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  1. Alexander Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... there are no ethnic, racial, geographic, or cultural/economic differences in its distribution. × Definition Alexander disease is ... there are no ethnic, racial, geographic, or cultural/economic differences in its distribution. View Full Definition Treatment ...

  2. Remembering Alexander Meiklejohn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tussman, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    A former student of Alexander Meiklejohn, a member of the Experimental College movement on the 1930s, describes his impressions of Meiklejohn's life, leadership qualities, and personal characteristics. (MSE)

  3. Maniac Talk - Alexander Kashlinsky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-30

    Alexander Kashlinsky Maniac Lecture, September 30, 2016 Dr. Alexander "Sasha" Kashlinsky, an astronomer/cosmologist working at NASA Goddard presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "HOW I PLANNED TO TRAVEL TO SPACE AND GOT TO STUDY IT INSTEAD: a personal journey through 6 different countries in a changing world." Sasha was born in the former Soviet Union, just as the space era got underway with the Sputnick launch. He traced his journey back to those days of Sputnick, and walked the audience through different stages of his life and career, including his interactions with Lord Martin Rees, one of the world's most eminent astronomer and John Mather, a Nobel Prize in Physics winner.

  4. Alexander I. Ignatowski

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.; Jankovic, Gradimir M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1908, Alexander I. Ignatowski (1875–1955) published his pioneering work that first revealed a relationship between cholesterol-rich food and experimental atherosclerosis. This early experimental work paved a way to the metabolic study of the mechanism of atherosclerosis. Herein, we present a brief account of Ignatowski's work and life. PMID:23914012

  5. [Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Raita

    2014-11-01

    Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson is considered a pioneer in extrapyramidal system research largely due to his dissertation on progressive lenticular degeneration, later known as "Wilson's Disease". His concept of neurological symptomatology was based on the clinical observations of Pierre Marie, Joseph Babinski and John Hughlings Jackson, who he observed when he was young. To keep focusing on the nature of actual symptoms while performing medical examinations is the essence of neurological symptomatology, which in turn form the spirit of neurology. This paper will discuss major events in Wilson's later life that would explain how his basic idea for neurological symptomatology was eventually formed.

  6. Alexander's Law revisited.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoat, Benjamin; Shelukhin, Alexander; Fong, Alex; Mustain, William; Zhou, Wu

    2008-07-01

    Alexander's Law states that the slow-phase velocity of the nystagmus caused by unilateral vestibular lesion increases with gaze in the beat direction. Two studies have shown that this gaze effect is generalized to the nystagmus caused by unilateral cold water irrigation. This indicates that the gaze effect is not the result of central changes associated with a peripheral lesion but rather because of unilateral vestibular peripheral inhibition. In this study, we show that there is a similar gaze effect on the nystagmus produced by unilateral warm water ear irrigation. Furthermore, we examined the two hypotheses of Alexander's Law proposed in the two studies. One hypothesis is based on the gaze-dependent modulation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) response to unbalanced canal input. The other hypothesis, however, is based on the leaky neural integrator caused by unilateral vestibular peripheral inhibition. These two hypotheses predict the same gaze effect on the nystagmus produced by cold water irrigation, but opposite gaze effects on the nystagmus produced by warm water irrigation. Our results support the first hypothesis and suggest that the second hypothesis needs to be modified.

  7. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  9. What killed Alexander the Great?

    PubMed

    Battersby, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    The cause of the death of the Macedonian King, Alexander the Great, at Babylon in 323 BC has excited interest and conjecture throughout the ages. The information available in the surviving ancient sources, none of which is contemporaneous, has been reviewed and compared with modern knowledge as set out in several well-known recent surgical texts. The ancient sources record epic drinking by the Macedonian nobility since at least the time of Phillip II, Alexander's father. Alexander's sudden illness and death is likely to have resulted from a surgical complication of acute alcoholic excess.

  10. Alexander Lowen: An Energetic Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Glenn E.; Rabinowitz, Fredric E.

    1992-01-01

    Presents interview with Alexander Lowen, prominent psychotherapist, who discusses his personal and professional development, as well as the evolution of bioenergetic analysis. Includes a list of suggested readings by Lowen. (Author/NB)

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Alexander disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Central Li R, Johnson AB, Salomons G, Goldman JE, Naidu S, Quinlan R, Cree B, Ruyle SZ, Banwell ... Citation on PubMed Quinlan RA, Brenner M, Goldman JE, Messing A. GFAP and its role in Alexander ...

  12. Interview with Alexander Cohen.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Ander

    2017-05-01

    Ander Cohen speaks to Adam Price-Evans, Commissioning Editor of Future Cardiology: Alexander (Ander) Cohen MBBS (Hons), MSc, MD, FRACP is a vascular physician and epidemiologist at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, King's College (London, UK). He graduated with honors in medicine and honors in surgery from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and became a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 1990. He was awarded an MSc in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London in 1991 with a thesis on the metabolic syndrome in South-Asian populations. In 1998, he was awarded an MD with a thesis on the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism and thromboprophylaxis. In addition to his clinical work, he is involved in designing, managing and analyzing clinical trials from Phase I to IV. He is the Chairman and a member of many international steering committees for multicenter trials, epidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, and was previously the Director of Clinical Research and an Epidemiologist in Thrombosis Research at King's College Hospital.

  13. Commentary. The diseases of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    York, George K; Steinberg, David A

    2004-06-01

    The accompanying articles that speculate that Alexander the Great had a traumatic carotid dissection or congenital cervical scoliosis demonstrate the difficulties in retrospective diagnosis as a historical enterprise. The extant primary sources were written centuries after Alexander's death and are ambiguous in their original languages, and even more so in translation. Thus we cannot be certain what illness Alexander actually had. Furthermore, anachronistic diagnosis removes Alexander from the medical context of this time, telling us little of historical significance about him. Such investigations also illustrate the more general limits that the absence of context imposes on the study of ancient history.

  14. Dancers' Application of the Alexander Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Sylvie; Girard, Fernande

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the experience of professional contemporary dancers studying and applying the Alexander Technique to their dancing. This study was motivated by: 1. years of teaching both dance and somatics, 2. a strong desire to better understand how the Alexander Technique can be applied by dancers, and 3. a gap that the…

  15. Dancers' Application of the Alexander Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Sylvie; Girard, Fernande

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the experience of professional contemporary dancers studying and applying the Alexander Technique to their dancing. This study was motivated by: 1. years of teaching both dance and somatics, 2. a strong desire to better understand how the Alexander Technique can be applied by dancers, and 3. a gap that the…

  16. Robert Alexander and His Passionate Philosophy (Profile).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosseau, Remi Barclay

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the passionate philosophy of Robert Alexander, founder and director of living stage theater company and his views of art, creativity, the entire process of learning, politics, philosophy, and hope. Presents several excerpts from Alexander's presentations for artists and teachers during Living Stage residencies in cities around the…

  17. The Alexander Technique: An Acting Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Sarah A.

    2002-01-01

    Notes the discrepancy between students' use of the Alexander Technique in class and on stage. Discusses three fundamental self-use objectives of the Alexander Technique: the reduction of excess physical compression and muscularity; the unification of body/voice and thought; and the expansion of the field of attention. Demonstrates how each…

  18. Alexander the Great's relationship with alcohol.

    PubMed

    Liappas, J A; Lascaratos, J; Fafouti, S; Christodoulou, G N

    2003-05-01

    This study sought to clarify if Alexander the Great indulged pathologically in alcohol and whether it contributed to his death. The texts of the historians Diodorus of Sicily, Plutarch, Arrian, Curtius Rufus, Athenaeus, Aelian and Justin were studied, with their information concerning wine consumption by Macedonians, and especially Alexander, and were evaluated. The surviving historical texts, all later than Alexander's epoch, are based on a series of contemporary histories and especially on the 'Royal Journals', an official diary written in the imperial court. Alexander consumed large quantities of undiluted wine periodically, reaching pathological intoxication. However, the existing data do not provide convincing evidence that Alexander the Great manifested abuse of or dependence on alcohol according to DSM-IV or ICD-10 criteria and it seems unlikely that alcohol was involved in his untimely death.

  19. An unusual presentation of juvenile Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Maria Joana; Risen, Sarah; Alper, Gulay

    2012-04-01

    Alexander disease is a rare leukodystrophy that most often presents in infancy but also includes neonatal, juvenile, and adult variants. Juvenile Alexander disease presents primarily with bulbar symptoms between 2 and 12 years of age. The diagnosis is often suggested by the clinical course and brain magnetic resonance image pattern and then confirmed by the presence of a mutation in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. A young girl presented with globus sensation and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed abnormalities mainly involving white matter tracts of the medulla oblongata and cerebellum. The presence of a mutation in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile Alexander disease. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary for the diagnosis of late-onset presentations of Alexander disease.

  20. The Haunting Influence of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sue H.

    1971-01-01

    The article examines the significance that Alexander Graham Bell's attitude and actions had on the social and economic conditions experienced by deaf people during his lifetime and into the present. (CD)

  1. The Haunting Influence of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sue H.

    1971-01-01

    The article examines the significance that Alexander Graham Bell's attitude and actions had on the social and economic conditions experienced by deaf people during his lifetime and into the present. (CD)

  2. Myelin changes in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pinedo, U; Duran-Moreno, M; Sirerol-Piquer, S; Matias-Guiu, J

    2017-03-22

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a type of leukodystrophy. Its pathological basis, along with myelin loss, is the appearance of Rosenthal bodies, which are cytoplasmic inclusions in astrocytes. Mutations in the gene coding for GFAP have been identified as a genetic basis for AxD. However, the mechanism by which these variants produce the disease is not understood. The most widespread hypothesis is that AxD develops when a gain of function mutation causes an increase in GFAP. However, this mechanism does not explain myelin loss, given that experimental models in which GFAP expression is normal or mutated do not exhibit myelin disorders. This review analyses other possibilities that may explain this alteration, such as epigenetic or inflammatory alterations, presence of NG2 (+) - GFAP (+) cells, or post-translational modifications in GFAP that are unrelated to increased expression. The different hypotheses analysed here may explain the myelin alteration affecting these patients, and multiple mechanisms may coexist. These theories raise the possibility of designing therapies based on these mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [On Alexander's pneumothorax: A critical appraisal].

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Guillermo; Villarreal-Alarcón, Miguel Ángel; Estañol-Vidal, Bruno

    According to the testimony of Ptolemy, which we know through Arrian, it has been assumed that Alexander the Great suffered a pneumothorax during his campaign against the Malli. In general, this assumption has been interpreted as a historical fact in medical literature. We consulted the same sources and concluded that it is unlikely that Alexander's arrow wound had given him a pneumothorax. In addition, we stressed the extra-historical content of classical sources.

  4. A psychoanalytic study of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K R

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate how Freudian concepts such as the Oedipus complex, castration anxiety, fear of loss of love, the psychosexual stages of development, and the tripartite structure of personality can be used to understand the life and achievements of Alexander the Great. To accomplish this purpose, specific incidents, myths, and relationships in Alexander's life were analyzed from a Freudian psychoanalytic perspective. Green (1991), in his recent biography of Alexander, has questioned the merit of using Freudian concepts to understand Alexander's character. In fact, he stated specifically: If he (Alexander) had any kind of Oedipus complex it came in a poor second to the burning dynastic ambition which Olympias so sedulously fostered in him; those who insist on his psychological motivation would do better to take Adler as their mentor than Freud (p.56). Later, in the concluding section of his book, Green (1991, pp. 486-487) discounted Freudian interpretations of Alexander's distaste for sex, the rumors of his homosexual liaisons, his partiality for middle-aged or elderly ladies, and the systematic domination of his early years by Olympias as little more than the projected fears and desires of the interpreters. And again, an Adlerian power-complex paradigm was suggested as the preferable theoretical framework to use. Green's argument was based primarily on an exchange, reported originally by Plutarch, which took place between Alexander and Philip prior to Alexander's tutorship with Aristotle. Purportedly, Philip enjoined his son to study hard and pay close attention to all Aristotle said "so that you may not do a great many things of the sort that I am sorry I have done." At this point, Alexander "somewhat pertly" took Philip to task "because he was having children by other women besides his wife." Philip's reply was: "Well then, if you have many competitors for the kingdom, prove yourself honorable and good, so that you may obtain the

  5. The Remarkable Journey of Lloyd Alexander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnel, Michael O.; Jacobs, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This article features Lloyd Alexander, an author who has produced some of the most elegant and powerful prose in the history of modern children's literature. Lloyd began writing seriously in high school, and though he wrote and submitted many poems and short stories, his only success was being named a finalist in the "Writer's Digest" Short Story…

  6. Alexander Graham Bell: Teacher of the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Robert V.

    The lecture on Alexander Graham Bell by Dr. Robert V. Bruce, the author of a biography of Bell, focuses on Bell's association with the Clarke School for the Deaf in Massachusetts. Noted are Bell's employment by the school at 25 years of age and the preceding period during which Bell taught elocution at a boys' school in Scotland and used his…

  7. The Remarkable Journey of Lloyd Alexander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnel, Michael O.; Jacobs, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This article features Lloyd Alexander, an author who has produced some of the most elegant and powerful prose in the history of modern children's literature. Lloyd began writing seriously in high school, and though he wrote and submitted many poems and short stories, his only success was being named a finalist in the "Writer's Digest" Short Story…

  8. Expedition 25 portraits in Russia - Alexander Kaleri

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-31

    JSC2010-E-124004 (August 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri, Expedition 25/26 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Sokol launch and entry suit, takes a break from training in Star City, Russia to pose for a portrait. Photo credit: Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  9. Alexander Graham Bell: Teacher of the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Robert V.

    The lecture on Alexander Graham Bell by Dr. Robert V. Bruce, the author of a biography of Bell, focuses on Bell's association with the Clarke School for the Deaf in Massachusetts. Noted are Bell's employment by the school at 25 years of age and the preceding period during which Bell taught elocution at a boys' school in Scotland and used his…

  10. Alexander Putman | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Alexander Putman, PhD December 6 Pharmacologist Division of Hematology Oncology Toxicology Office of New Drugs Center for Drug Evaluation and Research U.S. Food and Drug Administration Topic: “Role of a pharmacology/toxicology reviewer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration”

  11. Alexander von Humboldt: a revolutionary explorer.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    After he returned from his five-year expedition to the New World, Alexander von Humboldt promoted himself as a Romantic explorer. Although this image pervades British perceptions, political movements have fashioned different heroic versions of Humboldt in Germany and South America.

  12. The Alexander Archipelago wolf: a conservation assessment.

    Treesearch

    David K. Person; Matthew Kirchhoff; Victor van Ballenberghe; George C. Iverson; Edward. Grossman

    1996-01-01

    We summarized the scientific information available for the Alexander Archipelago wolf (Canis lupus ligoni) in the Tongass National Forest of southeast Alaska. Information concerning the morphology, distribution, taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of wolves are presented. Three issues for the conservation of wolves in southeast Alaska are discussed:...

  13. Dr Elizabeth Alexander: First Female Radio Astronomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    During March-April 1945, solar radio emission was detected at 200 MHz by operators of a Royal New Zealand Air Force radar unit located on Norfolk Island. Initially dubbed the `Norfolk Island Effect', this anomalous radiation was investigated throughout 1945 by British-born Elizabeth Alexander, head of the Operational Research Section of the Radio Development Laboratory in New Zealand. Alexander prepared a number of reports on this work, and in early 1946 she published a short paper in the newly-launched journal, Radio & Electronics. A geologist by training, Elizabeth Alexander happened to be in the right place at the right time, and unwittingly became the first woman in the world to work in the field that would later become known as radio astronomy. Her research also led to further solar radio astronomy projects in New Zealand in the immediate post-war year, and in part was responsible for the launch of the radio astronomy program at the Division of Radiophysics, CSIRO, in Sydney.

  14. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF BASEMENT FIREPLACE - Indian Trading Post, Second & Merchant Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF STONEWORK (WEST ELEVATION) - Indian Trading Post, Second & Merchant Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 MASSACHUSETTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE FACADE, 1971 - James C. Hooe House, 2230 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. "Most brilliant in judgment": Alexander the Great and Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Lainas, Panagiotis; Panutsopulos, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Zoras, Odysseas; Skandalakis, John E

    2005-03-01

    From historical sources, it is evident that Alexander the Great was indebted to one of his teachers, Aristotle of Stagira. It was the teaching of Aristotle that evoked all the nascent talents of young Alexander and turned him into a great man. Alexander was extremely interested in the secrets of medicine and considered it an art. The medical knowledge he acquired from Aristotle may have saved his life and the lives of his troops on many occasions. If Alexander did not possess medical knowledge and if his everyday life had not been so greatly influenced by medicine, he might never have been able to create his empire.

  18. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 VIEW FROM SITTING ROOM INTO DRAWING ROOM - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 DETAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 DETAIL, ENTRANCE STOOP (LION FIGURE) - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. A Study of Combined Arms Warfare by Alexander the Great.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    campaigns. Because Alexander did not have his doctrine manually recorded, these writings can provide useful insight as a substitute for an...Alexander the Great: Man of Action, Man of Spirit. Trans. Jeremy Leggatt. 1987. Trieste, Italy: Editoriale Libraria, 1996. Brownstone, David, and

  1. Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 crane flies (Diptera: Pediciidae) of Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2015-08-25

    The Korean crane fly species of the genus Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 (Diptera: Pediciidae) is taxonomically revised. H. gloriosus gloriosus (Alexander, 1924) is redescribed. A new species Heterangaeus koreanus n. sp., which is the first species of Pediciidae from South Korea, is described and illustrated.

  2. Vincent Alexander Bochdalek (1801-1883).

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Tubbs, R Shane; Gribben, Walter B; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cermakova, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Vincent Alexander Bochdalek, Czech anatomist and professor, was one of the pioneers in describing congenital diaphragmatic hernias in newborns. Interestingly, there is very little in the literature and almost nothing in the English literature regarding this important medical figure. A dedicated individual, Bochdalek had great perseverance, which allowed him to surpass obstacles in both his personal life and career. He is recognized for his accurate description of posterior diaphragmatic herniation, for which during his lifetime, there was no treatment. In addition, Bochdalek has multiple eponyms in his honor: ganglion Bochdalecki, Bochdalek's basket, and the valves of Bochdalek. Always steadfast in his beliefs, Bochdalek fought for the creation of anatomy labs in Prague against society pressures. His devoted study of anatomy, especially of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, laid the foundation for the successful surgical correction of this once lethal anomaly.

  3. The death of Alexander the Great: malaria or typhoid fever?

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A

    2004-03-01

    Alexander the Great had a profound effect on world history. His conquests covered the entire known world at the time, and he was responsible for the spread of Greek culture throughout the ancient world. In Babylon in 323 BC, Alexander died when he was nearly 33 years old. Possible explanations for his death have included alcoholic liver disease and strychnine poisoning, but little data support either condition as the cause of his death. Alexander most likely died from malaria or typhoid fever, which were rampant in ancient Babylon. The description of his final illness from the royal diaries is consistent with typhoid fever or malaria but is most characteristic of typhoid fever.

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  5. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM NORTH - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  7. Within Rover Reach at Mars Target Area Alexander Hills

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-25

    This view from ASA Curiosity Mars rover shows a swath of bedrock called Alexander Hills, which the rover approached for close-up inspection of selected targets. It is a mosaic of six frames taken on Nov. 23, 2014.

  8. Alexander von Humboldt and the Origins of Landscape Archaeology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathewson, Kent

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the life, theories, and influence of Alexander von Humboldt, the early nineteenth century founder of modern geography. Maintains that Humboldt's novel approaches to the study of landscape antiquities have value for contemporary students in cultural and historical geography. (JDH)

  9. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 FIRST FLOOR NORTH PARLOR, FIREPLACE - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer April 1969 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer April 1969 3034 P STREET (right) AND ADJOINING ROWHOUSES, LOOKING EAST - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer October 1968 VIEW OF SOUTH PARLOR FROM NORTH PARLOR - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 'Mind in general' by Sir Alexander Crichton.

    PubMed

    Berrios, G E

    2006-12-01

    The history of the 'philosophies of psychiatry' can be defined as the contextualized study of past theoretical views on the nature, understanding and management of madness and related notions. The application of an hermeneutic apparatus to past psychiatric narratives gives rise to the history of psychiatry; its application to current narrative gives origin to the philosophy of psychiatry. If the latter employs off-the-shelf, ready-made, external philosophies, it follows a centripetal approach; if it starts from the inside of psychiatry and generates its own tools and meta-language, it follows a centrifugal approach. Psychiatry is burdened by intrinsic and extrinsic philosophical problems. The former result from its hybrid nature, i.e., from the fact that psychiatry unsteadily straddles the natural and human sciences. The latter are borrowed from the conceptual frames into which psychiatry has been inscribed since the 19th century. The philosophy of psychiatry may anticipate or follow empirical research. The ante rem mode is based on the idea that empirical research requires conceptual supervision, audit and guidance, for it is always ideology- and theory-laden. The post rem mode is based on the view that science is the only way to 'truth' and hence all that the philosophy of psychiatry can (or should) do is facilitate, interpret, justify, defend or glorify empirical findings. The Classic Text that follows was written by Sir Alexander Crichton at the end of the 18th century, and is a good example of the centripetal mode of philosophy-making.

  13. Recognizing the Presidents: Was Alexander Hamilton President?

    PubMed

    Roediger, Henry L; DeSoto, K Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Studies over the past 40 years have shown that Americans can recall about half the U.S. presidents. Do people know the presidents even though they are unable to access them for recall? We investigated this question using the powerful cues of a recognition test. Specifically, we tested the ability of 326 online subjects to recognize U.S. presidents when presented with their full names among various types of lures. The hit rate for presidential recognition was .88, well above the proportion produced in free recall but far from perfect. Presidents Franklin Pierce and Chester Arthur were recognized less than 60% of the time. Interestingly, four nonpresidents were falsely recognized at relatively high rates, and Alexander Hamilton was more frequently identified as president than were several actual presidents. Even on a recognition test, knowledge of American presidents is imperfect and prone to error. The false alarm data support the theory that false fame can arise from contextual familiarity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Alexander F. Chamberlain: a life's work.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Julia M

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the life and work of Alexander Francis Chamberlain. Though he has received little attention since the early 1900s, the importance of this scholar should not be underestimated. Chamberlain made notable contributions to the body of knowledge in anthropology-a discipline that, at the time, was a combination of anthropological and psychological inquiry. His early work began with investigations into the cultures and languages of two Indian tribes indigenous to Canada and the northern United States and, within a few decades, positioned Chamberlain as the leading scholar in this domain. Beyond his ethnographic insights, Chamberlain queried the development of the child and wrote on the subject of childhood in world folklore. He concerned himself with a scope of worthwhile subjects ranging from linguistics to women's suffrage. No topic was out of range as all forms of human study addressed the need for seeing each group as a contributing force to humanity at large. Chamberlain emphasized that no single racial, ethnic, or religious group should be singled out as inherently superior to another, a belief far ahead of his time. This article is an attempt at drawing a picture of a man whose scholarly achievements and strength of character are captured in the depth and breadth of his writing.

  15. Astrocytic TDP-43 pathology in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam K; Daniels, Christine M LaPash; Goldman, James E; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Messing, Albee

    2014-05-07

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by the presence of eosinophilic inclusions known as Rosenthal fibers (RFs) within astrocytes, and is caused by dominant mutations in the coding region of the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). GFAP is the major astrocytic intermediate filament, and in AxD patient brain tissue GFAP is a major component of RFs. TAR DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is the major pathological protein in almost all cases of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ∼50% of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), designated as FTLD-TDP. In ALS and FTLD-TDP, TDP-43 becomes insoluble, ubiquitinated, and pathologically phosphorylated and accumulates in cytoplasmic inclusions in both neurons and glia of affected brain and spinal cord regions. Previously, TDP-43 was detected in RFs of human pilocytic astrocytomas; however, involvement of TDP-43 in AxD has not been determined. Here we show that TDP-43 is present in RFs in AxD patient brains, and that insoluble phosphorylated full-length and high molecular weight TDP-43 accumulates in white matter of such brains. Phosphorylated TDP-43 also accumulates in the detergent-insoluble fraction from affected brain regions of Gfap(R236H/+) knock-in mice, which harbor a GFAP mutation homologous to one that causes AxD in humans, and TDP-43 colocalizes with astrocytic RF pathology in Gfap(R236H/+) mice and transgenic mice overexpressing human wild-type GFAP. These findings suggest common pathogenic mechanisms in ALS, FTLD, and AxD, and this is the first report of TDP-43 involvement in a neurological disorder primarily affecting astrocytes.

  16. Zanvil Alexander Cohn 1926-1993

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Zanvil Alexander Cohn, an editor of this Journal since 1973, died suddenly on June 28, 1993. Cohn is best known as the father of the current era of macrophage biology. Many of his scientific accomplishments are recounted here, beginning with seminal studies on the granules of phagocytes that were performed with his close colleague and former editor of this Journal, James Hirsch. Cohn and Hirsch identified the granules as lysosomes that discharged their contents of digestive enzymes into vacuoles containing phagocytosed microbes. These findings were part of the formative era of cell biology and initiated the modern study of endocytosis and cell-mediated resistance to infection. Cohn further explored the endocytic apparatus in pioneering studies of the mouse peritoneal macrophage in culture. He described vesicular inputs from the cell surface and Golgi apparatus and documented the thoroughness of substrate digestion within lysosomal vacuoles that would only permit the egress of monosaccharides and amino acids. These discoveries created a vigorous environment for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior and visiting faculty. Some of the major findings that emerged from Cohn's collaborations included the radioiodination of the plasma membrane for studies of composition and turnover; membrane recycling during endocytosis; the origin of the mononuclear phagocyte system in situ; the discovery of the dendritic cell system of antigen-presenting cells; the macrophage as a secretory cell, including the release of proteases and large amounts of prostaglandins and leukotrienes; several defined parameters of macrophage activation, especially the ability of T cell-derived lymphokines to enhance killing of tumor cells and intracellular protozoa; the granule discharge mechanism whereby cytotoxic lymphocytes release the pore-forming protein perforin; the signaling of macrophages via myristoylated substrates of protein kinase C; and a tissue culture model in which

  17. Did Alexander the Great die of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Sbarounis, C N

    1997-06-01

    I propose that Alexander the Great died of acute pancreatitis secondary to heavy alcohol consumption and a very rich meal. The cause of death of prominent historic or artistic figures attracts considerable interest of historians and researchers. This is especially the case for Alexander the Great. More than 20,000 publications, books, or monographs on the life and work of Alexander the Great have been published. There are several theories and hypotheses regarding the cause of his death, that are based on historic descriptions, diaries, notations, and interpretations of events. It is inevitable that history and myth intermingle in any investigative approach, no matter how scholarly. In this article, on the basis of several historic sources. I have made an effort to reconstruct the final 14 days of his life and record the course of medical events that preceded his death with the formulation of a plausible diagnosis.

  18. Alexander the Great and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Marr, John S; Calisher, Charles H

    2003-12-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning; assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander's death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile virus encephalitis.

  19. Obituary: Walter Alexander Feibelman, 1930-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oergerle, William

    2005-12-01

    Walter Alexander Feibelman, 79, an astronomer who discovered the E-ring of Saturn, died of a heart attack 19 November 2004 at his home at Riderwood Village in Silver Spring, Maryland. Walter was born 30 October 1925 in Berlin, Germany to Bernard and Dora Feibelman. He came to the United States with his parents in 1941. They were some of the last German Jews to flee Nazi Germany. Years later, he reported his experiences in an account contributed to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. As a youth, he worked at a cleaning shop and as a soda jerk before taking a course in tool and die making. He worked at the Abbey Photo Corp. in New York and in a model-making firm, where he constructed models of aircraft for use in identification courses by the Army Air Forces. After high school, he attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology and received his BS degree in 1956. Until 1969, he was a research scientist at the University of Pittsburgh. While working as an assistant research professor in physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, he examined a photo of Saturn taken a year earlier at the university's Allegheny Observatory. The E-ring -- unlike the bright main rings, A, B, C, D and F -- is faint and not easily spotted. He paired his observation with calculations and announced his discovery, which remained unconfirmed until the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. Walter joined the Optical Astronomy Division of Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt in 1969, and worked there until 2002, when he became an emeritus astronomer at NASA. He became associated with the International Ultraviolet Explorer project, and worked on developing detectors for the orbiting observatory's spectrograph. The project turned out to be one of NASA's most successful observatories, operating from 1978 to 1996. In his scientific career, he published more than 200 refereed articles, mainly on hot stars and planetary nebulae. He also wrote papers in the fields of photography, spectroscopy

  20. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  1. 12. Detail view of southeast side window of AlexanderAlmon House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of southeast side window of Alexander-Almon House with rain barrel at lower left and roof rafter tails at top, facing northwest. - Alexander-Almon House, 130 Philip Almon Road, Roopville, Carroll County, GA

  2. 8. View of southwest rear and southeast side of AlexanderAlmon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of southwest rear and southeast side of Alexander-Almon House with cement block outbuilding to far left, facing north. - Alexander-Almon House, 130 Philip Almon Road, Roopville, Carroll County, GA

  3. Alexander Meiklejohn in Search of Freedom and Dignity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tony W.

    1982-01-01

    Assesses the contributions of the philosopher/educator Alexander Meiklejohn. Discusses the influences of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and the U.S. Constitution on Meiklejohn's educational theories, which stressed that human freedom and dignity can be enhanced by rigorous examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the meaning of…

  4. Lamar Alexander and the Politics of School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, George R.

    1992-01-01

    Although U.S. Education Secretary Lamar Alexander's forceful presence on the educational scene has compelled attention and eclipsed his predecessors, we are a long way from knowing whether this consummate politician and his espoused causes (such as America 2000) are destined to make a serous difference in U.S. education. (MLH)

  5. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David R. Lapp

    2008-01-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and…

  6. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David R. Lapp

    2008-01-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and…

  7. View west of the James and Lucy Alexander gravestone and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of the James and Lucy Alexander gravestone and family plot among other demarcated family plots in the Female Union Band Cemetery. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. All Aboard the Engine of Reform: Lamar Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1991-01-01

    Transformation of schools is the key to America 2000, an ambitious amalgam of ideas that Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander and his advisers have developed. The program's centerpiece is the creation of 535 "New American Schools" receiving a 1-time $1 million federal grant to develop exemplary programs. A sidebar describes the…

  9. 46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's Last Street Cars, Daily Press, January 15, 1956) photographer unknown. The first streetcar (with dignitaries) to make the run from Newport News to a new housing development named Hilton Village in September 1918. - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  10. Journalism and the Educational Views of Alexander Meiklejohn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Mack R.

    Alexander Meiklejohn, who died in 1964 at the age of 92, was a constitutional scholar whose major interest was education. Among Meiklejohn's beliefs were the following: the social good should take precedence over individual achievement; the liberal arts college is the institution best suited to carry out an affirmative reading of the First…

  11. The Making of the Liberal College: Alexander Meiklejohn at Amherst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the history and curricular changes of Amherst College from its founding in 1821 through the administration of Alexander Meiklejohn in 1912. Assesses Meiklejohn's impact upon the development of Amherst as a liberal arts college, and analyses the events surrounding his dismissal. (SLM)

  12. Introduction: Alexander Luria's continuing influence on worldwide neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Tupper, D E

    1999-03-01

    As an introduction to this special issue, this article provides an overview of the worldwide influence of the work of Alexander R. Luria, a noted Russian neuropsychologist. Major themes and issues that he studied are reviewed, and the reasons for his strong worldwide influence are discussed. An overview of subsequent articles in this issue is provided.

  13. Alexander Meiklejohn in Search of Freedom and Dignity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tony W.

    1982-01-01

    Assesses the contributions of the philosopher/educator Alexander Meiklejohn. Discusses the influences of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and the U.S. Constitution on Meiklejohn's educational theories, which stressed that human freedom and dignity can be enhanced by rigorous examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the meaning of…

  14. The Century-Old Wisdom of Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Orin

    1990-01-01

    This article reflects on Alexander Graham Bell's 1888 testimony before the Royal Commission of the United Kingdom on the Condition of the Deaf and Dumb, Etc. Excerpts are grouped by reference to (1) language education for the hearing impaired; (2) speechreading; (3) methods of teaching; (4) speech; and (5) sign language. (Author/PB)

  15. The alexander surgical technique for the treatment of severe burns

    PubMed Central

    Gasperoni, M.; Neri, R.; Carboni, A.; Purpura, V.; Morselli, P.G.; Melandri, D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The extensive loss of skin in burned patients is a critical clinical condition, and the choice of an effective technique to cover and protect the damaged area has always been a challenge in the surgical field. Despite its wide clinical use, there is little data in the literature on using the Alexander technique to treat severe burns, while several studies have focused on alternative approaches. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the Alexander surgical technique on 117 patients with severe burns. The characteristics of the burned patients, factors related to etiology of burns as well as adverse prognostic factors and their incidence in discharged versus deceased patients were also taken into account. Finally, a comparison is made with an alternative surgical procedure described in the literature. Our results show a satisfactory level of survival for patients with severe burns surgically treated with the Alexander technique, accounting for 63% of all clinical cases reported here. This treatment is also less expensive and more rapid than the alternative approach we compared it with. The Alexander technique is a lifesaving method for the treatment of severe burns that provides a satisfactory chance of survival at lower cost than the alternative surgical procedure examined. PMID:28289363

  16. Alexander the Great, the dahlia, and the tortoise.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Malcolm

    2004-06-01

    Some of the problems of establishing the cause of the death of Alexander the Great are like the attempts to find causes other than hysteria for Anna O.'s symptoms. The more general problem of using plausibility as a criterion of the truth of such reconstructions are illustrated by the arguments embedded in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia.

  17. The Century-Old Wisdom of Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Orin

    1990-01-01

    This article reflects on Alexander Graham Bell's 1888 testimony before the Royal Commission of the United Kingdom on the Condition of the Deaf and Dumb, Etc. Excerpts are grouped by reference to (1) language education for the hearing impaired; (2) speechreading; (3) methods of teaching; (4) speech; and (5) sign language. (Author/PB)

  18. A complex-network perspective on Alexander's wholeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and can be described by precise mathematical language. However, it remains somehow mysterious and elusive, and therefore hard to grasp. This paper develops a complex network perspective on the wholeness to better understand the nature of order or beauty for sustainable design. I bring together a set of complexity-science subjects such as complex networks, fractal geometry, and in particular underlying scaling hierarchy derived by head/tail breaks - a classification scheme and a visualization tool for data with a heavy-tailed distribution, in order to make Alexander's profound thoughts more accessible to design practitioners and complexity-science researchers. Through several case studies (some of which Alexander studied), I demonstrate that the complex-network perspective helps reduce the mystery of wholeness and brings new insights to Alexander's thoughts on the concept of wholeness or objective beauty that exists in fine and deep structure. The complex-network perspective enables us to see things in their wholeness, and to better understand how the kind of structural beauty emerges from local actions guided by the 15 fundamental properties, and in particular by differentiation and adaptation processes. The wholeness goes beyond current complex network theory towards design or creation of living structures.

  19. Alexander the Great and West Nile Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Marr, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning, assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander’s death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile encephalitis. PMID:14725285

  20. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  1. Alexander Samokutyaev conducts BTKh-14/Bioemulsiya (Bioemulsion) Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-05

    ISS027-E-022454 (5 May 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev, Expedition 27 flight engineer, uses a glovebox to service the Russian Bioemulsion science payload in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station. The Bioemulsion experiment is attempting to develop faster technologies for obtaining microorganism biomass and biologically active substance biomass for creating highly efficient environmentally pure bacteria, enzymes, and medicinal/pharmaceutical preparations.

  2. Dr Alexander Graham Bell--audiologist and speech therapist.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, R C

    1976-09-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is best known for his role in the invention of the telephone. However, he had a lifelong involvement in speech therapy and audiology besides many other medical investigations. He was also awarded an honorary MD degree from Heidelberg University. In this, the 100th anniversary of his invention of the telephone, his life and some of his medical interests are briefly reviewed.

  3. In memoriam. Alexander Hollaender 1898-1986. [Radiobiology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Alexander Hollaender gave an early clue that there might be recovery or repair mechanisms in bacteria, although at the time the target for cell target for cell killing was not known. As one of the early investigators who used action spectra for the identification of the targets in biological systems, he was able to show that the wavelengths producing mutations were just those absorbed by nucleic acids, even though in those days nucleic acids were not known to be the genetic material. This result was the first clear indication that radiation and environmental biologists should concentrate on changes in DNA and not in proteins.

  4. Alexander Thomas Augusta--physician, teacher and human rights activist.

    PubMed

    Butts, Heather M

    2005-01-01

    Commissioned surgeon of colored volunteers, April 4, 1863, with the rank of Major. Commissioned regimental surgeon on the 7th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops, October 2, 1863. Brevet Lieutenant Colonel of Volunteers, March 13, 1865, for faithful and meritorious services--mustered out October 13, 1866. So reads the tombstone at Arlington National Cemetery of Alexander Thomas Augusta, the first black surgeon commissioned in the Union Army during the Civil War and the first black officer-rank soldier to be buried at Arlington Cemetery. He was also instrumental in founding the institutions that later became the hospital and medical college of Howard University and the National Medical Association.

  5. Alexander Crichton on the psychopathology of the passions.

    PubMed

    Charland, Louis C

    2008-09-01

    Alexander Crichton (1763-1856) made significant contributions to the medical theory of the passions, yet there exists no systematic exegesis of this particular aspect of his work. The present article explores four themes in Crichton's work on the passions: (1) the role of irritability in the physiology of the passions; (2) the manner in which irritability and sensibility contribute to the valence, or polarity, of the passions; (3) the elaboration of a psychopathology of the passions that emphasizes their physiological form rather than meaningful content or connections; and (4) the insistence that medical science ought to ignore ethical and other 'moral' psychological and social aspects of the passions.

  6. Alexander Monro Tertius and his works on hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Tubbs, Isaiah; Loukas, Marios; Oakes, W Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The Monros of the University of Edinburgh reigned over anatomy instruction for over a century. The last of these men, Monro Tertius, was the weaker teacher of the family but still contributed to the anatomical and surgical literature. Herein, we describe the life of Alexander Monro Tertius and his writings, particularly on childhood hydrocephalus. Monro Tertius will not be remembered as a great anatomist or teacher. However, he collected and published important books on his observations and those of others on hydrocephalus. These texts contained the knowledge of his era on this topic.

  7. The 'horns' of a medical dilemma: Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül A

    2004-06-01

    Retrospective 'diagnosis' of clinical disorders of famous historical figures has been of medical interest. In the absence of a patient's 'body', the validity of 'physical symptoms' and their interpretation by contemporary diagnostic criteria are questionable. When the symptoms have been gleaned from the patients's effigy which, as in the case of Alexander the Great, is submerged in legend, the enterprise becomes inherently hazardous. In the present paper, some of the conceptual problems underlying retrospective diagnoses will be identified. Then the use of iconographic records, such as numismatics and sculpture, to provide evidence of clinical symptoms will be shown to be highly misleading.

  8. >From alexander of aphrodisias to young and airy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. D.

    1999-10-01

    A didactic discussion of the physics of rainbows is presented, with some emphasis on the history, especially the contributions of Thomas Young nearly 200 years ago. We begin with the simple geometrical optics of Descartes and Newton, including the reasons for Alexander's dark band between the main and secondary bows. We then show how dispersion produces the familiar colorful spectacle. Interference between waves emerging at the same angle, but traveling different optical paths within the water drops, accounts for the existence of distinct supernumerary rainbows under the right conditions (small drops, uniform in size). Young's and Airy's contributions are given their due.

  9. Alexander von Humboldt and the concept of animal electricity.

    PubMed

    Kettenmann, H

    1997-06-01

    More than two hundred years ago, Alexander von Humboldt helped to establish Galvani's view that muscle and nerve tissue are electrically excitable. His 1797 publication was a landmark for establishing the concept of animal electricity. Almost half a century later, von Humboldt became the mentor of the young du Bois-Reymond. With the help of von Humboldt's promotion, du Bois-Reymond demonstrated convincingly that animal tissue has the intrinsic capacity to generate electrical activity, and thus laid the ground for modern electrophysiology.

  10. Was the death of Alexander the Great due to poisoning? Was it Veratrum album?

    PubMed

    Schep, Leo J; Slaughter, Robin J; Vale, J Allister; Wheatley, Pat

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the death of Alexander the Great to determine if he died from natural causes or was poisoned and, if the latter, what was the most likely poison. OVID MEDLINE (January 1950-May 2013) and ISI Web of Science (1900-May 2013) databases were searched and bibliographies of identified articles were screened for additional relevant studies. These searches identified 53 relevant citations. Classical literature associated with Alexander's death. There are two divergent accounts of Alexander's death. The first has its origins in the Royal Diary, allegedly kept in Alexander's court. The second account survives in various versions of the Alexander Romance. Nature of the terminal illness. The Royal Diary describes a gradual onset of fever, with a progressive inability to walk, leading to Alexander's death, without offering a cause of his demise. In contrast, the Romance implies that members of Alexander's inner circle conspired to poison him. The various medical hypotheses include cumulative debilitation from his previous wounds, the complications of alcohol imbibing (resulting in alcohol hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, or perforated peptic ulcer), grief, a congenital abnormality, and an unhealthy environment in Babylon possibly exacerbated by malaria, typhoid fever, or some other parasitic or viral illness. Was it poisoning? Of all the chemical and botanical poisons reviewed, we believe the alkaloids present in the various Veratrum species, notably Veratrum album, were capable of killing Alexander with comparable symptoms to those Alexander reportedly experienced over the 12 days of his illness. Veratrum poisoning is heralded by the sudden onset of epigastric and substernal pain, which may also be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, followed by bradycardia and hypotension with severe muscular weakness. Alexander suffered similar features for the duration of his illness. If Alexander the Great was poisoned, Veratrum album offers a more plausible cause than arsenic

  11. CSF and Blood Levels of GFAP in Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jany, Paige L.; Agosta, Guillermo E.; Benko, William S.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Keller, Stephanie R.; Köehler, Wolfgang; Mar, Soe; Naidu, Sakkubai; Marie Ness, Jayne; Renaud, Deborah L.; Salsano, Ettore; Schiffmann, Raphael; Simon, Julie; Vanderver, Adeline; Eichler, Florian; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alexander disease is a rare, progressive, and generally fatal neurological disorder that results from dominant mutations affecting the coding region of GFAP, the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein, the major intermediate filament protein of astrocytes in the CNS. A key step in pathogenesis appears to be the accumulation of GFAP within astrocytes to excessive levels. Studies using mouse models indicate that the severity of the phenotype correlates with the level of expression, and suppression of GFAP expression and/or accumulation is one strategy that is being pursued as a potential treatment. With the goal of identifying biomarkers that indirectly reflect the levels of GFAP in brain parenchyma, we have assayed GFAP levels in two body fluids in humans that are readily accessible as biopsy sites: CSF and blood. We find that GFAP levels are consistently elevated in the CSF of patients with Alexander disease, but only occasionally and modestly elevated in blood. These results provide the foundation for future studies that will explore whether GFAP levels can serve as a convenient means to monitor the progression of disease and the response to treatment. PMID:26478912

  12. [Alexander Borodin--physician, chemist, scientist, teacher and composer].

    PubMed

    Vik, T

    1998-12-10

    Concert programmes and CD covers suggest that the Russian composer Alexander Borodin (1833-87) was also a great scientist. In this article we examine this proposition. Borodin was born in St. Petersburg as the illegitimate son of a Russian nobleman. As a boy his talents ranged from music to chemistry and languages. Borodin studied medicine at the Medico-Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg from 1850 to 1855 and defended his doctoral thesis on the similarity between arsenic and phosphoric acid in 1858. He did not, however, feel comfortable in his role as a doctor, and soon started to work as a chemist. In 1864 he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Medico-Surgical Academy. In 1861, Borodin attended the first international congress of chemistry in Karlsruhe, and he was among the founders of the Russian Chemical Society in 1868. He published 42 articles and was a friend of Dmitri Mendeleev, the scientist who described the periodic system. In 1872, Borodin started the first medical courses for women in Russia. It seems warranted to conclude that Alexander Borodin was indeed a great scientist and university teacher, though his immortality was earned by his leisure time activities.

  13. Kinesthetic Ventures Informed by the Work of F. M. Alexander, Stanislavski, Peirce, and Freud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Ed; Wright, Ben; Protzel, Michael, Ed.

    This book is about education harvested from self-observation. F. Matthias Alexander (1869-1955) studied the experience of self formation, working with motor habits. His method is used in performing arts training to enhance bodily and vocal expression. Like Alexander, Konstantine Stanislavski (1863-1938) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) studied human…

  14. Kinesthetic Ventures Informed by the Work of F. M. Alexander, Stanislavski, Peirce, and Freud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Ed; Wright, Ben; Protzel, Michael, Ed.

    This book is about education harvested from self-observation. F. Matthias Alexander (1869-1955) studied the experience of self formation, working with motor habits. His method is used in performing arts training to enhance bodily and vocal expression. Like Alexander, Konstantine Stanislavski (1863-1938) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) studied human…

  15. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons or...

  16. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons or...

  17. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons or...

  18. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons or...

  19. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons or...

  20. The death of Alexander the Great--a spinal twist of fate.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great died in 323 B.C. from an unknown cause. Physical depictions of this historical figure reveal the likelihood of a cervical scoliotic deformity. This is substantiated with the medical history and is correlated with his untimely death. For the first time, it is concluded that Alexander's death may have ensued from the sequelae of congenital scoliotic syndrome.

  1. 76 FR 28226 - Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander; and AIR 7 Seas... ``Complainant,'' against African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia, ALCO Logistics, LLC; Brenda Alexander; and Air 7 Seas... Ndahendekire Foundation located in Mbarara, Uganda. Complainant alleges that: Respondent African Shipping...

  2. Silurian Gastropoda from the Alexander terrane, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Gastropods are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska. They are part of a diverse megabenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. Heceta Limestone gastropods with Uralian affinities include Kirkospira glacialis, which closely resembles "Pleurotomaria" lindstromi Oehlert of Chernyshev, 1893, Retispira cf. R. volgulica (Chernyshev, 1893), and Medfracaulus turriformis (Chernyshev, 1893). Medfracaulus and similar morphotypes such as Coelocaulus karlae are unknown from rocks that are unquestionably part of the North American continent (Laurentia) during Late Silurian time. Beraunia is previously known only from the Silurian of Bohemia. Pachystrophia has previously been reported only from western North American terranes (Eastern Klamath, York, and Farewell terranes) and Europe. Bathmopterus Kirk, 1928, is resurrected and is only known from the Silurian of southeast Alaska. Newly described taxa include Hecetastoma gehrelsi n. gen. and n. sp. and Baichtalia tongassensis n. gen. and n. sp. ??2008 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapp, David R.

    2008-03-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and terrible three-week illness. Having the story continue to unfold throughout the next two weeks of the new unit provided a daily opportunity for students to see the relevance of what we were doing in class. My students were able to have meaningful and informed conversations with their peers and parents over an important international event. They even began to feel a bit like authorities themselves when listening to experts respond to media questions about polonium-210 and nuclear radiation in general. This paper discusses some of the ways that the story of Litvinenko was used while presenting the topic of nuclear radiation.

  4. Alexander Thomas Augusta--physician, teacher and human rights activist.

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Heather M.

    2005-01-01

    Commissioned surgeon of colored volunteers, April 4, 1863, with the rank of Major. Commissioned regimental surgeon on the 7th Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops, October 2, 1863. Brevet Lieutenant Colonel of Volunteers, March 13, 1865, for faithful and meritorious services--mustered out October 13, 1866. So reads the tombstone at Arlington National Cemetery of Alexander Thomas Augusta, the first black surgeon commissioned in the Union Army during the Civil War and the first black officer-rank soldier to be buried at Arlington Cemetery. He was also instrumental in founding the institutions that later became the hospital and medical college of Howard University and the National Medical Association. PMID:15719881

  5. The Astronomer Alexander I. Postoiev (1900-1976)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, P. M.; Matsuura, O. T.

    This is a biographical note on the life of Dr Alexander I. Postoiev, a victim of Stalin's purge of Soviet astronomers in 1936-1937 (McCutcheon, 1985). Along with his family, he left the Soviet Union in 1943, and lived in Germany as a refugee and "displaced person" until 1952, when he moved to Brazil. Then he started the second part of his professional career. Thanks to his efforts the Astronomical and Geophysical Institute (IAG) from the University of Sao Paulo (USP) was involved, for the first time, in programme of international cooperation, thus contributing to the institutional consolidation of IAG/USP as a leading centre of astronomical research and teaching today in Brazil.

  6. Alexander the Great's tombolos at Tyre and Alexandria, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, N.; Goiran, J. P.; Morhange, C.

    2008-08-01

    Tyre and Alexandria's coastlines are today characterised by wave-dominated tombolos, peculiar sand isthmuses that link former islands to the adjacent continent. Paradoxically, despite a long history of inquiry into spit and barrier formation, understanding of the dynamics and sedimentary history of tombolos over the Holocene timescale is poor. At Tyre and Alexandria we demonstrate that these rare coastal features are the heritage of a long history of natural morphodynamic forcing and human impacts. In 332 BC, following a protracted seven-month siege of the city, Alexander the Great's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow sublittoral sand bank to seize the island fortress; Tyre's causeway served as a prototype for Alexandria's Heptastadium built a few months later. We report stratigraphic and geomorphological data from the two sand spits, proposing a chronostratigraphic model of tombolo evolution.

  7. Alexander von Humboldt's perceptions of colonial Spanish America.

    PubMed

    Rebok, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an in-depth analysis of Alexander von Humboldt's descriptions and critical comments on the colonial society of the different regions he visited during his well-known expedition through the Americas (1799-1804). The criticisms of colonialism that he expressed, reflecting his personal convictions, have already been the focal point of many studies, but Humboldt also was able to offer a more differentiated assessment through comparisons of regional and local traditions and developments. This essay focuses on his personal diaries, which offer many interesting comments on colonial societies. These considerations and impressions made during the expedition are of particular scholarly value since they were not subject to censorship of any kind.

  8. Adaptive autophagy in Alexander disease-affected astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guomei; Yue, Zhenyu; Tallóczy, Zsolt; Goldman, James E

    2008-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosomal pathways are the two main routes of protein and organelle clearance in eukaryotic cells. The proteasome system is responsible for unfolded, short-lived proteins, which precludes the clearance of oligomeric and aggregated proteins, whereas macroautophagy, a process generally referred to as autophagy, mediates mainly the bulk degradation of long-lived cytoplasmic proteins, large protein complexes or organelles.(1) Recently, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders as an important pathway for the clearance of abnormally accumulated intracellular proteins, such as huntingtin, tau, and mutant and modified α-synuclein.(1-6) Our recent study illustrated the induction of adaptive autophagy in response to mutant glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) accumulation in astrocytes, in the brains of patients with Alexander disease (AxD), and in mutant GFAP knock-in mouse brains.(7) This autophagic response is negatively regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The activation of p38 MAPK by GFAP accumulation is responsible for mTOR inactivation and the induction of autophagy. We also found that the accumulation of GFAP impairs proteasome activity.(8) In this commentary we discuss the potential compensatory relationship between an impaired proteasome and activated autophagy, and propose that the MLK-MAPK (mixed lineage kinase-mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascade is a regulator of this crosstalk. Addendum to: Tang G, Yue Z, Talloczy, Z, Hagemann T, Cho W, Sulzer D, Messing A, Goldman JE. Alexander disease-mutant GFAP accumulation stimulates autophagy through p38 MAPK and mTOR signaling pathways. Hum Mol Genetics 2008; In press.

  9. The modern mythology of the left-handedness of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C

    2006-11-01

    The prevalent modern suggestion that Alexander the Great was left-handed probably derives from Michael Barsley's (1966) book, Left-handed man is a right-handed word, perhaps by mutation from as earlier story cited by Wile in 1934 from a 17th century Rabbirical exegesis, which said that Alexander discovered a country where all the inhabitants were left-handed. That itself may derive in part from the medieval Hebrew Book of Jossippon, which mentions Alexander talking of the superiority of the left hand and of how "kings stemming from the tribe of kings are left-handed".

  10. The effect of Alexander technique training program: A qualitative study of ordinary behavior application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Baek, Soon Gi

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to configure and apply the Alexander technique training program and assess the effect of program through physical, emotional and behavioral aspects. To achieve the research aims, qualitative research method had been conducted, subjecting 8 people, who were participating in Alexander Technique training program for this study. The study used focus group interview method for collecting date and employed for the interview method by mixing the semi-structured and unstructured questionnaire. The results were followings. First, one could develop body awareness and body consciousness through experiencing lived bodily sensation. Second, from Alexander Technique training program, people experienced psycho & physical's equilibrium. Third, one could change not only the manner of use of body but also the attitude to the life from conscious attention to daily ordinary movement. The results provided empirical evidence of Alexander Technique training program's functions in terms of physical, emotional and behavioral aspect through the process of consciousness control from lived body education.

  11. The Berlin tradition in Chicago: Franz Alexander and the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Erika S

    2010-01-01

    Freud considered Franz Alexander, the first graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute and an assistant in the Berlin Polyclinic, to be "one of our strongest hopes for the future." Alexander went on to become the first director of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis in 1932 and modeled some of the Chicago Institute's mission on his Berlin experiences. He was also a researcher in psychosomatic medicine, a prolific writer about psychoanalysis and prominent in psychoanalytic organizations. As he proposed modifications in psychoanalytic technique, he became a controversial figure, especially in the elaboration of his ideas about brief therapy and the corrective emotional experience. This paper puts Alexander's achievements in historical context, draws connections between the Berlin and Chicago Institutes and suggests that, despite his quarrels with traditional psychoanalysis, Alexander's legacy may be in his attitude towards psychoanalysis, characterized by a commitment to scientific study, a willingness to experiment, and a conviction about the role of psychoanalysis within the larger culture.

  12. Alexander Robertson (1834-1908): Glasgow's pioneer aphasiologist and epileptologist.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Robertson (1834-1908) was a Glasgow physician whose professional career was involved mainly with institutional-based practice but who published significant insights into the anatomical background to aphasia (1867) and the mechanisms of focal epileptogenesis (1869). His aphasiology ideas, including his suggestion that disconnection between cerebral centers involved in speech was responsible for the phenomenon, made him one of the earliest members of the late-nineteenth-century school of aphasia diagram makers. His view of epileptogenesis was that contralateral convulsing arose from irritation in a local area of pathology on the surface of the cerebral cortex after the irritation spread to a cortical motor center and then down the motor pathway to the striatum, while spreading within the cortex itself caused loss of consciousness. This interpretation contains much of the essence of the present-day understanding of cortical epileptogenesis. The origin of this interpretation is often attributed to John Hughlings Jackson, but Robertson published the idea in full a year or two prior to Jackson. However, Robertson's original insights were hardly noticed at the time they were published and have since almost entirely been ignored.

  13. Expedition 8 Crew Interviews: Alexander Y. Kaleri - FE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Russian cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Flight Engineer on Expedition 8 to the International Space Station (ISS), answers interview questions on this video, either himself or with the help of an interpreter. The questions cover: 1) The goal of the expedition; 2) The place in history of Mir; 3) The reaction to the loss of Columbia in Houston; 4) Why the rewards of spaceflight are worth the risks; 5) Why he decided to become a cosmonaut; 6) His memory of Yuri Gagarin's first flight; 7) What happens on a Soyuz capsule during launch and flight; 8) Are Soyuz maneuvers automatic or manual; 8) How the ISS science mission will be advanced during his stay; 9) The responsibilities of a Flight Engineer onboard the ISS; 10) Extravehicular activity (EVA) plans at that time; 11) The Shuttle Return to Flight and his preference for a Shuttle or Soyuz landing; 12) Why the last Soyuz landing was too rough; 13) The most valueable contribution of the ISS program.

  14. Alexander Forbes, Walter Cannon, and science-based literature.

    PubMed

    Garson, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The Harvard physiologists Alexander Forbes (1882-1965) and Walter Bradford Cannon (1871-1945) had an enormous impact on the physiology and neuroscience of the twentieth century. In addition to their voluminous scientific output, they also used literature to reflect on the nature of science itself and its social significance. Forbes wrote a novel, The Radio Gunner, a literary memoir, Quest for a Northern Air Route, and several short stories. Cannon, in addition to several books of popular science, wrote a literary memoir in the last year of his life, The Way of an Investigator. The following will provide a brief overview of the life and work of Forbes and Cannon. It will then discuss the way that Forbes used literature to express his views about the changing role of communications technology in the military, and his evolving view of the nervous system itself as a kind of information-processing device. It will go on to discuss the way that Cannon used literature to articulate the horrors he witnessed on the battlefield, as well as to contribute to the philosophy of science, and in particular, to the logic of scientific discovery. Finally, it will consider the historical and philosophical value of deeper investigation of the literary productions of scientists. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The life and music of Alexander Scriabin: megalomania revisited.

    PubMed

    Starcevic, Vladan

    2012-02-01

    To shed more light on the relationship between the grandiosity of the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915) and his creative output, and discuss its implications for psychopathology. Scriabin was a highly original composer, who brought innovations to the idiom of music. He firmly believed that music and philosophy were inseparable and that music was only a vehicle for expressing ideas and emotional states. As Scriabin was getting more preoccupied with mysticism and as he was developing a belief that his mission was to save the world through his art, his music became more esoteric. Over the last five years of his life, he composed relatively little, as he was working on a supergrandiose project that he never completed. Scriabin's grandiosity, which had delusional qualities, might have diminished his creativity towards the end of his life and contributed to his destructive fantasies. All along, his social façade was well preserved and he was not noted to exhibit overt psychotic behaviour, suggesting an encapsulated delusional megalomania. The implications of megalomania, especially in creative or otherwise influential individuals, are briefly discussed.

  16. Personal reflections on the life and legacy of Alexander Hollaender.

    PubMed

    Gaulden, Mary Esther; Jagger, John; White, Virginia P

    2007-01-01

    Mary Esther Gaulden presents a personal summary of the activities of Alexander Hollaender, from his days at the National Institutes of Health to his becoming Director of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1947. This appealing story deals with many of her reactions to his personality and organizational style. It reflects the atmosphere of science in those days, and her enthusiasm in this vibrant milieu. Next is a brief account by John Jagger of his first meeting with Dr. Hollaender, arrival in Oak Ridge in April 1956, and wedding to Mary Esther six months later at the house of the Hollaenders in Oak Ridge. The third section is an account by Virginia P. White of how she came to Oak Ridge in 1955 and became Dr. Hollaender's Laboratory Administrator. She gives a personal account of the many facets of his managerial style, as well as of the personality of his wife, Henrietta. She also describes one of Hollaender's many avocations, the collection of fossils on Sunday morning hikes in the Cumberland Mountains, accompanied by lab and visiting personnel, and finally comments on the annual research conferences in Gatlinburg TN, for which Hollaender and the lab became very well known, with some closing vignettes on his leadership style.

  17. Splice Site, Frameshift and Chimeric GFAP Mutations in Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Daniel; Li, Rong; Webster, Lital S.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kolodny, Edwin; Percy, Alan; van der Knaap, Marjo; Powers, James M.; Mantovani, John F.; Ekstein, Josef; Goldman, James E.; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a usually fatal astrogliopathy primarily caused by mutations in the gene encoding GFAP, an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes. We describe three patients with unique characteristics, and whose mutations have implications for AxD diagnosis and studies of intermediate filaments. Patient 1 is the first reported case with a non-coding mutation. The patient has a splice site change producing an in-frame deletion of exon 4 in about 10% of the transcripts. Patient 2 has an insertion and deletion at the extreme end of the coding region, resulting in a short frameshift. In addition, the mutation was found in buccal DNA but not in blood DNA, making this patient the first reported chimera. Patient 3 has a single base deletion near the C-terminal end of the protein, producing a short frameshift. These findings recommend inclusion of intronic splice site regions in genetic testing for AxD, indicate that alteration of only a small fraction of GFAP can produce disease, and provide caution against tagging intermediate filaments at their C-terminal end for cell biological investigations. PMID:22488673

  18. Cyclicity in Silurian island-arc carbonates, Alexander terrane, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, L.E.; Soja, C.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Silurian carbonates from Alaska (Alexander terrane) record the evolution of a submarine platform during waning volcanism in an island arc. A detailed stratigraphic analysis of a 47 meter-thick sequence revealed the existence of cyclically repeated limestones: coral-stromatoporoid wackestones alternate with oncoid packstones and bioturbated, silty lime mudstones. The coral-stromatoporoid deposits are characterized by a low-diversity assemblage of dendroid corals, massive stromatoporoids, Atrypoidea brachiopods, and rare occurrences of biostromes associated with Solenopora, high-spired gastropods, and crinoids. Oncoids typically are 2-6 mm in diameter and form massive, meter-thick units. Coated grains are symmetrically developed, have a shell or algal nucleus, and are also a minor component of coral-stromatoporoid beds. These lithologic units form seven, shallowing-upwards cycles (parasequences) that range in thickness from 3-9 meters. Coral-stomatoporoid wackestones form the base of each cycle and grade upwards into oncoid packstones with silty, lime mudstones at the top. This succession of lithofacies within each cycle reflects an increase in energy levels from relatively deeper water environments to relatively shallower ones. The lack of abrasion in the corals and stromatoporoids suggests predominantly quiet-water conditions in shallow subtidal areas affected by periodic turbulence. Comparison with correlative sections in Alaska and lack of correspondence with global sea level curves suggest that the primary cause of cyclicity was tectonic perturbations with secondary eustatic effects. Cyclic deposition in peri/subtidal sites was terminated by rapid drowning of the carbonate platform during late Silurian orogenesis.

  19. The life and death of Alexander Bogdanov, physician.

    PubMed

    Huestis, D W

    1996-08-01

    It was early in April in 1928 when the word went out in Moscow that Alexander Bogdanov had died. He was a controversial figure, an old Bolshevik who had left that party long before the 1917 revolution and never returned. All the same, he had had Lenin's respect as a scientist (as long as he stayed out of politics). More recently, he also had the support of the new party strong man, Stalin. Bogdanov opposed the growing despotism of the "dictatorship of the proletariat", under which slogan Communist autocracy was being developed. But he was respected as a tireless propagandist for the socialist cause, an enthusiastic teacher of the proletariat, and a writer of arcane science and philosophy. Bogdanov was held in such respect that Communist bigwigs spoke glowingly at the funeral, praising his intellect, courage, and dedication to science and humanity. They did not fail to point out that he had split with his one-time friend, Lenin, and had succumbed to ideological "errors". Indeed, he had powerful enemies in the early Soviet state. Bogdanov was a physician, economist, philosopher, natural scientist, writer of utopian science fiction, poet, teacher, politician (unsuccesful), lifelong revolutionary, forerunner of what we now call cybernetics and organizational science, and founder of the world's first institution devoted entirely to the field of blood transfusion. You could call him a Renaissance man. Although he clearly fitted the category of the late-nineteenth-century Russian intellectual revolutionary, Bogdanov differed from most of them in being no dilettante. More than just a theorist, he was an active scientist and physician. As a teacher, he firmly believed that education and indoctrination could alter people's ways of thinking and behaving, and that humanity could be perfected under socialism. Like many revolutionaries, Bogdanov tried to keep ahead of the Tsar's police by using a variety of pseudonyms, among them Riadavoy, Werner, Maximov, and Bogdanov. After

  20. Increased dynamic regulation of postural tone through Alexander Technique training

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, TW; Gurfinkel, VS; Horak, FB; Cordo, PJ; Ames, KE

    2010-01-01

    Gurfinkel and colleagues (2006) recently found that healthy adults dynamically modulate postural muscle tone in the body axis during anti-gravity postural maintenance and that this modulation is inversely correlated with axial stiffness. Our objective in the present study was to investigate whether dynamic modulation of axial postural tone can change through training. We examined whether teachers of the Alexander Technique (AT), who undergo “long-term” (3-year) training, have greater modulation of axial postural tone than matched control subjects. In addition, we performed a longitudinal study on the effect of “short-term” (10-week) AT training on the axial postural tone of individuals with low back pain (LBP), since short term AT training has previously been shown to reduce LBP. Axial postural tone was quantified by measuring the resistance of the neck, trunk and hips to small (±10°), slow (1°/s) torsional rotation during stance. Modulation of tone was determined by the torsional resistance to rotation (peak-to-peak, phase-advance, and variability of torque) and axial muscle activity (EMG). Peak-to-peak torque was lower (~50%), while phase-advance and cycle-to-cycle variability were enhanced for AT teachers compared to matched control subjects at all levels of the axis. In addition, LBP subjects decreased trunk and hip stiffness following short-term AT training compared to a control intervention. While changes in static levels of postural tone may have contributed to the reduced stiffness observed with the AT, our results suggest that dynamic modulation of postural tone can be enhanced through long-term training in the AT, which may constitute an important direction for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21185100

  1. An adult form of Alexander disease: a novel mutation in glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Ohnari, K; Yamano, M; Uozumi, T; Hashimoto, T; Tsuji, S; Nakagawa, M

    2007-10-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutation has been reported in Alexander disease. We report a patient with the adult form of Alexander disease who shows a novel mutation in GFAP. This case presented with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia and spastic gait on the right side. Brain and spinal cord MRI showed marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. Abnormal high signal intensities in the ventral medulla oblongata were detected bilaterally. There were no white matter lesions or contrast enhancing lesions. Recently, there have been reports of patients with a juvenile form of Alexander disease presenting with atrophy or signal abnormalities of the medulla or spinal cord. Atrophy of the medulla and spinal cord have specifically been described as suggestive of Alexander disease [1]. Sequence analysis of the GFAP gene of this patient showed a heterozygous c.221T>C mutation, predicting a p.M74T amino acid change. In all patients suspected of Alexander disease on the basis of MRI findings, GFAP analysis is necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

  2. Obituary: Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, 1956-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc William

    2006-12-01

    Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, Program Coordinator at the Space Telescope Science Institute, was diagnosed with cancer of the gallbladder, pancreas, and liver in May 2005 and died on 29 September 2005. He was forty-nine. Andy was born to Bodo and Helen Lubenow in St. Paul, Minnesota on 4 January 1956. In 1964 at the age of eight, he moved with his family to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and attended the American Community School there until returning with his family in 1973 to St. Paul. Argentina had a big impact on Andy's future as an astronomer. He later recalled how he had observed and was puzzled by the "upside-down" appearance of the Moon in the southern hemisphere. In Argentina, he built his first telescope using a mirror he had ground himself. He never parted ways with that instrument. Andy did not follow a standard educational track. He spent two years at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, before transferring to the University of Minnesota, where he earned his bachelor's degree and began work towards a master's degree in astrophysics. Later he transferred to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he remained until Dr. Peter Stockman hired him to work on the Hubble Space Telescope project. While in school, he worked as a teacher's assistant, taught night school, and gave demonstrations of stargazing. He was an excellent teacher and had a flair for writing. He later wrote articles for a sailing magazine and a pilot's magazine. Andy was a very practical, meticulous, and steady worker, attributes that he combined with an understated and dry sense of humor. He was always able to find a way through a problem, no matter how sticky. If a job required him to roll up his sleeves and get it done through hard work, he would persevere. Nevertheless, he was always on the lookout for an easier way. He had no patience for being forced to deal with stupid things for stupid reasons. At work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Andy was

  3. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson. Wilson's disease, Queen Square and neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Trocello, J-M; Woimant, F; Lachaux, A; Quinn, N

    2013-12-01

    This historical article describes the life and work of the British physician Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson (1878-1937), who was one of the world's greatest neurologists of the first half of the 20th century. Early in his career, Wilson spent one year in Paris in 1903 where he learned from Pierre-Marie at Bicêtre Hospital. He subsequently retained uninterrupted links with French neurology. He also visited in Leipzig the German anatomist Paul Flechsig. In 1904, Wilson returned to London, where he worked for the rest of his life at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (later the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, and today the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery) in Queen Square, and also at Kings' College Hospital. He wrote on 'the old motor system and the new', on disorders of motility and muscle tone, on the epilepsies, on aphasia, apraxia, tics, and pathologic laughing and crying, and most importantly on Wilson's disease. The other objective of our paper is to commemorate the centenary of Wilson's most important work published in 1912 in Brain, and also in Revue Neurologique, on an illness newly recognized and characterized by him entitled "Progressive lenticular degeneration, a familial nervous disease associated with liver cirrhosis". He analyzed 12 clinical cases, four of whom he followed himself, but also four cases previously published by others and a further two that he considered in retrospect had the same disease as he was describing. The pathological profile combined necrotic damage in the lenticular nuclei of the brain and hepatic cirrhosis. This major original work is summarized and discussed in the present paper. Wilson not only delineated what was later called hepato-lenticular degeneration and Wilson's disease, but also introduced for the first time the terms extrapyramidal syndrome and extrapyramidal system, stressing the role of the basal ganglia in motility. The present historical work emphasizes the special

  4. IN MEMORIAM: In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    In Memoriam of Alexander A Golovin (1962-2008) Alexander (Sasha) Golovin passed away on 10 September 2008. Sasha's scientific heritage includes seminal works in different fields of physics, from Marangoni convection to self-assembly of quantum dots, and from combustion fronts to anomalous diffusion in flows and on a crystal surface. A graduate of the Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, he had very broad scientific interests and a unique ability to identify and solve new, intellectually challenging and technologically important problems. One of the basic fields of Sasha's research was the fluid dynamics in systems with interfaces. His favorite subject was the motion of droplets, bubbles and particles in the presence of heat and mass transfer. Sasha's early works contained the discovery of the spontaneous motion of droplets due to the Marangoni effect and the investigation of the interaction between solid particles, bubbles and droplets caused by the Marangoni effect, which is a crucial factor that determines the effect of heat/mass transfer on the rate of coalescence. In both cases, Sasha's work was the first in a long sequence of papers written by different authors. Later, Sasha returned to that field when studying such fascinating subjects as levitation of droplets above the surface of an evaporating liquid and encapsulation of particles and bubbles by an advancing solidification front. The subject of interfacial hydrodynamics overlaps with another basic field of Sasha's research, the theory of pattern formation. The contribution of Sasha's work to the modern understanding of the variety of pattern formation phenomena is significant. It includes the analysis of the interaction between long-wave and short-wave instability modes in Marangoni convection, investigation of the large-scale Marangoni convection that led to the prediction of different patterns including quasipatterns, and the description of various non-potential effects in Marangoni convection

  5. What Matters to Alexander Astin? A Conversation with Higher Education's Senior Scholar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    About Campus, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Since the mid-1960s, the work of Alexander Astin--Allan M. Cartter Professor of Higher Education at the University of California-Los Angeles and director of the Higher Education Research Institute--has served as both bellwether for and mirror of the American college and university system. He was there to study and shed light on the student…

  6. Alexander Disease: A Novel Mutation in GFAP Leading to Epilepsia Partialis Continua.

    PubMed

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Karacay, Bahri

    2016-06-01

    Alexander disease is a genetically induced leukodystrophy, due to dominant mutations in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP ) gene, causing dysfunction of astrocytes. We have identified a novel GFAP mutation, associated with a novel phenotype for Alexander disease. A boy with global developmental delay and hypertonia was found to have a leukodystrophy. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous point mutation in exon 6 of the GFAP gene. The guanine-to-adenine change causes substitution of the normal glutamic acid codon (GAG) with a mutant lysine codon (AAG) at position 312 (E312 K mutation). At the age of 4 years, the child developed epilepsia partialis continua, consisting of unabating motor seizures involving the unilateral perioral muscles. Epilepsia partialis continua has not previously been reported in association with Alexander disease. Whether and how the E312 K mutation produces pathologic changes and clinical signs that are unique from other Alexander disease-inducing mutations in GFAP remain to be determined. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. How Alexander von Humboldt's life story can inspire innovative soil research in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Johan

    2017-09-01

    The pioneering vision of Alexander von Humboldt of science and society of the early 1800s is still highly relevant today. His open mind and urge to make many measurements characterizing the interconnected web of life are crucial ingredients as we now face the worldwide challenge of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Case studies in the Philippines, Vietnam, Kenya, Niger, and Costa Rica demonstrate, in Alexander's spirit, interaction with stakeholders and attention to unique local conditions, applying modern measurement and modeling methods and allowing inter- and transdisciplinary research approaches. But relations between science and society are increasingly problematic, partly as a result of the information revolution and post-truth, fact-free thinking. Overly regulated and financially restricted scientific communities in so-called developed countries may stifle intellectual creativity. Researchers in developing countries are urged to leapfrog these problems in the spirit of Alexander von Humboldt as they further develop their scientific communities. Six suggestions to the science community are made with particular attention to soil science. (The Humboldt lecture, presented by the 2017 recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt lecture, Johan Bouma, can be accessed at http://client.cntv.at/egu2017/ml1.)

  8. A Disciplinary Immigrant. Alexander Smith at the University of Chicago, 1894-1911

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The publication in 1906 of Alexander Smith's "Introduction to general inorganic chemistry" inaugurated a decisive change in chemical pedagogy in the US, the effects of which are still evident. The nature and extent of Smith's innovations are described through a comparison of his text to its source material and contemporaries. His…

  9. Progressive Pioneer: Alexander James Inglis (1879-1924) and American Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wraga, William G.

    2006-01-01

    Alexander James Inglis's transformation from an academic traditionalist devoted to Latin pedagogy to an influential progressive-experimentalist and advocate of the comprehensive high school during the early twentieth century has received insufficient attention from educational and curriculum historians. A reconstruction of Inglis's career leads to…

  10. Another View of Dynamic Criteria: A Critical Reanalysis of Barrett, Caldwell, and Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, James T.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A critical reanalysis of Barrett, Caldwell, and Alexander's (1985) critique of dynamic criteria. Summarizes and questions Barrett, et al.'s three definitions of dynamic criteria and their conclusion that reported temporal changes in criteria could be explained by methodological artifacts. A greater focus on dynamic criteria as constructs is…

  11. The Language of Teaching Coordination: Suzuki Training Meets the Alexander Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Details an investigation of the language of Suzuki instruction and the students' interpretation of that language. Describes the Alexander Technique and Suzuki training and provides specific examples illustrating the interaction of language and coordination in this context. Proposes that teachers of movement, voice and acting can benefit from these…

  12. Identification of metapopulation dynamics among Northern Goshawks of the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and Coastal British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; McClaren, Erica L.; Doyle, Frank I.; Titus, K.; Sage, George K.; Wilson, Robert E.; Gust, Judy R.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Northern Goshawks occupying the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and coastal British Columbia nest primarily in old-growth and mature forest, which results in spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of individuals across the landscape. We used microsatellite and mitochondrial data to infer genetic structure, gene flow, and fluctuations in population demography through evolutionary time. Patterns in the genetic signatures were used to assess predictions associated with the three population models: panmixia, metapopulation, and isolated populations. Population genetic structure was observed along with asymmetry in gene flow estimates that changed directionality at different temporal scales, consistent with metapopulation model predictions. Therefore, Northern Goshawk assemblages located in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia interact through a metapopulation framework, though they may not fit the classic model of a metapopulation. Long-term population sources (coastal mainland British Columbia) and sinks (Revillagigedo and Vancouver islands) were identified. However, there was no trend through evolutionary time in the directionality of dispersal among the remaining assemblages, suggestive of a rescue-effect dynamic. Admiralty, Douglas, and Chichagof island complex appears to be an evolutionarily recent source population in the Alexander Archipelago. In addition, Kupreanof island complex and Kispiox Forest District populations have high dispersal rates to populations in close geographic proximity and potentially serve as local source populations. Metapopulation dynamics occurring in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia by Northern Goshawks highlight the importance of both occupied and unoccupied habitats to long-term population persistence of goshawks in this region.

  13. The Doors to Home and History: Post-Colonial Identities in Meena Alexander and Bharati Mukherjee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Shilpa

    1993-01-01

    Examines postcolonial inquiry and studies of identity in Asians of Indian descent, focusing on the works of Meena Alexander and Bharati Mukherjee. Their commentaries on India and immigrant cultures are constantly influenced by a history dependent on Western tradition, although both authors resist the stereotypical definitions imposed by the West.…

  14. The effect of Alexander technique training program: A qualitative study of ordinary behavior application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Baek, Soon Gi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to configure and apply the Alexander technique training program and assess the effect of program through physical, emotional and behavioral aspects. To achieve the research aims, qualitative research method had been conducted, subjecting 8 people, who were participating in Alexander Technique training program for this study. The study used focus group interview method for collecting date and employed for the interview method by mixing the semi-structured and unstructured questionnaire. The results were followings. First, one could develop body awareness and body consciousness through experiencing lived bodily sensation. Second, from Alexander Technique training program, people experienced psycho & physical’s equilibrium. Third, one could change not only the manner of use of body but also the attitude to the life from conscious attention to daily ordinary movement. The results provided empirical evidence of Alexander Technique training program’s functions in terms of physical, emotional and behavioral aspect through the process of consciousness control from lived body education. PMID:25610819

  15. Connect the Book. Always Inventing: A Photobiography of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    Cell phones, video phones, voice messaging?one wonders what Alexander Graham Bell would have thought about the many venues today for electronic communication with one another. Bell's March 10, 1876 invention is now 128 years old, but there is no doubt that Bell's "talking machine" changed the world. This article presents a brief review of the…

  16. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  17. Russia's Literary Genius Alexander Pushkin: The Great-Grandson of an African Slave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounsbery, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Pushkin, Russia's most celebrated literary figure, descended from an African slave. On both parents' sides, he was related to Avram Petrovich Gannibal, who was born to an African prince and abducted to become a slave to a Russian diplomat. Pushkin chose to pride himself on both his aristocratic life and his African ancestry. (SM)

  18. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  19. An Appraisal of Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander's First Year in Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Terrel H.; Elmquist, Donna L.

    1992-01-01

    Although U.S. Education Secretary Lamar Alexander's strategy includes a track for today's students, emphasis has been on the new generation of schools advocated in the America 2000 plan. This article pleads for concrete steps to improve the education of today's students and recommends a book ("How to Shape Up Our Nation's Schools") to…

  20. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  1. Popular Response to Public Education in the Reign of Tsar Alexander I (1801-1825).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Franklin A.

    1984-01-01

    Tsar Alexander I of Russia created a ministry of public education and promulgated laws to provide elementary and secondary schools and higher education institutions for all classes of the population. The public took a great interest in education and actively participated in the funding of schools at every level. (RM)

  2. "In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great" PBS Series. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide correlates with the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) television series "In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great" hosted by historian Michael Wood. The four episodes of the series are entitled: "Son of God"; "Lord of Asia"; "Across the Hindu Kush"; and "To the Ends of the…

  3. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-29

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an approximately 1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated approximately 8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  4. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  5. Russia's Literary Genius Alexander Pushkin: The Great-Grandson of an African Slave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounsbery, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Pushkin, Russia's most celebrated literary figure, descended from an African slave. On both parents' sides, he was related to Avram Petrovich Gannibal, who was born to an African prince and abducted to become a slave to a Russian diplomat. Pushkin chose to pride himself on both his aristocratic life and his African ancestry. (SM)

  6. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  7. Connect the Book. Always Inventing: A Photobiography of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    Cell phones, video phones, voice messaging?one wonders what Alexander Graham Bell would have thought about the many venues today for electronic communication with one another. Bell's March 10, 1876 invention is now 128 years old, but there is no doubt that Bell's "talking machine" changed the world. This article presents a brief review of the…

  8. Alexander Cameron Rutherford: A Gentleman and a Scholar. Documents in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodysh, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information about Alexander Cameron Rutherford, a provincial politician. Includes a letter written by Rutherford in 1912 that provides insights into his responsibilities to the general public, information about Rutherford himself, the economic conditions of Alberta, Canada in 1912, and information about the individual to whom it was…

  9. 76 FR 54800 - Sandy Alexander, Clifton, NJ; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sandy Alexander, Clifton, NJ; Notice of Negative Determination on... resulted in a negative determination based on the findings that the petitioning worker group did not meet... or the law. Conclusion After reconsideration, I affirm the original notice of negative...

  10. The Election of 1800: Alexander Hamilton and the Death of the Federalist Party.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook-DeFeo, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Describes the significance of the election of 1800 in the development of political parties in the United States. Contends that Alexander Hamilton's view of the United States Constitution was dangerous for the new nation and led to a permanent split in the Federalist Party. Includes a resource bibliography for teachers wishing to incorporate this…

  11. Alexander Hamilton: Soldier-Statesmen of the Constitution. A Bicentennial Series No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Center of Military History, Washington, DC.

    Alexander Hamilton was among the most intellectually gifted of the Founding Fathers and a brilliant political theorist, but he lacked practical political experience, and his major political contributions occurred only when his specific policies were adopted and carried forward by others with broader vision. This booklet on Hamilton is one in a…

  12. A Disciplinary Immigrant. Alexander Smith at the University of Chicago, 1894-1911

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The publication in 1906 of Alexander Smith's "Introduction to general inorganic chemistry" inaugurated a decisive change in chemical pedagogy in the US, the effects of which are still evident. The nature and extent of Smith's innovations are described through a comparison of his text to its source material and contemporaries. His…

  13. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1–2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system. PMID:17517668

  14. 78 FR 53630 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ..., March 11, 1964) (``AD 64-07-05''). The NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the specified... 3227, March 11, 1964) and adding the following new AD: 2013-16-05 Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co... supersedes AD 64-07-05, Amendment 701 (29 FR 3227; March 11, 1964). (c) Applicability This AD applies to...

  15. [Urology and National Socialism: the fate of Alexander von Lichtenberg 1880-1949].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Krischel, M; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2010-09-01

    Alexander von Lichtenberg (1880-1949) was one of the famous members of the German Urological Society (DGU) in pre-war Germany. He introduced excretion urography and a special TURP Instrument. In 1928 he was president of the 8th meeting held in the German capital Berlin. His Handbook of Urology, released by Ferdinand Springer publishing house, was a trendsetter in establishing urology as a specialty in Germany and bringing together the whole wisdom of all aspects of urology. He was the founder of the famous Maximilian Nitze Award of the DGU. As a Jew he-like many others-was forced to leave Nazi Germany after 1933. Even in Hungary, his native country, he again had to resist anti-Semitic hostility. Later on he lived in Mexico. Alexander von Lichtenberg has to be remembered with special focus on the exodus of German Jewish scientists during the Nazi time.

  16. Clinical Experience in Late Antiquity: Alexander of Tralles and the Therapy of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouras-vallianatos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Alexander of Tralles, writing in the late sixth century, combined his wide-ranging practical knowledge with earlier medical theories. This article shows how clinical experience is used in Alexander’s works by concentrating on his therapeutic advice on epilepsy and, in particular, on pharmacology and the group of so-called natural remedies. I argue that clinical testing is used not only for the introduction of new medicines but also as an instrument for checking the therapeutic effect of popular healing practices. On another level, this article discusses Alexander’s role as the author of a medical compendium; it suggests that by marking the cases of clinical testing with a set of recurrent expressions, Alexander leads his audience to reflect on his medical authority and personal contribution. PMID:25045178

  17. Paleozoic paleomagnetism and northward drift of the Alexander Terrane, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Der Voo, Rob; Jones, Meridee; Gromme, C. Sherman; Eberlein, G. Donald; Churkin, Michael, Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Paleozoic limestone, graywacke, sandstone, milestone, red beds and volcanic rocks of the Alexander terrane, southeastern Alaska, have yielded six paleomagnetic pole positions after thermal and alternating-field demagnetization. These poles are from sample groups of late Middle Ordovician, Late Ordovician, Devonian, Late Devonian, and early and late Carboniferous age. To test various tectonic models for the structural development of this part of western North America, the paleomagnetic results are compared to those for the North American craton. It is found that the observed inclination and declination values deviate significantly from the values predicted for the present-day position of the Alexander terrane (55.5N, 133.5W). Better matching can be obtained for a paleoposition of the terrane at about 40N, 120W, in the present position of western Nevada and northeastern California. In addition, an in situ 25° clockwise rotation of the terrane is required to restore it to its original position.

  18. Protein misfolding and oxidative stress promote glial-mediated neurodegeneration in an Alexander disease model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Colodner, Kenneth J.; Feany, Mel B.

    2011-01-01

    Although alterations in glial structure and function commonly accompany death of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, the role glia play in modulating neuronal loss is poorly understood. We have created a model of Alexander disease in Drosophila by expressing disease-linked mutant versions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in fly glia. We find aggregation of mutant human GFAP into inclusions bearing the hallmarks of authentic Rosenthal fibers. We also observe significant toxicity of mutant human GFAP to glia, which is mediated by protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Both protein aggregation and oxidative stress contribute to activation of a robust autophagic response in glia. Toxicity of mutant GFAP to glial cells induces a non-cell autonomous stress response and subsequent apoptosis in neurons, which is dependent on glial glutamate transport. Our findings thus establish a simple genetic model of Alexander disease and further identify cellular pathways critical for glial-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21414908

  19. Paleozoic paleomagnetism and northward drift of the Alexander terrane, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Der Voo, R.; Jones, M.; Gromme, C.S.; Eberlein, G.D.; Churkin, M.

    1980-01-01

    Paleozoic limestone, greywacke, sandstone, mudstone, red beds and volcanic rocks of the Alexander terrane, SE Alaska, have yielded six paleomagnetic pole positions after thermal and alternating-field demagnetization. These poles are from sample groups of late Middle Ordovician, Late Ordovician, Devonian, Late Devonian, and early and late Carboniferous age. To test various tectonic models for the structural development of this part of western N America, the paleomagnetic results are compared to those for the N American craton. It is found that the observed inclination and declination values deviate significantly from the values predicted for the present-day position of the Alexander terrance (55.5 N, 133.5 W). Better matching can be obtained for a paleoposition of the terrane at about 40 N, 120 W, in the present position of western Nevada and NE California. In addition, an in situ 25o clockwise rotation of the terrane is required to restore it to its original position.-Authors

  20. Unusual diagnosis in a child suffering from juvenile Alexander disease: clinical and imaging report.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, Emilio; Van der Knaap, Marjo S; Errani, Alessandra; Colonnelli, Maria Chiara; Bracceschi, Roberta; Malaspina, Elisabetta; Moscano, Filomena Caterina; Garone, Caterina; Sarajlija, Jasenka; Zimmerman, Robert A; Salomons, Gajja S; Bernardi, Bruno

    2006-12-01

    Alexander disease is a rare, sporadic leukoencephalopathy characterized by white-matter abnormalities with frontal predominance and, as a rule, clinically associated with megalencephaly, seizures, spasticity, and psychomotor deterioration. We describe a boy who was diagnosed as affected by anorexia nervosa because of his refusal to eat, progressive weight loss, and psychologic disturbances. The observation of a hyperintense lesion on T(2)-weighed magnetic resonance images (MRIs) was initially explained as a pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis related to malnutrition. Following MRI and DNA analysis, we diagnosed a juvenile type of Alexander disease. Therefore, we can affirm the importance of the history and clinical examination to look for brainstem dysfunction in patients presenting with atypical anorexia nervosa.

  1. Pennsylvanian pluton stitching of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.C.; Bergman, S.C.; Cushing, G.W. ); Plafker, G. ); Campbell, R.B.; Dodds, C.J. ); McClelland, W.C. ); Mueller, P.A. ); MacKevett, E.M. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A quartz monzonite-syenite-alkali granite plutonic complex in eastern Alaska crosscuts the contact of the Alexander terrane and Wrangellia and intrudes the basement rocks of both terranes. Zircon U-Pb data indicate an intrusion age of 309 {plus minus} 5 Ma (Middle Pennsylvanian) for the pluton, and {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar age for hornblende separates indicate cooling to about 450 C during Middle Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time. The new field relations and age data demonstrate the Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane were contiguous during the Middle Pennsylvanian. This conclusion provides an important new constraint on paleogeographic reconstructions of the northwest Cordillera, and necessitates reassessment of stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data that were cited as evidence that the terranes evolved separately until the late Mesozoic.

  2. The Use of "Ability" Measures as Controls for Concurrent or Subsequent Achievement (Comment on Alexander et al., ASR, October 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, James S.

    1982-01-01

    Comments upon a 1981 article by Alexander, Pallas, and Cook. Discusses whether particular standardized tests measure achievement or ability and the implications of this issue for school effects research. (GC)

  3. Scaphopoda from the Alexander Terrane, Southeast Alaska-The first occurrence of Scaphopoda in the Silurian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Baichtal, J.

    2006-01-01

    The scaphopods Dentalium hecetaensis n. sp. and Rhytiodentalium cf. kentuckyensis Pojeta et Runnegar, 1979, are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. This is the first occurrence of Silurian scaphopods known to date. They are part of a diverse macrobenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted southern Alaskan terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. ?? 2006 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  4. PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander) hepatoma cell line: further characterization and studies of infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Daemer, R J; Feinstone, S M; Alexander, J J; Tully, J G; London, W T; Wong, D C; Purcell, R H

    1980-01-01

    The Alexander hepatoma cell line, PLC/PRF/5, was studied for evidence of hepatitis B virus markers and alpha-fetoprotein. Only hepatitis B surface antigen and alpha-fetoprotein were detected. Induction experiments with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and inoculation of chimpanzees with whole cells or tissue culture fluid did not reveal evidence of synthesis of additional hepatitis B virus markers or of production of infectious virus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6160110

  5. A stone at the Siege of Cyropolis and the death of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew N; Arnott, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great was struck by a stone at the Siege of Cyropolis in 329 BC and was rendered temporarily blind and inaudible as a result. Although other authors have written extensively about the likely pathological effects of this injury, none have suggested carotid artery dissection as a possible cause. We present evidence that this should be considered as a differential diagnosis and how it might explain an unusual symptom seen at his deathbed in Babylon six years later.

  6. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain: economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hollinghurst, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie; Ballard, Kathleen; Barnett, Jane; Beattie, Angela; Evans, Maggie; Lewith, George; Middleton, Karen; Oxford, Frances; Webley, Fran; Little, Paul

    2008-12-11

    An economic evaluation of therapeutic massage, exercise, and lessons in the Alexander technique for treating persistent back pain. Cost consequences study and cost effectiveness analysis at 12 month follow-up of a factorial randomised controlled trial. 579 patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain recruited from primary care. Normal care (control), massage, and six or 24 lessons in the Alexander technique. Half of each group were randomised to a prescription for exercise from a doctor plus behavioural counselling from a nurse. Costs to the NHS and to participants. Comparison of costs with Roland-Morris disability score (number of activities impaired by pain), days in pain, and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Comparison of NHS costs with QALY gain, using incremental cost effectiveness ratios and cost effectiveness acceptability curves. Intervention costs ranged from pound30 for exercise prescription to pound596 for 24 lessons in Alexander technique plus exercise. Cost of health services ranged from pound50 for 24 lessons in Alexander technique to pound124 for exercise. Incremental cost effectiveness analysis of single therapies showed that exercise offered best value ( pound61 per point on disability score, pound9 per additional pain-free day, pound2847 per QALY gain). For two-stage therapy, six lessons in Alexander technique combined with exercise was the best value (additional pound64 per point on disability score, pound43 per additional pain-free day, pound5332 per QALY gain). An exercise prescription and six lessons in Alexander technique alone were both more than 85% likely to be cost effective at values above pound20 000 per QALY, but the Alexander technique performed better than exercise on the full range of outcomes. A combination of six lessons in Alexander technique lessons followed by exercise was the most effective and cost effective option.

  7. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease.

    PubMed

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity.

  8. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M.; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V.; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity. PMID:26378915

  9. [Neurology in Byzantine medicine. An analysis of Alexander of Tralles' Medici libri duodecim].

    PubMed

    de Frutos-Gonzalez, Virgina; Guerrero-Peral, Ángel L

    2010-10-01

    Byzantium continued Greek and Roman habit of texts compilation, and so, preserved medical knowledge. In addition, assimilating the influence of Monastic and Arabic medicine, Byzantine physicians transmitted original contributions including references to neurological diseases. Alexander of Tralles was one of major exponents of Byzantine medicine. He received his early medical training with his father, and in extensive travels, gathered medical knowledge and experience. Medici libri duodecim is a treatise on pathology and therapeutics of internal diseases, in twelve books. It comprises views from observation of different diseases. Its influence was prolonged and it was translated and edited until Renaissance. We analyze grecolatin edition by Henricum Petrum (1556), with special interest in neurological disease citations. DEVELOPMENT. First of twelve books is dedicated to head and brain diseases. When considering headache, he classifies them, following Aretaeus of Cappadocia, in cephalalgia, cephalea and hemicrania, suggesting different pathogenic mechanisms and therapies. Headache is included among symptoms conducting, as well as memory or sleep disturbances, to delirium. Medici libri duodecim considers memory complaints among systemic diseases, mainly with cardiac involvement. Alexander distinguishes between paralysis (privation of sensibility and mobility concerning half of the body), and apoplexy (including main soul functions loss, even conducting to death). Regarding epilepsy, Medici libri duodecim considers that its origin can be outside the head, mainly in the stomach, and offers us descriptions of epileptic auras. Analysis of Alexander of Tralles' Medici libri duodecim shows how byzantine physicians understood neurological diseases. Therapeutics was based on venesection, medicinal plants and avoidance of noxious substances.

  10. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support

  11. The remarkable medical lineage of the Monro family: contributions of Alexander primus, secundus, and tertius.

    PubMed

    Wu, Osmond C; Manjila, Sunil; Malakooti, Nima; Cohen, Alan R

    2012-06-01

    Among the families that have influenced the development of modern medicine into what it is today, the Monro lineage stands as one of the most notable. Alexander Monro primus (1697-1767) was the first of 3 generations with the same name, a dynasty that spanned 126 years occupying the Chair of Anatomy one after the other at the University of Edinburgh. After becoming Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh in 1719, Monro primus played a principal role in the establishment of the University of Edinburgh School of Medicine and the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. In 1726, he published The Anatomy of the Humane Bones, of which 8 editions were printed during his lifetime. His son, Alexander Monro secundus (1733-1817), arguably the most notable of the 3 men, succeeded him as Professor of Anatomy. A highly regarded lecturer and anatomist, Monro secundus studied under many great physicians, including William Hunter and Johann Friedrich Meckel the Elder, and was also teacher to other well-known figures at the time, such as Joseph Black and Thomas Trotter. His most notable contributions include his work with the lymphatic system, the interventricular foramen (of Monro), and the Monro-Kellie doctrine. Alexander Monro tertius (1773-1859), the last of the dynasty, also succeeded his father as Professor of Anatomy. His work included insights into abdominal aortic aneurysms and the anatomy of the genitourinary system. The prominent association of the Monro family with the University of Edinburgh and the effects of a tenured professorship under the concept of "Ad vitam aut culpam" over successive generations are also described. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this historical review of the Monro family is among the few published in neurosurgical literature. A vivid historical overview of the medical contributions of the most famous and influential dynasty of physicians in Edinburgh at that time is provided, with relevant excerpts from original publications.

  12. Origin of Silurian reefs in the Alexander Terrane of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lower to Upper Silurian (upper Llandovery-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation record several episodes of reef growth in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. As the oldest carbonates of wide-spread distribution in the region, the Heceta limestones represent the earliest development of a shallow-marine platform within the Alexander arc and the oldest foundation for reef evolution. These deposits provide important insights into the dynamic processes, styles, and bathymetry associated with reef growth in tectonically active oceanic islands. Massive stromatoporoids, corals, and red algae are preserved in fragmental rudstones and represent a fringing reef that formed at the seaward edge of the incipient marine shelf. Accessory constituents in this reef include crinoids and the cyanobacterium Girvanella. Small biostromes were constructed by ramose corals and stromatoporoids on oncolitic substrates in backreef or lagoonal environments. These buildups were associated with low-diversity assemblages of brachiopods and with gastropods, amphiporids, calcareous algae and cyanobacteria. Microbial boundstones reflect the widespread encrustation of cyanobacteria and calcified microproblematica on shelly debris as stromatolitic mats that resulted in the development of a stromatactoid-bearing mud mound and a barrier reef complex. Epiphytaceans, other microbes, and aphrosalpingid sponges were the primary frame-builders of the barrier reefs. These buildups attained significant relief at the shelf margin and shed detritus as slumped blocks and debris flows into deep-water sites along the slope. The similarity of these stromatolitic-aphrosalpingid reefs to those from Siluro-Devonian strata of autochthonous southwestern Alaska suggests paleobiogeographic ties of the Alexander terrane to cratonal North America during the Silurian.

  13. Familial Adult-onset Alexander Disease: Clinical and Neuroradiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    ELMALI, Ayşe Deniz; ÇETİNÇELİK, Ümran; IŞLAK, Civan; UZUN ADATEPE, Nurten; KARAALİ SAVRUN, Feray; YALÇINKAYA, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) dramatically differs from the early onset AD with respect to clinical and neuroradiological findings. Herein we report the detailed clinical and neuroradiological findings of a Turkish family with AOAD. In all three cases, magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked atrophy of the mesencephalon, bulbus, and cervical spinal cord accompanied with signal abnormalities in the same regions along with supratentorial white matter. Basal ganglia were affected in two cases. Molecular genetic analysis revealed heterozygous mutation in the 8th exon of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene M451I (c.1245G>A), leading to the diagnosis of AOAD in all cases. PMID:28360791

  14. Alexander the Great: A Strategy Review in the Context of the ACSC strategy Process Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    observe the development of both political and military strategies in support of a specific national objective. As ruler of Greece and later of a massive...was born in 356 B.C. in Macedonia (the northern part of modern Greece ), the son of Philip II, the king of Macedonia. At the age of 16 Alexander...left wing of his father’s army at the dec ive battle of Chaeronea in which Philip defeated the allied Greek forces 1 won control of Greece . Philip

  15. Professor Robert McNeill Alexander CBE FRS (1934-2016).

    PubMed

    Ker, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Robert McNeill Alexander, known to friends and colleagues as 'Neill', was a zoologist with an engineer's eye for how animals work. He used mathematical models to show how evolution has produced optimal designs. His skill was to choose appropriate models: realistic enough to contain the essence of a problem and yet simple enough to be tractable. He wrote fluently and easily: 23 books, 280 papers and a CD-ROM entitled How Animals Move. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. The ocular motor features of adult-onset alexander disease: a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Abegg, Mathias; Vertinsky, A Talia; Ceccherini, Isabella; Caroli, Francesco; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-06-01

    A 51-year-old Chinese man presented with gaze-evoked nystagmus, impaired smooth pursuit and vestibular ocular reflex cancellation, and saccadic dysmetria, along with a family history suggestive of late-onset autosomal dominant parkinsonism. MRI revealed abnormalities of the medulla and cervical spinal cord typical of adult-onset Alexander disease, and genetic testing showed homozygosity for the p.D295N polymorphic allele in the gene encoding the glial fibrillary acidic protein. A review of the literature shows that ocular signs are frequent in adult-onset Alexander disease, most commonly gaze-evoked nystagmus, pendular nystagmus, and/or oculopalatal myoclonus, and less commonly ptosis, miosis, and saccadic dysmetria. These signs are consistent with the propensity of adult-onset Alexander disease to cause medullary abnormalities on neuroimaging.

  17. Trace element analysis of Alexander the Great's silver tetradrachms minted in Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.; Katsanos, A. A.; Touratsoglou, J.

    2000-11-01

    The coinage of Alexander the Great presents a special interest because of its international character in the frame of the ancient times. At least 31 mints (from Aigai to Babylon and from Pella to Alexandreia) operated in the vast state, which was created by Alexander in just over 10 years (334-323 BC). Impressive quantities of tetradrachms were consequently minted for the economic affairs of an expanding state. The mints continued to be active and after the premature death of the Macedonian king, producing among others and tetradrachms in his name. The elemental chemical composition of silver tetradrachms minted in Amphipolis as well as in other Macedonian Greek cities was analysed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), and 12 elements were determined. The problem of the patina (silver corrosion layer) effects on the results was examined by analysis before and after the corrosion product removal. From the results of the chemical composition, a similar numismatic policy is deduced for all the analysed coin as well as metal provenance indications for some of the coins.

  18. Possible refugia in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, P.E.; Ager, T.A.; Baichtal, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the extent of late Wisconsin glaciation in southeastern Alaska has varied between geologists and biologists. Maps and reports of the region prepared by geologists commonly indicated that late Wisconsin ice extended as a large uniform front west to the edge of the continental shelf. However, the distribution of plants and animals in the region has led many biologists to suggest that there may have been ice-free areas that served as refugia during the late Wisconsin. Based on analyses of aerial photographs, topographic maps, and bathymetric charts, in conjunction with a review of previous literature and reconnaissance fieldwork throughout the region, this study presents data supporting a limited ice extent in the Alexander Archipelago during the late Wisconsin and identifies possible ice-free areas that may have served as refugia. These areas include (1) the Fairweather Ground, (2) the Herbert Graves Island area, (3) the western coast of southern Baranof Island and adjacent continental shelf, (4) Coronation Island and the adjacent continental shelf, (5) the Warren Island area, (6) the continental shelf from west of Heceta Island to Forrester Island in the south, (7) parts of the west coast of southern Dall Island, and (8) lowland areas in southern Prince of Wales Island. The identification of these possible refugia has bearing on the recolonization of the Alexander Archipelago, as they could have served as centers of biotic dispersal upon regional deglaciation and as stepping stones for early humans with a maritime tradition entering the western hemisphere from Asia. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  19. Improvement in Automatic Postural Coordination Following Alexander Technique Lessons in a Person With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Horak, Fay B; Henry, Sharon M

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose The relationship between abnormal postural coordination and back pain is unclear. The Alexander Technique (AT) aims to improve postural coordination by using conscious processes to alter automatic postural coordination and ongoing muscular activity, and it has been reported to reduce low back pain. This case report describes the use of the AT with a client with low back pain and the observed changes in automatic postural responses and back pain. Case Description The client was a 49-year-old woman with a 25-year history of left-sided, idiopathic, lumbrosacral back pain. Automatic postural coordination was measured using a force plate during horizontal platform translations and one-legged standing. Outcomes The client was tested monthly for 4 months before AT lessons and for 3 months after lessons. Before lessons, she consistently had laterally asymmetric automatic postural responses to translations. After AT lessons, the magnitude and asymmetry of her responses and balance improved and her low back pain decreased. Discussion Further research is warranted to study whether AT lessons improve low back pain–associated abnormalities in automatic postural coordination and whether improving automatic postural coordination helps to reduce low back pain. [Cacciatore TW, Horak FB, Henry SM. Improvement in automatic postural coordination following Alexander Technique lessons in a person with low back pain. PMID:15921477

  20. Alexander of Macedon, the greatest warrior of all times: did he have seizures?

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2004-10-01

    Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) was likely "the most incomparable general the world has ever seen." His name is often listed among the famous individuals in history who have had seizures. Examination of his illnesses reveals that in 333 BC he entered Tarsus, hot and exhausted, and plunged himself into the River Cydnus, ice-cold from melting mountain snows. His cramps were so severe that he was rescued half-conscious and ashen white, and quickly developed acute pneumonia. Only one doctor dared give him a medication, known for producing powerful and immediate effects. Immediately after drinking this medicine "he lost his speech and falling into a swoon, he had scarcely any sense or pulse left" (Plutarch, ad 75). His reactions were the direct effect of the medication, and this and only this phrase represents the "evidence" for epilepsy. None of his other illnesses involved seizures. Clearly, Alexander the Great did not have epilepsy and his name should be removed from the list of famous individuals who have had seizures.

  1. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewith, George; Webley, Fran; Evans, Maggie; Beattie, Angela; Middleton, Karen; Barnett, Jane; Ballard, Kathleen; Oxford, Frances; Smith, Peter; Yardley, Lucy; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of lessons in the Alexander technique, massage therapy, and advice from a doctor to take exercise (exercise prescription) along with nurse delivered behavioural counselling for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Design Factorial randomised trial. Setting 64 general practices in England. Participants 579 patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain; 144 were randomised to normal care, 147 to massage, 144 to six Alexander technique lessons, and 144 to 24 Alexander technique lessons; half of each of these groups were randomised to exercise prescription. Interventions Normal care (control), six sessions of massage, six or 24 lessons on the Alexander technique, and prescription for exercise from a doctor with nurse delivered behavioural counselling. Main outcome measures Roland Morris disability score (number of activities impaired by pain) and number of days in pain. Results Exercise and lessons in the Alexander technique, but not massage, remained effective at one year (compared with control Roland disability score 8.1: massage -0.58, 95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.77, six lessons -1.40, -2.77 to -0.03, 24 lessons -3.4, -4.76 to -2.03, and exercise -1.29, -2.25 to -0.34). Exercise after six lessons achieved 72% of the effect of 24 lessons alone (Roland disability score -2.98 and -4.14, respectively). Number of days with back pain in the past four weeks was lower after lessons (compared with control median 21 days: 24 lessons -18, six lessons -10, massage -7) and quality of life improved significantly. No significant harms were reported. Conclusions One to one lessons in the Alexander technique from registered teachers have long term benefits for patients with chronic back pain. Six lessons followed by exercise prescription were nearly as effective as 24 lessons. Trial registration National Research Register N0028108728. PMID:18713809

  2. Efficacy of the Alexander Technique in treating chronic non-specific neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Schuth, Mareike; Schwickert, Myriam; Lüdtke, Rainer; Musial, Frauke; Michalsen, Andreas; Dobos, Gustav; Choi, Kyung-Eun

    2016-03-01

    To test the efficacy of the Alexander Technique, local heat and guided imagery on pain and quality of life in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. A randomized controlled trial with 3 parallel groups was conducted. Outpatient clinic, Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine. A total of 72 patients (65 females, 40.7±7.9 years) with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients received 5 sessions of the Alexander Technique--an educational method which aims to modify dysfunctional posture, movement and thinking patterns associated with musculoskeletal disorders. Control groups were treated with local heat application or guided imagery. All interventions were conducted once a week for 45 minutes each. The primary outcome measure at week 5 was neck pain intensity on a 100-mm visual analogue scale; secondary outcomes included neck disability, quality of life, satisfaction and safety. Analyses of covariance were applied; testing ordered hypotheses. No group difference was found for pain intensity for the Alexander Technique compared to local heat (difference 4.5mm; 95% CI:-8.1;17.1; p=0.48), but exploratory analysis revealed the superiority of the Alexander Technique over guided imagery (difference -12.9 mm; 95% CI:-22.6;-3.1, p=0.01). Significant group differences in favor of the Alexander Technique were also found for physical quality of life (P<0.05). Adverse events mainly included slightly increased pain and muscle soreness. The Alexander Technique was not superior to local heat application in treating chronic non-specific neck pain. It cannot be recommended as routine intervention at this time. Further trials are warranted for conclusive judgment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Geohydrology and water-chemistry of the Alexander Valley, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Farrar, Christopher D.; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2006-01-01

    This study of the geohydrology and water chemistry of the Alexander Valley, California, was done to provide an improved scientific basis for addressing emerging water-management issues, including potential increases in water demand and changes in flows in the Russian River. The study tasks included (1) evaluation of existing geohydrological, geophysical, and geochemical data; (2) collection and analysis of new geohydrologic data, including subsurface lithologic data, ground-water levels, and streamflow records; and (3) collection and analysis of new water-chemistry data. The estimated total water use for the Alexander Valley for 1999 was approximately 15,800 acre-feet. About 13,500 acre-feet of this amount was for agricultural use, primarily vineyards, and about 2,300 acre-feet was for municipal/industrial use. Ground water is the main source of water supply for this area. The main sources of ground water in the Alexander Valley are the Quaternary alluvial deposits, the Glen Ellen Formation, and the Sonoma Volcanics. The alluvial units, where sufficiently thick and saturated, comprise the best aquifer in the study area. Average recharge to the Alexander Valley is estimated from a simple, basinwide water budget. On the basis of an estimated annual average of 298,000 acre-feet of precipitation, 160,000 acre-feet of runoff, and 113,000 to 133,000 acre-feet of evapotranspiration, about 5,000 to 25,000 acre-feet per year is available for ground-water recharge. Because this estimate is based on differences between large numbers, there is significant uncertainty in this recharge estimate. Long-term changes in ground-water levels are evident in parts of the study area, but because of the sparse network and lack of data on well construction and lithology, it is uncertain if any significant changes have occurred in the northern part of the study area since 1980. In the southern half of the study area, ground-water levels generally were lower at the end of the 2002 irrigation

  4. The Four Domains of Moral Education: The Contributions of Dewey, Alexander and Goleman to a Comprehensive Taxonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Ronald Lee

    1998-01-01

    Attempts to place a neglected dimension of John Dewey's work into its proper context. Examines the works of Dewey, F. Matthias Alexander, and Daniel Goldman to create four domains that must be addressed by a truly comprehensive model of moral education: direct external, indirect external, direct internal, and indirect internal. (DSK)

  5. Growing Community: The Impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the Social and Learning Environment in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K.; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has…

  6. Growing Community: The Impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the Social and Learning Environment in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K.; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has…

  7. History of quantum electronics at the Moscow Lebedev and General Physics Institutes: Nikolaj Basov and Alexander Prokhorov.

    PubMed

    Karlov, N V; Krokhin, O N; Lukishova, S G

    2010-09-01

    Some moments of maser and laser history in the Soviet Union are outlined, commemorating the work of Nikolaj G. Basov and Alexander M. Prokhorov, who, together with Charles H. Townes, were awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize "for fundamental work in the field of quantum electronics, which has led to the construction of oscillators and amplifiers based on the maser-laser principle."

  8. The Four Domains of Moral Education: The Contributions of Dewey, Alexander and Goleman to a Comprehensive Taxonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Ronald Lee

    1998-01-01

    Attempts to place a neglected dimension of John Dewey's work into its proper context. Examines the works of Dewey, F. Matthias Alexander, and Daniel Goldman to create four domains that must be addressed by a truly comprehensive model of moral education: direct external, indirect external, direct internal, and indirect internal. (DSK)

  9. Riding on the Back of a Giant: Adding Malta to the "5 Cultures" Study by Robin Alexander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peresso, Randolph

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the methodology adopted for Malta+5, which builds on Robin Alexander's work by comparing the five pedagogical cultures he studied to the one in Malta. It reflects critically on the research process adopted in this study, and shows how, despite the very limited experience and resources, applying the methodology, frameworks and…

  10. Mythorealistic Concept of "Beautiful Lady" in the Structure of the Author's Identity (Based on the Diaries of Alexander Blok)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minets, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The present paper deals with the diaries of Alexander Blok dated 1901-1921 reflecting the process of the writer's self-identification. During 20 years under the influence of various social and cultural situations Blok's "Self-Conception" is undergoing significant changes. The vector of these changes shows the complicated evolution of the…

  11. Speciation despite globally overlapping distributions in Penicillium chrysogenum: the population genetics of Alexander Fleming’s lucky fungus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eighty years ago, Alexander Fleming described the antibiotic effects of a fungus that had contaminated his bacterial culture, kick starting the antimicrobial revolution. The fungus was later ascribed to a globally distributed asexual species, Penicillium chrysogenum. Recently, the species has been...

  12. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual.

  13. Alexander Gordon, puerperal sepsis, and modern theories of infection control--Semmelweis in perspective.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ian M

    2010-04-01

    Ignaz Semmelweis, a Hungarian doctor who practised in 19th century Vienna, is widely believed to be the father of modern infection control. He earned this accolade when he showed that puerperal sepsis was contagious and that it could be prevented with adequate hand hygiene. In fact, such ideas had circulated in the medical world for at least a century before Semmelweis' work. Moreover, it is well documented that Alexander Gordon, an obstetrician working in Aberdeen, UK, was the first to prove the contagious nature of puerperal sepsis. He also advocated the need for good hygiene for its prevention in a thesis published in 1795. This work described an epidemic of puerperal sepsis that began in Aberdeen in 1789. Gordon's thesis was reprinted three times in Edinburgh, Philadelphia, and London over the next 55 years, suggesting that Semmelweis (1847) could well have known of his work. Like Semmelweis, Gordon was persecuted for his findings.

  14. Cretaceous (Late Albian) coniferales of Alexander Island, Antarctica. 2. Leaves, reproductive structures and roots.

    PubMed

    Cantrill, D J.; Falcon-Lang, H J.

    2001-06-01

    Coniferous foliage from the Albian of Alexander Island, Antarctica, is assigned to the Araucariaceae, Podocarpaceae, and Taxodiaceae based on attached or associated fertile remains. Araucarian foliage represented by Araucaria alexandrensis sp. nov. and A. chambersii sp. nov. is associated with ovulate cone scales described as Araucarites wollemiaformis sp. nov. and A. citadelbastionensis sp. nov., respectively. The Podocarpaceae is represented by Bellingshausium willeyii sp. nov. and the Taxodiaceae by Athrotaxites ungeri, both with attached cones. Sterile foliage is widespread belonging to the form genera Podozamites, Elatocladus, Brachyphyllum and Pagiophyllum. The conifers in this Albian southern high-latitude flora make up ca. 15% of the species diversity. Evidence from leaf litter distribution on palaeosols and leaf morphology suggest that the majority of conifers were large canopy-forming trees, although a few were probably small understorey shrubs.

  15. Ambiguous provenance? Experience with provenance analysis of human remains from Namibia in the Alexander Ecker collection.

    PubMed

    Wittwer-Backofen, Ursula; Kästner, Mareen; Möller, Daniel; Vohberger, Marina; Lutz-Bonengel, Sabine; Speck, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    The project's aim is to verify the existence of Herero and Nama skulls among the roughly 1370 skulls in the Alexander Ecker collection (AEC). Methods include historical research, which was mainly concerned with the AEC and especially Eugen Fischer during his time as curator, as well as the methods of acquisition of human remains and scientific methods to verify the identity of the relevant skulls. Scientific methods include morphological sex and age-at-death verification, morphological estimation of ancestry, morphometric analysis and the application of UV light to decipher old labels on the skull surfaces, as well as a molecular biology approach (mtDNA) and stable isotope analyses. Out of 19 preselected skulls, 14 revealed a significant probability for a Herero/Nama ancestry, although identification of specific skulls according to the historical documentation was not possible.

  16. Bryan Coast, English Coast, Alexander Island, Fallieres Coast, and Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Antarctica shows the Bryan Coast (lower left), the English Coast (lower central), Alexander Island (middle right), the Fallieres Coast (top right), and the Bellingshausen Sea. The entire continent has been dedicated to peaceful scientific investigation since 1961, with the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.The waters surrounding Antarctica are intensely cold. Salt water freezes at -2C, allowing sea ice to form. The middle left portion of the image shows quite a lot of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea. During the Antarctic winter, when data for this image was acquired, Antarctica doubles in size to about 28.5 million square km (or about 11 million square miles), and temperatures in the -60C range are common.This true-color image was compiled from MODIS data gathered March 29, 2002. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  17. Bryan Coast, English Coast, Alexander Island, Fallieres Coast, and Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Antarctica shows the Bryan Coast (lower left), the English Coast (lower central), Alexander Island (middle right), the Fallieres Coast (top right), and the Bellingshausen Sea. The entire continent has been dedicated to peaceful scientific investigation since 1961, with the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.The waters surrounding Antarctica are intensely cold. Salt water freezes at -2C, allowing sea ice to form. The middle left portion of the image shows quite a lot of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea. During the Antarctic winter, when data for this image was acquired, Antarctica doubles in size to about 28.5 million square km (or about 11 million square miles), and temperatures in the -60C range are common.This true-color image was compiled from MODIS data gathered March 29, 2002. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Choking on food: a rare case of alexander leukodystrophy and choking.

    PubMed

    Murty, O P; Mun, Keinseong; Gopinath, Neetu; Wong, Kum T

    2008-12-01

    Every body has to eat to survive but it becomes a matter of great concern, when the life provider food becomes an asphyxiating agent. In this case, a 60-year-old woman choked herself while swallowing biscuits. On autopsy examination, biscuits were found lodged in larygo-pharynx. Brain showed marked dystrophy and loosened lusterless white matter. On histopathologic examination, brain tissue had numerous eosinophilic globules representing astrocytic processes called "Rosenthal fibers"; hence, it was diagnosed as a case of Alexander dystrophy. It is a disease of white matter, where there is a progressive degeneration of the white matter of the brain because of imperfect growth or development of the myelin sheath. The histopathology of brain showed Rosenthal fibers in abundance. This is one of the rarest disease in which choking can occur because of lack of nervous and muscular coordination and weakness. Its specific relation to choking is documented in this report.

  19. Neuromusicology or Musiconeurology? "Omni-art" in Alexander Scriabin as a Fount of Ideas.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2016-01-01

    Science can uncover neural mechanisms by looking at the work of artists. The ingenuity of a titan of classical music, the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915), in combining all the sensory modalities into a polyphony of aesthetical experience, and his creation of a chord based on fourths rather than the conventional thirds are proposed as putative points of departure for insight, in future studies, into the neural processes that underlie the perception of beauty, individually or universally. Scriabin's "Omni-art" was a new synthesis of music, philosophy and religion, and a new aesthetic language, a unification of music, vision, olfaction, drama, poetry, dance, image, and conceptualization, all governed by logic, in the quest for the integrative action of the human mind toward a "higher reality" of which music is only a component.

  20. Neuromusicology or Musiconeurology? “Omni-art” in Alexander Scriabin as a Fount of Ideas

    PubMed Central

    Triarhou, Lazaros C.

    2016-01-01

    Science can uncover neural mechanisms by looking at the work of artists. The ingenuity of a titan of classical music, the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin (1872–1915), in combining all the sensory modalities into a polyphony of aesthetical experience, and his creation of a chord based on fourths rather than the conventional thirds are proposed as putative points of departure for insight, in future studies, into the neural processes that underlie the perception of beauty, individually or universally. Scriabin’s “Omni-art” was a new synthesis of music, philosophy and religion, and a new aesthetic language, a unification of music, vision, olfaction, drama, poetry, dance, image, and conceptualization, all governed by logic, in the quest for the integrative action of the human mind toward a “higher reality” of which music is only a component. PMID:27014167

  1. Silurian trace fossils in carbonate turbidites from the Alexander Arc of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) body and trace fossils from the Heceta Formation are preserved in the oldest widespread carbonates in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. They represent the earliest shelly benthos to inhabit a diversity of marine environments and are important indicators of the early stages in benthic community development within this ancient island arc. The trace fossils are significant because they add to a small but growing body of knowledge about ichnofaunas in deep-water Paleozoic carbonates. Proximal to medial carbonate turbidites yield a low-diversity suite of trace fossils that comprises five distinct types of biogenic structures. Bedding planes reveal simple epichnial burrows (Planolites), cross-cutting burrows (Fucusopsis), and tiny cylindrical burrows. These and other casts, including chondrites( )-like burrow clusters, represent the feeding activities (fodinichnia) of preturbidite animals. Hypichnial burrows and rare endichnial traces reflect the activities of postturbidite animals. Broken and offset traces indicate that infaunal biota commenced burrowing before slumping and subsequent soft-sediment deformation. The abundance and density of trace fossils increases offshore in the medial turbidites associated with a decrease in the size and amount of coarse particles and with an increase in mud and preserved organic material. Although diversity levels are similar in the proximal and medial turbidite facies, they are much lower than in Paleozoic siliciclastic turbidites. This may reflect unfavorable environmental conditions for infaunal biota or paleobiogeographic isolation of the Alexander terrane during the Silurian. A greater use of trace fossils in terrane analysis will help to resolve this issue and should provide new data for reconstructing the paleogeography of circum-Pacific terranes.

  2. Alteration of glial-neuronal metabolic interactions in a mouse model of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Meisingset, Tore Wergeland; Risa, Øystein; Brenner, Michael; Messing, Albee; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Alexander disease is a rare and usually fatal neurological disorder characterized by the abundant presence of protein aggregates in astrocytes. Most cases result from dominant missense de novo mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), but how these mutations lead to aggregate formation and compromise function is not known. A transgenic mouse line (Tg73.7) over-expressing human GFAP produces astrocytic aggregates indistinguishable from those seen in the human disease, making them a model of this disorder. To investigate possible metabolic changes associated with Alexander disease Tg73.7 mice and controls were injected simultaneously with [1-13C]glucose to analyze neuronal metabolism and [1,2-13C]acetate to monitor astrocytic metabolism. Brain extracts were analyzed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify amounts of several key metabolites, and by 13C MRS to analyze amino acid neurotransmitter metabolism. In the cerebral cortex, reduced utilization of [1,2-13C]acetate was observed for synthesis of glutamine, glutamate, and GABA, and the concentration of the marker for neuronal mitochondrial metabolism, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), was decreased. This indicates impaired astrocytic and neuronal metabolism and decreased transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons compared to control mice. In the cerebellum, glutamine and GABA content and labeling from [1-13C]glucose were increased. Evidence for brain edema was found in the increased amount of water and of the osmoregulators myo-inositol and taurine. It can be concluded that astrocyte – neuronal interactions were altered differently in distinct regions. PMID:20544858

  3. Alteration of glial-neuronal metabolic interactions in a mouse model of Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Meisingset, Tore Wergeland; Risa, Øystein; Brenner, Michael; Messing, Albee; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2010-08-01

    Alexander disease is a rare and usually fatal neurological disorder characterized by the abundant presence of protein aggregates in astrocytes. Most cases result from dominant missense de novo mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), but how these mutations lead to aggregate formation and compromise function is not known. A transgenic mouse line (Tg73.7) over-expressing human GFAP produces astrocytic aggregates indistinguishable from those seen in the human disease, making them a model of this disorder. To investigate possible metabolic changes associated with Alexander disease Tg73.7 mice and controls were injected simultaneously with [1-(13)C]glucose to analyze neuronal metabolism and [1,2-(13)C]acetate to monitor astrocytic metabolism. Brain extracts were analyzed by (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify amounts of several key metabolites, and by (13)C MRS to analyze amino acid neurotransmitter metabolism. In the cerebral cortex, reduced utilization of [1,2-(13)C]acetate was observed for synthesis of glutamine, glutamate, and GABA, and the concentration of the marker for neuronal mitochondrial metabolism, N-acetylaspartate (NAA) was decreased. This indicates impaired astrocytic and neuronal metabolism and decreased transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons compared with control mice. In the cerebellum, glutamine and GABA content and labeling from [1-(13)C]glucose were increased. Evidence for brain edema was found in the increased amount of water and of the osmoregulators myo-inositol and taurine. It can be concluded that astrocyte-neuronal interactions were altered differently in distinct regions. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Exploring the psychological processes underlying touch: lessons from the Alexander Technique.

    PubMed

    Jones, T; Glover, L

    2014-01-01

    The experience of touch is significant; both in its positive implications and in how it attracts caution and controversy. Accordingly, physical contact within psychological therapy has been shown to improve well-being and the therapeutic relationship, yet the majority of therapists never or rarely use touch. This research aimed to explore psychological processes underlying touch through the Alexander Technique, a psycho-physical technique taught one to one using touch. Six individuals who had received the Alexander Technique were interviewed, and 111 completed surveys. Interview data suggested an incompatibility between touch and the spoken word, which was understood through the way touch lacks verbal discourses in our society. The largely simplistic and dichotomous verbal understanding we have (either only very positive or very negative) could help understand some of the societal-level caution surrounding touch. Touch was seen also as a nurturing experience by interviewees, which influenced inter-personal and intra-personal relational processes. Developmental models were used to frame the way touch strengthened the pupil-teacher relationship and the way pupils' intra-personal psychological change seemed linked to this relational experience. The surveys largely supported these findings, and discussion is made around the notable way pupils negatively interpreted the intention of the survey. Implications for the use of touch in psychological therapies are discussed, as are limitations and ideas for future research. Touch is a powerful experience, and physical contact within psychological therapy has been shown to improve well-being and the therapeutic relationship, yet the majority of therapists never or rarely use touch. The AT is an alternative therapeutic approach to psycho-physical well-being that offers an interesting model to study the impact of touch. Findings from those that have used the technique reaffirmed that touch can improve well-being and can be a

  5. "Outstanding Services to Negro Health": Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Dr. Virginia M. Alexander, and Black Women Physicians' Public Health Activism.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Vanessa Northington

    2016-08-01

    An examination of the lives and careers of physician-activists Dorothy Boulding Ferebee (1898-1972) and Virginia M. Alexander (1899-1949) demonstrates how Black physicians in the first half of the 20th century used public health to improve the health of Black Americans and provides insights into the experiences of Black women physicians. I discuss their professional and personal backgrounds and analyze their divergent strategies to address health inequities. Ferebee used her leadership in Black women's organizations to develop public health programs and become a national advocate for Black health. Alexander, a Quaker, used her religious connections to urge Whites to combat racism in medicine. She also conducted public health research and connected it to health activism. Both were passionate advocates of health equity long before it gained prominence as a major public health issue. An analysis of their work illuminates past efforts to improve the health of Black Americans.

  6. James Alexander Lindsay (1856-1931), and his clinical axioms and aphorisms.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-09-01

    John Alexander Lindsay was born at Fintona, county Tyrone in 1856, and at the age of 23 he graduated in medicine at the Royal University of Ireland. After two years in London and Europe he returned to Belfast to join the staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital and in 1899 he was appointed to the professorship of medicine. He was valued by the students for his clarity and by his colleagues for his many extracurricular contributions to the medical profession in the positions entrusted to him. He published monographs on Diseases of the Lungs, and the Climatic Treatment of Consumption, but his later Medical Axioms show his deep appreciation of studied clinical observation. Although practice was changing in the new century Lindsay displayed an ability to change with the new requirements, as evidenced by his lecture on electrocardiography as president of the section of medicine of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland in 1915. He was impressed by the way the string galvanometer changed attention from stenosis and incompetence of the valves to the cardiac musculature, but rightly suspected that there was more to be told about the state of the myocardium than Einthoven's three leads revealed. His death occurred in Belfast in 1931.

  7. James Alexander Lindsay (1856–1931), and his clinical axioms and aphorisms

    PubMed Central

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-01-01

    John Alexander Lindsay was born at Fintona, county Tyrone in 1856, and at the age of 23 he graduated in medicine at the Royal University of Ireland. After two years in London and Europe he returned to Belfast to join the staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital and in 1899 he was appointed to the professorship of medicine. He was valued by the students for his clarity and by his colleagues for his many extracurricular contributions to the medical profession in the positions entrusted to him. He published monographs on Diseases of the Lungs, and the Climatic Treatment of Consumption, but his later Medical Axioms show his deep appreciation of studied clinical observation. Although practice was changing in the new century Lindsay displayed an ability to change with the new requirements, as evidenced by his lecture on electrocardiography as president of the section of medicine of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland in 1915. He was impressed by the way the string galvanometer changed attention from stenosis and incompetence of the valves to the cardiac musculature, but rightly suspected that there was more to be told about the state of the myocardium than Einthoven's three leads revealed. His death occurred in Belfast in 1931. PMID:23620615

  8. GFAP mutations, age at onset, and clinical subtypes in Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Prust, M.; Wang, J.; Morizono, H.; Messing, A.; Brenner, M.; Gordon, E.; Hartka, T.; Sokohl, A.; Schiffmann, R.; Gordish-Dressman, H.; Albin, R.; Amartino, H.; Brockman, K.; Dinopoulos, A.; Dotti, M.T.; Fain, D.; Fernandez, R.; Ferreira, J.; Fleming, J.; Gill, D.; Griebel, M.; Heilstedt, H.; Kaplan, P.; Lewis, D.; Nakagawa, M.; Pedersen, R.; Reddy, A.; Sawaishi, Y.; Schneider, M.; Sherr, E.; Takiyama, Y.; Wakabayashi, K.; Gorospe, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To characterize Alexander disease (AxD) phenotypes and determine correlations with age at onset (AAO) and genetic mutation. AxD is an astrogliopathy usually characterized on MRI by leukodystrophy and caused by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutations. Methods: We present 30 new cases of AxD and reviewed 185 previously reported cases. We conducted Wilcoxon rank sum tests to identify variables scaling with AAO, survival analysis to identify predictors of mortality, and χ2 tests to assess the effects of common GFAP mutations. Finally, we performed latent class analysis (LCA) to statistically define AxD subtypes. Results: LCA identified 2 classes of AxD. Type I is characterized by early onset, seizures, macrocephaly, motor delay, encephalopathy, failure to thrive, paroxysmal deterioration, and typical MRI features. Type II is characterized by later onset, autonomic dysfunction, ocular movement abnormalities, bulbar symptoms, and atypical MRI features. Survival analysis predicted a nearly 2-fold increase in mortality among patients with type I AxD relative to those with type II. R79 and R239 GFAP mutations were most common (16.6% and 20.3% of all cases, respectively). These common mutations predicted distinct clinical outcomes, with R239 predicting the most aggressive course. Conclusions: AAO and the GFAP mutation site are important clinical predictors in AxD, with clear correlations to defined patterns of phenotypic expression. We propose revised AxD subtypes, type I and type II, based on analysis of statistically defined patient groups. PMID:21917775

  9. GFAP mutations, age at onset, and clinical subtypes in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Prust, M; Wang, J; Morizono, H; Messing, A; Brenner, M; Gordon, E; Hartka, T; Sokohl, A; Schiffmann, R; Gordish-Dressman, H; Albin, R; Amartino, H; Brockman, K; Dinopoulos, A; Dotti, M T; Fain, D; Fernandez, R; Ferreira, J; Fleming, J; Gill, D; Griebel, M; Heilstedt, H; Kaplan, P; Lewis, D; Nakagawa, M; Pedersen, R; Reddy, A; Sawaishi, Y; Schneider, M; Sherr, E; Takiyama, Y; Wakabayashi, K; Gorospe, J R; Vanderver, A

    2011-09-27

    To characterize Alexander disease (AxD) phenotypes and determine correlations with age at onset (AAO) and genetic mutation. AxD is an astrogliopathy usually characterized on MRI by leukodystrophy and caused by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mutations. We present 30 new cases of AxD and reviewed 185 previously reported cases. We conducted Wilcoxon rank sum tests to identify variables scaling with AAO, survival analysis to identify predictors of mortality, and χ(2) tests to assess the effects of common GFAP mutations. Finally, we performed latent class analysis (LCA) to statistically define AxD subtypes. LCA identified 2 classes of AxD. Type I is characterized by early onset, seizures, macrocephaly, motor delay, encephalopathy, failure to thrive, paroxysmal deterioration, and typical MRI features. Type II is characterized by later onset, autonomic dysfunction, ocular movement abnormalities, bulbar symptoms, and atypical MRI features. Survival analysis predicted a nearly 2-fold increase in mortality among patients with type I AxD relative to those with type II. R79 and R239 GFAP mutations were most common (16.6% and 20.3% of all cases, respectively). These common mutations predicted distinct clinical outcomes, with R239 predicting the most aggressive course. AAO and the GFAP mutation site are important clinical predictors in AxD, with clear correlations to defined patterns of phenotypic expression. We propose revised AxD subtypes, type I and type II, based on analysis of statistically defined patient groups.

  10. Alexander Scriabin: his chronic right-hand pain and Its impact on his piano compositions.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Scriabin was an outstanding pianist and an avant-garde composer who influenced later generations with his innovative "multimedia" conceptions of aesthetic experience. As an adolescent, he was systematically trained as a concert pianist and received lessons from Vassily Safonoff, one of the founders of the legendary Russian Piano School. At age 20, Scriabin suffered an overuse injury of his right hand when attempting to improve the sound quality of his piano touch. This injury caused a deep crisis and influenced his later composition style in his piano works. From this time on, his works were frequently dominated by unusual virtuosic use and wide spans of his left hand. Rest, restricted repertoire, and an increased focus on composition contributed to recovery; however, he always remained anxious concerning the stamina of his right hand. The case report impressively demonstrates the stressors an aspiring young pianist had to cope with at the end of the nineteenth century. Furthermore, it is a convincing example of how resource-oriented behavior and intuition lead to the improvement of health status. Differential diagnoses and the modern concept of multimodal pain therapy in chronic overuse injury will be discussed from a historical perspective. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. What is the perceived impact of Alexander technique lessons on health status, costs and pain management in the real life setting of an English hospital? The results of a mixed methods evaluation of an Alexander technique service for those with chronic back pain.

    PubMed

    McClean, Stuart; Brilleman, Sam; Wye, Lesley

    2015-07-28

    Randomised controlled trial evidence indicates that Alexander Technique is clinically and cost effective for chronic back pain. The aim of this mixed methods evaluation was to explore the role and perceived impact of Alexander Technique lessons in the naturalistic setting of an acute hospital Pain Management Clinic in England. To capture changes in health status and resource use amongst service users, 43 service users were administered three widely used questionnaires (Brief Pain Inventory, MYMOP and Client Service Resource Inventory) at three time points: baseline, six weeks and three months after baseline. We also carried out 27 telephone interviews with service users and seven face-to-face interviews with pain clinic staff and Alexander Technique teachers. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Those taking Alexander Technique lessons reported small improvements in health outcomes, and condition-related costs fell. However, due to the non-randomised, uncontrolled nature of the study design, changes cannot be attributed to the Alexander Technique lessons. Service users stated that their relationship to pain and pain management had changed, especially those who were more committed to practising the techniques regularly. These changes may explain the reported reduction in pain-related service use and the corresponding lower associated costs. Alexander Technique lessons may be used as another approach to pain management. The findings suggests that Alexander Technique lessons can help improve self-efficacy for those who are sufficiently motivated, which in turn may have an impact on service utilisation levels.

  12. Bathymetric gradients within a Paleozoic Island Arc, southeastern Alaska (Alexander Terrane)

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation reflect bathymetric gradients within the ancient island arc exposed in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. These rocks record the earliest occurrence of widespread carbonate deposition in the region and represent the earliest foundation for shallow-water platform development within the arc. The excellent preservation of platform, platform margin, and slope deposits contrasts with the poor preservation of many marine sediments that originated within other island arcs. Hence, these limestones provide important insights into the styles, processes, and bathymetry of carbonate deposition in island arcs. Carbonate depositional sites within the arc extended laterally from nearshore intertidal and relatively shallow subtidal zones of a marine platform, to the seaward margins of a rimmed shelf, and into deeper subtidal areas of a slope environment. Fossiliferous deposits that originated on the platform comprise a diversity of shelly benthos, including corals and stromatoporoids in growth position. Dasycladacean algae, oncoids, and Amphipora also indicate shallow-water conditions. Organic buildups and reefs were constructed by cyanobacteria, massive stromatoporoids, corals, and algae at the platform margin. Deposition beyond the seaward edge of the shelf is evident from the carbonate turbidites that consist of skeletal debris of shallow-water derivation and an absence of coarse siliciclastic detritus. Sedimentation and resedimentation along a bathymetric gradient within the arc is especially well illustrated by the carbonate breccias that are enclosed within these deep subtidal sediments. They comprise detached stromatolites and clasts of shallow-water origin that were derived from the platform and its margin during periodic slumping of the shelf edge.

  13. Neuromechanical interference of posture on movement: evidence from Alexander technique teachers rising from a chair.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Mian, Omar S; Peters, Amy; Day, Brian L

    2014-08-01

    While Alexander technique (AT) teachers have been reported to stand up by shifting weight gradually as they incline the trunk forward, healthy untrained (HU) adults appear unable to rise in this way. This study examines the hypothesis that HU have difficulty rising smoothly, and that this difficulty relates to reported differences in postural stiffness between groups. A wide range of movement durations (1-8 s) and anteroposterior foot placements were studied under the instruction to rise at a uniform rate. Before seat-off (SO) there were clear and profound performance differences between groups, particularly for slower movements, that could not be explained by strength differences. For each movement duration, HU used approximately twice the forward center-of-mass (CoM) velocity and vertical feet-loading rate as AT. For slow movements, HU violated task instruction by abruptly speeding up and rapidly shifting weight just before SO. In contrast, AT shifted weight gradually while smoothly advancing the CoM, achieving a more anterior CoM at SO. A neuromechanical model revealed a mechanism whereby stiffness affects standing up by exacerbating a conflict between postural and balance constraints. Thus activating leg extensors to take body weight hinders forward CoM progression toward the feet. HU's abrupt weight shift can be explained by reliance on momentum to stretch stiff leg extensors. AT's smooth rises can be explained by heightened dynamic tone control that reduces leg extensor resistance and improves force transmission across the trunk. Our results suggest postural control shapes movement coordination through a dynamic "postural frame" that affects the resistive behavior of the body. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Cretaceous (Late Albian) coniferales of Alexander Island, Antarctica. 1: Wood taxonomy: a quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Falcon-Lang; Cantrill

    2000-08-01

    Silicified conifer woods are very common in the mid-Cretaceous (Late Albian, 100Ma) Triton Point Member of the Neptune Glacier Formation (Fossil Bluff Group), SE Alexander Island, Antarctica. These occur as up to 7m high in situ tree trunks and stumps rooted in carbonaceous palaeosols and as allochthonous logs and wood fragments in fluvial channel and sheet sandstone facies. Sixty-eight wood samples were examined in this study and were classified in terms of five form taxa using a quantitative approach. Araucarioxylon (1.5% of specimens) is characterised by dominantly multiseriate, alternately arranged bordered pitting on radial tracheid walls and by 1-4 araucarioid cross-field pitting. Araucariopitys (11.8% of specimens) is characterised by dominantly uniseriate tracheid pitting with subordinate biseriate, alternate tracheid pitting and by 1-4 araucarioid cross-field pitting. Podocarpoxylon sp. 1 (63.1% of specimens) is characterised by contiguous, uniseriate tracheid pitting and 1-2 podocarpoid cross-field pits. Podocarpoxylon sp. 2 (22.1% of specimens) is similar to P. sp. 1, differing only in that ray height is lower, tracheid pits are dominantly spaced more than one pit diameter apart and abundant axial parenchyma is present. These first four taxa all possess growth rings with subtle boundaries. Taxodioxylon (1.5% of specimens) is characterised by 1-2 seriate, oppositely arranged, bordered tracheid pitting, 1-2 taxodioid cross-field pitting and very marked ring boundaries. These woods were derived from large trees with basal stump diameters of up to 0.5m and probable heights of up to 29m. Data from leaf traces suggest that Araucariopitys and Podocarpoxylon sp. 1 and sp. 2 (97% of specimens) were evergreen with leaf retention times of >5years. These predominantly evergreen conifer forests grew in a mild, high latitude (75 degrees S) environment during the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse climate phase.

  15. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    PubMed

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  16. Neuromechanical interference of posture on movement: evidence from Alexander technique teachers rising from a chair

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W.; Mian, Omar S.; Peters, Amy

    2014-01-01

    While Alexander technique (AT) teachers have been reported to stand up by shifting weight gradually as they incline the trunk forward, healthy untrained (HU) adults appear unable to rise in this way. This study examines the hypothesis that HU have difficulty rising smoothly, and that this difficulty relates to reported differences in postural stiffness between groups. A wide range of movement durations (1–8 s) and anteroposterior foot placements were studied under the instruction to rise at a uniform rate. Before seat-off (SO) there were clear and profound performance differences between groups, particularly for slower movements, that could not be explained by strength differences. For each movement duration, HU used approximately twice the forward center-of-mass (CoM) velocity and vertical feet-loading rate as AT. For slow movements, HU violated task instruction by abruptly speeding up and rapidly shifting weight just before SO. In contrast, AT shifted weight gradually while smoothly advancing the CoM, achieving a more anterior CoM at SO. A neuromechanical model revealed a mechanism whereby stiffness affects standing up by exacerbating a conflict between postural and balance constraints. Thus activating leg extensors to take body weight hinders forward CoM progression toward the feet. HU's abrupt weight shift can be explained by reliance on momentum to stretch stiff leg extensors. AT's smooth rises can be explained by heightened dynamic tone control that reduces leg extensor resistance and improves force transmission across the trunk. Our results suggest postural control shapes movement coordination through a dynamic “postural frame” that affects the resistive behavior of the body. PMID:25085609

  17. Death by polonium-210: lessons learned from the murder of former Soviet spy Alexander Litvinenko.

    PubMed

    McFee, Robin B; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2009-02-01

    The medical response to radiation--whether the result of radiological warfare, terrorist deployment of improvised radiation dispersal weapons, political assassination, occupational or industrial accidents or the medically radiated patient remains one of the least taught among all disciplines within medical education. In the aftermath of 9/11 among medical vulnerabilities to toxicant threats, of all the categories of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--whether using the CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) or NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) acronym--radiation is the least taught in professional schools, responder cultures or civil preparedness organizations. To date, few health care professionals (HCP) possess the fundamental knowledge or skills to identify and diagnose, let alone treat a radiation victim; this vulnerability made even more obvious in the aftermath of the high profile assassination of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko. He was poisoned with Polonium210. Radioactive substances are ubiquitous with radiation sources being in or transported through virtually every region nationwide. It is essential to increase preparedness among community and rural health care facilities as well as urban and university hospitals. Managing radiation injuries effectively requires access to specialized equipment and expertise. Radiation sickness is progressive and may require acute, critical and long-term care throughout the course of illness. Regardless of the source, preparedness rests upon acknowledging a threat exists and dedicating the resources to address the risks including the enhancement of training and equipment. Mass or individual exposures to radiation present unique challenges to the entire response continuum from law enforcement, first responders and emergency medical care. Increased education about and practice in responding to radiological threats is essential to enhance preparedness.

  18. The origin of Rosenthal fibers and their contributions to astrocyte pathology in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Goldman, James E

    2017-03-31

    Rosenthal fibers (RFs) are cytoplasmic, proteinaceous aggregates. They are the pathognomonic feature of the astrocyte pathology in Alexander Disease (AxD), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the GFAP gene, encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although RFs have been known for many years their origin and significance remain elusive issues. We have used mouse models of AxD based on the overexpression of human GFAP (transgenic, TG) and a point mutation in mouse GFAP (knock-in, KI) to examine the formation of RFs and to find astrocyte changes that correlate with the appearance of RFs. We found RFs of various sizes and shapes. The smallest ones appear as granular depositions on intermediate filaments. These contain GFAP and the small heat shock protein, alphaB-crystallin. Their aggregation appears to give rise to large RFs. The appearance of new RFs and the growth of previously formed RFs occur over time. We determined that DAPI is a reliable marker of RFs and in parallel with Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining defined a high variability in the appearance of RFs, even in neighboring astrocytes. Although many astrocytes in AxD with increased levels of GFAP and with or without RFs change their phenotype, only some cells with large numbers of RFs show a profound reconstruction of cellular processes, with a loss of fine distal processes and the appearance of large, lobulated nuclei, likely due to arrested mitosis. We conclude that 1) RFs appear to originate as small, osmiophilic masses containing both GFAP and alphaB-crystallin deposited on bundles of intermediate filaments. 2) RFs continue to form within AxD astrocytes over time. 3) DAPI is a reliable marker for RFs and can be used with immunolabeling. 4) RFs appear to interfere with the successful completion of astrocyte mitosis and cell division.

  19. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ~30 km north and ~100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  20. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ∼30 km north and ∼100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  1. Adult-onset Alexander disease: a series of eleven unrelated cases with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Fancellu, Roberto; Mariotti, Caterina; Romano, Silvia; Salmaggi, Andrea; Carella, Francesco; Girotti, Floriano; Gattellaro, Grazietta; Carriero, Maria Rita; Farina, Laura; Ceccherini, Isabella; Savoiardo, Mario

    2008-09-01

    Alexander disease (AD) in its typical form is an infantile lethal leucodystrophy, characterized pathologically by Rosenthal fibre accumulation. Following the identification of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene as the causative gene, cases of adult-onset AD (AOAD) are being described with increasing frequency. AOAD has a different clinical and neuroradiological presentation with respect to early-onset AD, as abnormalities are mainly concentrated in the brainstem-spinal cord junction. We report detailed clinical and genetic data of 11 cases of AOAD, observed over a 4-year period, and a review of the previously reported 25 cases of genetically confirmed AOAD. In our series, onset occurred as late as age 62, and up to 71 in an affected deceased relative. Most cases appeared sporadic, but family history may be misleading. The most frequent symptoms were related to bulbar dysfunction-with dysarthria, dysphagia, dysphonia (seven patients)-, pyramidal involvement (seven patients) and cerebellar ataxia (seven patients). Four patients had palatal myoclonus. Sleep disorders were also observed (four cases). Bulbar symptoms, however, were infrequent at onset and two symptomatic patients had an almost pure pyramidal involvement. Two subjects were asymptomatic. Misdiagnosis at presentation was frequent and MRI was instrumental in suggesting the correct diagnosis by showing, in all cases, mild to severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata extending caudally to the cervical spinal cord. In ten patients, molecular studies revealed six novel missense mutations and three previously reported changes in GFAP. The last typical patient carried no definitely pathogenic mutation, but a missense variant (p.D157N), supposedly a rare polymorphism. Revision of the literature and the present series indicate that the clinical picture is not specific, but AOAD must be considered in patients of any age with lower brainstem signs. When present, palatal myoclonus is strongly suggestive

  2. Revision of Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi Alexander (Diptera, Tipulidae), and a short discussion on subspecies among crane flies

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract All available type material of Tipula stackelbergi Alexander, Tipula usuriensis Alexander and Tipula subpruinosa Mannheims were examined. Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi stat. rev. is elevated from a subspecies of Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa Wiedemann to a valid species. Two new synonyms are proposed: Tipula usuriensis syn. n. proved to be a junior synonym of. Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa and Tipula subpruinosa syn. n. a junior synonym of Tipula (Yamatotipula) freyana Lackschewitz. Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi is redescribed, male and female terminalia of Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa are illustrated and discussed. Female terminalia of Tipula (Yamatotipula) freyana are described and illustrated for the first time. A key to both sexes of Tipula (Yamatotipula) stackelbergi and Tipula (Yamatotipula) pruinosa, and a key to females of Tipula (Yamatotipula) chonsaniana, Tipula (Yamatotipula) freyana and Tipula (Yamatotipula) moesta are provided. Subspecies are not uncommon among crane flies, but their ranges and traits are poorly known. An interdisciplinary approach (genetics, ecology, taxonomy) is suggested if subspecific ranks are to be used in tipuloid systematics. PMID:22303125

  3. The grand experiment, a historical account of a museum/school partnership: The Alexander Science Center School of Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heughins, Andrew R.

    This study tells the history of The Alexander Science Center School, a museum/school partnership between the Los Angeles Unified School District and the California Science Center created with the goal of becoming a national model in elementary science education. To provide a background to the development of the school, this study explores the definition of what constitutes a museum school, including the existence of a formal partnership between a school district and a museum and systemic change in the partner institutions leading to a marriage of formal and informal learning styles. In addition, the literature review explores the unique models of museum/school partnerships developed in the United States. The history of the Alexander Science Center School is told in a narrative style using documentation from the schools development and through interviews with individuals who played key roles, from the schools inception through its opening. The study covers the initiation of concept, architectural design, formation of the partnership, and development of the curriculum. The study also identifies the roadblocks encountered in the schools development and makes recommendations for school districts and institutions seeking to create future museum school projects. In addition, a comparison is made other recently studied museum schools to provide a context for the school's historical and programmatic development.

  4. Paleomagnetism and geochronology of 23 Ma gabbroic intrusions in the Keku Strait, Alaska, and implications for the Alexander Terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Coe, Robert S.; Renne, Paul R.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of Tertiary gabbro from 24 sites in the Keku Strait, Alaska, help constrain the displacement history of the Alexander terrane. Step heating experiments on a plagioclase separate from these previously undated intrusions indicate a discordant 40Ar/39Ar age of 23.1 ± 1.7 Ma. The characteristic magnetization resides in magnetite, is easily isolated by thermal and alternating field demagnetization, and has both normal and reversed polarities. The mean paleomagnetic pole, with no structural correction, is latitude 87.1°N, longitude 141.6°E, A95 = 10.1°, with N = 20 sites. This pole indicates insignificant tectonic displacement (0.5° ± 8.2° southward) and rotation (0.6° ± 15.2° counterclockwise). We therefore conclude that any northward displacement or vertical axis rotation of the Alexander terrane, and/or tilting in the vicinity of the Keku Strait must have occurred before 23 Ma.

  5. [Analysis of the plaster casts of Class II division 1 non-extraction patients treated with Alexander technique].

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian; Wei, Song; Zhou, Yan-heng

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the changes of arch width and arch length in Class II division 1 non-extraction patients treated with Alexander technique. Dental casts of 21 Class II division 1 non-extraction patients treated with Alexander appliance were taken before (T1) and after treatment (T2). All the casts were laser scanned. The arch width and arch length were digitally measured. The differences of arch width and arch length between T1 and T2 were recorded and analyzed. The upper arch length decreased from (32.82 ± 2.51) mm to (31.97 ± 2.17) mm (P < 0.05). The lower arch length increased from (27.53 ± 2.61) mm to (28.80 ± 1.81) mm (P < 0.05). The intercanine width in the upper arch changed significantly from T1 to T2. The intermolar width in the upper and lower arches increased significantly from T1 to T2. Class II division 1 non-extraction patients could be treated successfully by increasing the upper arch width.

  6. Teachers of the Alexander Technique in the UK and the people who take their lessons: A national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Eldred, J; Hopton, A; Donnison, E; Woodman, J; MacPherson, H

    2015-06-01

    Given the rising profile of the Alexander Technique in the UK, there is a need for a comprehensive description of its teachers and of those who currently take lessons. In a national survey of Alexander teachers, we set out to address this information gap. A cross-sectional survey of 871 UK members of three main Alexander Technique teachers' professional associations was conducted. A questionnaire requested information about their professional background, teaching practice and methods, and about the people who attend lessons and their reasons for seeking help. With an overall response rate of 61%, 534 teachers responded; 74% were female with median age of 58 years, 60% had a higher education qualification, and 95% were self-employed, many with additional non-Alexander paid employment. The majority (87%) offered lessons on their own premises or in a privately rented room, and 19% provided home visits; both individual and group lessons were provided. People who took lessons were predominantly female (66%) with a median age of 48 years, and 91% paid for their lessons privately. Nearly two-thirds (62%) began lessons for reasons related to musculoskeletal conditions, including back symptoms, posture, neck pain, and shoulder pain. Other reasons were general (18%, including well-being), performance-related (10%, including voice-, music-, and sport-related), psychological (5%) and neurological (3%). We estimate that Alexander teachers in the UK provide approximately 400,000 lessons per year. This study provides an overview of Alexander Technique teaching in the UK today and data that may be useful when planning future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The metallogeny of Late Triassic rifting of the Alexander terrane in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.D.; Premo, W.R.; Meier, A.L.; Taggart, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A belt of unusual volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) occurrences is located along the eastern margin of the Alexander terrane throughout southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia and exhibits a range of characteristics consistent with a variety of syngenetic to epigenetic deposit types. Deposits within this belt include Greens Creek and Windy Craggy, the economically most significant VMS deposit in Alaska and the largest in North America, respectively. The occurrences are hosted by a discontinuously exposed, 800-km-long belt of rocks that consist of a 200- to 800-m-thick sequence of conglomerate, limestone, marine elastic sedimentary rocks, and tuff intercalated with and overlain by a distinctive unit of mafic pyroclastic rocks and pillowed flows. Faunal data bracket the age of the host rocks between Anisian (Middle Triassic) and late Norian (late Late Triassic). This metallogenic belt is herein referred to as the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt. The VMS occurrences show systematic differences in degree of structural control, chemistry, and stratigraphic setting along the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt that suggest important spatial or temporal changes in the tectonic environment of formation. At the southern end of the belt, felsic volcanic rocks overlain by shallow-water limestones characterize the lower part of the sequence. In the southern and middle portion of the belt, a distinctive pebble conglomerate marks the base of the section and is indicative of high-energy deposition in a near slope or basin margin setting. At the northern end of the belt the conglomerates, limestones, and felsic volcanic rocks are absent and the belt is composed of deep-water sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks. This northward change in depositional environment and lithofacies is accompanied by a northward transition from epithermal-like structurally controlled, discontinuous, vein- and pod-shaped, Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba-(Cu) occurrences with relatively simple mineralogy

  8. Impact of the Alexander technique on well-being: a randomised controlled trial involving older adults with visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Sherrington, Catherine; Lo, Serigne; Auld, Robin; Keay, Lisa

    2017-02-01

    Older adults with visual loss have high rates of depression, restricted participation and reduced quality of life. We sought to measure the impact of lessons in the Alexander technique on vision-related emotional and social well-being, as secondary outcomes to a study on improving physical functioning in this population. This is a single-blind randomised controlled trial. One hundred and twenty community-dwelling adults aged 50 to 90 years with visual impairments were randomised to either 12 Alexander lessons over 12 weeks and usual care or usual care. The Perceived Visual Ability Scale, the Keele Assessment of Participation, the emotional subscale of the Impact of Vision Impairment Profile, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the five-item Geriatric Depression Scale were administered at baseline and three and 12 months. Participants were receiving services from Guide Dogs NSW/ACT. None of the validated questionnaires found statistically significant improvements after adjustment for baseline at three or 12 months, although the emotional subscale of the Impact of Vision Impairment approached significance in favour of the intervention group (4.54 points, 95 per cent CI: -0.14 to 9.21, p = 0.06). Depressive symptoms were prevalent and associated with greater impact of visual impairment on emotional well-being (odds ratio: 1.12, 95 per cent CI: 1.07 to 1.17, p < 0.0001). Faster gait, an indicator of general mobility, was associated with less depressive symptoms (odds ratio: 1.27, 95 per cent CI: 1.06 to 1.54, p = 0.01). On average, there was no significant impact of weekly lessons in the Alexander technique on social and emotional well-being, although the emotional impact of visual impairment showed a trend toward less distress in the intervention group. Our data found that emotional distress associated with visual impairment influences depressive symptoms but contrary to expectations, the level of social support received was not significant

  9. Prevention and Early Intervention: Individual Differences as Risk Factors for the Mental Health of Children. A Festschrift for Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, William B., Ed.; McDevitt, Sean C., Ed.

    This collection of essays, in honor of child psychiatry pioneers Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, focuses on their idea that important life outcomes are the product of ongoing interactions between a child's behavioral style and the complimentarity or lack of fit of the parenting environment. Following an introduction, the remaining chapters are:…

  10. Prevention and Early Intervention: Individual Differences as Risk Factors for the Mental Health of Children. A Festschrift for Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, William B., Ed.; McDevitt, Sean C., Ed.

    This collection of essays, in honor of child psychiatry pioneers Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, focuses on their idea that important life outcomes are the product of ongoing interactions between a child's behavioral style and the complimentarity or lack of fit of the parenting environment. Following an introduction, the remaining chapters are:…

  11. The Question of Sign-Language and the Utility of Signs in the Instruction of the Deaf: Two Papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, M.

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3?4 and pp. 38?44,…

  12. Alexander Graham Bell's Patent for the Telephone and Thomas Edison's Patent for the Electric Lamp. The Constitution Community: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schur, Joan Brodsky

    In 1876 Americans held a Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) to celebrate the nation's birth 100 years earlier. Machinery Hall drew the most admiration and wonder. Alexander Graham Bell exhibited the first telephone, and Thomas Alva Edison presented the automatic telegraph, one of more than 1,000 inventions he would patent in his…

  13. The Question of Sign-Language and the Utility of Signs in the Instruction of the Deaf: Two Papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, M.

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3?4 and pp. 38?44,…

  14. Discuss: If Essays Are Dead, Then Where Does That Leave Everything Else? A Response to: Shirley Alexander's "Buying Essays: How to Make Sure Assessment Is Authentic"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Kelvin

    2015-01-01

    Professor Shirley Alexander is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President (Teaching, Learning & Equity) at the University of Technology, Sydney. On 12 November 2014, an article of hers appeared in "The Conversation": "Buying essays: how to make sure assessment is authentic." That article traverses, in an abbreviated way,…

  15. Map of glacial limits and possible refugia in the southern Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, Paul E.; Ager, Thomas A.; Baichtal, James F.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2003-01-01

    During the late Wisconsin glaciation (circa 26,000-13,000 carbon-14 yr BP) the Cordilleran glacier complex formed vast ice fields and large glaciers along the crest of the Coast Mountains. As these glaciers flowed west to the Pacific Ocean, they were joined by local glaciers originating on the higher reaches of the Alexander Archipelago (Mann and Hamiltion, 1995). This extensive volume of ice was channeled into deep troughs (present-day fiords) that formed major outlet glaciers, such as the glaciers that occupied Chatham Strait and Dixon Entrance. In several places along the coast, deep glacially scoured submarine troughs indicate that glaciers reached to the edge of the continental shelf. For instance, the glacier that extended into the Dixon Entrance trough is known to have extended to the edge of the continental shelf. Its retreat began sometime after 16,000-15,000 carbon-14 yr BP (Barrie and Conway, 1999).

  16. James Sowerby: meteorites and his meteoritic sword made for the Emperor of Russia, Alexander I, in 1814

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    James Sowerby included meteorites in his publications of British and exotic natural history and so raised interest in their nature and origins at a time of much debate and involving the President of the Royal Society, Sir Joseph Banks. The celebrations over the defeat of France in 1814 prompted Sowerby to make a sword from the Cape of Good Hope iron meteorite to present to the Russian Emperor, Alexander I, at the time of his state visit to London in June 1814 and in recognition of his achievements in bringing peace to Europe. The story of its attempted presentation, its final reception and the following response, including publications, all helped to increase interest in meteorites and their properties. The rediscovery of the sword after a lengthy disappearance probably brings an unusual saga to a fitting close.

  17. Deficits in adult neurogenesis, contextual fear conditioning, and spatial learning in a Gfap mutant mouse model of Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Tracy L; Paylor, Richard; Messing, Albee

    2013-11-20

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament of mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Dominant gain of function mutations in GFAP lead to the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Alexander disease (AxD), which is characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates known as Rosenthal fibers along with variable degrees of leukodystrophy and intellectual disability. The mechanisms by which mutant GFAP leads to these pleiotropic effects are unknown. In addition to astrocytes, GFAP is also expressed in other cell types, particularly neural stem cells that form the reservoir supporting adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Here, we show that mouse models of AxD exhibit significant pathology in GFAP-positive radial glia-like cells in the dentate gyrus, and suffer from deficits in adult neurogenesis. In addition, they display impairments in contextual learning and spatial memory. This is the first demonstration of cognitive phenotypes in a model of primary astrocyte disease.

  18. The appearance of the artist to the people: the creativity, personality and malady of Alexander Ivanov (1806-58).

    PubMed

    Lerner, Vladimir; Witztum, Eliezer

    2005-02-01

    Alexander Ivanov was an outstanding Russian painter who lived in the middle of the nineteenth century, during the romantic period. He did not accept romanticism but instead tried to create his own original style, an ambitious combination of spiritual profundity and a manner of execution unparalleled in Western European art. Ivanov's intention and style are best reflected in his major work The Appearance of Christ to the People, a picture on which he worked for over 20 years. He painted more than 400 sketches of the picture while attempting to bring his masterpiece to perfection. At the end of his life Ivanov became disillusioned, renounced his strong religious conviction and became suspicious. This study examines the influence of his background, life story and personality on the creative process. From a diagnostic perspective, Ivanov's personality featured obsessive, narcissistic and schizoid traits. In his final years he suffered from a delusional disorder.

  19. The evolution of ultrahigh carbon steels - from the Great Pyramids, to Alexander the Great, to Y2K

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J

    1999-10-01

    Hypereutectoid steels containing between about 1 and 2.1 wt%C, and now known as ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCS), have both a rich history (dating back to the time of Alexander the Great, i.e. {approximately} 300 BC) and an interesting, recent, technological period of development (from 1975 to the present). The connections between the modern UHCS and their ancient counterparts, and in particular Damascus steels, have received considerable attention. In addition to monolithic products, UHCS have also been used in both ancient and modern times in laminated composites. In the present paper, a summary of the modern development of UHCS and UHCS-containing laminates is given, and parallels are drawn with ancient materials. Also, ancient laminated composites containing other steels are described; controversial issues and a possible solution related to the age of such a laminate found in the Great Pyramid of Gizeh are discussed.

  20. Non-Euclidean Space, Movement and Astronomy in Modern Art: Alexander Calder's Mobiles and Ben Nicholson's Reliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Vanja

    2013-09-01

    John Keats once wrote that `there is no such thing as time and space' rather, believing that time and space are mental constructs that are subject to a variety of forms and as diverse as the human mind. In the 1920s through the 1930s, modern physics in many ways supported this idea through the various philosophical writings on the Theory of General Relativity to the masses by scientists such as Arthur Eddington and Albert Einstein. These new concepts of modern physics fundamentally changed our understanding of time and space and had substantial philosophical implications, which were absorbed by modern artists resulting in the 1936 Dimensionist Manifesto. Seeking to internalize the developments of modern science within modern art, this manifesto was widely endorsed by the most prominent figures of the avant-garde such as Marcel Duchamp, Jean Arp, Naum Gabo, Joan Miró, László Moholy-Nagy, Wassily Kandinsky and Alexander Calder. Of particular interest to this manifesto was the new concept of the fourth-dimension, which in many ways revolutionized the arts. Importantly, its interpretation varied widely in the artistic community, ranging from a purely physical four-dimensional space, to a kinetic concept of space in which space and time are linked, to a metaphysical interest in a space that exists beyond the material realm. The impact of modern science and astronomy on avant-garde art is currently a bourgeoning area of research with considerable implications to our rethinking of substantial artistic figures of this era. Through a case study of Alexander Calder's Mobiles and Ben Nicholson's Reliefs, this paper explores how these artworks were informed by an interest in modern science.

  1. The Cannery Formation--Devonian to Early Permian arc-marginal deposits within the Alexander Terrane, Southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Susan M.; Layer, Paul W.; Harris, Anita G.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Murchey, Benita L.

    2011-01-01

    cherts on both Admiralty and Kupreanof Islands contain radiolarians as young as Permian, the age of the Cannery Formation is herein extended to Late Devonian through early Permian, to include the early Permian rocks exposed in its type locality. The Cannery Formation is folded and faulted, and its stratigraphic thickness is unknown but inferred to be several hundred meters. The Cannery Formation represents an extended period of marine deposition in moderately deep water, with slow rates of deposition and limited clastic input during Devonian through Pennsylvanian time and increasing argillaceous, volcaniclastic, and bioclastic input during the Permian. The Cannery Formation comprises upper Paleozoic rocks in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. In the pre-Permian upper Paleozoic, the tectonic setting of the Alexander terrane consisted of two or more evolved oceanic arcs. The lower Permian section is represented by a distinctive suite of rocks in the Alexander terrane, which includes sedimentary and volcanic rocks containing early Permian fossils, metamorphosed rocks with early Permian cooling ages, and intrusive rocks with early Permian cooling ages, that form discrete northwest-trending belts. After restoration of 180 km of dextral displacement of the Chilkat-Chichagof block on the Chatham Strait Fault, these belts consist, from northeast to southwest, of (1) bedded chert, siliceous argillite, volcaniclastic turbidites, pillow basalt, and limestone of the Cannery Formation and the Porcupine Slate of Gilbert and others (1987); (2) greenschist-facies Paleozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks that have Permian cooling ages; (3) silty limestone and calcareous argillite interbedded with pillow basalt and volcaniclastic rocks of the Halleck Formation and the William Henry Bay area; and (4) intermediate-composition and syenitic plutons. These belts correspond to components of an accretionary complex, contemporary metamorphic rocks, forearc-basin deposits,

  2. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Frederick W. Smith, FedEx Corporation), with Introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander (TN)

    ScienceCinema

    Smith, Frederick W. (FedEx Corporation, Chairman, President and CEO)

    2016-07-12

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Frederick W. Smith, Chairman, President, and CEO of FedEx Corporation, gave the third keynote presentation of the day.

  3. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Frederick W. Smith, FedEx Corporation), with Introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander (TN)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Frederick W.

    2012-04-24

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Frederick W. Smith, Chairman, President, and CEO of FedEx Corporation, gave the third keynote presentation of the day.

  4. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 1: formative years, naturphilosophie, and galvanism.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    During the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), who showed an early interest in many facets of natural philosophy and natural history, delved into the controversial subject of galvanism and animal electricity, hoping to shed light on the basic nature of the nerve force. He was motivated by his broad worldview, the experiments of Luigi Galvani, who favored animal electricity in more than a few specialized fishes, and the thinking of Alessandro Volta, who accepted specialized fish electricity but was not willing to generalize to other animals, thinking Galvani's frog experiments flawed by his use of metals. Differing from many German Naturphilosophen, who shunned "violent" experiments, the newest instruments, and detailed measurement, Humboldt conducted thousands of galvanic experiments on animals and animal parts, as well as many on his own body, some of which caused him great pain. He interpreted his results as supporting some but not all of the claims made by both Galvani and Volta. Notably, because of certain negative findings and phenomenological differences, he remained skeptical about the intrinsic animal force being qualitatively identical to true electricity. Hence, he referred to a "galvanic force," not animal electricity, in his letters and publications, a theoretical position he would abandon with Volta's help early in the new century.

  5. Growing community: the impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the social and learning environment in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-08-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has a positive impact on student engagement, social connections, and confidence within and beyond the school gates. Primary evidence for the research question came from qualitative data collected from students, parents, teachers, volunteers, school principals, and specialist staff through interviews, focus groups, and participant observations. This was supported by analyses of quantitative data on child quality of life, cooperative behaviors, teacher perceptions of the school environment, and school-level educational outcome and absenteeism data. Results showed that some of the program attributes valued most highly by study participants included increased student engagement and confidence, opportunities for experiential and integrated learning, teamwork, building social skills, and connections and links between schools and their communities. In this analysis, quantitative findings failed to support findings from the primary analysis. Limitations as well as benefits of a mixed-methods approach to evaluation of complex community interventions are discussed.

  6. Crossed aphasia in a dextral: a test of the Alexander-Annett theory of anomalous organization of brain function.

    PubMed

    Osmon, D C; Panos, J; Kautz, P; Gandhavadi, B

    1998-07-01

    A case of crossed aphasia is presented in a strongly right-handed 77-year-old white female without history of familial sinistrality or prior neurological illness. She developed a right middle cerebral artery infarction documented by CT and accompanied by obvious clinical signs of a conduction aphasia with some resolution but continuing obvious language defect after 9 weeks in rehabilitation. Comprehensive neuropsychological and aphasia testing suggested anomalous lateralization of phonologic-output aspects of language, emotional prosody, motor planning and body schema modules with usual lateralization of lexical-semantic aspects of language and visuo-spatial functions. Experimental validation of the uncrossed lexical-semantic aspects of language using tachistoscope methods found support for the Alexander-Annett theory that different aspects of language can be dissociated in their lateralization. The subject had difficulty identifying a semantic associate of a picture presented to the left visual field (7 errors out of 10) relative to right visual field presentation (2 errors out of 10). Bilateral free naming errors (6 and 5 errors in the left and right visual fields, respectively) occurred consistent with the aphasic presentation, suggesting phonologic-output dysfunction from the right cerebral vascular accident. Implications of the results for aphasia classification are discussed.

  7. Listening to the whispers of matter through Arabic hermeticism: new studies on The Book of the Treasure of Alexander.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Jubran, Safa Abou Chahla

    2008-07-01

    The Jabirian Corpus refers to the K. Thahirat Al-'Iskandar, "The Book of the Treasure of Alexander" (hereafter BTA), as one of several forgeries suggesting that alchemical secrets were hidden in inscriptions in various places. The book was neglected until 1926, when Julius Ruska discussed it in his work on the Emerald Tablet, placing the BTA within the literature related to the development of Arabic alchemy. His preliminary study became an essential reference and encouraged many scholars to work on the BTA in the following decades. Some years ago, we completed the first translation of the BTA into a Western language. The work was based on the acephalous Escorial manuscript, which we identified as a fourteenth-century copy of the BTA. This manuscript is peculiar, as part of it is encoded. After finishing our translation, we started to establish the text of the BTA. At present, the text is in process of fixation--to be followed by textual criticism--and has been the main focus of a thorough study of ours on medieval hermeticism and alchemy. A sample of the work currently in progress is presented in this paper: an analysis of the variations between different manuscripts along with a study and English translation of its alchemical chapter.

  8. Prolonged weight-shift and altered spinal coordination during sit-to-stand in practitioners of the Alexander Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Gurfinkel, Victor S; Horak, Fay B; Day, Brian L

    2011-01-01

    The Alexander Technique (AT) is used to improve postural and movement coordination and has been reported to be clinically beneficial, however its effect on movement coordination is not well-characterized. In this study we examined the sit-to-stand (STS) movement by comparing coordination (phasing, weight-shift and spinal movement) between AT teachers (n=15) and matched control subjects (n=14). We found AT teachers had a longer weight-shift (p<0.001) and shorter momentum transfer phase (p=0.01), than control subjects. AT teachers also increased vertical foot force monotonically, rather than unweighting the feet prior to seat-off, suggesting they generate less forward momentum with hip flexors. The prolonged weight-shift of AT teachers occurred over a greater range of trunk inclination, such that their weight shifted continuously onto the feet while bringing the body mass forward. Finally, AT teachers had greatly reduced spinal bending during STS (cervical, p<0.001; thoracic, p<0.001; lumbar, p<0.05). We hypothesize that the low hip joint stiffness and adaptive axial postural tone previously reported in AT teachers underlies this novel “continuous” STS strategy by facilitating eccentric contractions during weight-shift. PMID:21782443

  9. Alexander Technique Training Coupled With an Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction in Teachers With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kamalikhah, Tahereh; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Rezaei-Moghaddam, Farid; Ghasemi, Mohammad; Gholami-Fesharaki, Mohammad; Goklani, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP) experience major physical, social, and occupational disruptions. Strong evidence confirms the effectiveness of Alexander technique (AT) training for CLBP. Objectives The present study applied an integrative model (IM) of behavioral prediction for improvement of AT training. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study of female teachers with nonspecific LBP in southern Tehran in 2014. Group A contained 42 subjects and group B had 35 subjects. In group A, AT lessons were designed based on IM constructs, while in group B, AT lessons only were taught. The validity and reliability of the AT questionnaire were confirmed using content validity (CVR 0.91, CVI 0.96) and Cronbach’s α (0.80). The IM constructs of both groups were measured after the completion of training. Statistical analysis used independent and paired samples t-tests and the univariate generalized linear model (GLM). Results Significant differences were recorded before and after intervention (P < 0.001) for the model constructs of intention, perceived risk, direct attitude, behavioral beliefs, and knowledge in both groups. Direct attitude and behavioral beliefs in group A were higher than in group B after the intervention (P < 0.03). Conclusions The educational framework provided by IM for AT training improved attitude and behavioral beliefs that can facilitate the adoption of AT behavior and decreased CLBP. PMID:28144457

  10. Using the Alexander Collection to measure the effects of climate change on the grasshoppers of the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nufio, C. R.; Bowers, D. M.; Guralnick, R. P.

    2007-12-01

    The current study utilizes the recently curated and databased Alexander Grasshopper Collection coupled with a new resurvey program to measure the effects of climate change on grasshoppers found along an elevational gradient in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The Alexander Collection is composed of approximately 19,000 pinned grasshoppers and a series of field data notebooks from a three year 1958-1960 survey project. During these survey years, Alexander processed over 65,000 grasshoppers from repeatedly sampled sites along an elevational gradient from Boulder (1530 m elev.) to Mt Evans (3900m elev.) in the Colorado Front Range. Data from 2006 shows that at mid-elevation sites grasshoppers are becoming adults 15-28 days earlier than they did nearly a half century ago. We found no changes in the time to reach adulthood at the high elevation sites. Preliminary data from 2007 (a year with milder spring temperatures) suggests that unlike the dramatic patterns documented in 2006, that the time to reach adulthood for grasshoppers at low and high elevation sites was not much different than it was 50 years ago. In 2007, several grasshopper species at mid-elevation did become adults earlier than they had a half century ago.

  11. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 2: the electric eel, animal electricity, and later years.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    After extensive experimentation during the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt remained skeptical about "animal electricity" (and metallic electricity), writing instead about an ill-defined galvanic force. With his worldview and wishing to learn more, he studied electric eels in South America just as the new century began, again using his body as a scientific instrument in many of his experiments. As had been the case in the past and for many of the same reasons, some of his findings with the electric eel (and soon after, Italian torpedoes) seemed to argue against biological electricity. But he no longer used galvanic terminology when describing his electric fish experiments. The fact that he now wrote about animal electricity rather than a different "galvanic" force owed much to Alessandro Volta, who had come forth with his "pile" (battery) for multipling the physical and perceptable effects of otherwise weak electricity in 1800, while Humboldt was deep in South America. Humboldt probably read about and saw voltaic batteries in the United States in 1804, but the time he spent with Volta in 1805 was probably more significant in his conversion from a galvanic to an electrical framework for understanding nerve and muscle physiology. Although he did not continue his animal electricity research program after this time, Humboldt retained his worldview of a unified nature and continued to believe in intrinsic animal electricity. He also served as a patron to some of the most important figures in the new field of electrophysiology (e.g., Hermann Helmholtz and Emil du Bois-Reymond), helping to take the research that he had participated in to the next level.

  12. Clinical aspects and pathology of Alexander disease, and morphological and functional alteration of astrocytes induced by GFAP mutation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2012-08-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is pathologically characterized by the presence of Rosenthal fibers (RF), which are made up of GFAP, αB-crystallin and heat shock protein 27, in the cytoplasm of perivascular and subpial astrocyte endfeet. Since GFAP mutation has been confirmed in reported cases of AxD, clinical or experimental research is being conducted on the relationship between GFAP mutation and the onset pathology as well as the clinical form. We conducted a nationwide survey and a clinical study, and classified AxD into three types: cerebral AxD (type 1), which primarily has an infantile onset with presence of seizures, psychomotor developmental retardation, macrocephaly, and abnormalities in the superior frontal cerebral white matter observed in a brain MRI; bulbospinal AxD (type 2), which primarily has an adult onset with presence of muscle weakness, hyperreflexia, bulbar or pseudobulbar symptoms, signal abnormalities, and atrophy observed in an MRI of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical spinal cord; and an intermediate form (type 3) which has the characteristics of both. A research on GFAP mutations and aggregate formation concluded that GFAP mutations decreased the solubility of GFAP. According to our cell model experiment, the formation of mutant GFAP aggravates depending on the site of the GFAP mutation. Furthermore, there is a possibility that polymorphism in the GFAP promoter gene regulates the degree to which GFAP is expressed; it may have an effect on clinical heterogeneity. Recent research using cell and animal models suggests that the pathology of AxD involves not only mere functional abnormalities in intermediate filaments but also functional abnormalities in astrocytes as well as in neurons. Clarification of the glia-neuron interactions will prove the disease to be very interesting.

  13. Alexander Ya. Orolv - Well-Known Scientist and Recognized Organizer of Astronmoical Research. Little Known Facts of His Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.; Vavilova, I. B.; Korsun', A. A.

    Alexander Ya. Orlov is a well-known astronomer and geophysicist as well as a worldrecognized organizer of scientific research in Russia, the USSR, and Ukraine. Orlov has formulated his main scientific ideas during the Odesa's period of life. He studied a tidal deformation of the Earth and its polar motion using the gravity and latitude observations. He has proposed new defenitions of a mean pole and a mean latitude, as wel as a new method for determing the Earth pole coordinates. To the end of 1940-ties, the Orlov's scientific ideas were implemented and stimulated a development of a research field, which is now called as Astrogeodynamics or Space Geodynamics. Among the representatives of the Orlov's scientific school are about 20 Doctors of Sciences and more than 40 Candidates of Sciences, including the members of Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and other countries. Among them are N.Stoyko-Radilenko (France), J.Witkowski (Poland), V.Zhardetsky (Yugoslavia-Austria-USA), D.Pyaskovsky, Z.Aksent'eva, E.Lavrentieva, N.Popov, E.Fedorov and A.Korol in Ukraine. The deserved followers of the Orlov's scientific ideas were also I.Androsov, I.Dyukov, K.Mansurova, B.Novopashennyj, N.V.Zimmerman in Russia and M.Bursa (Chesh Republic), who worked with him, as well as his sons, A.A.Orlov and B.A. Orlov. The Orlov's life and scientific activity were fully described in many articles. For that reason in this paper we will focus on the little-known facts of the Orlov's scientific-organizational activity, for example, the Orlov's appointments as a director of observatories in Odesa, Poltava, m.Pip-Ivan, Pulkovo, and Kyiv; interesesting facts related to his membership in the Academies of Sciences of the USSR and Ukrainian SSR; organization of a large-scale program on the latitude observations and gravimetric survey. We describe briefly his life and his astrogeodynamic scientific school.

  14. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo; Cifelli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. These GIFT workshops represented the first workshops specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  15. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, C. E.; Cifelli, F.

    2014-12-01

    Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. In 3 cases of the 4 cases, these GIFT workshops represented the first workshop specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  16. [Considerations on the concepts of nature, space, and morphology in Alexander von Humboldt and on the genesis of modern physical geography].

    PubMed

    Vitte, Antonio Carlos; Silveira, Roberison Wittgenstein Dias da

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses how Alexander von Humboldt developed the concepts of nature, space, and morphology in his works and impacted the shaping of modern physical geography. Influenced by Kant's ideas in Critique of judgment and also by the writings of Goethe and Schelling, Humboldt devised a new interpretation and representation of nature on Earth's surface, wherein the concept of space is essential to explaining natural phenomena. Modern physical geography is grounded in a complex interweaving of aesthetic and instrumental influences fashioned by Humboldt, with the principle of connection playing an important role in the artistic and scientific development of the notion of a geographic landscape.

  17. The Neotropical tanyderid Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) (Diptera, Tanyderidae), with description of the egg, larva and pupa, redescription of adults, and notes on natural history.

    PubMed

    Madriz, R Isaí; Courtney, Gregory W

    2016-08-30

    Larvae, pupae and adults of Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) were collected during fieldwork in Chilean Patagonia, December 2013 and January 2014. Eggs were obtained from females that oviposited in captivity. Association of all life stages is based on co-occurrence and rearing of individual larvae to adults. A diagnosis for the genus and species is provided. Descriptions of the egg, larva and pupa and redescriptions of the male and female are completed. Eggs of A. gloriosus are the first described for Tanyderidae. Natural history characteristics for this species, including microhabitat, copulatory behavior and oviposition, are discussed.

  18. Alexander Technique Lessons, Acupuncture Sessions or usual care for patients with chronic neck pain (ATLAS): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain is a common condition in the adult population. More research is needed to evaluate interventions aiming to facilitate beneficial long-term change. We propose to evaluate the effect of Alexander Technique lessons and acupuncture in a rigorously conducted pragmatic trial with an embedded qualitative study. Methods/Design We will recruit 500 patients who have been diagnosed with neck pain in primary care, who have continued to experience neck pain for at least three months with 28% minimum cut-off score on the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ). We will exclude patients with serious underlying pathology, prior cervical spine surgery, history of psychosis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoporosis, haemophilia, cancer, HIV or hepatitis, or with alcohol or drug dependency currently or in the last 12 months, or actively pursuing compensation or with pending litigation. The York Trials Unit will randomly allocate participants using a secure computer-based system. We will use block randomisation with allocation to each intervention arm being unambiguously concealed from anyone who might subvert the randomisation process. Participants will be randomised in equal proportions to Alexander Technique lessons, acupuncture or usual care alone. Twenty 30-minute Alexander Technique lessons will be provided by teachers registered with the Society of Teachers of the Alexander Technique and twelve 50-minute sessions of acupuncture will be provided by acupuncturists registered with the British Acupuncture Council. All participants will continue to receive usual GP care. The primary outcome will be the NPQ at 12 months, with the secondary time point at 6 months, and an area-under-curve analysis will include 3, 6 and 12 month time-points. Adverse events will be documented. Potential intervention effect modifiers and mediators to be explored include: self-efficacy, stress management, and the incorporation of practitioner advice about

  19. How our changing research arena can inspire innovative environmental research in developing countries (Alexander von Humboldt Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Alexander von Humboldt was a true pioneer by engagingly articulating an ecosystem-wide vision on environmental issues and research, connecting and moving beyond disciplinary boundaries. Focusing here on soil science as an important discipline within the geosciences, the work of our group has acted in the spirit of this approach by focusing on interdisciplinary systems research in different developing countries in close interaction with stakeholders, based on soil processes in a dynamic landscape context. But recent developments of internet and social media are drastically changing relations between science and society all over the world. Scientists have to continuously struggle to keep their "societal license to research". Researchers in so-called developed countries would be well advised to communicate lessons learned to scientists in developing countries allowing them to leapfrog and avoid making time- consuming mistakes adhering to yesterday's practices. Specifically, attention should be paid to: (i) more continuing interaction with stakeholders when planning and executing research. This takes time that should be allocated in research projects. ; (ii) the quality of a limited number of key papers rather than on the total number of published and cited scientific papers, when judging researchers; (iii) defining new research on the basis of proven inadequacy of existing techniques and methods, realizing that "new" is not necessarily "better" and that available research methods and procedures can solve many current environmental problems; (iv) showing the value of the scientific approach that does not articulate: "yet another opinion" but is essential to face the major environmental challenges of the 21th century. (v) demonstrate the crucial importance of interdisciplinary ecosystem research and innovation when addressing the seventeen UN Sustainable Developments Goals (SDG's) that are attractive now as a focus for the scientific effort in land-related research. (vi

  20. Correlation of Emkuckfaw Group metagraywackes with the Wedowee Group, Northern Piedmont, Alabama: Implications for the interpretation of the Alexander City fault

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Recent field studies to clarify stratigraphic relationships between the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite Gneiss and the Brevard zone lead to the interpretation that part of the Emuckfaw Group is correlative with, and probably structurally continuous with, part of the Wedowee Group. The Josie Leg formation of Bieler and Deininger (1987) is a sequence of metagraywackes and interbedded metapelites; it is here interpreted as a coarse submarine fan facies. The northwestern contact of the unit, frequently mapped as the Alexander City fault, maps into the Wadley Line in the New Site and Daviston quadrangles. The southeastern contact is a sheared contact with structurally overlying migmatitic rocks that include quartzites and calcsilicates. The Josie Leg and Wedowee rocks form a southwesterly plunging synform in which the Elkahatchee lies. Where the contact between the units is gently dipping it is mapped as the Wadley line. Where the contact has been folded and dips steeply, it is highly sheared and is mapped as the Alexander City fault. It is impossible to determine at this time how much the section has been attenuated during the shearing. Although the contact has been interpreted as structural, the data are not unambiguous. The Josie Leg/Wedowee contact may be a stratigraphic contact with the apparent structural discordance reflecting the different mechanical behavior of the contrasting lithologies.

  1. Synergistic effects of the SAPK/JNK and the proteasome pathway on glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) accumulation in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guomei; Xu, Zhiheng; Goldman, James E

    2006-12-15

    Protein aggregates in astrocytes that contain glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), small heat shock proteins, and ubiquitinated proteins are termed Rosenthal fibers and characterize Alexander disease, a leukodystrophy caused by heterozygous mutations in GFAP. The mechanisms responsible for the massive accumulation of GFAP in Alexander disease remain unclear. In this study, we show that overexpression of both wild type and R239C mutant human GFAP led to cytoplasmic inclusions. GFAP accumulation also led to a decrease of proteasome activity and an activation of the MLK2-JNK pathway. In turn, the expression of activated mixed lineage kinases (MLKs) induced JNK activation and increased GFAP accumulation, whereas blocking the JNK pathway decreased GFAP accumulation. Activated MLK also inhibited proteasome function. A direct inhibition of proteasome function pharmacologically further activated JNK. Our data suggest a synergistic interplay between the proteasome and the SAPK/JNK pathway in the context of GFAP accumulation. Feedback interactions among GFAP accumulation, SAPK/JNK activation, and proteasomal hypofunction cooperate to produce further protein accumulation and cellular stress responses.

  2. [Researchers training in the context of the collaborative projects: experiences of Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humbolt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia].

    PubMed

    Gotuzzo, Eduardo; González, Elsa; Verdonck, Kristien

    2010-09-01

    Research is a main element for human and social development. Under this point of view, it involves particular challenges and opportunities for the so-called "developing countries". An approach for those challenges and opportunities comes from the analysis of two interrelated activities; the training of new researchers and the research development with institutions or researchers which are external to the institution ("collaborative research"). Both activities are essential for the consolidation, widening and updating of the institutional capabilities for scientific production. We present here the experiences of the Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humboldt" of the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, in relation to the training of new researchers, we discuss the four elements we consider key for this process; the promotion of stimulating environments for research, the proactive identification of fellows, the complementary advice and networks consolidation; and we analyze three successful models of international collaboration for the training of new researchers under different institutional approaches.

  3. Post-traumatic stress reactions before the advent of post-traumatic stress disorder: potential effects on the lives and legacies of Alexander the Great, Captain James Cook, Emily Dickinson, and Florence Nightingale.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Philip A; Batten, Sonja V

    2008-12-01

    Evidence is presented that Alexander the Great, Captain James Cook, Emily Dickinson, and Florence Nightingale each developed symptoms consistent with post-traumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of repeated potentially traumatizing events of differing character. Their case histories also varied with respect to background, premorbid personality style, risk factors, clinical presentation, and course of the illness, illustrating the pleomorphic character of the disorder, as well as the special problems in diagnosing it in historical figures.

  4. The question of sign-language and the utility of signs in the instruction of the deaf: two papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898).

    PubMed

    Bell, Alexander Graham

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3-4 and pp. 38-44, capture Bell's thinking about sign language and its use in the classroom. Contrary to frequent claims, Bell does not demand "oral" training for all deaf children--even if he thinks it is the superior alternative--but does advocate for it for "the semi-deaf" and "the semi-mute." "In regard to the others," he writes, "I am not so sure." Although he clearly voices his support for oral methods and fingerspelling (the Rochester method) over sign language, Bell acknowledges the use and utility of signing in a carefully-crafted discussion that includes both linguistics and educational philosophy. In separating the language used at home from that in school and on the playground, Bell reveals a far more complex view of language learning by deaf children than he is often granted. (M. Marschark).

  5. GFAP aggregates in the cochlear nerve increase the noise vulnerability of sensory cells in the organ of Corti in the murine model of Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Masatsugu; Tanaka, Kenji F; Kanzaki, Sho; Wakabayashi, Kenichiro; Oishi, Naoki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-09-01

    Outer hair cell (OHC) loss in the auditory sensory epithelium is a primary cause of noise-induced sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL). To clarify the participation of glial cells in SNHL, we used an Alexander disease (AxD) mouse model. These transgenic mice harbor the AxD causal mutant of the human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) under the control of the mouse GFAP promoter. It is thought that GFAP aggregates compromise the function of astrocytes. In the auditory pathway, the formation of GFAP aggregates was observed only in GFAP-positive cells of the cochlear nerve. The presence of GFAP aggregates did not change auditory function at the threshold level. To assess the change in vulnerability to auditory excitotoxicity, both transgenic and control mice were treated with intense noise exposure. Auditory threshold shifts were assessed by auditory brainstem responses (ABR) at 1 and 4 weeks after noise exposure, and OHC damage was analyzed by quantitative histology at 4 weeks after exposure. Transgenic mice showed more severe ABR deficits and OHC damage, suggesting that cochlear nerve glial cells with GFAP aggregates play a role in noise susceptibility. Thus, we should focus more on the roles of cochlear nerve glial cells in SNHL.

  6. A film of patients with movement disorders made in Queen Square, London in the Mid-1920s by Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, E H; Healy, D G; Lees, A J

    2011-12-01

    Through Edward Reynolds' collaboration with Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson's (SAKW) son, James, on Babylonian neurology and psychiatry, and his contact with James' nephew, Jim, grandson of SAKW, a remarkable film of patients with movement disorders, made by SAKW in the mid-1920s, has come to light. The 20-min silent film with captions by SAKW includes patients with senile tremor, Parkinson's disease and postencephalitic parkinsonism, hemiballismus, Huntington's chorea, Sydenham's chorea, hysterical palsy and tremor, multiple sclerosis, and progressive lenticular degeneration. Most of the patients are filmed in the square outside the National Hospital. The British Film Institute dates the film to 1924 and the captions to 1925. The case records of 6 of the 14 patients, who were admitted to the National Hospital, Queen Square, under the care of Dr. SAKW have been identified and summarized. SAKW may have been stimulated and facilitated to make this film through his personal contact with Charlie Chaplin with whom he stayed at his Californian estate, probably in the summer of 1924. The first films of neurological patients were made in Europe and USA at the beginning of the 20th century, although most have perished. This may be one of the oldest examples from UK. It is also notable for the inclusion of Wilson's disease and a brief shot of SAKW himself. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  7. An autopsied case of adult-onset bulbospinalform Alexander disease with a novel S393R mutation in the GFAP gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Kozo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man with no apparent family history noticed diplopia. He gradually showed gait disturbance and dysuria. Abducens disorder of eye movement with nystagmus, tongue atrophy with fasciculation, spastic tetraparesis, and sensory disturbance were also observed. MRI showed severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord ("tadpole appearance"). Tracheotomy and gastrostomy were performed 7 years after onset due to the development of bulbar palsy. Death occurred following respiratory failure after 11 years total disease duration. The brain weighed 1,380 g. The cerebrum, cerebellum, midbrain, and upper pons were preserved from atrophy, but the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. A few Rosenthal fibers were observed in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, whereas numerous Rosenthal fibers were observed in the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord. Myelin loss with relatively preserved axons was extensively observed from the middle of the pons to the spinal cord. The clinicopathological diagnosis was adult-onset bulbospinal-form Alexander disease. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene analysis revealed a novel mutation of S393R. Expression patterns of S393R mutant GFAP using adrenal carcinoma-derived cells (SW13 cells) showed a decreased number of filamentous structures and abnormal aggregates.

  8. Feasibility study of asset mapping with children: identifying how the community environment shapes activity and food choices in Alexander First Nation.

    PubMed

    DyckFehderau, David; Holt, Nicholas L; Ball, Geoff D; Willows, Noreen D

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that First Nations children living on reserves are 4.5 times more likely to be obese than Canadian children in general. Many First Nations children living on reserves have limited healthy food and physical activity options. Understanding how community factors contribute to First Nations children's lifestyle choices is an understudied area of research. Furthermore, rarely has health research elicited First Nations children's perspectives of their communities. The purpose of this study was to understand the external behavior-shaping factors that influence the lifestyle behaviors of First Nations' children. Asset mapping with children was used to understand how community resources impacted children's activity and eating options. Alexander First Nation is in central Alberta. Asset mapping was one component of a research project in the community to identify risk factors for children developing diabetes. Participants were a convenience sample of two high school students working at the local health centre and seven grade six children. Maps, photographs, and a tour of the town site enabled participants to identify places and spaces where they were active or could obtain food. For each of these assets, a description of how it was used and how it could be modified for better usage was derived from notes and transcripts using content analysis. Assets were grouped into usage categories, which were then mapped onto a layout of the community and presented at a community meeting to address childhood obesity. Twenty-five places and spaces were identified as being activity or food related. Breakfast and/or lunch, concession foods (snack foods, eg chocolate bars, potato crisps) were obtained at school; meals and snack foods where cultural gatherings occur; and snack foods at the local store. Healthy food choices were limited. Children and youth were active at different locations in town, with only two spaces beyond the town site identified as locations for activity

  9. Public information needs after the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210 in London: cross sectional telephone survey and qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Page, Lisa; Morgan, Oliver; Pinder, Richard J; Riley, Paul; Hatch, Stephani; Maguire, Helen; Catchpole, Mike; Simpson, John; Wessely, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To identify public perceptions of the risk to health after the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210 (210Po) in London and to assess the impact of public health communications. Design Cross sectional telephone survey and qualitative interviews. Setting London, United Kingdom. Participants 1000 people completed the cross sectional survey and 86 potentially exposed people completed the qualitative interviews. Main outcome measures Perception of risk to personal health after the 210Po incident. Qualitative interviews were analysed with an emphasis on information needs. Results 11.7% of the survey sample (n=117) perceived their health to be at risk. Aside from personal variables the main predictors of perceived risk to health were believing that the incident was related to terrorism (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 4.6) rather than to espionage, that it was targeted at the wider public rather than one person (5.9, 3.2 to 10.9), and that it could affect people who had not been in the contaminated area (3.2, 2.1 to 5.1). Participants in the qualitative interviews were generally satisfied with the information they had received, although they would have preferred more information about their individual risk of exposure, the results of their urine tests, and the health implications of the incident. Conclusions Perceptions of the public that the 210Po incident in London in 2006 was related to espionage helped to reassure them that the risks to personal health were low. In the event of future incidents it is important to ensure that detailed, comprehensible information about the risks of any exposure is available. PMID:17975252

  10. Public information needs after the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210 in London: cross sectional telephone survey and qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, G James; Page, Lisa; Morgan, Oliver; Pinder, Richard J; Riley, Paul; Hatch, Stephani; Maguire, Helen; Catchpole, Mike; Simpson, John; Wessely, Simon

    2007-12-01

    To identify public perceptions of the risk to health after the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210 (210Po) in London and to assess the impact of public health communications. Cross sectional telephone survey and qualitative interviews. London, United Kingdom. 1000 people completed the cross sectional survey and 86 potentially exposed people completed the qualitative interviews. Perception of risk to personal health after the 210Po incident. Qualitative interviews were analysed with an emphasis on information needs. 11.7% of the survey sample (n=117) perceived their health to be at risk. Aside from personal variables the main predictors of perceived risk to health were believing that the incident was related to terrorism (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 4.6) rather than to espionage, that it was targeted at the wider public rather than one person (5.9, 3.2 to 10.9), and that it could affect people who had not been in the contaminated area (3.2, 2.1 to 5.1). Participants in the qualitative interviews were generally satisfied with the information they had received, although they would have preferred more information about their individual risk of exposure, the results of their urine tests, and the health implications of the incident. Perceptions of the public that the 210Po incident in London in 2006 was related to espionage helped to reassure them that the risks to personal health were low. In the event of future incidents it is important to ensure that detailed, comprehensible information about the risks of any exposure is available.

  11. The Alexander Disease–Causing Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Mutant, R416W, Accumulates into Rosenthal Fibers by a Pathway That Involves Filament Aggregation and the Association of αB-Crystallin and HSP27

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Ming Der; Su, Mu; Wen, Shu Fang; Li, Rong; Gibbon, Terry; Prescott, Alan R.; Brenner, Michael; Quinlan, Roy A.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we describe the early events in the disease pathogenesis of Alexander disease. This is a rare and usually fatal neurodegenerative disorder whose pathological hallmark is the abundance of protein aggregates in astrocytes. These aggregates, termed “Rosenthal fibers,” contain the protein chaperones αB-crystallin and HSP27 as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an intermediate filament (IF) protein found almost exclusively in astrocytes. Heterozygous, missense GFAP mutations that usually arise spontaneously during spermatogenesis have recently been found in the majority of patients with Alexander disease. In this study, we show that one of the more frequently observed mutations, R416W, significantly perturbs in vitro filament assembly. The filamentous structures formed resemble assembly intermediates but aggregate more strongly. Consistent with the heterozygosity of the mutation, this effect is dominant over wild-type GFAP in coassembly experiments. Transient transfection studies demonstrate that R416W GFAP induces the formation of GFAP-containing cytoplasmic aggregates in a wide range of different cell types, including astrocytes. The aggregates have several important features in common with Rosenthal fibers, including the association of αB-crystallin and HSP27. This association occurs simultaneously with the formation of protein aggregates containing R416W GFAP and is also specific, since HSP70 does not partition with them. Monoclonal antibodies specific for R416W GFAP reveal, for the first time for any IF-based disease, the presence of the mutant protein in the characteristic histopathological feature of the disease, namely Rosenthal fibers. Collectively, these data confirm that the effects of the R416W GFAP are dominant, changing the assembly process in a way that encourages aberrant filament-filament interactions that then lead to protein aggregation and chaperone sequestration as early events in Alexander disease. PMID:16826512

  12. Observatoriya imeni russkogo astronoma v dalekoj Brazilii. K 100-letiyu so diya rozhdeniya Aleksandra Ivanovicha Postoeva (1900 - 1976) %t An observatory in distant Brazil named after a Russian astronomer (dedicated to Alexander Postoyev (1900 - 1976) centennial anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques Dos Santos, P.; Matsuura, O. T.

    This is a biographical note on the life of Dr. Alexander Postoyev, a victim of Stalin's purge of Soviet astronomers in 1936 - 1937. Together with his family, he left the Soviet Union in 1943 and lived in Germany as a refugee and a "displaced person" until 1952, when he moved to Brazil. There, he started the second part of his professional career. Thanks to his efforts, the Astronomical and Geophysical Institute (IAG) of the University of Sao Paulo (USP) was for the first time included in programs of international cooperation, thus contributing to the institutional consolidation of IAG/USP as a leading center of astronomical research and teaching in Brazil now.

  13. Evaluating return on investment in a school based health promotion and prevention program: the investment multiplier for the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Simon; Dawber, James; Yeatman, Heather; Quinsey, Karen; Morris, Darcy

    2014-08-01

    Successful health promotion and disease prevention strategies in complex community settings such as primary schools rely on acceptance and ownership across community networks. Assessing multiplier impacts from investment on related community activity over time are suggested as key alongside evidence of program health effects on targeted groups of individuals in gauging community network engagement and ownership, dynamic impacts, and program long term success and return on investment. An Australian primary school based health promotion and prevention strategy, the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program (SAKGNP), which has been providing garden and kitchen classes for year 3-6 students since 2008, was evaluated between 2011 and 2012. Returns on Australian Federal Government investment for school infrastructure grants up to $60,000 are assessed up to and beyond a two year mutual obligation period with: (i) Impacts on student lifestyle behaviours, food choices and eating habits surveyed across students (n = 491 versus 260) and parents (n = 300 versus 234) in 28 SAKGNP and 14 matched schools, controlling for school and parent level confounders and triangulated with SAKGNP pre-post analysis; (ii) Multiplier impacts of investment on related school and wider community activity up to two years; and (iii) Evidence of continuation and program evolution in schools observed beyond two years. SAKGNP schools showed improved student food choices (p = 0.024) and kitchen lifestyle behaviour (p = 0.019) domains compared to controls and in pre-post analysis where 20.0% (58/290) reported eating fruit and vegetables more often and 18.6% (54/290) preparing food at home more often. No significant differences were found in case control analysis for eating habits or garden lifestyle behaviour domains, although 32.3% of children helped more in the garden (91/278) and 15.6% (45/289) ate meals together more often in pre-post analysis. The multiplier impact on total

  14. Obituary: Alexander Dalgarno (1928 - 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, Tom; Babb, James F. Babb; Loeb, Avi

    Alex Dalgarno's major contributions to the understanding of fundamental atomic and molecular processes enabled him to develop diagnostics of the physical conditions of atmospheres and astrophysical sources and to elucidate the roles of such processes in controlling those environments. He greatly influenced the research of physicists, chemists, atmospheric scientists, and astronomers, leading Sir David Bates to write, "There is no greater figure than Alex in the history of atomic physics and its applications." Alex was born and grew up in London. As a child, he enjoyed mathematical puzzles and did well at sports. He was invited to try out for the Tottenham Hotspur soccer team, but his professional sporting career ended due to an injury, which did not prevent Alex playing tennis and squash into his ninth decade. In 1945 Alex began to study Mathematics at University College London (UCL). In 1947 Sir Harrie Massey invited him to work for a PhD in Physics and suggested that Alex investigate collisions of metastable helium atoms in helium gas to determine the cross sections for excitation transfer. Richard Buckingham was Alex's immediate supervisor. After completing his graduate study in 1951, Alex became a member of staff in Applied Mathematics at the Queen's University of Belfast (QUB). He served as the Director of the Computational Laboratory after a 1954 visit to MIT, which had an electronic computer, led Alex to persuade colleagues that QUB needed one. In 1957, the poet Philip Larkin was the best man at the marriage of Alex to Barbara Kane. They had four children, Fergus, Penelope, Piers, and Rebecca, but the marriage dissolved after ten years. Alex's important work during the 1950s on the quantitative evaluation of long-range interactions underpinned his collaborations on precise scattering calculations relevant to ultra-cold collisions and the formation of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates over four decades later. He investigated the theory of atomic and molecular collisions and calculated charge transfer cross sections. Some of these proved later to be important for forming the spectra of diffuse astronomical matter surrounding high mass stars and 100 million solar mass black holes at the centers of active galaxies. In the early 1950s David Bates stimulated Alex's interest in the study of quantum processes occurring in the upper terrestrial atmosphere. Together they considered the sources of the nightglow and dayglow features and concluded that the altitudes previously inferred for them from observations were up to several hundred kilometers too large. Experiments carried on V2 rockets, like those seen by Alex in wartime London, proved him and David to be right. Alex felt that though many theorists believe that "physics is embodied in its equations," it is instead "to be found in the solutions to the equations." He was a master at developing and applying methods that simplified calculations leading to reliable solutions. Exploiting the contemporary advances in electronic computation, by the 1960s Alex and his colleagues were able to address atomic and molecular processes of increasing complexity. Their development and early applications of the S-matrix theory of molecular rotational excitation by particle impact triggered major advances in molecular physics and theoretical chemistry and in the understanding of processes important in many environments, including a wide variety of astrophysical sources. In 1967 Alex became a professor in the Harvard Department of Astronomy and a member of the staff of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. He was a team member for several Atmosphere Explorer satellite missions, which elucidated the roles of atoms and ions in the upper atmosphere and paved the way for further applications to the other planets. By 1969 Alex was publishing papers on molecular hydrogen (H2) radiative processes, including photodissociation, in which the foundations of molecular astrophysics began to emerge. H2 is the most abundant astrophysical molecule and the main constituent of the regions where stars form. Interstellar H2 was first detected directly in the following year, and data for interstellar H2 began to become abundant in 1973. Alex was well prepared and led efforts to interpret these data, from which he was able to infer the physical properties of diffuse interstellar molecular clouds. At nearly the same time he was involved in work on the ionization and energy deposition in H2 by nearly relativistic and relativistic particles called cosmic rays. The work has relevance to emission in the atmospheres of the giant planets, as well as for conditions in interstellar molecular clouds. Cosmic ray induced ionization initiates much of the basic chemistry in star forming regions, and the emissions of the product molecules control the temperatures and allow the diagnosis of the physical conditions and dynamics of the stellar nurseries. For more than four decades Alex elucidated the chemical networks governing the molecular abundances in a wide variety of astrophysical sources including star forming regions, supernova ejecta, the pregalactic universe, and extreme environments like those in the vicinities of X-ray sources powered by accretion onto black holes. The refinement of the models led to calculations predicting the existence of subsequently discovered negative ions in giant molecular clouds. One of his astrophysical interests that intrigued him late in his career was the emission of soft X-rays by comets and in the heliosphere due to charge transfer with solar wind particles, and he also worked on related processes occurring in the atmospheres of the giant planets. Alex remained very active in fundamental atomic and molecular physics, as well as for its applications to astrophysics and to terrestrial and extraterrestrial planetary atmospheres. Ultra-cold collisions and ultra-cold chemistry were major interests for Alex for much of the latest phase of his career, most recently with pioneering work on atom-molecule collisions. In the early 1980s Alex had concerns about the future of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics in the United States, where it was inadequately funded and somewhat out of fashion in many of the physics departments providing most of the physicists who became university faculty. Alex played a key role in efforts to address this issue and led a proposal to the National Science Foundation that resulted in the founding on 1 November 1988 of the Institute of Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics (ITAMP) at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Alex served for five years as the first ITAMP director. A number of the former ITAMP students and postdoctoral researchers have become leading AMO physicists, and its visitor program and workshops have led to the identification and stimulation of the leading areas of AMO physics. Alex was a Fellow of the Royal Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a member (Honorary) of the Royal Irish Academy. He received many medals, including the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics, the Royal Society's Hughes Medal, the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal, the American Geophysical Society's Fleming Medal, and the Royal Society of Chemistry's Spiers Medal. He served as the editor of the Astrophysical Journal Letters for nearly thirty years starting in 1973, as the Chair of the Harvard Department of Astronomy from 1971 to 1976, and as the Acting Director of Harvard College Observatory and then the Acting Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics from 1971 to 1973 during a critical period of its existence. Alex was a gifted mentor who spoke and wrote with pride of his former students and postdoctoral researchers. He was able to match projects very well with the abilities of the students. He made availability to students a special priority, and despite his supply of problems would encourage students as they developed their own. Alex was very supportive of junior scientists as they developed their careers, and in addition to writing many letters of recommendation he made many visits to colleagues as they were establishing themselves elsewhere. Furthermore, Alex very graciously hosted a number of his former students when they visited. He combined quiet modesty with a confidence that reassured others, and his humor was dry, interactive, and friendly. Alex passed away peacefully on 9 April 2015 in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the company of Fern Creelan, who was his partner for 30 years.

  15. Thom, Alexander (1894-1945)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    British engineer and archaeo-astronomer, born in Scotland, became professor of engineering science at Oxford University. Accurately surveyed the megalithic sites in Britain and the megalithic lunar observatories, identifying their shapes and astronomical alignments. He claimed to have discovered in the dimensions of the circles, as apparently used by the megalithic constructors, quanta of length ...

  16. [Improvement of hygiene and the combat of epidemics as Russian state concerns during World War I: Prince Alexander von Oldenburg and the POWs of the Central Powers in Russia].

    PubMed

    Nachtigal, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    When Russia joined the war against the Central Powers in 1914, she immediately faced problems of public health care among the masses of people who were forced to move across far distances in the country: soldiers, refugees, and prisoners of war. Because of poor organisation and the unexpectedly long duration of the war, the POWs fared worst of all war victims in Russia. Subjected to an overstrained military organisation in the rear, the fate of this broadly neglected group illustrates how and with what success Russia strove to meet its deficiencies in administrative structure during wartime. The "Evacuation and Sanitation Section" was put under the command of a member of the Imperial family, Prince Alexander of Oldenburg, a high ranking official of German origin. This amateur scientist and initiator of medical institutions was an energetic and courageous personality who became vital for the fate of millions of POWs in epidemic-stricken Russia. The role of this "silent" ally of the German and Austro-Hungarian governments has hitherto been unknown. Newly found sources in Russian archives now shed an interesting light on a weak spot of Russia's administration and a generally neglected chapter of the history of medicine, the handling of epidemics and of deficits in hygiene.

  17. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks Creek...

  18. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks Creek...

  19. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks Creek...

  20. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks Creek...

  1. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks Creek...

  2. Humboldt, Alexander von (1769-1859)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Naturalist, geographer, explorer, born in Tegel Palace, Berlin. The Humboldt current off the west coast of South America is named after him. He named the gegenschein. He set in train an international project organized by GAUSS to study terrestrial magnetism. His major work, Kosmos, based on lectures at Berlin University, endeavoured to provide a comprehensive physical picture of the universe. ...

  3. Dr. Alexander H. Flax: Technologist of Aeronautics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    aeronautics. (82:19) The ability to apply theory made the difference in the spectacular aviation feats of this time--Lindbergh, Wiley Post, 6 Amelia ... Earhart and Howard Hughes. Of these, the Lindbergh flight was perceived by the popular imagination as the event of the century. The plane had one motor

  4. Alexander Graham Bell in Professional Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol; Hampton, Leonard A.

    1976-01-01

    The University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education and the School of Pharmacy developed and presented, as a pilot project, a series of four telelectures at 10 locations throughout the State. Participating pharmacists were receptive to the approach and reported favorable reactions in the evaluation. (LH)

  5. Alexander Graham Bell in Professional Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol; Hampton, Leonard A.

    1976-01-01

    The University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education and the School of Pharmacy developed and presented, as a pilot project, a series of four telelectures at 10 locations throughout the State. Participating pharmacists were receptive to the approach and reported favorable reactions in the evaluation. (LH)

  6. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left) and Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos share a game of ping-pong June 30 during pre-launch activities. They and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left) and Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos share a game of ping-pong June 30 during pre-launch activities. They and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  7. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 prime crewmember Kate Rubins of NASA (left) and her backup, NASA���s Peggy Whitson (right) share a game of chess June 30 during pre-launch activities. Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 prime crewmember Kate Rubins of NASA (left) and her backup, NASA’s Peggy Whitson (right) share a game of chess June 30 during pre-launch activities. Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  8. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Kate Rubins of NASA takes a spin in a rotating chair to test her vestibular system June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Kate Rubins of NASA takes a spin in a rotating chair to test her vestibular system June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  9. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency takes a spin in a rotating chair to test his vestibular system June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. Onishi, Kate Rubins of NASA and Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency takes a spin in a rotating chair to test his vestibular system June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. Onishi, Kate Rubins of NASA and Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  10. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (foreground) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency conduct tests of their vestibular system on tilt tables June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. They and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (foreground) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency conduct tests of their vestibular system on tilt tables June 30 as part of pre-launch activities. They and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  11. Outside their Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) answer reporters��� questions June 26 as they continue preparations for launch on July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-26

    Outside their Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) answer reporters’ questions June 26 as they continue preparations for launch on July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  12. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) conduct rendezvous rehearsals on a laptop computer simulator June 30 as instructors look on. Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) conduct rendezvous rehearsals on a laptop computer simulator June 30 as instructors look on. Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  13. Outside the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left) and Kate Rubins of NASA (second from left) receive a briefing on the use of a satellite phone June 25 as they prepare for their launch with Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos on July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-25

    Outside the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left) and Kate Rubins of NASA (second from left) receive a briefing on the use of a satellite phone June 25 as they prepare for their launch with Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos on July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  14. Illustrated and online catalog of type specimens of freshwater fishes in the Colección de Peces Dulceacuícolas of Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander von Humboldt (IAvH-P), Colombia.

    PubMed

    Donascimiento, Carlos; Cárdenas-Bautista, Johann-Stephens; Acosta, Kevin Giancarlo Borja; González-Alvarado, Arturo; Medina, Claudia A

    2016-09-29

    The catalog of type specimens of freshwater fishes deposited in the Colección de Peces Dulceacuícolas del Instituto de Investigación de Recursos Biológicos Alexander von Humboldt (IAvH-P) is presented. This list includes 483 specimens in 65 lots representing 11 holotypes and 472 paratypes of 48 nominal species. Corrections, additions, and updating of information in the original descriptions are included in individual remarks for each catalog number entry and a gallery of pictures of holotypes or paratypes of each nominal species is also presented, which supplements some original descriptions lacking figures of their respective types. An online version of the catalog is available at http://humboldt.org.co/en/servicios/colecciones-biologicas/catalogo-de-tipos.

  15. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) tries his hand at billiards June 30 during pre-launch activities as his crewmate, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos looks on. In the background on the left, backup crewmember Peggy Whitson of NASA participates in a game of chess. Onishi, Ivanishin and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) tries his hand at billiards June 30 during pre-launch activities as his crewmate, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos looks on. In the background on the left, backup crewmember Peggy Whitson of NASA participates in a game of chess. Onishi, Ivanishin and Kate Rubins of NASA will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  16. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 backup crewmember Peggy Whitson of NASA waters a tree in her name first planted in 2007 during traditional pre-launch activities June 30. Whitson is one of three backups to the prime crewmembers, Kate Rubins of NASA, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, who will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 backup crewmember Peggy Whitson of NASA waters a tree in her name first planted in 2007 during traditional pre-launch activities June 30. Whitson is one of three backups to the prime crewmembers, Kate Rubins of NASA, Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, who will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  17. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left) lends a hand to NASA���s Kate Rubins (crouching) as she plants a tree in her name June 30 in traditional pre-launch activities. Standing from left to right are backup crewmembers Peggy Whitson of NASA, Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency and Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and prime crewmember Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos. Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (left) lends a hand to NASA’s Kate Rubins (crouching) as she plants a tree in her name June 30 in traditional pre-launch activities. Standing from left to right are backup crewmembers Peggy Whitson of NASA, Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency and Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and prime crewmember Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos. Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  18. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) pose for pictures June 30 after Rubins and Onishi, both first-time fliers, planted trees in their names in traditional pre-launch activities. Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmembers Kate Rubins of NASA (left), Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (center) and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (right) pose for pictures June 30 after Rubins and Onishi, both first-time fliers, planted trees in their names in traditional pre-launch activities. Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  19. Postglacial vegetation history of Mitkof Island, Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, Thomas A.; Carrara, Paul E.; Smith, Jane L.; Anne, Victoria; Johnson, Joni

    2010-03-01

    An AMS radiocarbon-dated pollen record from a peat deposit on Mitkof Island, southeastern Alaska provides a vegetation history spanning ˜12,900 cal yr BP to the present. Late Wisconsin glaciers covered the entire island; deglaciation occurred > 15,400 cal yr BP. The earliest known vegetation to develop on the island (˜12,900 cal yr BP) was pine woodland ( Pinus contorta) with alder ( Alnus), sedges (Cyperaceae) and ferns (Polypodiaceae type). By ˜12,240 cal yr BP, Sitka spruce ( Picea sitchensis) began to colonize the island while pine woodland declined. By ˜11,200 cal yr BP, mountain hemlock ( Tsuga mertensiana) began to spread across the island. Sitka spruce-mountain hemlock forests dominated the lowland landscapes of the island until ˜10,180 cal yr BP, when western hemlock ( Tsuga heterophylla) began to colonize, and soon became the dominant tree species. Rising percentages of pine, sedge, and sphagnum after ˜7100 cal yr BP may reflect an expansion of peat bog habitats as regional climate began to shift to cooler, wetter conditions. A decline in alders at that time suggests that coastal forests had spread into the island's uplands, replacing large areas of alder thickets. Cedars ( Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Thuja plicata) appeared on Mitkof Island during the late Holocene.

  20. The big ideas of Edgar Alexander Pask (1912-66).

    PubMed

    Conacher, I D

    2010-02-01

    Edgar Pask worked before, during and after World War II with the anaesthetist Robert Macintosh. Both were ranking officers and engaged in work with the Royal Air Force Physiological Laboratories at Farnborough, then in the charge of Dr Bryan Matthews. Pask submitted as a Doctorate Thesis a compilation of much of the experimental work in which he was the main subject, most of the data being acquired while he was unconscious. Experiments in which the Farnborough Team were engaged form a central core to the Thesis and relate to the development of life jackets. The information is well known and has been widely publicized, along with most of the biography of Pask. However, some extreme physiological experiments, again with Pask as the test subject and which probably were not conducted at Farnborough, are less well known but in their own way even more extraordinary. The theme in common is Pask's ideas to use the anaesthetized state and the properties of anaesthetic agents as surrogates to the extreme situations Royal Air Force pilots were subject to in modern warfare. There is no purpose to detract from Pask's ideas and selfless heroism by digressions into parallel processes conducted by the opposing Oberkommando der Luftwaffe (OKL) research establishments, but it is evident these were known and had shocked the Farnborough Team (including Pask) before revelation at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials.

  1. The polonium-210 poisoning of Mr Alexander Litvinenko.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John; Fell, Tim; Leggett, Rich; Lloyd, David; Puncher, Matthew; Youngman, Mike

    2017-03-20

    Mr Litvinenko died on 23 November 2006 after having been poisoned with polonium-210 on 1 November. Measurements of the polonium-210 content of post-mortem tissue samples and samples of urine and blood showed the presence of large amounts of (210)Po. Autoradiography of hair samples showed two regions of (210)Po activity, providing evidence of an earlier poisoning attempt during October 2006, resulting in absorption to blood of about one-hundredth of that estimated for 1 November. Intake by ingestion on 1 November was estimated to be around 4 GBq, assuming 10% absorption to blood, and the resulting organ doses reached estimated values that were generally in a range from about 20 Gy to over 100 Gy. Comparison with estimates of protracted alpha particle doses required to cause irreversible organ damage supported the conclusion that death was the inevitable consequence of multiple organ failure, with destruction of the haemopoietic bone marrow, as well as damage to kidneys and liver, being important contributors. If the earlier poisoning during October 2006 had not been followed by a second major intake on 1 November, it is possible that the earlier intake of around 40 MBq, with absorption of 4 MBq to blood, might have caused irreversible kidney damage over a prolonged period of months or years, with doses of approaching 3 Gy.

  2. [Alexander Pushkin's duel--biographic and medical aspects].

    PubMed

    Tangen, J M

    2000-04-10

    The great Russian poet Aleksandr Pushkin (1799-1837) died 46 hours after being wounded by a pistol shot in a duel. The bullet penetrated the right pelvic bone, continued through the lower abdomen, and crushed the right part of the sacral bone. Biographical events leading to the duel are presented in the article, which also reviews articles in Russian medical journals describing the extent of the trauma and discussing the treatment possibilities at the time of the duel as well as present-day treatment. It is concluded that death was caused by peritonitis and that only modern extensive abdominal and orthopaedic surgery combined with antibiotic treatment could have saved the poet's life.

  3. A Measurement of "g" Using Alexander's Diving Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroga, M.; Martinez, S.; Otranto, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a very simple exercise using an inverted test tube pushed straight down into a column of water to determine the free-fall acceleration "g". The exercise employs the ideal gas law and only involves the measurement of the displacement of the bottom of the "diving bell" and the water level inside the tube with respect to the…

  4. Review Symposium of Alexander Astin's "Four Critical Years."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, J. Bruce; And Others

    1978-01-01

    (NOTE: See HE 512 216 for journal name change information.) The findings, methodology, and policy implications presented in Astin's longitudinal study of college students, are reviewed by four higher education scholars. These include J. Bruce Francis, Gerald Gurin, Arthur W. Chickering, and G. Lester Anderson. (SF)

  5. Bioanalysis young investigator: Alexander Medina-Remón.

    PubMed

    Medina-Remón, Alexander; Raventós, Rosa Maria Lamuela

    2011-07-01

    Supervisor's supporting comments Alex Medina joined my research group, Natural Antioxidants, in January 2006 to start his PhD program. He has been working intensively and efficiently on several projects; initially for his thesis he developed a new bioanalytical methodology to quantify phenols in urine (Medina-Remón A et al. 2009) to correlate with the hypertension prevention in the PREDIMED study ( www.predimed.org ). Thanks to this new bioanalytical method, we are currently starting collaboration projects with different research centers. In addition, he has been working on other research projects on tomatoes, grapes, citric fruits and wine. Medina is helpful whenever needed and efficient. He has shown himself to be responsible, well-prepared, intelligent, organized and to have very good teaching skills. Moreover, he is patient and able to solve problems calmly, but at the same time, he is enthusiastic about what he does and can transmit this enthusiasm to his colleagues. He is really a thoughtful scientist. I have now contracted him as a Postdoctoral researcher. His responsibilities include leading several master's students and he is writing several papers on the health effects of polyphenols using his method.

  6. The polonium-210 poisoning of Mr Alexander Litvinenko

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, John; Fell, Tim; Leggett, Rich; ...

    2017-02-28

    Mr Litvinenko died on 23rd November 2006 after having been poisoned with polonium-210 on 1st November. Measurements of the polonium-210 content of post-mortem tissue samples and samples of urine and blood showed the presence of large amounts of 210Po. Furthermore, autoradiography of hair samples showed two regions of 210Po activity, providing evidence of an earlier poisoning attempt during October 2006, resulting in absorption to blood of about one-hundredth of that estimated for 1st November. Intake by ingestion on 1st November was estimated to be around 4 GBq, assuming 10% absorption to blood, and the resulting organ doses reached estimatedmore » values that were generally in a range from about 20 Gy to over 100 Gy. In comparison with estimates of protracted alpha particle the doses required to cause irreversible organ damage support the conclusion that death was the inevitable consequence of multiple organ failure, with destruction of the haemopoietic bone marrow, as well as damage to kidneys and liver, being important contributors. If the earlier poisoning during October 2006 had not been followed by a second major intake on 1st November, it is possible that the earlier intake of around 40 MBq, with absorption of 4 MBq to blood, might have proved fatal over a prolonged period of months or years, primarily as a result of kidney damage following a dose of approaching 3 Gy.« less

  7. A Measurement of "g" Using Alexander's Diving Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroga, M.; Martinez, S.; Otranto, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a very simple exercise using an inverted test tube pushed straight down into a column of water to determine the free-fall acceleration "g". The exercise employs the ideal gas law and only involves the measurement of the displacement of the bottom of the "diving bell" and the water level inside the tube with respect to the…

  8. Postglacial vegetation history of Mitkof Island, Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, T.A.; Carrara, P.E.; Smith, Jody L.; Anne, V.; Johnson, J.

    2010-01-01

    An AMS radiocarbon-dated pollen record from a peat deposit on Mitkof Island, southeastern Alaska provides a vegetation history spanning ???12,900??cal yr BP to the present. Late Wisconsin glaciers covered the entire island; deglaciation occurred > 15,400??cal yr BP. The earliest known vegetation to develop on the island (???12,900??cal yr BP) was pine woodland (Pinus contorta) with alder (Alnus), sedges (Cyperaceae) and ferns (Polypodiaceae type). By ???12,240??cal yr BP, Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) began to colonize the island while pine woodland declined. By ???11,200??cal yr BP, mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) began to spread across the island. Sitka spruce-mountain hemlock forests dominated the lowland landscapes of the island until ???10,180??cal yr BP, when western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) began to colonize, and soon became the dominant tree species. Rising percentages of pine, sedge, and sphagnum after ???7100??cal yr BP may reflect an expansion of peat bog habitats as regional climate began to shift to cooler, wetter conditions. A decline in alders at that time suggests that coastal forests had spread into the island's uplands, replacing large areas of alder thickets. Cedars (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Thuja plicata) appeared on Mitkof Island during the late Holocene.

  9. Symbiotic Situation. Brown County, Aberdeen, and Alexander Mitchell Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, David

    Utilizing 1970 census data and updates plus local data and library records, the study seeks to assess the current status of public library usage in and around Aberdeen, South Dakota. A demographic profile of the community as a whole was first constructed and then compared with similar data for known public library users. Information was also…

  10. John Alexander Sinton, MD FRS VC (1884-1956).

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2016-05-01

    Brigadier John Sinton is the only individual in history to have been both awarded the Victoria Cross and also elected to the Royal Society. He qualified at Belfast and afterwards joined the Indian Medical Service (IMS). Serving before and during the Great War (1914-18), he was first posted to the North-West Frontier province, and afterwards as a captain in the Indian Expeditionary force in Mesopotamia (now Iraq). It was there in 1916 that, shot in both arms during an engagement and under heavy gunfire, he remained steadfastly at his post; for this bravery he received the Victoria Cross. Following the war he carried out major researches into malaria in India, and became Director of the Malaria Survey of India Both there and shortly afterwards, Sinton published about 200 papers on various aspects of malaria and leishmaniasis. In England, he later worked at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health's laboratory at Horton, Epsom. In 1946, he was elected to the Royal Society for his researches into malaria and kala-azar, and following retirement he underwent another distinguished career in Northern Ireland. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Alexander Nikolaevich Scriabin (1872-1915): Enlightenment or illness?

    PubMed

    Witztum, Eliezer; Lerner, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The similarity between psychotic symptoms and aspects of mystical experiences is well known. It has long been recognized that there are similarities between mystical and spiritual and psychotic experiences. The content of an experience alone usually does not determine whether an individual is psychotic. The Russian composer Scriabin (1872-1915) was among the most famous artists of his time. Scriabin infused his music with mysticism, evolving a modernistic idiom through which he created a musical counterpart to the Symbolist literature of that period. In this paper, we discuss the question that arises from perusing Scriabin's life is whether the composer was a mystic genius or whether he suffered from affective psychopathology with psychotic features. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Learning to See the Ball Using the Alexander Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Gaynelle

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a personal anecdote from the author, for whom childhood P.E. classes were exercises in frustration and humiliation largely because she could not master the coordination needed to catch, throw, or hit a ball. She could not keep her eye on the ball despite well-meaning instruction from coaches, friends, and family members.…

  13. Alexander Hollaender distinguished postdoctoral fellowship program: Program description

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The fellowship awards are intended to reflect and continue this tradition of nurturing the development of scientific leadership in investigators of outstanding promise. Those selected will have the opportunity to pursue their research interests at one of the National Laboratories.

  14. At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (second from the right) helps to plant a tree in his name in traditional pre-launch activities June 30 with the assistance of prime crewmates Kate Rubins of NASA (far right) and Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (left with water bucket). Looking on are backup crewmembers Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency (standing, left), Peggy Whitson of NASA (standing, center) and Oleg Novitskiy (partially obscured, right). Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Alexander Vysotsky.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    At the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 48-49 crewmember Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (second from the right) helps to plant a tree in his name in traditional pre-launch activities June 30 with the assistance of prime crewmates Kate Rubins of NASA (far right) and Anatoly Ivanishin of Roscosmos (left with water bucket). Looking on are backup crewmembers Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency (standing, left), Peggy Whitson of NASA (standing, center) and Oleg Novitskiy (partially obscured, right). Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch July 7, Baikonur time, on the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft for a planned four-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Alexander Vysotsky

  15. A Darwinian mystery: fluctuations in runoff from the la Plata basin (Alexander von Humboldt Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R. T.

    2012-04-01

    During the voyage of HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin sailed in a small boat along the River Paraná, a major tributary of the la Plata drainage system. He wrote about the occurrence of severe droughts (the latest of which had been termed the "gran seco") alternating with periods of severe flooding. From reports received, he concluded that these events appeared to be cyclic with a period "of about fifteen years". Because extended periods of low flow in Brazilian rivers are of immense economic importance, the presentation describes a search for the material which led Darwin to this conclusion. A prolonged period of low flow in another la Plata tributary - the River Paraguay - not unlike the "gran seco" reported by Darwin, has occurred more recently; if such low flows were to recur in the future, the consequences would be severe for a region where more than 70% of energy is supplied by hydropower. A priori considerations suggest the use of statistical long-memory models for predicting River Paraguay water-levels, and some preliminary results from their use are presented.

  16. Measuring the World: How theory follows observation (Alexander von Humboldt Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2015-04-01

    I started my professional career as a hydrologist working for the government of Mozambique. I was responsible for overseeing the hydrological network, the operational hydrology and answering specific questions related to water resources availability and the occurrence of floods. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the use of telecommunication and computers was still very limited. We had to work with handbooks, lecture notes and consultancy reports, but mostly with our brains. The key to answering a specific question was to go into the field and observe. We measured as much as we could to understand the processes that we observed. I didn't know it at the time, but this perfectly fits in the tradition of Von Humboldt. During my time in Mozambique I surveyed during and after extreme floods, such as the 1984 flood caused by the tropical cyclone Demoina. I surveyed the geometry, hydraulics and salt intrusion of 4 major Mozambican estuaries. And I measured the quality and the quantity of the flows draining onto these estuaries. Having only limited access to the literature, it was a survey without much theoretical guidance. This maybe slowed us down a bit, and sometimes led to inefficient approaches, but scientifically it was a gold mine. Not being biased by established theories is a great advantage. One does not follow onto the well-trodden, but sometimes erroneous, paths of others. After working for 6 years in Mozambique I joined an international consultant, for whom I worked for 6 years in many different countries in Asia, Africa and South America. Although the access to literature and other people's experience was better, I continued the practice of observing before believing. These 12 years of doing hydrology in practice formed the basis for the development of my own theories on hydrological processes, salt intrusion in estuaries, tidal hydraulics and even atmospheric moisture recycling. So when I started on my PhD at the age of 38, I made a completely different start from what has become normal nowadays. It was the first time I really had the opportunity to study the literature and to confront my own theory with the work of others. How different is this from how we guide our PhD students today. In my Von Humboldt lecture I shall give examples of how field observation was crucial in developing new insights and new theories. I shall present highlights of my theories on: salt intrusion and tidal dynamics in estuaries; atmospheric moisture recycling; landscape based hydrological modeling; and the sizing of root zone storage capacity. I shall emphasise the use of analytical approaches and of the need to develop hypotheses and conceptual models based on field experience, observations and perceptions of how nature works.

  17. Collateral contamination concomitant to the polonium-210 poisoning of Mr Alexander Litvinenko.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John; Smith, Tracy; Fell, Tim; Smith, Jenny; Ham, George; Haylock, Richard; Hodgson, Alan; Etherington, George

    2017-07-20

    Mr Litvinenko died on 23 November 2006, having been poisoned with polonium-210 on 1 November, with evidence of a previous poisoning attempt during October 2006. Measurements of (210)Po in urine samples were made for a large number of people to determine whether they may have been contaminated. In the majority of cases, measured levels were attributable to the presence of (210)Po from normal dietary sources. For a small number of cases, elevated levels provided evidence of direct contamination associated with the poisonings. For one individual, while estimated doses were below thresholds for irreversible organ damage, a notably increased risk of cancer can be inferred. The use of the chelating agent, unithiol, to increase (210)Po excretion in this case was only moderately effective in reducing doses received.

  18. Alexander Disease and Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts: Leukodystrophies Arising from Astrocyte Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, J. Rafael; Maletkovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Disorders of white matter are some of the most commonly encountered conditions in the practice of child neurology. For a child presenting with evidence of neurological impairment, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is usually performed and often proves informative in suggesting the diagnosis. Traditionally, primary white matter…

  19. Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language Knowledge Center Menu Learn Ages & Stages of Language Development Hearing Loss Explained Next Steps for Your Child Assistive Technology Language Development Resources Glossary of Terms Bookstore Connect Join Our ...

  20. Portraits in medical biography: Alexander Pope (1688-1744), poet, patient, celebrity.

    PubMed

    James, Douglas

    2013-11-01

    Portraits are underused in the medical biographies of patients, yet they can illuminate health concerns and even health itself in many ways. Tying portraiture and medicine together analytically yields many insights into Pope's medical biography - from his response to satirical ridicule to his friends' concern for his health - without abandoning his portraits as works of 'art'.

  1. Nothing is Simple in Afghanistan: The Principles of Sustainment and Logistics in Alexander’s Shadow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Persia, along the Helmand River, through Herat, Kandahar, and Kabul before crossing the Hindu Kush mountain range with approximately 100,000 troops...highlands and mountainous northeast stand in dramatic contrast with its desert climate in the southwest. While the dry southwest may experi- ence just two...inches of precipitation annually, the northeast mountains average 39.06 inches, of which much of that is snowfall.9 The Hindu Kush and its

  2. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  3. Topology simplification: Important biological phenomenon or evolutionary relic?. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Andrew D.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    The review, Disentangling DNA molecules[1], gives an excellent technical description of the phenomenon of topology simplification (TS) by type IIA DNA topoisomerases (topos). In the 20 years since its discovery [2], this effect has attracted a good deal of attention, probably because of its apparently magical nature, and because it seemed to offer a solution to the conundrum that all type II topos rely on ATP hydrolysis, but only bacterial DNA gyrases were known to transduce the free energy of hydrolysis into torsion (supercoiling) in the DNA. It made good sense to think that the other enzymes are using the energy to reduce the level of supercoiling, knotting, and particularly decatenation (unlinking), below equilibrium, since the key activity of the non-supercoiling topos is the removal of links between daughter chromosomes [3]. As Vologodskii discusses [1], there have been a number of theoretical models developed to explain how the local effect of a type II topo can influence the global level of knotting and catenation in large DNA molecules, and he explains how features of two of the most successful models (bent G segment and hooked juxtapositions) may be combined to explain the magnitude of the effect and overcome a kinetic problem with the hooked juxtaposition model.

  4. Mechanisms of DNA disentangling by type II topoisomerases. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this article [1] Dr. Vologodskii presents a comprehensive discussion on the mechanisms by which the type II topoisomerases unknot/disentangle DNA molecules. It is motivated by a mysterious capability of the nanometer-size enzymes to keep the steady-state probability of DNA entanglement/knot almost two orders of magnitude below that expected from thermal equilibrium [2-5]. In spite of obvious functional advantages of the enzymes, it raises a question regarding how such high efficiency could be achieved. The off-equilibrium steady state distribution of DNA topology is powered by ATP consumption. However, it remains unclear how this energy is utilized to bias the distribution toward disentangled/unknotted topological states of DNA.

  5. On Some Mile-Stones in Scientific Life of Professor Alexander N. Guz*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushchitsky, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    This article is prepared on the occasion of awarding Professor A.N. Guz the ICCES Lifetime Achievement Medal and was read as a lecture at the International Conference on Computational and Experimental Engineering and Sciences (ICCES-12), Greece, Crete, April 30-May 4, 2012. Four important mile-stones in the scientific life of A. N. Guz are shown and discussed: defense of doctor of sciences dissertation, forming of new scientific areas and scientific school, directorship at the S. P. Timoshenko Institute of Mechanics, preparation of many monographs, which can be classified as the first ones in the world's scientific literature

  6. Alexander P. Stewart and the Tactical Employment of His Division at the Battle of Chickamauga

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-02

    introduction of the "minie- ball ". The minie- ball was a cone shaped hollow based bullet that allowed ease of loading and expanded into the riflinq when fired...It was the unique combination of percussion cap, rifling, and minie- ball that made for an extremely accurate. reliable, and deadly weapon. It could...next major action for Stewart and his brigade. Polk’s Corps was arayed in two successive lines of battle, with Stewart’s Brigade in the second line

  7. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  8. 77 FR 35028 - Bill Alexander, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... individuals who were addicted to pain medication without `` `bogging down other clinics asking for pain pills... clinics were good because they served individuals who were addicted to pain medication without...

  9. The Warrior Who Would Rule Russia: A Profile of Alexander Lebed.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    capital of the self- proclaimed Russian republic, that the latter were forced to retreat. That action cast Lebed as a wildcat who refused to be bound by...culprits, he maintains that these ravages severely damaged the coun- try’s " genetic pool" and that much more of such stress can cause the country...seems to bear out James Billington’s view that Americans need not reflexively assume that the Russians "have some genetic predisposition to produce

  10. Alexander Meets Michotte: A Simulation Tool Based on Pattern Programming and Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basawapatna, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Simulation and modeling activities, a key point of computational thinking, are currently not being integrated into the science classroom. This paper describes a new visual programming tool entitled the Simulation Creation Toolkit. The Simulation Creation Toolkit is a high level pattern-based phenomenological approach to bringing rapid simulation…

  11. Alexander v. Gardner-Denver: A Threat to Title VII Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Richard F.

    1975-01-01

    An examination of the decision on the rights of an employee, who has unsuccessfully pursued a race or sex discrimination claim through arbitration, to "relitigate" the claim under Title VII, Civil Rights Act of 1964. Conclusion: the decision endangers Title VII rights by granting too much weight to prior arbitration awards. (JT)

  12. Russian Advanced Course: Glossary to Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Novel "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This glossary is intended to assist students seeking to broaden their knowledge of Russian as it is currently spoken. The lexical items, largely consisting of idioms and colloquialisms, are listed with English translations, in the order of their appearance in the text and grouped to correspond to each individual page of the book. The novel is…

  13. The Integration of Cambridge: Alexander Crummell as Undergraduate, 1849-1853

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockton, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    "When Crummell went up to Queens' College in 1849, the university had never received so conspicuous a figure. He was almost twice the age of his fellow undergraduates... He had been a popular lecturer to vast audiences throughout Great Britain. He was the author of a well-received publication. He was an American. He was a priest. And most…

  14. Immature stages and larval chaetotaxy of Notofairchildia stenygros (Quate & Alexander) (Diptera: Psychodidae: Bruchomyiinae).

    PubMed

    Alencar, Ronildo Baiatone; Barrett, Toby Vincent; Scarpassa, Vera Margarete

    2016-09-21

    Some authors have hypothesized that Bruchomyiinae is "the most plesiomorphic subfamily of Psychodidae" and its members "are among the most primitive living Diptera". Although Bruchomyiinae is of no medical importance, it is of great evolutionary significance, having long been placed as the sister group of Phlebotominae. In general, species of this subfamily are rarely collected in their natural environment; therefore, adults and, even more so, the immature stages of these flies are poorly known. We describe the egg, larvae and pupae of Notofairchildia stenygros and provide nomenclatural notes on larval chaetotaxy based on analyses using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optic microscopy. The morphology of immature Nt. stenygros is compared with other Bruchomyiinae and Psychodidae species, especially with species of Phlebotominae that are superficially similar to Bruchomyiinae. Results of this study revealed striking morphological differences between the immature stages of Bruchomyiinae and Phlebotominae; the former are lacking abdominal pseudopods and microtrichia on the cephalic integument, both of which are present in the larvae of Phlebotominae. These morphological differences observed in the immature stages between members of the two subfamilies support the findings of recent molecular studies indicating that Bruchomyiinae and Phlebtominae are evolutionarily not closely related. Notofairchildia stenygros is now the fourth species of Bruchomyiinae for which the immature stages are described.

  15. Vortex modeling for rotor aerodynamics - The 1991 Alexander A. Nikolsky Lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robin B.

    1992-01-01

    The efforts toward realistic vortex modeling for rotary wings which began under the guidance of professor A. A. Nikolsky of Princeton University in 1955-1956 are discussed. Attention is given to Nikolsky's flow-visualization studies and major theoretical considerations for vortex modeling. More recent efforts by other researchers have led to models of increasing complexity. The neglect of compressibility and viscous effects in the classical approach is noted to be a major limiting factor in full-scale rotor applications of the classical vortex theory; it has nevertheless been valuable for the delineation of problem areas and the guiding of both experimental and theoretical investigations.

  16. 78 FR 30791 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Rutherford, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone: (816) 329-4165; fax: (816) 329-4090; email: jim.rutherford@faa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY... Rutherford, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Small Airplane Directorate, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City,...

  17. Alexander Meets Michotte: A Simulation Tool Based on Pattern Programming and Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basawapatna, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Simulation and modeling activities, a key point of computational thinking, are currently not being integrated into the science classroom. This paper describes a new visual programming tool entitled the Simulation Creation Toolkit. The Simulation Creation Toolkit is a high level pattern-based phenomenological approach to bringing rapid simulation…

  18. Alexander Disease and Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts: Leukodystrophies Arising from Astrocyte Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, J. Rafael; Maletkovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Disorders of white matter are some of the most commonly encountered conditions in the practice of child neurology. For a child presenting with evidence of neurological impairment, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is usually performed and often proves informative in suggesting the diagnosis. Traditionally, primary white matter…

  19. Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change: Quantification of Uncertainties (Alexander von Humboldt Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujumdar, Pradeep P.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change results in regional hydrologic change. The three prominent signals of global climate change, viz., increase in global average temperatures, rise in sea levels and change in precipitation patterns convert into signals of regional hydrologic change in terms of modifications in water availability, evaporative water demand, hydrologic extremes of floods and droughts, water quality, salinity intrusion in coastal aquifers, groundwater recharge and other related phenomena. A major research focus in hydrologic sciences in recent years has been assessment of impacts of climate change at regional scales. An important research issue addressed in this context deals with responses of water fluxes on a catchment scale to the global climatic change. A commonly adopted methodology for assessing the regional hydrologic impacts of climate change is to use the climate projections provided by the General Circulation Models (GCMs) for specified emission scenarios in conjunction with the process-based hydrologic models to generate the corresponding hydrologic projections. The scaling problem arising because of the large spatial scales at which the GCMs operate compared to those required in distributed hydrologic models, and their inability to satisfactorily simulate the variables of interest to hydrology are addressed by downscaling the GCM simulations to hydrologic scales. Projections obtained with this procedure are burdened with a large uncertainty introduced by the choice of GCMs and emission scenarios, small samples of historical data against which the models are calibrated, downscaling methods used and other sources. Development of methodologies to quantify and reduce such uncertainties is a current area of research in hydrology. In this presentation, an overview of recent research carried out by the author's group on assessment of hydrologic impacts of climate change addressing scale issues and quantification of uncertainties is provided. Methodologies developed with conditional random fields, Dempster-Shafer theory, possibility theory, imprecise probabilities and non-stationary extreme value theory are discussed. Specific applications on uncertainty quantification in impacts on streamflows, evaporative water demands, river water quality and urban flooding are presented. A brief discussion on detection and attribution of hydrologic change at river basin scales, contribution of landuse change and likely alterations in return levels of hydrologic extremes is also provided.

  20. When Maxwellian demon meets action at a distance. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybenkov, Valentin V.

    2016-09-01

    The ability of living systems to defy thermodynamics without explicitly violating it is a continued source of inspiration to many biophysicists. The story of type-2 DNA topoisomerases is a beautiful example from that book. DNA topoisomerases catalyze a concerted DNA cleavage-religation reaction, which is interjected by a strand passage event. This sequence of events results in a seemingly unhindered transfer of one piece of DNA through another upon their random collision. An obvious consequence of such transfer is a change in the topological state of the colliding DNAs; hence the name of the enzymes, topoisomerases. There are several classes of topoisomerases, which differ in how they capture the cleaved and transported DNA segments (which are often referred to as the gate and transfer segments; or the G- and T-segments, to be short). Type-2 topoisomerases have two cleavage-religation centers. They open a gate in double stranded DNA and transfer another piece of double stranded DNA through it [1]. And in doing so, they manage to collect information about the rest of the DNA and perform strand passage in a directional manner so as to take the molecule away from the thermodynamic equilibrium [2].

  1. The controversy between Alexander Friedmann and Albert Einstein about the possibility of a non-static world (German Title: Die Kontroverse zwischen Alexander Friedmann und Albert Einstein um die Möglichkeit einer nichtstatischen Welt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Georg

    Einstein's treatment of the cosmological problem as well as his unshakeable adherence to his own static solution of the complete field equations was throughout determined by Ernst Mach's idea of relativity of inertia. Friedmann, however, like Eddington, Weyl and others did not consider Mach's principle to be a part of general relativity, and so he regarded a time dependent developing spatial geometry as being consistent with world matter at relative rest. In his final statement to the controversy, Einstein acknowledged just formal correctness of Friedmann's results. Actually his criticism was not due ``to a miscalculation'', as he was ready to admit, but was owed to a fundamental fixed idea which continued to exist and which was the cause of his disavowal of physical significance of dynamical solutions.

  2. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  3. Is research on soil erosion hazard and mitigation in the Global South still needed? (Alexander von Humbold Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion represents a geomorphological and geological hazard that may cause environmental damage (land degradation), property damage, loss of livelihoods and services as well as social and economic disruption. Erosion not only lowers the quality of our soils on site, resulting in a drastic reduction of their ecosystem functions that play a vital role in daily life, but causes also significant sediment-related problems off site. To curb soil erosion problems, a range of soil conservation techniques and strategies have been designed and are being applied. Worldwide, ca. 62 000 research papers on soil erosion and 116 000 on soil conservation have been published (Web of Science, Dec. 2015). The number of such papers dealing with the Global South represents less than 20 % of all papers, despite the fact that many regions in this part of the world face significant soil erosion problems, aggravated by a rapidly growing population and major environmental changes. Given the large number of research papers on this topic, one might therefore conclude that we now know almost everything about the various soil erosion processes and rates, their factors and consequences as well as their control so that little new knowledge can still be added to the vast amount of available information. We refute this conclusion by pointing to some major research gaps that still need to be addressed if we want to use our soils in a more sustainable way. More specifically the following topics need more research attention: 1) improved understanding of both natural and anthropogenic soil erosion processes and their interactions, 2) scaling up soil erosion processes and rates in space and time, and 3) innovative techniques and strategies to prevent or reduce erosion rates. This will be illustrated with case studies from the Global South. If future research focuses on these research gaps, we will 1) better understand processes and their interactions operating at a range of spatial and temporal scales, their rates as well as their on-site and off-site impacts, which is crucial for better targeting erosion control measures and which is academically spoken rewarding, and 2) we will also be in a better position to select the most appropriate and effective soil erosion control techniques and strategies which are badly needed for a sustainable use of our soils in the Anthropocene and for the improvement of environmental conditions worldwide.

  4. Evaluation of nutrient quality-assurance data for Alexanders and Mount Rock Spring basins, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, E. C.; Hippe, D.J.; Giovannitti, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 304 nutrient samples were collected from May 1990 through September 1991 to determine concentrations and loads of nutrients in water discharged from two spring basins in Cumberland County, Pa. Fifty-four percent of these nutrient samples were for the evaluation of (1) laboratory consistency, (2) container and preservative cleanliness, (3) maintenance of analyte representativeness as affected by three different preservation methods, and (4) comparison of analyte results with the "Most Probable Value" for Standard Reference Water Samples. Results of 37 duplicate analyses indicate that the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Laboratories (principal laboratory) remained within its ±10 percent goal for all but one analyte. Results of the blank analysis show that the sampling containers did not compromise the water quality. However, mercuric-chloride-preservation blanks apparently contained measurable ammonium in four of five samples and ammonium plus organic nitrogen in two of five samples. Interlaboratory results indicate substantial differences in the determination of nitrate and ammonium plus organic nitrogen between the principal laboratory and the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Laboratory. In comparison with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Quality-Control Samples, the principal laboratory was sufficiently accurate in its determination of nutrient anafytes. Analysis of replicate samples indicated that sulfuric-acid preservative best maintained the representativeness of the anafytes nitrate and ammonium plus organic nitrogen, whereas, mercuric chloride best maintained the representativeness of orthophosphate. Comparison of nutrient analyte determinations with the Most Probable Value for each preservation method shows that two of five analytes with no chemical preservative compare well, three of five with mercuric-chloride preservative compare well, and three of five with sulfuricacid preservative compare well.

  5. Importance of disentanglement and entanglement during DNA replication and segregation. Comment on: "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, David; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    In the Vologodskii review[19], the accompanying comments, and many other publications, there has been considerable effort to analyze the actions of type II topoisomerases, especially with regard to "topological simplification" [4]. Whereas these efforts could be characterized as a battle of the models, with each research team arguing for their version of how it might work, each specific kinetic concept adds important considerations to the fundamental question of how these enzymes function. The basic tenet, however, of what is called the "hooked juxtaposition model [1]," is not a modeling aspect, but is simply a geometric mathematical fact.

  6. In silico, in vitro and in vivo imageries of type II topoisomerases. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    In this review Vologodskii describes how he and his coworkers had ascertained by computer simulation that bending the G-segment alike a hairpin would provide type-IIA topoisomerases the striking ability of simplifying equilibrium DNA topology [1,2]. Remarkably, this in silico model found strong support few years later, when crystals of topo-DNA complexes evidenced a G-segment bend [3]. However, bending angles measured in the crystals and by AFM and FRET techniques were not as sharp as predicted by the ;hairpin model;. Moreover, bending angles did not correlate with the simplification capacity of several type-IIA enzymes [4,5]. The relevance of G-segment bending became more dubious when mutations that reduced G-segment bending did not show the expected effects in the simplification activity [6]; and when type-IIB topoisomerases that lack simplification activity were found to bend the G-segment to similar degree that type-IIA [5]. Therefore, as Vologodskii states here, the bending model falls short in explaining the experimental findings, suggesting that there is something else there what we do not know yet.

  7. Alexander Pope and the Comma Splice, or, Contradictions and Problems in College Composition--An Administrator's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bataille, Robert R.

    The training of doctoral candidates in English often does not match the kind of teaching they must do upon taking their first jobs: namely, training is in literature, while most jobs are available in composition. Even when acceptable composition teachers are found, keeping them in the face of budgetary restraints and declining enrollments is…

  8. Eponymous doctors associated with Edinburgh, Part 2--David Bruce, John Cheyne, William Stokes, Alexander Monro Secundus, Joseph Gamgee.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2006-12-01

    This, the second in a three-paper series with this title, looks at famous doctors who trained in Edinburgh and their eponyms. With one possible exception, none seems to have sought the eponym, nor awarded it to themselves, nor used it for self-promotion. Unlike those in the first paper, all eponyms in this paper are still in use and their brevity is in contrast to the lengthy description needed if the eponym is not used. Examples are Cheyne-Stokes respiration, Stokes-Adam attacks, Brucellosis and Gamgee dressing. Monro Secundus is included because of his vehement defence of his professional reputation and research findings when he suspected others of trying to detract credit from him, a characteristic seldom reported for the others.

  9. All Prime Contract Awards by State or Country, Place and Contractor. Part 1. (Alexander City, Alabama-Sevier, Arkansas)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    21- -" -) e 0 -4 3- SH2I Cato a’ -0000000 .00 AID0 .0 -40 0 24 0 N>.I N 0 HS -4 1 (0N Ho Z0.000-fnl 00 0 2 =-4 Cl0 ILJO Ir w " to 0 o H E 1 (0- Hf...I ~ ~ ~ OC NN N01--.41 4.ICI4 40C*tC0N(4N 4000-44 qqon -414 It 4N H16 Ir 0 -N0. N I 000100000 I4C4M *q 0 -44-4l0 N ()𔃺 -4 cl 00000- V 00N -104C...E 4 4 4 4 0 4 E 44 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 K I to -4 C4 <I ’O (a4 to0) o n oio rin ir 00OO oInoiOar I rOItO 33 3 0-4N< 33.0.-4 MO) M0400444 - .- - q-4 - q

  10. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  11. Liquid Interfaces in Chemistry and Biology (by Alexander G. Volkov, David W. Deamer, Darrell L. Tanelian, Vladislav S. Markin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acree, William E., Jr.

    1998-11-01

    Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1997. x + 491 pp. Bibliography, appendix, index. ISBN 0471-14872-5. $ 95.00. The book represents one of the more comprehensive treatments of liquid-liquid interfacial phenomena. The authors, all of whom are leading scholars in their respective areas of bioelectrochemistry, membrane biophysics, and thermodynamics, have drawn upon their years of experience to write a detailed account of the thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence chemical reactions at and ion transport across liquid surfaces. The text is organized into five main sections with 11 chapters, a bibliography, an appendix containing units, symbols, and important physical constants, and an index. Chapter headings reflect the different aspects of liquid interfaces in chemistry and biology.

  12. Descriptive Case Study of the University of Pennsylvania Partnership with the Penn Alexander School: Understanding Success and Its Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidle, Ann

    2016-01-01

    With more than half of all higher education institutions in the United States located in or near urban areas, higher education institutions are particularly vulnerable to challenges faced today by cities, such as underperforming public schools, poverty, crime, economic disinvestment and residential abandonment in areas that surround their campuses…

  13. Archaeological Survey Within Designated Portions of the Proposed Len Small Floodway in Dogtooth Bend, Alexander County, Illinois

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    tlM.Np M.MNM.aa M .aIIM,p 1 ..p m NEaRm . .N..Mmmmv.v.IN,.W. .MM . . .N ....I .MM.INN MM.. norma Eir _ama mum .M.Y NMmpNmmp.I.1. .N or .M.1 .laM...PY•ANNPNVf ...1•.W1NANV.. PNMNff PP /PN•N/AMAWA NN NW. HAPWWtl f•.R .•N1PW.tl/vxPW1W1W/ ... APA HWWII•NN•• ....A1M.. ••1.AA1.111.1 P _]MiN...Mm• AY .m.MNmmNMM./mtlMM MAWNp AMPAWxNVWOWMmPAMPA x.vvW Niiii .NA1VWWm1•NN: CMN mWMpm /fAMWY maroonsAmur.. MEP AMP. APA ~MWMA/AWtl/MNMu

  14. Vingt ans après (Twenty years after). Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander Y.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of DNA topology simplification by type II topoisomerase enzymes was discovered experimentally by Rybenkov et al. [1] 20 years ago - which motivates me to borrow the title for this comment from Alexandre Dumas [2]. Ever since the original discovery, the effect keeps entertaining theorists - but the most surprising fact is that the original experiment was never repeated, let alone improved. I do not understand why it is so. In my opinion, there is an acute need of new experiments, not only repeating the original measurements, but also examining numerous other aspects of the phenomenon. In this sense, the review [3] by Vologodskii, one of the original discoverers, is both timely and important. In his review, Vologodskii concentrates on what I would call mechanical aspect of the problem - how bent are T- and G-segments, what kinds of juxtaposition are relevant, etc. The importance of these issues notwithstanding, I want to complement this approach, and to consider in greater detail the thermodynamics of the process. My main points are as follows: action of topo II enzyme violates detailed balance for DNA, leading to circular currents and dissipation (which is indeed quite a common occurrence in many living systems). These currents are potentially observable, and dissipation measurable, which should challenge experimenters. The main goal of this comment is to show how general phenomenological point of view allows to formulate theoretical prediction for the energy dissipation rate.

  15. [Two letters to Alexander Numan by J.H. van Opdorp, surgeon at Arnemuiden (Province of Zealand)].

    PubMed

    Oldenkamp, E P; Mathijsen, A H

    2000-01-01

    The periodical, Veeartsenijkundig Magazijn, that Numan had started in 1828 caught the attention of a surgeon in a small town in the neighbourhood of Middelburg. In his two letters he tells about his experiences in animal healing, leaving it to Numan which use he eventually might make of these observations. In the first letter (1829) he tells how he as a ship's doctor was shipwrecked in the Indian Ocean, and after being put ashore on a small island, had successfully performed an operation on an ass, suffering from a very large praeputial tumor. In his second letter (1830) he tells about his practice in Arnemuiden where he settled after leaving the navy. As there were no trained veterinarians in the surroundings, he extended his care also to animals. l.a. he reports on a case of a cow suffering from an enlarged heart, and this item was, indeed, published by Numan. A biographical sketch of Van Opdorp is added. His name is known in the medical history of The Netherlands, because he was the most fervent adherent of the teachings of Broussais, a professor of medicine in Paris. Although these teachings found many followers in the French-speaking countries, the propaganda made by Van Opdorp through a periodical, devoted to this so called physiological medicine, did not meet with success in The Netherlands.

  16. Descriptive Case Study of the University of Pennsylvania Partnership with the Penn Alexander School: Understanding Success and Its Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreidle, Ann

    2016-01-01

    With more than half of all higher education institutions in the United States located in or near urban areas, higher education institutions are particularly vulnerable to challenges faced today by cities, such as underperforming public schools, poverty, crime, economic disinvestment and residential abandonment in areas that surround their campuses…

  17. Duemmler, Kerstin; Nagel, Alexander-Kenneth: governing religious diversity: top-down and bottom-up initiatives in Germany and Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Duemmler, Kerstin; Nagel, Alexander-Kenneth

    2013-06-01

    In recent years religious pluralization has become a significant policy issue in Western societies as a result of a new awareness of religion and of religious minorities articulating themselves and becoming more visible. The article explores the variety of social and political reactions to religious diversity in urban areas and in doing so it brings together theoretical concepts of political and cultural sociology. The notion of diversity governance as joint endeavour of state and societal actors managing societies is linked to the notion of boundary work as interplay of state and/or societal actors maintaining or modifying boundaries between religious traditions. Based on two case studies the article illustrates two idealtypical settings of diversity governance: The first case from the German Ruhr Area stands for a bottom-up approach which is based on civic self-organization of interreligious activities whereas the second case from the Swiss canton of Lucerne exhibits a model of top-down governance based on state interventions in religious instruction at schools. Drawing on semi-structured interviews and participant observation the authors show how different governance settings shape the construction and blurring of boundaries in the religious field. Both approaches operate differently when incorporating religious diversity and rendering former homogenous notions of we-groups more heterogeneous. Despite of the approaches initial aim of inclusion, patterns of exclusion are equally reproduced since the idea of 'legitimate religion' rooted in Christian majority culture is present.

  18. Model of DNA topology simplification has come full (supercoiled) circle after two decades of research. Comment on "Disentangling DNA molecules" by Alexander Vologodskii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiak, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Being a geek of DNA topology, I remember very well the stir caused by 1997 Science paper showing that DNA topoisomerases have the ability to simplify DNA topology below the topological equilibrium values [1]. In their seminal experiments Rybenkov et al. [1] started with linear double-stranded DNA molecules with cohesive ends. The mutual cohesiveness of DNA ends was due to mutual complementarity of single-stranded extensions at both ends of linear double-stranded DNA molecules. When such DNA molecules were heated up and then slowly cooled down the single-stranded ends eventually annealed with each other causing DNA circularization. This experimental protocol permitted the authors to establish topological/thermodynamic equilibrium within samples of circularized DNA molecules. Among simple unknotted circles one also observed knotted and catenated DNA molecules. The fraction of knotted molecules in DNA samples at topological equilibrium was increasing with the length of DNA molecules undergoing slow circularization. The fraction of catenated molecules was increasing with the length and the concentration of the molecules undergoing slow circularization. Rybenkov et al. incubated then such equilibrated DNA samples with type II DNA topoisomerases, which pass DNA duplex regions through each other, and observed that as the result of it the fraction of knotted and catenated DNA molecules was dramatically decreased (up to 80-fold). This elegant experiment indicated for the first time that type II DNA topoisomerases acting on knotted or catenated DNA molecules have the ability to select among many potential sites of DNA-DNA passages these that result in DNA unknotting or decatenation. Without such a selection topoisomerases could only maintain the original topological equilibrium obtained during the slow cyclization. The big question was how DNA topoisomerases can be directed to do DNA-DNA passages that preferentially result in DNA unknotting and decatenation.

  19. Did Alexander Really Ask, "Do I Appear to You to Be a Bastard?": Using Ancient Texts to Improve Pupils' Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Beth; Mastin, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Beth Baker and Steven Mastin make the case for teaching ancient history in the post-14 curriculum. Pointing out the damaging messages that could be conveyed by assuming that ancient history is not worthy of higher-level and demanding study, they also show the opportunities that are missed if pupils do not return to it when they are able to apply…

  20. A new species of Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 crane flies (Diptera: Pediciidae) from north-central Mongolia with first description of the larva for the genus.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija; Gelhaus, Jon

    2014-06-09

    A new species of Pediciidae, Heterangaeus mongolicus is described from specimens collected during the fieldwork of the Mongolian Aquatic Insect Survey Project in north-central Mongolia, Tov Aimag (district). Descriptions and illustrations of the distinguishing morphological features are provided. Habitat information is presented. Female ovipositor and larvae of Heterangaeus are described and illustrated for the first time. This discovery of Heterangaeus in Mongolia represents a 1700 kilometer extension of the known distribution for the genus.

  1. National Dam Safety Program. Alexander Lake Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 936), Susquehanna River Basin, Tioga County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    sasi xwmwv*Aa "a onomwvf -t 4,tLft "S蓸 0 doll?1 wi #m$rooa w WOW I -stm * r &4 gwff t(IU 14640" asa.u a4 . n.vunu .3 NOWc M f IANO V" 4’IV w- domin C...81 L D ANDERSEN DACWSI-81-C-O01D UNCLASSIFIED NL *NNnnnnnlInSIhhhhhIEE BlIIIIIIIIIIIl I IIIIhhhhhhh 111111-0 13 1w 111140 MICROCO~PY R [SOLUION IS...NEW YORK DISTRICT CORPS OF ENGINEERS__J JULY 1981 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELE.’ I DISTR!BUTION UNgM.rED 0 19 82052 St 7 e r (:&. A f 136olf T N1 S ft

  2. Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach - Third edition Alexander Mary Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach - Third edition 625pp Elsevier 9781416064107 1416064109 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2010-11-03

    This book considers all aspects of infusion therapy and provides a solid evidence base. Its 30 chapters are well organised into six sections covering physiological considerations, infusion therapies and nursing practice.

  3. The dynamical behaviour of our planetary system. Proceedings. 4th Alexander von Humboldt Colloquium on Celestial Mechanics, Ramsau (Austria), 17 - 23 Mar 1996.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Henrard, J.

    1996-03-01

    The following topics were dealt with: celestial mechanics, dynamical astronomy, planetary systems, resonance scattering, Hamiltonian mechanics non-integrability, irregular periodic orbits, escape, dynamical system mapping, fast Fourier method, precession-nutation, Nekhoroshev theorem, asteroid dynamics, the Trojan problem, planet-crossing orbits, Kirkwood gaps, future research, human comprehension limitations.

  4. Qualitative and quantitative behaviour of planetary systems; Proceedings of the 3rd Alexander von Humboldt Colloquium on Celestial Mechanics, Ramsau, Austria, Mar. 29-Apr. 4, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Henrard, J.

    1993-06-01

    Topics addressed include planetary theories, the Sitnikov problem, asteroids, resonance, general dynamical systems, and chaos and stability. Particular attention is given to recent progress in the theory and application of symplectic integrators, a computer-aided analysis of the Sitnikov problem, the chaotic behavior of trajectories for the asteroidal resonances, and the resonant motion in the restricted three-body problem. Also discussed are the second order long-period motion of Hyperion, meteorites from the asteroid 6 Hebe, and least squares parameter estimation in chaotic differential equations.

  5. Identifying Unique Ethical Challenges of Indigenous Field-Workers: A Commentary on Alexander and Richman's "Ethical Dilemmas in Evaluations Using Indigenous Research Workers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nick L.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with nonindigenous workers, to what extent do unique ethical problems arise when indigenous field-workers participate in field studies? Three aspects of study design and operation are considered: data integrity issues, risk issues, and protection issues. Although many of the data quality issues that arise with the use of indigenous…

  6. Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At the confluence of Alexander's Bridge Road and Gordon's Slough, southeast of Alexander's Bridge, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  7. 76 FR 5594 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  8. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  9. 76 FR 66361 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... BERNARD STEVEN JACQUES BERTSCHI HANSPETER ANDREA BINER ALFRED ALEXANDER P BIRDWELL NATALIE ] BLANK JASON... KONG SUIT CHO ALEXANDER HAN CHOI SUN YOUNG CHOONG CAROLINE VICTORIA CHOU PATRICK JAMES CHOU TOM CHI... PAIVA JULIA SOUZA DEAN JANET TERESA DEBLESER ALEXANDER DENTON CHRIS EDWARD DEURING ALEXANDER ALBERT...

  10. Shoot winter injury and nut cold tolerance: Possible limitations for American chestnut restoration in cold environments? In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech

    Treesearch

    Thomas M. Saielli; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Joshua M. Halman; Kendra M. Gurney

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 years ago, American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) was rapidly removed as an overstory tree by the fungal pathogen Cryphonectria parasitica (the causal agent of chestnut blight). Currently, the most effective method of restoration involves the hybridization of American chestnut with the...

  11. Adult Education: The Challenge of Change. Report by a Committee of Inquiry Appointed by the Secretary of State for Scotland under the Chairmanship of Professor K.J.W. Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Education Dept., Edinburgh.

    The report examines the present position of adult education in Scotland, its future aims, and how these aims might be achieved. Following a summary of 66 recommendations by the committee, 13 chapters, divided into two sections, present: (1) definitions of terms; (2) an historical review, from the seventeenth century to the present; (3) present…

  12. North & South Elevations and Bridge Plan Chickamauga National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North & South Elevations and Bridge Plan - Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At the confluence of Alexander's Bridge Road and Gordon's Slough, southeast of Alexander's Bridge, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  13. Site Plan and Transverse Section Chickamauga National Military Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site Plan and Transverse Section - Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At the confluence of Alexander's Bridge Road and Gordon's Slough, southeast of Alexander's Bridge, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  14. Constructivism. Clip and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Provides background information on constructivism. Focuses on Alexander Calder and includes teaching activities. Offers a reproduction of Alexander Calder's work "Flamingo," information on Calder's life and career as an artist, and details of the featured sculpture. (CMK)

  15. Community Education: The Making of an Empowering Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Charlie, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Alexander); "Preface" (McConnell); "Editorial Introduction" (McConnell); "People Power" (Gibson); "Community Education within the Context of Reorganisation of Local Government" (Hughes); "The Challenge of Change" (Alexander Report);…

  16. Community Education: The Making of an Empowering Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Charlie, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Alexander); "Preface" (McConnell); "Editorial Introduction" (McConnell); "People Power" (Gibson); "Community Education within the Context of Reorganisation of Local Government" (Hughes); "The Challenge of Change" (Alexander Report);…

  17. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapies for Parkinson's include massage, yoga, tai chi, hypnosis, acupuncture, and the Alexander technique, which optimizes posture ... therapies for Parkinson's include massage, yoga, tai chi, hypnosis, acupuncture, and the Alexander technique, which optimizes posture ...

  18. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Contact Person: Janice B Allen,...

  19. 78 FR 20931 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: May 15, 2013, 8... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  20. 75 FR 49500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: September 2, 2010... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  1. Constructivism. Clip and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Provides background information on constructivism. Focuses on Alexander Calder and includes teaching activities. Offers a reproduction of Alexander Calder's work "Flamingo," information on Calder's life and career as an artist, and details of the featured sculpture. (CMK)

  2. MATRYOSHKA-R. Receiving and preparing of PADLE detectors for return

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-09

    ISS040-E-130021 (9 Sept. 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left), writes a note while Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, looks on in the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station.

  3. K. a. Ter-Martirosyan as i Remember him

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilga, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    Karen Avetovich Ter-Martirosyan was a remarkable physicist, one of the creators of the great ITEP theoretical physics school. He was a teacher of many brilliant theorists. The most known of them are probably three Alexanders: Alexander Polyakov, Alexander Migdal and Alexander Zamolodchikov. He was also one of my teachers and it is an honor and pleasure for me to write these notes...

  4. 78 FR 68151 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... ADAMS LAWRENCE BRUCE AIERS RODGER CHARLES AL RAIS AHMED SALIM ALBRECHT-FENNER SOPHIE VIOLETTE ALEXANDER... RAVI CHILLAK ALEXANDER......... CONNELL CHIN SUNG SUP CHIU JENNIFER WENDY CHOE SUNG JAY CHOI HYUN JIN... AMALIA AMY HONEGGER HEINRICH DAVID HONG HEI-WEON HOOD JAMES ALEXANDER STUART TATE HOOGE...

  5. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany... classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany County X Anson... Forsyth County 11/7/94 Statewide Unclassifiable/Attainment Alamance County Alexander County...

  6. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany... Alexander County X Alleghany County X Anson County X Ashe County X Avery County X Beaufort County X Bertie.../Attainment Alamance County Alexander County Alleghany County Anson County Ashe County Avery County...

  7. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany... classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany County X Anson... Forsyth County 11/7/94 Statewide Unclassifiable/Attainment Alamance County Alexander County...

  8. 76 FR 6146 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander... 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: February 17... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander...

  9. 77 FR 26300 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    .... Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive... 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: June 4... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  10. 76 FR 46823 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: September 2, 2011... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  11. 78 FR 59042 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle...: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709....

  12. 77 FR 3480 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed.... of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Contact Person: Gwen W Collman,...

  13. 77 FR 48164 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. Agenda..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: 2:30 p.m. to 5:00... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC...

  14. 77 FR 9673 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: March 19, 2012, 1:30 p.m. to 5... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC...

  15. Rejoinder to Craig A. Cunningham, David Granger, Jane Fowler Morse, Barbara Stengel, and Terri Wilson, "Dewey, Women, and Weirdoes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Terry

    2010-01-01

    It is good to see Cunningham et al. including F. Matthias Alexander in their list of positive influences in John Dewey's life. However, I believe Cunningham's essay, "Shared explorations of body-mind: the reciprocal influences of Dewey and F.M. Alexander", falls short in its acknowledgement of Alexander and in one important aspect is incorrect. In…

  16. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany... classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany County X Anson... Forsyth County 11/7/94 Statewide Unclassifiable/Attainment Alamance County Alexander County Alleghany...

  17. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany... classified Better than national standards Alamance County X Alexander County X Alleghany County X Anson... Forsyth County 11/7/94 Statewide Unclassifiable/Attainment Alamance County Alexander County Alleghany...

  18. Rejoinder to Craig A. Cunningham, David Granger, Jane Fowler Morse, Barbara Stengel, and Terri Wilson, "Dewey, Women, and Weirdoes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Terry

    2010-01-01

    It is good to see Cunningham et al. including F. Matthias Alexander in their list of positive influences in John Dewey's life. However, I believe Cunningham's essay, "Shared explorations of body-mind: the reciprocal influences of Dewey and F.M. Alexander", falls short in its acknowledgement of Alexander and in one important aspect is incorrect. In…

  19. Antocha crane flies from Taiwan (Diptera: Limoniidae: Limoniinae).

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Young, Chen W

    2015-11-27

    Taiwanese species of the crane fly subgenus Antocha (Antocha) Osten Sacken, 1860, are reviewed. Antocha (Antocha) taiwanensis, new species, is described and figured. Previously known species, Antocha (A.) bifida Alexander, 1924a and Antocha (A.) styx Alexander, 1930 are redescribed and illustrated. Antocha (A.) javanensis Alexander, 1915 is removed from the list of Taiwanese crane flies. Antocha (A.) gracillima Alexander, 1924b and species close to Antocha (A.) streptocera Alexander, 1949 are listed for the first time in Taiwan. Identification key for all Taiwanese Antocha species is given.

  20. Southeastern Alaska tectonostratigraphic terranes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, D.A.; Ford, A.B.

    1985-04-01

    The presence of only three major tectonostratigraphic terranes (TSTs) in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia (Chugach, Wrangell, and Alexander) is indicated by critical analysis of available age, stratigraphic, and structural data. A possible fourth TST (Stikine) is probably an equivalent of part or all of the Alexander. The Yakutat block belongs to the Chugach TST, and both are closely linked to the Wrangell and Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs; the Gravina TST is an overlap assemblage. THe Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs is subdivided on the basis of age and facies. The subterranes within it share common substrates and represent large-scale facies changes in a long-lived island-arc environment. The Taku TSTs is the metamorphic equivalent of the upper part (Permian and Upper Triassic) of the Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs with some fossil evidence preserved that indicates the age of protoliths. Similarly, the Tracy Arm TST is the metamorphic equivalent of (1) the lower (Ordovician to Carboniferous) Alexander TST without any such fossil evidence and (2) the upper (Permian to Triassic) Alexander(-Stikine) with some newly discovered fossil evidence. Evidence for the ages of juxtaposition of the TSTs is limited. The Chugach TST deformed against the Wrangell and Alexander TSTs in late Cretaceous. Gravina rocks were deformed at the time and also earlier. The Wrangell TST was stitched to the Alexander(-Stikine) by middle Cretaceous plutons but may have arrived before its Late Jurassic plutons were emplaced. The Alexander(-Stikine) and Cache Creek TSTs were juxtaposed before Late Triassic.

  1. Limonia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) of Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija

    2017-02-09

    The Korean species of Limonia Meigen, 1803 crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) are taxonomically revised. Species L. annulata Lackschewitz, 1940 (Lackschewitz, Pagast, 1940), L. bidens Savchenko, 1979, L. episema Alexander, 1924, L. fusciceps fusciceps Alexander, 1924, L. juvenca Alexander, 1935, L. messaurea messaurea Mendl, 1971, L. nemoralis Savchenko, 1983 are new records for the Korean peninsula and L. pia n. sp. is described. Synonymy of L. venerabilis Alexander, 1938 with L. macrostigma (Schummel, 1829) is confirmed. L. tanakai (Alexander, 1921) is not confirmed for the Korean Peninsula. An identification key, redescriptions and illustrations of all species and both sexes of adults, if they were found in Korea, are presented. Descriptions, illustrations and habitat characteristics are given for the previously unknown larva and pupa of L. parvipennis Alexander, 1940. Distinguishing morphological characters of the last instar larvae of Korean Limonia are discussed. Keys to the known Korean Limonia larvae and pupae are compiled.

  2. Gait Dynamics and Locomotor Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    pulses are feasible. 21 References 1. Alexander RM. Estimates of speeds of dinosaurs . Nature 261: 129-130, 1976. 2. Alexander RM. Principles of...1976). Estimates of the speeds of dinosaurs . Nature 261, 129-130. Alexander, R. M. (2004). Bipedal animals and their differences from humans. J. Anat...terrestrial species from rodents to dinosaurs (1, 2). In keeping with our first hypothesis, the empirical, best-fit equations in the form of the

  3. The Air War Over Serbia: Denial, Punishment, or Balance of Interest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    the punishment theory of Thomas Schelling, and the balance of interest theory of Alexander George and William Simons, section two of this study... Alexander L. George and William E. Simons, ed., The Limits of Coercive Diplomacy (Boulder, C.O.: Westview Press, 1994), 16. 11 William Pfaff, �After...Influence, and Alexander L. George and William E. Simons� The Limits of Coercive Diplomacy, will serve as the templates for the three different coercion

  4. Shaping the National Guard in a Post-War Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    the duties of superintending the common defense, and of watching over the internal peace of the Confederacy. –Alexander Hamilton , Federalist No...Officer (USPFO) who exercises 27 Alexander Hamilton , “The Federalist Papers: Concerning the Militia...A0004598.html. 30 In the Federalist Papers No 29, Alexander Hamilton writes that a “if a well- regulated militia be the most natural defense of a free

  5. AFCYBER: Postured to Support Air Force and USCYBERCOM Cyber Needs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Garamone, “ Alexander Details U.S. Cyber Command Gains,” September 24, 2010, from American Forces Press Service. 41 Brigadier General Franz , U.S. Cyber...missions. General Alexander , Commander USCYBERCOM, first envisions a cyber profession where communications, signals intelligence, cryptography...to support both USCYBERCOM and Air Force requirements. General Alexander considers having trained and ready forces as the single most important

  6. Off We Go into the Wild Digital Yonder: Building Cyber Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    which can be provided to supported organizations-- primarily Geographic Combatant Commands. As GEN Keith Alexander testified before the senate on March...during his congressional testimony in September 2010, CYBERCOM’s commander, GEN Alexander , stated, “it’s generating the people that we need to do this...service-oriented tasks while they are defending the United States against cyber attack. GEN Alexander wrote that CYBERCOM’s “mission document states

  7. Army Support of Military Cyberspace Operations: Joint Contexts and Global Escalation Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Alexander as well as its cur- rent operations led by Admiral Michael Rog- ers. Also, it assesses the command’s mission to direct operations, defend...of the command under the leadership of General Keith Alexander as well as its current operations led by Admiral Michael Rogers. Also, it assesses...dissemination, Lieutenant Gen- eral Keith Alexander (Director, NSA and command- er, JFCC-NW) summed up the state of cyberspace operations in a 2007

  8. Free Space Optical Communication in the Military Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    photophone developed by Alexander Graham Bell and Charles Sumner Tainter [10]. This message was transmitted between two buildings nearly 200...Aviation_light_signals. Accessed July 25, 2014. [10] D. Phillipson. (2010, July 28). Alexander Graham Bell . [Online]. Available: http...www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/ alexander - graham - bell / 122 [11] L. N. Bonikowsky. (2013, Oct. 18). What’s better than Bell’s telephone? The

  9. 77 FR 4881 - Commercial Driver's license (CDL) Standards; Rotel North American Tours, LLC; Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... Endres, Helmut Erbersdobler, Reinhard Freudenstein, Alexander Friedl, Peter Hess, Gerhard Kinateder, Hermann Lichtenauer, Karl Lippl, Horst Mahl, Franz Manzinger, Fabian Maurer, Rudolf Ramsl, Paul Schl...

  10. 76 FR 32387 - Kentucky Disaster Number KY-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    .... Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Kentucky: Elliott, Floyd, Hancock, Johnson, Knott, Letcher, Martin, Morgan, Muhlenberg, Ohio. Illinois: Alexander. Indiana: Spencer, Vanderburgh, Warrick. Virginia...

  11. Expedition 35/36 Crew Departs Star City

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Expedition 35 Flight Enginners Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin participated in traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside Mo...

  12. ARC-2009-ACD09-0238-050

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-29

    NASA Advisory Council Meeting at NASA Ames Research Center NRP Conference Center. Gary Martin, Ames Director of New Ventures & Communication (left) with Brett Alexander, Chair, Commercial Space Committee

  13. 75 FR 65365 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W.... Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander...

  14. 76 FR 35936 - Illinois Disaster #IL-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Alexander, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Jefferson, Lawrence, Marion, Massac, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Randolph,...

  15. 76 FR 36558 - Illinois; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... disaster by the President in his declaration of June 7, 2011. Alexander, Franklin, Gallatin, Hardin... Public Assistance (already designated for Individual Assistance). Hamilton, Jefferson, Marion,...

  16. 76 FR 35260 - Illinois Disaster # IL-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ...: Primary Counties (Physical Damage and Economic Injury Loans): Alexander, Franklin, Gallatin, Hardin... (Economic Injury Loans Only): Illinois: Crawford, Edwards, Hamilton, Jefferson, Johnson, Monroe,...

  17. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-02-20

    Joel Kearns viewing a laboratory demonstration of the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) experiment module. Principal Investigator is Alexander McPherson. First flight plarned for ISS.

  18. Viewing the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Joel Kearns viewing a laboratory demonstration of the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) experiment module. Principal Investigator is Alexander McPherson. First flight plarned for ISS.

  19. 1. COPY OF A LATE 19TH CENTURY BUSINESS CARD FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. COPY OF A LATE 19TH CENTURY BUSINESS CARD FOR A. ALEXANDER & SON FLOURING MILLS. CARD OWNED BY THOMAS R. WILSON. Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986. - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Analyzing Quality Attributes as a Means to Improve Acquisition Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    ever doing it the same way twice; in other words, a pattern is a template that can be used in a specific situations. (Alexander, Ishikawa ...ways that acquisition strategy and architecture have mutual influence. References Alexander, C., Ishikawa , S., & Silverstein, M. (1977). A pattern

  1. Results and Recommendations from the 2009 National Surveys of Randomly Selected and Highly Successful Middle Level Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwin, C. Kenneth; Greene, Melanie W.

    2010-01-01

    While a number of studies have yielded useful information regarding the status of middle level schools in the United States, four linked national surveys provide a longitudinal perspective on the degree of implementation of key middle grades programs and practices. These studies were conducted in 1968 (Alexander, 1968), 1988 (Alexander &…

  2. Education Law Texts Usage: Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kathleen A.; Zirkel, Perry A.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies the textbooks professors use in education law courses, based on a survey of 110 members of the Education Law Association during 1996-97. Almost half preferred Alexander and Alexander's "American School Law," with McCarthy and Caqmbron-McCabe's "Public School Law" a close second. Only 44% required or suggested additional nontextbook…

  3. Results and Recommendations from the 2009 National Surveys of Randomly Selected and Highly Successful Middle Level Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwin, C. Kenneth; Greene, Melanie W.

    2010-01-01

    While a number of studies have yielded useful information regarding the status of middle level schools in the United States, four linked national surveys provide a longitudinal perspective on the degree of implementation of key middle grades programs and practices. These studies were conducted in 1968 (Alexander, 1968), 1988 (Alexander &…

  4. Detection of the CS20 Colonization Factor Antigen in Diffuse-Adhering Escherichia coli Strains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Savarino5 & Claudio F. Lanata4•7 ’Institute de Medicina Tropical ’Alexander von Humboldt’, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; 2Umvers1ty...de C•encias Aplicadas. Lima, Peru Abstract Correspondence: Theresa J. Ochoa, Institute de Medicina Tropical ’Alexander von Humboldt’, Universidad

  5. STS-38 crewmembers participate in photography training and camera briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-01

    STS-38 crewmembers listen as RSOC-JSC crew trainer M. Judy Alexander explains the camera equipment they will be using on their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission. Left to right are Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, Mission Specialist (MS) Carl J. Meade, and MS Charles D. Gemar. Alexander is holding a training version of the 70mm handheld HASSELBLAD camera.

  6. 76 FR 59416 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... V. Alexander, Barbara Alvarez, Luis Anderson, Audrey Anderson, Gary Anderson, Penny Andrews, John... Garza, Alexander Gersten, David Gina, Allen Gnerlich, Jan Goode, Brendan Gowadia, Huban Grade, Deborah C... Martoccia, Anthony May, Daniel RADM May, Major McConnell, Bruce McCormack, Luke McDermond, James E....

  7. STS-38 crewmembers participate in photography training and camera briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-38 crewmembers listen as RSOC-JSC crew trainer M. Judy Alexander explains the camera equipment they will be using on their upcoming Department of Defense (DOD) mission. Left to right are Pilot Frank L. Culbertson, Mission Specialist (MS) Carl J. Meade, and MS Charles D. Gemar. Alexander is holding a training version of the 70mm handheld HASSELBLAD camera.

  8. Iwo Jima: The Unnecessary Battle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    Fred, Samurai ! (New York: Nelson Doubleday Inc. 1957). Schmidt, Harry Schmidt, Lieutenant General, U.S. Marine Corps, IWO JIMA, Commanding...191-202. 21 Alexander 14. 22 Alexander 14. 23 Saburo Sakai, Martin Caidan, and Fred Saito, Samurai ! (New York: Nelson Doubleday Inc. 1957), 276

  9. Vengeance without Justice, Injustice without Retribution: The Afro-American Council's Struggle against Racial Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Shawn Leigh

    2007-01-01

    On January 19, 1901, just one week after Leavenworth, Kansas, witnessed the burning of Fred Alexander, a twenty-two-year-old black Spanish-American war veteran, the "Wichita Searchlight" called for armed self-defense. The brutal murder of Alexander horrified many African Americans throughout the region, who decided that it was time to…

  10. Prompting Students to Contemplate Effective Communication with a Visible Speech Chart from the 1870s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, director of Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress Lee Ann Potter describes a classroom activity that focuses on an 1876 single-page circular published in Salem, Massachusetts about Alexander Melville Bell's Visible Speech. A. M. Bell's son, Alexander Graham Bell described "Visible Speech" as "a…

  11. 78 FR 18997 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: April 15, 2013.... Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive.... Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T....

  12. 77 FR 18252 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: May 23, 2012, 8:30 a... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111...

  13. 78 FR 48695 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Date...: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W....

  14. 75 FR 3474 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: February 19, 2010... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T....

  15. 77 FR 60448 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed.... Place: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Closed: November 5, 2012, 2:45...

  16. 75 FR 57280 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... Toxicology. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W...: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Conference Rooms 101 A, B, and C, Research Triangle...

  17. 75 FR 19981 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: May 13, 2010, 8:30... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... applications. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T....

  18. Organizations in Transition. Symposium 41. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on organizations in transition that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Human Resource Development in an Industry in Transition: The Case of the Russian Banking Sector" (Alexander Ardichvili, Alexander Gasparishvili) reports on a study…

  19. Instructional Strategies to Accommodate a Team-Teaching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The concept of team teaching is attributed to William Alexander, known as the "father of the American middle school," who delivered a presentation at a 1963 conference held at Cornell University. Alexander's main idea was to establish teams of three to five middle school teachers who would be in charge of team teaching content to large groups of…

  20. The Validity of the Air Traffic Selection and Training (AT-SAT) Test Battery in Operational Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    The Validity of the Air Traffic Selection and Training (AT-SAT) Test Battery in Operational Use Dana Broach Cristina L. Byrne Carol A. Manning...7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report No. Broach D, Byrne CL, Manning CA, Pierce L, McCauley D, Bleckley MK 9...variables attenuate predictor- criterion relationships ( Barrett , Caldwell, & Alexander, 1989; Barrett , Alexander, & Doverspike, 1992; Beier

  1. Instructional Strategies to Accommodate a Team-Teaching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The concept of team teaching is attributed to William Alexander, known as the "father of the American middle school," who delivered a presentation at a 1963 conference held at Cornell University. Alexander's main idea was to establish teams of three to five middle school teachers who would be in charge of team teaching content to large groups of…

  2. 75 FR 13576 - Labor Surplus Area Classification Under Executive Orders 12073 and 10582

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    .... Beaumont city, CA Riverside County, CA. Bell city, CA Los Angeles County, CA. Bell Gardens city, CA Los.... Valley County, ID Valley County, ID. ILLINOIS Alexander County, IL Alexander County, IL. Alton city, IL... County, KY. Bath County, KY Bath County, KY. Bell County, KY Bell County, KY. Boyle County, KY Boyle...

  3. Prompting Students to Contemplate Effective Communication with a Visible Speech Chart from the 1870s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, director of Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress Lee Ann Potter describes a classroom activity that focuses on an 1876 single-page circular published in Salem, Massachusetts about Alexander Melville Bell's Visible Speech. A. M. Bell's son, Alexander Graham Bell described "Visible Speech" as "a…

  4. ATV docking ops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-12

    ISS040-E-091673 (12 Aug. 2014) --- In the Zvezda Service Module, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (right) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, take a brief moment for a photo during the approach and docking operations of ESA's "Georges Lemaitre" Automated Transfer Vehicle-5 (ATV-5) to the International Space Station.

  5. ATV docking ops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-12

    ISS040-E-091688 (12 Aug. 2014) --- In the Zvezda Service Module, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of ESA?s "Georges Lemaitre" Automated Transfer Vehicle-5 (ATV-5) to the International Space Station.

  6. ATV docking ops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-12

    ISS040-E-091635 (12 Aug. 2014) --- In the Zvezda Service Module, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of ESA's "Georges Lemaitre" Automated Transfer Vehicle-5 (ATV-5) to the International Space Station.

  7. ATV docking ops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-12

    ISS040-E-091638 (12 Aug. 2014) --- In the Zvezda Service Module, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of ESA's "Georges Lemaitre" Automated Transfer Vehicle-5 (ATV-5) to the International Space Station.

  8. ATV docking ops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-12

    ISS040-E-091634 (12 Aug. 2014) --- In the Zvezda Service Module, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (left) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, both Expedition 40 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of ESA's "Georges Lemaitre" Automated Transfer Vehicle-5 (ATV-5) to the International Space Station.

  9. Vengeance without Justice, Injustice without Retribution: The Afro-American Council's Struggle against Racial Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Shawn Leigh

    2007-01-01

    On January 19, 1901, just one week after Leavenworth, Kansas, witnessed the burning of Fred Alexander, a twenty-two-year-old black Spanish-American war veteran, the "Wichita Searchlight" called for armed self-defense. The brutal murder of Alexander horrified many African Americans throughout the region, who decided that it was time to…

  10. Crowdsourcing ISR: A Systems Thinking Approach to Knowledge Dynamics in Intelligence Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Alexander Bordetsky Thesis Co-Advisor: Wayne Porter THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704–0188...MANAGEMENT from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September2013 Author: John J. Hoffner Approved by: Dr. Alexander Bordetsky...Flock & Bell 2007, Gajjalla 2007 Fragoso 2006, Nyland & Near 2007 Surveys Users; both individuals and corporate entities, use SNS for survey data

  11. Is the U.S. National Security Strategy Balanced? An Assessment of the Role of Domestic Issues as Part of the National Security Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-10

    Budget Office, 82. 16Nye, 220-222. 17 Edward M. Earle, " Adam Smith , Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List: The Economic Foundations of Military Power...34 Adam Smith , Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List: the Economic Foundations of Military Power." Makers of Modern Strategy. Princeton; NJ: Princeton

  12. Systems Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christakis, Alexander; Hammond, Debora; Jackson, Michael; Laszlo, Alexander; Mitroff, Ian; Snowden, Dave; Troncale, Len; Carr-Chellman, Alison; Spector, J. Michael; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of systems science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Alexander Christakis, Debora Hammond, Michael Jackson, Alexander Laszlo, Ian Mitroff, Dave…

  13. New species of subgenus Tipula (Sivatipula) from China, with redescription of T. (S.) parvauricula and a key to all known species of the Oriental Region (Diptera, Tipulidae, Tipula)

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Guo-Xi; Men, Qiu-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Species of Tipula (Sivatipula) biprocessa sp. n. from Guangxi, China is described and illustrated as new in the subgenus Tipula (Sivatipula) Alexander, 1964. Tipula (Sivatipula) parvauricula Alexander, 1941 is redescribed and illustrated based on additional morphological characters. Semen pump of this subgenus is discussed. A key to all described species in this group is compiled. PMID:27047238

  14. Systems Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christakis, Alexander; Hammond, Debora; Jackson, Michael; Laszlo, Alexander; Mitroff, Ian; Snowden, Dave; Troncale, Len; Carr-Chellman, Alison; Spector, J. Michael; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of systems science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Alexander Christakis, Debora Hammond, Michael Jackson, Alexander Laszlo, Ian Mitroff, Dave…

  15. HISTORIA Alexandri Magni: Astronomy, Astrology and Tradition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, M.

    A popular text on the birth, life and death of Alexander the Great is that attributed to Pseudo-Callisthenes. According to this Byzantine text Alexander is the son of the last king of Egypt, the Pharao Nectanebo, who left his country and following Apollo's oracle visited Macedonia. Nectanebo was famous for his astronomical, astrological and magical knowledge which he used to prevent Alexander's birth for some hours until a favoured time comes. In only one manuscript (Paris. gr. 1711, 11th century) of this work there is a unique passage in which astronomical information is given regarding the positions of the Sun, the Moon, and the five planets at the time of Alexander's birth. In this paper I attempt a study of all information related to the astronomical instruments and their use as mentioned in the text as well as of the astronomical information regarding Alexander's birth.

  16. 77 FR 48107 - Workshop on Performance Assessments of Near-Surface Disposal Facilities: FEPs Analysis, Scenario...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...-415- 6755; email: George.Alexander@nrc.gov ; or Tarsha Moon, Office of Federal and State Materials and...-415-6745; email: Tarsha.Moon@nrc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Accessing Information Please...

  17. Celebrate Picasso!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Gives instructions for student art projects inspired by the work of five famous artists: Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder, Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, and Michelangelo. Directions for making art smocks and a display kiosk are also included. (ME)

  18. 76 FR 11500 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ..., Building 4401, East Campus, 79 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (Virtual Meeting..., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (Virtual Meeting) Contact Person: Sally Eckert-Tilotta, PhD,...

  19. Community capital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    Veterinary scientist Alexander Travis collaborated with economists and conservation biologists to assess how a new model promoting sustainable agriculture helps Zambian communities address climate change, protect biodiversity and increase income.

  20. Listen to Data: Video 3 Ulysses

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This clip contains audified data from the joint European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA Ulysses satellite gathered on October 26, 1995. The participant in Alexander's study was able to detect artifici...

  1. OH Exam

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-03

    ISS040-E-006897 (3 June 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, performs an Ocular Health (OH) examination in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  2. Plazmennyi-Kristall-3 plus hardware installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-30

    ISS024-E-007108 (30 June 2010) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov, Expedition 24 commander, installs hardware for the new Plasma Crystal-3 Plus experiment in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  3. 3. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CATARACT MILLS, NEWBURGH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CATARACT MILLS, NEWBURGH, OHIO. Date unknown. Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Russian EVA 33

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    View of Russian cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin (bottom center), Expedition 36 flight engineer, participating in Russian extravehicular activity (EVA) 33. Also visible are the Progress spacecraft docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment (DC1) with the Service Module (SM) .

  5. 78 FR 45188 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ..., mechanical or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., by... Protection Agency, T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; telephone number: (919)...

  6. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rolfing, Alexander technique, craniosacral therapy, and Trager bodywork. Energy Medicine Energy medicine draws on a number of traditions supporting ... view that illness results from disturbances of subtle energies. Energy therapies are based on the use of ...

  7. Next Station Crew in Kazakhstan for Soyuz Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Expedition 35/36 Soyuz Commander Pavel Vinogradov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, NASA Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy and Russian Flight Engineer Alexander Misurkin arrive at the Baikonur Cosmo...

  8. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 10, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION (Copied from student's drawing, Dept. of Architecture, Armour Institute of Technology. Chicago) - Keating House, U.S. Highway 430, Fayville, Alexander County, IL

  9. Install of Cygnus controller cable

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-15

    ISS040-E-063760 (15 July 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, works with power and data cables in the vestibule between the Destiny laboratory and Unity node of the International Space Station.

  10. 77 FR 64121 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... tigers (Panthera tigris) for the purpose of enhancement of the survival of the species from Alexander... of their permits to re-export and re-import three captive born tigers (Panthera tigris) to worldwide...

  11. Harnessing poverty alleviation to reduce the stigma of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alexander C; Bangsberg, David R; Weiser, Sheri D

    2013-11-01

    Alexander Tsai and colleagues highlight the complex relationship between poverty and HIV stigma in sub-Saharan Africa, and discuss possible ways to break the cycle. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  12. jsc2014e045676

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-15

    PHOTO DATE: 05-15-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 9NW - ISS Mockups SUBJECT: Expedition 42 crew members Butch Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev and Yelena Serova during Routine Ops training PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD

  13. jsc2014e045667

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-15

    PHOTO DATE: 05-15-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 9NW - ISS Mockups SUBJECT: Expedition 42 crew members Butch Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev and Yelena Serova during Routine Ops training PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD

  14. jsc2014e045591

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-15

    PHOTO DATE: 05-15-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 9NW - ISS Mockups SUBJECT: Expedition 42 crew members Butch Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev and Yelena Serova during Routine Ops training PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD

  15. jsc2014e045594

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-15

    PHOTO DATE: 05-15-14 LOCATION: Bldg. 9NW - ISS Mockups SUBJECT: Expedition 42 crew members Butch Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev and Yelena Serova during Routine Ops training PHOTOGRAPHER: BILL STAFFORD

  16. Communist purges of Soviet Academy of Sciences members and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilin, Konstantin A.

    The author is investigating the corelation between the intansity of Communsit purges under Members of the Academy of Sciences of USSR and Solar Activity, based on previous researches by Alexander Leonidovich Chizhevskij (1897-1964).

  17. Kaleri talks on the ARISS Ham Radio in the SM during Expedition 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-01

    ISS008-E-07170 (December 2003) --- Cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Expedition 8 flight engineer representing Rosaviakosmos, uses a communication system in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS).

  18. Kaleri takes cabin pressure check readings in the SM during Expedition 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-01-09

    ISS008-E-12270 (9 January 2004) --- Cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Expedition 8 flight engineer, uses a communication system as he works in the Zvezda Service Module on the International Space Station (ISS). Kaleri represents Rosaviakosmos.

  19. STS-91 Pilot Gorie suits up in Pad 39A's white room for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-91 Pilot Dominic L. Gorie waves to the camera as he is prepared for entry into the Space Shuttle Discovery by Launch Pad 39A white room crew members Jean Alexander (behind Gorie) and Greg Lohning.

  20. Nineteenth-Century Psychology and the Teaching of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, William F.

    1985-01-01

    Explores some features of early psychology that are implicit in early methods of writing instruction. Includes varieties of early psychology, the Scottish Commonsense philosophy, Alexander Bain's associationist psychology, William James's functionalist psychology, and composition teaching after 1900. (HTH)

  1. 16. VIEW OF OVERHEAD DOOR TO HOP DRYER NO. 3. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF OVERHEAD DOOR TO HOP DRYER NO. 3. ALL EIGHT HOP DRYERS ARE ON THE SECOND FLOOR. - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  2. 5. VIEW OF SOUTH FACADE OF HOP BARN COMPLEX, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF SOUTH FACADE OF HOP BARN COMPLEX, LOOKING NORTH INTO THE 'FUEL BAY' (IN THE CENTER). - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  3. 11. DETAIL OF CAST IRON DOOR OF LAST SURVIVING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF CAST IRON DOOR OF LAST SURVIVING FURNACE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BARN ON GROUND FLOOR. - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  4. 9. VIEW OF OF LAST SURVIVING FURNACE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF OF LAST SURVIVING FURNACE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BARN ON GROUND FLOOR. - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  5. 21. REMAINS OF HOP BAILING CHUTE ON SECOND FLOOR; THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. REMAINS OF HOP BAILING CHUTE ON SECOND FLOOR; THIS CHUTE EXTENDS TO THE GROUND FLOOR. - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  6. 10. DETAIL OF LAST SURVIVING FURNACE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF LAST SURVIVING FURNACE IN SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BARN ON GROUND FLOOR. - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  7. 3. Photocopy of photograph, original print in the possession of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph, original print in the possession of John R. Morison, Peterborough, New Hampshire. Photographer unknown, circa 1887. JAMES HOWARD TRANSFER STEAMER USED FOR CONSTRUCTION - Cairo Bridge, Spanning Ohio River, Cairo, Alexander County, IL

  8. 20. REMAINS OF HOP BAILING CHUTE ON GROUND FLOOR; THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. REMAINS OF HOP BAILING CHUTE ON GROUND FLOOR; THIS CHUTE EXTENDS TO THE SECOND FLOOR. - James W. Seavey Hop Driers, 0.6 mile East from junction of Highway 99 & Alexander Avenue, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  9. 75 FR 4415 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Grove Cemetery Historic Section, E. Bruce St. approx. .3 mi. E. of Harkrider St., Conway, 09000868..., 11/02/09 Lincoln County Alexander Teen Center, 456 Rogers St., Brookhaven, 09000885, LISTED,...

  10. 77 FR 76497 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... The Honorable Bruce City Hall Public October 26, 2012 290896 No.: B-1269). (12-07-1972P). Geiger... Clarkstown The Honorable Alexander Department of September 24, 2012 360679 1269). (12-02-0115P). J....

  11. Kaleri prepares for a telecon in the U.S. Lab during Expedition 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-28

    ISS008-E-10695 (28 December 2003) --- Cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Expedition 8 flight engineer representing Rosaviakosmos, is pictured in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). Holiday decorations are visible in the background.

  12. ARC-1999-AC99-0013-4

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-01-26

    Prince Willem-Alexander van Oranje (Crown Prince of the Netherlands) visits Ames. Shown here with Dr Henry McDonald, Ames Director in lobby of N-243. His visit was prompted by his strong personal interest in aviation.

  13. Nespoli and Kaleri during emergency scenario drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-11

    ISS026-E-016965 (11 Jan. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri (foreground) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, participate in an emergency scenarios drill in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  14. Nespoli and Kaleri during emergency scenario drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-11

    ISS026-E-016970 (11 Jan. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri (right) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, participate in an emergency scenarios drill in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  15. Nespoli and Kaleri during emergency scenario drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-11

    ISS026-E-016963 (11 Jan. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri (foreground) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, participate in an emergency scenarios drill in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  16. Skvortsov and Artemyen conduct IFM on BD-2 Treadmill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-30

    ISS039-E-016480 (30 April 2014) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Artemyev (right) and Alexander Skvortsov with Russia's Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) work on the BD-2 treadmill in the Zvezda service module aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station.

  17. Filling the Void: The Benefits of Career and Technical Education for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Sandy; Crockett, Lori L.; Armstrong, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Includes "Welding Done Well" (Cutshall); "Opening Doors" (Cutshall); "Earning and Learning" (Cutshall); "New York's ELITE Schools" (Crockett); "Alexander High School's RVI [Related Vocational Instruction] Program: Focusing on Abilities" (Crockett); and "Perrysville's START Program Making a…

  18. Expedition 28 Crew Lands Safely

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Expedition 28 Commander Andrey Borisenko and Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Ron Garan land their Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft in Kazakhstan. Russian recovery teams were on hand to help the c...

  19. Mission, Science, and Race in South Africa; AW Roberts of Lovedale 1883-1938

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I.S.

    2016-02-01

    Book Review: Biography of Alexander William Roberts. Noted educator, variable star observer and politician who represented South African "natives" in the parliament of the Union of South Africa at a time when they had no other representation.

  20. Meiklejohn and Dewey in the 1950's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Harold

    1988-01-01

    A reflection on the contributions of college presidents John Dewey and Alexander Meiklejohn to higher education highlights the 1950's progressive movement which encouraged social and educational reform and sought divergent ideas and opinions. (CB)