required for the model are taken from the literature. The distribution of bicarbonate, chloride, and H(+) ions across the red blood cell membrane follows that of a Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium. The system of equations that results is solved numerically using constraints for mass balance and electroneutrality. The model reproduces the phenomena associated with CO2 carriage, including the magnitude of the Haldane effect, very well. The structural nature of the model allows various hypothetical scenarios to be explored. Here we examine the effects of 1) removing the ability of hemoglobin to form carbamino compounds; 2) allowing a degree of Cl(-) binding to deoxygenated hemoglobin; and 3) removing the chloride (Hamburger) shift. The insights gained could not have been obtained from empirical models.

  13. Early Mechanistic Events in Biotin Dissociation from Streptavidin

    SciTech Connect

    Hyre, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    The streptavidin-biotin system has provided a unique opportunity to investigate the molecular details of ligand dissociation pathways. An underlying mechanistic question is whether ligand dissociation proceeds with a relatively ordered process of bond breaking and ligand escape. Here we report a joint computational and crystallographic study of the earliest events in biotin dissociation. In molecular dynamics potential of mean force simulations, a water molecule from a defined access channel intercalated into the hydrogen bond between Asp 128 and biotin, bridging them and stabilizing an intermediate state. In forced biotin dissociation simulations, this event led to subsequent bond breaking steps and ligand escape. In equilibrium simulations, the water molecule was sometimes observed to move back to the access channel with re-formation of the biotin hydrogen bond. Analysis of streptavidin crystal structures revealed a close overlap of crystallographically defined and simulated waters in the water access channel. These results suggest that biotin dissociation is initiated by stochastic coupling of water entry with lengthening of a specific biotin hydrogen-bonding interaction.

  14. Mechanistic explanation, cognitive systems demarcation, and extended cognition.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Dingmar; Looren de Jong, Huib

    2016-10-01

    Approaches to the Internalism-Externalism controversy in the philosophy of mind often involve both (broadly) metaphysical and explanatory considerations. Whereas originally most emphasis seems to have been placed on metaphysical concerns, recently the explanation angle is getting more attention. Explanatory considerations promise to offer more neutral grounds for cognitive systems demarcation than (broadly) metaphysical ones. However, it has been argued that explanation-based approaches are incapable of determining the plausibility of internalist-based conceptions of cognition vis-à-vis externalist ones. On this perspective, improved metaphysics is the route along which to solve the Internalist-Externalist stalemate. In this paper we challenge this claim. Although we agree that explanation-orientated approaches have indeed so far failed to deliver solid means for cognitive system demarcation, we elaborate a more promising explanation-oriented framework to address this issue. We argue that the mutual manipulability account of constitutive relevance in mechanisms, extended with the criterion of 'fat-handedness', is capable of plausibly addressing the cognitive systems demarcation problem, and thus able to decide on the explanatory traction of Internalist vs. Externalist conceptions, on a case-by-case basis. Our analysis also highlights why some other recent mechanistic takes on the problem of cognitive systems demarcation have been unsuccessful. We illustrate our claims with a case on gestures and learning.

  15. Anti-fibro-hepatocarcinogenic Chinese herbal medicines: A mechanistic overview

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Alex; Yang, Yan; Asenso, James; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is an integral component of complementary/alternative medicine and it is increasingly becoming the preferred therapeutic modality for the treatment of liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. Accordingly, the World Health Organization (WHO) has attested to the popularity and efficacy of indigenous herbal therapies including CHM as a first line of treatment for some diseases including liver disorders. However, the WHO and drug discovery experts have always recommended that use of indigenous herbal remedies must go hand-in-hand with the requisite mechanistic elucidation so as to constitute a system of verification of efficacy within the ethnobotanical context of use. Although many CHM experts have advanced knowledge on CHM, nonetheless, more enlightenment is needed, particularly mechanisms of action of CHMs on fibro-hepato-carcinogenesis. We, herein, provide in-depth mechanisms of the action of CHMs which have demonstrated anti-fibro-hepatocarcinogenic effects, in pre-clinical and clinical studies as published in PubMed and other major scientific databases. Specifically, the review brings out the important signaling pathways, and their downstream targets which are modulated at multi-level by various anti-fibro-hepatocarcinogenic CHMs. PMID:27366355

  16. Rapid Discrimination Among Putative Mechanistic Models of Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lomnitz, Jason G.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    An overarching goal in molecular biology is to gain an understanding of the mechanistic basis underlying biochemical systems. Success is critical if we are to predict effectively the outcome of drug treatments and the development of abnormal phenotypes. However, data from most experimental studies is typically noisy and sparse. This allows multiple potential mechanisms to account for experimental observations, and often devising experiments to test each is not feasible. Here, we introduce a novel strategy that discriminates among putative models based on their repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes, without relying on knowledge of specific values for rate constants and binding constants. As an illustration, we apply this strategy to two synthetic gene circuits exhibiting anomalous behaviors. Our results show that the conventional models, based on their well-characterized components, cannot account for the experimental observations. We examine a total of 40 alternative hypotheses and show that only 5 have the potential to reproduce the experimental data, and one can do so with biologically relevant parameter values. PMID:27578053

  17. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Vineet; Eddy, James A.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based (CB) models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell. PMID:23112774

  18. Neutron structure and mechanistic studies of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Julian C.-H.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Schoenborn, Benno P.; Langan, Paul; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2010-11-01

    The structure and mechanism of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) have been studied using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography. The neutron structure of DFPase, mechanistic studies and subsequent rational design efforts are described. Diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) is a calcium-dependent phosphotriesterase that acts on a variety of highly toxic organophosphorus compounds that act as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. The mechanism of DFPase has been probed using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, which demonstrated the presence of a phosphoenzyme intermediate in the reaction mechanism. In order to further elucidate the mechanism of DFPase and to ascertain the protonation states of the residues and solvent molecules in the active site, the neutron structure of DFPase was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. The proposed nucleophile Asp229 is deprotonated, while the active-site solvent molecule W33 was identified as water and not hydroxide. These data support a mechanism involving direct nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on the substrate and rule out a mechanism involving metal-assisted water activation. These data also allowed for the re-engineering of DFPase through rational design to bind and productively orient the more toxic S{sub P} stereoisomers of the nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin, creating a modified enzyme with enhanced overall activity and significantly increased detoxification properties.

  19. A mechanistic model for permeability evolution in fractured sorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shugang; Elsworth, Derek; Liu, Jishan

    2012-06-01

    A mechanistic model is presented to represent the evolution of permeability in fractured sorbing media such as coal beds and organic-rich shales. This model accommodates key competing processes of poromechanical dilation and sorption-induced swelling. We show that the significant difference in stiffness between fracture and matrix transforms the composite system from globally unconstrained to locally constrained by the development of a virtual "stiff shell" that envelops the perimeter of a representative elementary volume containing a fracture. It is this transformation that results in swelling-induced permeability reduction at low (sorbing) gas pressures and self consistently allows competitive dilation of the fracture as gas pressures are increased. Importantly, net dilation is shown to require a mismatch in the Biot coefficients of fracture and matrix with the coefficient for the fracture exceeding that for the matrix—a condition that is logically met. Permeability evolution is cast in terms of series and parallel models with the series model better replicating observational data. The model may be cast in terms of nondimensional parameters representing sorptive and poromechanical effects and modulated by the sensitivity of the fracture network to dilation or compaction of the individual fractures. This latter parameter encapsulates the effects of fracture spacing and initial permeability and scale changes in permeability driven by either sorption or poromechanical effects. This model is applied to well-controlled observational data for different ranks of coals and different gases (He, CO2) and satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  20. Environmental perception and epigenetic memory: mechanistic insight through FLC

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott; Dean, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin plays a central role in orchestrating gene regulation at the transcriptional level. However, our understanding of how chromatin states are altered in response to environmental and developmental cues, and then maintained epigenetically over many cell divisions, remains poor. The floral repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in Arabidopsis thaliana is a useful system to address these questions. FLC is transcriptionally repressed during exposure to cold temperatures, allowing studies of how environmental conditions alter expression states at the chromatin level. FLC repression is also epigenetically maintained during subsequent development in warm conditions, so that exposure to cold may be remembered. This memory depends on molecular complexes that are highly conserved among eukaryotes, making FLC not only interesting as a paradigm for understanding biological decision-making in plants, but also an important system for elucidating chromatin-based gene regulation more generally. In this review, we summarize our understanding of how cold temperature induces a switch in the FLC chromatin state, and how this state is epigenetically remembered. We also discuss how the epigenetic state of FLC is reprogrammed in the seed to ensure a requirement for cold exposure in the next generation. Significance Statement FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) regulation provides a paradigm for understanding how chromatin can be modulated to determine gene expression in a developmental context. This review describes our current mechanistic understanding of how FLC expression is genetically specified and epigenetically regulated throughout the plant life cycle, and how this determines plant life-history strategy. PMID:25929799

  1. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Genistein: Mechanistic Studies on its ADME

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Kulkarni, Kaustubh; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, one of the most active natural flavonoids, exerts various biological effects including chemoprevention, antioxidation, antiproliferation and anticancer. More than 30 clinical trials of genistein with various disease indications have been conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy. Based on many animals and human pharmacokinetic studies, it is well known that the most challenge issue for developing genistein as a chemoprevention agent is the low oral bioavailability, which may be the major reason relating to its ambiguous therapeutic effects and large interindividual variations in clinical trials. In order to better correlate pharmacokinetic to pharmacodynamics results in animals and clinical studies, an in-depth understanding of pharmacokinetic behavior of genistein and its ADME properties are needed. Numerous in vitro/in vivo ADME studies had been conducted to reveal the main factors contributing to the low oral bioavailability of genistein. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the most recent progress on mechanistic studies of genistein ADME and provides a systemic view of these processes to explain genistein pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. The better understanding of genistein ADME property may lead to development of proper strategy to improve genistein oral bioavailability via mechanism-based approaches. PMID:22583407

  2. Mechanistic investigation of beta-galactosidase-activated MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk-Pearson, Lauren M; Femia, Frank J; Smith, Jeffrey; Parigi, Giacomo; Duimstra, Joseph A; Eckermann, Amanda L; Luchinat, Claudio; Meade, Thomas J

    2008-01-07

    We report a mechanistic investigation of an isomeric series of beta-galactosidase-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents. Our strategy focuses on the synthesis of macrocyclic caged-complexes that coordinatively saturate a chelated lanthanide. Enzyme cleavage of the complex results in an open coordination site available for water that creates a detectable MR contrast agent. The complexes consist of a DO3A Gd(III) chelator modified with a galactopyranose at the N-10 position of the macrocycle. We observed significant differences in relaxometric properties and coordination geometry that can be correlated to subtle variations of the linker between the macrocycle and the galactopyranose. After synthesis and purification of the R, S, and racemic mixtures of complexes 1 and 3 and measurement of the hydration number, water residence lifetime, and longitudinal relaxation rates, we propose mechanisms for water exclusion from the lanthanide in the precleavage state. While the stereochemistry of the linker does not influence the agents' properties, the mechanism of water exclusion for each isomer is significantly influenced by the position of modification. Data for one series with a methyl group substituted on the sugar-macrocycle linker at the alpha-position suggests a steric mechanism where the galactopyranose sugar blocks water from the Gd(III) center. In contrast, our observations for a second series with methyl substitution at the beta position of the sugar-macrocycle linker are consistent with a mechanism in which a bidentate anion occupies two available coordination sites of Gd(III) in the precleavage state.

  3. Air pollution, inflammation and preterm birth: a potential mechanistic link.

    PubMed

    Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Buxton, Miatta A; Sánchez, Brisa N; Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Viveros-Alcaráz, Martin; Castillo-Castrejón, Marisol; Beltrán-Montoya, Jorge; Brown, Daniel G; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    Preterm birth is a public health issue of global significance, which may result in mortality during the perinatal period or may lead to major health and financial consequences due to lifelong impacts. Even though several risk factors for preterm birth have been identified, prevention efforts have failed to halt the increasing rates of preterm birth. Epidemiological studies have identified air pollution as an emerging potential risk factor for preterm birth. However, many studies were limited by study design and inadequate exposure assessment. Due to the ubiquitous nature of ambient air pollution and the potential public health significance of any role in causing preterm birth, a novel focus investigating possible causal mechanisms influenced by air pollution is therefore a global health priority. We hypothesize that air pollution may act together with other biological factors to induce systemic inflammation and influence the duration of pregnancy. Evaluation and testing of this hypothesis is currently being conducted in a prospective cohort study in Mexico City and will provide an understanding of the pathways that mediate the effects of air pollution on preterm birth. The important public health implication is that crucial steps in this mechanistic pathway can potentially be acted on early in pregnancy to reduce the risk of preterm birth.

  4. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. A.; Xu, C.; Rogers, A.; Fisher, R. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.; Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.; Muss, J. D.; Fisher, J. B.; Reich, P. B.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc, max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25 °C) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55 % of the variation in observed Vc, max25 and 65 % of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc, max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc, max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.

  5. Diffusion theory in biology: a relic of mechanistic materialism.

    PubMed

    Agutter, P S; Malone, P C; Wheatley, D N

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion theory explains in physical terms how materials move through a medium, e.g. water or a biological fluid. There are strong and widely acknowledged grounds for doubting the applicability of this theory in biology, although it continues to be accepted almost uncritically and taught as a basis of both biology and medicine. Our principal aim is to explore how this situation arose and has been allowed to continue seemingly unchallenged for more than 150 years. The main shortcomings of diffusion theory will be briefly reviewed to show that the entrenchment of this theory in the corpus of biological knowledge needs to be explained, especially as there are equally valid historical grounds for presuming that bulk fluid movement powered by the energy of cell metabolism plays a prominent note in the transport of molecules in the living body. First, the theory's evolution, notably from its origins in connection with the mechanistic materialist philosophy of mid nineteenth century physiology, is discussed. Following this, the entrenchment of the theory in twentieth century biology is analyzed in relation to three situations: the mechanism of oxygen transport between air and mammalian tissues; the structure and function of cell membranes; and the nature of the intermediary metalbolism, with its implicit presumptions about the intracellular organization and the movement of molecules within it. In our final section, we consider several historically based alternatives to diffusion theory, all of which have their precursors in nineteenth and twentieth century philosophy of science.

  6. Warming will affect phytoplankton differently: evidence through a mechanistic approach

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, I. Emma; Rouco, Mónica; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Although the consequences of global warming in aquatic ecosystems are only beginning to be revealed, a key to forecasting the impact on aquatic communities is an understanding of individual species' vulnerability to increased temperature. Despite their microscopic size, phytoplankton support about half of the global primary production, drive essential biogeochemical cycles and represent the basis of the aquatic food web. At present, it is known that phytoplankton are important targets and, consequently, harbingers of climate change in aquatic systems. Therefore, investigating the capacity of phytoplankton to adapt to the predicted warming has become a relevant issue. However, considering the polyphyletic complexity of the phytoplankton community, different responses to increased temperature are expected. We experimentally tested the effects of warming on 12 species of phytoplankton isolated from a variety of environments by using a mechanistic approach able to assess evolutionary adaptation (the so-called ratchet technique). We found different degrees of tolerance to temperature rises and an interspecific capacity for genetic adaptation. The thermal resistance level reached by each species is discussed in relation to their respective original habitats. Our study additionally provides evidence on the most resistant phytoplankton groups in a future warming scenario. PMID:21508031

  7. A Mechanistic Link between Olfaction and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rozenkrantz, Liron; Zachor, Ditza; Heller, Iris; Plotkin, Anton; Weissbrod, Aharon; Snitz, Kobi; Secundo, Lavi; Sobel, Noam

    2015-07-20

    Internal action models (IAMs) are brain templates for sensory-motor coordination underlying diverse behaviors. An emerging theory suggests that impaired IAMs are a common theme in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, whether impaired IAMs occur across sensory systems and how they relate to the major phenotype of ASD, namely impaired social communication, remains unclear. Olfaction relies on an IAM known as the sniff response, where sniff magnitude is automatically modulated to account for odor valence. To test the failed IAM theory in olfaction, we precisely measured the non-verbal non-task-dependent sniff response concurrent with pleasant and unpleasant odors in 36 children--18 with ASD and 18 matched typically developing (TD) controls. We found that whereas TD children generated a typical adult-like sniff response within 305 ms of odor onset, ASD children had a profoundly altered sniff response, sniffing equally regardless of odor valance. This difference persisted despite equal reported odor perception and allowed for 81% correct ASD classification based on the sniff response alone (binomial, p < 0.001). Moreover, increasingly aberrant sniffing was associated with increasingly severe ASD (r = -0.75, p < 0.001), specifically with social (r = -0.72, p < 0.001), but not motor (r < -0.38, p > 0.18), impairment. These results uncover a novel ASD marker implying a mechanistic link between the underpinnings of olfaction and ASD and directly linking an impaired IAM with impaired social abilities.

  8. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes.

  9. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orey, Michael; Moore, David M.; Reeves, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Contains the following two leadership profiles of individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of instructional technology: "Francis M. Dwyer: Visual Researcher Extraordinaire" (David M. Moore); and "Tribute to John G. Hedberg: Professor of Education, University of Wollongong" (Thomas Reeves). (MES)

  10. Ranking Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the "U.S. News" ranking profiles of four colleges, namely: (1) Smith College; (2) Washington University in St. Louis; (3) Colorado State University at Fort Collins; and (4) Whitman College. Smith College was in the top 10 of the nation's liberal-arts colleges, or just outside it, almost since the "U.S.…

  11. Identification of key characteristics of male reproductive toxicants as an approach for screening and sorting mechanistic evidence.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of systematic review practices in human health assessment includes integration of multi-disciplinary evidence from epidemiological, experimental, and mechanistic studies. Although mode of action analysis relies on the evaluation of mechanistic and toxicological ou...

  12. Mechanistic analysis of cavitation assisted transesterification on biodiesel characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Abdul Aziz, A R; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sonoluminescence transesterification on biodiesel physicochemical properties was investigated and the results were compared to those of traditional mechanical stirring. This study was conducted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasonication by coupling statistical analysis of the experiments into the simulation of cavitation bubble. Different combinations of operational variables were employed for alkali-catalysis transesterification of palm oil. The experimental results showed that transesterification with ultrasound irradiation could change the biodiesel density by about 0.3kg/m(3); the viscosity by 0.12mm(2)/s; the pour point by about 1-2°C and the flash point by 5°C compared to the traditional method. Furthermore, 93.84% of yield with alcohol to oil molar ratio of 6:1 could be achieved through ultrasound assisted transesterification within only 20min. However, only 89.09% of reaction yield was obtained by traditional macro mixing/heating under the same condition. Based on the simulated oscillation velocity value, the cavitation phenomenon significantly contributed to generation of fine micro emulsion and was able to overcome mass transfer restriction. It was found that the sonoluminescence bubbles reached the temperature of 758-713K, pressure of 235.5-159.55bar, oscillation velocity of 3.5-6.5cm/s, and equilibrium radius of 17.9-13.7 times greater than its initial size under the ambient temperature of 50-64°C at the moment of collapse. This showed that the sonoluminescence bubbles were in the condition in which the decomposition phenomena were activated and the reaction rate was accelerated together with a change in the biodiesel properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The attention schema theory: a mechanistic account of subjective awareness.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Michael S A; Webb, Taylor W

    2015-01-01

    We recently proposed the attention schema theory, a novel way to explain the brain basis of subjective awareness in a mechanistic and scientifically testable manner. The theory begins with attention, the process by which signals compete for the brain's limited computing resources. This internal signal competition is partly under a bottom-up influence and partly under top-down control. We propose that the top-down control of attention is improved when the brain has access to a simplified model of attention itself. The brain therefore constructs a schematic model of the process of attention, the 'attention schema,' in much the same way that it constructs a schematic model of the body, the 'body schema.' The content of this internal model leads a brain to conclude that it has a subjective experience. One advantage of this theory is that it explains how awareness and attention can sometimes become dissociated; the brain's internal models are never perfect, and sometimes a model becomes dissociated from the object being modeled. A second advantage of this theory is that it explains how we can be aware of both internal and external events. The brain can apply attention to many types of information including external sensory information and internal information about emotions and cognitive states. If awareness is a model of attention, then this model should pertain to the same domains of information to which attention pertains. A third advantage of this theory is that it provides testable predictions. If awareness is the internal model of attention, used to help control attention, then without awareness, attention should still be possible but should suffer deficits in control. In this article, we review the existing literature on the relationship between attention and awareness, and suggest that at least some of the predictions of the theory are borne out by the evidence.

  14. Mechanistic Understanding of Microbial Plugging for Improved Sweep Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Larry Britton

    2008-09-30

    Microbial plugging has been proposed as an effective low cost method of permeability reduction. Yet there is a dearth of information on the fundamental processes of microbial growth in porous media, and there are no suitable data to model the process of microbial plugging as it relates to sweep efficiency. To optimize the field implementation, better mechanistic and volumetric understanding of biofilm growth within a porous medium is needed. In particular, the engineering design hinges upon a quantitative relationship between amount of nutrient consumption, amount of growth, and degree of permeability reduction. In this project experiments were conducted to obtain new data to elucidate this relationship. Experiments in heterogeneous (layered) beadpacks showed that microbes could grow preferentially in the high permeability layer. Ultimately this caused flow to be equally divided between high and low permeability layers, precisely the behavior needed for MEOR. Remarkably, classical models of microbial nutrient uptake in batch experiments do not explain the nutrient consumption by the same microbes in flow experiments. We propose a simple extension of classical kinetics to account for the self-limiting consumption of nutrient observed in our experiments, and we outline a modeling approach based on architecture and behavior of biofilms. Such a model would account for the changing trend of nutrient consumption by bacteria with the increasing biomass and the onset of biofilm formation. However no existing model can explain the microbial preference for growth in high permeability regions, nor is there any obvious extension of the model for this observation. An attractive conjecture is that quorum sensing is involved in the heterogeneous bead packs.

  15. Mechanistic Study of Plasma Damage of Low k Dielectric Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Junjing; Shi Hualiang; Huang Huai; Ho, P. S.; Liu Junjun; Goodner, M. D.; Moinpour, M.; Kloster, G. M.

    2007-10-31

    Plasma damage to low k dielectric materials was investigated from a mechanistic point of view. Low k dielectric films were treated by plasma Ar, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in a standard RIE chamber and the damage was characterized by Angle Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS), X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Contact Angle measurements. Both carbon depletion and surface densification were observed on the top surface of damaged low k materials while the bulk remained largely unaffected. Plasma damage was found to be a complicated phenomenon involving both chemical and physical effects, depending on chemical reactivity and the energy and mass of the plasma species. A downstream hybrid plasma source with separate ions and atomic radicals was employed to study their respective roles in the plasma damage process. Ions were found to play a more important role in the plasma damage process. The dielectric constant of low k materials can increase up to 20% due to plasma damage and we attributed this to the removal of the methyl group making the low k surface hydrophilic. Annealing was generally effective in mitigating moisture uptake to restore the k value but the recovery was less complete for higher energy plasmas. Quantum chemistry calculation confirmed that physisorbed water in low k materials induces the largest increase of dipole moments in comparison with changes of surface bonding configurations, and is primarily responsible for the dielectric constant increase.

  16. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Wullschleger, Stan D; Wilson, Cathy; Cai, Michael; McDowell, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions

  17. Human endotoxemia: a model for mechanistic insight and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Stephen F

    2005-12-01

    The diversity of phenotypic manifestations, comorbidities, and therapeutic algorithms in patients with severe inflammation have confounded efforts to translate mechanistic insights from the bench top to the bedside. This dilemma has negatively impacted upon many therapeutic interventions that exhibited seemingly well-reasoned preclinical portfolios. Prudence urges the assessment of potent immunoregulatory therapies, wherever possible, in models that replicate the clinical phenotype absent overt manifestations of genetically or environmentally modified processes. The healthy human model of endotoxin administration (systemic or endobronchial) provides such an opportunity and has been used to great advantage for gaining insight into mechanisms of disease and for determination of therapeutic signal strength. When thoughtfully interpreted, the model may provide proof of principle as well as lessen the unpredictability of clinical responses. Although the broad characteristics of this model are well described in the literature, it is recognized that this model does not fully replicate the magnitude of initial inflammatory stress nor the latent spectrum of inflammation/sepsis-inducible organ system pathologies. Nevertheless, the similarities between the early, transient clinical phenotype, inducible physiochemical change, and biochemical pathway activation of this model to the early hyperdynamic phase of resuscitated injury and infection are striking. Rational testing of a therapeutic mechanism requires a quantifiable and reproducibly altered marker of the hypothetical mechanism. Given the modest nature of endotoxin induced insult, interventions that demonstrate target specific efficacy in conjunction with attenuated phenotype responses are more likely to exhibit efficacy within lower risk patient populations. By contrast, the model cannot predict clinical efficacy among higher risk patients nor in those who have endured extended periods of inflammatory stress.

  18. Acyclovir-Polyethylene Glycol 6000 Binary Dispersions: Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Venkateskumar, Krishnamoorthy; Parasuraman, Subramani; Gunasunderi, Raju; Sureshkumar, Krishnan; Nayak, M Muralidhar; Shah, Syed Adnan Ali; Khoo, Khassen; Kai, Heng Wei

    2016-12-21

    The dissolution and subsequent oral bioavailability of acyclovir (ACY) is limited by its poor aqueous solubility. An attempt has been made in this work to provide mechanistic insights into the solubility enhancement and dissolution of ACY by using the water-soluble carrier polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000). Solid dispersions with varying ratios of the drug (ACY) and carrier (PEG6000) were prepared and evaluated by phase solubility, in vitro release studies, kinetic analysis, in situ perfusion, and in vitro permeation studies. Solid state characterization was done by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, and surface morphology was assessed by polarizing microscopic image analysis, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Thermodynamic parameters indicated the solubilization effect of the carrier. The aqueous solubility and dissolution of ACY was found to be higher in all samples. The findings of XRD, DSC, FTIR and NMR analysis confirmed the formation of solid solution, crystallinity reduction, and the absence of interaction between the drug and carrier. SEM and AFM analysis reports ratified the particle size reduction and change in the surface morphology in samples. The permeation coefficient and amount of ACY diffused were higher in samples in comparison to pure ACY. Stability was found to be higher in dispersions. The results suggest that the study findings provided clear mechanical insights into the solubility and dissolution enhancement of ACY in PEG6000, and such findings could lay the platform for resolving the poor aqueous solubility issues in formulation development.

  19. Vitamins C and E: Beneficial effects from a mechanistic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Traber, Maret G.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic properties of two dietary antioxidants that are required by humans, vitamins C and E, are discussed relative to their biological effects. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is an essential cofactor for α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. Examples are prolyl hydroxylases, which play a role in the biosynthesis of collagen and in down-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, a transcription factor that regulates many genes responsible for tumor growth, energy metabolism, and neutrophil function and apoptosis. Vitamin C-dependent inhibition of the HIF pathway may provide alternative or additional approaches for controlling tumor progression, infections and inflammation. Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) functions as an essential lipid soluble antioxidant, scavenging hydroperoxyl radicals in lipid milieu. Human symptoms of vitamin E deficiency suggest that its antioxidant properties play a major role in protecting erythrocyte membranes and nervous tissues. As an antioxidant, vitamin C provides protection against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage by scavenging of reactive oxygen species, vitamin E-dependent neutralization of lipid hydroperoxyl radicals, and by protecting proteins from alkylation by electrophilic lipid peroxidation products. These bioactivities bear relevance to inflammatory disorders. Vitamin C plays also a role in the function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by recycling the eNOS cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin, which is relevant to arterial elasticity and blood pressure regulation. Evidence from plants supports a role for vitamin C in the formation of covalent adducts with electrophilic secondary metabolites. Mechanism-based effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on biomarkers and on clinical outcomes from randomized, placebo-controlled trials are emphasized in this review. PMID:21664268

  20. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko K; Omaye, Stanley T

    2012-06-19

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual's behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

  1. The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Kevin J; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Hopkins, John

    2013-11-01

    The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights.

  2. Mechanistic studies of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Case, April; Stein, Ross L

    2006-02-21

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) cleave Ub-X bonds (Ub is ubiquitin and X an alcohol, an amine, or a protein) through a thioester intermediate that is produced by nucleophilic attack of the Cys residue of a Cys-SH/His-Im catalytic diad. We are studying the mechanism of UCH-L1, a UCH that is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and now wish to report our initial findings. (i) Pre-steady-state kinetic studies for UCH-L1-catalyzed hydrolysis of Ub-AMC (AMC, 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin) indicate that k(cat) is rate-limited by acyl-enzyme formation. Thus, K(m) = K(s), the dissociation constant for the Michaelis complex, and k(cat) = k(2), the rate constant for acyl-enzyme formation. (ii) For K(assoc) (=K(s)(-)(1)), DeltaC(p) = -0.8 kcal mol(-)(1) deg(-)(1) and is consistent with coupling between substrate association and a conformational change of the enzyme. For k(2), DeltaS(++) = 0 and suggests that in the E-S, substrate and active site residues are precisely aligned for reaction. (iii) Solvent isotope effects are (D)K(assoc) = 0.5 and (D)k(2) = 0.9, suggesting that the substrate binds to a form of free enzyme in which the active site Cys exists as the thiol. In the resultant Michaelis complex, the diad has tautomerized to ion pair Cys-S(-)/His-ImH(+). Subsequent attack of thiolate produces the acyl-enzyme species. In contrast, isotope effects for association of UCH-L1 with transition-state analogue ubiquitin aldehyde suggest that an alternative mechanistic pathway can sometimes be available to UCH-L1 involving general base-catalyzed attack of Cys-SH by His-Im.

  3. Conceptualising population health: from mechanistic thinking to complexity science.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Saroj

    2011-01-20

    The mechanistic interpretation of reality can be traced to the influential work by René Descartes and Sir Isaac Newton. Their theories were able to accurately predict most physical phenomena relating to motion, optics and gravity. This paradigm had at least three principles and approaches: reductionism, linearity and hierarchy. These ideas appear to have influenced social scientists and the discourse on population health. In contrast, Complexity Science takes a more holistic view of systems. It views natural systems as being 'open', with fuzzy borders, constantly adapting to cope with pressures from the environment. These are called Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). The sub-systems within it lack stable hierarchies, and the roles of agency keep changing. The interactions with the environment and among sub-systems are non-linear interactions and lead to self-organisation and emergent properties. Theoretical frameworks such as epi+demos+cracy and the ecosocial approach to health have implicitly used some of these concepts of interacting dynamic sub-systems. Using Complexity Science we can view population health outcomes as an emergent property of CAS, which has numerous dynamic non-linear interactions among its interconnected sub-systems or agents. In order to appreciate these sub-systems and determinants, one should acquire a basic knowledge of diverse disciplines and interact with experts from different disciplines. Strategies to improve health should be multi-pronged, and take into account the diversity of actors, determinants and contexts. The dynamic nature of the system requires that the interventions are constantly monitored to provide early feedback to a flexible system that takes quick corrections.

  4. Mechanistic kinetic models of enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis-A review.

    PubMed

    Jeoh, Tina; Cardona, Maria J; Karuna, Nardrapee; Mudinoor, Akshata R; Nill, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Bioconversion of lignocellulose forms the basis for renewable, advanced biofuels, and bioproducts. Mechanisms of hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases have been actively studied for nearly 70 years with significant gains in understanding of the cellulolytic enzymes. Yet, a full mechanistic understanding of the hydrolysis reaction has been elusive. We present a review to highlight new insights gained since the most recent comprehensive review of cellulose hydrolysis kinetic models by Bansal et al. (2009) Biotechnol Adv 27:833-848. Recent models have taken a two-pronged approach to tackle the challenge of modeling the complex heterogeneous reaction-an enzyme-centric modeling approach centered on the molecularity of the cellulase-cellulose interactions to examine rate limiting elementary steps and a substrate-centric modeling approach aimed at capturing the limiting property of the insoluble cellulose substrate. Collectively, modeling results suggest that at the molecular-scale, how rapidly cellulases can bind productively (complexation) and release from cellulose (decomplexation) is limiting, while the overall hydrolysis rate is largely insensitive to the catalytic rate constant. The surface area of the insoluble substrate and the degrees of polymerization of the cellulose molecules in the reaction both limit initial hydrolysis rates only. Neither enzyme-centric models nor substrate-centric models can consistently capture hydrolysis time course at extended reaction times. Thus, questions of the true reaction limiting factors at extended reaction times and the role of complexation and decomplexation in rate limitation remain unresolved. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1369-1385. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual’s behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases. PMID:22713169

  6. Mechanistic Aspects of Hydration of Guanine Radical Cations in DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations, G•+ in double- and single-stranded oligonucleotides were investigated by direct time-resolved spectroscopic monitoring methods. The G•+ radical one-electron oxidation products were generated by SO4•– radical anions derived from the photolysis of S2O82– anions by 308 nm laser pulses. In neutral aqueous solutions (pH 7.0), after the complete decay of SO4•– radicals (∼5 μs after the actinic laser flash) the transient absorbance of neutral guanine radicals, G(-H)• with maximum at 312 nm, is dominant. The kinetics of decay of G(-H)• radicals depend strongly on the DNA secondary structure. In double-stranded DNA, the G(-H)• decay is biphasic with one component decaying with a lifetime of ∼2.2 ms and the other with a lifetime of ∼0.18 s. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA the G(-H)• radicals decay monophasically with a ∼ 0.28 s lifetime. The ms decay component in double-stranded DNA is correlated with the enhancement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) yields which are ∼7 greater than in single-stranded DNA. In double-stranded DNA, it is proposed that the G(-H)• radicals retain radical cation character by sharing the N1-proton with the N3-site of C in the [G•+:C] base pair. This [G(-H)•:H+C ⇆ G•+:C] equilibrium allows for the hydration of G•+ followed by formation of 8-oxoG. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA, deprotonation of G•+ and the irreversible escape of the proton into the aqueous phase competes more effectively with the hydration mechanism, thus diminishing the yield of 8-oxoG, as observed experimentally. PMID:24689701

  7. Mechanistic Investigation of Toxaphene Induced Mouse Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zemin; Neal, Barbara H; Lamb, James C; Klaunig, James E

    2015-10-01

    Chronic exposure to toxaphene resulted in an increase in liver tumors in B6C3F1 mice. This study was performed to investigate the mode of action of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors. Following an initial 14 day dietary dose range-finding study in male mice, a mechanistic study (0, 3, 32, and 320 ppm toxaphene in diet for 7, 14, and 28 days of treatment) was performed to examine the potential mechanisms of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors. Toxaphene induced a significant increase in expression of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) target genes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11) at 32 and 320 ppm toxaphene. aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) target genes (Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2) were slightly increased in expression at the highest toxaphene dose (320 ppm). No increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activity or related genes was seen following toxaphene treatment. Lipid peroxidation was seen following treatment with 320 ppm toxaphene. These changes correlated with increases in hepatic DNA synthesis. To confirm the role of CAR in this mode of action, CAR knockout mice (CAR(-/-)) treated with toxaphene confirmed that the induction of CAR responsive genes seen in wild-type mice was abolished following treatment with toxaphene for 14 days. These findings, taken together with previously reported studies, support the mode of action of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors is through a nongenotoxic mechanism involving primarily a CAR-mediated processes that results in an increase in cell proliferation in the liver, promotes the clonal expansion of preneoplastic lesions leading to adenoma formation.

  8. Toward a Mechanistic Modeling of Nitrogen Limitation on Vegetation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chonggang; Fisher, Rosie; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Cai, Michael; McDowell, Nate G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO2 concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO2 concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of Vc,max (maximum carboxylation rate) and Jmax (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO2 concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks

  9. Two Mechanistic Pathways for Thienopyridine-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Kim, Benjamin; Zakarija, Anaadriana; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Pandey, Dilip K.; Buffie, Charlie G.; McKoy, June M.; Tevar, Amul D.; Cursio, John F.; Yarnold, Paul R.; Kwaan, Hau C.; De Masi, Davide; Sarode, Ravindra; Raife, Thomas J.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Davidson, Charles; Sadler, J. Evan; Ortel, Thomas L.; Zheng, X. Long; Kato, Seiji; Matsumoto, Masanori; Uemura, Masahito; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe clinical and laboratory findings for a large cohort of patients with thienopyridine-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Background The thienopyridine derivatives, ticlopidine and clopidogrel, are the 2 most common drugs associated with TTP in databases maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods Clinical reports of TTP associated with clopidogrel and ticlopidine were identified from medical records, published case reports, and FDA case reports (n = 128). Duration of thienopyridine exposure, clinical and laboratory findings, and survival were recorded. ADAMTS13 activity (n = 39) and inhibitor (n = 30) were measured for a subset of individuals. Results Compared with clopidogrel-associated TTP cases (n = 35), ticlopidine-associated TTP cases (n = 93) were more likely to have received more than 2 weeks of drug (90% vs. 26%), to be severely thrombocytopenic (84% vs. 60%), and to have normal renal function (72% vs. 45%) (p < 0.01 for each). Compared with TTP patients with ADAMTS13 activity >15% (n = 13), TTP patients with severely deficient ADAMTS13 activity (n = 26) were more likely to have received ticlopidine (92.3% vs. 46.2%, p < 0.003). Among patients who developed TTP >2 weeks after thienopyridine, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) increased likelihood of survival (84% vs. 38%, p < 0.05). Among patients who developed TTP within 2 weeks of starting thienopyridines, survival was 77% with TPE and 78% without. Conclusions Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare complication of thienopyridine treatment. This drug toxicity appears to occur by 2 different mechanistic pathways, characterized primarily by time of onset before versus after 2 weeks of thienopyridine administration. If TTP occurs after 2 weeks of ticlopidine or clopidogrel therapy, therapeutic plasma exchange must be promptly instituted to enhance likelihood of survival. PMID:17868804

  10. Labor inhibits placental mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Aye, I L M H; Gaccioli, F; Ramirez, V I; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-12-01

    Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n = 15 no-labor; n = 12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFĸB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFĸB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  12. The attention schema theory: a mechanistic account of subjective awareness

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Michael S. A.; Webb, Taylor W.

    2015-01-01

    We recently proposed the attention schema theory, a novel way to explain the brain basis of subjective awareness in a mechanistic and scientifically testable manner. The theory begins with attention, the process by which signals compete for the brain’s limited computing resources. This internal signal competition is partly under a bottom–up influence and partly under top–down control. We propose that the top–down control of attention is improved when the brain has access to a simplified model of attention itself. The brain therefore constructs a schematic model of the process of attention, the ‘attention schema,’ in much the same way that it constructs a schematic model of the body, the ‘body schema.’ The content of this internal model leads a brain to conclude that it has a subjective experience. One advantage of this theory is that it explains how awareness and attention can sometimes become dissociated; the brain’s internal models are never perfect, and sometimes a model becomes dissociated from the object being modeled. A second advantage of this theory is that it explains how we can be aware of both internal and external events. The brain can apply attention to many types of information including external sensory information and internal information about emotions and cognitive states. If awareness is a model of attention, then this model should pertain to the same domains of information to which attention pertains. A third advantage of this theory is that it provides testable predictions. If awareness is the internal model of attention, used to help control attention, then without awareness, attention should still be possible but should suffer deficits in control. In this article, we review the existing literature on the relationship between attention and awareness, and suggest that at least some of the predictions of the theory are borne out by the evidence. PMID:25954242

  13. Tightly Coupled Mechanistic Study of Materials in the Extreme Space Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-11

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0338 Tightly Coupled Mechanistic Study of Materials in the Extreme Space Environment Adrianus Van Duin PENNSYLVANIA STATE...To)      01 Jul 2011 to 30 Jun 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tightly Coupled Mechanistic Study of Materials in the Extreme Space Environment 5a...Public Release 13.  SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14.  ABSTRACT The Tightly Coupled Mechanistic Study of Materials in the Extreme Space Environment Group has worked

  14. Rational approaches, design strategies, structure activity relationship and mechanistic insights for anticancer hybrids.

    PubMed

    Nepali, Kunal; Sharma, Sahil; Sharma, Manmohan; Bedi, P M S; Dhar, K L

    2014-04-22

    A Hybrid drug which comprises the incorporation of two drug pharmacophores in one single molecule are basically designed to interact with multiple targets or to amplify its effect through action on another bio target as one single molecule or to counterbalance the known side effects associated with the other hybrid part(.) The present review article offers a detailed account of the design strategies employed for the synthesis of anticancer agents via molecular hybridization techniques. Over the years, the researchers have employed this technique to discover some promising chemical architectures displaying significant anticancer profiles. Molecular hybridization as a tool has been particularly utilized for targeting tubulin protein as exemplified through the number of research papers. The microtubule inhibitors such as taxol, colchicine, chalcones, combretasatin, phenstatins and vinca alkaloids have been utilized as one of the functionality of the hybrids and promising results have been obtained in most of the cases with some of the tubulin based hybrids exhibiting anticancer activity at nanomolar level. Linkage with steroids as biological carrier vector for anticancer drugs and the inclusion of pyrrolo [2,1-c] [1,4]benzodiazepines (PBDs), a family of DNA interactive antitumor antibiotics derived from Streptomyces species in hybrid structure based drug design has also emerged as a potential strategy. Various heteroaryl based hybrids in particular isatin and coumarins have also been designed and reported to posses' remarkable inhibitory potential. Apart from presenting the design strategies, the article also highlights the structure activity relationship along with mechanistic insights revealed during the biological evaluation of the hybrids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanistic Lake Modeling to Understand and Predict Heterogeneous Responses to Climate Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. S.; Winslow, L. A.; Rose, K. C.; Hansen, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Substantial warming has been documented for of hundreds globally distributed lakes, with likely impacts on ecosystem processes. Despite a clear pattern of widespread warming, thermal responses of individual lakes to climate change are often heterogeneous, with the warming rates of neighboring lakes varying across depths and among seasons. We aggregated temperature observations and parameterized mechanistic models for 9,000 lakes in the U.S. states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan to examine broad-scale lake warming trends and among-lake diversity. Daily lake temperature profiles and ice-cover dynamics were simulated using the General Lake Model for the contemporary period (1979-2015) using drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2) and for contemporary and future periods (1980-2100) using downscaled data from six global circulation models driven by the Representative Climate Pathway 8.5 scenario. For the contemporary period, modeled vs observed summer mean surface temperatures had a root mean squared error of 0.98°C with modeled warming trends similar to observed trends. Future simulations under the extreme 8.5 scenario predicted a median lake summer surface warming rate of 0.57°C/decade until mid-century, with slower rates in the later half of the 21st century (0.35°C/decade). Modeling scenarios and analysis of field data suggest that the lake-specific properties of size, water clarity, and depth are strong controls on the sensitivity of lakes to climate change. For example, a simulated 1% annual decline in water clarity was sufficient to override the effects of climate warming on whole lake water temperatures in some - but not all - study lakes. Understanding heterogeneous lake responses to climate variability can help identify lake-specific features that influence resilience to climate change.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas putida F1 growth on benzoate and citrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas species are capable to proliferate under diverse environmental conditions and thus have a significant bioremediation potential. To enhance our understanding of their metabolic versatility, this study explores the changes in the proteome and physiology of Pseudomonas putida F1 resulting from its growth on benzoate, a moderate toxic compound that can be catabolized, and citrate, a carbon source that is assimilated through central metabolic pathways. A series of repetitive batch cultivations were performed to ensure a complete adaptation of the bacteria to each of these contrasting carbon sources. After several growth cycles, cell growth stabilized at the maximum level and exhibited a reproducible growth profile. The specific growth rates measured for benzoate (1.01 ± 0.11 h-1) and citrate (1.11 ± 0.12 h-1) were similar, while a higher yield was observed for benzoate (0.6 and 0.3 g cell mass per g of benzoate and citrate, respectively), reflecting the different degrees of carbon reduction in the two substrates. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed an enrichment of several oxygenases/dehydrogenases in benzoate-grown cells, indicative of the higher carbon reduction of benzoate. Moreover, the upregulation of all 14 proteins implicated in benzoate degradation via the catechol ortho-cleavage pathway was observed, while several stress-response proteins were increased to aid cells to cope with benzoate toxicity. Unexpectedly, citrate posed more challenges than benzoate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis, as indicated by the enhancement of the Na+/H+ antiporter and carbonic anhydrase. The study provides important mechanistic insights into Pseudomonas adaptation to varying carbon sources that are of great relevance to bioremediation efforts. PMID:24156539

  17. Use of Gene Expression Changes in Blood to Elucidate Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment increasingly relies more heavily on mode of action, thus the identification of human bioindicators of disease becomes all the more important. Genomic methods represent a tool for both mode of action determination and bioindicator identification. The Mechanistic In...

  18. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  19. ASSESSING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Modeling Environment for Total Risks studies (MENTOR) system, combined with an extension of the SHEDS (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation) methodology, provide a mechanistically consistent framework for conducting source-to-dose exposure assessments of multiple pol...

  20. ASSESSING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Modeling Environment for Total Risks studies (MENTOR) system, combined with an extension of the SHEDS (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation) methodology, provide a mechanistically consistent framework for conducting source-to-dose exposure assessments of multiple pol...

  1. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  2. Dose-response relationships and extrapolation in toxicology - Mechanistic and statistical considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Controversy on toxicological dose-response relationships and low-dose extrapolation of respective risks is often the consequence of misleading data presentation, lack of differentiation between types of response variables, and diverging mechanistic interpretation. In this chapter...

  3. Clinical and Mechanistic Drivers of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Kutcher, Matt; Redick, Britt; Nelson, Mary; Call, Mariah; Knudson, M Margaret; Schreiber, Martin A; Bulger, Eileen M; Muskat, Peter; Alarcon, Louis H; Myers, John G; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Brasel, Karen J; Phelan, Herb A; del Junco, Deborah J; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Matijevic, Nena

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy (ATC) occurs after severe injury and shock and is associated with increased bleeding, morbidity and mortality. The effects of ATC and hemostatic resuscitation on outcome are not well-explored. The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study provided a unique opportunity to characterize coagulation and the effects of resuscitation on ATC after severe trauma. Methods Blood samples were collected upon arrival on a subset of PROMMTT patients. Plasma clotting factor levels were prospectively assayed for coagulation factors. These data were analyzed with comprehensive PROMMTT clinical data. Results There were 1198 patients with laboratory results of whom 41.6% were coagulopathic. Using International Normalized Ratio (INR)≥1.3, 41.6% (448) of patients were coagulopathic while 20.5% (214) were coagulopathic using partial thromboplastin time (PTT)≥35. Coagulopathy was primarily associated with a combination of an ISS>15 and a BD<−6 (P<.05). Regression modeling for INR-based coagulopathy shows that pre-hospital crystalloid (odds ratio (OR)=1.05), Injury Severity Score (ISS, OR=1.03), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR=0.93), heart rate (OR=1.08), systolic blood pressure (OR=0.96), base deficit (BD, OR=0.92) and temperature (OR=0.84) were significant predictors of coagulopathy (all P<.03). A subset of 165 patients had blood samples collected and coagulation factor analysis performed. Elevated ISS and BD were associated with elevation of aPC and depletion of factors (all P<.05). Reductions in factors I, II, V, VIII and an increase in aPC drive ATC (all p<.04). Similar results were found for PTT-defined coagulopathy. Conclusions ATC is associated with depletion of factors I, II, V, VII, VIII, IX and X and is driven by the activation of the protein C system. These data provide additional mechanistic understanding of the drivers of coagulation abnormalities after injury. Further understanding of the drivers of

  4. Mechanistic, Mutational, and Structural Evaluation of a Taxus Phenylalanine Aminomutase

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Lei; Wanninayake, Udayanga; Strom, Susan; Geiger, James; Walker, Kevin D.

    2014-10-02

    The structure of a phenylalanine aminomutase (TcPAM) from Taxus canadensis has been determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. The active site of the TcPAM contains the signature 4-methylidene-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one prosthesis, observed in all catalysts of the class I lyase-like family. This catalyst isomerizes (S)-{alpha}-phenylalanine to the (R)-{beta}-isomer by exchange of the NH{sub 2}/H pair. The stereochemistry of the TcPAM reaction product is opposite of the (S)-{beta}-tyrosine made by the mechanistically related tyrosine aminomutase (SgTAM) from Streptomyces globisporus. Since TcPAM and SgTAM share similar tertiary- and quaternary-structures and have several highly conserved aliphatic residues positioned analogously in their active sites for substrate recognition, the divergent product stereochemistries of these catalysts likely cannot be explained by differences in active site architecture. The active site of the TcPAM structure also is in complex with (E)-cinnamate; the latter functions as both a substrate and an intermediate. To account for the distinct (3R)-{beta}-amino acid stereochemistry catalyzed by TcPAM, the cinnamate skeleton must rotate the C{sub 1}-C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub ipso}-C{sub {beta}} bonds 180{sup o} in the active site prior to exchange and rebinding of the NH{sub 2}/H pair to the cinnamate, an event that is not required for the corresponding acrylate intermediate in the SgTAM reaction. Moreover, the aromatic ring of the intermediate makes only one direct hydrophobic interaction with Leu-104. A L104A mutant of TcPAM demonstrated an 1.5-fold increase in k{sub cat} and a decrease in K{sub M} values for sterically demanding 3'-methyl-{alpha}-phenylalanine and styryl-{alpha}-alanine substrates, compared to the kinetic parameters for TcPAM. These parameters did not change significantly for the mutant with 4'-methyl-{alpha}-phenylalanine compared to those for TcPAM.

  5. Mechanistic, mutational, and structural evaluation of a Taxus phenylalanine aminomutase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Wanninayake, Udayanga; Strom, Susan; Geiger, James; Walker, Kevin D

    2011-04-12

    The structure of a phenylalanine aminomutase (TcPAM) from Taxus canadensis has been determined at 2.4 Å resolution. The active site of the TcPAM contains the signature 4-methylidene-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one prosthesis, observed in all catalysts of the class I lyase-like family. This catalyst isomerizes (S)-α-phenylalanine to the (R)-β-isomer by exchange of the NH2/H pair. The stereochemistry of the TcPAM reaction product is opposite of the (S)-β-tyrosine made by the mechanistically related tyrosine aminomutase (SgTAM) from Streptomyces globisporus. Since TcPAM and SgTAM share similar tertiary- and quaternary-structures and have several highly conserved aliphatic residues positioned analogously in their active sites for substrate recognition, the divergent product stereochemistries of these catalysts likely cannot be explained by differences in active site architecture. The active site of the TcPAM structure also is in complex with (E)-cinnamate; the latter functions as both a substrate and an intermediate. To account for the distinct (3R)-β-amino acid stereochemistry catalyzed by TcPAM, the cinnamate skeleton must rotate the C1-Cα and Cipso-Cβ bonds 180° in the active site prior to exchange and rebinding of the NH2/H pair to the cinnamate, an event that is not required for the corresponding acrylate intermediate in the SgTAM reaction. Moreover, the aromatic ring of the intermediate makes only one direct hydrophobic interaction with Leu-104. A L104A mutant of TcPAM demonstrated an ∼1.5-fold increase in kcat and a decrease in KM values for sterically demanding 3'-methyl-α-phenylalanine and styryl-α-alanine substrates, compared to the kinetic parameters for TcPAM. These parameters did not change significantly for the mutant with 4'-methyl-α-phenylalanine compared to those for TcPAM.

  6. Clinical and mechanistic drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Kutcher, Matt; Redick, Britt; Nelson, Mary; Call, Mariah; Knudson, M Margaret; Schreiber, Martin A; Bulger, Eileen M; Muskat, Peter; Alarcon, Louis H; Myers, John G; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Brasel, Karen J; Phelan, Herb A; del Junco, Deborah J; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Matijevic, Nena

    2013-07-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) occurs after severe injury and shock and is associated with increased bleeding, morbidity, and mortality. The effects of ATC and hemostatic resuscitation on outcome are not well-explored. The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study provided a unique opportunity to characterize coagulation and the effects of resuscitation on ATC after severe trauma. Blood samples were collected upon arrival on a subset of PROMMTT patients. Plasma clotting factor levels were prospectively assayed for coagulation factors. These data were analyzed with comprehensive PROMMTT clinical data. There were 1,198 patients with laboratory results, of whom 41.6% were coagulopathic. Using international normalized ratio of 1.3 or greater, 41.6% of patients (448) were coagulopathic, while 20.5% (214) were coagulopathic using partial thromboplastin time of 35 or greater. Coagulopathy was primarily associated with a combination of an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of greater than 15 and a base deficit (BD) of less than -6 (p < 0.05). Regression modeling for international normalized ratio-based coagulopathy shows that prehospital crystalloid (odds ratio [OR], 1.05), ISS (OR, 1.03), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score (OR, 0.93), heart rate (OR, 1.08), systolic blood pressure (OR, 0.96), BD (OR, 0.92), and temperature (OR, 0.84) were significant predictors of coagulopathy (all p < 0.03). A subset of 165 patients had blood samples collected and coagulation factor analysis performed. Elevated ISS and BD were associated with elevation of aPC and depletion of factors (all p < 0.05). Reductions in factors I, II, V, VIII and an increase in aPC drive ATC (all p < 0.04). Similar results were found for partial thromboplastin time-defined coagulopathy. ATC is associated with the depletion of factors I, II, V, VII, VIII, IX, and X and is driven by the activation of the protein C system. These data provide additional mechanistic understanding of the

  7. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation for photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Travis, B. J.; Wilson, C. J.; McDowell, N. G.

    2011-12-01

    The nitrogen limitation is an important regulator for vegetation growth and global carbon cycle. Most current ecosystem process models simulate nitrogen effects on photosynthesis based on a prescribed relationship between leaf nitrogen and photosynthesis; however, there is a large amount of variability in this relationship with different light, temperature, nitrogen availability and CO2 conditions, which can affect the reliability of photosynthesis prediction under future climate conditions. To account for the variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationship under different environmental conditions, in this study, we developed a mechanistic model of nitrogen limitation for photosynthesis based on nitrogen trade-offs among light absorption, electron transport, carboxylization and carbon sink. Our model shows that strategies of nitrogen storage allocation as determined by tradeoff among growth and persistence is a key factor contributing to the variability in relationship between leaf nitrogen and photosynthesis. Nitrogen fertilization substantially increases the proportion of nitrogen in storage for coniferous trees but much less for deciduous trees, suggesting that coniferous trees allocate more nitrogen toward persistence compared to deciduous trees. The CO2 fertilization will cause lower nitrogen allocation for carboxylization but higher nitrogen allocation for storage, which leads to a weaker relationship between leaf nitrogen and maximum photosynthesis rate. Lower radiation will cause higher nitrogen allocation for light absorption and electron transport but less nitrogen allocation for carboxylyzation and storage, which also leads to weaker relationship between leaf nitrogen and maximum photosynthesis rate. At the same time, lower growing temperature will cause higher nitrogen allocation for carboxylyzation but lower allocation for light absorption, electron transport and storage, which leads to a stronger relationship between leaf nitrogen and maximum

  8. Mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations in DNA.

    PubMed

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Cadet, Jean; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2014-04-23

    The mechanistic aspects of hydration of guanine radical cations, G(•+) in double- and single-stranded oligonucleotides were investigated by direct time-resolved spectroscopic monitoring methods. The G(•+) radical one-electron oxidation products were generated by SO4(•-) radical anions derived from the photolysis of S2O8(2-) anions by 308 nm laser pulses. In neutral aqueous solutions (pH 7.0), after the complete decay of SO4(•-) radicals (∼5 μs after the actinic laser flash) the transient absorbance of neutral guanine radicals, G(-H)(•) with maximum at 312 nm, is dominant. The kinetics of decay of G(-H)(•) radicals depend strongly on the DNA secondary structure. In double-stranded DNA, the G(-H)(•) decay is biphasic with one component decaying with a lifetime of ∼2.2 ms and the other with a lifetime of ∼0.18 s. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA the G(-H)(•) radicals decay monophasically with a ∼ 0.28 s lifetime. The ms decay component in double-stranded DNA is correlated with the enhancement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) yields which are ∼7 greater than in single-stranded DNA. In double-stranded DNA, it is proposed that the G(-H)(•) radicals retain radical cation character by sharing the N1-proton with the N3-site of C in the [G(•+):C] base pair. This [G(-H)(•):H(+)C ⇆ G(•+):C] equilibrium allows for the hydration of G(•+) followed by formation of 8-oxoG. By contrast, in single-stranded DNA, deprotonation of G(•+) and the irreversible escape of the proton into the aqueous phase competes more effectively with the hydration mechanism, thus diminishing the yield of 8-oxoG, as observed experimentally.

  9. Mechanistically Distinct Mouse Models for CRX-Associated Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nicholas M.; Zhang, Alan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Huecker, Julie B.; Hennig, Anne K.; Chen, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (CRX) protein is a “paired-like” homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for regulating rod and cone photoreceptor transcription. Mutations in human CRX are associated with the dominant retinopathies Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), Cone-Rod Dystrophy (CoRD) and Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), with variable severity. Heterozygous Crx Knock-Out (KO) mice (“+/−”) have normal vision as adults and fail to model the dominant human disease. To investigate how different mutant CRX proteins produce distinct disease pathologies, we generated two Crx Knock-IN (K-IN) mouse models: CrxE168d2 (“E168d2”) and CrxR90W (“R90W”). E168d2 mice carry a frameshift mutation in the CRX activation domain, Glu168del2, which is associated with severe dominant CoRD or LCA in humans. R90W mice carry a substitution mutation in the CRX homeodomain, Arg90Trp, which is associated with dominant mild late-onset CoRD and recessive LCA. As seen in human patients, heterozygous E168d2 (“E168d2/+”) but not R90W (“R90W/+”) mice show severely impaired retinal function, while mice homozygous for either mutation are blind and undergo rapid photoreceptor degeneration. E168d2/+ mice also display abnormal rod/cone morphology, greater impairment of CRX target gene expression than R90W/+ or +/− mice, and undergo progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Surprisingly, E168d2/+ mice express more mutant CRX protein than wild-type CRX. E168d2neo/+, a subline of E168d2 with reduced mutant allele expression, displays a much milder retinal phenotype, demonstrating the impact of Crx expression level on disease severity. Both CRX[E168d2] and CRX[R90W] proteins fail to activate transcription in vitro, but CRX[E168d2] interferes more strongly with the function of wild type (WT) CRX, supporting an antimorphic mechanism. E168d2 and R90W are mechanistically distinct mouse models for CRX-associated disease that will allow the elucidation of molecular mechanisms and testing of

  10. Mechanistic modeling of turkey growth response to genotype and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, V; Ferket, P R; Sauvant, D

    2011-10-01

    Along with the fast genetic improvement, nutritional and environmental effects on poultry growth performance have made it necessary to develop growth models that have the flexibility to adapt to different genotypes and growing conditions. A mechanistic simulation model of energy and nutrient utilization in growing turkeys is presented herein. The model consists of simulating the average homeorhetic and homeostatic regulations associated with the utilization of circulating glucose, fatty acid, AA, and acetyl-CoA for protein and lipid retention in carcass, viscera, and feathers in a turkey population. Homeorhesis plays a major role in the control of protein and lipid turnover for the definition of genetic potential and feed intake, whereas homeostasis adjusts growth rate through protein and lipid turnover rates and, therefore, BW gain and feed intake to the growing conditions. Also, homeostasis enables the maintenance of a dynamic balance state during all the growing period through the control of circulating nutrient concentration. The model was developed and calibrated with experimental data that described energy utilization in male and female growing turkeys. Then, the ability of the model to adapt to genotypes and to predict the average response of a turkey population to dietary energy was evaluated. Model calibration showed simulations of energy and nutrient utilization that fitted well with the experimental data because ME was satisfyingly partitioned into heat production and energy retention as protein and lipid, and nutrient intake accurately partitioned BW gain into carcass, viscera, and feathers. The evaluation of the model was also satisfactory because BW gain and feed-to-gain ratio were globally in accordance with the observations in different male and female genotypes, in spite of an overestimation of the feed-to-gain ratio during the first weeks of age. Model evaluation showed that the BW gain and feed intake response of growing turkeys to dietary energy

  11. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Tyler G.; Diamond, Sarah E.; Kelly, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  12. Mechanistic species distribution modelling as a link between physiology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tyler G; Diamond, Sarah E; Kelly, Morgan W

    2015-01-01

    Climate change conservation planning relies heavily on correlative species distribution models that estimate future areas of occupancy based on environmental conditions encountered in present-day ranges. The approach benefits from rapid assessment of vulnerability over a large number of organisms, but can have poor predictive power when transposed to novel environments and reveals little in the way of causal mechanisms that define changes in species distribution or abundance. Having conservation planning rely largely on this single approach also increases the risk of policy failure. Mechanistic models that are parameterized with physiological information are expected to be more robust when extrapolating distributions to future environmental conditions and can identify physiological processes that set range boundaries. Implementation of mechanistic species distribution models requires knowledge of how environmental change influences physiological performance, and because this information is currently restricted to a comparatively small number of well-studied organisms, use of mechanistic modelling in the context of climate change conservation is limited. In this review, we propose that the need to develop mechanistic models that incorporate physiological data presents an opportunity for physiologists to contribute more directly to climate change conservation and advance the field of conservation physiology. We begin by describing the prevalence of species distribution modelling in climate change conservation, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks of both mechanistic and correlative approaches. Next, we emphasize the need to expand mechanistic models and discuss potential metrics of physiological performance suitable for integration into mechanistic models. We conclude by summarizing other factors, such as the need to consider demography, limiting broader application of mechanistic models in climate change conservation. Ideally, modellers, physiologists and

  13. MPI Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  14. Mechanistic Investigations of the Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibitor Rotenone in the Context of Pharmacological and Safety Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Sabrina; Freyberger, Alexius; Lawrenz, Bettina; Schladt, Ludwig; Schmuck, Gabriele; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are suggested to exert anti-tumor activity on those tumors relying on oxidative metabolism and are therefore of interest to oncology research. Nevertheless, the safety profile of these inhibitors should be thoroughly assessed. Rotenone, a proven complex I inhibitor, has shown anti-carcinogenic activity in several studies. In this context rotenone was used in this study as a tool compound with the aim to identify suitable biomarker candidates and provide enhanced mechanistic insights into the molecular and cellular effects of complex I inhibitors. Rats were treated with 400 ppm rotenone daily for 1, 3 or 14 consecutive days followed by necropsy. Classical clinical endpoints, including hematology, clinical chemistry and histopathology with supporting investigations (FACS-analysis, enzymatic activity assays) were examined as well as gene expression analysis. Through these investigations, we identified liver, bone marrow and bone as target organs amongst approx. 40 organs evaluated at least histopathologically. Our results suggest blood analysis, bone marrow parameters, assessment of lactate in serum and glycogen in liver, and especially gene expression analysis in liver as useful parameters for an experimental model to help to characterize the profile of complex I inhibitors with respect to a tolerable risk-benefit balance. PMID:28374803

  15. Mechanistically Driven Development of Iridium Catalysts for Asymmetric Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.; Stanley, Levi M.

    2010-01-01

    , with high branched-to-linear ratios and high enantioselectivities. Parallel mechanistic studies had revealed the metallacyclic structure of the active catalyst, and subsequent experiments with the purposefully formed metallacycle increased the reaction scope dramatically. Aromatic amines, azoles, ammonia, and amides and carbamates as ammonia equivalents all reacted with high selectivities and yields. Moreover, weakly basic enolates (such as silyl enol ethers) and enolate equivalents (such as enamines) also reacted, and other research groups have used this catalyst to conduct reactions of stabilized carbon nucleophiles in the absence of additional base. One hallmark of the reactions catalyzed by this iridium system is the invariably high enantioselectivity, which reflects a high stereoselectivity for formation of the allyl intermediate. Enantioselectivity typically exceeds 95%, regioselectivity for formation of branched over linear products is usually near 20:1, and yields generally exceed 75% and are often greater than 90%. Thus, the development of iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution shows how studies of reaction mechanism can lead to a particularly active and a remarkably general system for an enantioselective process. In this case, a readily accessible catalyst effects allylic substitution, with high enantioselectivity and regioselectivity complementary to that of the venerable palladium systems. PMID:20873839

  16. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  17. Anodic Cyclization Reactions and the Mechanistic Strategies That Enable Optimization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruozhu; Smith, Jake A; Moeller, Kevin D

    2017-09-19

    Oxidation reactions are powerful tools for synthesis because they allow us to reverse the polarity of electron-rich functional groups, generate highly reactive intermediates, and increase the functionality of molecules. For this reason, oxidation reactions have been and continue to be the subject of intense study. Central to these efforts is the development of mechanism-based strategies that allow us to think about the reactive intermediates that are frequently central to the success of the reactions and the mechanistic pathways that those intermediates trigger. For example, consider oxidative cyclization reactions that are triggered by the removal of an electron from an electron-rich olefin and lead to cyclic products that are functionalized for further elaboration. For these reactions to be successful, the radical cation intermediate must first be generated using conditions that limit its polymerization and then channeled down a productive desired pathway. Following the cyclization, a second oxidation step is necessary for product formation, after which the resulting cation must be quenched in a controlled fashion to avoid undesired elimination reactions. Problems can arise at any one or all of these steps, a fact that frequently complicates reaction optimization and can discourage the development of new transformations. Fortunately, anodic electrochemistry offers an outstanding opportunity to systematically probe the mechanism of oxidative cyclization reactions. The use of electrochemical methods allows for the generation of radical cations under neutral conditions in an environment that helps prevent polymerization of the intermediate. Once the intermediates have been generated, a series of "telltale indicators" can be used to diagnose which step in an oxidative cyclization is problematic for less successful transformation. A set of potential solutions to address each type of problem encountered has been developed. For example, problems with the initial

  18. Ultrasound enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of Parthenium hysterophorus: A mechanistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shuchi; Agarwal, Mayank; Bhatt, Aditya; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2015-09-01

    This study has attempted to establish the mechanism of the ultrasound-induced enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated and delignified biomass of Parthenium hysterophorus. A dual approach of statistical optimization of hydrolysis followed by application of sonication at optimum conditions has been adopted. The kinetics of hydrolysis shows a marked 6× increase with sonication, while net sugar yield shows marginal rise of ∼ 20%. The statistical experimental design reveals the hydrolysis process to be enzyme limited. Profile of sugar yield in ultrasound-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis has been analyzed using HCH-1 model coupled with Genetic Algorithm optimization. The trends in the kinetic and physiological parameters of HCH-1 model reveal that sonication enhances enzyme/substrate affinity and reaction velocity of hydrolysis. The product inhibition of enzyme in all forms (free, adsorbed, complexed) also reduces with ultrasound. These effects are attributed to intense micro-convection induced by ultrasound and cavitation in the liquid medium.

  19. Development of an in silico profiler for respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Steven J; Roberts, David W; Madden, Judith C; Cronin, Mark T D

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we outline work that led the QSAR and Molecular Modelling Group at Liverpool John Moores University to be jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. Our research focuses around the development of in silico profilers for category formation within the Adverse Outcome Pathway paradigm. The development of a well-defined chemical category allows toxicity to be predicted via read-across. This is the central approach used by the OECD QSAR Toolbox. The specific work for which we were awarded the Lush Prize was for the development of such an in silico profiler for respiratory sensitisation. The profiler was developed by an analysis of the mechanistic chemistry associated with covalent bond formation in the lung. The data analysed were collated from clinical reports of occupational asthma in humans. The impact of the development of in silico profilers on the Three Rs is also discussed.

  20. Understanding the influence of biofilm accumulation on the hydraulic properties of soils: a mechanistic approach based on experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carles Brangarí, Albert; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Freixa, Anna; Romaní, Anna M.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    The distribution, amount, and characteristics of biofilms and its components govern the capacity of soils to let water through, to transport solutes, and the reactions occurring. Therefore, unraveling the relationship between microbial dynamics and the hydraulic properties of soils is of concern for the management of natural systems and many technological applications. However, the increased complexity of both the microbial communities and the geochemical processes entailed by them causes that the phenomenon of bioclogging remains poorly understood. This highlights the need for a better understanding of the microbial components such as live and dead bacteria and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), as well as of their spatial distribution. This work tries to shed some light on these issues, providing experimental data and a new mechanistic model that predicts the variably saturated hydraulic properties of bio-amended soils based on these data. We first present a long-term laboratory infiltration experiment that aims at studying the temporal variation of selected biogeochemical parameters along the infiltration path. The setup consists of a 120-cm-high soil tank instrumented with an array of sensors plus soil and liquid samplers. Sensors measured a wide range of parameters in continuous, such as volumetric water content, electrical conductivity, temperature, water pressure, soil suction, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Samples were kept for chemical and biological analyses. Results indicate that: i) biofilm is present at all depths, denoting the potential for deep bioclogging, ii) the redox conditions profile shows different stages, indicating that the community was adapted to changing redox conditions, iii) bacterial activity, richness and diversity also exhibit zonation with depth, and iv) the hydraulic properties of the soil experienced significant changes as biofilm proliferated. Based on experimental evidences, we propose a tool to predict changes in the

  1. Mechanistic studies of glass vial breakage for frozen formulations. I. Vial breakage caused by crystallizable excipient mannitol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ge; Akers, Mike; Jain, Manish; Guo, Jeremy; Distler, Adrian; Swift, Rob; Wadhwa, Manpreet-Vick S; Jameel, Feroz; Patro, Sugu; Freund, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The process of freeze-thaw not only subjects bioproducts to potentially destabilizing stress, but also imposes challenges to retain container integrity. Shipment and storage of frozen products in glass vials and thawing of the vials prior to use at clinics is a common situation. Vial integrity failure during freeze-thaw results in product loss and safety issues. Formulations of biomolecules often include crystallizable excipients, which can cause glass vial breakage during freeze-thaw operations. In this study, mannitol formulations served as models for mechanistic investigation of root causes for vial breakage. Several parameters and their impacts on vial breakage were investigated, including mannitol concentration (5% and 15%), different freeze-thaw conditions (fast, slow, and staging), fill configurations (varying fill volume/vial size ratio), and vial tray materials (plastic, stainless steel, corrugated cardboard, aluminum, and polyurethane foam). The results in this study were subjected to a statistical proportion test. The data showed that large fill volumes strongly correlated with higher percentage of vial cracks. Furthermore, the 15% mannitol was found to cause more breakage than 5% mannitol, especially with fast temperature gradient. Significantly more thawing vial breakage occurred in the fast compared to slow freeze-thaw with all types of vial trays. The freezing breakage was substantially lower than the thawing breakage using the fast temperature gradient, and the trend was reversed with the slow temperature gradient. An intermediate hold at -30 degrees C prior to further decrease in temperature proved to be a practical approach to minimize mannitol-induced vial breakage. Thermal mechanical analysis (TMA) and strain gage techniques were employed to gain mechanistic insights, and it was found that the primary causes for mannitol-induced vial breakage were partial crystallization during freezing and "secondary" crystallization of non

  2. Mechanistic platform knowledge of concomitant sugar uptake in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, David J.; Hausjell, Johanna; Ulonska, Sophia; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    When producing recombinant proteins, the use of Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) in combination with the T7-based pET-expression system is often the method of choice. In a recent study we introduced a mechanistic model describing the correlation of the specific glucose uptake rate (qs,glu) and the corresponding maximum specific lactose uptake rate (qs,lac,max) for a pET-based E. coli BL21(DE3) strain producing a single chain variable fragment (scFv). We showed the effect of qs,lac,max on productivity and product location underlining its importance for recombinant protein production. In the present study we investigated the mechanistic qs,glu/qs,lac,max correlation for four pET-based E. coli BL21(DE3) strains producing different recombinant products and thereby proved the mechanistic model to be platform knowledge for E. coli BL21(DE3). However, we found that the model parameters strongly depended on the recombinant product. Driven by this observation we tested different dynamic bioprocess strategies to allow a faster investigation of this mechanistic correlation. In fact, we succeeded and propose an experimental strategy comprising only one batch cultivation, one fed-batch cultivation as well as one dynamic experiment, to reliably determine the mechanistic model for qs,glu/qs,lac,max and get trustworthy model parameters for pET-based E. coli BL21(DE3) strains which are the basis for bioprocess development. PMID:28332595

  3. Putting the psychology back into psychological models: mechanistic versus rational approaches.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yasuaki; Jones, Mattr; Love, Bradley C

    2008-09-01

    Two basic approaches to explaining the nature of the mind are the rational and the mechanistic approaches. Rational analyses attempt to characterize the environment and the behavioral outcomes that humans seek to optimize, whereas mechanistic models attempt to simulate human behavior using processes and representations analogous to those used by humans. We compared these approaches with regard to their accounts of how humans learn the variability of categories. The mechanistic model departs in subtle ways from rational principles. In particular, the mechanistic model incrementally updates its estimates of category means and variances through error-driven learning, based on discrepancies between new category members and the current representation of each category. The model yields a prediction, which we verify, regarding the effects of order manipulations that the rational approach does not anticipate. Although both rational and mechanistic models can successfully postdict known findings, we suggest that psychological advances are driven primarily by consideration of process and representation and that rational accounts trail these breakthroughs.

  4. Using a Mechanistic Reactive Transport Model to Represent Soil Organic Matter Dynamics and Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerry, N.; Riley, W. J.; Maggi, F.; Torn, M. S.; Kleber, M.

    2011-12-01

    The nature of long term Soil Organic Matter (SOM) dynamics is uncertain and the mechanisms involved are crudely represented in site, regional, and global models. Recent work challenging the paradigm that SOM is stabilized because of its sequential transformations to more intrinsically recalcitrant compounds motivated us to develop a mechanistic modeling framework that can be used to test hypotheses of SOM dynamics. We developed our C cycling model in TOUGHREACT, an established 3-dimensional reactive transport solver that accounts for multiple phases (aqueous, gaseous, sorbed), multiple species, advection and diffusion, and multiple microbial populations. Energy and mass exchange through the soil boundaries are accounted for via ground heat flux, rainfall, C sources (e.g., exudation, woody, leaf, root litter) and C losses (e.g., CO2 emissions and DOC deep percolation). SOM is categorized according to the various types of compounds commonly found in the above mentioned C sources and microbial byproducts, including poly- and monosaccharides, lignin, amino compounds, organic acids, nucleic acids, lipids, and phenols. Each of these compounds is accounted for by one or more representative species in the model. A reaction network was developed to describe the microbially-mediated processes and chemical interactions of these species, including depolymerization, microbial assimilation, respiration and deposition of byproducts, and incorporation of dead biomass into SOM stocks. Enzymatic reactions are characterized by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with maximum reaction rates determined by the species' O/C ratio. Microbial activity is further regulated by soil moisture content, O2 availability, pH, and temperature. For the initial set of simulations, literature values were used to constrain microbial Monod parameters, Michaelis-Menten parameters, sorption parameters, physical protection, partitioning of microbial byproducts, and partitioning of litter inputs, although there is

  5. Mechanistic modeling of vacuum UV advanced oxidation process in an annular photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Crapulli, F; Santoro, D; Sasges, M R; Ray, A K

    2014-11-01

    A novel mechanistic model that describes the vacuum UV advanced oxidation process in an annular photoreactor initiated by 172 nm and 185 nm (in combination with 253.7 nm, with and without exogenous H2O2) is presented in this paper. The model was developed from first principles by incorporating the vacuum UV-AOP kinetics into the theoretical framework of in-series continuous flow stirred tank reactors. After conducting a sensitivity analysis, model predictions were compared against experiments conducted under a variety of conditions: (a) photo-induced formation of hydrogen peroxide by water photolysis at 172 nm (for both air- and oxygen-saturated conditions); (b) photo-induced formation of hydrogen peroxide by water photolysis at 185 + 253.7 nm (in the presence of formic acid, with and without the initial addition of hydrogen peroxide); (c) direct photolysis of hydrogen peroxide by 253.7 nm; (d) degradation of formic acid by 185 + 253.7 nm (with and without initial addition of hydrogen peroxide); and (e) degradation of formic acid by 253.7 nm (with the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide). In all cases, the model was able to accurately predict the time-dependent profiles of hydrogen peroxide and formic acid concentrations. Two newly recognized aspects associated with water photolysis were identified through the use of the validated model. Firstly, unlike the 185 nm and 253.7 nm cases, water photolysis by the 172 nm wavelength revealed a depth of photoactive water layer an order of magnitude greater (∼230-390 μm, depending on the specific operating conditions) than the 1-log photon penetration layer (∼18 μm). To further investigate this potentially very important finding, a computational fluid dynamics model was set up to assess the role of transport mechanisms and species distributions within the photoreactor annulus. The model confirmed that short-lived hydroxyl radicals were present at a radial distance far beyond the ∼18 μm photon

  6. [Chlorination of ethynyl estradiol: a kinetic and mechanistic study].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin-Nan; Liu, Guo-Qiang; Kong, De-Yang; Lu, Jun-He

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this research is to explore the fundamentals of reactions between chlorine and ethynyl estradiol (EE2), which is expected to occur during the drinking water treatment. The first step of EE2 chlorination was shown to follow the second-order kinetics with the first order to concentrations of both target compound and chlorine, respectively. Apparent rate constants of EE2 chlorination exhibit the pH-dependent profile which indicates that the phenolic ring is the preferred site of attack by Cl. The transformation of EE2 is governed by 3 elementary reactions between different species of EE2 and HClO. The deprotonated EE2 anion is significantly more reactive than its neutral conjugate. HPLC/MS analysis revealed that several Cl atoms can be incorporated into this site via complex multi-step pathways, resulting in the formation of mono and di-chlorine substituted EE2. The incorporation of the third Cl is accompanied by immediate broken down of the ring via hydrolysis. The results of this study are helpful to fully understand the behavior of EE2 in chlorinated drinking water disinfection, provide the basis for evaluating the potential exposure of this contaminant to human. The data of this work also give insights to the formation of chlorinated drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs).

  7. Mechanistic studies of Agmatine Deiminase from multiple bacterial species†

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Justin E.; Dreyton, Christina J.; Flick, Heather; Causey, Corey P.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    One subfamily within the guanidino-group modifying enzymes (GMEs) is the agmatine Deiminases (AgD). These enzymes catalyze the conversion of agmatine (decarboxylated arginine) to N-carbamoyl putrescine and ammonia. In plants, viruses, and bacteria, these enzymes are thought to be involved in energy production, biosynthesis of polyamines, and biofilm formation. In particular, we are interested in the role that this enzyme plays in pathogenic bacteria. Previously we reported the initial kinetic characterization of the agmatine deiminase from Helicobacter pylori and described the synthesis and characterization the two most potent inactivators AgD inactivators. Herein we have expanded our initial efforts to characterize the catalytic mechanisms of AgD from H. pylori as well Streptococcus mutans, and Porphromonas gingivalis. Through the use of pH rate profiles, pKa measurements of the active site cysteine, solvent isotope effects, and solvent viscosity effects, we have determined that the AgDs, like PADs 1 and 4, utilize a reverse protonation mechanism. PMID:20939536

  8. Use of Capsaicin to Treat Pain: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Campbell, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is the pungent ingredient of chili peppers and is approved as a topical treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesia lasts for several months after a single treatment. Capsaicin selectively activates TRPV1, a Ca2+-permeable cationic ion channel that is enriched in the terminals of certain nociceptors. Activation is followed by a prolonged decreased response to noxious stimuli. Interest also exists in the use of injectable capsaicin as a treatment for focal pain conditions, such as arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. Recently injection of capsaicin showed therapeutic efficacy in patients with Morton’s neuroma, a painful foot condition associated with compression of one of the digital nerves. The relief of pain was associated with no change in tactile sensibility. Though injection evokes short term pain, the brief systemic exposure and potential to establish long term analgesia without other sensory changes creates an attractive clinical profile. Short-term and long-term effects arise from both functional and structural changes in nociceptive terminals. In this review, we discuss how local administration of capsaicin may induce ablation of nociceptive terminals and the clinical implications. PMID:27809268

  9. Mechanistic Elucidation of Zirconium-Catalyzed Direct Amidation.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Helena; Tinnis, Fredrik; Zhang, Jiji; Algarra, Andrés G; Himo, Fahmi; Adolfsson, Hans

    2017-02-15

    The mechanism of the zirconium-catalyzed condensation of carboxylic acids and amines for direct formation of amides was studied using kinetics, NMR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. The reaction is found to be first order with respect to the catalyst and has a positive rate dependence on amine concentration. A negative rate dependence on carboxylic acid concentration is observed along with S-shaped kinetic profiles under certain conditions, which is consistent with the formation of reversible off-cycle species. Kinetic experiments using reaction progress kinetic analysis protocols demonstrate that inhibition of the catalyst by the amide product can be avoided using a high amine concentration. These insights led to the design of a reaction protocol with improved yields and a decrease in catalyst loading. NMR spectroscopy provides important details of the nature of the zirconium catalyst and serves as the starting point for a theoretical study of the catalytic cycle using DFT calculations. These studies indicate that a dinuclear zirconium species can catalyze the reaction with feasible energy barriers. The amine is proposed to perform a nucleophilic attack at a terminal η(2)-carboxylate ligand of the zirconium catalyst, followed by a C-O bond cleavage step, with an intermediate proton transfer from nitrogen to oxygen facilitated by an additional equivalent of amine. In addition, the DFT calculations reproduce experimentally observed effects on reaction rate, induced by electronically different substituents on the carboxylic acid.

  10. Use of Capsaicin to Treat Pain: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Campbell, James N

    2016-11-01

    Capsaicin is the pungent ingredient of chili peppers and is approved as a topical treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesia lasts for several months after a single treatment. Capsaicin selectively activates TRPV1, a Ca(2+)-permeable cationic ion channel that is enriched in the terminals of certain nociceptors. Activation is followed by a prolonged decreased response to noxious stimuli. Interest also exists in the use of injectable capsaicin as a treatment for focal pain conditions, such as arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. Recently injection of capsaicin showed therapeutic efficacy in patients with Morton's neuroma, a painful foot condition associated with compression of one of the digital nerves. The relief of pain was associated with no change in tactile sensibility. Though injection evokes short term pain, the brief systemic exposure and potential to establish long term analgesia without other sensory changes creates an attractive clinical profile. Short-term and long-term effects arise from both functional and structural changes in nociceptive terminals. In this review, we discuss how local administration of capsaicin may induce ablation of nociceptive terminals and the clinical implications.

  11. Do we know what causes eosinophilic esophagitis? A mechanistic update

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Thomas M.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) have been intensely investigated, and significant advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis of EoE. EoE is defined as a chronic immune/antigen-mediated disease, characterized clinically by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and histologically by an esophageal eosinophilic infiltrate. In this paper, we will review the current knowledge of EoE pathophysiology based on both animal and human data, and discuss possible etiologic mechanisms from the genetic and environmental perspectives. EoE is a Th2-predominant inflammatory process triggered by allergens. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines recruit eosinophils and other effector cells, such as mast cells, into the esophageal epithelium, where they cause direct damage and promote esophageal remodeling. The genetic expression profile of EoE has been described, and several single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified and associated with EoE. While this genetic contribution is important, it is difficult to postulate that EoE is primarily a genetic disease. Given the rapid epidemiologic changes in the incidence and prevalence of EoE over the past two decades, environmental factors may be the driving force. While it is not known what causes EoE in an individual patient at a specific time, the current hypothesis is that there is a complex interaction between genetic factors and environmental exposures that remains to be elucidated. PMID:26205715

  12. Mechanistic investigation on pressure dependency of Heckel parameter.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2010-04-15

    This work proposed to study the influence of varying compaction pressure on the plastic energy, elasticity (Young's modulus), particle yield strength, strain hardening, and applied pressures on derived Heckel parameter using material with different densification and deformation mechanisms: ibuprofen (IBN), paracetamol (PCM) (elastic behavior), methyl cellulose (Me-Cel), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), sodium chloride (NaCl) (plastic behavior), and dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (brittle fracture). Force-displacement data were captured during in-die compaction for all materials having different deformation behavior. The apparent mean yield pressure (Py), plastic energy, Young's moduli, strain hardening parameter and rate of increase in Py were calculated from force-displacement compaction profiles obtained across a pressure range of 65-260 MPa. Materials under confined compression loading showed pressure dependent biphasic behavior in Py upon increasing pressure from 65 MPa to 260 MPa. IBN and PCM showed pressure dependency due to simultaneous elasticity and strain hardening upon increasing applied pressure. Me-Cel, MCC, and NaCl showed lower pressure dependency while DCP showed higher change in Py upon increasing pressure as a result of higher yield strength of DCP particles. Apparent mean yield pressure from Heckel analysis was significantly affected by the applied pressure, viscoelastic behavior, particle yield strength, and strain hardening. The simultaneously occurring events of elastic deformation and strain hardening give a false increase in Py at higher applied pressures.

  13. Evaluation of Mechanistic Models for Nitrate Removal in Woodchip Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Halaburka, Brian J; LeFevre, Gregory H; Luthy, Richard G

    2017-05-02

    Woodchip bioreactors (WBRs) are increasingly being applied to remove nitrate from runoff. In this study, replicate columns with aged woodchips were subjected to a range of measured flow rates and influent nitrate concentrations with an artificial stormwater matrix. Dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were measured along the length of the columns. A multispecies reactive transport model with Michaelis-Menten kinetics was developed to explain the concentration profiles of DO, nitrate, and DOC. Four additional models were developed based on simplifying assumptions, and all five models were tested for their ability to predict nitrate concentrations in the experimental columns. Global sensitivity analysis and constrained optimization determined the set of parameters that minimized the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) between the model and the experimental data. A k-fold validation test revealed no statistical difference in RMSE for predicting nitrate concentrations between a zero-order model and the other multispecies reactive transport models tested. Additionally, the multispecies reactive transport models demonstrated no significant differences in predicting DO and DOC concentrations. These results suggest that denitrification in an aged woodchip bioreactor at constant temperature can effectively be modeled using zero-order kinetics when nitrate concentrations are >2 mg-N L(-1). A multispecies model may be used if predicting DOC or DO concentrations is desired.

  14. Serum Metabolomic Profiling and Liver Transcriptomic Analysis Provide Mechanistic Evidence of Ozone (O3)- Induced Systemic Metabolic Impairment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, air pollution has been linked to insulin resistance and obesity but the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We have recently shown that acute O3 exposure induces glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia and increases in leptin and epinephrine in rats. Here, we hypothesized th...

  15. Periodic table-based descriptors to encode cytotoxicity profile of metal oxide nanoparticles: a mechanistic QSTR approach.

    PubMed

    Kar, Supratik; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Puzyn, Tomasz; Roy, Kunal; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-09-01

    Nanotechnology has evolved as a frontrunner in the development of modern science. Current studies have established toxicity of some nanoparticles to human and environment. Lack of sufficient data and low adequacy of experimental protocols hinder comprehensive risk assessment of nanoparticles (NPs). In the present work, metal electronegativity (χ), the charge of the metal cation corresponding to a given oxide (χox), atomic number and valence electron number of the metal have been used as simple molecular descriptors to build up quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models for prediction of cytotoxicity of metal oxide NPs to bacteria Escherichia coli. These descriptors can be easily obtained from molecular formula and information acquired from periodic table in no time. It has been shown that a simple molecular descriptor χox can efficiently encode cytotoxicity of metal oxides leading to models with high statistical quality as well as interpretability. Based on this model and previously published experimental results, we have hypothesized the most probable mechanism of the cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles to E. coli. Moreover, the required information for descriptor calculation is independent of size range of NPs, nullifying a significant problem that various physical properties of NPs change for different size ranges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolomic profiling in Selaginella lepidophylla at various hydration states provides new insights into the mechanistic basis of desiccation tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selaginella lepidophylla is one of only a few species of spike mosses (Selaginellaceae) that have evolved desiccation tolerance (DT) or the ability to ‘resurrect’ from an air-dried state. In order to understand the metabolic basis of DT, S. lepidophylla was subjected to a five-stage, rehydration/de...

  17. Serum Metabolomic Profiling and Liver Transcriptomic Analysis Provide Mechanistic Evidence of Ozone (O3)- Induced Systemic Metabolic Impairment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, air pollution has been linked to insulin resistance and obesity but the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We have recently shown that acute O3 exposure induces glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia and increases in leptin and epinephrine in rats. Here, we hypothesized th...

  18. Computer-assisted mechanistic structure-activity studies: application to diverse classes of chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, G H; Poulsen, M; Kirkjian, E; Ferrell, J; Sudhindra, B S; Rebagliati, M

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we have indicated how the techniques and capabilities of theoretical chemistry, together with experimental results, can be used in a mechanistic approach to structure-activity studies of toxicity. In the second part, we have illustrated how this computer-assisted approach has been used to identify and calculate causally related molecular indicators of relative carcinogenic activity in five classes of chemical carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their methyl derivatives, aromatic amines, chloroethanes, chloroalkenes and dialkyl nitrosamines. In each class of chemicals studied, candidate molecular indicators have been identified that could be useful in predictive screening of unknown compounds. In addition, further insights into some mechanistic aspects of chemical carcinogenesis have been obtained. Finally, experiments have been suggested to both verify the usefulness of the indicators and test their mechanistic implications. PMID:3905382

  19. Real-time forecasting of infectious disease dynamics with a stochastic semi-mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Funk, Sebastian; Camacho, Anton; Kucharski, Adam J; Eggo, Rosalind M; Edmunds, W John

    2016-12-16

    Real-time forecasts of infectious diseases can help public health planning, especially during outbreaks. If forecasts are generated from mechanistic models, they can be further used to target resources or to compare the impact of possible interventions. However, paremeterising such models is often difficult in real time, when information on behavioural changes, interventions and routes of transmission are not readily available. Here, we present a semi-mechanistic model of infectious disease dynamics that was used in real time during the 2013-2016 West African Ebola epidemic, and show fits to a Ebola Forecasting Challenge conducted in late 2015 with simulated data mimicking the true epidemic. We assess the performance of the model in different situations and identify strengths and shortcomings of our approach. Models such as the one presented here which combine the power of mechanistic models with the flexibility to include uncertainty about the precise outbreak dynamics may be an important tool in combating future outbreaks.

  20. Applying math onto mechanisms: mechanistic knowledge is associated with the use of formal mathematical strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Allison S; Schunn, Christian D

    2017-01-01

    It is notoriously difficult for people to adaptively apply formal mathematical strategies learned in school to real-world contexts, even when they possess the required mathematical skills. The current study explores whether a problem context's mechanism can act as an "embodied analogy" onto which abstract mathematical concepts can be applied, leading to more frequent use of formal mathematical strategies. Participants were asked to program a robot to navigate a maze and to create a navigation strategy that would work for differently sized robots. We compared the strategy complexity of participants with high levels of mechanistic knowledge about the robot against participants with low levels of mechanistic knowledge about the robot. Mechanistic knowledge was significantly associated with the frequency and complexity of the mathematical strategies used by participants, suggesting that learning to recognize a problem context's mechanism may promote independent mathematical problem solving in applied contexts.

  1. Measurement, geospatial, and mechanistic models of public health hazard vulnerability and jurisdictional risk.

    PubMed

    Testa, Marcia A; Pettigrew, Mary L; Savoia, Elena

    2014-01-01

    County and state health departments are increasingly conducting hazard vulnerability and jurisdictional risk (HVJR) assessments for public health emergency preparedness and mitigation planning and evaluation to improve the public health disaster response; however, integration and adoption of these assessments into practice are still relatively rare. While the quantitative methods associated with complex analytic and measurement methods, causal inference, and decision theory are common in public health research, they have not been widely used in public health preparedness and mitigation planning. To address this gap, the Harvard School of Public Health PERLC's goal was to develop measurement, geospatial, and mechanistic models to aid public health practitioners in understanding the complexity of HVJR assessment and to determine the feasibility of using these methods for dynamic and predictive HVJR analyses. We used systematic reviews, causal inference theory, structural equation modeling (SEM), and multivariate statistical methods to develop the conceptual and mechanistic HVJR models. Geospatial mapping was used to inform the hypothetical mechanistic model by visually examining the variability and patterns associated with county-level demographic, social, economic, hazards, and resource data. A simulation algorithm was developed for testing the feasibility of using SEM estimation. The conceptual model identified the predictive latent variables used in public health HVJR tools (hazard, vulnerability, and resilience), the outcomes (human, physical, and economic losses), and the corresponding measurement subcomponents. This model was translated into a hypothetical mechanistic model to explore and evaluate causal and measurement pathways. To test the feasibility of SEM estimation, the mechanistic model path diagram was translated into linear equations and solved simultaneously using simulated data representing 192 counties. Measurement, geospatial, and mechanistic

  2. Mechanistic studies of the agmatine deiminase from Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Charles A.; Knuckley, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive food-borne pathogen that is capable of living within extreme environments (i.e. low temperatures and pH). This ability to survive in such conditions may arise, at least in part, from agmatine catabolism via the agmatine deiminase system (AgDS). This catabolic pathway utilizes an agmatine deiminase (AgD) to hydrolyse agmatine into N-carbamoylputrescine (NCP), with concomitant release of ammonia, which increases the pH, thus mitigating the ill effects of the acidic environment. Given the potential significance of this pathway for cell survival, we set out to study the catalytic mechanism of the AgD encoded by L. monocytogenes. In the present paper, we describe the catalytic mechanism employed by this enzyme based on pH profiles, pKa measurements of the active site cysteine and solvent isotope effects (SIE). In addition, we report inhibition of this enzyme by two novel AgD inhibitors, i.e. N-(4-aminobutyl)-2-fluoro-ethanimidamide (ABFA) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-2-chloro-ethanimidamide (ABCA). In contrast with other orthologues, L. monocytogenes AgD does not use the reverse protonation or substrate-assisted mechanism, which requires an active site cysteine with a high pKa and has been commonly seen in other members of the guanidinium-modifying enzyme (GME) superfamily. Instead, the L. monocytogenes AgD has a low pKa cysteine in the active site leading to an alternative mechanism of catalysis. This is the first time that this mechanism has been observed in the GME superfamily and is significant because it explains why previously developed mechanism-based inactivators of AgDs are ineffective against this orthologue. PMID:27034081

  3. PTN signaling: Components and mechanistic insights in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Geetika; Kwon, Youngjoo; Burkhalter, Rebecca J; Pathak, Harsh B; Madan, Rashna; McHugh, Sarah; Atay, Safinur; Murthy, Smruthi; Tawfik, Ossama W; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-12-01

    Molecular vulnerabilities represent promising candidates for the development of targeted therapies that hold the promise to overcome the challenges encountered with non-targeted chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Through a synthetic lethality screen, we previously identified pleiotrophin (PTN) as a molecular vulnerability in ovarian cancer and showed that siRNA-mediated PTN knockdown induced apoptotic cell death in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells. Although, it is well known that PTN elicits its pro-tumorigenic effects through its receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Z1 (PTPRZ1), little is known about the potential importance of this pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. In this study, we show that PTN is expressed, produced, and secreted in a panel of EOC cell lines. PTN levels in serous ovarian tumor tissues are on average 3.5-fold higher relative to normal tissue and PTN is detectable in serum samples of patients with EOC. PTPRZ1 is also expressed and produced by EOC cells and is found to be up-regulated in serous ovarian tumor tissue relative to normal ovarian surface epithelial tissue (P < 0.05). Gene silencing of PTPRZ1 in EOC cell lines using siRNA-mediated knockdown shows that PTPRZ1 is essential for viability and results in significant apoptosis with no effect on the cell cycle phase distribution. In order to determine how PTN mediates survival, we silenced the gene using siRNA mediated knockdown and performed expression profiling of 36 survival-related genes. Through computational mapping of the differentially expressed genes, members of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family were found to be likely effectors of PTN signaling in EOC cells. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that PTN and its signaling components may be of significance in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of MAPK inhibitors in PTN and/or PTPRZ1 expressing ovarian

  4. Mechanistic insights into epigenetic modulation of ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Igor; Stelly, Claire E; Morikawa, Hitoshi; Blednov, Yuri A; Mayfield, R Dayne; Harris, R Adron

    2017-05-01

    There is growing evidence that small-molecule inhibitors of epigenetic modulators, such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), can reduce voluntary ethanol consumption in animal models, but molecular and cellular processes underlying this behavioral effect are poorly understood. We used C57BL/6J male mice to investigate the effects of two FDA-approved drugs, decitabine (a DNMT inhibitor) and SAHA (an HDAC inhibitor), on ethanol consumption using two tests: binge-like drinking in the dark (DID) and chronic intermittent every other day (EOD) drinking. Decitabine but not SAHA reduced ethanol consumption in both tests. We further investigated decitabine's effects on the brain's reward pathway by gene expression profiling in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), using RNA sequencing and electrophysiological recordings from VTA dopaminergic neurons. Decitabine-induced decreases in EOD drinking were associated with global changes in gene expression, implicating regulation of cerebral blood flow, extracellular matrix organization, and neuroimmune functions in decitabine actions. In addition, an in vivo administration of decitabine shortened ethanol-induced excitation of VTA dopaminergic neurons in vitro, suggesting that decitabine reduces ethanol drinking via changes in the reward pathway. Taken together, our data suggest a contribution of both neuronal and non-neuronal mechanisms in the VTA in the regulation of ethanol consumption. Decitabine and other epigenetic compounds have been approved for cancer treatment, and understanding their mechanisms of actions in the brain may assist in repurposing these drugs and developing novel therapies for central disorders, including drug addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PTN Signaling: Components and Mechanistic Insights in Human Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Geetika; Kwon, Youngjoo; Burkhalter, Rebecca J; Pathak, Harsh B.; Madan, Rashna; McHugh, Sarah; Atay, Safinur; Murthy, Smruthi; Tawfik, Ossama W.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular vulnerabilities represent promising candidates for the development of targeted therapies that hold the promise to overcome the challenges encountered with non-targeted chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Through a synthetic lethality screen, we previously identified pleiotrophin (PTN) as a molecular vulnerability in ovarian cancer and showed that siRNA mediated PTN knockdown induced apoptotic cell death in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells. Although it is well known that PTN elicits its pro-tumorigenic effects through its receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Z1 (PTPRZ1), little is known about the potential importance of this pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. In this study we show that PTN is expressed, produced, and secreted in a panel of EOC cell lines. PTN levels in serous ovarian tumor tissues are on average 3.5-fold higher relative to normal tissue and PTN is detectable in serum samples of patients with EOC. PTPRZ1 is also expressed and produced by EOC cells and is found to be up-regulated in serous ovarian tumor tissue relative to normal ovarian surface epithelial tissue (p<0.05). Gene silencing of PTPRZ1 in EOC cell lines using siRNA mediated knockdown shows that PTPRZ1 is essential for viability and results in significant apoptosis with no effect on the cell cycle phase distribution. In order to determine how PTN mediates survival, we silenced the gene using siRNA mediated knockdown and performed expression profiling of 36 survival-related genes. Through computational mapping of the differentially expressed genes, members of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family were found to be likely effectors of PTN signaling in EOC cells. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that PTN and its signaling components may be of significance in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of MAPK inhibitors in PTN and/or PTPRZ1 expressing ovarian

  6. The regularity theory of mechanistic constitution and a methodology for constitutive inference.

    PubMed

    Harbecke, Jens

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses a Boolean method for establishing constitutive regularity statements which, according to the regularity theory of mechanistic constitution, form the core of any mechanistic explanation in neuroscience. After presenting the regularity definition for the constitution relation, the paper develops a set of inference rules allowing one to establish constitutive hypotheses in light of certain kinds of empirical evidence. The general methodology consisting of these rules is characterized as having formed the basis of many successful explanatory projects in neuroscience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of the Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin in SLE: Explosion of Evidence in the Last Five Years

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Zachary; Winans, Thomas; Huang, Nick; Banki, Katalin; Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator in cell growth, activation, proliferation, and survival. Activation of the mTOR pathway underlies the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). While mTOR activation and its therapeutic reversal were originally discovered in T cells, recent investigations have also uncovered roles in other cell subsets including B cells, macrophages, and “non-immune” organs such as the liver and the kidney. Activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) precedes the onset of SLE and associated co-morbidities, such as anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), and may act as an early marker of disease pathogenesis. Six case reports have now been published that document the development of SLE in patients with genetic activation of mTORC1. Targeting mTORC1 over-activation with N-acetylcysteine, rapamycin, and rapalogs provides an opportunity to supplant current therapies with severe side effect profiles such as prednisone or cyclophosphamide. In the present review, we will discuss the recent explosion of findings in support for a central role for mTOR activation in SLE. PMID:27812954

  8. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay for High-throughput and Mechanistic Genotoxicity Assessment and Screening of Environmental Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaqi; Gou, Na; Rahman, Sheikh Mokhles; Gao, Ce; He, Miao; Gu, April Z

    2016-03-15

    The ecological and health concern of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity potentially associated with an overwhelmingly large and ever-increasing number of chemicals demands for cost-effective and feasible method for genotoxicity screening and risk assessment. This study proposed a genotoxicity assay using GFP-tagged yeast reporter strains, covering 38 selected protein biomarkers indicative of all the seven known DNA damage repair pathways. The assay was applied to assess four model genotoxic chemicals, eight environmental pollutants and four negative controls across six concentrations. Quantitative molecular genotoxicity end points were derived based on dose response modeling of a newly developed integrated molecular effect quantifier, Protein Effect Level Index (PELI). The molecular genotoxicity end points were consistent with multiple conventional in vitro genotoxicity assays, as well as with in vivo carcinogenicity assay results. Further more, the proposed genotoxicity end point PELI values quantitatively correlated with both comet assay in human cell and carcinogenicity potency assay in mice, providing promising evidence for linking the molecular disturbance measurements to adverse outcomes at a biological relevant level. In addition, the high-resolution DNA damaging repair pathway alternated protein expression profiles allowed for chemical clustering and classification. This toxicogenomics-based assay presents a promising alternative for fast, efficient and mechanistic genotoxicity screening and assessment of drugs, foods, and environmental contaminants.

  9. Mechanistic modelling of infrared mediated energy transfer during the primary drying step of a continuous freeze-drying process.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; De Meyer, Laurens; Corver, Jos; Vervaet, Chris; Nopens, Ingmar; De Beer, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Conventional pharmaceutical freeze-drying is an inefficient and expensive batch-wise process, associated with several disadvantages leading to an uncontrolled end product variability. The proposed continuous alternative, based on spinning the vials during freezing and on optimal energy supply during drying, strongly increases process efficiency and improves product quality (uniformity). The heat transfer during continuous drying of the spin frozen vials is provided via non-contact infrared (IR) radiation. The energy transfer to the spin frozen vials should be optimised to maximise the drying efficiency while avoiding cake collapse. Therefore, a mechanistic model was developed which allows computing the optimal, dynamic IR heater temperature in function of the primary drying progress and which, hence, also allows predicting the primary drying endpoint based on the applied dynamic IR heater temperature. The model was validated by drying spin frozen vials containing the model formulation (3.9mL in 10R vials) according to the computed IR heater temperature profile. In total, 6 validation experiments were conducted. The primary drying endpoint was experimentally determined via in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and compared with the endpoint predicted by the model (50min). The mean ratio of the experimental drying time to the predicted value was 0.91, indicating a good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data. The end product had an elegant product appearance (visual inspection) and an acceptable residual moisture content (Karl Fischer). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potassium tert-Butoxide-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative C-H Silylation of Heteroaromatics: A Combined Experimental and Computational Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Bo; Schuman, David P; Yang, Yun-Fang; Toutov, Anton A; Liang, Yong; Klare, Hendrik F T; Nesnas, Nasri; Oestreich, Martin; Blackmond, Donna G; Virgil, Scott C; Banerjee, Shibdas; Zare, Richard N; Grubbs, Robert H; Houk, K N; Stoltz, Brian M

    2017-05-24

    We recently reported a new method for the direct dehydrogenative C-H silylation of heteroaromatics utilizing Earth-abundant potassium tert-butoxide. Herein we report a systematic experimental and computational mechanistic investigation of this transformation. Our experimental results are consistent with a radical chain mechanism. A trialkylsilyl radical may be initially generated by homolytic cleavage of a weakened Si-H bond of a hypercoordinated silicon species as detected by IR, or by traces of oxygen which can generate a reactive peroxide by reaction with [KOt-Bu]4 as indicated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Radical clock and kinetic isotope experiments support a mechanism in which the C-Si bond is formed through silyl radical addition to the heterocycle followed by subsequent β-hydrogen scission. DFT calculations reveal a reasonable energy profile for a radical mechanism and support the experimentally observed regioselectivity. The silylation reaction is shown to be reversible, with an equilibrium favoring products due to the generation of H2 gas. In situ NMR experiments with deuterated substrates show that H2 is formed by a cross-dehydrogenative mechanism. The stereochemical course at the silicon center was investigated utilizing a (2)H-labeled silolane probe; complete scrambling at the silicon center was observed, consistent with a number of possible radical intermediates or hypercoordinate silicates.

  11. Mechanistic Insights into the Bifunctional Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase Carbapenem Synthase by Active Site Saturation Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Ryan M.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    The carbapenem class of β-lactam antibiotics is known for its remarkable potency, antibacterial spectrum and resistance to β-lactamase-mediated inactivation. While the biosynthesis of structurally “complex” carbapenems, such as thienamycin, share initial biochemical steps with carbapenem-3-carboxylate (“simple” carbapenem), the requisite inversion at C5 and formation of the characteristic α,β-unsaturated carboxylate are different in origin between the two groups. Here we consider carbapenem synthase, a mechanistically distinct bifunctional non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate-dependent enzyme responsible for the terminal reactions, C5 epimerization and desaturation, in simple carbapenem production. Interestingly, this enzyme accepts two stereoisomeric substrates and transforms each to a common active antibiotic. Owing both to enzyme and product instability, resort to saturation mutagenesis of active site and selected second-sphere residues gave clearly differing profiles of CarC tolerance to structural modification. Guided by a crystal structure and the mutational data, in silico docking was used to suggest the positioning of each disastereomeric substrate in the active site. The two orientations relative to the reactive iron-oxo center are manifest in the two distinct reactions, C5-epimerization and C2/3-desaturation. These observations favor a two-step reaction scheme involving two complete oxidative cycles as opposed to a single catalytic cycle in which an active site tyrosine, Tyr67, after hydrogen donation to achieve bicyclic ring inversion, is further hypothesized to serve as a radical carrier. PMID:23611403

  12. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  13. The role of prostaglandins E1 and E2, dinoprostone, and misoprostol in cervical ripening and the induction of labor: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Ronan; Pierce, Stephanie; Myers, Dean

    2017-08-01

    Prostaglandins play a critical role in cervical ripening by increasing inflammatory mediators in the cervix and inducing cervical remodeling. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exert different effects on these processes and on myometrial contractility. These mechanistic differences may affect outcomes in women treated with dinoprostone, a formulation identical to endogenous PGE2, compared with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog. The objective of this review is to evaluate existing evidence regarding mechanistic differences between PGE1 and PGE2, and consider the clinical implications of these differences in patients requiring cervical ripening for labor induction. We conducted a critical narrative review of peer-reviewed articles identified using PubMed and other online databases. While both dinoprostone and misoprostol are effective in cervical ripening and labor induction, they differ in their clinical and pharmacological profiles. PGE2 has been shown to stimulate interleukin-8, an inflammatory cytokine that promotes the influx of neutrophils and induces remodeling of the cervical extracellular matrix, and to induce functional progesterone withdrawal. Misoprostol has been shown to elicit a dose-dependent effect on myometrial contractility, which may affect rates of uterine tachysystole in clinical practice. Differences in the mechanism of action between misoprostol and PGE2 may contribute to their variable effects in the cervix and myometrium, and should be considered to optimize outcomes.

  14. Coupling a simple irradiance description to a mechanistic growth model to predict algal production in industrial-scale solar-powered photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Philip; Flynn, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Various innovative photobioreactor designs have been proposed to increase production of algae-derived biomass. Computer models are often employed to test these designs prior to construction. In the drive to optimise conversion of light energy to biomass, efforts to model the profile of irradiance levels within a microalgal culture can lead to highly complex descriptions which are computationally demanding. However, there is a risk that this effort is wasted if such optic models are coupled to overly simplified descriptions of algal physiology. Here we demonstrate that a suitable description of microalgal physiology is of primary significance for modelling algal production in photobioreactors. For the first time, we combine a new and computationally inexpensive model of irradiance to a mechanistic description of algal growth and test its applicability to modelling biofuel production in an advanced photobioreactor system. We confirm the adequacy of our approach by comparing the predictions of the model against published experimental data collected over a 2 ½-year period and demonstrate the effectiveness of the mechanistic model in predicting long-term production rates of bulk biomass and biofuel feedstock components at a commercially relevant scale. Our results suggest that much of the detail captured in more complicated irradiance models is indeed wasted as the critical limiting procedure is the physiological description of the conversion of light energy to biomass.

  15. A mechanistic detachment rate model to predict soil erodibility due to fluvial and seepage forces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The erosion rate of cohesive soils is typically computed using an excess shear stress model based on the applied fluvial shear stress. However, no mechanistic approaches are available for incorporating additional forces such as localized groundwater seepage forces into the excess shear stress model...

  16. A Mechanistic Study of Arsenic (III) Rejection by Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, Tasuma

    2009-01-01

    Reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) membranes are capable to provide an effective barrier for a wide range of contaminants (including disinfection by-products precursors) in a single treatment step. However, solute rejection mechanisms by RO/NF membranes are not well understood. The lack of mechanistic information arises from experimental…

  17. Territoriality and home-range dynamics in meerkats, Suricata suricatta: a mechanistic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Andrew W; Lewis, Mark A; Gall, Gabriella; Manser, Marta B; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2015-01-01

    Multiple approaches exist to model patterns of space use across species, among them resource selection analysis, statistical home-range modelling and mechanistic movement modelling. Mechanistic home-range models combine the benefits of these approaches, describing emergent territorial patterns based on fine-scale individual- or group-movement rules and incorporating interactions with neighbours and the environment. These models have not, to date, been extended to dynamic contexts. Using mechanistic home-range models, we explore meerkat (Suricata suricatta) territorial patterns, considering scent marking, direct group interactions and habitat selection. We also extend the models to accommodate dynamic aspects of meerkat territoriality (territory development and territory shift). We fit models, representing multiple working hypotheses, to data from a long-term meerkat study in South Africa, and we compare models using Akaike's and Bayesian Information Criteria. Our results identify important features of meerkat territorial patterns. Notably, larger groups do not seem to control larger territories, and groups apparently prefer dune edges along a dry river bed. Our model extensions capture instances in which 1) a newly formed group interacts more strongly with its parent groups over time and 2) a group moves its territory core out of aversive habitat. This extends our mechanistic modelling framework in previously unexplored directions.

  18. Mechanistic home range models capture spatial patterns and dynamics of coyote territories in Yellowstone

    PubMed Central

    Moorcroft, Paul R; Lewis, Mark A; Crabtree, Robert L

    2006-01-01

    Patterns of space-use by individuals are fundamental to the ecology of animal populations influencing their social organization, mating systems, demography and the spatial distribution of prey and competitors. To date, the principal method used to analyse the underlying determinants of animal home range patterns has been resource selection analysis (RSA), a spatially implicit approach that examines the relative frequencies of animal relocations in relation to landscape attributes. In this analysis, we adopt an alternative approach, using a series of mechanistic home range models to analyse observed patterns of territorial space-use by coyote packs in the heterogeneous landscape of Yellowstone National Park. Unlike RSAs, mechanistic home range models are derived from underlying correlated random walk models of individual movement behaviour, and yield spatially explicit predictions for patterns of space-use by individuals. As we show here, mechanistic home range models can be used to determine the underlying determinants of animal home range patterns, incorporating both movement responses to underlying landscape heterogeneities and the effects of behavioural interactions between individuals. Our analysis indicates that the spatial arrangement of coyote territories in Yellowstone is determined by the spatial distribution of prey resources and an avoidance response to the presence of neighbouring packs. We then show how the fitted mechanistic home range model can be used to correctly predict observed shifts in the patterns of coyote space-use in response to perturbation. PMID:16769637

  19. Productivity of "Collisions Generate Heat" for Reconciling an Energy Model with Mechanistic Reasoning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Robertson, Amy D.

    2015-01-01

    We observe teachers in professional development courses about energy constructing mechanistic accounts of energy transformations. We analyze a case in which teachers investigating adiabatic compression develop a model of the transformation of kinetic energy to thermal energy. Among their ideas is the idea that thermal energy is generated as a…

  20. Combining correlative and mechanistic habitat suitability models to improve ecological compensation.

    PubMed

    Meineri, Eric; Deville, Anne-Sophie; Grémillet, David; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Béchet, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Only a few studies have shown positive impacts of ecological compensation on species dynamics affected by human activities. We argue that this is due to inappropriate methods used to forecast required compensation in environmental impact assessments. These assessments are mostly descriptive and only valid at limited spatial and temporal scales. However, habitat suitability models developed to predict the impacts of environmental changes on potential species' distributions should provide rigorous science-based tools for compensation planning. Here we describe the two main classes of predictive models: correlative models and individual-based mechanistic models. We show how these models can be used alone or synoptically to improve compensation planning. While correlative models are easier to implement, they tend to ignore underlying ecological processes and lack accuracy. On the contrary, individual-based mechanistic models can integrate biological interactions, dispersal ability and adaptation. Moreover, among mechanistic models, those considering animal energy balance are particularly efficient at predicting the impact of foraging habitat loss. However, mechanistic models require more field data compared to correlative models. Hence we present two approaches which combine both methods for compensation planning, especially in relation to the spatial scale considered. We show how the availability of biological databases and software enabling fast and accurate population projections could be advantageously used to assess ecological compensation requirement efficiently in environmental impact assessments.

  1. DEVELOPING MECHANISTIC DATA FOR INCORPORATION INTO CANCER AND GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENTS: OLD PROBLEMS AND NEW APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    26th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture
    DEVELOPING MECHANISTIC DATA FOR INCORPORATION INTO CANCER AND
    GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENTS: OLD PROBLEMS AND NEW APPROACHES
    R. Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, NHEERL, Research Tr...

  2. CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS AND CARCINOGENESIS: INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC DATA INTO RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS AND CARCINOGENESIS: INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC DATA INTO RISK ASSESSMENT

    The current understanding of cancer as a genetic disease, requiring a specific set of genomic alterations for a normal cell to form a metastatic tumor, has provided the oppor...

  3. A Mechanistic Study of Arsenic (III) Rejection by Reverse Osmosis and Nanofiltration Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, Tasuma

    2009-01-01

    Reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) membranes are capable to provide an effective barrier for a wide range of contaminants (including disinfection by-products precursors) in a single treatment step. However, solute rejection mechanisms by RO/NF membranes are not well understood. The lack of mechanistic information arises from experimental…

  4. An Emphasis on Perception: Teaching Image Formation Using a Mechanistic Model of Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Sue; And Others

    An effective way to teach the concept of image is to give students a model of human vision which incorporates a simple mechanism of depth perception. In this study two almost identical versions of a curriculum in geometrical optics were created. One used a mechanistic, interpretive eye model, and in the other the eye was modeled as a passive,…

  5. Mechanistic assessment of hillslope transpiration controls of diel subsurface flow: a steady-state irrigation approach

    Treesearch

    H.R. Barnard; C.B. Graham; W.J. van Verseveld; J.R. Brooks; B.J. Bond; J.J. McDonnell

    2010-01-01

    Mechanistic assessment of how transpiration influences subsurface flow is necessary to advance understanding of catchment hydrology. We conducted a 24-day, steady-state irrigation experiment to quantify the relationships among soil moisture, transpiration and hillslope subsurface flow. Our objectives were to: (1) examine the time lag between maximum transpiration and...

  6. From Source to Sink: Mechanistic Reasoning Using the Electron-Pushing Formalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of Morrison and Boyd's textbook in organic chemistry over 50 years ago, reaction mechanisms and mechanistic reasoning using the electron-pushing formalism (EPF) have become a mainstay of organic chemistry courses. In recent years there have even been several papers in this Journal and others detailing research on how…

  7. Development of a Mechanistically Based, Basin-Scale Stream Temperature Model: Applications to Cumulative Effects Modeling

    Treesearch

    Douglas Allen; William Dietrich; Peter Baker; Frank Ligon; Bruce Orr

    2007-01-01

    We describe a mechanistically-based stream model, BasinTemp, which assumes that direct shortwave radiation moderated by riparian and topographic shading, controls stream temperatures during the hottest part of the year. The model was developed to support a temperature TMDL for the South Fork Eel basin in Northern California and couples a GIS and a 1-D energy balance...

  8. New Simulation Methods to Facilitate Achieving a Mechanistic Understanding of Basic Pharmacology Principles in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Anita; Lam, Tai Ning; Hunt, C. Anthony

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation tool to aid the study of basic pharmacology principles. By taking advantage of the properties of agent-based modeling, the tool facilitates taking a mechanistic approach to learning basic concepts, in contrast to the traditional empirical methods. Pharmacodynamics is a particular aspect of pharmacology that can benefit from…

  9. INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC INFORMATION IN THE ARSENIC PBPK MODEL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INCORPORATING MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS IN A PBPK MODEL FOR ARSENIC

    Elaina M. Kenyon, Michael F. Hughes, Marina V. Evans, David J. Thomas, U.S. EPA; Miroslav Styblo, University of North Carolina; Michael Easterling, Analytical Sciences, Inc.

    A physiologically based phar...

  10. Assessing Metal Levels in Children from the Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma(MICA) study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic and essential metals levels can be used as health indicators. Here, we quantitatively compare and contrast toxic and essential metals levels in vacuum dust, urine, and fingernail samples of 109 children in Detroit, Michigan as part of The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood...

  11. CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS AND CARCINOGENESIS: INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC DATA INTO RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS AND CARCINOGENESIS: INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC DATA INTO RISK ASSESSMENT

    The current understanding of cancer as a genetic disease, requiring a specific set of genomic alterations for a normal cell to form a metastatic tumor, has provided the oppor...

  12. USE OF MECHANISTIC DATA TO HELP DEFINE DOSE-RESPONSE CURVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of Mechanistic Data to Help Define Dose-Response Curves

    The cancer risk assessment process described by the U.S. EPA necessitates a description of the dose-response curve for tumors in humans at low (environmental) exposures. This description can either be a default l...

  13. Assessing Metal Levels in Children from the Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma(MICA) study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic and essential metals levels can be used as health indicators. Here, we quantitatively compare and contrast toxic and essential metals levels in vacuum dust, urine, and fingernail samples of 109 children in Detroit, Michigan as part of The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood...

  14. Students' Interpretations of Mechanistic Language in Organic Chemistry before Learning Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Stoyanovich, Carlee; Flynn, Alison B.

    2017-01-01

    Research on mechanistic thinking in organic chemistry has shown that students attribute little meaning to the electron-pushing (i.e., curved arrow) formalism. At the University of Ottawa, a new curriculum has been developed in which students are taught the electron-pushing formalism prior to instruction on specific reactions--this formalism is…

  15. Incorporation of stochastic variability in mechanistic population pharmacokinetic models: handling the physiological constraints using normal transformations.

    PubMed

    Tsamandouras, Nikolaos; Wendling, Thierry; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Galetin, Aleksandra; Aarons, Leon

    2015-08-01

    The utilisation of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models for the analysis of population data is an approach with progressively increasing impact. However, as we move from empirical to complex mechanistic model structures, incorporation of stochastic variability in model parameters can be challenging due to the physiological constraints that may arise. Here, we investigated the most common types of constraints faced in mechanistic pharmacokinetic modelling and explored techniques for handling them during a population data analysis. An efficient way to impose stochastic variability on the parameters of interest without neglecting the underlying physiological constraints is through the assumption that they follow a distribution with support and properties matching the underlying physiology. It was found that two distributions that arise through transformations of the normal, the logit-normal generalisation and the logistic-normal, are excellent for such an application as not only they can satisfy the physiological constraints but also offer high flexibility during characterisation of the parameters' distribution. The statistical properties and practical advantages/disadvantages of these distributions for such an application were clearly displayed in the context of different modelling examples. Finally, a simulation study clearly illustrated the practical gains of the utilisation of the described techniques, as omission of population variability in physiological systems parameters leads to a biased/misplaced stochastic model with mechanistically incorrect variance structure. The current methodological work aims to facilitate the use of mechanistic/physiologically-based models for the analysis of population pharmacokinetic clinical data.

  16. New Simulation Methods to Facilitate Achieving a Mechanistic Understanding of Basic Pharmacology Principles in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Anita; Lam, Tai Ning; Hunt, C. Anthony

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation tool to aid the study of basic pharmacology principles. By taking advantage of the properties of agent-based modeling, the tool facilitates taking a mechanistic approach to learning basic concepts, in contrast to the traditional empirical methods. Pharmacodynamics is a particular aspect of pharmacology that can benefit from…

  17. DEVELOPING MECHANISTIC DATA FOR INCORPORATION INTO CANCER AND GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENTS: OLD PROBLEMS AND NEW APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    26th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture
    DEVELOPING MECHANISTIC DATA FOR INCORPORATION INTO CANCER AND
    GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENTS: OLD PROBLEMS AND NEW APPROACHES
    R. Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, NHEERL, Research Tr...

  18. A Cycloaromatization Protocol for Synthesis of Polysubstituted Phenol Derivatives: Method Development and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, William T.

    2012-01-01

    The scope of the cycloaromatization of propargylic ethers was explored using operationally simple air- and moisture-insensitive conditions. Highly substituted phenol derivatives were obtained in high yields. Mechanistic experiments indicate that the reaction occurs by an electrocyclization followed by 1,3-proton transfer. PMID:22891882

  19. From Source to Sink: Mechanistic Reasoning Using the Electron-Pushing Formalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of Morrison and Boyd's textbook in organic chemistry over 50 years ago, reaction mechanisms and mechanistic reasoning using the electron-pushing formalism (EPF) have become a mainstay of organic chemistry courses. In recent years there have even been several papers in this Journal and others detailing research on how…

  20. INCORPORATION OF MECHANISTIC INFORMATION IN THE ARSENIC PBPK MODEL DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INCORPORATING MECHANISTIC INSIGHTS IN A PBPK MODEL FOR ARSENIC

    Elaina M. Kenyon, Michael F. Hughes, Marina V. Evans, David J. Thomas, U.S. EPA; Miroslav Styblo, University of North Carolina; Michael Easterling, Analytical Sciences, Inc.

    A physiologically based phar...

  1. Predictive mechanistic bioenergetics to model habitat suitability of shellfish culture in coastal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, A.; Montalto, V.; Manganaro, A.; Mazzola, A.; Mirto, S.; Sanfilippo, M.; Sarà, G.

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative tools based on mechanistic modelling of functional traits able to enhance the sustainability of aquaculture and most other human activities (i.e. reducing the likelihood of detrimental impacts optimising productions), are especially important factors in the decision to site aquaculture facilities in coastal lakes, ponds and lagoons and, in the case of detrimental impact, to adopt mitigation measures. We tested the ability of mechanistic functional trait based models to predict life history traits of cultivable shellfish in shallow coastal lakes. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models were run to generate spatially explicit predictions of Mytilus galloprovincialis life history (LH) traits (e.g. body size and fecundity). Using fortnightly data of food supply and hourly data of body temperatures, and exploiting the power of mechanistic rules, we estimated the amount of faeces ejected by a fixed quantity of organisms cultivated in two shallow Southern Mediterranean (Sicily) lakes. These differed in terms of temperature and food density, implying large differences in life history traits of mussels in the two study areas. This information could help facilitate the selection of sites where environmental conditions are more suitable for aquaculture and contextually compatible with sustainability. The validation exercise obtained by comparing the predicted and observed data was nearly consistent. Therefore, a mechanistic functional traits-based model seems able to capture the link between habitat characteristics and functional traits of organisms, delineating the fundamental portion of an ecological niche, the possibility of predicting LH traits and potential ecological applications in the management of natural coastal resources.

  2. Mechanistic modeling of pesticide exposure: The missing keystone of honey bee toxicology.

    PubMed

    Sponsler, Douglas B; Johnson, Reed M

    2017-04-01

    The role of pesticides in recent honey bee losses is controversial, partly because field studies often fail to detect effects predicted by laboratory studies. This dissonance highlights a critical gap in the field of honey bee toxicology: there exists little mechanistic understanding of the patterns and processes of exposure that link honey bees to pesticides in their environment. The authors submit that 2 key processes underlie honey bee pesticide exposure: 1) the acquisition of pesticide by foraging bees, and 2) the in-hive distribution of pesticide returned by foragers. The acquisition of pesticide by foraging bees must be understood as the spatiotemporal intersection between environmental contamination and honey bee foraging activity. This implies that exposure is distributional, not discrete, and that a subset of foragers may acquire harmful doses of pesticide while the mean colony exposure would appear safe. The in-hive distribution of pesticide is a complex process driven principally by food transfer interactions between colony members, and this process differs importantly between pollen and nectar. High priority should be placed on applying the extensive literature on honey bee biology to the development of more rigorously mechanistic models of honey bee pesticide exposure. In combination with mechanistic effects modeling, mechanistic exposure modeling has the potential to integrate the field of honey bee toxicology, advancing both risk assessment and basic research. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:871-881. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. A mechanistic treatment of the dominant soil nitrogen cycling processes: Model development, testing, and application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development and initial application of a mechanistic model (TOUGHREACT-N) designed to characterize soil nitrogen (N) cycling and losses are described. The model couples advective and diffusive nutrient transport, multiple microbial biomass dynamics, and equilibrium and kinetic chemical reactions...

  4. Productivity of "Collisions Generate Heat" for Reconciling an Energy Model with Mechanistic Reasoning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Robertson, Amy D.

    2015-01-01

    We observe teachers in professional development courses about energy constructing mechanistic accounts of energy transformations. We analyze a case in which teachers investigating adiabatic compression develop a model of the transformation of kinetic energy to thermal energy. Among their ideas is the idea that thermal energy is generated as a…

  5. Mechanistic home range models capture spatial patterns and dynamics of coyote territories in Yellowstone.

    PubMed

    Moorcroft, Paul R; Lewis, Mark A; Crabtree, Robert L

    2006-07-07

    Patterns of space-use by individuals are fundamental to the ecology of animal populations influencing their social organization, mating systems, demography and the spatial distribution of prey and competitors. To date, the principal method used to analyse the underlying determinants of animal home range patterns has been resource selection analysis (RSA), a spatially implicit approach that examines the relative frequencies of animal relocations in relation to landscape attributes. In this analysis, we adopt an alternative approach, using a series of mechanistic home range models to analyse observed patterns of territorial space-use by coyote packs in the heterogeneous landscape of Yellowstone National Park. Unlike RSAs, mechanistic home range models are derived from underlying correlated random walk models of individual movement behaviour, and yield spatially explicit predictions for patterns of space-use by individuals. As we show here, mechanistic home range models can be used to determine the underlying determinants of animal home range patterns, incorporating both movement responses to underlying landscape heterogeneities and the effects of behavioural interactions between individuals. Our analysis indicates that the spatial arrangement of coyote territories in Yellowstone is determined by the spatial distribution of prey resources and an avoidance response to the presence of neighbouring packs. We then show how the fitted mechanistic home range model can be used to correctly predict observed shifts in the patterns of coyote space-use in response to perturbation.

  6. The Combined Use of Correlative and Mechanistic Species Distribution Models Benefits Low Conservation Status Species.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Thibaud; Lassalle, Géraldine; Drouineau, Hilaire; Dumoulin, Nicolas; Faure, Thierry; Deffuant, Guillaume; Rochard, Eric; Lambert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Species can respond to climate change by tracking appropriate environmental conditions in space, resulting in a range shift. Species Distribution Models (SDMs) can help forecast such range shift responses. For few species, both correlative and mechanistic SDMs were built, but allis shad (Alosa alosa), an endangered anadromous fish species, is one of them. The main purpose of this study was to provide a framework for joint analyses of correlative and mechanistic SDMs projections in order to strengthen conservation measures for species of conservation concern. Guidelines for joint representation and subsequent interpretation of models outputs were defined and applied. The present joint analysis was based on the novel mechanistic model GR3D (Global Repositioning Dynamics of Diadromous fish Distribution) which was parameterized on allis shad and then used to predict its future distribution along the European Atlantic coast under different climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We then used a correlative SDM for this species to forecast its distribution across the same geographic area and under the same climate change scenarios. First, projections from correlative and mechanistic models provided congruent trends in probability of habitat suitability and population dynamics. This agreement was preferentially interpreted as referring to the species vulnerability to climate change. Climate change could not be accordingly listed as a major threat for allis shad. The congruence in predicted range limits between SDMs projections was the next point of interest. The difference, when noticed, required to deepen our understanding of the niche modelled by each approach. In this respect, the relative position of the northern range limit between the two methods strongly suggested here that a key biological process related to intraspecific variability was potentially lacking in the mechanistic SDM. Based on our knowledge, we hypothesized that local adaptations to cold

  7. Regulatory Technology Development Plan - Sodium Fast Reactor: Mechanistic Source Term – Trial Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Jerden, James; Brunett, Acacia J.; Denman, Matthew; Clark, Andrew; Denning, Richard S.

    2016-10-01

    The potential release of radioactive material during a plant incident, referred to as the source term, is a vital design metric and will be a major focus of advanced reactor licensing. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated an expectation for advanced reactor vendors to present a mechanistic assessment of the potential source term in their license applications. The mechanistic source term presents an opportunity for vendors to realistically assess the radiological consequences of an incident, and may allow reduced emergency planning zones and smaller plant sites. However, the development of a mechanistic source term for advanced reactors is not without challenges, as there are often numerous phenomena impacting the transportation and retention of radionuclides. This project sought to evaluate U.S. capabilities regarding the mechanistic assessment of radionuclide release from core damage incidents at metal fueled, pool-type sodium fast reactors (SFRs). The purpose of the analysis was to identify, and prioritize, any gaps regarding computational tools or data necessary for the modeling of radionuclide transport and retention phenomena. To accomplish this task, a parallel-path analysis approach was utilized. One path, led by Argonne and Sandia National Laboratories, sought to perform a mechanistic source term assessment using available codes, data, and models, with the goal to identify gaps in the current knowledge base. The second path, performed by an independent contractor, performed sensitivity analyses to determine the importance of particular radionuclides and transport phenomena in regards to offsite consequences. The results of the two pathways were combined to prioritize gaps in current capabilities.

  8. Are Mechanistic and Statistical QSAR Approaches Really Different? MLR Studies on 158 Cycloalkyl-Pyranones.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Garg, Rajni; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-07-12

    Two parallel approaches for quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) are predominant in literature, one guided by mechanistic methods (including read-across) and another by the use of statistical methods. To bridge the gap between these two approaches and to verify their main differences, a comparative study of mechanistically relevant and statistically relevant QSAR models, developed on a case study of 158 cycloalkyl-pyranones, biologically active on inhibition (Ki ) of HIV protease, was performed. Firstly, Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) based models were developed starting from a limited amount of molecular descriptors which were widely proven to have mechanistic interpretation. Then robust and predictive MLR models were developed on the same set using two different statistical approaches unbiased of input descriptors. Development of models based on Statistical I method was guided by stepwise addition of descriptors while Genetic Algorithm based selection of descriptors was used for the Statistical II. Internal validation, the standard error of the estimate, and Fisher's significance test were performed for both the statistical models. In addition, external validation was performed for Statistical II model, and Applicability Domain was verified as normally practiced in this approach. The relationships between the activity and the important descriptors selected in all the models were analyzed and compared. It is concluded that, despite the different type and number of input descriptors, and the applied descriptor selection tools or the algorithms used for developing the final model, the mechanistical and statistical approach are comparable to each other in terms of quality and also for mechanistic interpretability of modelling descriptors. Agreement can be observed between these two approaches and the better result could be a consensus prediction from both the models. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The Combined Use of Correlative and Mechanistic Species Distribution Models Benefits Low Conservation Status Species

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, Thibaud; Lassalle, Géraldine; Drouineau, Hilaire; Dumoulin, Nicolas; Faure, Thierry; Deffuant, Guillaume; Rochard, Eric; Lambert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Species can respond to climate change by tracking appropriate environmental conditions in space, resulting in a range shift. Species Distribution Models (SDMs) can help forecast such range shift responses. For few species, both correlative and mechanistic SDMs were built, but allis shad (Alosa alosa), an endangered anadromous fish species, is one of them. The main purpose of this study was to provide a framework for joint analyses of correlative and mechanistic SDMs projections in order to strengthen conservation measures for species of conservation concern. Guidelines for joint representation and subsequent interpretation of models outputs were defined and applied. The present joint analysis was based on the novel mechanistic model GR3D (Global Repositioning Dynamics of Diadromous fish Distribution) which was parameterized on allis shad and then used to predict its future distribution along the European Atlantic coast under different climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We then used a correlative SDM for this species to forecast its distribution across the same geographic area and under the same climate change scenarios. First, projections from correlative and mechanistic models provided congruent trends in probability of habitat suitability and population dynamics. This agreement was preferentially interpreted as referring to the species vulnerability to climate change. Climate change could not be accordingly listed as a major threat for allis shad. The congruence in predicted range limits between SDMs projections was the next point of interest. The difference, when noticed, required to deepen our understanding of the niche modelled by each approach. In this respect, the relative position of the northern range limit between the two methods strongly suggested here that a key biological process related to intraspecific variability was potentially lacking in the mechanistic SDM. Based on our knowledge, we hypothesized that local adaptations to cold

  10. Mechanistic-enriched models: integrating transcription factor networks and metabolic deregulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Siqueiros-García, J Mario

    2015-09-09

    In the present paper we will examine methodological frameworks to study complex genetic diseases (e.g. cancer) from the stand point of theoretical-computational biology combining both data-driven and hypothesis driven approaches. Our work focuses in the apparent counterpoint between two formal approaches to research in natural science: data- and hypothesis-driven inquiries. For a long time philosophers have recognized the mechanistic character of molecular biology explanations. On these grounds we suggest that hypothesis and data-driven approaches are not opposed to each other but that they may be integrated by the development of what we call enriched mechanistic models. We will elaborate around a case study from our laboratory that analyzed the relationship between transcriptional de-regulation of sets of genes that present both transcription factor and metabolic activity while at the same time have been associated with the presence of cancer. The way we do this is by analyzing structural, mechanistic and functional approaches to molecular level research in cancer biology. Emphasis will be given to data integration strategies to construct new explanations. Such analysis has led us to present a mechanistic-enriched model of the phenomenon. Such model pointed out to the way in which regulatory and thermodynamical behavior of gene regulation networks may be analyzed by means of gene expression data obtained from genome-wide analysis experiments in RNA from biopsy-captured tissue. The foundations of the model are given by the laws of thermodynamics and chemical physics and the approach is an enriched version of a mechanistic explanation. After analyzing the way we studied the coupling of metabolic and transcriptional deregulation in breast cancer, we have concluded that one plausible strategy to integrate data driven and hypothesis driven approaches is by means of resorting to fundamental and well established laws of physics and chemistry since these provide a solid

  11. Target biomarker profile for the clinical management of paracetamol overdose

    PubMed Central

    Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Antoine, Daniel J; Dear, James W

    2015-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose is one of the most common causes of acute liver injury in the Western world. To improve patient care and reduce pressure on already stretched health care providers new biomarkers are needed that identify or exclude liver injury soon after an overdose of paracetamol is ingested. This review highlights the current state of paracetamol poisoning management and how novel biomarkers could improve patient care and save healthcare providers money. Based on the widely used concept of defining a target product profile, a target biomarker profile is proposed that identifies desirable and acceptable key properties for a biomarker in development to enable the improved treatment of this patient population. The current biomarker candidates, with improved hepatic specificity and based on the fundamental mechanistic basis of paracetamol-induced liver injury, are reviewed and their performance compared with our target profile. PMID:26076366

  12. Target biomarker profile for the clinical management of paracetamol overdose.

    PubMed

    Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Antoine, Daniel J; Dear, James W

    2015-09-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdose is one of the most common causes of acute liver injury in the Western world. To improve patient care and reduce pressure on already stretched health care providers new biomarkers are needed that identify or exclude liver injury soon after an overdose of paracetamol is ingested. This review highlights the current state of paracetamol poisoning management and how novel biomarkers could improve patient care and save healthcare providers money. Based on the widely used concept of defining a target product profile, a target biomarker profile is proposed that identifies desirable and acceptable key properties for a biomarker in development to enable the improved treatment of this patient population. The current biomarker candidates, with improved hepatic specificity and based on the fundamental mechanistic basis of paracetamol-induced liver injury, are reviewed and their performance compared with our target profile. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Profiling Instructional Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gephart, William J.; Bartos, Bruce B.

    The necessity of evaluating research methodology is discussed, and a profiling approach is proposed. Explanatory statements about the research process, directions for doing the actual profiling of the research report, a research profiling flow chart, a research profile sheet, and two additional graphic aids to understanding are included. The…

  14. Mechanistic modelling of cancer: some reflections from software engineering and philosophy of science.

    PubMed

    Cañete-Valdeón, José M; Wieringa, Roel; Smallbone, Kieran

    2012-12-01

    There is a growing interest in mathematical mechanistic modelling as a promising strategy for understanding tumour progression. This approach is accompanied by a methodological change of making research, in which models help to actively generate hypotheses instead of waiting for general principles to become apparent once sufficient data are accumulated. This paper applies recent research from philosophy of science to uncover three important problems of mechanistic modelling which may compromise its mainstream application, namely: the dilemma of formal and informal descriptions, the need to express degrees of confidence and the need of an argumentation framework. We report experience and research on similar problems from software engineering and provide evidence that the solutions adopted there can be transferred to the biological domain. We hope this paper can provoke new opportunities for further and profitable interdisciplinary research in the field.

  15. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  16. Tautomeric stabilities of 4-fluorohistidine shed new light on mechanistic experiments with labeled ribonuclease A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasireddy, Chandana; Ellis, Jonathan M.; Bann, James G.; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R.

    2016-12-01

    Ribonuclease A is the oldest model for studying enzymatic mechanisms, yet questions remain about proton transfer within the active site. Seminal work by Jackson et al. (1994) labeled Ribonuclease A with 4-fluorohistidine, concluding that active-site histidines act as general acids and bases. Calculations of 4-fluorohistidine indicate that the π-tautomer is predominant in all simulated environments (by ∼17 kJ/mol), strongly suggesting that fluoro-labeled ribonuclease A functions with His119 in π-tautomer. The tautomeric form of His119 during proton transfer and tautomerism as a putative mechanistic step in wild-type RNase A remain open questions and should be considered in future mechanistic studies.

  17. A data-intensive approach to mechanistic elucidation applied to chiral anion catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Milo, Anat; Neel, Andrew J.; Toste, F. Dean; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of chemical reaction mechanisms can facilitate catalyst optimization, but extracting that knowledge from a complex system is often challenging. Here we present a data-intensive method for deriving and then predictively applying a mechanistic model of an enantioselective organic reaction. As a validating case study, we selected an intramolecular dehydrogenative C-N coupling reaction, catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acid derivatives, in which catalyst-substrate association involves weak, non-covalent interactions. Little was previously understood regarding the structural origin of enantioselectivity in this system. Catalyst and substrate substituent effects were probed by systematic physical organic trend analysis. Plausible interactions between the substrate and catalyst that govern enantioselectivity were identified and supported experimentally, indicating that such an approach can afford an efficient means of leveraging mechanistic insight to optimize catalyst design. PMID:25678656

  18. FOAM3D: A numerical simulator for mechanistic prediciton of foam displacement in multidimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W.; Radke, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    Field application of foam is a technically viable enhanced oil recovery process (EOR) as demonstrated by recent steam-foam field studies. Traditional gas-displacement processes, such as steam drive, are improved substantially by controlling gas mobility and thereby improving volumetric displacement efficiency. For instance, Patzek and Koinis showed major oil-recovery response after about two years of foam injection in two different pilot studies at the Kern River field. They report increased production of 5.5 to 14% of the original oil in place over a five year period. Because reservoir-scale simulation is a vital component of the engineering and economic evaluation of any EOR project, efficient application of foam as a displacement fluid requires a predictive numerical model of foam displacement. A mechanistic model would also expedite scale-up of the process from the laboratory to the field scale. No general, mechanistic, field-scale model for foam displacement is currently in use.

  19. Mechanistic modelling of urania fuel evolution and fission product migration during irradiation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veshchunov, M. S.; Dubourg, R.; Ozrin, V. D.; Shestak, V. E.; Tarasov, V. I.

    2007-05-01

    The models of the mechanistic code MFPR (Module for Fission Product Release) developed by IBRAE in collaboration with IRSN are described briefly in the first part of the paper. The influence of microscopic defects in the UO2 crystal structure on fission-gas transport out of grains and release from fuel pellets is described. These defects include point defects such as vacancies, interstitials and fission atoms, and extended defects such as bubbles, pores and dislocations. The mechanistic description of chemically active elements behaviour (fission-induced) is based on complex association of diffusion-vaporisation mechanism involving multi-phase and multi-component thermo-chemical equilibrium at the grain boundary with accurate calculation of fuel oxidation. In the second part, results of the code applications are given to different situations: normal LWR reactor operation, high temperature annealing, loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and severe accidents conditions.

  20. Conceptual models for waste tank mechanistic analysis. Status report, January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Allemann, R. T.; Antoniak, Z. I.; Eyler, L. L.; Liljegren, L. M.; Roberts, J. S.

    1992-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting a study for Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the work is to study possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from double-shell waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This interim report emphasizing the modeling work follows two other interim reports, Mechanistic Analysis of Double-Shell Tank Gas Release Progress Report -- November 1990 and Collection and Analysis of Existing Data for Waste Tank Mechanistic Analysis Progress Report -- December 1990, that emphasized data correlation and mechanisms. The approach in this study has been to assemble and compile data that are pertinent to the mechanisms, analyze the data, evaluate physical properties and parameters, evaluate hypothetical mechanisms, and develop mathematical models of mechanisms.

  1. Mechanistic modelling of cancer: some reflections from software engineering and philosophy of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañete-Valdeón, José M.; Wieringa, Roel; Smallbone, Kieran

    2012-12-01

    There is a growing interest in mathematical mechanistic modelling as a promising strategy for understanding tumour progression. This approach is accompanied by a methodological change of making research, in which models help to actively generate hypotheses instead of waiting for general principles to become apparent once sufficient data are accumulated. This paper applies recent research from philosophy of science to uncover three important problems of mechanistic modelling which may compromise its mainstream application, namely: the dilemma of formal and informal descriptions, the need to express degrees of confidence and the need of an argumentation framework. We report experience and research on similar problems from software engineering and provide evidence that the solutions adopted there can be transferred to the biological domain. We hope this paper can provoke new opportunities for further and profitable interdisciplinary research in the field.

  2. Synthesis, cytotoxicity and mechanistic evaluation of 4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives: finding new potential anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Forezi, Luana da S M; Tolentino, Nathalia M C; de Souza, Alessandra M T; Castro, Helena C; Montenegro, Raquel C; Dantas, Rafael F; Oliveira, Maria E I M; Silva, Floriano P; Barreto, Leilane H; Burbano, Rommel M R; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; de Oliveira, Riethe; Ferreira, Vitor F; Cunha, Anna C; Boechat, Fernanda da C S; de Souza, Maria Cecília B V

    2014-05-22

    As part of a continuing search for new potential anticancer candidates, we describe the synthesis, cytotoxicity and mechanistic evaluation of a series of 4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as novel anticancer agents. The inhibitory activity of compounds 10-18 was determined against three cancer cell lines using the MTT colorimetric assay. The screening revealed that derivatives 16b and 17b exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against the gastric cancer cell line but was not active against a normal cell line, in contrast to doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug in clinical use. Interestingly, no hemolytical activity was observed when the toxicity of 16b and 17b was tested against blood cells. The in silico and in vitro mechanistic evaluation indicated the potential of 16b as a lead for the development of novel anticancer agents against gastric cancer cells.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Mechanistically based probability modelling, life prediction and reliability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Robert P.; Harlow, D. Gary

    2005-01-01

    Life prediction and reliability assessment are essential components for the life-cycle engineering and management (LCEM) of modern engineered systems. These systems can range from microelectronic and bio-medical devices to large machinery and structures. To be effective, the underlying approach to LCEM must be transformed to embody mechanistically based probability modelling, vis-à-vis the more traditional experientially based statistical modelling, for predicting damage evolution and distribution. In this paper, the probability and statistical approaches are compared and differentiated. The process of model development on the basis of mechanistic understanding derived from critical experiments is illustrated through selected examples. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated through an example of the evolution and distribution of corrosion and corrosion fatigue damage in aluminium alloys in relation to aircraft that had been in long-term service.

  4. Substrate inhibition in the heterogeneous catalyzed aldol condensation: A mechanistic study of supported organocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kandel, Kapil; Althaus, Stacey M.; Peeraphatdit, Chorthip; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Trewyn, Brian G.; Pruski, Marek; Slowing, Igor I.

    2012-05-23

    In this study, we demonstrate how materials science can be combined with the established methods of organic chemistry to find mechanistic bottlenecks and redesign heterogeneous catalysts for improved performance. By using solid-state NMR, infrared spectroscopy, surface and kinetic analysis, we prove the existence of a substrate inhibition in the aldol condensation catalyzed by heterogeneous amines. We show that modifying the structure of the supported amines according to the proposed mechanism dramatically enhances the activity of the heterogeneous catalyst. We also provide evidence that the reaction benefits significantly from the surface chemistry of the silica support, which plays the role of a co-catalyst, giving activities up to two orders of magnitude larger than those of homogeneous amines. This study confirms that the optimization of a heterogeneous catalyst depends as much on obtaining organic mechanistic information as it does on controlling the structure of the support.

  5. Skin sensitization: reaction mechanistic applicability domains for structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Aptula, Aynur O; Patlewicz, Grace; Roberts, David W

    2005-09-01

    The prediction of skin sensitization potential with minimum animal testing is currently of great importance in light of forthcoming legislation. A number of structure-activity relationships for skin sensitization have been published over the years, but their applicability has often been limited to structural classes. The concept of an applicability domain for a quantitative structure-activity relationship [(Q)SAR] is increasingly being viewed as key for the predictive application of (Q)SARs. This is particularly the case for skin sensitization if more widely applicable SARs are to be developed. In this paper, we analyze a recently published chemical data set for skin sensitization, apply reaction mechanistic criteria to domain classification, and evaluate the structure-activity trends observed within each of these mechanistic domains.

  6. Formalising a mechanistic linkage between heterotrophic feeding and thermal bleaching resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, Scott A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, I utilise the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to propose a new biochemical framework that explains how certain (well-adapted) coral species can utilise heterotrophic carbon acquisition to combat the damaging algal photoinhibition response sequence that underpins thermal bleaching, thereby increasing thermal bleaching resistance. This mechanistic linkage helps to clarify a number of previously challenging experimental responses arising from feeding (versus starved) temperature stress experiments, and isotope labelling (tracer) experiments with heterotrophic carbon sources (e.g., zooplankton). In an era of rapidly warming surface ocean temperatures, the conferred fitness benefits arising from such a mechanistic linkage are considerable. Yet, various ecological constraints are outlined which caution against the ultimate benefit of the mechanism for raising bleaching thresholds at the coral community (reef) scale. Future experiments are suggested that can strengthen these proposed arguments.

  7. Case study: the role of mechanistic network models in systems toxicology.

    PubMed

    Hoeng, Julia; Talikka, Marja; Martin, Florian; Sewer, Alain; Yang, Xiang; Iskandar, Anita; Schlage, Walter K; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-02-01

    Twenty first century systems toxicology approaches enable the discovery of biological pathways affected in response to active substances. Here, we briefly summarize current network approaches that facilitate the detailed mechanistic understanding of the impact of a given stimulus on a biological system. We also introduce our network-based method with two use cases and show how causal biological network models combined with computational methods provide quantitative mechanistic insights. Our approach provides a robust comparison of the transcriptional responses in different experimental systems and enables the identification of network-based biomarkers modulated in response to exposure. These advances can also be applied to pharmacology, where the understanding of disease mechanisms and adverse drug effects is imperative for the development of efficient and safe treatment options. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Current mechanistic insights into the roles of matrix metalloproteinases in tumour invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gordon T; Murray, Graeme I

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent mechanistic developments elucidating the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumour invasion and metastasis. The ability of tumour cells to invade, migrate, and subsequently metastasize is a fundamental characteristic of cancer. Tumour invasion and metastasis are increasingly being characterized by the dynamic relationship between cancer cells and their microenvironment and developing a greater understanding of these basic pathological mechanisms is crucial. While MMPs have been strongly implicated in these processes as a result of extensive circumstantial evidence--for example, increased expression of individual MMPs in tumours and association of specific MMPs with prognosis--the underpinning mechanisms are only now being elucidated. Recent studies are now providing a mechanistic basis, highlighting and reinforcing the catalytic and non-catalytic roles of specific MMPs as key players in tumour invasion and metastasis. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Mechanistic exploration of a bi-directional PDT-based combination in pancreatic cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Liu, Joyce; Chiang, Chun-Te; Mai, Zhiming; Goldschmidt, Ruth; Rizvi, Imran; Ebrahim-Zadeh, Neema; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly evident that the most effective cancer treatments will involve interactive regimens that target multiple non-overlapping pathways, preferably such that each component enhances the others to improve outcomes while minimizing systemic toxicities. Toward this goal, we developed a combination of photodynamic therapy and irinotecan, which mechanistically cooperate with each other, beyond their individual tumor destruction pathways, to cause synergistic reduction in orthotopic pancreatic tumor burden. A three-way mechanistic basis of the observed the synergism will be discussed: (i) PDT downregulates drug efflux transporters to increase intracellular irinotecan levels. (ii) Irinotecan reduces the expression of hypoxia-induced marker, which is upregulated by PDT. (iii) PDT downregulates irinotecan-induced survivin expression to amplify the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects. The clinical translation potential of the combination will also be highlighted.

  10. Revealing the electrophilicity of N-Ac indoles with FeCl3: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Beaud, Rodolphe; Nandi, Raj Kumar; Perez-Luna, Alejandro; Guillot, Régis; Gori, Didier; Kouklovsky, Cyrille; Ghermani, Nour-Eddine; Gandon, Vincent; Vincent, Guillaume

    2017-05-30

    Herein, we report a mechanistic exploration of the unusual FeCl3-mediated hydroarylation of N-Ac indoles. Electron density topology analysis of a crystal, in situ IR monitoring, Hammett and Taft studies as well as DFT computations allowed us to determine that activation of acetyl with FeCl3 and of the C2[double bond, length as m-dash]C3 bond with a proton is involved.

  11. Microstructural and Mechanistic Study of Primary Creep in Titanium Alloys at Lower Temperatures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    98- ata sources, spect of this 15 Jefferson 503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) | 2. REPORT DATE 5 June 1998 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES...COVERED Final Technical Report 1 Feb 95 to 31 Jan 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microstructural and Mechanistic Study of Primary Creep in titanium...alloys at Lower Temperatures 6. AUTHOR(S) Professor Michael J. Mills 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS F49620-95-1-0153 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  12. Quantitative assessment of biological impact using transcriptomic data and mechanistic network models

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Ty M.; Sewer, Alain; Martin, Florian; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Frushour, Brian P.; Gebel, Stephan; Park, Jennifer; Schlage, Walter K.; Talikka, Marja; Vasilyev, Dmitry M.; Westra, Jurjen W.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to biologically active substances such as therapeutic drugs or environmental toxicants can impact biological systems at various levels, affecting individual molecules, signaling pathways, and overall cellular processes. The ability to derive mechanistic insights from the resulting system responses requires the integration of experimental measures with a priori knowledge about the system and the interacting molecules therein. We developed a novel systems biology-based methodology that leverages mechanistic network models and transcriptomic data to quantitatively assess the biological impact of exposures to active substances. Hierarchically organized network models were first constructed to provide a coherent framework for investigating the impact of exposures at the molecular, pathway and process levels. We then validated our methodology using novel and previously published experiments. For both in vitro systems with simple exposure and in vivo systems with complex exposures, our methodology was able to recapitulate known biological responses matching expected or measured phenotypes. In addition, the quantitative results were in agreement with experimental endpoint data for many of the mechanistic effects that were assessed, providing further objective confirmation of the approach. We conclude that our methodology evaluates the biological impact of exposures in an objective, systematic, and quantifiable manner, enabling the computation of a systems-wide and pan-mechanistic biological impact measure for a given active substance or mixture. Our results suggest that various fields of human disease research, from drug development to consumer product testing and environmental impact analysis, could benefit from using this methodology. - Highlights: • The impact of biologically active substances is quantified at multiple levels. • The systems-level impact integrates the perturbations of individual networks. • The networks capture the relationships between

  13. N-Heterocyclic carbene-mediated oxidative esterification of aldehydes: ester formation and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Maji, Biswajit; Vedachalan, Seenuvasan; Ge, Xin; Cai, Shuting; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2011-05-06

    An unexpected N-heterocyclic carbene-catalyzed esterification of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes including aromatic aldehydes with reactive cinnamyl bromides in the presence of air oxygen or MnO(2) as an oxidant is described. In the presence of oxygen, halogenated and electron-deficient aldehydes react smoothly to furnish esters in good yields. Great efforts have been made on mechanistic studies to deduce a plausible mechanism, based on the experimental results and isotopic labeling experiment.

  14. Exploiting the Imidazolium Effect in Base-free Ammonium Enolate Generation: Synthetic and Mechanistic Studies.

    PubMed

    Young, Claire M; Stark, Daniel G; West, Thomas H; Taylor, James E; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-11-07

    N-Acyl imidazoles and catalytic isothiourea hydrochloride salts function as ammonium enolate precursors in the absence of base. Enantioselective Michael addition-cyclization reactions using different α,β-unsaturated Michael acceptors have been performed to form dihydropyranones and dihydropyridinones with high stereoselectivity. Detailed mechanistic studies using RPKA have revealed the importance of the "imidazolium" effect in ammonium enolate formation and have highlighted key differences with traditional base-mediated processes.

  15. Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling and Simulation for Formulation Development and Bioequivalence Evaluation: Report of an FDA Public Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Duan, J; Kesisoglou, F; Novakovic, J; Amidon, GL; Jamei, M; Lukacova, V; Eissing, T; Tsakalozou, E; Zhao, L; Lionberger, R

    2017-01-01

    On May 19, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hosted a public workshop, entitled “Mechanistic Oral Absorption Modeling and Simulation for Formulation Development and Bioequivalence Evaluation.”1 The topic of mechanistic oral absorption modeling, which is one of the major applications of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation, focuses on predicting oral absorption by mechanistically integrating gastrointestinal transit, dissolution, and permeation processes, incorporating systems, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and the drug product information, into a systemic mathematical whole‐body framework.2 PMID:28571121

  16. Fluence rate effect semi-mechanistic modelling on WWER-type RPV welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debarberis, L.; Acosta, B.; Sevini, F.; Chernobaeva, A.; Kryukov, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Effort at JRC-IE is ongoing in order to develop a semi-mechanistic model to forecast radiation embrittlement. The understanding and the quantification of the influence of the fluence rate is of particular importance for the correct interpretation of data obtained in material testing reactors or in surveillance capsules, which are accelerated with respect to embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel wall itself. To verify the applicability of the fluence rate as included in the semi-mechanistic model and tuning the model parameters various WWER-type vessel weld material have been studied. For the selected welds, copper ranges from 0.08 to 0.18 mass%, while phosphorus variation is from 0.013 to 0.036 mass%. The fluence range is up to 2 × 10 20 n cm -2 obtained at two fluence rates of 4 × 10 11 and 3.5 × 10 12 n cm -2 s -1, typical for WWER-440 surveillance positions. Significant fluence rate effect has been observed for the welds containing low copper and moderate phosphorus, and adaptation of the semi-mechanistic model's parameters for the high flux data is required. To verify the consistency and the limits of the findings other similar data coming from RPV surveillance programmes are also included in this analysis.

  17. Integration of QSAR and SAR methods for the mechanistic interpretation of predictive models for carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fjodorova, Natalja; Novič, Marjana

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge-based Toxtree expert system (SAR approach) was integrated with the statistically based counter propagation artificial neural network (CP ANN) model (QSAR approach) to contribute to a better mechanistic understanding of a carcinogenicity model for non-congeneric chemicals using Dragon descriptors and carcinogenic potency for rats as a response. The transparency of the CP ANN algorithm was demonstrated using intrinsic mapping technique specifically Kohonen maps. Chemical structures were represented by Dragon descriptors that express the structural and electronic features of molecules such as their shape and electronic surrounding related to reactivity of molecules. It was illustrated how the descriptors are correlated with particular structural alerts (SAs) for carcinogenicity with recognized mechanistic link to carcinogenic activity. Moreover, the Kohonen mapping technique enables one to examine the separation of carcinogens and non-carcinogens (for rats) within a family of chemicals with a particular SA for carcinogenicity. The mechanistic interpretation of models is important for the evaluation of safety of chemicals. PMID:24688639

  18. Mechanistic models of animal migration behaviour--their diversity, structure and use.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Silke; Klaassen, Marcel

    2013-05-01

    1. Migration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom, including many taxonomic groups and modes of locomotion. Developing an understanding of the proximate and ultimate causes for this behaviour not only addresses fundamental ecological questions but has relevance to many other fields, for example in relation to the spread of emerging zoonotic diseases, the proliferation of invasive species, aeronautical safety as well as the conservation of migrants. 2. Theoretical methods can make important contributions to our understanding of migration, by allowing us to integrate findings on this complex behaviour, identify caveats in our understanding and to guide future empirical research efforts. Various mechanistic models exist to date, but their applications seem to be scattered and far from evenly distributed across taxonomic units. 3. Therefore, we provide an overview of the major mechanistic modelling approaches used in the study of migration behaviour and characterize their fundamental features, assumptions and limitations and discuss their typical data requirements both for model parameterization and for scrutinizing model predictions. 4. Furthermore, we review 155 studies that have used mechanistic models to study animal migration and analyse them with regard to the approaches used and the focal species, and also explore their contribution to advancing current knowledge within six broad migration ecology research themes. 5. This identifies important gaps in our present knowledge, which should be tackled in future research using existing and to-be developed theoretical approaches. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  19. Comparative evaluation of statistical and mechanistic models of Escherichia coli at beaches in southern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safaie, Ammar; Wendzel, Aaron; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith; Whitman, Richard L.; Corsi, Steven R.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical and mechanistic models are popular tools for predicting the levels of indicator bacteria at recreational beaches. Researchers tend to use one class of model or the other, and it is difficult to generalize statements about their relative performance due to differences in how the models are developed, tested, and used. We describe a cooperative modeling approach for freshwater beaches impacted by point sources in which insights derived from mechanistic modeling were used to further improve the statistical models and vice versa. The statistical models provided a basis for assessing the mechanistic models which were further improved using probability distributions to generate high-resolution time series data at the source, long-term “tracer” transport modeling based on observed electrical conductivity, better assimilation of meteorological data, and the use of unstructured-grids to better resolve nearshore features. This approach resulted in improved models of comparable performance for both classes including a parsimonious statistical model suitable for real-time predictions based on an easily measurable environmental variable (turbidity). The modeling approach outlined here can be used at other sites impacted by point sources and has the potential to improve water quality predictions resulting in more accurate estimates of beach closures.

  20. Exploiting Bioprocessing Fluctuations to Elicit the Mechanistics of De Novo Lipogenesis in Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Andrew M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial achievements in elucidating the metabolic pathways of lipogenesis, a mechanistic representation of lipid accumulation and degradation has not been fully attained to-date. Recent evidence suggests that lipid accumulation can occur through increases of either the cytosolic copy-number of lipid droplets (LDs), or the LDs size. However, the prevailing phenotype, or how such mechanisms pertain to lipid degradation remain poorly understood. To address this shortcoming, we employed the–recently discovered–innate bioprocessing fluctuations in Yarrowia lipolytica, and performed single-cell fluctuation analysis using optical microscopy and microfluidics that generate a quasi-time invariant microenvironment. We report that lipid accumulation at early stationary phase in rich medium is substantially more likely to occur through variations in the LDs copy-number, rather than the LDs size. Critically, these mechanistics are also preserved during lipid degradation, as well as upon exposure to a protein translation inhibitor. The latter condition additionally induced a lipid accumulation phase, accompanied by the downregulation of lipid catabolism. Our results enable an in-depth mechanistic understanding of lipid biogenesis, and expand longitudinal single-cell fluctuation analyses from gene regulation to metabolism. PMID:28052085

  1. Mechanistic Modelling of DNA Repair and Cellular Survival Following Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Schuemann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterising and predicting the effects of ionising radiation on cells remains challenging, with the lack of robust models of the underlying mechanism of radiation responses providing a significant limitation to the development of personalised radiotherapy. In this paper we present a mechanistic model of cellular response to radiation that incorporates the kinetics of different DNA repair processes, the spatial distribution of double strand breaks and the resulting probability and severity of misrepair. This model enables predictions to be made of a range of key biological endpoints (DNA repair kinetics, chromosome aberration and mutation formation, survival) across a range of cell types based on a set of 11 mechanistic fitting parameters that are common across all cells. Applying this model to cellular survival showed its capacity to stratify the radiosensitivity of cells based on aspects of their phenotype and experimental conditions such as cell cycle phase and plating delay (correlation between modelled and observed Mean Inactivation Doses R2 > 0.9). By explicitly incorporating underlying mechanistic factors, this model can integrate knowledge from a wide range of biological studies to provide robust predictions and may act as a foundation for future calculations of individualised radiosensitivity.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Statistical and Mechanistic Models of Escherichia coli at Beaches in Southern Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Safaie, Ammar; Wendzel, Aaron; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith B; Whitman, Richard L; Corsi, Steven R; Phanikumar, Mantha S

    2016-03-01

    Statistical and mechanistic models are popular tools for predicting the levels of indicator bacteria at recreational beaches. Researchers tend to use one class of model or the other, and it is difficult to generalize statements about their relative performance due to differences in how the models are developed, tested, and used. We describe a cooperative modeling approach for freshwater beaches impacted by point sources in which insights derived from mechanistic modeling were used to further improve the statistical models and vice versa. The statistical models provided a basis for assessing the mechanistic models which were further improved using probability distributions to generate high-resolution time series data at the source, long-term "tracer" transport modeling based on observed electrical conductivity, better assimilation of meteorological data, and the use of unstructured-grids to better resolve nearshore features. This approach resulted in improved models of comparable performance for both classes including a parsimonious statistical model suitable for real-time predictions based on an easily measurable environmental variable (turbidity). The modeling approach outlined here can be used at other sites impacted by point sources and has the potential to improve water quality predictions resulting in more accurate estimates of beach closures.

  3. Emergent global patterns of ecosystem structure and function from a mechanistic general ecosystem model.

    PubMed

    Harfoot, Michael B J; Newbold, Tim; Tittensor, Derek P; Emmott, Stephen; Hutton, Jon; Lyutsarev, Vassily; Smith, Matthew J; Scharlemann, Jörn P W; Purves, Drew W

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities are causing widespread degradation of ecosystems worldwide, threatening the ecosystem services upon which all human life depends. Improved understanding of this degradation is urgently needed to improve avoidance and mitigation measures. One tool to assist these efforts is predictive models of ecosystem structure and function that are mechanistic: based on fundamental ecological principles. Here we present the first mechanistic General Ecosystem Model (GEM) of ecosystem structure and function that is both global and applies in all terrestrial and marine environments. Functional forms and parameter values were derived from the theoretical and empirical literature where possible. Simulations of the fate of all organisms with body masses between 10 µg and 150,000 kg (a range of 14 orders of magnitude) across the globe led to emergent properties at individual (e.g., growth rate), community (e.g., biomass turnover rates), ecosystem (e.g., trophic pyramids), and macroecological scales (e.g., global patterns of trophic structure) that are in general agreement with current data and theory. These properties emerged from our encoding of the biology of, and interactions among, individual organisms without any direct constraints on the properties themselves. Our results indicate that ecologists have gathered sufficient information to begin to build realistic, global, and mechanistic models of ecosystems, capable of predicting a diverse range of ecosystem properties and their response to human pressures.

  4. Mechanistic models of animal migration behaviour – their diversity, structure and use

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Silke; Klaassen, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Migration is a wide-spread phenomenon in the animal kingdom, including many taxonomic groups and modes of locomotion. Developing an understanding of the proximate and ultimate causes for this behaviour not only addresses fundamental ecological questions but has relevance to many other fields, e.g. in relation to the spread of emerging zoonotic diseases, the proliferation of invasive species, aeronautical safety as well as the conservation of migrants.Theoretical methods can make important contributions to our understanding of migration, by allowing us to integrate findings on this complex behaviour, identify caveats in our understanding and guide future empirical research efforts. Various mechanistic models exist to date but their applications seem to be scattered and far from evenly distributed across taxonomic units.Therefore, we provide an overview of the major mechanistic modelling approaches used in the study of migration behaviour and characterise their fundamental features, assumptions and limitations, and discuss their typical data requirements both for model parameterisation and for scrutinizing model predictions.Furthermore, we review 155 studies that have used mechanistic models to study animal migration and analyse them with regard to the approaches used, focal species and also explore their contribution of advancing current knowledge within six broad migration ecology research themes.This identifies important gaps in our present knowledge, which should be tackled in future research using existing and to-be developed theoretical approaches. PMID:23373515

  5. Mechanistic analytical models for long-distance seed dispersal by wind.

    PubMed

    Katul, G G; Porporato, A; Nathan, R; Siqueira, M; Soons, M B; Poggi, D; Horn, H S; Levin, S A

    2005-09-01

    We introduce an analytical model, the Wald analytical long-distance dispersal (WALD) model, for estimating dispersal kernels of wind-dispersed seeds and their escape probability from the canopy. The model is based on simplifications to well-established three-dimensional Lagrangian stochastic approaches for turbulent scalar transport resulting in a two-parameter Wald (or inverse Gaussian) distribution. Unlike commonly used phenomenological models, WALD's parameters can be estimated from the key factors affecting wind dispersal--wind statistics, seed release height, and seed terminal velocity--determined independently of dispersal data. WALD's asymptotic power-law tail has an exponent of -3/2, a limiting value verified by a meta-analysis for a wide variety of measured dispersal kernels and larger than the exponent of the bivariate Student t-test (2Dt). We tested WALD using three dispersal data sets on forest trees, heathland shrubs, and grassland forbs and compared WALD's performance with that of other analytical mechanistic models (revised versions of the tilted Gaussian Plume model and the advection-diffusion equation), revealing fairest agreement between WALD predictions and measurements. Analytical mechanistic models, such as WALD, combine the advantages of simplicity and mechanistic understanding and are valuable tools for modeling large-scale, long-term plant population dynamics.

  6. Emergent Global Patterns of Ecosystem Structure and Function from a Mechanistic General Ecosystem Model

    PubMed Central

    Emmott, Stephen; Hutton, Jon; Lyutsarev, Vassily; Smith, Matthew J.; Scharlemann, Jörn P. W.; Purves, Drew W.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities are causing widespread degradation of ecosystems worldwide, threatening the ecosystem services upon which all human life depends. Improved understanding of this degradation is urgently needed to improve avoidance and mitigation measures. One tool to assist these efforts is predictive models of ecosystem structure and function that are mechanistic: based on fundamental ecological principles. Here we present the first mechanistic General Ecosystem Model (GEM) of ecosystem structure and function that is both global and applies in all terrestrial and marine environments. Functional forms and parameter values were derived from the theoretical and empirical literature where possible. Simulations of the fate of all organisms with body masses between 10 µg and 150,000 kg (a range of 14 orders of magnitude) across the globe led to emergent properties at individual (e.g., growth rate), community (e.g., biomass turnover rates), ecosystem (e.g., trophic pyramids), and macroecological scales (e.g., global patterns of trophic structure) that are in general agreement with current data and theory. These properties emerged from our encoding of the biology of, and interactions among, individual organisms without any direct constraints on the properties themselves. Our results indicate that ecologists have gathered sufficient information to begin to build realistic, global, and mechanistic models of ecosystems, capable of predicting a diverse range of ecosystem properties and their response to human pressures. PMID:24756001

  7. Model-free forecasting outperforms the correct mechanistic model for simulated and experimental data

    PubMed Central

    Perretti, Charles T.; Munch, Stephan B.; Sugihara, George

    2013-01-01

    Accurate predictions of species abundance remain one of the most vexing challenges in ecology. This observation is perhaps unsurprising, because population dynamics are often strongly forced and highly nonlinear. Recently, however, numerous statistical techniques have been proposed for fitting highly parameterized mechanistic models to complex time series, potentially providing the machinery necessary for generating useful predictions. Alternatively, there is a wide variety of comparatively simple model-free forecasting methods that could be used to predict abundance. Here we pose a rather conservative challenge and ask whether a correctly specified mechanistic model, fit with commonly used statistical techniques, can provide better forecasts than simple model-free methods for ecological systems with noisy nonlinear dynamics. Using four different control models and seven experimental time series of flour beetles, we found that Markov chain Monte Carlo procedures for fitting mechanistic models often converged on best-fit parameterizations far different from the known parameters. As a result, the correctly specified models provided inaccurate forecasts and incorrect inferences. In contrast, a model-free method based on state-space reconstruction gave the most accurate short-term forecasts, even while using only a single time series from the multivariate system. Considering the recent push for ecosystem-based management and the increasing call for ecological predictions, our results suggest that a flexible model-free approach may be the most promising way forward. PMID:23440207

  8. Modeling systems-level dynamics: Understanding without mechanistic explanation in integrative systems biology.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Miles; Nersessian, Nancy J

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we draw upon rich ethnographic data of two systems biology labs to explore the roles of explanation and understanding in large-scale systems modeling. We illustrate practices that depart from the goal of dynamic mechanistic explanation for the sake of more limited modeling goals. These processes use abstract mathematical formulations of bio-molecular interactions and data fitting techniques which we call top-down abstraction to trade away accurate mechanistic accounts of large-scale systems for specific information about aspects of those systems. We characterize these practices as pragmatic responses to the constraints many modelers of large-scale systems face, which in turn generate more limited pragmatic non-mechanistic forms of understanding of systems. These forms aim at knowledge of how to predict system responses in order to manipulate and control some aspects of them. We propose that this analysis of understanding provides a way to interpret what many systems biologists are aiming for in practice when they talk about the objective of a "systems-level understanding."

  9. A systematic approach for identifying and presenting mechanistic evidence in human health assessments

    PubMed Central

    Kushman, Mary E.; Kraft, Andrew D.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Makris, Susan L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Clear documentation of literature search and presentation methodologies can improve transparency in chemical hazard assessments. We sought to improve clarity for the scientific support for cancer mechanisms of action using a systematic approach to literature retrieval, selection, and presentation of studies. The general question was “What are the mechanisms by which a chemical may cause carcinogenicity in the target tissue?” Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was used as a case study chemical with a complex database of >3,000 publications. Relevant mechanistic events were identified from published reviews. The PubMed search strategy included relevant synonyms and wildcards for DEHP and its metabolites, mechanistic events, and species of interest. Tiered exclusion/inclusion criteria for study pertinence were defined, and applied to the retrieved literature. Manual curation was conducted for mechanistic events with large literature databases. Literature trees documented identification and selection of the literature evidence. The selected studies were summarized in evidence tables accompanied by succinct narratives. Primary publications were deposited into the Health and Environmental Research Online (http://hero.epa.gov/) database and identified by pertinence criteria and key terms to permit organized retrieval. This approach contributes to human health assessment by effectively managing a large volume of literature, improving transparency, and facilitating subsequent synthesis of information across studies. PMID:23959061

  10. The mechanistic-holistic divide revisited: The case of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Racine, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, I revisit the development of the repression model of genetic regulation in the lac operon to challenge a common application of a conceptual framework in the history of biology. I take Allen's (1978) account of the changes in the life sciences during the early and mid-twentieth century as an example of a common application of a framework based on the dichotomy between a mechanistic, or reductionist, approach to science and a holistic one. From this conceptual framework, Allen infers two general claims about the process of science and its goals: (1) that "mechanistic materialism" has often presented a more practical way to begin the study of complex phenomena in the life sciences, and (2) that the approach described as "holistic materialism" provides a more complete or accurate description of the natural world. The development of the lac operon model does not fit Allen's generalizations about scientific developments, and it can be used to cast some doubt on the scope of application of that conceptual framework. I argue that a better framework to interpret particular episodes in the history of molecular biology is to consider the ways in which biologists prioritize and track different aspects of the phenomena under study, rather than to focus on whether certain scientific practices are best described as developing from mechanistic to more holistic approaches. I end with some implications for the historiography of science by considering the appropriateness of different conceptual frameworks for different grains of resolution in the history of biology.

  11. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) interaction'' of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  12. Mechanistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1990-09-01

    Several models and theories are reviewed that incorporate the idea of radiation-induced lesions (repairable and/or irreparable) that can be related to molecular lesions in the DNA molecule. Usually the DNA double-strand or chromatin break is suggested as the critical lesion. In the models, the shoulder on the low-LET survival curve is hypothesized as being due to one (or more) of the following three mechanisms: (1) ``interaction`` of lesions produced by statistically independent particle tracks; (2) nonlinear (i.e., linear-quadratic) increase in the yield of initial lesions, and (3) saturation of repair processes at high dose. Comparisons are made between the various approaches. Several significant advances in model development are discussed; in particular, a description of the matrix formulation of the Markov versions of the RMR and LPL models is given. The more advanced theories have incorporated statistical fluctuations in various aspects of the energy-loss and lesion-formation process. An important direction is the inclusion of physical and chemical processes into the formulations by incorporating relevant track structure theory (Monte Carlo track simulations) and chemical reactions of radiation-induced radicals. At the biological end, identification of repair genes and how they operate as well as a better understanding of how DNA misjoinings lead to lethal chromosome aberrations are needed for appropriate inclusion into the theories. More effort is necessary to model the complex end point of radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  13. Polyester Textiles as a Source of Microplastics from Households: A Mechanistic Study to Understand Microfiber Release During Washing.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Edgar; Nowack, Bernd; Mitrano, Denise M

    2017-06-20

    Microplastic fibers make up a large proportion of microplastics found in the environment, especially in urban areas. There is good reason to consider synthetic textiles a major source of microplastic fibers, and it will not diminish since the use of synthetic fabrics, especially polyester, continues to increase. In this study we provide quantitative data regarding the size and mass of microplastic fibers released from synthetic (polyester) textiles during simulated home washing under controlled laboratory conditions. Consideration of fabric structure and washing conditions (use of detergents, temperature, wash duration, and sequential washings) allowed us to study the propensity of fiber shedding in a mechanistic way. Thousands of individual fibers were measured (number, length) from each wash solution to provide a robust data set on which to draw conclusions. Among all the variables tested, the use of detergent appeared to affect the total mass of fibers released the most, yet the detergent composition (liquid or powder) or overdosing of detergent did not significantly influence microplastic release. Despite different release quantities due to the addition of a surfactant (approximately 0.025 and 0.1 mg fibers/g textile washed, without and with detergent, respectively), the overall microplastic fiber length profile remained similar regardless of wash condition or fabric structure, with the vast majority of fibers ranging between 100 and 800 μm in length irrespective of wash cycle number. This indicates that the fiber staple length and/or debris encapsulated inside the fabric from the yarn spinning could be directly responsible for releasing stray fibers. This study serves as a first look toward understanding the physical properties of the textile itself to better understand the mechanisms of fiber shedding in the context of microplastic fiber release into laundry wash water.

  14. Mechanistic explanation of the imbalance between the net community production and nutrient supply in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; McKinley, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the oligotrophic subtropical gyre, seasonal drawdown of summertime dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and oxygen (O2) build-up in the surface layer ( 0-50m) without a source of nutrients to support primary productivity has been an unresolved puzzle for decades (Michaels et al., 1994). Here to resolve this puzzle, we analyzed biogeochemical data from recently-available profiling floats deployed in the northwestern subtropical North Atlantic (Johnson et al., 2013) together with bottle samples from a timeseries near Bermuda (Lomas et al., 2013). Our results show that subduction of oxygen-rich, nitrate-low surface waters occurring after the spring bloom can increase depth-integrated (50-100m) O2 anomaly by 1.64 ± 0.60 mol/m2 from May to October, and decrease nitrate by 0.028 ± 0.022 mol/m2. Due to simultaneous injection of very high non-sinking organic matter with subduction, the tendency towards large oxygen build-up is suppressed by organic matter remineralization as the watermass travels through the shallow subsurface. However, this compensation is incomplete (70-80%), such that a small net increase of O2 anomaly from May to October (0.32 ± 0.15 mol/m2) in the seasonal thermocline is observed, despite negative net community production (NCP). Positive NCP within the mixed layer is potentially supported by vertical supply of remineralized nutrients into the mixed layer, and we estimate these processes can contribute 30%-50% of the annual NCP near Bermuda. However, the net impact of horizontal advection is to decrease thermocline nitrate at seasonal time scale, thus leads to the previous conundrum of "DIC drawdown in the mixed layer but no visible nitrate". The mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical cycles in the NASG would improve our understanding how future climate change may impact the ocean biological carbon pump via perturbations to the oceanic upper layer circulation.

  15. The mechanistic study of Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase based on steady- and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Renata A G; Ferreira, Patricia; Medina, Milagros; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODHLm) has been considered as a potential therapeutic target against leishmaniasis. DHODHLm, a member of class 1A DHODH, oxidizes dihydro-orotate (DHO) to orotate (ORO) during pyrimidine biosynthesis using fumarate (FUM) as the oxidizing substrate. In the present study, the chemistry of reduction and reoxidation of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor in DHODHLm was examined by steady- and pre-steady state kinetics under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Our results provide for the first time the experimental evidence of co-operative behaviour in class 1A DHODH regulated by DHO binding and reveal that the initial reductive flavin half-reaction follows a mechanism with two steps. The first step is consistent with FMN reduction and shows a hyperbolic dependence on the DHO concentration with a limiting rate (kred) of 110±6 s(-1) and a K(DHO) d of 180±27 μM. Dissociation of the reduced flavin-ORO complex corresponds to the second step, with a limiting rate of 6 s(-1). In the oxidative half-reaction, the oxygen-sensitive reoxidation of the reduced FMN cofactor of DHODHLm by FUM exhibited a hyperbolic saturation profile dependent on FUM concentration allowing estimation of K(FUM) d and the limiting rate (kreox) of 258±53 μM and 35±2 s(-1), respectively. Comparison between steady- and pre-steady-state parameters together with studies of interaction for DHODHLm with both ORO and succinate (SUC), suggests that ORO release is the rate-limiting step in overall catalysis. Our results provide evidence of mechanistic differences between class 1A and class 2 individual half-reactions to be exploited for the development of selective inhibitors.

  16. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  17. GHGRP Industrial Profiles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses. This page hosts data highlights for all sectors.

  18. Microbial community dynamics in soil aggregates shape biogeochemical gas fluxes from soil profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates dynamically adjust their activity and composition in response to variations in hydration and other external conditions. These rapid dynamics shape signatures of biogeochemical activity and gas fluxes emitted from soil profiles. Mechanistic models of microbial processes in unsaturated aggregate pore networks revealed dynamic interplay between oxic and anoxic microsites that are jointly shaped by hydration and by aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities. The spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) flicker in time (hot moments) and support significant anaerobic microbial activity even in aerated soil profiles. We employed an individual-based model for microbial community life in soil aggregate assemblies represented by 3-D angular pore networks with profiles of water, carbon, and oxygen that vary with soil depth as boundary conditions. The study integrates microbial activity within aggregates of different sizes and soil depth to obtain biogeochemical fluxes over the soil profile. The results quantify impacts of dynamic shifts in microbial community composition on CO2 and N2O production rates in soil profiles in good agreement with experimental data. Aggregate size distribution and the shape of resource profiles in a soil determine how hydration dynamics shape denitrification and carbon utilization rates. Results from the mechanistic model for microbial activity in aggregates of different sizes were used to derive parameters for analytical representation of soil biogeochemical processes across large scales of interest for hydrological and climate models.

  19. PROFILER: 1D galaxy light profile decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.

    2017-05-01

    Written in Python, PROFILER analyzes the radial surface brightness profiles of galaxies. It accurately models a wide range of galaxies and galaxy components, such as elliptical galaxies, the bulges of spiral and lenticular galaxies, nuclear sources, discs, bars, rings, and spiral arms with a variety of parametric functions routinely employed in the field (Sérsic, core-Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian, Moffat and Ferrers). In addition, Profiler can employ the broken exponential model (relevant for disc truncations or antitruncations) and two special cases of the edge-on disc model: namely along the major axis (in the disc plane) and along the minor axis (perpendicular to the disc plane).

  20. Mechanistic effects of autophosphorylation on receptor tyrosine kinase catalysis: enzymatic characterization of Tie2 and phospho-Tie2.

    PubMed

    Murray, B W; Padrique, E S; Pinko, C; McTigue, M A

    2001-08-28

    Activation of receptor tyrosine kinases by autophosphorylation is one of the most common and critical transformations in signal transduction, yet its role in catalysis remains controversial. Autophosphorylation of the angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase Tie2 was studied in terms of the autophosphorylation sites, sequence of phosphorylation at these sites, kinetic effects, and mechanistic consequences. Isoelectric focusing electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis of a Tie2 autophosphorylation time course showed that Tyr992 on the putative activation loop was phosphorylated first followed by Tyr1108 in the C-terminal tail (previously unidentified autophosphorylation site). Autophosphorylation of Tie2 to produce pTie2 resulted in a 100-fold increase in k(cat) and a 460-fold increase in k(cat)/K(m). Viscosity studies showed that the unphosphorylated Tie2 was partially limited by product diffusion ((k(cat))(eta) = 0.67 +/- 0.06), while product release was more rate-limiting ((k(cat))(eta) = 0.94 +/- 0.08) for autophosphorylated Tie2 (pTie2). Furthermore, autophosphorylation did not significantly affect the phosphoacceptor dissociation constants. There was a significant (k(cat))(H)/(k(cat))(D) solvent isotope effect (SIE) for unphosphorylated Tie2 (2.42 +/- 0.12) and modest SIE (1.28 +/- 0.04) for pTie2, which is consistent with the chemistry step being more rate-limiting for Tie2 as compared to pTie2. The pH-rate profiles of Tie2 and pTie2 revealed a >0.5 unit shift in the pK(a) values of catalytically relevant ionizable residues upon autophosphorylation. The shift in rate-limiting step will result in a different distribution of enzyme pools (e.g., E, E*S, E*P, etc.) which may modulate the susceptibility to inhibition. Tie2 and pTie2 were profiled with a panel of known ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. Tie2 activation perturbs catalytic residue ionizations, shifts the rate-limiting step to almost exclusive diffusion-control, and transforms the kinase into a more

  1. Organophotocatalysis: Insights into the Mechanistic Aspects of Thiourea-Mediated Intermolecular [2+2] Photocycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Vallavoju, Nandini; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Pemberton, Barry C; Jockusch, Steffen; Sibi, Mukund P; Sivaguru, Jayaraman

    2016-04-25

    Mechanistic investigations of the intermolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition of coumarin with tetramethylethylene mediated by thiourea catalysts reveal that the reaction is enabled by a combination of minimized aggregation, enhanced intersystem crossing, and altered excited-state lifetime(s). These results clarify how the excited-state reactivity can be manipulated through catalyst-substrate interactions and reveal a third mechanistic pathway for thiourea-mediated organo-photocatalysis.

  2. Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and Scalable Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0319 Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and...controlled growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using vapor phase epitaxy: mechanistic understanding and scalable production FA9550-14-1-0115 Zhou...producing nanotubes of predefined chirality. By combining nanotube separation with synthesis, we have achieved controlled growth of nanotubes with

  3. Assessment of hepatotoxic liabilities by transcript profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruepp, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.ruepp@roche.com; Boess, Franziska; Suter, Laura; Vera, Maria Cristina de; Steiner, Guido; Steele, Thomas; Weiser, Thomas; Albertini, Silvio

    2005-09-01

    Male Wistar rats were treated with various model compounds or the appropriate vehicle controls in order to create a reference database for toxicogenomics assessment of novel compounds. Hepatotoxic compounds in the database were either known hepatotoxicants or showed hepatotoxicity during preclinical testing. Histopathology and clinical chemistry data were used to anchor the transcript profiles to an established endpoint (steatosis, cholestasis, direct acting, peroxisomal proliferation or nontoxic/control). These reference data were analyzed using a supervised learning method (support vector machines, SVM) to generate classification rules. This predictive model was subsequently used to assess compounds with regard to a potential hepatotoxic liability. A steatotic and a non-hepatotoxic 5HT{sub 6} receptor antagonist compound from the same series were successfully discriminated by this toxicogenomics model. Additionally, an example is shown where a hepatotoxic liability was correctly recognized in the absence of pathological findings. In vitro experiments and a dog study confirmed the correctness of the toxicogenomics alert. Another interesting observation was that transcript profiles indicate toxicologically relevant changes at an earlier timepoint than routinely used methods. Together, these results support the useful application of toxicogenomics in raising alerts for adverse effects and generating mechanistic hypotheses that can be followed up by confirmatory experiments.

  4. Examining the Use of a Mechanistic Model to Generate an In Vivo/In Vitro Correlation: Journey Through a Thought Process.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Bipin; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2016-09-01

    The attention and interest in establishing in vivo/in vitro correlations (IVIVCs) is grounded in its tremendous utility as a prognostic tool. It can be used to support formulation optimization, predict in vivo drug exposure across a potential patient population, select a biologically relevant in vitro dissolution test condition, and support the use of in vitro dissolution data as a surrogate for in vivo bioequivalence trials. The pharmacological and statistical implications of this correlation are linked to the method by which the IVIVC was determined and to the assumptions and optimization approaches integrated into the estimation procedure. Using previously published data generated in normal healthy volunteers, an IVIVC for metoprolol was established using a mechanistic modeling approach. Within that framework, we explored the consequences of (1) our method of fitting a single Weibull function to the in vivo dissolution, (2) our selection of weighting scheme and optimization approaches, (3) the impact of applying a fixed versus fitted gastric emptying time, and 4) the importance of factoring population variability into our IVIVC estimation and profile reconvolution. We identified those factors found to be critical in terms of their influence on the accuracy of our predicted systemic metoprolol concentration-time profiles. We considered the strengths and weaknesses of our approach and discussed how the results of this study may impact efforts to generate IVIVCs with compounds presenting physicochemical characteristics different from that of metoprolol.

  5. In vitro--in silico--in vivo drug absorption model development based on mechanistic gastrointestinal simulation and artificial neural networks: nifedipine osmotic release tablets case study.

    PubMed

    Ilić, Marija; Ðuriš, Jelena; Kovačević, Ivan; Ibrić, Svetlana; Parojčić, Jelena

    2014-10-01

    In vitro--in vivo correlations (IVIVC) are generally accepted as a valuable tool in modified release formulation development aimed at (i) quantifying the in vivo drug delivery profile and formulation related effects on absorption; (ii) establishing clinically relevant dissolution specifications and (iii) supporting the biowaiver claims. The aim of the present study was to develop relevant IVIVC models based on mechanistic gastrointestinal simulation (GIS) and artificial neural network (ANN) analysis and to evaluate their applicability and usefulness in biopharmaceutical drug characterisation. Nifedipine osmotic release tablets were selected as model drug product on the basis of their robustness, dissolution limited drug absorption and the availability of relevant literature data. Although the osmotic release tablets have been designed to be robust against the influence of physiological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract, notable differences in nifedipine dissolution kinetics were observed depending on the in vitro experimental conditions employed. The results obtained indicate that both GIS and ANN model developed were sensitive to input kinetics represented by the in vitro profiles obtained under various experimental conditions. Different in silico approaches may be successfully employed in the in vitro--in silico--in vivo model development. However, the results obtained may differ and relevant outcomes are sensitive to the methodology employed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanistic and Pharmacological Characterization of PF-04457845: A Highly Potent and Selective Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Inhibitor That Reduces Inflammatory and Noninflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah E.; Liimatta, Marya B.; Beidler, David; Sadagopan, Nalini; Dudley, David T.; Young, Tim; Wren, Paul; Zhang, Yanhua; Swaney, Steven; Van Becelaere, Keri; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Nomura, Daniel K.; Bhattachar, Shobha N.; Stiff, Cory; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Johnson, Douglas S.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) anandamide is principally degraded by the integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Pharmacological blockade of FAAH has emerged as a potentially attractive strategy for augmenting endocannabinoid signaling and retaining the beneficial effects of cannabinoid receptor activation, while avoiding the undesirable side effects, such as weight gain and impairments in cognition and motor control, observed with direct cannabinoid receptor 1 agonists. Here, we report the detailed mechanistic and pharmacological characterization of N-pyridazin-3-yl-4-(3-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]oxy}benzylidene)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-04457845), a highly efficacious and selective FAAH inhibitor. Mechanistic studies confirm that PF-04457845 is a time-dependent, covalent FAAH inhibitor that carbamylates FAAH's catalytic serine nucleophile. PF-04457845 inhibits human FAAH with high potency (kinact/Ki = 40,300 M−1s−1; IC50 = 7.2 nM) and is exquisitely selective in vivo as determined by activity-based protein profiling. Oral administration of PF-04457845 produced potent antinociceptive effects in both inflammatory [complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)] and noninflammatory (monosodium iodoacetate) pain models in rats, with a minimum effective dose of 0.1 mg/kg (CFA model). PF-04457845 displayed a long duration of action as a single oral administration at 1 mg/kg showed in vivo efficacy for 24 h with a concomitant near-complete inhibition of FAAH activity and maximal sustained elevation of anandamide in brain. Significantly, PF-04457845-treated mice at 10 mg/kg elicited no effect in motility, catalepsy, and body temperature. Based on its exceptional selectivity and in vivo efficacy, combined with long duration of action and optimal pharmacokinetic properties, PF-04457845 is a clinical candidate for the treatment of pain and other nervous system disorders. PMID:21505060

  7. Inhibition of 4EBP phosphorylation mediates the cytotoxic effect of mechanistic target of rapamycin kinase inhibitors in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chengfeng; Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xianhuo; Meng, Bin; Zhang, Huilai; Wang, Ping; Vose, Julie M; Chan, Wing C; McKeithan, Timothy W; Fu, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 is a central integrator of nutrient and growth factor inputs that controls cell growth in eukaryotes. The second generation of mTOR kinase inhibitors (TORKi), directly targeting the mTOR catalytic site, are more effective than rapamycin and its analogs in cancer treatment, particularly in inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effect of TORKi remains elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that TORKi-induced apoptosis is predominantly dependent on the loss of mTOR complex 1-mediated 4EBP activation. Knocking out RICTOR, a key component of mTOR complex 2, or inhibiting p70S6K has little effect on TORKi-induced apoptosis. Conversely, increasing the eIF4E:4EBP ratio by either overexpressing eIF4E or knocking out 4EBP1/2 protects lymphoma cells from TORKi-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, downregulation of MCL1 expression plays an important role in TORKi-induced apoptosis, whereas BCL-2 overexpression confers resistance to TORKi treatment. We further show that the therapeutic effect of TORKi in aggressive B-cell lymphomas can be predicted by BH3 profiling, and improved by combining it with pro-apoptotic drugs, especially BCL-2 inhibitors, both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, the study herein provides mechanistic insight into TORKi cytotoxicity and identified a potential way to optimize its efficacy in the clinical treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphoma. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. ReactionPredictor: prediction of complex chemical reactions at the mechanistic level using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Baldi, Pierre

    2012-10-22

    Proposing reasonable mechanisms and predicting the course of chemical reactions is important to the practice of organic chemistry. Approaches to reaction prediction have historically used obfuscating representations and manually encoded patterns or rules. Here we present ReactionPredictor, a machine learning approach to reaction prediction that models elementary, mechanistic reactions as interactions between approximate molecular orbitals (MOs). A training data set of productive reactions known to occur at reasonable rates and yields and verified by inclusion in the literature or textbooks is derived from an existing rule-based system and expanded upon with manual curation from graduate level textbooks. Using this training data set of complex polar, hypervalent, radical, and pericyclic reactions, a two-stage machine learning prediction framework is trained and validated. In the first stage, filtering models trained at the level of individual MOs are used to reduce the space of possible reactions to consider. In the second stage, ranking models over the filtered space of possible reactions are used to order the reactions such that the productive reactions are the top ranked. The resulting model, ReactionPredictor, perfectly ranks polar reactions 78.1% of the time and recovers all productive reactions 95.7% of the time when allowing for small numbers of errors. Pericyclic and radical reactions are perfectly ranked 85.8% and 77.0% of the time, respectively, rising to >93% recovery for both reaction types with a small number of allowed errors. Decisions about which of the polar, pericyclic, or radical reaction type ranking models to use can be made with >99% accuracy. Finally, for multistep reaction pathways, we implement the first mechanistic pathway predictor using constrained tree-search to discover a set of reasonable mechanistic steps from given reactants to given products. Webserver implementations of both the single step and pathway versions of Reaction

  9. Mechanistic pathways of mindfulness meditation in combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wahbeh, Helané; Goodrich, Elena; Goy, Elizabeth; Oken, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study’s objective was to evaluate the effect of two common components of meditation (mindfulness and slow breathing) on potential mechanistic pathways. Methods 102 combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to: 1) the body scan mindfulness meditation (MM), 2) slow breathing (SB) with a biofeedback device, 3) mindful awareness of the breath with an intention to slow the breath (MM+SB), or 4) sitting quietly (SQ). Participants had six weekly one-on-one sessions with 20 minutes of daily home practice. The mechanistic pathways and measures were: 1) Autonomic Nervous System: hyperarousal symptoms, heart-rate (HR), heart-rate variability (HRV); 2) Frontal Cortex Activity: Attentional Network Task (ANT) conflict effect and event-related negativity, and intrusive thoughts; and 3) Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: awakening cortisol. PTSD measures were also evaluated. Results Meditation participants had significant but modest within-group improvement in PTSD and related symptoms although there were no between-group effects. Perceived impression of PTSD symptom improvement was greater in the meditation arms compared to controls. Resting respiration decreased in the meditation arms compared to SQ. For the mechanistic pathways 1) Subjective hyperarousal symptoms improved within-group (but not between-group) for MM, MM+SB, and SQ while HR and HRV did not; 2) Intrusive thoughts decreased in MM compared to MM+SB and SB while the ANT measures did not change; and 3) MM had lower awakening cortisol within-group but not between-group. Conclusion Treatment effects were mostly specific to self-report rather than physiological measures. Continued research is needed to further evaluate mindfulness meditation’s mechanism in people with PTSD. PMID:26797725

  10. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  11. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Beth J.; Kaandorp, Joepe J.; Kane, Andrew D.; Camm, Emily J.; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M.; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S.; Derks, Jan B.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Giussani, Dino A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2–1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P < 0.05). Hypoxic pregnancy in young offspring accelerated endothelial dysfunction (maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine: 42 ± 1%, P < 0.05) but this was dissociated from increased vascular short telomere length abundance. Maternal allopurinol rescued maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine in aged offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy but not in young offspring of hypoxic pregnancy. Aged offspring of hypoxic allopurinol pregnancy compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P < 0.05). These data provide evidence for divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.—Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26932929

  12. Validating Mechanistic Sorption Model Parameters and Processes for Reactive Transport in Alluvium

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S K; Rose, T P; Phinney, D L

    2002-05-02

    The laboratory batch and flow-through experiments presented in this report provide a basis for validating the mechanistic surface complexation and ion exchange model we use in our hydrologic source term (HST) simulations. Batch sorption experiments were used to examine the effect of solution composition on sorption. Flow-through experiments provided for an analysis of the transport behavior of sorbing elements and tracers which includes dispersion and fluid accessibility effects. Analysis of downstream flow-through column fluids allowed for evaluation of weakly-sorbing element transport. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of the core after completion of the flow-through experiments permitted the evaluation of transport of strongly sorbing elements. A comparison between these data and model predictions provides additional constraints to our model and improves our confidence in near-field HST model parameters. In general, cesium, strontium, samarium, europium, neptunium, and uranium behavior could be accurately predicted using our mechanistic approach but only after some adjustment was made to the model parameters. The required adjustments included a reduction in strontium affinity for smectite, an increase in cesium affinity for smectite and illite, a reduction in iron oxide and calcite reactive surface area, and a change in clinoptilolite reaction constants to reflect a more recently published set of data. In general, these adjustments are justifiable because they fall within a range consistent with our understanding of the parameter uncertainties. These modeling results suggest that the uncertainty in the sorption model parameters must be accounted for to validate the mechanistic approach. The uncertainties in predicting the sorptive behavior of U-1a and UE-5n alluvium also suggest that these uncertainties must be propagated to nearfield HST and large-scale corrective action unit (CAU) models.

  13. A dynamic and mechanistic model of PCB bioaccumulation in the European hake ( Merluccius merluccius)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodiguel, Xavier; Maury, Olivier; Mellon-Duval, Capucine; Roupsard, François; Le Guellec, Anne-Marie; Loizeau, Véronique

    2009-08-01

    Bioaccumulation is difficult to document because responses differ among chemical compounds, with environmental conditions, and physiological processes characteristic of each species. We use a mechanistic model, based on the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, to take into account this complexity and study factors impacting accumulation of organic pollutants in fish through ontogeny. The bioaccumulation model proposed is a comprehensive approach that relates evolution of hake PCB contamination to physiological information about the fish, such as diet, metabolism, reserve and reproduction status. The species studied is the European hake ( Merluccius merluccius, L. 1758). The model is applied to study the total concentration and the lipid normalised concentration of 4 PCB congeners in male and female hakes from the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean sea) and the Bay of Biscay (NE Atlantic ocean). Outputs of the model compare consistently to measurements over the life span of fish. Simulation results clearly demonstrate the relative effects of food contamination, growth and reproduction on the PCB bioaccumulation in hake. The same species living in different habitats and exposed to different PCB prey concentrations exhibit marked difference in the body accumulation of PCBs. At the adult stage, female hakes have a lower PCB concentration compared to males for a given length. We successfully simulated these sex-specific PCB concentrations by considering two mechanisms: a higher energy allocation to growth for females and a transfer of PCBs from the female to its eggs when allocating lipids from reserve to eggs. Finally, by its mechanistic description of physiological processes, the model is relevant for other species and sets the stage for a mechanistic understanding of toxicity and ecological effects of organic contaminants in marine organisms.

  14. A mechanistic model of ion-exchange chromatography on polymer fiber stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Winderl, Johannes; Hahn, Tobias; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-12-02

    Fibers are prominent among novel stationary phase supports for preparative chromatography. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of fiber-based adsorbents for high productivity downstream processing in both batch and continuous mode, but so far the development of these materials and of processes employing these materials has solely been based on experimental data. In this study we assessed whether mechanistic modeling can be performed on fiber-based adsorbents. With a column randomly filled with short cut hydrogel grafted anion exchange fibers, we tested whether tracer, linear gradient elution, and breakthrough data could be reproduced by mechanistic models. Successful modeling was achieved for all of the considered experiments, for both non-retained and retained molecules. For the fibers used in this study the best results were obtained with a transport-dispersive model in combination with a steric mass action isotherm. This approach accurately accounted for the convection and dispersion of non-retained tracers, and the breakthrough and elution behaviors of three different proteins with sizes ranging from 6 to 160kDa were accurately modeled, with simulation results closely resembling the experimental data. The estimated model parameters were plausible both from their physical meaning, and from an analysis of the underlying model assumptions. Parameters were determined within good confidence levels; the average confidence estimate was below 7% for confidence levels of 95%. This shows that fiber-based adsorbents can be modeled mechanistically, which will be valuable for the future design and evaluation of these novel materials and for the development of processes employing such materials.

  15. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Kaandorp, Joepe J; Kane, Andrew D; Camm, Emily J; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S; Derks, Jan B; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-05-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2-1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P < 0.05). Hypoxic pregnancy in young offspring accelerated endothelial dysfunction (maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine: 42 ± 1%, P < 0.05) but this was dissociated from increased vascular short telomere length abundance. Maternal allopurinol rescued maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine in aged offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy but not in young offspring of hypoxic pregnancy. Aged offspring of hypoxic allopurinol pregnancy compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P < 0.05). These data provide evidence for divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.-Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease. © FASEB.

  16. Mechanistic Pathways of Mindfulness Meditation in Combat Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wahbeh, Helané; Goodrich, Elena; Goy, Elizabeth; Oken, Barry S

    2016-04-01

    This study's objective was to evaluate the effect of two common components of meditation (mindfulness and slow breathing) on potential mechanistic pathways. A total of 102 combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomized to (a) the body scan mindfulness meditation (MM), (b) slow breathing (SB) with a biofeedback device, (c) mindful awareness of the breath with an intention to slow the breath (MM+SB), or (d) sitting quietly (SQ). Participants had 6 weekly one-on-one sessions with 20 minutes of daily home practice. The mechanistic pathways and measures were as follows: (a) autonomic nervous system (hyperarousal symptoms, heart rate [HR], and heart rate variability [HRV]); (b) frontal cortex activity (attentional network task [ANT] conflict effect and event-related negativity and intrusive thoughts); and (c) hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (awakening cortisol). PTSD measures were also evaluated. Meditation participants had significant but modest within-group improvement in PTSD and related symptoms, although there were no effects between groups. Perceived impression of PTSD symptom improvement was greater in the meditation arms compared with controls. Resting respiration decreased in the meditation arms compared with SQ. For the mechanistic pathways, (a) subjective hyperarousal symptoms improved within-group (but not between groups) for MM, MM+SB, and SQ, while HR and HRV did not; (b) intrusive thoughts decreased in MM compared with MM+SB and SB, while the ANT measures did not change; and (c) MM had lower awakening cortisol within-group (but not between groups). Treatment effects were mostly specific to self-report rather than physiological measures. Continued research is needed to further evaluate mindfulness meditation's mechanism in people with PTSD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Inferring Mechanistic Parameters from Amyloid Formation Kinetics by Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    PubMed

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri; Nath, Abhinav

    2017-03-14

    Amyloid formation is implicated in a number of human diseases, and is thought to proceed via a nucleation-dependent polymerization mechanism. Experimenters often wish to relate changes in amyloid formation kinetics, for example, in response to small molecules to specific mechanistic steps along this pathway. However, fitting kinetic fibril formation data to a complex model including explicit rate constants results in an ill-posed problem with a vast number of potential solutions. The levels of uncertainty remaining in parameters calculated from these models, arising both from experimental noise and high levels of degeneracy or codependency in parameters, is often unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a combination of explicit mathematical models with an approximate Bayesian computation approach can be used to assign the mechanistic effects of modulators on amyloid fibril formation. We show that even when exact rate constants cannot be extracted, parameters derived from these rate constants can be recovered and used to assign mechanistic effects and their relative magnitudes with a great deal of confidence. Furthermore, approximate Bayesian computation provides a robust method for visualizing uncertainty remaining in the model parameters, regardless of its origin. We apply these methods to the problem of heparin-mediated tau polymerization, which displays complex kinetic behavior not amenable to analysis by more traditional methods. Our analysis indicates that the role of heparin cannot be explained by enhancement of nucleation alone, as has been previously proposed. The methods described here are applicable to a wide range of systems, as models can be easily adapted to account for new reactions and reversibility.

  18. Molecular Signaling Network Motifs Provide a Mechanistic Basis for Cellular Threshold Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sudin; Conolly, Rory B.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasingly, there is a move toward using in vitro toxicity testing to assess human health risk due to chemical exposure. As with in vivo toxicity testing, an important question for in vitro results is whether there are thresholds for adverse cellular responses. Empirical evaluations may show consistency with thresholds, but the main evidence has to come from mechanistic considerations. Objectives: Cellular response behaviors depend on the molecular pathway and circuitry in the cell and the manner in which chemicals perturb these circuits. Understanding circuit structures that are inherently capable of resisting small perturbations and producing threshold responses is an important step towards mechanistically interpreting in vitro testing data. Methods: Here we have examined dose–response characteristics for several biochemical network motifs. These network motifs are basic building blocks of molecular circuits underpinning a variety of cellular functions, including adaptation, homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. For each motif, we present biological examples and models to illustrate how thresholds arise from specific network structures. Discussion and Conclusion: Integral feedback, feedforward, and transcritical bifurcation motifs can generate thresholds. Other motifs (e.g., proportional feedback and ultrasensitivity)produce responses where the slope in the low-dose region is small and stays close to the baseline. Feedforward control may lead to nonmonotonic or hormetic responses. We conclude that network motifs provide a basis for understanding thresholds for cellular responses. Computational pathway modeling of these motifs and their combinations occurring in molecular signaling networks will be a key element in new risk assessment approaches based on in vitro cellular assays. Citation: Zhang Q, Bhattacharya S, Conolly RB, Clewell HJ III, Kaminski NE, Andersen ME. 2014. Molecular signaling network motifs provide a

  19. Mechanistic Explanations for Restricted Evolutionary Paths That Emerge from Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cotterell, James; Sharpe, James

    2013-01-01

    The extent and the nature of the constraints to evolutionary trajectories are central issues in biology. Constraints can be the result of systems dynamics causing a non-linear mapping between genotype and phenotype. How prevalent are these developmental constraints and what is their mechanistic basis? Although this has been extensively explored at the level of epistatic interactions between nucleotides within a gene, or amino acids within a protein, selection acts at the level of the whole organism, and therefore epistasis between disparate genes in the genome is expected due to their functional interactions within gene regulatory networks (GRNs) which are responsible for many aspects of organismal phenotype. Here we explore epistasis within GRNs capable of performing a common developmental function – converting a continuous morphogen input into discrete spatial domains. By exploring the full complement of GRN wiring designs that are able to perform this function, we analyzed all possible mutational routes between functional GRNs. Through this study we demonstrate that mechanistic constraints are common for GRNs that perform even a simple function. We demonstrate a common mechanistic cause for such a constraint involving complementation between counter-balanced gene-gene interactions. Furthermore we show how such constraints can be bypassed by means of “permissive” mutations that buffer changes in a direct route between two GRN topologies that would normally be unviable. We show that such bypasses are common and thus we suggest that unlike what was observed in protein sequence-function relationships, the “tape of life” is less reproducible when one considers higher levels of biological organization. PMID:23613807

  20. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; ...

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  1. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  2. Bird Migration Under Climate Change - A Mechanistic Approach Using Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.; Blattner, Tim; Messmer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The broad-scale reductions and shifts that may be expected under climate change in the availability and quality of stopover habitat for long-distance migrants is an area of increasing concern for conservation biologists. Researchers generally have taken two broad approaches to the modeling of migration behaviour to understand the impact of these changes on migratory bird populations. These include models based on causal processes and their response to environmental stimulation, "mechanistic models", or models that primarily are based on observed animal distribution patterns and the correlation of these patterns with environmental variables, i.e. "data driven" models. Investigators have applied the latter technique to forecast changes in migration patterns with changes in the environment, for example, as might be expected under climate change, by forecasting how the underlying environmental data layers upon which the relationships are built will change over time. The learned geostatstical correlations are then applied to the modified data layers.. However, this is problematic. Even if the projections of how the underlying data layers will change are correct, it is not evident that the statistical relationships will remain the same, i.e. that the animal organism may not adapt its' behaviour to the changing conditions. Mechanistic models that explicitly take into account the physical, biological, and behaviour responses of an organism as well as the underlying changes in the landscape offer an alternative to address these shortcomings. The availability of satellite remote sensing observations at multiple spatial and temporal scales, coupled with advances in climate modeling and information technologies enable the application of the mechanistic models to predict how continental bird migration patterns may change in response to environmental change. In earlier work, we simulated the impact of effects of wetland loss and inter-annual variability on the fitness of

  3. New mechanistic insights in the NH3-SCR reactions at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggeri, Maria Pia; Selleri, Tomasso; Nova, Isabella; Tronconi, Enrico; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2016-05-06

    The present study is focused on the investigation of the low temperature Standard SCR reaction mechanism over Fe- and Cu-promoted zeolites. Different techniques are employed, including in situ DRIFTS, transient reaction analysis and chemical trapping techniques. The results present strong evidence of nitrite formation in the oxidative activation of NO and of their role in SCR reactions. These elements lead to a deeper understanding of the standard SCR chemistry at low temperature and can potentially improve the consistency of mechanistic mathematical models. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanism on a fundamental level can contribute to the development of improved SCR catalysts.

  4. How Do Phosphinates React with Unactivated Alkenes Under Organic Photocatalyzed Conditions? Substrate Scope and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Fausti, Giovanni; Morlet-Savary, Fabrice; Lalevée, Jacques; Gaumont, Annie-Claude; Lakhdar, Sami

    2017-02-10

    The first visible-light-mediated, metal-free hydrophosphinylation of unactivated alkenes with ethyl and butyl phosphinates is described. The reaction works with a low catalyst loading of 9-mesityl-10-methylacridinium perchlorate (Fukuzumi photocatalyst, 0.5 mol %) in the presence of diphenyliodonium triflate as oxidant. The reaction proceeds smoothly and covers a broad scope of substrates. Detailed mechanistic investigations, including EPR spectroscopy, fluorescence and steady-state photolysis, allowed the mechanism of this photoreaction to be rationalized. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Kysela, David T; Randich, Amelia M; Caccamo, Paul D; Brun, Yves V

    2016-10-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance.

  6. Prediction of Damage in Randomly Oriented Short-Fibre Composites by means of A Mechanistic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-05-01

    A micro-macro mechanistic approach to damage in short-fiber composites is developed in this paper. At the micro-scale, the damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding are analyzed to define the associated damage variables. The stiffness reduction law dependent on these variables is then established using micromechanical models and average orientation distributions of fibers and microcracks. The macroscopic response is obtained by means of thermodynamics of continuous media, continuum damage mechanics and a finite element formulation.

  7. Problems in mechanistic theoretical models for cell transformation by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Holley, W.R.

    1991-10-01

    A mechanistic model based on yields of double strand breaks has been developed to determine the dose response curves for cell transformation frequencies. At its present stage the model is applicable to immortal cell lines and to various qualities (X-rays, Neon and Iron) of ionizing radiation. Presently, we have considered four types of processes which can lead to activation phenomena: (1) point mutation events on a regulatory segment of selected oncogenes, (2) inactivation of suppressor genes, through point mutation, (3) deletion of a suppressor gene by a single track, and (4) deletion of a suppressor gene by two tracks.

  8. A comprehensive mechanistic model for simulating algal growth dynamics in photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Thomas, Jeenu; Bose, Purnendu

    2017-06-01

    A comprehensive mechanistic model for describing algal growth dynamics in a photobioreactor was developed in this work with state of the art understanding and realistic assumptions for major associated processes. The model included 27 state variables related to various algal processes. This model was validated with extensive experimental data obtained from independent growth experiments in batch reactors, and was able to simulate system performance reasonably well. The comprehensive nature of the formulation also highlights the complex inter-relationship between all processes, and provides a tool for gaining more systematic insights into algal behavior in photobioreactors and other such systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuronal nicotinic receptors as novel targets for inflammation and neuroprotection: mechanistic considerations and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Bencherif, Merouane

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have confirmed the potential for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (NNR)-mediated neuroprotection and, more recently, its anti-inflammatory effects. The mechanistic overlap between these pathways and the ubiquitous effects observed following diverse insults suggest that NNRs modulate fundamental pathways involved in cell survival. These results have wide-reaching implications for the design of experimental therapeutics that regulate inflammatory and anti-apoptotic responses through NNRs and represent an initial step toward understanding the benefits of novel therapeutic strategies for the management of central nervous system disorders that target neuronal survival and associated inflammatory processes. PMID:19498416

  10. Parameterization of phosphine ligands reveals mechanistic pathways and predicts reaction outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, Zachary L.; Milo, Anat; Hickey, David P.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic foundation behind the identity of a phosphine ligand that best promotes a desired reaction outcome is often non-intuitive, and thus has been addressed in numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this work, multivariate correlations of reaction outcomes using 38 different phosphine ligands were combined with classic potentiometric analyses to study a Suzuki reaction, for which the site selectivity of oxidative addition is highly dependent on the nature of the phosphine. These studies shed light on the generality of hypotheses regarding the structural influence of different classes of phosphine ligands on the reaction mechanism(s), and deliver a methodology that should prove useful in future studies of phosphine ligands.

  11. Catalytic reactions of titanium alkoxides with Grignard reagents and imines: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akshai; Samuelson, Ashoka G

    2010-08-02

    The reactivity of Grignard reagents towards imines in the presence of catalytic and stoichiometric amounts of titanium alkoxides is reported. Alkylation, reduction, and coupling of imines take place. Whereas reductive coupling is the major reaction in stoichiometric reactions, alkylation is favored in catalytic reactions. Mechanistic studies clearly indicate that intermediates involved in the two reactions are different. Catalytic reactions involve a metal-alkyl complex. This has been confirmed by reactions of deuterium-labeled substrates and different alkylating agents. Under the stoichiometric conditions, however, titanium olefin complexes are formed through reductive elimination, probably through a multinuclear intermediate.

  12. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  13. Development of a mechanistically based computer simulation of nitrogen oxide absorption in packed towers

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer simulation for nitrogen oxide (NO/sub x/) scrubbing in packed towers was developed for use in process design and process control. This simulation implements a mechanistically based mathematical model, which was formulated from (1) an exhaustive literature review; (2) previous NO/sub x/ scrubbing experience with sieve-plate towers; and (3) comparisons of sequential sets of experiments. Nitrogen oxide scrubbing is characterized by simultaneous absorption and desorption phenomena: the model development is based on experiments designed to feature these two phenomena. The model was then successfully tested in experiments designed to put it in jeopardy.

  14. Progress toward an explicit mechanistic model for the light-driven pump, bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    Recent crystallographic information about the structure of bacteriorhodopsin and some of its photointermediates, together with a large amount of spectroscopic and mutational data, suggest a mechanistic model for how this protein couples light energy to the translocation of protons across the membrane. Now nearing completion, this detailed molecular model will describe the nature of the steric and electrostatic conflicts at the photoisomerized retinal, as well as the means by which it induces proton transfers in the two half-channels leading to the two membrane surfaces, thereby causing unidirectional, uphill transport.

  15. The Cycloaddition of the Benzimidazolium Ylides with Alkynes: New Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Moldoveanu, Costel; Zbancioc, Gheorghita; Mantu, Dorina; Maftei, Dan; Mangalagiu, Ionel

    2016-01-01

    New insights concerning the reaction mechanism in the cycloaddition reaction of benzimidazolium ylides to activated alkynes are presented. The proposed pathway leading both to 2-(1H-pyrrol-1-yl)anilines and to pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalin-4(5H)-ones involves an opening of the imidazole ring from the cycloaddition product, followed by a nucleophilic attack of the aminic nitrogen to a proximal carbonyl group and the elimination of a leaving group. The mechanistic considerations are fully supported by experimental data, including the XRD resolved structure of the key reaction intermediate. PMID:27224656

  16. Parameterization of phosphine ligands reveals mechanistic pathways and predicts reaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Zachary L; Milo, Anat; Hickey, David P; Sigman, Matthew S

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic foundation behind the identity of a phosphine ligand that best promotes a desired reaction outcome is often non-intuitive, and thus has been addressed in numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this work, multivariate correlations of reaction outcomes using 38 different phosphine ligands were combined with classic potentiometric analyses to study a Suzuki reaction, for which the site selectivity of oxidative addition is highly dependent on the nature of the phosphine. These studies shed light on the generality of hypotheses regarding the structural influence of different classes of phosphine ligands on the reaction mechanism(s), and deliver a methodology that should prove useful in future studies of phosphine ligands.

  17. A mechanistic study of the effects of nitrogen on the corrosion properties of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.R.; Bennekom, A. van

    1995-12-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloying on the corrosion properties of stainless steels (SS) is a matter of debate. A number of apparently contradictory results have been presented by various researchers. The actual mechanism by which nitrogen alloying influences the corrosion properties of SS has been the topic of even more controversy. The effects of nitrogen on the corrosion and mechanical properties of SS were reviewed. Various proposals relating to the mechanistic effect of nitrogen alloying on the corrosion properties of SS were evaluated critically by comparing the various theories.

  18. Catalytic intermolecular amination of C-H bonds: method development and mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Kristin Williams; Du Bois, J

    2007-01-24

    Reaction methodology for intermolecular C-H amination of benzylic and 3 degrees C-H bonds is described. This process uses the starting alkane as the limiting reagent, gives optically pure tetrasubstituted amines through stereospecific insertion into enantiomeric 3 degrees centers, displays high chemoselectivity for benzylic oxidation, and enables the facile preparation of isotopically enriched 15N-labeled compounds. Access to substituted amines, amino alcohols, and diamines is thereby made possible in a single transformation. Important information relevant to understanding the initial steps in the catalytic cycle, reaction chemoselectivity, the nature of the active oxidant, and pathways for catalyst inactivation has been gained through mechanistic analysis; these studies are also presented.

  19. Alcohol amination with ammonia catalyzed by an acridine-based ruthenium pincer complex: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuan; Plessow, Philipp N; Brinks, Marion K; Schelwies, Mathias; Schaub, Thomas; Rominger, Frank; Paciello, Rocco; Limbach, Michael; Hofmann, Peter

    2014-04-23

    The mechanistic course of the amination of alcohols with ammonia catalyzed by a structurally modified congener of Milstein's well-defined acridine-based PNP-pincer Ru complex has been investigated both experimentally and by DFT calculations. Several key Ru intermediates have been isolated and characterized. The detailed analysis of a series of possible catalytic pathways (e.g., with and without metal-ligand cooperation, inner- and outer-sphere mechanisms) leads us to conclude that the most favorable pathway for this catalyst does not require metal-ligand cooperation.

  20. Mechanistic Investigations of Branched Macromolecules and Metal Nanocomposites for Nonlinear Optical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-26

    2004 - 3l- Jan -2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanistic Investigations of Branched Macromolecules and W9llNF-04-l-0293 Metal...dendrimer system. J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 116, 8893-8903. 40. Varnavski, O.P.; Ostrovski, J.C.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Twieg, R.J.; Bazan , G.C.; Goodson...Chem. Soc., 2002, 124,1736-1743. 41. Varnavski, O.P.; Ostrovski, J.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Bazan , G.C.; Goodson III, T. Energy transfer and fluorescence

  1. Colorado wind profilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauch, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) has operated a network of wind profiling radars in Colorado. The current configuration of the network is described. All radars operate continuously and unattended to supply hourly-averaged wind profiles to a central computer in Boulder in real time. The hardware and software changes made to improve reliability are discussed. This research network will continue to be used to provide wind profiles for operational and research meteorologists and the performance of various wavelength systems will be evaluated.

  2. Deprojecting the nasal profile.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D; Mabrie, D C

    1999-02-01

    The nose is the most prominent aesthetic feature of the facial profile. Nasal length, tip rotation, and tip projection are integral aspects in analysis of the nasal profile. In most rhinoplasties the surgeon has the difficult task of increasing or maintaining tip projection of an underprojected or normally projected nasal tip. Less commonly, the rhinoplastic surgeon is presented with an overprojected nasal tip, and efforts are focused on deprojecting the nasal profile. In this article, the authors present a discussion of the overprojected tip, elucidating strategies of analysis, etiologies, and management of the nasal profile and give clinical examples.

  3. Simulating the Risk of Liver Fluke Infection using a Mechanistic Hydro-epidemiological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, Ludovica; Dunne, Toby; Rose, Hannah; Walker, Josephine; Morgan, Eric; Vickerman, Peter; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Liver Fluke (Fasciola hepatica) is a common parasite found in livestock and responsible for considerable economic losses throughout the world. Risk of infection is strongly influenced by climatic and hydrological conditions, which characterise the host environment for parasite development and transmission. Despite on-going control efforts, increases in fluke outbreaks have been reported in recent years in the UK, and have been often attributed to climate change. Currently used fluke risk models are based on empirical relationships derived between historical climate and incidence data. However, hydro-climate conditions are becoming increasingly non-stationary due to climate change and direct anthropogenic impacts such as land use change, making empirical models unsuitable for simulating future risk. In this study we introduce a mechanistic hydro-epidemiological model for Liver Fluke, which explicitly simulates habitat suitability for disease development in space and time, representing the parasite life cycle in connection with key environmental conditions. The model is used to assess patterns of Liver Fluke risk for two catchments in the UK under current and potential future climate conditions. Comparisons are made with a widely used empirical model employing different datasets, including data from regional veterinary laboratories. Results suggest that mechanistic models can achieve adequate predictive ability and support adaptive fluke control strategies under climate change scenarios.

  4. Mechanistic studies of protein arginine deiminase 2: evidence for a substrate-assisted mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dreyton, Christina J; Knuckley, Bryan; Jones, Justin E; Lewallen, Daniel M; Thompson, Paul R

    2014-07-15

    Citrullination, which is catalyzed by protein arginine deiminases (PADs 1-4 and 6), is a post-translational modification (PTM) that effectively neutralizes the positive charge of a guanidinium group by its replacement with a neutral urea. Given the sequence similarity of PAD2 across mammalian species and the genomic organization of the PAD2 gene, PAD2 is predicted to be the ancestral homologue of the PADs. Although PAD2 has long been known to play a role in myelination, it has only recently been linked to other cellular processes, including gene transcription and macrophage extracellular trap formation. For example, PAD2 deiminates histone H3 at R26, and this PTM leads to the increased transcription of more than 200 genes under the control of the estrogen receptor. Given that our understanding of PAD2 biology remains incomplete, we initiated mechanistic studies on this enzyme to aid the development of PAD2-specific inhibitors. Herein, we report that the substrate specificity and calcium dependence of PAD2 are similar to those of PADs 1, 3, and 4. However, unlike those isozymes, PAD2 appears to use a substrate-assisted mechanism of catalysis in which the positively charged substrate guanidinium depresses the pKa of the nucleophilic cysteine. By contrast, PADs 1, 3, and 4 use a reverse-protonation mechanism. These mechanistic differences will aid the development of isozyme-specific inhibitors.

  5. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGES

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; ...

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  6. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  7. A Mechanistic Understanding of Axon Degeneration in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yusuke; Li, Yihang; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents cause many short and long term toxic side effects to peripheral nervous system (PNS) that drastically alter quality of life. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and enduring disorder caused by several anti-neoplastic agents. CIPN typically presents with neuropathic pain, numbness of distal extremities, and/or oversensitivity to thermal or mechanical stimuli. This adverse side effect often requires a reduction in chemotherapy dosage or even discontinuation of treatment. Currently there are no effective treatment options for CIPN. While the underlying mechanisms for CIPN are not understood, current data identify a “dying back” axon degeneration of distal nerve endings as the major pathology in this disorder. Therefore, mechanistic understanding of axon degeneration will provide insights into the pathway and molecular players responsible for CIPN. Here, we review recent findings that expand our understanding of the pathogenesis of CIPN and discuss pathways that may be shared with the axonal degeneration that occurs during developmental axon pruning and during injury-induced Wallerian degeneration. These mechanistic insights provide new avenues for development of therapies to prevent or treat CIPN. PMID:28912674

  8. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  9. Systems biology and the integration of mechanistic explanation and mathematical explanation.

    PubMed

    Brigandt, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    The paper discusses how systems biology is working toward complex accounts that integrate explanation in terms of mechanisms and explanation by mathematical models-which some philosophers have viewed as rival models of explanation. Systems biology is an integrative approach, and it strongly relies on mathematical modeling. Philosophical accounts of mechanisms capture integrative in the sense of multilevel and multifield explanations, yet accounts of mechanistic explanation (as the analysis of a whole in terms of its structural parts and their qualitative interactions) have failed to address how a mathematical model could contribute to such explanations. I discuss how mathematical equations can be explanatorily relevant. Several cases from systems biology are discussed to illustrate the interplay between mechanistic research and mathematical modeling, and I point to questions about qualitative phenomena (rather than the explanation of quantitative details), where quantitative models are still indispensable to the explanation. Systems biology shows that a broader philosophical conception of mechanisms is needed, which takes into account functional-dynamical aspects, interaction in complex networks with feedback loops, system-wide functional properties such as distributed functionality and robustness, and a mechanism's ability to respond to perturbations (beyond its actual operation). I offer general conclusions for philosophical accounts of explanation.

  10. Application of Pulse Radiolysis to Mechanistic Investigations of Catalysis Relevant to Artificial Photosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Fujita, Etsuko; Grills, David C.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.

    2017-09-12

    Taking inspiration from natural photosystems, the goal of artificial photosynthesis is to harness solar energy to convert abundant materials, such as CO2 and H2O, into solar fuels. Catalysts are required to ensure that the necessary redox half-reactions proceed in the most energy-efficient manner. It is thus critical to gain a detailed mechanistic understanding of these catalytic reactions in order to develop new and improved catalysts. Many of the key catalytic intermediates are short-lived transient species, requiring time-resolved spectroscopic techniques for their observation. The two main methods for rapidly generating such species on the sub-microsecond timescale are laser flash photolysis andmore » pulse radiolysis. These methods complement one another, and both can provide important spectroscopic and kinetic information. However, pulse radiolysis proves to be superior in systems with significant spectroscopic overlap between photosensitizer and other species present during the reaction. In this paper, we review the pulse radiolysis technique and how it has been applied to mechanistic investigations of half-reactions relevant to artificial photosynthesis.« less

  11. Mechanistic investigation of the reaction of epoxides with heterocumulenes catalysed by a bimetallic aluminium salen complex.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Christopher; North, Michael

    2014-06-23

    The bimetallic aluminium(salen) complex [(Al(salen))2O] is known to catalyse the reaction between epoxides and heterocumulenes (carbon dioxide, carbon disulfide and isocyanates) leading to five-membered ring heterocycles. Despite their apparent similarities, these three reactions have very different mechanistic features, and a kinetic study of oxazolidinone synthesis combined with previous kinetic work on cyclic carbonate and cyclic dithiocarbonate synthesis showed that all three reactions follow different rate equations. An NMR study of [Al(salen)]2O and phenylisocyanate provided evidence for an interaction between them, consistent with the rate equation data. A variable-temperature kinetics study on all three reactions showed that cyclic carbonate synthesis had a lower enthalpy of activation and a more negative entropy of activation than the other two heterocycle syntheses. The kinetic study was extended to oxazolidinone synthesis catalysed by the monometallic complex Al(salen)Cl, and this reaction was found to have a much less negative entropy of activation than any reaction catalysed by [Al(salen)]2O, a result that can be explained by the partial dissociation of an oligomeric Al(salen)Cl complex. A mechanistic rationale for all of the results is presented in terms of [Al(salen)]2O being able to function as a Lewis acid and/or a Lewis base, depending upon the susceptibility of the heterocumulene to reaction with nucleophiles.

  12. Mechanistic approach to multi-element isotope modeling of organic contaminant degradation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a multi-element isotope modeling approach to simultaneously predict the evolution of different isotopes during the transformation of organic contaminants. The isotopic trends of different elements are explicitly simulated by tracking position-specific isotopologues that contain the isotopes located at fractionating positions. Our approach is self-consistent and provides a mechanistic description of different degradation pathways that accounts for the influence of both primary and secondary isotope effects during contaminant degradation. The method is particularly suited to quantitatively describe the isotopic evolution of relatively large organic contaminant molecules. For such compounds, an integrated approach, simultaneously considering all possible isotopologues, would be impractical due to the large number of isotopologues. We apply the proposed modeling approach to the degradation of toluene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and nitrobenzene observed in previous experimental studies. Our model successfully predicts the multi-element isotope data (both 2D and 3D), and accurately captures the distinct trends observed for different reaction pathways. The proposed approach provides an improved and mechanistic methodology to interpret multi-element isotope data and to predict the extent of multi-element isotope fractionation that goes beyond commonly applied modeling descriptions and simplified methods based on the ratio between bulk enrichment factors or on linear regression in dual-isotope plots.

  13. Mechismo: predicting the mechanistic impact of mutations and modifications on molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Betts, Matthew J; Lu, Qianhao; Jiang, YingYing; Drusko, Armin; Wichmann, Oliver; Utz, Mathias; Valtierra-Gutiérrez, Ilse A; Schlesner, Matthias; Jaeger, Natalie; Jones, David T; Pfister, Stefan; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Siebert, Reiner; Bork, Peer; Apic, Gordana; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Russell, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Systematic interrogation of mutation or protein modification data is important to identify sites with functional consequences and to deduce global consequences from large data sets. Mechismo (mechismo.russellab.org) enables simultaneous consideration of thousands of 3D structures and biomolecular interactions to predict rapidly mechanistic consequences for mutations and modifications. As useful functional information often only comes from homologous proteins, we benchmarked the accuracy of predictions as a function of protein/structure sequence similarity, which permits the use of relatively weak sequence similarities with an appropriate confidence measure. For protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and a subset of protein-chemical interactions, we also developed and benchmarked a measure of whether modifications are likely to enhance or diminish the interactions, which can assist the detection of modifications with specific effects. Analysis of high-throughput sequencing data shows that the approach can identify interesting differences between cancers, and application to proteomics data finds potential mechanistic insights for how post-translational modifications can alter biomolecular interactions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Use of mechanistic data in assessing human risks from exposure to particles.

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, R O

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of toxicologic investigations of both natural and man-made fibrous and nonfibrous particles is to provide essential input for the assessment of potential human risks from exposure to these materials. The development of risk assessment procedures for airborne particles has evolved over the years. The earliest assessments for naturally occurring materials used direct human observations and incorporated safety factors to arrive at allowable human exposures. More recently, there has been a need to assess the potential risk associated with production and use of certain man-made materials for which human data are not available or are inadequate. For these materials, it has been necessary to assess human risks using data obtained from studies conducted in laboratory animals and with cells or tissues. During the last several decades, it has been suggested that data on the mechanisms by which particles cause disease could be used to reduce the uncertainty in estimates of human risks of particle exposures. This article provides comments on the use of mechanistic data in the risk assessment process and suggestions for increasing the successful development and use of mechanistic data in risk assessments conducted in the future. PMID:9400751

  15. Mechanistic relationship of all-terrain vehicles and pediatric renal trauma.

    PubMed

    Hale, Nathan; Brown, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    To identify and discuss the mechanistic risk factors associated with genitourinary (GU) trauma in pediatric all-terrain vehicle (ATV) accidents. A retrospective analysis of all pediatric trauma admissions to a level 1 trauma center from 2005 to August 2011 was performed. We identified all pediatric patients who presented with GU trauma related to an ATV accident. The demographics, injury data, mechanism of injury, and treatment records of these children were investigated. A total of 304 pediatric patients were admitted with ATV-related injuries during the study period. Of these 304 patients, 10 (3.2%) had experienced GU injuries. An analysis of the mechanism revealed that 9 of the 10 had been thrown from the ATV; 1 event was described as a rollover accident. All 10 patients sustained renal trauma: 9 renal lacerations of various grades and 1 renal pedicle injury. Hematuria was observed in all cases. Spleen and liver lacerations were commonly associated injuries (40% and 30%, respectively). Pediatric ATV-related GU injuries remain an uncommon, yet serious, problem. Renal trauma is the most commonly encountered GU injury and can be suspected by the presence of hematuria. Analysis of the mechanism of injury suggests that ejection from the ATV places pediatric patients at the greatest risk of renal injury. Additional research is recommended concerning the mechanistic relationship of ATV-related GU trauma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The autism puzzle: challenging a mechanistic model on conceptual and historical grounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although clinicians and researchers working in the field of autism are generally not concerned with philosophical categories of kinds, a model for understanding the nature of autism is important for guiding research and clinical practice. Contemporary research in the field of autism is guided by the depiction of autism as a scientific object that can be identified with systematic neuroscientific investigation. This image of autism is compatible with a permissive account of natural kinds: the mechanistic property cluster (MPC) account of natural kinds, recently proposed as the model for understanding psychiatric disorders. Despite the heterogeneity, multicausality and fuzzy boundaries that complicate autism research, a permissive account of natural kinds (MPC kinds) provides prescriptive guidance for the investigation of objective causal mechanisms that should inform nosologists in their attempt to carve autism’s boundaries at its natural joints. However, this essay will argue that a mechanistic model of autism is limited since it disregards the way in which autism relates to ideas about what kind of behavior is abnormal. As historical studies and definitions of autism show, normative issues concerning disability, impairment and societal needs have been and still are inextricably linked to how we recognize and understand autism. The current search for autism’s unity in neurobiological mechanisms ignores the values, social norms and various perspectives on mental pathology that play a significant role in 'the thing called autism’. Autism research needs to engage with these issues in order to achieve more success in the effort to become clinically valuable. PMID:24207065

  17. Predictive Analysis of Mechanistic Triggers and Mitigation Strategies for Pathological Scarring in Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Sridevi; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Fine, David; DiPietro, Luisa A; Reifman, Jaques; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y

    2017-01-15

    Wound fibrosis (i.e., excessive scar formation) is a medical problem of increasing prevalence, with poorly understood mechanistic triggers and limited therapeutic options. In this study, we employed an integrated approach that combines computational predictions with new experimental studies in mice to identify plausible mechanistic triggers of pathological scarring in skin wounds. We developed a computational model that predicts the time courses for six essential cell types, 18 essential molecular mediators, and collagen, which are involved in inflammation and proliferation during wound healing. By performing global sensitivity analyses using thousands of model-simulated wound-healing scenarios, we identified five key processes (among the 90 modeled processes) whose dysregulation may lead to pathological scarring in wounds. By modulating a subset of these key processes, we simulated fibrosis in wounds. Moreover, among the 18 modeled molecular mediators, we identified TGF-β and the matrix metalloproteinases as therapeutic targets whose modulation may reduce fibrosis. The model predicted that simultaneous modulation of TGF-β and matrix metalloproteinases would be more effective in treating excessive scarring than modulation of either therapeutic target alone. Our model was validated with previously published and newly generated experimental data, and suggested new in vivo experiments. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Stochastic Modeling Yields a Mechanistic Framework for Spindle Attachment Error Correction in Budding Yeast Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Tubman, Emily S; Biggins, Sue; Odde, David J

    2017-06-28

    Proper segregation of the replicated genome requires that kinetochores form and maintain bioriented, amphitelic attachments to microtubules from opposite spindle poles and eliminate erroneous, syntelic attachments to microtubules from the same spindle pole. Phosphorylation of kinetochore proteins destabilizes low-tension kinetochore-microtubule attachments, yet tension stabilizes bioriented attachments. This conundrum for forming high-tension amphitelic attachments is recognized as the "initiation problem of biorientation (IPBO)." A delay before kinetochore-microtubule detachment solves the IPBO, but it lacks a mechanistic framework. We developed a stochastic mathematical model for kinetochore-microtubule error correction in yeast that reveals: (1) under low chromatin tension, requiring a large number of phosphorylation events at multiple sites to achieve detachment provides the necessary delay; and (2) kinetochore-induced microtubule depolymerization generates tension in amphitelic, but not syntelic, attachments. With these requirements, the model provides a mechanistic framework for the delay before detachment to solve the IPBO and demonstrates the high degree of amphitely observed experimentally for wild-type spindles under optimal conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ecological Forecasting in Chesapeake Bay: Using a Mechanistic-Empirical Modelling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Long, Wen; Jacobs, John M.; Ramers, D. L.; Wazniak, C.; Wiggert, J. D.; Wood, R.; Xu, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Ecological Prediction System (CBEPS) automatically generates daily nowcasts and three-day forecasts of several environmental variables, such as sea-surface temperature and salinity, the concentrations of chlorophyll, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen, and the likelihood of encountering several noxious species, including harmful algal blooms and water-borne pathogens, for the purpose of monitoring the Bay's ecosystem. While the physical and biogeochemical variables are forecast mechanistically using the Regional Ocean Modeling System configured for the Chesapeake Bay, the species predictions are generated using a novel mechanistic empirical approach, whereby real-time output from the coupled physical biogeochemical model drives multivariate empirical habitat models of the target species. The predictions, in the form of digital images, are available via the World Wide Web to interested groups to guide recreational, management, and research activities. Though full validation of the integrated forecasts for all species is still a work in progress, we argue that the mechanistic–empirical approach can be used to generate a wide variety of short-term ecological forecasts, and that it can be applied in any marine system where sufficient data exist to develop empirical habitat models. This paper provides an overview of this system, its predictions, and the approach taken.

  20. Mechanistic micro-structural theory of soft tissues growth and remodeling: tissues with unidirectional fibers.

    PubMed

    Lanir, Yoram

    2015-04-01

    A new mechanistic theory was developed for soft tissues growth and remodeling (G&R). The theory considers tissues with unidirectional fibers. It is based on the loading-dependent local turnover events of each constituent and on the resulting evolution of the tissue micro-structure, the tissue dimensions and its mechanical properties. The theory incorporates the specific mechanical properties and turnover kinetics of each constituent, thereby establishing a general framework which can serve for future integration of additional mechanisms involved in G&R. The feasibility of the theory was examined by considering a specific realization of tissues with one fibrous constituent (collagen fibers), assuming a specific loading-dependent first-order fiber's turnover kinetics and the fiber's deposition characteristics. The tissue was subjected to a continuous constant rate growth. Model parameters were adopted from available data. The resulting predictions show qualitative agreement with a number of well-known features of tissues including the fibers' non-uniform recruitment density distribution, the associated tissue convex nonlinear stress-stretch relationship, and the development of tissue pre-stretch and pre-stress states. These results show that mechanistic micro-structural modeling of soft tissue G&R based on first principles can successfully capture the evolution of observed tissues' structure and size, and of their associated mechanical properties.