Science.gov

Sample records for media processes mediaphysics

  1. Statistical physics of media processes: Mediaphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Dmitri V.; Mandel, Igor

    2007-04-01

    The processes of mass communications in complicated social or sociobiological systems such as marketing, economics, politics, animal populations, etc. as a subject for the special scientific subbranch-“mediaphysics”-are considered in its relation with sociophysics. A new statistical physics approach to analyze these phenomena is proposed. A keystone of the approach is an analysis of population distribution between two or many alternatives: brands, political affiliations, or opinions. Relative distances between a state of a “person's mind” and the alternatives are measures of propensity to buy (to affiliate, or to have a certain opinion). The distribution of population by those relative distances is time dependent and affected by external (economic, social, marketing, natural) and internal (influential propagation of opinions, “word of mouth”, etc.) factors, considered as fields. Specifically, the interaction and opinion-influence field can be generalized to incorporate important elements of Ising-spin-based sociophysical models and kinetic-equation ones. The distributions were described by a Schrödinger-type equation in terms of Green's functions. The developed approach has been applied to a real mass-media efficiency problem for a large company and generally demonstrated very good results despite low initial correlations of factors and the target variable.

  2. Memory Processes in Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellermann, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Explores the role of memory in mediating mass communication effects. Examines (1) the nature of memory, (2) issues in retention and recall of media messages, (3) methods of promoting retention and recall of media messages, and (4) implications of memory processes for mass media effects. (PD)

  3. Composite media for ion processing

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Wood, Donald J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2009-12-08

    Composite media, systems, and devices for substantially removing, or otherwise processing, one or more constituents of a fluid stream. The composite media comprise a plurality of beads, each having a matrix substantially comprising polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and supporting one or more active components which are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream. Due to the porosity and large surface area of the beads, a high level of contact is achieved between composite media of the present invention and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the homogeneity of the beads facilitates use of the beads in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a large volume of flow per unit of time.

  4. High capacity heavy media processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chedgy, D.G.; Yu, S.; Addison, F.; Stanley, F.

    1996-12-31

    Pittston Coal Company recognized the potential economic benefit of improving process efficiency with increased capacity at it`s U.K. No. 1 Coal Preparation Plant. Accordingly, extensive research, both domestically and internationally, was conducted to select the appropriate technologies to achieve the desired circuit in the most cost effective manner while, at the same time, sacrificing neither structural integrity nor process performance. Large diameter heavy media cyclone technology was combined with highly efficient banana type screens and improved high intensity magnetic separators to create a coordinated process circuit that provided high efficiency at very high capacities in an economically attractive package.

  5. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2003-02-04

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  6. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2009-03-24

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  7. A Social Information Processing Model of Media Use in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulk, Janet; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presents a model to examine how social influence processes affect individuals' attitudes toward communication media and media use behavior, integrating two research areas: media use patterns as the outcome of objectively rational choices and social information processing theory. Asserts (in a synthesis) that media characteristics and attitudes are…

  8. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, C.L.; Jacobsen, J.S.

    1990-04-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes (TTIP) is used to derive governing equations and phenomenological equations for transport processes and chemical reactions in water-saturated semipermeable media. TTIP is based on three fundamental postulates. The first postulate, the assumption of local equilibrium, allows the formulation of balance equations for entropy. These equations are the bases for the derivation of governing equations for the thermodynamic variables, temperature, pressure, and composition. The governing equations involve vector fluxes of heat and mass and scalar rates of chemical reactions; in accordance with the second postulate of TTIP, these fluxes and rates are related, respectively, to all scalar driving forces (gradients of thermodynamic variables) acting within the system. The third postulate of TTIP states equality (the Onsager reciprocal relations) between certain of the phenomenological coefficients relating forces and fluxes. The description by TTIP of a system undergoing irreversible processes allows consideration of coupled transport processes such as thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis, and ultrafiltration. The coupled processes can make significant contributions to flows of mass and energy in slightly permeable, permselective geological materials such as clays and shales.

  9. Coupled transport processes in semipermeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1990-04-01

    A numerical simulator has been developed to investigate the effects of coupled processes on heat and mass transport in semipermeable media. The governing equations on which the simulator is based were derived using the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. The equations are nonlinear and have been solved numerically using the n-dimensional Newton's method. As an example of an application, the numerical simulator has been used to investigate heat and solute transport in the vicinity of a heat source buried in a saturated clay-like medium, in part to study solute transport in bentonite packing material surrounding a nuclear waste canister. The coupled processes considered were thermal filtration, thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis and ultrafiltration. In the simulations, heat transport by coupled processes was negligible compared to heat conduction, but pressure and solute migration were affected. Solute migration was retarded relative to the uncoupled case when only chemical osmosis was considered. When both chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis were included, solute migration was enhanced. 18 refs., 20 figs.

  10. Modeling microbial processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ellyn M.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    The incorporation of microbial processes into reactive transport models has generally proceeded along two separate lines of investigation: (1) transport of bacteria as inert colloids in porous media, and (2) the biodegradation of dissolved contaminants by a stationary phase of bacteria. Research over the last decade has indicated that these processes are closely linked. This linkage may occur when a change in metabolic activity alters the attachment/detachment rates of bacteria to surfaces, either promoting or retarding bacterial transport in a groundwater-contaminant plume. Changes in metabolic activity, in turn, are controlled by the time of exposure of the microbes to electron acceptors/donor and other components affecting activity. Similarly, metabolic activity can affect the reversibility of attachment, depending on the residence time of active microbes. Thus, improvements in quantitative analysis of active subsurface biota necessitate direct linkages between substrate availability, metabolic activity, growth, and attachment/detachment rates. This linkage requires both a detailed understanding of the biological processes and robust quantitative representations of these processes that can be tested experimentally. This paper presents an overview of current approaches used to represent physicochemical and biological processes in porous media, along with new conceptual approaches that link metabolic activity with partitioning of the microorganism between the aqueous and solid phases. Résumé L'introduction des processus microbiologiques dans des modèles de transport réactif a généralement suivi deux voies différentes de recherches: (1) le transport de bactéries sous forme de colloïdes inertes en milieu poreux, et (2) la biodégradation de polluants dissous par une phase stationnaire de bactéries. Les recherches conduites au cours des dix dernières années indiquent que ces processus sont intimement liés. Cette liaison peut intervenir lorsqu

  11. Modeling microbial processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ellyn M.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    The incorporation of microbial processes into reactive transport models has generally proceeded along two separate lines of investigation: (1) transport of bacteria as inert colloids in porous media, and (2) the biodegradation of dissolved contaminants by a stationary phase of bacteria. Research over the last decade has indicated that these processes are closely linked. This linkage may occur when a change in metabolic activity alters the attachment/detachment rates of bacteria to surfaces, either promoting or retarding bacterial transport in a groundwater-contaminant plume. Changes in metabolic activity, in turn, are controlled by the time of exposure of the microbes to electron acceptors/donor and other components affecting activity. Similarly, metabolic activity can affect the reversibility of attachment, depending on the residence time of active microbes. Thus, improvements in quantitative analysis of active subsurface biota necessitate direct linkages between substrate availability, metabolic activity, growth, and attachment/detachment rates. This linkage requires both a detailed understanding of the biological processes and robust quantitative representations of these processes that can be tested experimentally. This paper presents an overview of current approaches used to represent physicochemical and biological processes in porous media, along with new conceptual approaches that link metabolic activity with partitioning of the microorganism between the aqueous and solid phases. Résumé L'introduction des processus microbiologiques dans des modèles de transport réactif a généralement suivi deux voies différentes de recherches: (1) le transport de bactéries sous forme de colloïdes inertes en milieu poreux, et (2) la biodégradation de polluants dissous par une phase stationnaire de bactéries. Les recherches conduites au cours des dix dernières années indiquent que ces processus sont intimement liés. Cette liaison peut intervenir lorsqu

  12. Granular media filtration: old process, new thoughts.

    PubMed

    Lawler, D F; Nason, J A

    2006-01-01

    The design of granular media filters has evolved over many years so that modern filters have larger media sizes and higher filtration velocities than in earlier times. The fundamental understanding of filtration has also improved over time, with current models that account reasonably for all characteristics of the media, the suspension and the filter operation. The methodology for design, however, has not kept pace with these improvements; current designs are based on pilot plants, past experience, or a simple guideline (the ratio of the bed depth to media grain size). We propose that design should be based universally on a characteristic removal length, with the provision of a bed depth that is some multiple of that characteristic length. This characteristic removal length is calculated using the most recent (and most complete) fundamental model and is based on the particle size with the minimum removal efficiency in a filter. The multiple of the characteristic length that yields the required bed depth has been calibrated to existing, successful filters.

  13. Granular media filtration: old process, new thoughts.

    PubMed

    Lawler, D F; Nason, J A

    2006-01-01

    The design of granular media filters has evolved over many years so that modern filters have larger media sizes and higher filtration velocities than in earlier times. The fundamental understanding of filtration has also improved over time, with current models that account reasonably for all characteristics of the media, the suspension and the filter operation. The methodology for design, however, has not kept pace with these improvements; current designs are based on pilot plants, past experience, or a simple guideline (the ratio of the bed depth to media grain size). We propose that design should be based universally on a characteristic removal length, with the provision of a bed depth that is some multiple of that characteristic length. This characteristic removal length is calculated using the most recent (and most complete) fundamental model and is based on the particle size with the minimum removal efficiency in a filter. The multiple of the characteristic length that yields the required bed depth has been calibrated to existing, successful filters. PMID:16752758

  14. Dual Transport Process for Targeted Delivery in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, W.; Fan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The targeted delivery in porous media is a promising technology to encapsulate the solute (i.e., the cargo) in colloid-like microcapsules (i.e., the carriers), transport the microcapsules in the targeted location in porous media, and then release the solute. While extensive literatures and applications about the drug delivery in human and animal bodies exist, the targeted delivery using similar delivery carriers in subsurface porous media is not well understood. The dual transport process study is an explorative study for the targeted delivery in porous media. While the colloid transport is dominated by the advection process and the solute transport is dominated by the advection-dispersion, the dual transport process is the process with the first step of carrier transport, which is dominated by advection, and then after the release of cargo, the transport of cargo is dominated by advection-dispersion. By applying the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) approach, we investigate how the carriers transport in porous media and how the cargo release mechanisms affect the cargo distribution for the targeted delivery in various patterns of porous media. The RWPT numerical model will be verified against the experimental results of dual transport process in packed-disk 2D micromodels. The understanding of the mechanism of dual transport process is crucial to achieve the potential applications of targeted delivery in improved oil and gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, environmental remediation, and soil biomediation.

  15. Detecting ultrafast interatomic electronic processes in media by fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, André; Hans, Andreas; Förstel, Marko; Hergenhahn, Uwe; Schmidt, Philipp; Reiß, Philipp; Ozga, Christian; Kambs, Benjamin; Trinter, Florian; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Metz, Daniel; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard; Kuleff, Alexander I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Ehresmann, Arno

    2014-10-01

    Interatomic coulombic decay (ICD), a radiationless transition in weakly bonded systems, such as solutes or van der Waals bound aggregates, is an effective source for electrons of low kinetic energy. So far, the ICD processes could only be probed in ultra-high vacuum by using electron and/or ion spectroscopy. Here we show that resonant ICD processes can also be detected by measuring the subsequently emitted characteristic fluorescence radiation, which makes their study in dense media possible.

  16. Diesel oil volatilization processes affected by selected porous media.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanfei; Zheng, Xilai; Anderson, S H; Lu, Jie; Feng, Xuedong

    2014-03-01

    Volatilization plays an important role in attenuating petroleum products in contaminated soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of wind speed, vessel diameter and mean grain size of porous media on diesel oil volatilization. Experiments were conducted to investigate the volatilization behavior of diesel oil from porous media by weighing contaminated samples pre- and post-volatilization. Three selected field porous media materials were evaluated: Silty Clay Loam, Fine Sand, and Coarse Sand along with six individual sand fractions of the Coarse Sand. Results indicate that increasing wind speed accelerates the diesel oil volatilization process, especially for wind speeds below 2.10ms(-1). The low-carbon components of diesel oil volatilize more rapidly, with the effects of wind speed more pronounced on C10 to C15 volatilization than on C16 and higher. The volatilization rate coefficient of diesel oil increases with decreasing mean grain size of porous media, and with increasing vessel diameter. A power function expressed the relationship with mean grain size. All processes (wind speed, vessel diameter, and mean grain size) were included in an equation which explained over 92% of the measured diesel oil volatilization rate coefficient variations for the experiments. Diesel oil volatilization appears to be boundary-layer regulated to some extent.

  17. Robust media processing on programmable power-constrained systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVeigh, Jeff

    2005-03-01

    To achieve consumer-level quality, media systems must process continuous streams of audio and video data while maintaining exacting tolerances on sampling rate, jitter, synchronization, and latency. While it is relatively straightforward to design fixed-function hardware implementations to satisfy worst-case conditions, there is a growing trend to utilize programmable multi-tasking solutions for media applications. The flexibility of these systems enables support for multiple current and future media formats, which can reduce design costs and time-to-market. This paper provides practical engineering solutions to achieve robust media processing on such systems, with specific attention given to power-constrained platforms. The techniques covered in this article utilize the fundamental concepts of algorithm and software optimization, software/hardware partitioning, stream buffering, hierarchical prioritization, and system resource and power management. A novel enhancement to dynamically adjust processor voltage and frequency based on buffer fullness to reduce system power consumption is examined in detail. The application of these techniques is provided in a case study of a portable video player implementation based on a general-purpose processor running a non real-time operating system that achieves robust playback of synchronized H.264 video and MP3 audio from local storage and streaming over 802.11.

  18. (Central) Auditory Processing: the impact of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Leticia Reis; Paschoal, Jorge Rizzato; Colella-Santos, Maria Francisca

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze auditory processing test results in children suffering from otitis media in their first five years of age, considering their age. Furthermore, to classify central auditory processing test findings regarding the hearing skills evaluated. METHODS: A total of 109 students between 8 and 12 years old were divided into three groups. The control group consisted of 40 students from public school without a history of otitis media. Experimental group I consisted of 39 students from public schools and experimental group II consisted of 30 students from private schools; students in both groups suffered from secretory otitis media in their first five years of age and underwent surgery for placement of bilateral ventilation tubes. The individuals underwent complete audiological evaluation and assessment by Auditory Processing tests. RESULTS: The left ear showed significantly worse performance when compared to the right ear in the dichotic digits test and pitch pattern sequence test. The students from the experimental groups showed worse performance when compared to the control group in the dichotic digits test and gaps-in-noise. Children from experimental group I had significantly lower results on the dichotic digits and gaps-in-noise tests compared with experimental group II. The hearing skills that were altered were temporal resolution and figure-ground perception. CONCLUSION: Children who suffered from secretory otitis media in their first five years and who underwent surgery for placement of bilateral ventilation tubes showed worse performance in auditory abilities, and children from public schools had worse results on auditory processing tests compared with students from private schools. PMID:23917659

  19. Twitter for Teaching: Can Social Media Be Used to Enhance the Process of Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Can social media be used to enhance the process of learning by students in higher education? Social media have become widely adopted by students in their personal lives. However, the application of social media to teaching and learning remains to be fully explored. In this study, the use of the social media tool Twitter for teaching was…

  20. Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee E., Ed.

    1974-01-01

    Intended for secondary English teachers, the materials and ideas presented here suggest ways to use media in the classroom in teaching visual and auditory discrimination while enlivening classes and motivating students. Contents include "Media Specialists Need Not Apply," which discusses the need for preparation of media educators with…

  1. Composite media for fluid stream processing, a method of forming the composite media, and a related method of processing a fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Garn, Troy G; Law, Jack D; Greenhalgh, Mitchell R; Tranter, Rhonda

    2014-04-01

    A composite media including at least one crystalline aluminosilicate material in polyacrylonitrile. A method of forming a composite media is also disclosed. The method comprises dissolving polyacrylonitrile in an organic solvent to form a matrix solution. At least one crystalline aluminosilicate material is combined with the matrix solution to form a composite media solution. The organic solvent present in the composite media solution is diluted. The composite media solution is solidified. In addition, a method of processing a fluid stream is disclosed. The method comprises providing a beads of a composite media comprising at least one crystalline aluminosilicate material dispersed in a polyacrylonitrile matrix. The beads of the composite media are contacted with a fluid stream comprising at least one constituent. The at least one constituent is substantially removed from the fluid stream.

  2. Using Social Media "Smartly" in the Admissions Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrot, Teresa Valerio; Tipton, Stacia

    2010-01-01

    Admissions officers around the country are hearing consistent calls to enhance their social media presence. Whether the pressure is from administrators, influential alumni, or peers across institutions, social media are touted as the next big thing in admissions marketing. But are social media strategies truly "strategic," or are they merely…

  3. Modeling Multi-process Transport of Pathogens in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    The transport behavior of microorganisms in porous media is of interest with regard to the fate of pathogens associated with wastewater recharge, riverbank filtration, and land application of biosolids. This interest has fomented research on the transport of pathogens in the subsurface environment. The factors influencing pathogen transport within the subsurface environment include advection, dispersion, filtration, and inactivation. The filtration process, which mediates the magnitude and rate of pathogen retention, comprises several mechanisms such as attachment to porous-medium surfaces, straining, and sedimentation. We present a mathematical model wherein individual filtration mechanisms are explicitly incorporated along with advection, dispersion, and inactivation. The performance of the model is evaluated by applying it to several data sets obtained from miscible-displacement experiments conducted using various pathogens. Input parameters are obtained to the extent possible from independent means.

  4. Media Richness and Social Information Processing: Rationale for Multifocal Continuing Medical Education Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Stuart C.; Turner, Jeanine Warisse

    2001-01-01

    Media richness theory suggests that media choice results from matching characteristics with content requirements. Social information processing theory adds the influence of social norms and familiarity with media types. In applying both to continuing medical information, consideration of content and participant environment guides selection of…

  5. Media Literacy Education in Turkey: An Evaluation of Media Processes and Ethical Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elma, Cevat; Kesten, Alper; Dicle, Abdullah N.; Uzun, Elif Mercan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate school principals', teachers', parents', and students' opinions, arising from participation in a pilot program which used a media literacy curriculum in Turkey. The research population covers all seventh grade students who attended the media literacy course during the 2006-2007 academic year, in five pilot…

  6. Media Exposure, Interpersonal Communication and the Electoral Decision Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimsey, William D.; Hantz, Alan

    The relationships among mass media, interpersonal communication, and voting behavior were explored in a two-stage panel study of 141 respondents during a 1974 Illinois congressional election. Analyses of perceived exposures to mass media and to interpersonal communication were interpreted as supporting Rogers and Shoemakers' (1971)…

  7. Automated dynamic fed-batch process and media optimization for high productivity cell culture process development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Franklin; Toh, Poh Choo; Burnett, Iain; Li, Feng; Hudson, Terry; Amanullah, Ashraf; Li, Jincai

    2013-01-01

    Current industry practices for large-scale mammalian cell cultures typically employ a standard platform fed-batch process with fixed volume bolus feeding. Although widely used, these processes are unable to respond to actual nutrient consumption demands from the culture, which can result in accumulation of by-products and depletion of certain nutrients. This work demonstrates the application of a fully automated cell culture control, monitoring, and data processing system to achieve significant productivity improvement via dynamic feeding and media optimization. Two distinct feeding algorithms were used to dynamically alter feed rates. The first method is based upon on-line capacitance measurements where cultures were fed based on growth and nutrient consumption rates estimated from integrated capacitance. The second method is based upon automated glucose measurements obtained from the Nova Bioprofile FLEX® autosampler where cultures were fed to maintain a target glucose level which in turn maintained other nutrients based on a stoichiometric ratio. All of the calculations were done automatically through in-house integration with a Delta V process control system. Through both media and feed strategy optimization, a titer increase from the original platform titer of 5 to 6.3 g/L was achieved for cell line A, and a substantial titer increase of 4 to over 9 g/L was achieved for cell line B with comparable product quality. Glucose was found to be the best feed indicator, but not all cell lines benefited from dynamic feeding and optimized feed media was critical to process improvement. Our work demonstrated that dynamic feeding has the ability to automatically adjust feed rates according to culture behavior, and that the advantage can be best realized during early and rapid process development stages where different cell lines or large changes in culture conditions might lead to dramatically different nutrient demands.

  8. Role and Responsibility of the Media Specialist in the Change Process: Operating Within New Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannigan, Jane Anne

    1978-01-01

    Three variables in the process of educational change are examined as they relate to media specialists: timeliness, trade-off processes, and the nature of responses to demands for change. New American Association of School Librarians/Association for Educational Communications and Technology guidelines for media specialists, published in "Media…

  9. Examination of the mass media process and personal factors affecting the assessment of mass media-disseminated health information.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çakır, Tülin; Avşar, Zakir; Üzel Taş, Hanife

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the mass media and personal characteristics leading to health communication inequality as well as the role of certain factors in health communication's mass media process. Using both sociodemographic variables and Maletzke's model as a basis, we investigated the relationship between selected components of the mass communication process, the receiving of reliable health information as a result of health communication, and the condition of its use. The study involved 1853 people in Turkey and was structured in two parts. The first part dealt with questions regarding sociodemographic characteristics, the use of the mass media and the public's ability to obtain health information from it, the public's perception of the trustworthiness of health information, and the state of translating this information into health-promoting behaviours. In the second part, questions related to the mass communication process were posed using a five-point Likert scale. This section tried to establish structural equation modelling using the judgements prepared on the basis of the mass media model. Through this study, it has been observed that sociodemographic factors such as education and age affect individuals' use of and access to communication channels; individuals' trust in and selection of health information from the programme content and their changing health behaviours (as a result of the health information) are related to both their perception of the mass communication process and to sociodemographic factors, but are more strongly related to the former. PMID:25002272

  10. Examination of the mass media process and personal factors affecting the assessment of mass media-disseminated health information.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çakır, Tülin; Avşar, Zakir; Üzel Taş, Hanife

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the mass media and personal characteristics leading to health communication inequality as well as the role of certain factors in health communication's mass media process. Using both sociodemographic variables and Maletzke's model as a basis, we investigated the relationship between selected components of the mass communication process, the receiving of reliable health information as a result of health communication, and the condition of its use. The study involved 1853 people in Turkey and was structured in two parts. The first part dealt with questions regarding sociodemographic characteristics, the use of the mass media and the public's ability to obtain health information from it, the public's perception of the trustworthiness of health information, and the state of translating this information into health-promoting behaviours. In the second part, questions related to the mass communication process were posed using a five-point Likert scale. This section tried to establish structural equation modelling using the judgements prepared on the basis of the mass media model. Through this study, it has been observed that sociodemographic factors such as education and age affect individuals' use of and access to communication channels; individuals' trust in and selection of health information from the programme content and their changing health behaviours (as a result of the health information) are related to both their perception of the mass communication process and to sociodemographic factors, but are more strongly related to the former.

  11. Integrating social media and social marketing: a four-step process.

    PubMed

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Keller, Heidi

    2012-03-01

    Social media is a group of Internet-based applications that allows individuals to create, collaborate, and share content with one another. Practitioners can realize social media's untapped potential by incorporating it as part of the larger social marketing strategy, beyond promotion. Social media, if used correctly, may help organizations increase their capacity for putting the consumer at the center of the social marketing process. The purpose of this article is to provide a template for strategic thinking to successfully include social media as part of the social marketing strategy by using a four-step process. PMID:22382492

  12. Integrating social media and social marketing: a four-step process.

    PubMed

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L; Keller, Heidi

    2012-03-01

    Social media is a group of Internet-based applications that allows individuals to create, collaborate, and share content with one another. Practitioners can realize social media's untapped potential by incorporating it as part of the larger social marketing strategy, beyond promotion. Social media, if used correctly, may help organizations increase their capacity for putting the consumer at the center of the social marketing process. The purpose of this article is to provide a template for strategic thinking to successfully include social media as part of the social marketing strategy by using a four-step process.

  13. Exploring Media Processes and Project Applications: Rediscovering Shrinky Dinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf Bordonaro, Gaelynn P.; Blake, Ann; Corrington, Deborah; Fanders, Tegan; Morley, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Shrinky Dinks[R] are a plastic-sheet material that shrinks, hardens and thickens when heated in a traditional or toaster oven. The material was a favorite of generations, but many contemporary students and professionals in art have never had the opportunity to play with the unique media. This article discusses Shrinky Dinks and the importance of…

  14. Cyberbullying behavior and adolescents' use of media with antisocial content: a cyclic process model.

    PubMed

    den Hamer, Anouk; Konijn, Elly A; Keijer, Micha G

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined the role of media use in adolescents' cyberbullying behavior. Following previous research, we propose a Cyclic Process Model of face-to-face victimization and cyberbullying through two mediating processes of anger/frustration and antisocial media content. This model was tested utilizing a cross-sectional design with adolescent participants (N=892). Exposure to antisocial media content was measured with a newly developed content-based scale (i.e., the C-ME), showing good psychometric qualities. Results of structural equation modeling showed that adolescents' exposure to antisocial media content was significantly associated with cyberbullying behavior, especially in adolescents who experienced anger and frustration due to face-to-face victimization. Goodness of fit indices demonstrated a good fit of the theoretical model to the data and indicated that exposure to antisocial media content acts as an amplifier in a cyclic process of victimization-related anger and cyberbullying behavior. PMID:24015985

  15. Learning and Collective Knowledge Construction with Social Media: A Process-Oriented Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmerle, Joachim; Moskaliuk, Johannes; Oeberst, Aileen; Cress, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Social media are increasingly being used for educational purposes. The first part of this article briefly reviews literature that reports on educational applications of social media tools. The second part discusses theories that may provide a basis for analyzing the processes that are relevant for individual learning and collective knowledge…

  16. A Research Park for Studying Processes in Unsaturated Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine Baker; Travis McLing; Leah Street; Annette Schafer; Shannon Ansley; Larry Hull; Robert Holt

    2005-01-01

    A field research site has been developed to explore the combined use of physical experiments and mathematical modeling to analyze large-scale infiltration and chemical transport through the unsaturated media overlying the Snake River Plain Aquifer in southeastern Idaho. This site offers opportunities to observe water and contaminant migration influenced by fluid dynamics and microbial activity through heterogeneous-porous and fractured media. At many waste disposal facilities, the presence of toxic or radioactive wastes between the land surface and underlying aquifers poses a serious and ongoing threat to public health and safety. To reduce the risk associated with these industrial and Cold War by-products, a combination of remediation and long-term monitoring will be required.

  17. Towards a biomolecular computer. Information processing capabilities of biomolecular nonlinear dynamic media.

    PubMed

    Rambidi, N G; Maximychev, A V

    1997-01-01

    The information processing capabilities of biomolecular excitable media based on nonlinear dynamic mechanisms are discussed. Given even the simplest medium geometry, dynamics and information processing features inherent in biomolecular excitable media proves to be diverse and sophisticated. For the case of pseudo two-dimensional versions these media can be described in terms of neural networks having lateral connections. The main responses of shunting on-center off-surround feedback neural networks and pseudo two-dimensional excitable systems to the external excitations are surprisingly similar. The excitable media are capable of short-time memory, of contour enhancement and quenching or amplifying small features depending on medium state. The analogies discussed reaffirm specific neural net characteristics of excitable media and give the opportunity to estimate more accurate excitable medium characteristics. PMID:9113354

  18. Process evaluation and participatory methods in an obesity-prevention media campaign for Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Reininger, Belinda M; Barroso, Cristina S; Mitchell-Bennett, Lisa; Cantu, Ethel; Fernandez, Maria E; Gonzalez, Dora Alicia; Chavez, Marge; Freeberg, Diamantina; McAlister, Alfred

    2010-05-01

    To address obesity and related morbidities, community-based participatory research (CBPR) strategies were employed to design and evaluate a Spanish-language media campaign promoting physical activity and healthful food choices among Mexican Americans. Process evaluation including content analyses on types and focus of media messages was conducted. Focus groups assessed appeal and trustworthiness of messages. All media campaign products featured role models and experts. Campaign messages primarily (91%) appeared in TV morning show segments. Newsletters presented individual and family role model stories. A majority of newsletters (68%) were distributed through churches and "promotora" outreach efforts. CBPR lends itself to the selection and tailoring of evidence-based media campaigns. Moreover, CBPR guidance resulted in media messages that were credible and appealing to audience. Process evaluation strategies that gather information from the community provide solid evidence for how to modify the campaign to best meet audience expectations.

  19. Simulating diffusion processes in discontinuous media: Benchmark tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejay, Antoine; Pichot, Géraldine

    2016-06-01

    We present several benchmark tests for Monte Carlo methods simulating diffusion in one-dimensional discontinuous media. These benchmark tests aim at studying the potential bias of the schemes and their impact on the estimation of micro- or macroscopic quantities (repartition of masses, fluxes, mean residence time, …). These benchmark tests are backed by a statistical analysis to filter out the bias from the unavoidable Monte Carlo error. We apply them on four different algorithms. The results of the numerical tests give a valuable insight into the fine behavior of these schemes, as well as rules to choose between them.

  20. Social Media and eBusiness: Cultural Impacts on the Influence Process in Consumer Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Hong; Xu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Social media has been used as an important tool by firms to influence consumers’ attitude and behavior. Influence occurs in consumer communities in social media because community members have the control of discovering, producing, sharing, and distributing information and because the spread out of their experiences and opinions in the format of electronic word-of-mouth forms emerging conformance. Prior research has explored how the influence occurring in online social media communities impacts consumers’ attitude and behavior (e.g., product attitude and purchase decision, effectual thinking and behavior, brand trust and brand loyalty). But because social media has the ability of global reach, cross-border factors should not be neglected in studying the influence process. As such, this paper adopts national cultural dimensions identified by Hofstede (1984), individualism/collectivism and power distance particularly, the index of cultural distance, and the social influence theory to explore how culture impacts the influence occurring in consumer communities in social media.

  1. Learning and Collective Knowledge Construction With Social Media: A Process-Oriented Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerle, Joachim; Moskaliuk, Johannes; Oeberst, Aileen; Cress, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Social media are increasingly being used for educational purposes. The first part of this article briefly reviews literature that reports on educational applications of social media tools. The second part discusses theories that may provide a basis for analyzing the processes that are relevant for individual learning and collective knowledge construction. We argue that a systems-theoretical constructivist approach is appropriate to examine the processes of educational social media use, namely, self-organization, the internalization of information, the externalization of knowledge, and the interplay of externalization and internalization providing the basis of a co-evolution of cognitive and social systems. In the third part we present research findings that illustrate and support this systems-theoretical framework. Concluding, we discuss the implications for educational design and for future research on learning and collective knowledge construction with social media. PMID:26246643

  2. Method of treating contaminated HEPA filter media in pulp process

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian S.; Argyle, Mark D.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Mondok, Emilio P.

    2003-07-29

    A method for reducing contamination of HEPA filters with radioactive and/or hazardous materials is described. The method includes pre-processing of the filter for removing loose particles. Next, the filter medium is removed from the housing, and the housing is decontaminated. Finally, the filter medium is processed as pulp for removing contaminated particles by physical and/or chemical methods, including gravity, flotation, and dissolution of the particles. The decontaminated filter medium is then disposed of as non-RCRA waste; the particles are collected, stabilized, and disposed of according to well known methods of handling such materials; and the liquid medium in which the pulp was processed is recycled.

  3. Effects of focusing on third-order nonlinear processes in isotropic media. [laser beam interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    Third-order nonlinear processes in isotropic media have been successfully used for tripling the efficiency of high-power laser radiation for the production of tunable and fixed-frequency coherent vacuum UV radiation and for up-conversion of IR radiation. The effects of focusing on two processes of this type are studied theoretically and experimentally.

  4. Chemical conversions in supercritical media: Environmentally sound approaches to processes and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Borkowsky, S.; Buelow, S.; Langlois, D.; LeLacheur, R.; Mitchell, M.; Tumas, B.; Williams, P.; Waymouth, R.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The aim of this effort was to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluids (SCF) as reaction media in an effort to develop new, environmentally-friendly methods for chemical synthesis or processing. The use of novel media creates the possibility of opening up substantially different chemical pathways, increasing selectivity (eliminating waste by-products), and enhancing reaction rates (decreasing hold-up times and saving energy). In addition, the use of SCF as reaction media facilitates downstream separations and mitigate or eliminate the need for hazardous solvents on scales from bench top to production. This project employed a highly interdisciplinary approach to investigate the utility of SCFs as reaction media for polymer synthesis and synthetic organic chemistry.

  5. Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures for image recording and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasherininov, P. G. Tomasov, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    Fast optical recording media based on semiconductor nanostructures (CdTe, GaAs) for image recording and processing with a speed to 10{sup 6} cycle/s (which exceeds the speed of known recording media based on metal-insulator-semiconductor-(liquid crystal) (MIS-LC) structures by two to three orders of magnitude), a photosensitivity of 10{sup -2}V/cm{sup 2}, and a spatial resolution of 5-10 (line pairs)/mm are developed. Operating principles of nanostructures as fast optical recording media and methods for reading images recorded in such media are described. Fast optical processors for recording images in incoherent light based on CdTe crystal nanostructures are implemented. The possibility of their application to fabricate image correlators is shown.

  6. Emotionally anesthetized: media violence induces neural changes during emotional face processing.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Laura A; Morrison, Robert G; Kmiecik, Matthew J; Garbarino, James; Silton, Rebecca L

    2015-10-01

    Media violence exposure causes increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior, suggesting that media violence desensitizes people to the emotional experience of others. Alterations in emotional face processing following exposure to media violence may result in desensitization to others' emotional states. This study used scalp electroencephalography methods to examine the link between exposure to violence and neural changes associated with emotional face processing. Twenty-five participants were shown a violent or nonviolent film clip and then completed a gender discrimination stop-signal task using emotional faces. Media violence did not affect the early visual P100 component; however, decreased amplitude was observed in the N170 and P200 event-related potentials following the violent film, indicating that exposure to film violence leads to suppression of holistic face processing and implicit emotional processing. Participants who had just seen a violent film showed increased frontal N200/P300 amplitude. These results suggest that media violence exposure may desensitize people to emotional stimuli and thereby require fewer cognitive resources to inhibit behavior.

  7. Emotionally anesthetized: media violence induces neural changes during emotional face processing.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Laura A; Morrison, Robert G; Kmiecik, Matthew J; Garbarino, James; Silton, Rebecca L

    2015-10-01

    Media violence exposure causes increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior, suggesting that media violence desensitizes people to the emotional experience of others. Alterations in emotional face processing following exposure to media violence may result in desensitization to others' emotional states. This study used scalp electroencephalography methods to examine the link between exposure to violence and neural changes associated with emotional face processing. Twenty-five participants were shown a violent or nonviolent film clip and then completed a gender discrimination stop-signal task using emotional faces. Media violence did not affect the early visual P100 component; however, decreased amplitude was observed in the N170 and P200 event-related potentials following the violent film, indicating that exposure to film violence leads to suppression of holistic face processing and implicit emotional processing. Participants who had just seen a violent film showed increased frontal N200/P300 amplitude. These results suggest that media violence exposure may desensitize people to emotional stimuli and thereby require fewer cognitive resources to inhibit behavior. PMID:25759472

  8. Emotionally anesthetized: media violence induces neural changes during emotional face processing

    PubMed Central

    Stockdale, Laura A.; Morrison, Robert G.; Kmiecik, Matthew J.; Garbarino, James

    2015-01-01

    Media violence exposure causes increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior, suggesting that media violence desensitizes people to the emotional experience of others. Alterations in emotional face processing following exposure to media violence may result in desensitization to others’ emotional states. This study used scalp electroencephalography methods to examine the link between exposure to violence and neural changes associated with emotional face processing. Twenty-five participants were shown a violent or nonviolent film clip and then completed a gender discrimination stop-signal task using emotional faces. Media violence did not affect the early visual P100 component; however, decreased amplitude was observed in the N170 and P200 event-related potentials following the violent film, indicating that exposure to film violence leads to suppression of holistic face processing and implicit emotional processing. Participants who had just seen a violent film showed increased frontal N200/P300 amplitude. These results suggest that media violence exposure may desensitize people to emotional stimuli and thereby require fewer cognitive resources to inhibit behavior. PMID:25759472

  9. Communication as group process media of aircrew performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, B. G.; Foushee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    This study of group process was motivated by a high-fidelity flight simulator project in which aircrew performance was found to be better when the crew had recently flown together. Considering recent operating experience as a group-level input factor, aspects of the communication process between crewmembers (Captain and First Officer), were explored as a possible mediator to performance. Communication patterns were defined by a speech act typology adapted for the flightdeck setting and distinguished crews that had previously flown together (FT) from those that had not flown together (NFT). A more open communication channel with respect to information exchange and validation and greater First Officer participation in task-related topics was shown by FT crews while NFT crews engaged in more non-task discourse, a speech mode less structured by roles and probably serving a more interpersonal function. Relationships between the speech categories themselves, representing linguistic, and role-related interdependencies provide guidelines for interpreting the primary findings.

  10. Double resonant processes in 1D nonlinear periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmiak, Vladimir; Konotop, Vladimir

    2001-03-01

    We consider one-dimensional periodic structure consisting of alternating layers fabricated from the materials possessing \\chi^(2) nonlinearity and assume that the filling fraction and the dielectric permittivities of the slabs are chosen in such a way that resonant contions for the generation for the second and third harmonic are satisfied simultaneously. The possibility of such process is demonstrated in the structure consisting of the alternating slabs of AlGaAs and InSb. The wave evolution is described in terms of envelope function approach. By taking account three resonant waves one obtains a system of coupled-mode differential equations. One of the solutions which is of special importance is that of having a constant amplitude and the first and third harmonic having zero amplitude. We analyze the stability of the solutions and show that the use of the double resonance allows one to obtain difference generation. A particular example of such a process is fractional conversion ω arrow (2/3)ω which takes place with the participation of the mode with the frequency ω/3.

  11. Small scale flow processes in aqueous heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.; Dickenson, E.

    1996-04-01

    Small scale flow processes in aqueous heterogeneous porous systems have been studied experimentally via novel nonintrusive fluorescence imaging techniques. The techniques involve 3D visualization and quantification of flow fields within a refractive index-matched transparent porous column. The refractive index-matching yields a transparent porous medium, free from any scattering and refraction at the solid-liquid interfaces, as a result allowing direct optical probing at any point within the porous system. By illuminating the porous regions within the column with a planar sheet of laser beam, flow processes through the porous medium can be observed microscopically, and qualitative and quantitative in-pore transport information can be obtained at a good resolution and a good accuracy. A CCD camera is used to record the fluorescent images at every vertical plane location while sweeping back and forth across the column. These digitized flow images are then analyzed and accumulated over a 3D volume within the column. Series of flow experiments in aqueous, refractive index-matched, porous systems packed with natural mineral particles have been performed successfully in these laboratories.

  12. Bio-objects and the media: the role of communication in bio-objectification processes

    PubMed Central

    Maeseele, Pieter; Allgaier, Joachim; Martinelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The representation of biological innovations in and through communication and media practices is vital for understanding the nature of “bio-objects” and the process we call “bio-objectification.” This paper discusses two ideal-typical analytical approaches based on different underlying communication models, ie, the traditional (science- and media-centered) and media sociological (a multi-layered process involving various social actors in defining the meanings of scientific and technological developments) approach. In this analysis, the latter is not only found to be the most promising approach for understanding the circulation, (re)production, and (re)configuration of meanings of bio-objects, but also to interpret the relationship between media and science. On the basis of a few selected examples, this paper highlights how media function as a primary arena for the (re)production and (re)configuration of scientific and biomedical information with regards to bio-objects in the public sphere in general, and toward decision-makers, interest groups, and the public in specific. PMID:23771763

  13. Particulate removal processes and hydraulics of porous gravel media filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, J. M.; Phoenix, V. R.; Dorea, C. C.; Haynes, H.; Sloan, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainable urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) are rapidly gaining acceptance as a low-cost tool for treating urban runoff pollutants close to source. Road runoff water in particular requires treatment due to the presence of high levels of suspended particles and heavy metals adsorbed to these particles. The aim of this research is to elucidate the particle removal processes that occur within gravel filters that have so far been considered as 'black-box' systems. Based on these findings, a better understanding will be attained on what influences gravel filter removal efficiency and how this changes throughout their design life; leading to a more rational design of this useful technology. This has been achieved by tying together three disparate research elements: tracer residence time distribution curves of filters during clogging; 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of clogging filters and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of complex filter pore networks. This research relates column average changes in particle removal efficiency and tracer residence time distributions (RTDs) due to clogging with non-invasive measurement of the spatial variability in particle deposition. The CFD modelling provides a link between observed deposition patterns, flow velocities and wall shear stresses as well as the explanations for the change in RTD with clogging and the effect on particle transport. Results show that, as a filter clogs, particles take a longer, more tortuous path through the filter. This is offset by a reduction in filter volume resulting in higher flow velocities and more rapid particle transport. Higher velocities result in higher shear stresses and the development of preferential pathways in which the velocity exceeds the deposition threshold and the overall efficiency of the filter decreases. Initial pore geometry is linked to the pattern of deposition and subsequent formation of preferential pathways. These results shed light on the 'black-box' internal

  14. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  15. Imprint process performance for patterned media at densities greater than 1Tb/in2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengmao; Carden, Scott; Hellebrekers, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Melliar-Smith, M.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The use of bit pattern media beyond densities of 1Tb/in2 requires the ability to pattern dimensions to sub 10nm. This paper describes the techniques used to reach these dimensions with imprint lithography and avoid such challenges as pattern collapse, by developing improved resist materials with higher strength, and utilizing a reverse tone J-FIL/R process.

  16. Information Search Process: A Summary of Research and Implications for School Library Media Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Carol C.

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes a series of five studies on students' perspectives of information seeking in response to a research assignment. Feelings, thoughts, and actions commonly experienced in the information search process are described in six stages. Implications of the findings for further research and their impact on school library media programs are…

  17. Heuristic versus Systematic Processing of Specialist versus Generalist Sources in Online Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Yoon Jeon; Sundar, S. Shyam

    2010-01-01

    In exploring why specialist sources (e.g., CNN.com) are more persuasive than generalist sources (e.g., CBS.com), this study examines theoretical mechanisms related to information-processing differences caused by these sources. When we have a chain of sources (Websites and agents) in online media, does specialization of one of them bias the…

  18. Filamentation processes and dynamical excitation of light condensates in optical media with competing nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Tommasini, Daniele; Carpentier, Alicia V.

    2010-04-15

    We analyze both theoretically and by means of numerical simulations the phenomena of filamentation and dynamical formation of self-guided nonlinear waves in media featuring competing cubic and quintic nonlinearities. We provide a theoretical description of recent experiments in terms of a linear stability analysis supported with simulations, showing the possibility of the observation of modulational instability suppression of intense light pulses traveling across such nonlinear media. We also show a mechanism of indirect excitation of light condensates by means of coalescence processes of nonlinear coherent structures produced by managed filamentation of high-power laser beams.

  19. Media fill for validation of a good manufacturing practice-compliant cell production process.

    PubMed

    Serra, Marta; Roseti, Livia; Bassi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Regulation EC 1394/2007, the clinical use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products, such as Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells expanded for the regeneration of bone tissue or Chondrocytes for Autologous Implantation, requires the development of a process in compliance with the Good Manufacturing Practices. The Media Fill test, consisting of a simulation of the expansion process by using a microbial growth medium instead of the cells, is considered one of the most effective ways to validate a cell production process. Such simulation, in fact, allows to identify any weakness in production that can lead to microbiological contamination of the final cell product as well as qualifying operators. Here, we report the critical aspects concerning the design of a Media Fill test to be used as a tool for the further validation of the sterility of a cell-based Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant production process. PMID:25096172

  20. Media fill for validation of a good manufacturing practice-compliant cell production process.

    PubMed

    Serra, Marta; Roseti, Livia; Bassi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Regulation EC 1394/2007, the clinical use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products, such as Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells expanded for the regeneration of bone tissue or Chondrocytes for Autologous Implantation, requires the development of a process in compliance with the Good Manufacturing Practices. The Media Fill test, consisting of a simulation of the expansion process by using a microbial growth medium instead of the cells, is considered one of the most effective ways to validate a cell production process. Such simulation, in fact, allows to identify any weakness in production that can lead to microbiological contamination of the final cell product as well as qualifying operators. Here, we report the critical aspects concerning the design of a Media Fill test to be used as a tool for the further validation of the sterility of a cell-based Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant production process.

  1. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  6. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved.

  7. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved. PMID:27477101

  8. Fluid Stretching in Heterogeneous Porous Media as a Lévy Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Lester, Daniel R.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Stretching and compression of material fluid elements is key for the understanding and quantification of the dispersion and mixing dynamics in heterogeneous porous media flows, because they represent the support of a transported solute. The elongation and compression of a material strip determine the mixing volume and mixing rate and thus the concentration content of a heterogeneous mixture. While linear and exponential elongation dynamics typical for shear and chaotic flows, respectively, are well understood, the mechanisms that lead toobserved power-law elongation in heterogeneous porous media are in general unknown. We cast the fluid deformation problem in streamline coordinates, which reveals that the principal elongation mechanism for non-helical steady flows is due to shear deformation and velocity fluctuations along the streamline. The impact of this coupling on the elongation dynamics is quantified within a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach. The CTRW describes the movement of fluid particles in porous media flows through a random in both space and time, in which the transition time τ over a characteristic velocity length scale ℓc is coupled kinematically to streamline velocity vs as τ = ℓc/vc. In this framework, the elongation process isidentified as a coupled CTRW in which the elongation increment is related to the transition time through the velocity-shear coupling. For a broad distribution of transition, as found in strongly heterogeneous porous media, the elongation is a Lévy process. These dynamics describe a broad range of algebraic stretching behaviors with mean strip elongations ⟨ℓ(t)⟩∝ tν with 1/2 ≤ ν < 2. These findings have broad implications for the understanding and prediction of dilution and mixing in heterogeneous porous media flows.

  9. Volume Averaging Study of the Capacitive Deionization Process in Homogeneous Porous Media

    DOE PAGES

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-05

    Ion storage in porous electrodes is important in applications such as energy storage by supercapacitors, water purification by capacitive deionization, extraction of energy from a salinity difference and heavy ion purification. In this paper, a model is presented to simulate the charge process in homogeneous porous media comprising big pores. It is based on a theory for capacitive charging by ideally polarizable porous electrodes without faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions. A volume averaging technique is used to derive the averaged transport equations in the limit of thin electrical double layers. Transport between the electrolyte solution and the chargedmore » wall is described using the Gouy–Chapman–Stern model. The effective transport parameters for isotropic porous media are calculated solving the corresponding closure problems. Finally, the source terms that appear in the average equations are calculated using numerical computations. An alternative way to deal with the source terms is proposed.« less

  10. Selection and Transmission Processes for Information in the Emerging Media Environment: Psychological Motives and Message Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Joseph N.; Kim, Hyun Suk; Albarracín, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    The emerging media environment introduced fundamental changes in the quality and format of information available to the public, which can now flexibly seek, alter, and disseminate the information they receive. Therefore, the two processes of information selection and information retransmission are crucial for understanding the reach of any information available in the online information environment. From this starting point, we examine the common psychological motives driving information selection and transmission of attitude-relevant information: Defense and accuracy motives adding a focus on interpersonal motives. We also review message factors that can activate psychological motives leading to selection of retransmission of information, such as the desire for novelty and emotional stimulation. We speculate about the directions for the next generation of research necessary to understand exposure as a core outcome in media effects research and theory. PMID:26190944

  11. Volume Averaging Study of the Capacitive Deionization Process in Homogeneous Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-05

    Ion storage in porous electrodes is important in applications such as energy storage by supercapacitors, water purification by capacitive deionization, extraction of energy from a salinity difference and heavy ion purification. In this paper, a model is presented to simulate the charge process in homogeneous porous media comprising big pores. It is based on a theory for capacitive charging by ideally polarizable porous electrodes without faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions. A volume averaging technique is used to derive the averaged transport equations in the limit of thin electrical double layers. Transport between the electrolyte solution and the charged wall is described using the Gouy–Chapman–Stern model. The effective transport parameters for isotropic porous media are calculated solving the corresponding closure problems. Finally, the source terms that appear in the average equations are calculated using numerical computations. An alternative way to deal with the source terms is proposed.

  12. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Final separating media evaluation and test report (FSMER)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-19

    {open_quotes}Evaluation Engineering and Development of Advanced Cyclone Processes{close_quotes} is one of the DOE-PETC sponsored advanced coal cleaning projects, which share a number of specific goals. These goals are to produce a 6% ash product, reject 85% of the parent coal`s pyritic sulfur, recover 85% of the parent coal`s Btu value, and provide products that are less than 30% moisture. The process in this project, as the name implies, relies on a cyclone or cyclonic separator to achieve physical beneficiation based on the gravimetric differences between clean coal and its impurities. Just as important as the cyclonic separator, if not more so, is the selection of a parting liquid or medium for use in the separator. Selection of a separating medium is regarded as a significant portion of the project because it has a profound impact on the required unit operations, the performance of the separator, and economics of the process. The choice of medium especially influences selection of media recovery system(s), and the characteristics of clean coal and refuse products. Since medium selection is such an important aspect of the project, portions of the project are dedicated to the study, evaluation, and selection of the most desirable medium. Though separators are an important component, this project initially focused on media study, rather than the separators themselves. In coal processing, discussion of media requires description of the handling and recovery system(s), separation performance, interaction with coal, cost, and health, environmental and safety issues. In order to be effective, a candidate must perform well in all of these categories.

  13. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Final separating media evaluation and test report (FSMER). Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report consists of appendices pertaining to the separating media evaluation (calcium nitrate solution) and testing for an advanced cyclone process. Appendices include: materials safety data, aqueous medium regeneration, pH control strategy, and other notes and data.

  14. Simulating diffusion processes in discontinuous media: A numerical scheme with constant time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Lejay, Antoine; Pichot, Geraldine

    2012-08-30

    In this article, we propose new Monte Carlo techniques for moving a diffusive particle in a discontinuous media. In this framework, we characterize the stochastic process that governs the positions of the particle. The key tool is the reduction of the process to a Skew Brownian motion (SBM). In a zone where the coefficients are locally constant on each side of the discontinuity, the new position of the particle after a constant time step is sampled from the exact distribution of the SBM process at the considered time. To do so, we propose two different but equivalent algorithms: a two-steps simulation with a stop at the discontinuity and a one-step direct simulation of the SBM dynamic. Some benchmark tests illustrate their effectiveness.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems. PMID:27176384

  16. Cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti GM5 in two batch process using vinasse as culture media.

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Lombana-Sánchez, Nelson; Villa-Restrepo, Andrés Felipe; Fernández-Calle, Erika Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti GM5 by means of two aerobic treatments: the static discontinuous fermentation process (treatment 1) and the discontinuous fermentation process in a rotary shaker (treatment 2). All these experiments were carried out using vinasse as experimental culture media (VM) and were compared with standard media containing glucose at 2% (standard medium (SM)). A sample of each treatment was extracted every 24 h over a period of 168 h. The maximum rates of cellulose produced in treatment 1 using SM added up to 3.63 ± 0.18 g l(-1), and to 4.15 ± 0.16 g l(-1) when VM was used. The amount of cellulose produced in treatment 2 using SM was 2.95 ± 0.09 g l(-1) (which suggests an increase of 37%), and added up to 1.84 ± 0.07 g l(-1) when using VM. A better global yield of both treatments in terms of sugar consumption after 168 h was obtained when using VM: 32% in treatment 1, whereas in treatment 2 it was 9%. A 20% decrease on vinasse COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) values was found to be yet another important advantage of working with this strain. PMID:24037159

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  18. Conservation Laws for Coupled Hydro-mechanical Processes in Unsaturated Porous Media: Theory and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Borja, R I; White, J A

    2010-02-19

    We develop conservation laws for coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media using three-phase continuum mixture theory. From the first law of thermodynamics, we identify energy-conjugate variables for constitutive modeling at macroscopic scale. Energy conjugate expressions identified relate a certain measure of effective stress to the deformation of the solid matrix, the degree of saturation to the matrix suction, the pressure in each constituent phase to the corresponding intrinsic volume change of this phase, and the seepage forces to the corresponding pressure gradients. We then develop strong and weak forms of boundary-value problems relevant for 3D finite element modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes in unsaturated porous media. The paper highlights a 3D numerical example illustrating the advances in the solution of large-scale coupled finite element systems, as well as the challenges in developing more predictive tools satisfying the basic conservation laws and the observed constitutive responses for unsaturated porous materials.

  19. Thermodynamics of Irreversible Processes Applied to Solute Transport in Non Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu-Balster, I.; Sicard, J.

    1999-09-01

    Modeling of solute transport in non-saturated and non-isothermal porous media is dealt with by thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This rigorous approach enables us to consider the different kinds of transfer and the coupling. Every physical phenomenon as water phase transition and solute adsorption by the solid matrix can be taken into account. The final model may be applied to several fields such as civil engineering, agronomy, pollution and the assessment of radioactive waste repositories. A numerical modeling taking into account the effect of temperature gradient on solute transport (“Soret effect”) is in the process of implementation in the French software “CESAR-LCPC” of the “Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussées”.

  20. Ultrasonic measurement device for the characterization of microbiological and biochemical processes in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvira, L.; Durán, C.; Sierra, C.; Resa, P.; Montero de Espinosa, F.

    2007-07-01

    A measuring device for the characterization of liquid media based on the propagation of ultrasonic waves is presented. It is a four-channel system especially designed for monitoring microbiological and biochemical processes. The liquid samples are placed in commercial glass bottles which can be sterilized. The bottles have inlet and outlet tubes, which can be used for adding substances or extracting samples during the measuring process without interruption. Magnetic stirring can be used to keep the liquid agitated for homogenization purposes. Thermal control elements assure the temperature stability during the measurement. The liquid characterization is based on the detection of amplitude and time-of-flight changes in the sample under study. The main features, operation and performance of this ultrasonic device are analysed in this work, and some measurements and preliminary results are shown.

  1. Thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes in fractured-porous media: Benchmarks and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, O.; Shao, H.; Görke, U.; Kalbacher, T.; Bauer, S.; McDermott, C. I.; Wang, W.

    2012-12-01

    The book comprises an assembly of benchmarks and examples for porous media mechanics collected over the last twenty years. Analysis of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes is essential to many applications in environmental engineering, such as geological waste deposition, geothermal energy utilisation, carbon capture and storage, water resources management, hydrology, even climate change. In order to assess the feasibility as well as the safety of geotechnical applications, process-based modelling is the only tool to put numbers, i.e. to quantify future scenarios. This charges a huge responsibility concerning the reliability of computational tools. Benchmarking is an appropriate methodology to verify the quality of modelling tools based on best practices. Moreover, benchmarking and code comparison foster community efforts. The benchmark book is part of the OpenGeoSys initiative - an open source project to share knowledge and experience in environmental analysis and scientific computation.

  2. A Communication Process: Electronic Media in Distance Education--A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Donald; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the current use of electronic media in distance education, emphasizing Canadian examples. Examines broadcast television, videotape, satellite, telephone, radio, audiocassette, and computer. Discusses trends in media use and institutional development, focusing on education as communication and on the importance of combining different media.…

  3. Combining natural language processing and network analysis to examine how advocacy organizations stimulate conversation on social media

    PubMed Central

    Bail, Christopher Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Social media sites are rapidly becoming one of the most important forums for public deliberation about advocacy issues. However, social scientists have not explained why some advocacy organizations produce social media messages that inspire far-ranging conversation among social media users, whereas the vast majority of them receive little or no attention. I argue that advocacy organizations are more likely to inspire comments from new social media audiences if they create “cultural bridges,” or produce messages that combine conversational themes within an advocacy field that are seldom discussed together. I use natural language processing, network analysis, and a social media application to analyze how cultural bridges shaped public discourse about autism spectrum disorders on Facebook over the course of 1.5 years, controlling for various characteristics of advocacy organizations, their social media audiences, and the broader social context in which they interact. I show that organizations that create substantial cultural bridges provoke 2.52 times more comments about their messages from new social media users than those that do not, controlling for these factors. This study thus offers a theory of cultural messaging and public deliberation and computational techniques for text analysis and application-based survey research. PMID:27694580

  4. Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices

    DOEpatents

    Laadan, Oren; Nieh, Jason; Phung, Dan

    2012-10-02

    Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices are provided. In some embodiments, a method includes running one or more processes associated with the distributed application in virtualized operating system environments on a plurality of digital processing devices, suspending the one or more processes, and saving network state information relating to network connections among the one or more processes. The method further include storing process information relating to the one or more processes, recreating the network connections using the saved network state information, and restarting the one or more processes using the stored process information.

  5. Talking Back to the Media Ideal: The Development and Validation of the Critical Processing of Beauty Images Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engeln-Maddox, Renee; Miller, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    This article details the development of the Critical Processing of Beauty Images Scale (CPBI) and studies demonstrating the psychometric soundness of this measure. The CPBI measures women's tendency to engage in critical processing of media images featuring idealized female beauty. Three subscales were identified using exploratory factor analysis…

  6. On the Upscaling of Reaction-Transport Processes in Porous Media with Fast Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kechagi, P.; Tsimpanogiannis, I.; Yortsos, Y.C.; Lichtner, P.

    2001-01-09

    This report is organized as follows: Provide a brief review of the upscaling constraints of the type (2) for a typical diffusion-reaction system. In this an analogy with two-phase flow in porous media was drawn. Then, using the methodology of QW a problem at the unit cell for the computation of the effective mass transfer coefficient, in processes where local thermodynamic equilibrium applies was derived. This problem is found to be different than in QW, as it depends on the gradients of the macroscale variable, and can be cast in terms of an eigenvalue problem. Two simple, examples, one involving advection-dissolution and another involving drying in a pore network, was presented to illustrate the coupling between scales and to show the quantitative effect in case this coupling was neglected. Finally, similar ideas and an illustrative example was applied to reaction-diffusion systems with fast kinetics, where an equilibrium state is approached.

  7. Going beyond exposure to local news media: an information-processing examination of public perceptions of food safety.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kenneth; Thorson, Esther; Zhang, Yuyan

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between local news media and public perceptions of food safety was examined in a statewide telephone survey (n = 524). The theoretical framework of the study was based on a review of the social and psychological factors that affect public concerns about food safety, the relationship between mass communication and risk perception, and the thesis of information-processing strategies and its impact on learning from the news. The results show that information-processing strategies substantially mediated the relationship between local news media and public perceptions of food safety, with elaborative processing being more influential than active reflection in people's learning from the news media. Attention to local television had an independent effect, after demographics, awareness of food safety problems, and perceived safety of local food supply were statistically controlled. Other important predictors included gender, education, ethnicity, and perceived safety of local food supply.

  8. Microwave activation of electrochemical processes: enhanced electrodehalogenation in organic solvent media.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Chen; Coles, Barry A; Compton, Richard G; Marken, Frank

    2002-08-21

    The effect of high-intensity microwave radiation focused into a "hot spot" region in the vicinity of an electrode on electrochemical processes with and without coupled chemical reaction steps has been investigated in organic solvent media. First, the electrochemically reversible oxidation of ferrocene in acetonitrile and DMF is shown to be affected by microwave-induced thermal activation, resulting in increased currents and voltammetric wave shape effects. A FIDAP simulation investigation allows quantitative insight into the temperature distribution and concentration gradients at the electrode / solution interface. Next, the effect of intense microwave radiation on electroorganic reactions is considered for the case of ECE processes. Experimental data for the reduction of p-bromonitrobenzene, o-bromonitrobenzene, and m-iodonitrobenzene in DMF and acetonitrile are analyzed in terms of an electron transfer (E), followed by a chemical dehalogenation step (C), and finally followed by another electron-transfer step (E). The presence of the "hot spot" in the solution phase favors processes with high activation barriers.

  9. Using hypnosis to disrupt face processing: mirrored-self misidentification delusion and different visual media

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Michael H.; Barnier, Amanda J.; Coltheart, Max; Langdon, Robyn; Cox, Rochelle E.; Rivolta, Davide; Halligan, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Mirrored-self misidentification delusion is the belief that one’s reflection in the mirror is not oneself. This experiment used hypnotic suggestion to impair normal face processing in healthy participants and recreate key aspects of the delusion in the laboratory. From a pool of 439 participants, 22 high hypnotisable participants (“highs”) and 20 low hypnotisable participants were selected on the basis of their extreme scores on two separately administered measures of hypnotisability. These participants received a hypnotic induction and a suggestion for either impaired (i) self-face recognition or (ii) impaired recognition of all faces. Participants were tested on their ability to recognize themselves in a mirror and other visual media – including a photograph, live video, and handheld mirror – and their ability to recognize other people, including the experimenter and famous faces. Both suggestions produced impaired self-face recognition and recreated key aspects of the delusion in highs. However, only the suggestion for impaired other-face recognition disrupted recognition of other faces, albeit in a minority of highs. The findings confirm that hypnotic suggestion can disrupt face processing and recreate features of mirrored-self misidentification. The variability seen in participants’ responses also corresponds to the heterogeneity seen in clinical patients. An important direction for future research will be to examine sources of this variability within both clinical patients and the hypnotic model. PMID:24994973

  10. Methods, media, and systems for detecting attack on a digital processing device

    DOEpatents

    Stolfo, Salvatore J.; Li, Wei-Jen; Keromylis, Angelos D.; Androulaki, Elli

    2014-07-22

    Methods, media, and systems for detecting attack are provided. In some embodiments, the methods include: comparing at least part of a document to a static detection model; determining whether attacking code is included in the document based on the comparison of the document to the static detection model; executing at least part of the document; determining whether attacking code is included in the document based on the execution of the at least part of the document; and if attacking code is determined to be included in the document based on at least one of the comparison of the document to the static detection model and the execution of the at least part of the document, reporting the presence of an attack. In some embodiments, the methods include: selecting a data segment in at least one portion of an electronic document; determining whether the arbitrarily selected data segment can be altered without causing the electronic document to result in an error when processed by a corresponding program; in response to determining that the arbitrarily selected data segment can be altered, arbitrarily altering the data segment in the at least one portion of the electronic document to produce an altered electronic document; and determining whether the corresponding program produces an error state when the altered electronic document is processed by the corresponding program.

  11. Using hypnosis to disrupt face processing: mirrored-self misidentification delusion and different visual media.

    PubMed

    Connors, Michael H; Barnier, Amanda J; Coltheart, Max; Langdon, Robyn; Cox, Rochelle E; Rivolta, Davide; Halligan, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Mirrored-self misidentification delusion is the belief that one's reflection in the mirror is not oneself. This experiment used hypnotic suggestion to impair normal face processing in healthy participants and recreate key aspects of the delusion in the laboratory. From a pool of 439 participants, 22 high hypnotisable participants ("highs") and 20 low hypnotisable participants were selected on the basis of their extreme scores on two separately administered measures of hypnotisability. These participants received a hypnotic induction and a suggestion for either impaired (i) self-face recognition or (ii) impaired recognition of all faces. Participants were tested on their ability to recognize themselves in a mirror and other visual media - including a photograph, live video, and handheld mirror - and their ability to recognize other people, including the experimenter and famous faces. Both suggestions produced impaired self-face recognition and recreated key aspects of the delusion in highs. However, only the suggestion for impaired other-face recognition disrupted recognition of other faces, albeit in a minority of highs. The findings confirm that hypnotic suggestion can disrupt face processing and recreate features of mirrored-self misidentification. The variability seen in participants' responses also corresponds to the heterogeneity seen in clinical patients. An important direction for future research will be to examine sources of this variability within both clinical patients and the hypnotic model.

  12. Analyzing Public Discourse: Using Media Content Analysis to Understand the Policy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saraisky, Nancy Green

    2016-01-01

    One of the most basic and obvious sources of data for education policy analysis is text. This article discusses content analysis as an important part of the methodological toolbox for elucidating patterns and trends about education policy. Focusing specifically on media, I show how media content analysis can produce nuanced insights about the ways…

  13. Mortgaging the First Amendment: Strategic Use of the Regulatory Process and the Electronic Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Shawn

    This analysis of First Amendment rights for the electronic media recounts the stories of the broadcasting/cable industry must-carry compromise of 1986 and the failed codification of the Fairness Doctrine in 1987. It is noted that these cases were peculiar because, in each instance, the most powerful media in the country willingly sought abridgment…

  14. The Principal's Experience through the Process of Implementing Social Media in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovecchio, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    As school districts struggle to identify the role social media will play both inside and outside of the classroom, educational leaders can no longer ignore the benefits that these tools provide to students, stakeholders and faculty members. The potential challenges facing school leaders working in schools that utilize social media is extensive.…

  15. VARIATIONS IN INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA, PROCESSES, CONTENT AND APTITUDE VARIABLES IN RELATION TO EFFICIENCY OF COGNITIVE GOAL ATTAINMENT, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FATTU, N. A.

    A SERIES OF STUDIES WAS UNDERTAKEN, DIRECTED TOWARD EXPLORATIONS OF INTERRELATIONSHIPS AMONG MEDIA, PROCESSES (INSTRUCTIONAL PREREQUISITES), CONTENT AND APTITUDE VARIABLES, AND ACHIEVEMENTS. EMPHASIS THROUGHOUT WAS ON (1) THE COGNITIVE DOMAIN AND (2) PROBLEMS INVOLVED IN APPLICATION OF KNOWLEDGE TO A PRACTICAL TEACHING SITUATION. "THE TAXONOMY OF…

  16. Effects of Test Media on Different EFL Test-Takers in Writing Scores and in the Cognitive Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Yan-Min

    2016-01-01

    The effects of computer and paper test media on EFL test-takers with different computer familiarity in writing scores and in the cognitive writing process have been comprehensively explored from the learners' aspect as well as on the basis of related theories and practice. The results indicate significant differences in test scores among the…

  17. Statistical media and process optimization for biotransformation of rice bran to vanillin using Pediococcus acidilactici.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar

    2013-11-01

    An isolate of P. acidilactici capable of producing vanillin from rice bran was isolated from a milk product. Response Surface Methodology was employed for statistical media and process optimization for production of biovanillin. Statistical medium optimization was done in two steps involving Placket Burman Design and Central Composite Response Designs. The RSM optimized vanillin production medium consisted of 15% (w/v) rice bran, 0.5% (w/v) peptone, 0.1% (w/v) ammonium nitrate, 0.005% (w/v) ferulic acid, 0.005% (w/v) magnesium sulphate, and 0.1% (v/v) tween-80, pH 5.6, at a temperature of 37 degrees C under shaking conditions at 180 rpm. 1.269 g/L vanillin was obtained within 24 h of incubation in optimized culture medium. This is the first report indicating such a high vanillin yield obtained during biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin using a Pediococcal isolate.

  18. Examining the effects of media on learners' mental representations and cognitive processes in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Adrienne L.

    This study examined the effects of television and video games as media on the science knowledge and understanding of middle school students in a Midwest, urban charter school. Twenty-five study participants were organized into eight focus groups. Each group, which comprised of three to four members, was introduced to one of two media types, a television show episode or video games, and then asked a series of questions prompting group dialogue. Results show that students were able to distinguish science ideas presented in the media and made science content connections from previous classroom learning. Implications suggest how teachers can utilize weapons of mass instruction, the tools of media technology, to fight against the challenges that plague our current system of education.

  19. The SDO Social Media Planning Process: Walking the cat back into the bag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawro, M.; Young, C.; Van Norden, W. M.; Durscher, R.

    2012-12-01

    As social media continues to grow as a way to communicate with the public about science missions, data and other STEM related topics, there has become a need for more organized and regimented Social Media programs and plans. In the Heliophysics science division at Goddard Space Flight Center we have been working on creating a template for social media programs which incorporates not just the goals for the program, as well as identifying an audience, but also deals with concerns about messaging, collaboration with other organizations, controversial topics, and evaluation. We hope that through creating a more unified approach we can develop a social media program that not only meets the needs of the audience but incorporates the needs of all of the different entities including the scientists, EPO Professionals and Office of Communications.

  20. Parallel processing approach for radiative heat transfer prediction in participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, C.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-10-01

    Numerical analysis of radiative transfer in participating media can be very complex. Computer simulations of practical situations often require both large computer memory and long calculation times. The use of massively parallel machines has proven very effective in simulating large complex systems. This technical note presents a unified matrix formulation for node-to-node-based radiative exchange in isotropically scattering homogeneous media using the discrete exchange factor (DEF) method. Computational implementation is compared between serial and parallel computing machines. The results demonstrate that parallel computing has the potential for changing the nature of radiative transfer calculations. Parallel computing allows for faster, more manageable calculations; it is especially effective for nonlinear problems.

  1. Practical Tips to Help the Collaborative Process Work More Effectively in the School Library Media Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Amy

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author presents six tips to help school library media specialists achieve effective collaboration with teachers: (1) Schedule a set time for collaboration meetings and use a meeting log; (2) Be flexible; (3) Be an advocate for collaboration; (4) Co-plan, co-teach, and co-access; (5) Be positive; and (6) Keep a meeting log, log…

  2. Parallel processing approach for radiative heat transfer prediction in participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Saltiel, C.; Naraghi, M.H.N. Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY )

    1993-12-01

    A unified matrix formulation for node-to-node-based radiative exchange in isotropically scattering inhomogeneous media is developed using the discrete exchange factor method. Computational implementations of the unified matrix formulation on serial and parallel computers are compared. 15 refs.

  3. On the Process of Inquiry: A Synergy of Teacher, School Library Media Specialist, and Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Regina

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program developed collaboratively between a school library media specialist and a teacher for a fifth-grade language arts class on writing a research paper. Goals, including shared library resources and the use of print and electronic materials; sequence of lessons; and student reactions are discussed. (LRW)

  4. Developing Critically Thoughtful, Media-Rich Lessons in Science: Process and Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcaen, Philip

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I describe a professional development approach and a conceptual framework used to create critically thoughtful and media-rich science learning resources. Greater clarity about the nature of critical thinking and how to support teachers in learning to implement it are needed if we are to respond to broader calls for critical thinking…

  5. Developing the Second Language Writing Process through Social Media-Based Interaction Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez, Julian Esteban Zapata

    2015-01-01

    This paper depicts the results from a qualitative research study focused on finding out the effect of interaction through social media on the development of second language learners' written production from a private school in Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia. The study was framed within concepts such as "social interaction," "digital…

  6. Cataloging and Processing of Media, Directed Studies Materials and Arrangement of the Card Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poindexter, Charles C.

    The trend in Community Colleges, Technical Institutes, and some senior institutions is to merge the services of libraries, skills labs, media centers, and supportive instructional agencies into Learning Resources Centers (LRC). Many excellent reports have been written about the LRC concept, consequently, this report deals with the mechanics of…

  7. Thermal effects on the magnetization reversal process and its interpretation in perpendicular magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kumar; Acharya, B. Ramamurthy; Bertero, Gerardo

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the time-scale and temperature dependence of the magnetization reversal in perpendicular magnetic recording media. One of the under-reported phenomena associated with this reversal is the thermal dependence of the squareness of the magnetic hysteresis loop. Understanding this phenomenon is important because the coercive squareness parameter S∗ is often used to evaluate the strength of the magnetic exchange-coupling interactions between the grains. In this work, we demonstrate that S∗ is a dynamic quantity which depends on the thermal agitation of the magnetization, and it is imperative to take this dependence into account in interpreting magnetic and microstructural effects. Based on the Sharrock model for the dynamic coercivity, we built an expression for the time-scale and temperature dependence of S∗ in highly oriented perpendicular magnetic recording media. Fits of experimental data to the resulting expression were then used to extract the intrinsic squareness parameter Sint∗ which originates in the thermal-independent demagnetization and exchange-interaction effects. Sint∗ was estimated for two sets of perpendicular recording media samples. For the first set of media samples showing progressively smaller grain sizes, the values of S∗ measured at the normal magnetometry time-scales of milliseconds to seconds indicated progressively smaller values. In contrast, the values of the thermal-independent S∗ determined from applying the above model were progressively larger. This discrepancy can only be explained on the basis of progressively stronger intergranular exchange coupling, which is offset by strong thermal effects at small grain sizes. For the second set of media samples with increasingly larger segregant oxide content, progressively smaller values of both S∗ and thermal-independent Sint∗ were observed, thus verifying the strong intergranular segregation effects due to greater nonmagnetic grain boundary phase. The

  8. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. PMID:27081796

  9. Processes affecting soil and groundwater contamination by DNAPL in low-permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    This paper is one of a set of focus papers intended to document the current knowledge relevant to the contamination and remediation of soils and ground water by dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). The emphasis is on low permeability media such as fractured clay and till and unconsolidated, stratified formations. Basic concepts pertaining to immiscible-fluid mixtures are described and used to discuss such aspects as DNAPL transport, dissolved-phase transport, and equilibrium mass distributions. Several implications for remediation are presented. 27 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M). PMID:24953939

  11. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M).

  12. Process Performance of Secondary Effluent Granular Media Filtration with and without Preozonation.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion; De Las Casas, Carla; Henneman, Seppi; Witzgall, Robert; Yu, William; Ramberg, Steve; Parker, Denny; Ohlinger, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    A 10-month pilot study compared the performance of conventional granular media filtration (CGMF) with granular media filtration with preozonation (OGMF) to determine the effects of preozonation on filter performance. Filtration recoveries were lower for OGMF compared to CMGF when operated at a loading rate of 18.3 m/h. Operation at 18.3 m/h met turbidity requirements for California Department of Public Health Title 22 unrestricted reclaimed water requirements for both OGMF and CGMF. Preozonated secondary effluent at a transferred dose of 3 mg/L resulted in an increase in ultraviolet transmissivity (UVT) of approximately 6% and greater than 5-log inactivation of male-specific bacteriophage MS2. Wet weather flow events resulted in UVT decrease and a decline in MS2 inactivation to less than 3 log attributed to higher ozone demand in the secondary effluent. Preozonation increased N-nitrosodimethlyamine (NDMA) concentration approximately 10 times, but subsequent filtration reduced levels to secondary effluent values. A net increase in NDMA was observed at times.

  13. How scientists view the public, the media and the political process.

    PubMed

    Besley, John C; Nisbet, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    We review past studies on how scientists view the public, the goals of communication, the performance and impacts of the media, and the role of the public in policy decision-making. We add to these past findings by analyzing two recent large-scale surveys of scientists in the UK and US. These analyses show that scientists believe the public is uninformed about science and therefore prone to errors in judgment and policy preferences. Scientists are critical of media coverage generally, yet they also tend to rate favorably their own experience dealing with journalists, believing that such interactions are important both for promoting science literacy and for career advancement. Scientists believe strongly that they should have a role in public debates and view policy-makers as the most important group with which to engage. Few scientists view their role as an enabler of direct public participation in decision-making through formats such as deliberative meetings, and do not believe there are personal benefits for investing in these activities. Implications for future research are discussed, in particular the need to examine how ideology and selective information sources shape scientists' views.

  14. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media.

  15. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media. PMID:25378255

  16. Droplet fragmentation: 3D imaging of a previously unidentified pore-scale process during multiphase flow in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Tannaz; Butler, Ian B.; Geiger, Sebastian; van Dijke, Marinus I. J.; Sorbie, Ken S.

    2015-01-01

    Using X-ray computed microtomography, we have visualized and quantified the in situ structure of a trapped nonwetting phase (oil) in a highly heterogeneous carbonate rock after injecting a wetting phase (brine) at low and high capillary numbers. We imaged the process of capillary desaturation in 3D and demonstrated its impacts on the trapped nonwetting phase cluster size distribution. We have identified a previously unidentified pore-scale event during capillary desaturation. This pore-scale event, described as droplet fragmentation of the nonwetting phase, occurs in larger pores. It increases volumetric production of the nonwetting phase after capillary trapping and enlarges the fluid−fluid interface, which can enhance mass transfer between the phases. Droplet fragmentation therefore has implications for a range of multiphase flow processes in natural and engineered porous media with complex heterogeneous pore spaces. PMID:25646491

  17. Formation processes of CuCl and regenerated Cu crystals on bronze surfaces in neutral and acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Julin; Xu, Chunchun; Lv, Guocheng

    2006-07-01

    The paper is devoted to investigating the formation of CuCl and regenerated Cu crystals on bronze. Electrochemical behaviour of bronze in simulated anoxic edaphic media and occluded cell (O.C.) solutions was studied with cycle voltammetry (CV) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Within potential range of -800 to +800 mV, oxidation occurred was largely a process in which Cu is oxidized to CuCl and the reduction process was a reverse of it. An atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the morphology of CuCl crystals, regenerated Cu crystals and corrosion interface at nm level. The deposition of regenerated Cu on simulated archaeological bronzes was simulated under experimental conditions for the first time. CuCl could be thoroughly reduced to pure Cu if reduction time interval were sufficiently prolonged. This provided a theoretical and experimental basis for getting rid of harmful CuCl patina from archaeological bronzes with electrochemical means.

  18. Word Processing as Decision-Making: Writers' Choices of Writing Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Christina

    A study examined two writers and their use of word processing and pen and paper in order to set up and draw out the important variables that influence writers' decisions about word processing. Subjects, a college freshman and an engineer, were interviewed about their writing processes and were observed in their natural environment. Results…

  19. Plutonium scrap waste processing based on aqueous nitrate and chloride media

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, J D

    1985-05-13

    A brief review of plutonium scrap aqueous waste processing technology at Rocky Flats is given. Nitric acid unit operations include dissolution and leaching, anion exchange purification and precipitation. Chloride waste processing consists of cation exchange and carbonate precipitation. Ferrite and carrier precipitation waste treatment processes are also described. 3 figs.

  20. Meta-analytic moderators of experimental exposure to media portrayals of women on female appearance satisfaction: Social comparisons as automatic processes.

    PubMed

    Want, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Experimental exposure to idealized media portrayals of women is thought to induce social comparisons in female viewers and thereby to be generally detrimental to female viewers' satisfaction with their own appearance. Through meta-analysis, the present paper examines the impact of moderators of this effect, some identified and updated from a prior meta-analysis and some that have hitherto received little attention. Participants' pre-existing appearance concerns and the processing instructions participants were given when exposed to media portrayals were found to significantly moderate effect sizes. With regard to processing instructions, a novel and counter-intuitive pattern was revealed; effect sizes were smallest when participants were instructed to focus on the appearance of women in media portrayals, and largest when participants processed the portrayals on a distracting, non-appearance dimension. These results are interpreted through a framework that suggests that social comparisons are automatic processes, the effects of which can be modified through conscious processing.

  1. A computational model for coupled multiphysics processes of CO2 sequestration in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebian, M.; Al-Khoury, R.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a computational model for the simulation of coupled hydromechanical and electrokinetic flow in fractured porous media is introduced. Particular emphasis is placed on modeling CO2 flow in a deformed, fractured geological formation and the associated electrokinetic flow. The governing field equations are derived based on the averaging theory and the double porosity model. They are solved numerically with a mixed discretization scheme, formulated on the basis of the standard Galerkin finite element method, the extended finite element method, the level-set method and the Petrov-Galerkin method. The standard Galerkin method is utilized to discretize the equilibrium and the diffusive dominant field equations, and the extended finite element method, together with the level-set method and the Petrov-Galerkin method, are utilized to discretize the advective dominant field equations. The level-set method is employed to trace the CO2 plume front, and the extended finite element method is employed to model the high gradient in the saturation field front. The proposed mixed discretization scheme leads to a convergent system, giving a stable and effectively mesh-independent model. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed model is evaluated by verification and numerical examples. Effects of the fracture spacing on the CO2 flow and the streaming potential are discussed.

  2. Liquid-phase continuity and solute concentration dynamics during evaporation from porous media: pore-scale processes near vaporization surface.

    PubMed

    Shokri, N; Lehmann, P; Or, D

    2010-04-01

    Evaporation from porous media involves complex pore scale transport processes affecting liquid phase distribution and fluxes. Often, the initial evaporation rate is nearly constant and supplied by capillary flow from wetted zones below to the surface. Sustaining constant flow against gravity hinges on an upward capillary gradient and on liquid phase continuity with hydraulic conductivity sufficient for supplying evaporative flux. The pore scale liquid phase adjustments during evaporative displacement necessary for maintaining a constant flux have been postulated but rarely measured. In this study we employed detailed imaging using x-ray synchrotron radiation to study liquid phase distribution and dynamics at the most sensitive domain just below the surface of evaporating sand columns. Three-dimensional images at a resolution of 7 microns were obtained from sand column (mean particle size 0.6 mm) initially saturated with calcium iodide solution (4% by mass) to enhance image contrast. Detailed imaging of near-surface liquid phase distribution during evaporation confirmed phase continuity at micrometric scale and provided quantitative estimates of liquid conductance in agreement with values required to supply evaporative flux. Temporal variations in bulk salt concentrations determined from x-ray attenuation were proportional to evaporative water mass loss. Highly resolved salt concentration images revealed existence of evaporating chimneys that supply the bulk of evaporative demand. Delineated mass loss dynamics and salt distribution measured by the x-ray attenuation were in reasonable agreement with a simplified analytical convection-diffusion model for salt dynamics during evaporation from porous media. PMID:20481828

  3. Computer Assistance in Multi-Media Educational Publishing. IET Text-Processing Paper 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefrere, Paul; Whalley, Peter

    The use of word processing and digital image processing to develop new methods for preparing and evaluating materials in the Open University and the implications of these developments are discussed. Recent developments in computer and educational technology are reported as they pertain to cost effectiveness both in production efficiency and…

  4. The Writing Process from a School Library Media Specialist's Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Marge; Harvey, Carl A., II; Page, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    Most state standards refer to the writing process as one that writers use to communicate ideas with meaning and clarity for a variety of purposes and audiences. The writing process includes the stages a writer progresses through to move from a blank piece of paper to a finished piece that will be shared with the intended audience. Many teachers…

  5. Media Education: Sociology Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In Russia as well as in foreign countries we can witness sort of the confusion of the terms of "media education" and "media literacy". There are quite a few differences in theoretical approaches to media education, to distinguishing of the most important aims, objectives, means of introduction into the teaching process, etc.…

  6. The Electric Media Conspiracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Media defines a process of marking time. I can only make my own marks as producer and consumer of my own media forms. Man is, all at once, life sound and life motion--a mark through time, leaving a trail of images behind. Media is a natural extension of being human. (SR)

  7. Elucidation of adsorption processes at the surface of Pt(331) model electrocatalysts in acidic aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Marcus D; Colic, Viktor; Scieszka, Daniel; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S

    2016-04-28

    The Pt(331) surface has long been known to be the most active pure metal electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media. Its activity is often higher than those known for the Pt-based alloys towards ORR, being comparable with the most active Pt3Ni(111), Pt3Y or Pt5Gd, and being more active than e.g. polycrystalline Pt3Ni. Multiple active sites at this surface offer adsorption energies which are close to the optimal binding energy with respect to the main ORR intermediates; nevertheless, the exact location of these sites is still not clear. Taking into account the unique surface geometry of Pt(331), some adsorbates (including some oxygenated ORR-intermediates) should also contribute to the electronic structure of the neighbouring catalytic centres. However, the experimental elucidation of the specific adsorption of oxygenated species at this surface appears to be a non-trivial task. Such information holds the keys to the understanding of the high activity of this material and would enable the rational design of nanostructured ORR catalysts even without alloying. In this work, the electrified Pt(331)/electrolyte interface has been characterised using cyclic voltammetry (CV) combined with potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PDEIS) in 0.1 M HClO4 solutions. The systems were studied in the potential region between 0.05 V and 1.0 V vs. RHE, where the adsorption of *H, *OH and *O species is possible in both O2-free and O2-saturated electrolytes. Our CV and PDEIS results support the hypothesis that in contrast to Pt(111), many Pt(331) surface sites are likely blocked by *O species at the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell benchmark potential of 0.9 V (RHE). We propose a model illustrated by simplified adsorbate structures at different electrode potentials, which is, however, able to explain the voltammetric and impedance data, and which is in good agreement with previously reported electrocatalytic measurements. PMID

  8. Applying traditional signal processing techniques to social media exploitation for situational understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelzaher, Tarek; Roy, Heather; Wang, Shiguang; Giridhar, Prasanna; Al Amin, Md. Tanvir; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Kolodny, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Signal processing techniques such as filtering, detection, estimation and frequency domain analysis have long been applied to extract information from noisy sensor data. This paper describes the exploitation of these signal processing techniques to extract information from social networks, such as Twitter and Instagram. Specifically, we view social networks as noisy sensors that report events in the physical world. We then present a data processing stack for detection, localization, tracking, and veracity analysis of reported events using social network data. We show using a controlled experiment that the behavior of social sources as information relays varies dramatically depending on context. In benign contexts, there is general agreement on events, whereas in conflict scenarios, a significant amount of collective filtering is introduced by conflicted groups, creating a large data distortion. We describe signal processing techniques that mitigate such distortion, resulting in meaningful approximations of actual ground truth, given noisy reported observations. Finally, we briefly present an implementation of the aforementioned social network data processing stack in a sensor network analysis toolkit, called Apollo. Experiences with Apollo show that our techniques are successful at identifying and tracking credible events in the physical world.

  9. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered.

  10. Nonlinear optical processing with Fabry-Perot interferometers containing phase recording media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholomew, B. J.; Lee, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    New techniques in nonlinear optical processing are explored, based on the operation of intensity level selection as performed by a Fabry-Perot interferometer containing a phase object. The image being processed is recorded on a medium between the mirrors as a spatially varying phase shift less than pi. The interferometer only transmits light through those portions of the object that corresponds to a single value of the phase and hence to a single intensity level in the input. More complicated operations such as thresholding and analog-to-digital conversion are performed by modulating the light source as the different levels are selected. Photoresist and lithium niobate have been used as phase objects, and experimental data for both are presented. Three kinds of Fabry-Perot interferometers have been used to demonstrate nonlinear processing using coherent and incoherent light. Color images have been produced with black and white inputs and white light illumination.

  11. Coupled processes in single fractures, double fractures and fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.F.

    1986-12-01

    The emplacement of a nuclear waste repository in a fractured porous medium provides a heat source of large dimensions over an extended period of time. It also creates a large cavity in the rock mass, changing significantly the stress field. Such major changes induce various coupled thermohydraulic, hydromechanic and hydrochemical transport processes in the environment around a nuclear waste repository. The present paper gives, first, a general overview of the coupled processes involving thermal, mechanical, hydrological and chemical effects. Then investigations of a number of specific coupled processes are described in the context of fluid flow and transport in a single fracture, two intersecting fractures and a fractured porous medium near a nuclear waste repository. The results are presented and discussed.

  12. Upward and Downward: Social Comparison Processing of Thin Idealized Media Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggemann, Marika; Polivy, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of social comparison processing in women's responses to thin idealized images. In particular, it was predicted that comparison with the images on the basis of appearance would lead to more negative outcomes than comparison on the basis of intelligence. A sample of 114 women viewed fashion magazine…

  13. Implementationof a modular software system for multiphysical processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Dmitri; Watanabe, Norihiro; Bilke, Lars; Fischer, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph; Rink, Karsten; Walther, Marc; Wang, Wenqing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2016-04-01

    Subsurface georeservoirs are a candidate technology for large scale energy storage required as part of the transition to renewable energy sources. The increased use of the subsurface results in competing interests and possible impacts on protected entities. To optimize and plan the use of the subsurface in large scale scenario analyses,powerful numerical frameworks are required that aid process understanding and can capture the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes with high computational efficiency. Due to having a multitude of different couplings between basic T, H, M, or C processes and the necessity to implement new numerical schemes the development focus has moved to software's modularity. The decreased coupling between the components results in two major advantages: easier addition of specialized processes and improvement of the code's testability and therefore its quality. The idea of modularization is implemented on several levels, in addition to library based separation of the previous code version, by using generalized algorithms available in the Standard Template Library and the Boost library, relying on efficient implementations of liner algebra solvers, using concepts when designing new types, and localization of frequently accessed data structures. This procedure shows certain benefits for a flexible high-performance framework applied to the analysis of multipurpose georeservoirs.

  14. COMPARISONS OF CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE AND RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE MEDIA FOR CESIUM REMOVAL BY IN-TANK COLUMN PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    King, W; Frank02 Smith, F; Si Lee, S; Daniel McCabe, D

    2007-11-07

    Chemical and thermal performance of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange media were predicted for column configurations designed for installation in high level waste tanks and intended for cesium removal from radioactive waste supernates. Modeling predictions for the processing of a known Savannah River Site tank waste composition were generated. In a two column configuration under presumed nominal operating conditions (432 gallon packed bed, 10 gpm liquid flow, 25 C, 45 nCi/g average breakthrough limit) with lead/lag column rotation between processing cycles, approximately two cycles were predicted to treat 1,000,000 gallons of radioactive waste with CST as compared to three cycles predicted for RF. However, this processing mode was shown to be highly unfavorable for RF due to the fact that the lead column is unnecessarily exposed to large radiation doses during movement of the cesium mass transfer zone into the lag column. Thermal modeling calculations indicated that maximum temperatures within stagnant, packed CST and RF columns containing the highest anticipated cesium loading and no active cooling will reach 128 and 78 C, respectively, within 6 days. Active cooling maintains the cesium-saturated CST and RF columns below 88 and 41 C, respectively, under stagnant flow conditions.

  15. Simulation of EOR (enhanced oil recovery) processes in stochastically generated permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, J.R.; Castillo, J.L.; Lake, L.W. . Dept. of Petroleum Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Many enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes involve injecting an agent, such as steam or CO{sub 2}, that is much more mobile than the resident oil. Other EOR processes attempt to improve sweep efficiency by adding polymer or surfactant to the injected water to create a favorable mobility ratio. This study examines the effect of statistically generated heterogeneity on miscible displacements at unfavorable and favorable mobility ratios. The principal goal is to delineate the effects of fingering, dispersion and channeling on volumetric sweep efficiency. Two-dimensional heterogeneous permeability fields are generated with variability (heterogeneity) and spatial correlation as characterizing parameters. Four levels of correlation and three of variability make up a 12 element matrix. At each element of the matrix, a miscible displacement simulation at unit mobility ratio shows the effect of the heterogeneity, and simulations at mobility ratios of 10 and 0.5 show the effect of viscous force differences combined with heterogeneity. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Transport processes and mutual interactions of three bacterial strains in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, Christine; Lawrence, John R.; Hendry, M. Jim; Maloszewski, Pitor

    2010-05-01

    Transport processes of the bacterial strains Klebsiella oxytoca, Burkholderia cepacia G4PR-1 and Pseudomonas sp #5 were investigated in saturated column experiments to study the differences in transport characteristics and the mutual interactions of these strains during transport. Soil column experiments (114 mm long x 33 mm in diameter) were conducted with constant water velocities (3.9-5.7 cm/h) through a medium to coarse grained silica sand. All experiments were performed in freshly packed columns in quadruplicate. Chloride was used as tracer to determine the mean transit time, dispersivity and flow rate. It was injected as a pulse into the columns together with the bacterial strains suspended in artificial groundwater medium. In the first setup, each strain was investigated alone. In the second setup, transport processes were performed injecting two strains simultaneously. Finally, the transport characteristics were studied in successive experiments when one bacterium was resident on the sand grains prior to the introduction of the second strain. In all experiments the peak C/Co bacterial concentrations were attenuated with respect to the conservative tracer chloride and a well defined tailing was observed. A one dimensional mathematical model for advective-dispersive transport that accounts for irreversible and reversible sorption was used to analyze the bacterial breakthrough curves and tailing patterns. It was shown that the sorption parameters were different for the three strains that can be explained by the properties of the bacteria. For the species Klebsiella oxytoca and Burkholderia cepacia G4PR-the transport parameters were mostly in the same range independent of the experimental setup. However, Pseudomonas sp #5, which is a motile bacterium, showed differences in the breakthrough curves and sorption parameters during the experiments. The simultaneous and successive experiments indicated an influence on the reversible sorption processes when another

  17. Tuning of read/write/erase processes in Electron Trapping Optical Memory media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, Daniel T.; Revay, Robert E.

    1992-08-01

    The wavelengths of light used for the Read/Write/Erase processes in Electron Trapping Optical Memory have been shown to be tunable. Simulation and excitation efficiency spectra of nine samples of these IR stimulable phosphors were measured. Tuning was accomplished through compositional modifications of the ETOMTM pseudobinary host lattice. The host lattice systems investigated were CaS, SrS, BaS, SrxCa1-xS, and SrxBa1-xS (0

  18. The Wave Processes in the Media Having Inelastic Hysteresis with Saturation of The Nonlinear Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. E.; Kiyashko, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We study theoretically the nonlinear wave processes during excitation of a longitudinal harmonic wave in an unbounded medium and the rod resonator with inelastic hysteresis and saturation of the amplitude-dependent loss. The nonlinear-wave characteristics in such systems, namely, the amplitude-dependent loss, variation in the wave-propagation velocity, the resonant-frequency shift, and the higher-harmonic amplitudes are determined. The results of the theoretical and experimental studies of nonlinear effects in the rod resonator of annealed polycrystalline copper are compared. The effective parameters of the hysteretic nonlinearity of this metal are evaluated.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation with fixed steplength for diffusion processes in nonhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Barlett, V.; Hoyuelos, M.; Mártin, H. O.

    2013-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is one of the most important tools in the study of diffusion processes. For constant diffusion coefficients, an appropriate Gaussian distribution of particle's steplengths can generate exact results, when compared with integration of the diffusion equation. It is important to notice that the same method is completely erroneous when applied to non-homogeneous diffusion coefficients. A simple alternative, jumping at fixed steplengths with appropriate transition probabilities, produces correct results. Here, a model for diffusion of calcium ions in the neuromuscular junction of the crayfish is used as a test to compare Monte Carlo simulation with fixed and Gaussian steplength.

  20. Hydrodynamic, Heat and Acoustic Processes Modelling in Tranport of Rheologically Complex Viscous Media Technology in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, Sergey N.; Kudelin, Nikita S.; Dedeyev, Pavel O.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the results of mathematical modelling of acoustic processes, hydrodynamics and heat exchange in case of oil products transportation in pipelines with constant and variable cross-section. The turbulence model features of RANS approach and intensification of heat exchange in substances with anomalous rheology are reviewed. It is shown that statistic second order models are appropriate to use for forecasting details of the pulsating flows. The paper states the numerical integration features of determining equations. The properties of vibratory effect influence are determined. Vortex and heat perturbations, rheological changes impact on resistance regularities and intensity of heat exchange are analyzed.

  1. The TOUGH codes - a family of simulation tools for multiphase flowand transport processes in permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2003-08-08

    Numerical simulation has become a widely practiced andaccepted technique for studying flow and transport processes in thevadose zone and other subsurface flow systems. This article discusses asuite of codes, developed primarily at Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory (LBNL), with the capability to model multiphase flows withphase change. We summarize history and goals in the development of theTOUGH codes, and present the governing equations for multiphase,multicomponent flow. Special emphasis is given to space discretization bymeans of integral finite differences (IFD). Issues of code implementationand architecture are addressed, as well as code applications,maintenance, and future developments.

  2. Thermal stresses in chemically hardening elastic media with application to the molding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitsky, M.; Shaffer, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    A method has been formulated for the determination of thermal stresses in materials which harden in the presence of an exothermic chemical reaction. Hardening is described by the transformation of the material from an inviscid liquid-like state into an elastic solid, where intermediate states consist of a mixture of the two, in a ratio which is determined by the degree of chemical reaction. The method is illustrated in terms of an infinite slab cast between two rigid mold surfaces. It is found that the stress component normal to the slab surfaces vanishes in the residual state, so that removal of the slab from the mold leaves the remaining residual stress unchanged. On the other hand, the residual stress component parallel to the slab surfaces does not vanish. Its distribution is described as a function of the parameters of the hardening process.

  3. A Fast MHD Code for Gravitationally Stratified Media using Graphical Processing Units: SMAUG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, M. K.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2015-03-01

    Parallelization techniques have been exploited most successfully by the gaming/graphics industry with the adoption of graphical processing units (GPUs), possessing hundreds of processor cores. The opportunity has been recognized by the computational sciences and engineering communities, who have recently harnessed successfully the numerical performance of GPUs. For example, parallel magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) algorithms are important for numerical modelling of highly inhomogeneous solar, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas. Here, we describe the implementation of SMAUG, the Sheffield Magnetohydrodynamics Algorithm Using GPUs. SMAUG is a 1-3D MHD code capable of modelling magnetized and gravitationally stratified plasma. The objective of this paper is to present the numerical methods and techniques used for porting the code to this novel and highly parallel compute architecture. The methods employed are justified by the performance benchmarks and validation results demonstrating that the code successfully simulates the physics for a range of test scenarios including a full 3D realistic model of wave propagation in the solar atmosphere.

  4. Beyond solutes - Mobile matter and its role for the properties, processes and functions of natural porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsche, Kai U.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation will focus on the vastly neglected but rather fascinating aspects of mobile colloidal and particulate materials in natural porous media. The substance spectra of mobile matter in soils, sediments and aquifers will be introduced. Besides clay minerals, carbonates and the oxides and hydroxides of Si, Al, Fe and Mn, these materials comprise in particular organic and biotic material of diverse provenience. Of particular importance are the neo-formations of nanoparticles in the presence of organic matter by means of heterogenic nucleation and growth. Beside the adsorption of mobile organic matter to mineral surfaces, it is this is process that results in the production of organo-mineral phases that differ dramatic in their properties from the pure minerals. Release and formation processes and their role for solute transport will be discussed. The manifold reactions and interactions within and in between the involved immobile and mobile solid, liquid and "biotic" phases are highlighted. Special consideration is given to the interdependence of mobile matter, fluids, physical structure, fluid properties and transport. Among others, this comprises the interplay of mobile matter and aggregation, surface inversion, and fluid properties. Based on lab and field experimental evidence and theoretical concepts, the "solutes and solution" approach will be challenged and the need to theoretically and experimentally step beyond will be justified.

  5. Reflection of no equilibrium two Phase Processes of Filtration in heterogeneous Media in the active seism acoustic borehole monitoring Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Dryagin, Veniamin; Igolkina, Galina; Khachay, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    It is provided a comparison of no equilibrium effects by independent hydro dynamical and seism acoustic influence on an oil layer. It is known, that by drainage and steeps the hysteresis effect on curves of the relative phase permeability in dependence from porous medium water saturation by some cycles of influence: drainage-steep-drainage is observed. In earlier papers the analysis of the seism acoustic monitoring data in regimes of phone radiation, response on the first influence of given frequency and on the second influence is developed. For the analysis of seism acoustic response in time on fixed intervals along the borehole an algorithm of phase diagrams of the state of many phase medium is suggested In that paper on the base of developed algorithm a new algorithm of analyze of space, but integral in time for equal observation periods changing by the method of phase diagram state of many phase medium in the oil layer is developed. The paper was supported by the Program of Presidium UB RAS 2012-2014. Key words: Oil and gas deposits, seism acoustic borehole monitoring data, new method of processing, reflection of no equilibrium two phase processes, heterogeneous media.

  6. Salt Processing Through Ion Exchange at the Savannah River Site Selection of Exchange Media and Column Configuration - 9198

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee; Punch, Timothy; McCabe, Daniel

    2009-02-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed, modeled, and tested several different ion exchange media and column designs for cesium removal. One elutable resin and one non-elutable resin were considered for this salt processing application. Deployment of non-elutable Crystalline Silicotitanate and elutable Resorcinol Formaldehyde in several different column configurations were assessed in a formal Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE). Salt solutions were selected that would allow a grouping of non-compliant tanks to be closed. Tests were run with the elutable resin to determine compatibility with the resin configuration required for an in-tank ion exchange system. Models were run to estimate the ion exchange cycles required with the two resins in several column configurations. Material balance calculations were performed to estimate the impact on the High Level Waste (HLW) system at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Conceptual process diagrams were used to support the hazard analysis. Data from the hazard analysis was used to determine the relative impact on safety. This report will discuss the technical inputs, SEE methods, results and path forward to complete the technical maturation of ion exchange.

  7. Self-sustaining smoldering combustion: a novel remediation process for non-aqueous-phase liquids in porous media.

    PubMed

    Switzer, C; Pironi, P; Gerhard, J I; Rein, G; Torero, J L

    2009-08-01

    Smoldering combustion, the slow burning process associated typically with porous solids (e.g., charcoal), is here proposed as a novel remediation approach for nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) embedded in porous media. Several one-dimensional vertical smoldering experiments are conducted on quartz sand containing fresh coal tar at an initial concentration of 71 000 mg/kg (approximately 25% saturation) and employing an upward darcy air flux of 4.25 cm/s. Following a short-duration energy input to achieve ignition at the lower boundary, a self-sustaining combustion front is observed to propagate upward at 1.3 x 10(-2) cm/s. The process is self-sustaining because the energy released during NAPL smoldering is efficiently trapped and recirculated by the soil matrix, preheating the NAPL ahead of the reaction front. The smoldering process is observed to self-terminate when all of the NAPL is destroyed or when the oxygen source is removed. Pre- and post-soil analysis revealed that NAPL smoldering reduced the concentration of total extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from 38 000 mg/kg to below detection limits (< 0.1 mg/kg) throughout the majority of the column. A comparable experiment in which conductive heating is applied in the absence of smoldering demonstrates a 6-fold reduction in the net energy in the system and residual TPH values of 2000-35 000 mg/kg. A further repeat in which the air supply is prematurely terminated demonstrated that the NAPL smoldering process can be extinguished via external control. A suite of 23 demonstration experiments shows that NAPL smoldering is successful across a range of soil types (including simple layered systems) and contaminants (including laboratory mixtures of dodecane, DCA/ grease, TCE/oil, vegetable oil, crude oil, and mineral oil) as well as field-obtained samples of materials containing coal tar, oil drill cutting waste, and oil sands. PMID:19731690

  8. Self-sustaining smoldering combustion: a novel remediation process for non-aqueous-phase liquids in porous media.

    PubMed

    Switzer, C; Pironi, P; Gerhard, J I; Rein, G; Torero, J L

    2009-08-01

    Smoldering combustion, the slow burning process associated typically with porous solids (e.g., charcoal), is here proposed as a novel remediation approach for nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) embedded in porous media. Several one-dimensional vertical smoldering experiments are conducted on quartz sand containing fresh coal tar at an initial concentration of 71 000 mg/kg (approximately 25% saturation) and employing an upward darcy air flux of 4.25 cm/s. Following a short-duration energy input to achieve ignition at the lower boundary, a self-sustaining combustion front is observed to propagate upward at 1.3 x 10(-2) cm/s. The process is self-sustaining because the energy released during NAPL smoldering is efficiently trapped and recirculated by the soil matrix, preheating the NAPL ahead of the reaction front. The smoldering process is observed to self-terminate when all of the NAPL is destroyed or when the oxygen source is removed. Pre- and post-soil analysis revealed that NAPL smoldering reduced the concentration of total extractable petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from 38 000 mg/kg to below detection limits (< 0.1 mg/kg) throughout the majority of the column. A comparable experiment in which conductive heating is applied in the absence of smoldering demonstrates a 6-fold reduction in the net energy in the system and residual TPH values of 2000-35 000 mg/kg. A further repeat in which the air supply is prematurely terminated demonstrated that the NAPL smoldering process can be extinguished via external control. A suite of 23 demonstration experiments shows that NAPL smoldering is successful across a range of soil types (including simple layered systems) and contaminants (including laboratory mixtures of dodecane, DCA/ grease, TCE/oil, vegetable oil, crude oil, and mineral oil) as well as field-obtained samples of materials containing coal tar, oil drill cutting waste, and oil sands.

  9. Microwave enhanced electroanalysis of formulations: processes in micellar media at glassy carbon and at platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed A; Compton, Richard G; Coles, Barry A; Canals, Antonio; Marken, Frank

    2005-10-01

    The direct electroanalysis of complex formulations containing alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) is possible in micellar solution and employing microwave-enhanced voltammetry. In the presence of microwave radiation substantial heating and current enhancement effects have been observed at 330 microm diameter glassy carbon electrodes placed into a micellar aqueous solution and both hydrophilic and highly hydrophobic redox systems are detected. For the water soluble Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) redox system in micellar aqueous solutions of 0.1 M NaCl and 0.1 M sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) at low to intermediate microwave power, thermal effects and convection effects are observed. At higher microwave power, thermal cavitation is induced and dominates the mass transport at the electrode surface. For the micelle-soluble redox systems tert-butylferrocene and 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone, strong and concentration dependent current responses are observed only in the presence of microwave radiation. For the oxidation of micelle-soluble alpha-tocopherol current responses at glassy carbon electrodes are affected by adsorption and desorption processes whereas at platinum electrodes, analytical limiting currents are obtained over a wide range of alpha-tocopherol concentrations. However, for the determination of alpha-tocopherol in a commercial formulation interference from proteins is observed at platinum electrodes and direct measurements are possible only over a limited concentration range and at glassy carbon electrodes.

  10. Evolution of process control parameters during extended co-composting of green waste and solid fraction of cattle slurry to obtain growing media.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Coromina, Narcís; Malińska, Krystyna; Marfà, Oriol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to monitor process parameters when two by-products (green waste - GW, and the solid fraction of cattle slurry - SFCS) were composted to obtain growing media. Using compost in growing medium mixtures involves prolonged composting processes that can last at least half a year. It is therefore crucial to study the parameters that affect compost stability as measured in the field in order to shorten the composting process at composting facilities. Two mixtures were prepared: GW25 (25% GW and 75% SFCS, v/v) and GW75 (75% GW and 25% SFCS, v/v). The different raw mixtures resulted in the production of two different growing media, and the evolution of process management parameters was different. A new parameter has been proposed to deal with attaining the thermophilic temperature range and maintaining it during composting, not only it would be useful to optimize composting processes, but also to assess the hygienization degree. PMID:25553571

  11. Evolution of process control parameters during extended co-composting of green waste and solid fraction of cattle slurry to obtain growing media.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Coromina, Narcís; Malińska, Krystyna; Marfà, Oriol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to monitor process parameters when two by-products (green waste - GW, and the solid fraction of cattle slurry - SFCS) were composted to obtain growing media. Using compost in growing medium mixtures involves prolonged composting processes that can last at least half a year. It is therefore crucial to study the parameters that affect compost stability as measured in the field in order to shorten the composting process at composting facilities. Two mixtures were prepared: GW25 (25% GW and 75% SFCS, v/v) and GW75 (75% GW and 25% SFCS, v/v). The different raw mixtures resulted in the production of two different growing media, and the evolution of process management parameters was different. A new parameter has been proposed to deal with attaining the thermophilic temperature range and maintaining it during composting, not only it would be useful to optimize composting processes, but also to assess the hygienization degree.

  12. Modeling and control of flow during impregnation of heterogeneous porous media, with application to composite mold-filling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickerton, Simon

    Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) encompasses a growing list of composite material manufacturing techniques. These processes have provided the promise for complex fiber reinforced plastics parts, manufactured from a single molding step. In recent years a significant research effort has been invested in development of process simulations, providing tools that have advanced current LCM technology and broadened the range of applications. The requirement for manufacture of larger, more complex parts has motivated investigation of active control of LCM processes. Due to the unlimited variety of part geometries that can be produced, finite element based process simulations will be used to some extent in design of actively controlled processes. Ongoing efforts are being made to improve material parameter specification for process simulations, increasing their value as design tools. Several phenomena occurring during mold filling have been addressed through flow visualization experimentation and analysis of manufactured composite parts. The influence of well defined air channels within a mold cavity is investigated, incorporating their effects within existing filling simulations. Three different flow configurations have been addressed, testing the application of 'equivalent permeabilities', effectively approximating air channels as representative porous media. LCM parts having doubly curved regions require preform fabrics to undergo significant, and varying deformation throughout a mold cavity. Existing methods for predicting preform deformation, and the resulting permeability distribution have been applied to a conical mold geometry. Comparisons between experiment and simulation are promising, while the geometry studied has required large deformation over much of the part, shearing the preform fabric beyond the scope of the models applied. An investigational study was performed to determine the magnitude of effect, if any, on mold filling caused by corners within LCM mold

  13. A Domain Decomposition Approach for Large-Scale Simulations of Flow Processes in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2008-07-01

    Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass- and heat-balance equations. In this study, we develop a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations with coarse-granularity parallel computation. This approach partitions a simulation domain into small subdomains. The full model domain, consisting of discrete subdomains, is still simulated simultaneously by using multiple processes/processors. Each processor is dedicated to following tasks of the partitioned subdomain: updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass- and energy-balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing various other local computations. The linearized equation systems are solved in parallel with a parallel linear solver, using an efficient interprocess communication scheme. This new domain decomposition approach has been implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and has demonstrated excellent speedup and good scalability. In this paper, we will demonstrate applications for the new approach in simulating field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate deposits.

  14. Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T Prabhakar; Barnett, Mark O; Zheng, Chunmiao; Jones, Norman L

    2010-05-05

    DE-FG02-06ER64213: Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales Investigators: T. Prabhakar Clement (PD/PI) and Mark O. Barnett (Auburn), Chunmiao Zheng (Univ. of Alabama), and Norman L. Jones (BYU). The objective of this project was to develop scalable modeling approaches for predicting the reactive transport of metal contaminants. We studied two contaminants, a radioactive cation [U(VI)] and a metal(loid) oxyanion system [As(III/V)], and investigated their interactions with two types of subsurface materials, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides. We also developed modeling methods for describing the experimental results. Overall, the project supported 25 researchers at three universities. Produced 15 journal articles, 3 book chapters, 6 PhD dissertations and 6 MS theses. Three key journal articles are: 1) Jeppu et al., A scalable surface complexation modeling framework for predicting arsenate adsorption on goethite-coated sands, Environ. Eng. Sci., 27(2): 147-158, 2010. 2) Loganathan et al., Scaling of adsorption reactions: U(VI) experiments and modeling, Applied Geochemistry, 24 (11), 2051-2060, 2009. 3) Phillippi, et al., Theoretical solid/solution ratio effects on adsorption and transport: uranium (VI) and carbonate, Soil Sci. Soci. of America, 71:329-335, 2007

  15. Macroscopic transport equations in many-body systems from microscopic exclusion processes in disordered media: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Describing particle transport at the macroscopic or mesoscopic level in non-ideal environments poses fundamental theoretical challenges in domains ranging from inter and intra-cellular transport in biology to diffusion in porous media. Yet, often the nature of the constraints coming from many-body interactions or reflecting a complex and confining environment are better understood and modeled at the microscopic level. In this paper we review the subtle link between microscopic exclusion processes and the mean-field equations that ensue from them in the continuum limit. We show that in an inhomogeneous medium, i.e. when jumps are controlled by site-dependent hopping rates, one can obtain three different nonlinear advection-diffusion equations in the continuum limit, suitable for describing transport in the presence of quenched disorder and external fields, depending on the particular rule embodying site inequivalence at the microscopic level. In a situation that might be termed point-like scenario, when particles are treated as point-like objects, the effect of crowding as imposed at the microscopic level manifests in the mean-field equations only if some degree of inhomogeneity is enforced into the model. Conversely, when interacting agents are assigned a finite size, under the more realistic extended crowding framework, exclusion constraints persist in the unbiased macroscopic representation.

  16. EPA/NSF ETV Equipment Verification Testing Plan for the Removal of Volatile Organic Chemical Contaminants by Adsorptive Media Processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific Test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of drinking water treatment equipment utilizing adsorptive media for synthetic organic chemical (SOC) removal. This TSTP is to be used within the structure provid...

  17. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Green adsorption media with the inclusion of renewable and recycled materials can be applied as a stormwater best management practice for copper removal. A green adsorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was physicochemically evaluated for its potential use in an upflow media filter. A suite of tests were conducted on the media mixture and the individual media components including studies of particle size distribution, isotherms, column adsorption and reaction kinetics. Isotherm test results revealed that the coconut coir had the highest affinity for copper (q(max) = 71.1 mg g(-1)), and that adsorption was maximized at a pH of 7.0. The coconut coir also performed the best under dynamic conditions, having an equilibrium uptake of 1.63 mg g(-1). FE-SEM imaging found a strong correlation between the porosity of the micro pore structure and the adsorptive capacity. The use of the green adsorption media mixture in isolation or the coconut coir with an expanded clay filtration chamber could be an effective and reliable stormwater best management practice for copper removal.

  18. Media matters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  19. European MEDIA Programme: the role of 'language' and 'visual images' in the processes of constructing European culture and identity.

    PubMed

    Bozić-Vrbancić, Senka; Vrbancić, Mario; Orlić, Olga

    2008-12-01

    Questions of diversity and multiculturalism are at the heart of many discussions on European supranational identity within contemporary anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, linguistics and so on. Since we are living in a period marked by the economic and political changes which emerged after European unification, a call for a new analysis of heterogeneity, cultural difference and issues of belonging is not surprising. This call has been fuelled by the European Union's concern with "culture" as one of the main driving forces for constructing "European identity". While the official European policy describes European culture as common to all Europeans, Europe is also-seen as representing "unity in diversity". By analysing contemporary European MEDIA policies and programs this article attempts to contribute to a small but growing body of work that explores what role "language" and "visual images" play in the process of constructing European culture and supranational European identity. More specifically, the article explores the complex articulation of language and culture in order to analyse supranational imaginary of European identity as it is expressed through the simple slogan "Europe: unity in diversity". We initially grounded our interest in the politics of identity within the European Union within theoretical frameworks of "power and knowledge" and "identity and subjectivity". We consider contemporary debates in social sciences and humanities over the concepts of language", "culture" and "identity" as inseparable from each other (Ahmed 2000; Brah 1996, 2000; Butler 1993, Derrida 1981; Gilroy 2004; Laclau 1990). Cultural and postcolonial studies theorists (e.g. Brah 1996; Bhabha 1994; Hall 1992, 1996, among others) argue that concepts of "culture" and "identity" signify a historically variable nexus of social meanings. That is to say, "culture" and "identity" are discursive articulations. According to this view, "culture" and "identity" are not separate

  20. European MEDIA Programme: the role of 'language' and 'visual images' in the processes of constructing European culture and identity.

    PubMed

    Bozić-Vrbancić, Senka; Vrbancić, Mario; Orlić, Olga

    2008-12-01

    Questions of diversity and multiculturalism are at the heart of many discussions on European supranational identity within contemporary anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, linguistics and so on. Since we are living in a period marked by the economic and political changes which emerged after European unification, a call for a new analysis of heterogeneity, cultural difference and issues of belonging is not surprising. This call has been fuelled by the European Union's concern with "culture" as one of the main driving forces for constructing "European identity". While the official European policy describes European culture as common to all Europeans, Europe is also-seen as representing "unity in diversity". By analysing contemporary European MEDIA policies and programs this article attempts to contribute to a small but growing body of work that explores what role "language" and "visual images" play in the process of constructing European culture and supranational European identity. More specifically, the article explores the complex articulation of language and culture in order to analyse supranational imaginary of European identity as it is expressed through the simple slogan "Europe: unity in diversity". We initially grounded our interest in the politics of identity within the European Union within theoretical frameworks of "power and knowledge" and "identity and subjectivity". We consider contemporary debates in social sciences and humanities over the concepts of language", "culture" and "identity" as inseparable from each other (Ahmed 2000; Brah 1996, 2000; Butler 1993, Derrida 1981; Gilroy 2004; Laclau 1990). Cultural and postcolonial studies theorists (e.g. Brah 1996; Bhabha 1994; Hall 1992, 1996, among others) argue that concepts of "culture" and "identity" signify a historically variable nexus of social meanings. That is to say, "culture" and "identity" are discursive articulations. According to this view, "culture" and "identity" are not separate

  1. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  2. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents. PMID:20876180

  3. Cooperative catalysis of noncompatible catalysts through compartmentalization: wacker oxidation and enzymatic reduction in a one-pot process in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirofumi; Hummel, Werner; Gröger, Harald

    2015-04-01

    A Wacker oxidation using CuCl/PdCl2 as a catalyst system was successfully combined with an enzymatic ketone reduction to convert styrene enantioselectively into 1-phenylethanol in a one-pot process, although the two reactions conducted in aqueous media are not compatible due to enzyme deactivation by Cu ions. The one-pot feasibility was achieved via compartmentalization of the reactions. Conducting the Wacker oxidation in the interior of a polydimethylsiloxane thimble enables diffusion of only the organic substrate and product into the exterior where the biotransformation takes place. Thus, the Cu ions detrimental to the enzyme are withheld from the reaction media of the biotransformation. In this one-pot process, which formally corresponds to an asymmetric hydration of alkenes, a range of 1-arylethanols were formed with high conversions and 98-99 % ee. In addition, the catalyst system of the Wacker oxidation was recycled 15 times without significant decrease in conversion.

  4. Learning with Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical and research literature on learning from books, television, computers, and multimedia environments is examined. The media are distinguished by cognitively relevant characteristics of their technologies, symbol systems, and processing capabilities. The relative cognitive effects of learning with different media--particularly those…

  5. Introduction to Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riler, Robert

    Designed for senior high school students, this one semester course focuses on four aspects of modern media: television, film, radio, and advertising. Each topic is worked into a weekly lesson plan format that stresses the active involvement of students in the learning process. The course outline contains lists of objectives and media materials…

  6. Preservation and Access Technology. The Relationship between Digital and Other Media Conversion Processes: A Structured Glossary of Technical Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, M. Stuart

    This document presents a comprehensive glossary of terms which are associated with document preservation technologies; there is a particular emphasis on the technologies of media conversion and the use of digital computer technologies. The glossary also includes technologies associated with access to such preserved materials. A document such as…

  7. The developmental effects of media-ideal internalization and self-objectification processes on adolescents' negative body-feelings, dietary restraint, and binge eating.

    PubMed

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Carrà, Giuseppe; Calogero, Rachel; Fida, Roberta; Clerici, Massimo; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Despite accumulated experimental evidence of the negative effects of exposure to media-idealized images, the degree to which body image, and eating related disturbances are caused by media portrayals of gendered beauty ideals remains controversial. On the basis of the most up-to-date meta-analysis of experimental studies indicating that media-idealized images have the most harmful and substantial impact on vulnerable individuals regardless of gender (i.e., "internalizers" and "self-objectifiers"), the current longitudinal study examined the direct and mediated links posited in objectification theory among media-ideal internalization, self-objectification, shame and anxiety surrounding the body and appearance, dietary restraint, and binge eating. Data collected from 685 adolescents aged between 14 and 15 at baseline (47 % males), who were interviewed and completed standardized measures annually over a 3-year period, were analyzed using a structural equation modeling approach. Results indicated that media-ideal internalization predicted later thinking and scrutinizing of one's body from an external observer's standpoint (or self-objectification), which then predicted later negative emotional experiences related to one's body and appearance. In turn, these negative emotional experiences predicted subsequent dietary restraint and binge eating, and each of these core features of eating disorders influenced each other. Differences in the strength of these associations across gender were not observed, and all indirect effects were significant. The study provides valuable information about how the cultural values embodied by gendered beauty ideals negatively influence adolescents' feelings, thoughts and behaviors regarding their own body, and on the complex processes involved in disordered eating. Practical implications are discussed.

  8. The developmental effects of media-ideal internalization and self-objectification processes on adolescents' negative body-feelings, dietary restraint, and binge eating.

    PubMed

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Carrà, Giuseppe; Calogero, Rachel; Fida, Roberta; Clerici, Massimo; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    Despite accumulated experimental evidence of the negative effects of exposure to media-idealized images, the degree to which body image, and eating related disturbances are caused by media portrayals of gendered beauty ideals remains controversial. On the basis of the most up-to-date meta-analysis of experimental studies indicating that media-idealized images have the most harmful and substantial impact on vulnerable individuals regardless of gender (i.e., "internalizers" and "self-objectifiers"), the current longitudinal study examined the direct and mediated links posited in objectification theory among media-ideal internalization, self-objectification, shame and anxiety surrounding the body and appearance, dietary restraint, and binge eating. Data collected from 685 adolescents aged between 14 and 15 at baseline (47 % males), who were interviewed and completed standardized measures annually over a 3-year period, were analyzed using a structural equation modeling approach. Results indicated that media-ideal internalization predicted later thinking and scrutinizing of one's body from an external observer's standpoint (or self-objectification), which then predicted later negative emotional experiences related to one's body and appearance. In turn, these negative emotional experiences predicted subsequent dietary restraint and binge eating, and each of these core features of eating disorders influenced each other. Differences in the strength of these associations across gender were not observed, and all indirect effects were significant. The study provides valuable information about how the cultural values embodied by gendered beauty ideals negatively influence adolescents' feelings, thoughts and behaviors regarding their own body, and on the complex processes involved in disordered eating. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:25416025

  9. The role of mass media in adolescents' sexual behaviors: exploring the explanatory value of the three-step self-objectification process.

    PubMed

    Vandenbosch, Laura; Eggermont, Steven

    2015-04-01

    This longitudinal study (N = 730) explored whether the three-step process of self-objectification (internalization of appearance ideals, valuing appearance over competence, and body surveillance) could explain the influence of sexual media messages on adolescents' sexual behaviors. A structural equation model showed that reading sexualizing magazines (Time 1) was related to the internalization of appearance ideals and valuing appearance over competence (Time 2). In turn, the internalization of appearance ideals was positively associated with body surveillance and valuing appearance over competence (all at Time 2). Valuing appearance over competence was also positively associated with body surveillance (all at Time 2). Lastly, body surveillance (Time 2) positively related to the initiation of French kissing (Time 3) whereas valuing appearance over competence (Time 2) positively related to the initiation of sexual intercourse (Time 3). No significant relationship was observed for intimate touching. The discussion focused on the explanatory role of self-objectification in media effects on adolescents' sexual behaviors.

  10. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  11. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study: Hiring @ Dynamid" (John…

  12. Do the Media Undermine Democracy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, William A.

    This paper considers political reasoning within a democracy and how mass media may affect that process, as well as how the perspective and method of critical thinking may be brought to bear on the subject of media and politics. Specifically, the paper (1) discusses some ways in which the mass media may affect political reasoning; (2) offers a…

  13. Cognitive control in media multitaskers.

    PubMed

    Ophir, Eyal; Nass, Clifford; Wagner, Anthony D

    2009-09-15

    Chronic media multitasking is quickly becoming ubiquitous, although processing multiple incoming streams of information is considered a challenge for human cognition. A series of experiments addressed whether there are systematic differences in information processing styles between chronically heavy and light media multitaskers. A trait media multitasking index was developed to identify groups of heavy and light media multitaskers. These two groups were then compared along established cognitive control dimensions. Results showed that heavy media multitaskers are more susceptible to interference from irrelevant environmental stimuli and from irrelevant representations in memory. This led to the surprising result that heavy media multitaskers performed worse on a test of task-switching ability, likely due to reduced ability to filter out interference from the irrelevant task set. These results demonstrate that media multitasking, a rapidly growing societal trend, is associated with a distinct approach to fundamental information processing.

  14. Rotary Microfilter Media Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M

    2005-04-20

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received funding from DOE EM-21, Office of Cleanup Technologies, to develop the rotary microfilter for high level radioactive service. One aspect of this project evaluated alternative filter media to select one for the 2nd generation rotary microfilter being procured as a prefilter to a small column ion exchange process. The authors conducted screening tests on a variety of filter media and pore sizes using a stirred cell followed by pilot-scale testing on a more limited number of filter media and pore sizes with a three disk rotary microfilter. These tests used 5.6 molar sodium supernate, and sludge plus monosodium titanate (MST) solids. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The 0.1 {micro} nominal TruMem{reg_sign} ceramic and the Pall PMM M050 (0.5 {micro} nominal) stainless steel filter media produced the highest flux in rotary filter testing. (2) The Pall PMM M050 media produced the highest flux of the stainless steel media tested in rotary filter testing. (3) The Pall PMM M050 media met filtrate quality requirements for the rotary filter. (4) The 0.1 {micro} TruMem{reg_sign} and 0.1 {micro} Pall PMM media met filtrate quality requirements as well. (5) The Pall PMM M050 media produced comparable flux to the 0.1 {micro} TruMem{reg_sign} media, and proved more durable and easier to weld. Based on these test results, the authors recommend Pall PMM M050 filter media for the 2nd generation rotary microfilter.

  15. Media and primary socialization theory.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K; Donohew, L

    1999-06-01

    This article discusses the role of media in the socialization process of adolescents, and supports the theory of primary socialization which identifies media as a secondary factor in the socialization process (as described in other articles in this series). Additionally, several models of information processing are presented which offer both a cognitive and affective model of processing communications. Finally, the article points to the need for future research to analyze the cases and implications of media's impact on adolescents when media serve as a primary, rather than a secondary, source of socialization. [Translations are provided in the International Abstracts Section of this issue.] PMID:10359221

  16. The influence of the Goos-Hänchen effect on seismic data processing and AVO in attenuating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong

    2015-11-01

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) effect induced by the total reflection of an incident beam of P-wave from a low-impedance medium to a high-impedance medium at near- and post-critical angles was theoretically simulated and discussed. For both PP- and PSV-waves, there may be large GH shifts (GHS) and penetration depths (PD) for both lossless and attenuating media. As the Q-factor increases, or the frequency of the seismic wave decreases, the GH effect is increased. However, in attenuating media, there may be non-zero GHS and PD at all non-zero incident angles, not just post-critical angles. GHS may be either positive or negative, while PD is positive only. Compared to the Q-factor in the incident medium, the Q-factor in the transmission medium may play a more dominant role in the determination of reflection coefficients, GHS, and PD. The GH-induced normal moveout (NMO) discrepancy of the PSV-wave may be larger than that of the PP-wave. Due to the GH effect, there may be an angle discrepancy (at fixed offset) between the GH-modified incident angle and the traditional incident angle. In addition, the GH effect at a given offset may produce two or three reflected waves, from different incident angles. These results suggest that, within their assumptions, the GH effect may lead to errors in NMO estimates and the vertical location of the reflector. Furthermore, there may be errors in offsets, incident angles, and reflection amplitudes, in the analyses of the amplitude variation with offset (AVO). These GH effects might be more important for seismic data at fixed offsets and shallow layers, and for sonic log data, which might fall into the post-critical angle regime. Therefore, there may be a necessity to take into account the GH effect in the interpretation of wide-angle reflection data in NMO and AVO analyses.

  17. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we describe the OpenGeoSys (OGS) project, which is a scientific open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical processes in porous media. The basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework (using primarily the Finite Element Method (FEM)) for solving multifield problems in porous and fractured media for applications in geoscience and hydrology. To this purpose OGS is based on an object-oriented FEM concept including a broad spectrum of interfaces for pre- and postprocessing. The OGS idea has been in development since the mid-eighties; meanwhile we are working on its 6th version. We provide a short historical note about the continuous process of concept and software development having evolved through Fortran, C, and C++ implementations. The idea behind OGS is to provide an open platform to the community, outfitted with professional software-engineering tools such as platform-independent compiling and automated benchmarking. A comprehensive benchmarking book has been prepared for publication. Benchmarking has been proven to be a valuable tool for cooperation between different developer teams, for example, for code comparison and validation purposes (DEVOVALEX, CO2BENCH and SSBENCH projects). On one hand, object-orientation (OO) provides a suitable framework for distributed code development; however, the parallelization of OO codes still lacks efficiency. High-performance-computing efficiency of OO codes is subject to future research (accompanying poster).

  18. Directing the Drama: Mass Media's Dramaturgical Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Kathy Brittain

    The shaping of social reality has become the task of the mass media due to the fact that audience members base interaction and social judgments upon the information they process from the mass media. Theorists have developed various paradigms linking individual media use and interpersonal communication with cultural effects and mass media. Although…

  19. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  20. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through workshops,…

  1. Media Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ron

    Developed by the Southwest Iowa Learning Resources Center, Media Now is a course for secondary students in media studies. Curriculum concentration is on television, film, radio, and recorded sound. Individualization of instruction, behavioral science, and mediated learning packages are employed with each module interrelated through printed…

  2. Connecting the molecular scale to the continuum scale for diffusion processes in smectite-rich porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we address the manner in which the continuum-scale diffusive properties of smectite-rich porous media arise from their molecular- and pore-scale features. Our starting point is a successful model of the continuum-scale apparent diffusion coefficient for water tracers and cations which decomposes it as a sum of pore-scale terms describing diffusion in macropore and interlayer 'compartments.' We then apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine molecular-scale diffusion coefficients D{sub interlayer} of water tracers and representative cations (Na{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}) in Na-smectite interlayers. We find that a remarkably simple expression relates D{sub interlayer} to the pore-scale parameter {delta}{sub nanopore} {<=} 1, a constrictivity factor that accounts for the lower mobility in interlayers as compared to macropores: {delta}{sub nanopore} = D{sub interlayer}/D{sub 0}, where D{sub 0} is the diffusion coefficient in bulk liquid water. Using this scaling expression, we can accurately predict the apparent diffusion coefficients of tracer H{sub 2}O, Na{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +}+ in compacted Na-smectite-rich materials.

  3. Processes, mechanisms, parameters, and modeling approaches for partially saturated flow in soil and rock media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Narasimhan, T.N.

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses conceptual models and mathematical equations, analyzes distributions and correlations among hydrological parameters of soils and tuff, introduces new path integration approaches, and outlines scaling procedures to model potential-driven fluid flow in heterogeneous media. To properly model the transition from fracture-dominated flow under saturated conditions to matrix-dominated flow under partially saturated conditions, characteristic curves and permeability functions for fractures and matrix need to be improved and validated. Couplings from two-phase flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and rock deformation to liquid flow are also important. For stochastic modeling of alternating units of welded and nonwelded tuff or formations bounded by fault zones, correlations and constraints on average values of saturated permeability and air entry scaling factor between different units need to be imposed to avoid unlikely combinations of parameters and predictions. Large-scale simulations require efficient and verifiable numerical algorithms. New path integration approaches based on postulates of minimum work and mass conservation to solve flow geometry and potential distribution simultaneously are introduced. This verifiable integral approach, together with fractal scaling procedures to generate statistical realizations with parameter distribution, correlation, and scaling taken into account, can be used to quantify uncertainties and generate the cumulative distribution function for groundwater travel times.

  4. Surface characterization and in vivo evaluation of laser sintered and machined implants followed by resorbable-blasting media process: A study in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Michelle; Yoo, Daniel; Marin, Charles; Gil, Luiz; Shabaka, Nour; Goldstein, Matt; Janal, Malvin; Tovar, Nick; Bonfante, Estevam; Coelho, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the histomorphometric and histological bone response to laser-sintered implants followed by resorbable-blasting media (RBM) process relative to standard machined/RBM surface treated implants. Material and Methods Six male sheep (n=6) received 2 Ti-6Al-4V implants (1 per surface) in each side of the mandible for 6 weeks in vivo. The histomorphometric parameters bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) were evaluated. Results Optical interferometry revealed higher Sa and Sq values for the laser-sintered/RBM surface in relation to standard/RBM implants. No significant differences in BIC were observed between the two groups (p>0.2), but significantly higher BAFO was observed for standard/RBM implants (p<0.01). Conclusions The present study demonstrated that both surfaces were biocompatible and osseoconductive, and the combination of laser sintering and RBM has no advantage over the standard machined implants with subsequent RBM. Key words:Dental implants, osseointegration, resorbable- blasting media, sheep, in vivo. PMID:26827064

  5. The Emerging Neuroscience of Social Media.

    PubMed

    Meshi, Dar; Tamir, Diana I; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2015-12-01

    Social media use is a global phenomenon, with almost two billion people worldwide regularly using these websites. As Internet access around the world increases, so will the number of social media users. Neuroscientists can capitalize on the ubiquity of social media use to gain novel insights about social cognitive processes and the neural systems that support them. This review outlines social motives that drive people to use social media, proposes neural systems supporting social media use, and describes approaches neuroscientists can use to conduct research with social media. We close by noting important directions and ethical considerations of future research with social media.

  6. Heat as a tracer for understanding transport processes in fractured media: Theory and field assessment from multiscale thermal push-pull tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria V.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Bour, Olivier; Dentz, Marco; Hochreutener, Rebecca; Lavenant, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The characterization and modeling of heat transfer in fractured media is particularly challenging as the existence of fractures at multiple scales induces highly localized flow patterns. From a theoretical and numerical analysis of heat transfer in simple conceptual models of fractured media, we show that flow channeling has a significant effect on the scaling of heat recovery in both space and time. The late time tailing of heat recovery under channeled flow is shown to diverge from the T>(t>)∝t-1.5 behavior expected for the classical parallel plate model and follow the scaling T>(t>)∝1/t>(log⁡t>)2 for a simple channel modeled as a tube. This scaling, which differs significantly from known scalings in mobile-immobile systems, is of purely geometrical origin: late time heat transfer from the matrix to a channel corresponds dimensionally to a radial diffusion process, while heat transfer from the matrix to a plate may be considered as a one-dimensional process. This phenomenon is also manifested on the spatial scaling of heat recovery as flow channeling affects the decay of the thermal breakthrough peak amplitude and the increase of the peak time with scale. These findings are supported by the results of a field experimental campaign performed on the fractured rock site of Ploemeur. The scaling of heat recovery in time and space, measured from thermal breakthrough curves measured through a series of push-pull tests at different scales, shows a clear signature of flow channeling. The whole data set can thus be successfully represented by a multichannel model parametrized by the mean channel density and aperture. These findings, which bring new insights on the effect of flow channeling on heat transfer in fractured rocks, show how heat recovery in geothermal tests may be controlled by fracture geometry. In addition, this highlights the interest of thermal push-pull tests as a complement to solute tracers tests to infer fracture aperture and geometry.

  7. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  8. Watching Media Learning: Making Sense of Media Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, David, Ed.

    Media education is expanding, both as a subject in its own right, and as a cross-curricular theme. Based on detailed classroom research, this book identifies the rewards and achievements, as well as the difficulties and contradictions, of teaching about the media in Great Britain. Four major themes emerge: the process of teaching and learning; the…

  9. Recommendation for Using Smaller (0.1 micro sign) Pore-Size Media for Filtration in Salt Waste Processing Project

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    2003-05-02

    Based on experimental studies with simulated and actual wastes, we recommend adopting the use of 0.1-micron pore-size, sintered stainless-steel filter elements within the design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Furthermore, adopting the smaller pore size elements for the Actinide Removal Process would result in a significant risk to the start-up schedule due to delays for buying, installing, and testing new equipment. The existing 0.5-micron pore-size filters will provide nearly equivalent service with no additional capital investment. Unless the planned filter test at Building 512-S fails to meet specifications, the project should proceed with the existing equipment, including spares. When the existing equipment reaches the end of the service life, management can consider replacement with the smaller pore-size elements. The laboratory studies indicate that use of the smaller pore size equipment will result in greater protection against particulate fines passing to downstream facilities while giving equivalent or superior processing rates than provided by the 0.5-micron elements.

  10. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  11. A Reply: Media and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    This response to a previously published article on the replaceability of media and instructional methods focuses on a study that uses a chemistry multimedia software package to examine cognitive processes in which learners interact with instructional designs and use media and methods to construct understanding. (nine references) (LRW)

  12. Adsorptive/photo-catalytic process for naphthalene removal from aqueous media using in-situ nickel doped titanium nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajit; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2015-05-15

    The present study investigates the synthesis and characterization of in-situ nickel doped titanium nanocomposite (TiO2/NiO) use as an adsorbent and a photo-catalyst for naphthalene removal from aqueous phase. Nickel-titanium nanocomposites were synthesized by using an in-situ process for the nickel doping and further calcined at 600 °C for 6 h to produce the desired TiO2/NiO nanocomposite, which was then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Vis analysis before and after naphthalene removal. The removal of naphthalene was explored with effect of pH, time and initial concentration of naphthalene (2-25 mg/L) in the presence of dark and light phases. Naphthalene removal tests were conducted under both batch and continuous flow conditions. A special column without any channeling problem was successfully designed for the removal of naphthalene by continuous flow process in the presence of visible light source. The removal was maximized at pH 6.5. The maximum amount of naphthalene removed by TiO2/NiO(0.1) nanocomposite in the presence of visible light phase was 322.1 mg/g, which was 2.5 times greater than that of the parent TiO2. The removal of naphthalene obtained during the breakthrough analysis was consistent with the batch equilibrium data.

  13. Photochemistry in Organized Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Janos H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes common artificially produced organized media such as colloids, surfactants, and polymers and their usefulness in studying complex biochemical processes. Discusses selected recent photophysical and photochemical exploitations of these systems, including artificial photosynthesis, in situ generation of colloidal gold and platinum,…

  14. The Media Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Joan; Crow, Jeanne

    This student text and activity book provides information on and suggests ways to examine seven of the mass media: movies, television, advertising, magazines, comics, radio, and newspapers. Much of the learning takes place by actual examination of actual products to learn characteristics common to them. The first section investigates the process of…

  15. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  16. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  17. 3D Imaging of Porous Media Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy with Application to Microscale Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.

    1999-02-10

    We present advances in the application of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the microgeometry of porous geologic and engineering materials. We discuss technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including both its advantages and limitations. Confocal imaging can be used to optically section a material, with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes. The resultant volumetric image data, consisting of fluorescence intensities for typically {approximately}50 million voxels in XYZ space, can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the two-phase medium. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in sandstone, characterizing brittle failure processes in low-porosity rock deformed under triaxial loading conditions in the laboratory, and analyzing the microstructure of porous ceramic insulations. We then describe approaches to extract statistical microgeometric descriptions from volumetric image data, and present results derived from confocal volumetric data sets. Finally, we develop the use of confocal image data to automatically generate a three-dimensional mesh for numerical pore-scale flow simulations.

  18. Solitons in quadratic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, M.; Di Menza, L.; Saut, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the properties of solitonic structures arising in quadratic media. First, we recall the derivation of systems governing the interaction process for waves propagating in such media and we check the local and global well-posedness of the corresponding Cauchy problem. Then, we look for stationary states in the context of normal or anomalous dispersion regimes, that lead us to either elliptic or non-elliptic systems and we address the problem of orbital stability. Finally, some numerical experiments are carried out in order to compute localized states for several regimes and to study dynamic stability as well as long-time asymptotics.

  19. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  20. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  1. Social media.

    PubMed

    Foster, James

    2013-01-01

    There is an argument that with the common use of a variety of media the professional expectations on our everyday life are becoming increasingly important. A moan about a patient on a Monday night 20 years ago may have been harmless. The same comment made using today's communication methods could result in a regulatory challenge. PMID:23729056

  2. Numerical modeling of Non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow process with phase change phenomena in the porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Shao, H.; Thullner, M.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    In applications of Deep Geothermal reservoirs, thermal recovery processes, and contaminated groundwater sites, the multiphase multicomponent flow and transport processes are often considered the most important underlying physical process. In particular, the behavior of phase appearance and disappearance is the critical to the performance of many geo-reservoirs, and great interests exit in the scientific community to simulate this coupled process. This work is devoted to the modeling and simulation of two-phase, two components flow and transport in the porous medium, whereas the phase change behavior in non-isothermal conditions is considered. In this work, we have implemented the algorithm developed by Marchand, et al., into the open source scientific software OpenGeoSys. The governing equation is formulated in terms of molar fraction of the light component and mean pressure as the persistent primary variables, which leads to a fully coupled nonlinear PDE system. One of the important advantages of this approach is avoiding the primary variables switching between single phase and two phase zones, so that this uniform system can be applied to describe the behavior of phase change. On the other hand, due to the number of unkown variables closure relationships are also formulated to close the whole equation system by using the approach of complementarity constrains. For the numerical technical scheme: The standard Galerkin Finite element method is applied for space discretization, while a fully implicit scheme for the time discretization, and Newton-Raphson method is utilized for the global linearization, as well as the closure relationship. This model is verified based on one test case developed to simulate the heat pipe problem. This benchmark involves two-phase two-component flow in saturated/unsaturated porous media under non-isothermal condition, including phase change and mineral-water geochemical reactive transport processes. The simulation results will be

  3. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    The goal of this NERI project was to perform research on high temperature fluoride and chloride molten salts towards the long-term goal of using these salts for transferring process heat from high temperature nuclear reactor to operation of hydrogen production and chemical plants. Specifically, the research focuses on corrosion of materials in molten salts, which continues to be one of the most significant challenges in molten salts systems. Based on the earlier work performed at ORNL on salt properties for heat transfer applications, a eutectic fluoride salt FLiNaK (46.5% LiF-11.5%NaF-42.0%KF, mol.%) and a eutectic chloride salt (32%MgCl2-68%KCl, mole %) were selected for this study. Several high temperature candidate Fe-Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, were exposed to molten FLiNaK with the goal of understanding corrosion mechanisms and ranking these alloys for their suitability for molten fluoride salt heat exchanger and thermal storage applications. The tests were performed at 850C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion was noted to occur predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries Alloy weight-loss due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys weight-loss was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present for the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. Experiments involving molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in Incoloy-800H crucibles under an argon cover gas showed a significantly lower corrosion for this alloy than when tested in a graphite crucible. Graphite significantly accelerated alloy corrosion due to the reduction of Cr from solution by graphite and formation

  4. Informal Learning through Science Media Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Michaela; Rothmund, Tobias; Retzbach, Andrea; Otto, Lukas; Besley, John C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews current research on informal science learning through news media. Based on a descriptive model of media-based science communication we distinguish between (a) the professional routines by which journalists select and depict scientific information in traditional media and (b) the psychological processes that account for how…

  5. Will Media Influence Learning? Reframing the Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Addresses Clark's position that media do not influence learning (EJ 294 173). The need to consider the capabilities of media as they interact with the cognitive and social processes by which knowledge is constructed is posited. This approach is examined within the context of two major media-based projects. Implications for theory, research, and…

  6. From Gutenberg to Gates: Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Considine, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Media consolidation and convergence have increasingly changed the way individuals as both consumers and citizens access, process, and communicate information at the local, national, and global levels. Media industries and institutions influence public perception and occupy our time at work and at home more and more. Media literacy has become…

  7. Performance evaluation of anaerobic hybrid reactors with different packing media for treating wastewater of mild alkali treated rice straw in ethanol fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Narra, Madhuri; Balasubramanian, Velmurugan; Mehta, Himali; Dixit, Garima; Madamwar, Datta; Shah, Amita R

    2014-01-01

    Four anaerobic hybrid reactors with different packing media viz. gravel (R1), pumice stone (R2), polypropylene saddles (R3) and ceramic saddles (R4) were operated in semi-continuous mode. Biomethanation potential of the wastewater generated during alkali-treatment of rice straw in ethanol production process was investigated at ambient conditions. The reactors were operated with varying organic loading rates (0.861-4.313 g COD l(-1) d(-1)) and hydraulic retention time (3-15 days). Higher COD removal efficiency (69.2%) and methane yield (0.153 l CH4 g(-1) CODadded) were achieved in reactor R2 at 15 days HRT. Modified Stover-Kincannon model was applied to estimate the bio-kinetic coefficients and fitness of the model was checked by the regression coefficient for all the reactors. The model showed an excellent correlation between the experimental and predicted values. The present study demonstrated the treatment of wastewater from alkali treated rice straw for production of biogas. PMID:24291309

  8. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  9. On Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This monograph analyzes the theory and practice of media education and media literacy. The book also includes the list of Russian media education literature and addresses of websites of the associations for media education.

  10. Otitis media with effusion

    MedlinePlus

    OME; Secretory otitis media; Serous otitis media; Silent otitis media; Silent ear infection; Glue ear ... drains from the tube and is swallowed. Otitis media with effusion (OME) and ear infections are connected ...

  11. Finite element method for simulating coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in discretely fractured porous media and application to enhanced geothermal reservoir analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Wong, L.; Bloecher, G.; Cacace, M.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    We present our recent development of the finite element method (FEM) for simulating coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in discretely fractured porous media and an application to geothermal reservoir modeling for the research test site Gross Schoenebeck in Germany operated by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. Numerical analysis of multi-physics problems in fractured rocks is important for various geotechnical applications. In particular for enhanced geothermal reservoirs where induced fractures and possibly natural fault systems dominate the system behavior, explicit modeling of those characteristic fractures (i.e. discrete fracture models) is essential to get more detailed understanding of in-situ processes and reliable estimations of heat extraction from those deep reservoirs. However, as fractures are mechanical discontinuities, it is difficult to solve the problems using continuity based numerical methods such as the FEM. Currently, equivalent porous medium or multiple continuum model approaches are often only the way to model fractured rocks with the FEM. The authors have recently developed lower-dimensional interface elements (LIEs) for modeling mechanics-involved coupled processes with pre-existing fractures (Watanabe et al. 2012 IJNME). The method does not require any double nodes unlike conventional interface elements. Moreover, for coupled problems, the approach allows for the use of a single mesh for both mechanical and other related processes such as flow and transport. All the code developments have been carried out within the scientific open source project OpenGeoSys (www.opengeosys.net) (Kolditz et al. 2012 EES). Using both traditional and new simulation techniques, a geothermal reservoir model for the research test site Gross Schoenebeck has been developed. Unstructured meshing of the complex faulted reservoir including both rock matrix and fracture elements has been conducted using recently developed automatic

  12. Reactive Transport Modeling of Chemical and Isotope Data to Identify Degradation Processes of Chlorinated Ethenes in a Diffusion-Dominated Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambon, J. C.; Damgaard, I.; Jeannottat, S.; Hunkeler, D.; Broholm, M. M.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Chlorinated ethenes are among the most widespread contaminants in the subsurface and a major threat to groundwater quality at numerous contaminated sites. Many of these contaminated sites are found in low-permeability media, such as clay tills, where contaminant transport is controlled by diffusion. Degradation and transport processes of chlorinated ethenes are not well understood in such geological settings, therefore risk assessment and remediation at these sites are particularly challenging. In this work, a combined approach of chemical and isotope analysis on core samples, and reactive transport modeling has been used to identify the degradation processes occurring at the core scale. The field data was from a site located at Vadsby, Denmark, where chlorinated solvents were spilled during the 1960-70's, resulting in contamination of the clay till and the underlying sandy layer (15 meters below surface). The clay till is heavily contaminated between 4 and 15 mbs, both with the mother compounds PCE/TCE and TCA and the daughter products (DCE, VC, ethene, DCA), indicating the occurrence of natural dechlorination of both PCE/TCE and TCA. Intact core samples of length 0.5m were collected from the source zone (between 6 and 12 mbs). Concentrations and stable isotope ratios of the mother compounds and their daughter products, as well as redox parameters, fatty acids and microbial data, were analyzed with discrete sub-sampling along the cores. More samples (each 5 mm) were collected around the observed higher permeability zones such as sand lenses, sand stringers and fractures, where a higher degradation activity was expected. This study made use of a reactive transport model to investigate the appropriateness of several conceptual models. The conceptual models considered the location of dechlorination and degradation pathways (biotic reductive dechlorination or abiotic β-elimination with iron minerals) in three core profiles. The model includes diffusion in the matrix

  13. Otitis media.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Anne G M; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Cripps, Allan W; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Casselbrant, Margaretha L; Haggard, Mark P; Venekamp, Roderick P

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) or middle ear inflammation is a spectrum of diseases, including acute otitis media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') and chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). OM is among the most common diseases in young children worldwide. Although OM may resolve spontaneously without complications, it can be associated with hearing loss and life-long sequelae. In developing countries, CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss. OM can be of bacterial or viral origin; during 'colds', viruses can ascend through the Eustachian tube to the middle ear and pave the way for bacterial otopathogens that reside in the nasopharynx. Diagnosis depends on typical signs and symptoms, such as acute ear pain and bulging of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) for AOM and hearing loss for OME; diagnostic modalities include (pneumatic) otoscopy, tympanometry and audiometry. Symptomatic management of ear pain and fever is the mainstay of AOM treatment, reserving antibiotics for children with severe, persistent or recurrent infections. Management of OME largely consists of watchful waiting, with ventilation (tympanostomy) tubes primarily for children with chronic effusions and hearing loss, developmental delays or learning difficulties. The role of hearing aids to alleviate symptoms of hearing loss in the management of OME needs further study. Insertion of ventilation tubes and adenoidectomy are common operations for recurrent AOM to prevent recurrences, but their effectiveness is still debated. Despite reports of a decline in the incidence of OM over the past decade, attributed to the implementation of clinical guidelines that promote accurate diagnosis and judicious use of antibiotics and to pneumococcal conjugate vaccination, OM continues to be a leading cause for medical consultation, antibiotic prescription and surgery in high-income countries. PMID:27604644

  14. Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Bain, John

    1992-01-01

    Otitis media remains one of the least understood conditions seen by a family physician. More attention to follow up instead of widespread use of antibiotics and decongestant mixtures could improve family practice care of children with middle ear disorders. Greater selection in resorting to surgical management would be helpful. Unnecessary interference is unlikely to be of long-term benefit to either children or their families. ImagesFigures 1-3Figures 4-5 PMID:21221314

  15. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  16. Manufacturing Process for Low Cost Dual Layer Blu-ray Disc Read-Only Memory Media Based on the “All Spin Method”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Eiji; Hisada, Kazuya; Ito, Eiichi; Tomekawa, Yuko; Nishikiori, Keiji; Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Abe, Shinya

    2008-07-01

    To achieve low-cost Blu-ray disc (BD) media, a test line for dual layer media based on the “All Spin Method”, which we have previously proposed, was fabricated. All transparent layers (the space layer, the cover layer, and the hard coat) were made of inexpensive UV resin by spin coating. Dual-layer BD read-only memory (BD-ROM) media were manufactured with a cycle time of 4 s, and the characteristics of the media were observed. The results indicated that (1) the variation in total thickness of the transparent layers was within ±2 µm (2) tilt properties after sudden environmental change and storage at high temperatures were good; (3) reproduced signals showed good jitter values and symbol error rate (SER); (4) reproduced signals were not degraded even after a storage test of 200 h at 80 °C and 85% relative humidity (RH). We have thus confirmed that the manufacturing line employing the All Spin Method has potential for mass production of low cost BD media. The All Spin Method is adaptable not only to the manufacture of BD-ROM but also BD-R (recordable) and BD-RE (rewritable), so it can contribute to decreasing the costs of all types of BD media.

  17. Improving interpretation of geoelectrical signatures arising from biomineralization process in porous media: Low-frequency dielectric spectroscopy measurements on Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Prodan, C.; Slater, L. D.; Bot, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2009-12-01

    Previous geophysical studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of complex conductivity measurements to microbial growth, biofilm formation, and microbial-mineral alternations, indicating that complex conductivity has the potential to serve as non-invasive tool for bioremediation monitoring. However, the inherent dielectric properties of microbes and how they might directly contribute to the geophysical responses observed during microbial-mineral transformations are not well understood. As a first step towards improving the understanding of electrical signals from microbial-mineral transformations in porous media, we studied the low frequency dielectric properties of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio vulgaris) cell suspensions, a common soil borne microorganism involved in remediation of toxic metals in solution. We utilized a two-electrode dielectric spectroscopy measurement, common in biophysics applications,to acquire high quality dielectric dispersion curves of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions over the frequency range 0.1 Hz to 1M Hz. Desulfovibrio vulgaris cell suspensions were placed between two parallel steel electrodes that are enclosed in a cylindrical glass tube, and the complex impedance of sample was measured relative to a known resistor. The measured impedance includes an electrode polarization impedance arising at the interface between electrodes and ionic solutions at low frequencies. This electrode impedance has traditionally precluded the reliable interpretation of two electrode techniques at low frequencies (< 1000 Hz). In order to obtain the true dielectric dispersion curve of sample, we adopt a simple and robust strategy to measure, analyze and remove the polarization impedance. The feasibility of this polarization removal technique was tested on water saturated glass beads. We show that the broadband dielectric response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris can be reliably determined with this approach. The measurements are modeled based on a

  18. Otitis media.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-04-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is diagnosed based on visualization of a full or bulging tympanic membrane with middle ear effusion. The distribution of bacteria causing AOM in North America under the influence of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination and antibiotic selection pressure has resulted in a predominance of β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae followed by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although guidelines continue to endorse amoxicillin as the preferred treatment, amoxicillin/clavulanate in high dosage would be the preferred treatment based on the otopathogen mix currently. Antibiotic prophylaxis has fallen into disfavor as a preventative strategy for AOM recurrences. PMID:23481107

  19. Heterogeneous recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  20. The Effects of Frequency of Media Utilization on Decision Making of Media Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotoh, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use the Analytic Hierarchy Process in order to identify how frequency of media use in daily life affects decision-making in media choice. 276 university students took part in this research, They were asked to prioritize their ways of obtaining information about current affairs using sets of media such as TV, books,…

  1. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  2. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  3. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  4. Theological Media Literacy Education and Hermeneutic Analysis of Soviet Audiovisual Anti-Religious Media Texts in Students' Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This article realized the Russian way of theological media education literacy and hermeneutic analysis of specific examples of Soviet anti-religious audiovisual media texts: a study of the process of interpretation of these media texts, cultural and historical factors influencing the views of the media agency/authors. The hermeneutic analysis…

  5. Reason and Reaction: The Dual Route of Decision Making Process on Social Media Usage: The Case of Hospitality Brand Fan Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthiou, Aikaterini

    2012-01-01

    A new phenomenon on Facebook, resulting from social media revolution, is the emergence of numerous Facebook fan pages. This form of online brand community is an effective tool for building relationships with consumers. Many hospitality firms (i.e. restaurants) have captured the strength of a fan page because it can enhance brand attractiveness and…

  6. Beethoven: architecture for media telephony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinarkaus, Anja; Ohtonen, Timo; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents a new architecture and techniques for media-based telephony over wireless/wireline IP networks, called `Beethoven'. The platform supports complex media transport and mobile conferencing for multi-user environments having a non-uniform access. New techniques are presented to provide advanced multimedia call management over different media types and their presentation. The routing and distribution of the media is rendered over the standards based protocol. Our approach offers a generic, distributed and object-oriented solution having interfaces, where signal processing and unified messaging algorithms are embedded as instances of core classes. The platform services are divided into `basic communication', `conferencing' and `media session'. The basic communication form platform core services and supports access from scalable user interface to network end-points. Conferencing services take care of media filter adaptation, conversion, error resiliency, multi-party connection and event signaling, while the media session services offer resources for application-level communication between the terminals. The platform allows flexible attachment of any number of plug-in modules, and thus we use it as a test bench for multiparty/multi-point conferencing and as an evaluation bench for signal coding algorithms. In tests, our architecture showed the ability to easily be scaled from simple voice terminal to complex multi-user conference sharing virtual data.

  7. Distractor filtering in media multitaskers.

    PubMed

    Cain, Matthew S; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    A growing amount of modern media is consumed simultaneously, a phenomenon known as 'media multitasking'. Individuals who regularly engage in this activity, heavy media multitaskers (HMMs), are more affected by irrelevant information that can intrude into a primary task than are light media multitaskers (LMMs--Ophir et al, 2009 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 106 15583). However, the locus of this deficit is unknown, as previous research is consistent with both memory and attentional explanations. Here, we isolated attentional processes by employing a singleton distractor task with low working-memory demands. In this task, LMMs used top-down information to improve their performance, yet HMMs did not. This difference in performance in an established attentional capture task argues for the presence of attentional differences in HMMs and is consistent with the idea that HMMs maintain a wider attentional scope than LMMs, even when instructed otherwise.

  8. FOREWORD: International Topical Workshop on Plasma Physics: Coherent Processes in Nonlinear Media. Sponsored by the ICTP (Trieste) and the European Union (Brussels)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Bingham, R.; Stenflo, L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Starting in 1989 we have created a forum at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, where scientists from different parts of the world can meet and exchange information in the frontier areas of physics. In the three previous meetings, we focused on large amplitude waves and fields in plasmas, the physics of dusty plasmas, and wave-particle interactions and energization in plasmas. In 1995, we came up with a fresh idea of organizing somewhat enlarged but still well focused research topics that are cross-disciplinary. Thus, the usual 'fourth-week activity' of the Plasma Physics College at the ICTP was replaced by an International Topical Workshop on Plasma Physics: Coherent Processes in Nonlinear Media, which was held at the ICTP during the period 16-20 October, 1995. This provided us an opportunity to draw eminent speakers from many closely related fields such as plasma physics, fluid dynamics, nonlinear optics, and astrophysics. The Workshop was attended by 82 delegates from 34 countries, and the participation from the industrial and the developing countries was about half each. The programme included 4 review and 29 topical invited lectures. In addition, about 30 contributed papers were presented as posters in two sessions. The latter were created in order to give opportunities to younger physicists for displaying the results of their recent work and to obtain constructive comments from the other participants. During the five days at the ICTP, we focused on almost all the various aspects of nonlinear phenomena that are common in different branches of science. The review and topical lectures as well as the posters dealt with the most recent advances in coherent nonlinear processes in space and astrophysical plasmas, in fluids and optics, in low temperature dusty plasmas, as well as in laser produced and magnetically confined laboratory plasmas. The focus was on the physics of various types of waves and their generation mechanisms, the development

  9. Children and media.

    PubMed

    Patankar, M

    1989-01-01

    Program developers in India's mass media are turning to the discipline of child development to increase their sensitivity to the special needs and capacities of child audiences. Children are particularly susceptible to having their thoughts, feelings, values, and behavior influenced by media programming. In India, radio is the medium with the greatest opportunity to communicate with children and programming for young people includes educational material, variety programs, quiz shows, drama, and live programs in which children participate. The 1st Children's Film Festival was held in India in 1952 and India participates in the International Center of Films for Children and Young People. Television enjoys popularity among children, illiterates, and the poor, but its potential to create social awareness, change behaviors, and raise the standard of living of the Indian people has not been fully realized. Drama is less able to reach large numbers of children, but offers children the opportunity to participate directly in the portrayal of different characters and emotions. Recently, the tradition of puppetry has been rivived and integrated into India's school curriculum. Finally, India is taking steps to expand the number of books available to children and the Government has established 2 trusts to support the publication of children's literature. Regardless of the form of media, it is important for parents to play a role in ensuring the appropriateness of the programming for the child and processing its content.

  10. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  11. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  12. Business and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchie, Lisa

    By virtue of the different natures of the two institutions, the relationship between business and the media is simultaneously adversarial and symbiotic: the media see themselves as society's watchdog while business sees itself as society's driving economic force. Meanwhile, business relies on the media for information, and the media rely on…

  13. How the Media Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carlos E.

    2005-01-01

    The mass media teach whether or not mediamakers intend to or realize it, and users learn from the media whether or not they try or are even aware of it. This means all of the media, including newspapers, magazines, movies, television, radio, and the new cyberspace media serve as informal yet omnipresent nonschool textbooks. This raises an…

  14. Living within the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Erin

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how media affects her as a teenager. The author says that media has such a relationship with the world today, specifically with teenagers like her. Media gives off so much information that can be valid or invalid, positive or negative. The media can persuade anyone to do something or to think a certain way.…

  15. Why Media Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Whether media affect learning has been debated for decades. The discussion of media's effectiveness has raised questions about the usefulness of comparison studies, not only in assessing applications of technology but in other areas as well. Arguments that media do not affect learning are re-examined and issues concerning media effects on expert…

  16. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical", the "practical" and…

  17. Promoting Media Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice Yuet Lin

    1997-01-01

    The "critical viewing" model for teaching media studies is based on the assumptions that mass media spread evil influences and viewers are mindless and passive media consumers. In contrast, a "cultural reflective" model of media studies would enhance cultural understanding by enabling students to seek alternative ways to think about culture and…

  18. Thermal MEMS actuator operation in aqueous media/seawater: Performance enhancement through atomic layer deposition post processing of PolyMUMPs devices

    SciTech Connect

    Warnat, Stephan Forbrigger, Cameron; Hubbard, Ted; Bertuch, Adam; Sundaram, Ganesh

    2015-01-15

    A method to enhance thermal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators in aqueous media by using dielectric encapsulation layers is presented. Aqueous media reduces the available mechanical energy of the thermal actuator through an electrical short between actuator structures. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} laminates with various thicknesses were deposited on packaged PolyMUMPs devices to electrically separate the actuator from the aqueous media. Atomic layer deposition was used to form an encapsulation layer around released MEMS structures and the package. The enhancement was assessed by the increase of the elastic energy, which is proportional to the mechanical stiffness of the actuator and the displacement squared. The mechanical stiffness of the encapsulated actuators compared with the noncoated actuators was increased by factors ranging from 1.45 (for 45 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 20 nm TiO{sub 2}) to 1.87 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). Displacement measurements were made for all laminate combinations in filtered tap water and seawater by using FFT based displacement measurement technique with a repeatability of ∼10 nm. For all laminate structures, the elastic energy increased and enhanced the actuator performance: In seawater, the mechanical output energy increased by factors ranging from 5 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to 11 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). The authors also measured the long-term actuator stability/reliability in seawater. Samples were stored for 29 days in seawater and tested for 17 days in seawater. Laminates with TiO{sub 2} layers allowed constant operation over the entire measurement period.

  19. Social media and disasters: a functional framework for social media use in disaster planning, response, and research.

    PubMed

    Houston, J Brian; Hawthorne, Joshua; Perreault, Mildred F; Park, Eun Hae; Goldstein Hode, Marlo; Halliwell, Michael R; Turner McGowen, Sarah E; Davis, Rachel; Vaid, Shivani; McElderry, Jonathan A; Griffith, Stanford A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review of online, official, and scientific literature was carried out in 2012-13 to develop a framework of disaster social media. This framework can be used to facilitate the creation of disaster social media tools, the formulation of disaster social media implementation processes, and the scientific study of disaster social media effects. Disaster social media users in the framework include communities, government, individuals, organisations, and media outlets. Fifteen distinct disaster social media uses were identified, ranging from preparing and receiving disaster preparedness information and warnings and signalling and detecting disasters prior to an event to (re)connecting community members following a disaster. The framework illustrates that a variety of entities may utilise and produce disaster social media content. Consequently, disaster social media use can be conceptualised as occurring at a number of levels, even within the same disaster. Suggestions are provided on how the proposed framework can inform future disaster social media development and research. PMID:25243593

  20. Social media and disasters: a functional framework for social media use in disaster planning, response, and research.

    PubMed

    Houston, J Brian; Hawthorne, Joshua; Perreault, Mildred F; Park, Eun Hae; Goldstein Hode, Marlo; Halliwell, Michael R; Turner McGowen, Sarah E; Davis, Rachel; Vaid, Shivani; McElderry, Jonathan A; Griffith, Stanford A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review of online, official, and scientific literature was carried out in 2012-13 to develop a framework of disaster social media. This framework can be used to facilitate the creation of disaster social media tools, the formulation of disaster social media implementation processes, and the scientific study of disaster social media effects. Disaster social media users in the framework include communities, government, individuals, organisations, and media outlets. Fifteen distinct disaster social media uses were identified, ranging from preparing and receiving disaster preparedness information and warnings and signalling and detecting disasters prior to an event to (re)connecting community members following a disaster. The framework illustrates that a variety of entities may utilise and produce disaster social media content. Consequently, disaster social media use can be conceptualised as occurring at a number of levels, even within the same disaster. Suggestions are provided on how the proposed framework can inform future disaster social media development and research.

  1. Nanomagnetic Simulations of Recording Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrefl, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The optimization of ultra-high density recording systems requires the joint simulation of the recording head, the data layer and the soft underlayer. This talk presents micromagnetic simulations of recording processes in perpendicular and patterned media. The numerical technique for the multiscale simulation combines the finite element method with an accelerated boundary method. The use of hierarchical matrices and FFT methods significantly speeds up the computation time for the magnetostatic interactions between the head and the data layer. In addition to dynamic magnetization processes, energy barriers of recording media are calculated using a nudged elastic band method. The rise time of the write field was found to depend significantly on vortex motion in the pole tip of the head. The shortest field rise time was obtained for intermediate values of the Gilbert damping constant. Under the influence of the write field, magnetization reversal in composite perpendicular media occurs by the nucleation and expansion of reversed domains. However, thermally activated switching in composite media shows reversal by quasi-uniform rotation. Therefore it is possible to keep a high energy barrier while reducing the switching field in composite media, where a soft magnetic layer is exchange coupled to the hard magnetic layer. The energy barrier of composite media was calculated as a function of the applied field. The results show that the extrapolation of barriers measured at high fields underestimates the zero-field energy barrier. The calculated energy barrier of an island of a patterned media is smaller than the anisotropy constant times the island volume. This result shows that thermally activated magnetization reversal in patterned islands is non-uniform. The energy barrier of a square island with a size of only 20 nm was found to be 17% lower than the barrier expected for uniform rotation.

  2. Investigation of the mechanisms of using metal complexation and cellulose nanofiber/sodium alginate layer-by-layer coating for retaining anthocyanin pigments in thermally processed blueberries in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Cavender, George; Simonsen, John; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-03-25

    This study investigated the mechanisms of anthocyanin pigment retention using Fe(3+)-anthocyanin complexation and cellulose nanofiber (CNF)/sodium alginate (SA) layer-by-layer (LBL) coatings on thermally processed blueberries in aqueous media. Anthocyanin pigments were polymerized through complexation with Fe(3+) but readily degraded by heat (93 °C for 7 min) in the aqueous media because of poor stability. CNF/SA LBL coating was successful to retain anthocyanin pigments in thermally processed blueberries. Fruits coated with CNF containing CaCl2 followed by treatment in a SA bath formed a second hydrogel layer onto the CNF layer (LBL coating system) through cross-linking between Ca(2+) and alginic acid. Methyl-cellulose-modified CNF improved the interactions between CNF, the fruit surface, and the SA layer. This study demonstrated that the CNF/SA LBL coating system was effective to retain anthocyanin pigments on thermally processed whole blueberries, whereas no combined benefit of complexation with coating was observed. Results explained the mechanisms of the new approaches for developing colorful and nutritionally enhanced anthocyanin-rich fruit products.

  3. Media, racism and public health psychology.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Raymond; Pega, Frank; McCreanor, Tim; Rankine, Jenny; Barnes, Angela

    2006-03-01

    International literature has established that racism contributes to ill-health of migrants, ethnic minorities and indigenous peoples. Racism generally negates wellbeing, adversely affecting physical and psychological health. Numerous studies have shown that media contribute marginalizing particular ethnic and cultural groups depicting them primarily as problems for and threats to the dominant. This articles frames media representations of, and their effect on, the indigenous Maori of Aotearoa, New Zealand within the ongoing processes of colonization. We argue that reflects the media contribution to maintenance and naturalisation of colonial relationships and seek to include critical media scholarship in a critical public health psychology.

  4. Elections, Image or Issues? Media & Values 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.; Silver, Rosalind, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue of "Media & Values" explores the growing influence of mass media on the election process in the United States. The essays present various interpretations of that influence and the implications for the nation. The magazine is divided into three sections. The introductory section includes: (1) "Where Have All the Leaders Gone?" (Daniel…

  5. Planning School Library Media Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Pauline H.

    This manual examines the planning process for building or renovating new library media facilities. It is concerned with building programs, local building and fire codes, design, working with architects, reading blueprints, engineering and mechanical plans, budgets, bids, and change orders. It offers help with such sensitive issues as the politics…

  6. Mass Media: The Invisible Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glessing, Robert J.; White, William P.

    This anthology for students of media consists of essays and articles grouped under four topics: media forms, media content, media environments, and "the last word." Media forms deals with the nature of these kinds of media: electronic, print, film, music, and comics, graffiti, and clothing. Media content contains articles on the news, advertising,…

  7. METAL MEDIA FILTERS, AG-1 SECTION FI

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D.

    2012-05-23

    One application of metal media filters is in various nuclear air cleaning processes including applications for protecting workers, the public and the environment from hazardous and radioactive particles. To support this application the development of the ASME AG-1 FI Standard on Metal Media has been under way for more than ten years. Development of the proposed section has required resolving several difficult issues associated with operating conditions (media velocity, pressure drop, etc.), qualification testing, and quality acceptance testing. Performance characteristics of metal media are dramatically different than the glass fiber media with respect to parameters like differential pressures, operating temperatures, media strength, etc. These differences make existing data for a glass fiber media inadequate for qualifying a metal media filter for AG-1. In the past much work has been conducted on metal media filters at facilities such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to qualify the media as High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters. Particle retention testing has been conducted at Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility and at Air Techniques International (ATI) to prove that the metal media meets or exceeds the 99.97% particle retention required for a HEPA Filter. Even with his testing, data was lacking to complete an AG-1 FI Standard on metal media. With funding secured by Mississippi State University (MSU) from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a research test stand is being designed and fabricated at MSU's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) Facility to obtain qualification data on metal media. This in turn will support required data needed for the FI Standard. The paper will discuss in detail how the test stand at MSU will obtain the necessary data to complete the FI Standard.

  8. New media, old media: The technologies of international development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, Henry T.

    1986-09-01

    The research, theory and practice of educational technology over the past 75 years provide convincing evidence that this process offers a comprehensive and integrated approach to solving educational and social problems. The use of media and technology in development has shifted from an emphasis on mass media to personal media. A variety of electronic delivery systems are being used and are usually coordinated by centralized governmental agencies. There are no patterns of use since the problems vary and the medium used is responsive to the problem. Computers are used most frequently and satellite telecommunication networks follow. The effective use of these and other technologies requires a long-term commitment to financial support and training of personnel. The extension model of face-to-face contact still prevails in developing nations whether in agriculture, education or rural development. Low-cost technologies are being used in local projects while major regional and national companies use radio, film and related video technologies. The use of all available and cost-effective media and technologies make possible appropriate communications for specific goals with specific audiences. There appears to be no conflict among proponents of various media formats. Development in education and other sectors has much to gain from old and new communication technologies and has hardly been tapped. Several new educational technology developments are discussed as potential contributors to formal and nonformal education.

  9. Pore Structure Reconstruction and Moisture Migration in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiayi; Shi, Xing; Shi, Juan; Chen, Zhenqian

    2014-09-01

    Three kinds of porous media (isotropic, perpendicular anisotropic and parallel anisotropic porous media) with the same porosity, different pore size distributions and fractal spectral dimensions were reconstructed by random growth method. It was aimed to theoretically study the impact of microscopic pore structure on water vapor diffusion process in porous media. The results show that pore size distribution can only denote the static characteristics of porous media but cannot effectively reflect the dynamic transport characteristics of porous media. Fractal spectral dimension can effectively analyze and reflect pores connectivity and moisture dynamic transport properties of porous media from the microscopic perspective. The pores connectivity and water vapor diffusion performance in pores of porous media get better with the increase of fractal spectral dimension of porous media. Fractal spectral dimension of parallel anisotropic porous media is more than that of perpendicular anisotropic porous media. Fractal spectral dimension of isotropic porous media is between parallel anisotropic porous media and perpendicular anisotropic porous media. Other macroscopic parameters such as equilibrium diffusion coefficient of water vapor, water vapor concentration variation at right boundary in equilibrium, the time when water vapor diffusion process reaches a stable state also can characterize the pores connectivity and water vapor diffusion properties of porous media.

  10. Media Directors Help Plan a Media Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John H.

    In an effort to plan a more useful media course for advertising majors at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a survey was conducted, along with a series of informal interviews, of media directors with large and small advertising firms. The five participating directors completed broad questionnaires on which they rated on a five-point…

  11. Using Social Media to Teach Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Howard

    2008-01-01

    By showing students how to use Web-based channels to inform publics, advocate positions, contest claims, and organize action around issues they care about, participatory media education can influence civic behavior positively throughout their lives. Participatory media literacy is necessarily a hands-on enterprise, requiring active use of digital…

  12. Zinc enhanced hard disk media

    DOEpatents

    Zou, Jie; Lambeth, David N.; Laughlin, David E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a magnetic recording media incorporating Zn containing layers in close proximity to a magnetic layer to provide media having increased coercivity and lower noise. The Zn containing layer can be incorporated in a rotating, translating or stationary recording media to operate in conjunction with magnetic transducing heads for recording and reading of magnetic data, as well as other applications. The magnetic recording medium of the invention preferably includes a Co or Co alloy film magnetic layer, underlayer structures to promote epitaxial crystalline structure in the magnetic layer, and a Zn containing layer to promote isolation between the magnetic grains. The medium can further include seed layers, underlayers, intermediate layers, and overlayers. The process of manufacture includes promoting diffusion of Zn to the magnetic layer grain boundaries.

  13. Introduction to social media.

    PubMed

    Meru, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This overview of social media categories some of the typical types and uses of this form of communication and suggests common courtesies and effective strategies for participation in the social media culture.

  14. Social media for lifelong learning.

    PubMed

    Kind, Terry; Evans, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Learning is ongoing, and can be considered a social activity. In this paper we aim to provide a review of the use of social media for lifelong learning. We start by defining lifelong learning, drawing upon principles of continuous professional development and adult learning theory. We searched Embase and MEDLINE from 2004-2014 for search terms relevant to social media and learning. We describe examples of lifelong learners using social media in medical education and healthcare that have been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. Medical or other health professions students may have qualities consistent with being a lifelong learner, yet once individuals move beyond structured learning environments they will need to recognize their own gaps in knowledge and skills over time and be motivated to fill them, thereby incorporating lifelong learning principles into their day-to-day practice. Engagement with social media can parallel engagement in the learning process over time, to the extent that online social networking fosters feedback and collaboration. The use of social media and online networking platforms are a key way to continuously learn in today's information sharing society. Additional research is needed, particularly rigorous studies that extend beyond learner satisfaction to knowledge, behaviour change, and outcomes. PMID:25906988

  15. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  16. Children's Media Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Amy B.

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems…

  17. Youth Media and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses how capacity is conceived of and understood in youth media/civic education programming, and how beliefs about agency, development, relationality and youth manifests in the discourses, programmes, and practices of organizations operating youth media programmes. Through attention to a youth media and development programme in…

  18. Sizing Up Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

  19. Functions of Media Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffres, Leo W.

    Individuals engage in media behavior several times daily. If a medium is actually used, that decision is one of a series of points which constitute a media behavior unit. The media behavior unit is used in several ways. First, by looking at particular attributes, researchers can determine whether an individual is consistent in medium…

  20. Creating Quality Media Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortin, John A.; Bailey, Gerald D.

    1982-01-01

    Innovation, imagination, and student creativity are key ingredients in creating quality media materials for the small school. Student-produced media materials, slides without a camera, personalized slide programs and copy work, self-made task cards, self-made overhead transparencies, graphic materials, and utilization of the mass media are some of…

  1. Media in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaver, Franca

    This 2-part report summarizes Dutch policy on mass media and reviews the status of cable television in the Netherlands. The first part defines the underlying principles of a national policy on mass media in relation to the press, commercial and educational television broadcasting, radio, cable television, and media research. Parliamentary debate…

  2. Media Center: Operations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guide to basic technical procedures recommended in the operation of within-school media centers is intended for all Department of Defense Dependent Schools (DoDDS) media specialists, clerks, aides, and technicians. The first four sections refer to the general media program functions identified in the related manual, "A is for Apple:…

  3. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial Issues"…

  4. New Media, New Literacies and the Adolescent Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Janette

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this research study was to develop a conceptualization of the relationship between new digital media and adolescent students' writing of poetry while immersed in using new media. More specifically, the research focused on the performative affordances of new media and how these interacted with the students' creative processes as they…

  5. Gender, Race and Class in Media. A Text-Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dines, Gail, Ed.; Humez, Jean M., Ed.

    This reader is intended to introduce undergraduates to the richness, sophistication, and diversity that characterize contemporary media scholarship. Another goal is to take the mystery out of the idea of media culture by examining its production, construction, and the meaning-making processes through which media imagery and messages help shape our…

  6. Media Stereotypes Analysis in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Media Stereotypes Analysis is the identification and analysis of stereotypical images of people, ideas, events, stories, themes and etc. in media texts. Media stereotype reflects the well-established attitudes towards a particular object, it is schematic averaged, familiar, stable representation of genres, social processes/events, ideas, people,…

  7. School Library Media Specialist-Teacher Collaboration: Characteristics, Challenges, Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, O. P.; Bray, Marty

    2011-01-01

    The most successful school library media specialists are those who collaborate with teachers as full partners in the instructional process. Without assertive action by the school library media specialist, however, school administrators and teachers are likely to be more aware of the media specialist's administrative role than the roles of teacher,…

  8. An Unseen Hand: The Mass Media and Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Mike

    This paper examines the role of mass media in the British education policy process, in particular, how the mass media steer education policy and inhibit certain issues from becoming the subject of policy. The paper describes how media professionals comprise an interest group competing with others to affect education policy; how they and other…

  9. Struggle for Social Position in Digital Media Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr-Stevens, Candance

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the processes and products of multimodal and multi-authored digital media composition. Using ethnographic case study and Mediated Discourse Analysis (Norris & Jones, 2005), this study focuses specifically on the digital media composition of radio and film documentaries, examining struggle among students, media, and…

  10. Media and Symbol Systems as Related to Cognition and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Gavriel

    1979-01-01

    The failure of research on media to deal with media's symbol systems is discussed. Nature of symbol systems is described and related to cognition and learning. Symbolic elements used by media can facilitate the cultivation of mental skills in interaction with individual differences and depth of processing. (Author/RD)

  11. Reduction of start-up time through bioaugmentation process in microbial fuel cells using an isolate from dark fermentative spent media fed anode.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Soumya; Khilari, Santimoy; Roy, Shantonu; Ghangrekar, M M; Pradhan, Debabrata; Das, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemically active bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa IIT BT SS1 was isolated from a dark fermentative spent media fed anode, and a bioaugmentation technique using the isolated strain was used to improve the start-up time of a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Higher volumetric current density and lower start-up time were observed with the augmented system MFC-PM (13.7 A/m(3)) when compared with mixed culture MFC-M (8.72 A/m(3)) during the initial phase. This enhanced performance in MFC-PM was possibly due to the improvement in electron transfer ability by the augmented strain. However, pure culture MFC-P showed maximum volumetric current density (17 A/m(3)) due to the inherent electrogenic properties of Pseudomonas sp. An electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) study, along with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis, supported the influence of isolated species in improving the MFC performance. The present study indicates that the bioaugmentation strategy using the isolated Pseudomonas sp. can be effectively utilized to decrease the start-up time of MFC.

  12. Youth, Crime & the Media: Media Representation of and Reaction to Young People in Relation to Law and Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Judith, Ed.; Hil, Richard, Ed.

    The 24 essays in this collection explore the ways in which young people are represented in the media in Australia. Australia's media are full of bad news about young people as perpetrators or victims of crime. The first six chapters explore a range of theoretical issues that connect media reports of young people with processes of governance in…

  13. Association of prophage antiterminator Q alleles and susceptibility to food-processing treatments applied to Escherichia coli O157 in laboratory media.

    PubMed

    Malone, Aaron S; Yousef, Ahmed E; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2007-11-01

    Resistance of Escherichia coli O157 to inactivation by high-pressure processing, heat, and UV and gamma radiation was associated with the allele of the prophage-encoded antiterminator Q gene present upstream of the Shiga toxin gene stx2. Increased processing may be required to kill certain strains of E. coli O157, and the choice of strains used as surrogate markers for processing efficiency is critical.

  14. Prosocial effects of media.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marjorie J

    2012-06-01

    Parents, teachers, health care providers, and other caring adults worry about the harmful influence of media messages and images on children and teens and wonder how to recognize and encourage positive and healthy use of media. For decades, experts have commented on the power of media. Media depictions can lead to negative attitudes and behavior in some young viewers. This article discusses whether prosocial, tolerant, and cooperative attitudes and behavior can be learned and imitated by children and adolescents and whether media can nurture or stimulate creativity or actively promote health and well-being in young consumers.

  15. Prosocial effects of media.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marjorie J

    2012-06-01

    Parents, teachers, health care providers, and other caring adults worry about the harmful influence of media messages and images on children and teens and wonder how to recognize and encourage positive and healthy use of media. For decades, experts have commented on the power of media. Media depictions can lead to negative attitudes and behavior in some young viewers. This article discusses whether prosocial, tolerant, and cooperative attitudes and behavior can be learned and imitated by children and adolescents and whether media can nurture or stimulate creativity or actively promote health and well-being in young consumers. PMID:22643170

  16. Culture et medias (Culture and the Media).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abastado, Claude

    1982-01-01

    The traditional conception of pluralistic culture is contrasted with a new, separate form of culture: mass media culture. Its components are noted: medium, message, "mosaic," and strategy, and methodology for its study is discussed. (MSE)

  17. Negotiated media effects. Peer feedback modifies effects of media's thin-body ideal on adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Jolanda; Konijn, Elly A; Seidell, Jacob C

    2014-02-01

    The present study introduces a theoretical framework on negotiated media effects. Specifically, we argue that feedback of peers on thin-body ideal media images and individual dispositions guide effects on adolescent girls' psychosocial responses to media exposure. Therefore, we examined the thin-body ideal as portrayed in media and peers' feedback on such thin-ideal images in their combined effects on adolescent girls' body dissatisfaction, objectified body consciousness, and social comparison with media models. Hence, media models and peer comments were systematically combined as incorporated entities in YouTube-formats. Hypotheses were tested in a 3 (media models: extremely thin vs. thin vs. normal weight)×3 (peer comments: 6kg-underweight vs. 3kg-underweight vs. normal-weight)×2 (appearance schematicity: lower vs. higher) between-subjects design (N=216). Results showed that peer comments indicating that a media model was 'only 3kg-underweight' exerted most negative responses, particularly in girls who strongly process appearance relevant information. Peer feedback interacts with media models in guiding perceptions of what is considered an 'ideal' body shape. Results highlight the important role of peers as well as individual predispositions in view of understanding how thin-ideal media images may impact adolescent girls' body image concerns.

  18. Body image, eating disorders, and the media.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marjorie J; Strasburger, Victor C

    2008-12-01

    Adolescence is a time of tremendous change in physical appearance. Many adolescents report dissatisfaction with their body shape and size. Forming one's body image is a complex process, influenced by family, peers, and media messages. Increasing evidence shows that the combination of ubiquitous ads for foods and emphasis on female beauty and thinness in both advertising and programming leads to confusion and dissatisfaction for many young people. Sociocultural factors, specifically media exposure, play an important role in the development of disordered body image. Of significant concern, studies have revealed a link between media exposure and the likelihood of having symptoms of disordered eating or a frank eating disorder. Pediatricians and other adults must work to promote media education and make media healthier for young people. More research is needed to identify the most vulnerable children and adolescents.

  19. Paint removal using wheat starch blast media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry; Oestreich, John

    1993-03-01

    A review of the Wheat Starch Blasting technology is presented. Laboratory evaluations covering Almen Arc testing on bare 2024-T3 aluminum and magnesium, as well as crack detection on 7075-T6 bare aluminum, are discussed. Comparisons with Type V plastic media show lower residual stresses are achieved on aluminum and magnesium with wheat starch media. Dry blasting effects on the detection of cracks confirms better crack visibility with wheat starch media versus Type V or Type II plastic media. Testing of wheat starch media in several composite test programs, including fiberglass, Kevlar, and graphite-epoxy composites, showed no fiber damage. Process developments and production experience at the first U.S. aircraft stripping facility are also reviewed. Corporate and regional aircraft are being stripped in this three nozzle dry blast hanger.

  20. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    theory and experimental results in this report demonstrate that the presence of fractures in anisotropic material can be unambiguously interpreted if experimental measurements are made as a function of stress, which eliminates many fracture-generated discrete modes (e.g., interface waves, and leaky guided-modes). Orthogonal fracture networks that are often encountered in field exploration bring in additional challenges for seismic/acoustic data interpretation. An innovative wavefront imaging system with a bi-axial load frame was designed and implemented on orthogonally-fractured samples to determine the effect of fracture networks on elastic wave propagation. The effects of central wave guiding and extra time delays along a fracture intersection were observed in experiments and was analyzed. Interpreting data from media with intersecting fracture sets must account for fracture intersections and the non-uniformity of fracture properties caused by local tectonic conditions or other physical process such as non-uniform fluid distributions within a network and/or chemical alterations.

  1. Absolute nutrient concentration measurements in cell culture media: (1)H q-NMR spectra and data to compare the efficiency of pH-controlled protein precipitation versus CPMG or post-processing filtering approaches.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The NMR spectra and data reported in this article refer to the research article titled "A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using q-NMR" [1]. We provide the (1)H q-NMR spectra of cell culture media (DMEM) after removal of serum proteins, which show the different efficiency of various precipitating solvents, the solvent/DMEM ratios, and pH of the solution. We compare the data of the absolute nutrient concentrations, measured by PULCON external standard method, before and after precipitation of serum proteins and those obtained using CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or applying post-processing filtering algorithms to remove, from the (1)H q-NMR spectra, the proteins signal contribution. For each of these approaches, the percent error in the absolute value of every measurement for all the nutrients is also plotted as accuracy assessment. PMID:27331118

  2. The role of media literacy in shaping adolescents' understanding of and responses to sexual portrayals in mass media.

    PubMed

    Pinkleton, Bruce E; Austin, Erica Weintraub; Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes; Cohen, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    This study was a theory-based, pretest-posttest quasi-experiment conducted in the field (N = 922) to determine whether and how a media literacy curriculum addressing sexual portrayals in the media would influence adolescents' decision-making processes regarding sex. Results of the evaluation, based on the Message Interpretation Process Model, indicated that participants who received media literacy training better understood that media influence teens' decision making about sex and were more likely to report that sexual depictions in the media are inaccurate and glamorized. In addition, participants who received media literacy lessons were more likely than were control group participants to believe that other teens practice abstinence and reported a greater ability to resist peer pressure. An interaction effect existed between gender and condition on attitudes toward abstinence, suggesting that the lessons helped girls and boys in somewhat different ways. Overall, the results indicated that media literacy strengthened key aspects of participants' logic-oriented decision-making process.

  3. Method and System for Producing Full Motion Media to Display on a Spherical Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starobin, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for producing full motion media for display on a spherical surface is described. The method may include selecting a subject of full motion media for display on a spherical surface. The method may then include capturing the selected subject as full motion media (e.g., full motion video) in a rectilinear domain. The method may then include processing the full motion media in the rectilinear domain for display on a spherical surface, such as by orienting the full motion media, adding rotation to the full motion media, processing edges of the full motion media, and/or distorting the full motion media in the rectilinear domain for instance. After processing the full motion media, the method may additionally include providing the processed full motion media to a spherical projection system, such as a Science on a Sphere system.

  4. Smoke-free policy development in Italy through the legislative process of the ban 2000-2005, and press media review 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Giuseppe; Currie, Laura; Spizzichino, Lorenzo; Galeone, Daniela; Lopez, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the process of approval of the Italian smoking ban, enacted in 2005. The method is to conduct a review of proposed and approved legislation 2000- 2005, and of articles published in Italian newspapers, 1998-2008. Enabling factors in the process were: the leadership of two consecutive Health Ministers, both physicians, who introduced the bill four times between 2000-2002; the repeated presentation and final approval of the bill as an amendment within a bill on public administration which enabled timely approval of the ban; and the stringent air quality standards in the 2003 regulation that made building smoking rooms impracticable and prohibitively expensive. Limiting factors in the process were: the 6-month delay in approving the regulation on smoking rooms; the 1.5-year delay in approving the regulation establishing owners' responsibility for enforcing the ban in hospitality premises and the legal action in August 2005, which shifted responsibility for enforcement to police. Eighty-three percent of the 808 articles published on smoking in 1998-2008 were released between 2000-2005, during the policy process. While the press devoted considerable attention to the issues raised by the hospitality sector, the long legislative process of the bill and its regulations also stimulated coverage on tobacco control issues. PMID:21952150

  5. Smoke-free policy development in Italy through the legislative process of the ban 2000-2005, and press media review 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Gorini, Giuseppe; Currie, Laura; Spizzichino, Lorenzo; Galeone, Daniela; Lopez, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the process of approval of the Italian smoking ban, enacted in 2005. The method is to conduct a review of proposed and approved legislation 2000- 2005, and of articles published in Italian newspapers, 1998-2008. Enabling factors in the process were: the leadership of two consecutive Health Ministers, both physicians, who introduced the bill four times between 2000-2002; the repeated presentation and final approval of the bill as an amendment within a bill on public administration which enabled timely approval of the ban; and the stringent air quality standards in the 2003 regulation that made building smoking rooms impracticable and prohibitively expensive. Limiting factors in the process were: the 6-month delay in approving the regulation on smoking rooms; the 1.5-year delay in approving the regulation establishing owners' responsibility for enforcing the ban in hospitality premises and the legal action in August 2005, which shifted responsibility for enforcement to police. Eighty-three percent of the 808 articles published on smoking in 1998-2008 were released between 2000-2005, during the policy process. While the press devoted considerable attention to the issues raised by the hospitality sector, the long legislative process of the bill and its regulations also stimulated coverage on tobacco control issues.

  6. Health-related media use among youth audiences in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Glik, Deborah; Massey, Philip; Gipson, Jessica; Dieng, Thierno; Rideau, Alexandre; Prelip, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are experiencing rapid changes in access to and use of new internet and digital media technologies. The purpose of this study was to better understand how younger audiences are navigating traditional and newer forms of media technologies, with particular emphasis on the skills and competencies needed to obtain, evaluate and apply health-related information, also defined as health and media literacy. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted throughout Senegal in September 2012 with youth aged 15-25. Using an iterative coding process based on grounded theory, four themes emerged related to media use for health information among Senegalese youth. They include the following: (i) media utilization; (ii) barriers and conflicts regarding media utilization; (iii) uses and gratifications and (iv) health and media literacy. Findings suggest that Senegalese youth use a heterogeneous mix of media platforms (i.e. television, radio, internet) and utilization often occurs with family members or friends. Additionally, the need for entertainment, information and connectedness inform media use, mostly concerning sexual and reproductive health information. Importantly, tensions arise as youth balance innovative and interactive technologies with traditional and conservative values, particularly concerning ethical and privacy concerns. Findings support the use of multipronged intervention approaches that leverage both new media, as well as traditional media strategies, and that also address lack of health and media literacy in this population. Implementing health-related interventions across multiple media platforms provides an opportunity to create an integrated, as opposed to a disparate, user experience.

  7. Health-related media use among youth audiences in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Glik, Deborah; Massey, Philip; Gipson, Jessica; Dieng, Thierno; Rideau, Alexandre; Prelip, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are experiencing rapid changes in access to and use of new internet and digital media technologies. The purpose of this study was to better understand how younger audiences are navigating traditional and newer forms of media technologies, with particular emphasis on the skills and competencies needed to obtain, evaluate and apply health-related information, also defined as health and media literacy. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted throughout Senegal in September 2012 with youth aged 15-25. Using an iterative coding process based on grounded theory, four themes emerged related to media use for health information among Senegalese youth. They include the following: (i) media utilization; (ii) barriers and conflicts regarding media utilization; (iii) uses and gratifications and (iv) health and media literacy. Findings suggest that Senegalese youth use a heterogeneous mix of media platforms (i.e. television, radio, internet) and utilization often occurs with family members or friends. Additionally, the need for entertainment, information and connectedness inform media use, mostly concerning sexual and reproductive health information. Importantly, tensions arise as youth balance innovative and interactive technologies with traditional and conservative values, particularly concerning ethical and privacy concerns. Findings support the use of multipronged intervention approaches that leverage both new media, as well as traditional media strategies, and that also address lack of health and media literacy in this population. Implementing health-related interventions across multiple media platforms provides an opportunity to create an integrated, as opposed to a disparate, user experience. PMID:25113152

  8. Medical ethics in the media.

    PubMed

    Raman, Usha

    2009-01-01

    The mass media function both as reflector and a shaper of a society's attitudes and values and as such represent a forum within which one may understand and influence public opinion. While questions of medical ethics may be largely confined to academic and scientific spaces, their importance to society at large cannot be denied, and how issues of medical ethics play out--if at all--in the media could tell us how society understands and processes these questions. This paper uses the techniques of framing analysis and textual analysis to examine how the print media, represented by two major Indian newspapers, cover medical ethics. The study looked at all articles related to medical research over a three-month period (January-March 2007) and considered how the story was framed, what were the key threads followed, and the dominant themes focused on. The ethical frame is notable by its absence, even in articles related to controversial themes such as drug research and genetics. Discussion of ethics appears to be problematic given the adherence to traditional "news values" when covering science and medicine. The research community and the media need to pay more attention to explicitly focusing on ethics in their interactions. PMID:19241950

  9. Pervasive media violence.

    PubMed

    Schooler, C; Flora, J A

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we focus our discussion on studies examining effects on children and young adults. We believe that the current epidemic of youth violence in the United States justifies a focus on this vulnerable segment of society. We consider media effects on individual children's behaviors, such as imitating aggressive acts. In addition, we examine how the media influence young people's perceptions of norms regarding interpersonal relationships. Next, we assess mass media effects on societal beliefs, or what children and adolescents think the "real world" is like. We suggest these media influences are cumulative and mutually reinforcing, and discuss the implications of repeated exposure to prominent and prevalent violent media messages. Finally, we catalog multiple intervention possibilities ranging from education to regulation. From a public health perspective, therefore, we evaluate the effects that pervasive media messages depicting violence have on young people and present multiple strategies to promote more healthful outcomes. PMID:8724228

  10. Ubiquitous Media for Collocated Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacucci, Giulio; Peltonen, Peter; Morrison, Ann; Salovaara, Antti; Kurvinen, Esko; Oulasvirta, Antti

    Has ubiquitous computing entered our lives as anticipated in the early 90s or at the turn of the millennium? In this last decade, the processing of media combined with sensing and communication capabilities has been slowly entering our lives through powerful smartphones, multimodal game consoles, instrumented cars, and large displays pervading public spaces. However, the visionary formulations (Weiser 1991) and updated scenarios (Abowd and Mynatt 2000) have not been realized, despite the fact that the technology has become increasingly accessible.

  11. Nanosecond transient processes in the triethylamine quenching of benzophenone triplets in aqueous alkaline media. Substituent effect, ketyl radical deprotonation, and secondary photoreduction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, K.; Das, P.K.

    1986-08-14

    In the course of benzophenone triplet quenching by triethylamine (TEA) at high concentrations in alkaline aqueous acetonitrile, two temporally distinct processes are observed for ketyl radical anion formation. The fast component occurs on a nanosecond time scale, has kinetics sensitive to basicity and water content of the medium, and is ascribed to the deprotonation of the diphenylhydroxymethyl radical initially produced as a result of subnanosecond intra-ion-pair proton transfer. The slow process occurs on a microsecond time scale and is characterized by pseudo-first-order rate constants linearly dependent on ketone ground-state concentration; this is assigned to the one-electron reduction of the ketone by the methyl(diethylamino)methyl radical (derived from TEA). Substituent effects on the kinetics of the two processes follow trends expected from those of the acidity of diarylhydroxymethyl radicals and of the behavior of diaryl ketones as oxidants. Neither of the two processes is observed with N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (DABCO) as quenchers. The electron or hydrogen transfer yields in the course of diaryl ketone triplet quenching by the three amines are all close to unity, suggesting that the back electron transfer in the triplet ion pairs is relatively unimportant.

  12. Improved identification of yeast species directly from positive blood culture media by combining Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis with the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization Biotyper system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yingjun; He, Ying; Maier, Thomas; Quinn, Criziel; Shi, Gongyi; Li, Haijing; Stratton, Charles W; Kostrzewa, Markus; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2011-07-01

    Current methods for identification of yeast from blood cultures may take several days after these microorganisms have been observed by Gram stain smears from positive blood cultures. We explored the use of a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) Biotyper system in combination with Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis for improved detection and identification of yeast species directly from positive blood culture specimens demonstrating yeast-like organisms by Gram stain. The limit of detection of yeast species in blood culture medium was determined to be 5.9 × 10(5) CFU, with intra- and interstrain coefficients of variation of 1.8 to 3.6% and 2.9%, respectively. A total of 42 yeast-containing positive blood culture specimens were processed, and the identification results were compared to those obtained by routinely used phenotypic methods. Specimens with discrepant results between the Biotyper and phenotypic methods were identified on the basis of internal transcribed spacer region sequencing. The MALDI Biotyper system correctly identified the 42 specimens to species level, including 28 (66.7%) Candida albicans, 8 (19.0%) Candida parapsilosis, and 5 (11.9%) Candida tropicalis isolates and 1 (2.4%) Cryptococcus neoformans isolate. The entire procedure, from specimen extraction to final result reporting, can be completed within 1 h. Our data indicated that the Sepsityper specimen processing and Microflex analysis by the MALDI Biotyper system provide a rapid and reliable tool for yeast species identification directly from positive blood culture media.

  13. Complementary media of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    The concept of complementary media, which cause negative refraction and make perfect lenses, was first introduced to electromagnetic waves. This paper extends it to general waves by expressing the complementarity in terms of a transfer matrix. As an example, complementary media of electrons are discussed theoretically. An application of complementary media to subsurface imaging by scanning tunnelling microscopy is described. For realistic materials the formulation of complementary media is extended to take account of the scattering at interfaces, and effectively complementary systems formed by interfaces are discussed. Interfaces of the graphitic lattice forming complementary systems are designed.

  14. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues.

  15. The media and suicide.

    PubMed

    Tor, Phern Chern; Ng, Beng Yeong; Ang, Yong Guan

    2008-09-01

    Suicide is a common and preventable event that is often reported by the media when there are sensationalistic elements or if the suicide involves a celebrity. Media reports of suicide can induce a copycat or "Werther effect". There is increasing evidence that sensationalistic reporting of suicides has a direct effect on increasing suicide rates. Responsible reporting guidelines drawn up in consultation with media professionals have been shown to improve reporting of suicides. Local reporting on suicides tends to be sensationalistic but also has a strong educational slant. The media should educate both the public and the medical professional about their role in suicide prevention. PMID:18989499

  16. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues. PMID:22643166

  17. The nonlocal elastomagnetoelectrostatics of disordered micropolar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabychenkov, A. F.; Lisiovskii, F. V.

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of electric, magnetic, and elastic subsystems in nonlinear disordered micropolar media that possess a bending-torsion tensor and an nonsymmetric strain tensor have been studied in the framework of phenomenological elastomagnetoelectrostatics. A system of nonlinear equations for determining the ground state of these media has been obtained by the variational method. It is shown that nonuniform external and internal rotations not only create elastic stresses, but also generate additional electric and magnetic fields, while nonuniform elastic stresses and external fields induce internal rotations. The nonlocal character of the micropolar media significantly influences elementary excitations and nonlinear dynamic processes.

  18. Practicing Critical Media Literacy Education: Developing a Community of Inquiry among Teachers Using Popular Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Koulish, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Media literacy compels us to look anew at the most mundane, that which surrounds us: the media and our popular culture. From there media literacy compels us to accept that the media are constructed and to seek various ways to analyze them, while considering our own beliefs to evaluate for ourselves an ultimate interpretation. This process has the…

  19. The Analysis of Detective Genre in Media Studies in the Student Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Development of skills for the critical analysis of media texts--an important task of media education. However, media literacy practice shows that students have the problems with the discussion/analysis of entertainment genres in the early stages of media studies, for example, the difficulties in the process of understanding and interpreting the…

  20. Localized coating removal using plastic media blasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Wyckoff, Michael G.; Zook, Lee M.

    1988-01-01

    Steps taken to qualify the use of plastic media blasting for safely and effectively removing paint and other coatings from solid rocket booster aluminum structures are described. As a result of the effort, an improvement was made in the design of surface finishing equipment for processing flight hardware, in addition to a potentially patentable idea on improved plastic media composition. The general arrangement of the blast equipment and the nozzle configuration are presented.

  1. Some Media Relations Success Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperbeck, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A panel of 29 extension faculty/staff members who work well with the media were interviewed to identify ways to improve their media relations. Reasons for working with the media, ways to develop relationships with media representatives, and suggestions for creating a more favorable climate for media relations in universities were noted. (JOW)

  2. Media Education and Native Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1991-01-01

    Media literacy encourages critical thinking about the news media, advertising, and popular culture. Media education of American Indian students challenges mass media's stereotyped aboriginal representations and the mainstream values of egotism and consumerism. Integrated across the curriculum at all grades, media education is empowering and…

  3. Degradation of antidepressant drug fluoxetine in aqueous media by ozone/H2O2 system: process optimization using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Aghaeinejad-Meybodi, Abbas; Ebadi, Amanollah; Shafiei, Sirous; Khataee, Alireza; Rostampour, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the modelling and optimization of antidepressant drug fluoxetine degradation in aqueous solution by ozone/H2O2 process using central composite design. The operational parameters were ozone concentration, initial hydrogen peroxide concentration, reaction time and initial fluoxetine concentration. A good agreement between the predicted values of fluoxetine removal and experimental results were observed (R2=0.976 and Adj-R2=0.955). Pareto analysis indicated that all selected factors and some interactions were effective on the removal efficiency. It was found that the reaction time is the most effective parameter in the ozone/H2O2 process. The maximum removal efficiency (86.14%) was achieved at ozone concentration of 30 mg L(-1), initial H2O2 concentration of 0.02 mM, reaction time of 20 min and initial fluoxetine concentration of 50 mg L(-1) as the optimum conditions.

  4. The Influence of Media Violence on Youth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Craig A; Berkowitz, Leonard; Donnerstein, Edward; Huesmann, L Rowell; Johnson, James D; Linz, Daniel; Malamuth, Neil M; Wartella, Ellen

    2003-12-01

    Research on violent television and films, video games, and music reveals unequivocal evidence that media violence increases the likelihood of aggressive and violent behavior in both immediate and long-term contexts. The effects appear larger for milder than for more severe forms of aggression, but the effects on severe forms of violence are also substantial (r = .13 to .32) when compared with effects of other violence risk factors or medical effects deemed important by the medical community (e.g., effect of aspirin on heart attacks). The research base is large; diverse in methods, samples, and media genres; and consistent in overall findings. The evidence is clearest within the most extensively researched domain, television and film violence. The growing body of video-game research yields essentially the same conclusions. Short-term exposure increases the likelihood of physically and verbally aggressive behavior, aggressive thoughts, and aggressive emotions. Recent large-scale longitudinal studies provide converging evidence linking frequent exposure to violent media in childhood with aggression later in life, including physical assaults and spouse abuse. Because extremely violent criminal behaviors (e.g., forcible rape, aggravated assault, homicide) are rare, new longitudinal studies with larger samples are needed to estimate accurately how much habitual childhood exposure to media violence increases the risk for extreme violence. Well-supported theory delineates why and when exposure to media violence increases aggression and violence. Media violence produces short-term increases by priming existing aggressive scripts and cognitions, increasing physiological arousal, and triggering an automatic tendency to imitate observed behaviors. Media violence produces long-term effects via several types of learning processes leading to the acquisition of lasting (and automatically accessible) aggressive scripts, interpretational schemas, and aggression-supporting beliefs

  5. The Influence of Media Violence on Youth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Craig A; Berkowitz, Leonard; Donnerstein, Edward; Huesmann, L Rowell; Johnson, James D; Linz, Daniel; Malamuth, Neil M; Wartella, Ellen

    2003-12-01

    Research on violent television and films, video games, and music reveals unequivocal evidence that media violence increases the likelihood of aggressive and violent behavior in both immediate and long-term contexts. The effects appear larger for milder than for more severe forms of aggression, but the effects on severe forms of violence are also substantial (r = .13 to .32) when compared with effects of other violence risk factors or medical effects deemed important by the medical community (e.g., effect of aspirin on heart attacks). The research base is large; diverse in methods, samples, and media genres; and consistent in overall findings. The evidence is clearest within the most extensively researched domain, television and film violence. The growing body of video-game research yields essentially the same conclusions. Short-term exposure increases the likelihood of physically and verbally aggressive behavior, aggressive thoughts, and aggressive emotions. Recent large-scale longitudinal studies provide converging evidence linking frequent exposure to violent media in childhood with aggression later in life, including physical assaults and spouse abuse. Because extremely violent criminal behaviors (e.g., forcible rape, aggravated assault, homicide) are rare, new longitudinal studies with larger samples are needed to estimate accurately how much habitual childhood exposure to media violence increases the risk for extreme violence. Well-supported theory delineates why and when exposure to media violence increases aggression and violence. Media violence produces short-term increases by priming existing aggressive scripts and cognitions, increasing physiological arousal, and triggering an automatic tendency to imitate observed behaviors. Media violence produces long-term effects via several types of learning processes leading to the acquisition of lasting (and automatically accessible) aggressive scripts, interpretational schemas, and aggression-supporting beliefs

  6. Minorities in the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherard, Regina G., Comp.; And Others

    The four reports in this compilation focus on the role of blacks in the various media. The first report provides a general discussion of the status of blacks in the media, and notes that it has been largely analogous to their political and economic development. The second report traces the changing image of blacks as it has been portrayed on…

  7. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  8. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  9. Social Media. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The growing use of social media by students and adults is impacting schools. A recent Pew study found that 73% of teens use social-networking sites to connect with others. Social media includes blogs, wikis, and podcasts as well as sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Linkedin. While such sites promote connection with others, their use has created…

  10. Folk Media in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Technology Report, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to folk media. Using Indonesia for his case study, Dr. Nat Colletta analyzes traditional culture as a medium for development. Juan Diaz Bordenave expresses doubts about adapting folk media to development objectives; Susan Hostetler and Arthur Gillette report on uses of the theater to promote development objectives; and…

  11. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  12. Accessing the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judy

    This guide for school districts offers a quick outline for developing good communications skills and public relations with news media personnel. Guidelines for good press relations are provided that emphasize the importance of keeping two-way, open communications with the media, with attention to: accuracy; being prepared; sharing the bad news as…

  13. Wisconsin Ideas in Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rose, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    These two documents contain a variety of articles on media use in education. The first provides 16 articles that focus on justifying media programs in the 1980's. Topics include selling your program to administrators; reorganization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; video literacy; student-made videotape recordings; interactive…

  14. Speaking through the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrick, Andrea; Dessoff, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Offers advice for college communications officers in dealing with the media. Tips include: "bring in the big guns", "play show and tell", expand the media circle, understand reporters' jobs and respect deadlines, "keep it real", "stay in touch", and "hedge your bets". (EV)

  15. A Media Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Curriculum Lab.

    This curriculum guide is designed to train students who will assist in planning, designing, producing, and using media and multimedia materials. It offers a 2-year, competency-based, post-secondary program of studies in media technology, and uses an interdisciplinary approach drawn from the broad areas of art, business management, drafting,…

  16. The Organisation of Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chibnall, Bernard

    Many of the techniques used to structure, record, and store information contained in printed material should now be applied to the field of audiovisual media. The rules of communication and association which apply to printed knowledge can serve as tools to critically analyze messages delivered via audiovisual media. This text describes the…

  17. Japanese Media in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Sachiko Oda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of English in the media in Japan, focusing on the role and history of English-language newspapers, radio, and television programs, as well as the proliferation of English-language films shown in Japanese cinemas. Discusses the implications of English in the Japanese media. (20 references) (MDM)

  18. Working with News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosenbaugh, Dick

    To work effectively with personnel in the news media, one needs to assist them in doing their job by getting accurate information to them (in plenty of time for their deadline) and in providing information about meetings (when they do not have a reporter to cover the event). Familiarity aids in communication with news media personnel so one should…

  19. New Media Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Ian

    The media industry is the fastest growing business in the world today; additional leisure time, coupled with increasingly global distribution, has created large international markets for information and entertainment. The United Kingdom is relatively strong in the three main areas concerned with new media publishing: information technology,…

  20. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  1. Building Social Media Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

  2. Evaluating Media in Malawi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warr, David

    1978-01-01

    The Extension Aids Branch (EAB) produces films, radio programs, posters, leaflets, and other media which support the Ministry's agricultural extention and rural development programs. The Evaluation and Action Research Unit works with EAB to do formative evaluation of each media project or campaign during the production stage. (JEG)

  3. Trends in Media Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Donald F.; Foehr, Ulla G.

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of…

  4. The Media Gospel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christians, Clifford G.; Fortner, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Examines four recent books on the religious media: Ben Armstrong's "The Electric Church," James F. Engel's "Contemporary Christian Communications: Its Theory and Practice," Malcolm Muggeridge's "Christ and the Media," and Virginia Stem Owens'"The Total Image: or Selling Jesus in the Modern Age." Evaluates the internal validity of each. (JMF)

  5. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a…

  6. Fabrication of magnetic nanodot arrays for patterned magnetic recording media.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirotaka; Homma, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    Fabrication processes of arrayed magnetic nanodots for the use of patterned magnetic recording media were reviewed. One candidate for the patterned media is ordered assemble of magnetic nanoparticles, and the other is patterned magnetic thin films fabricated using various micro/nano scale machining processes. For the formation of patterned masks and molds, lithography processes as well as self-organized pattern formation are utilized. For the deposition processes of magnetic dots, electrochemical deposition processes were widely used. These fabrication processes are reviewed mainly from recent reports. The recording systems for the patterned media including probe-type-recording are also overviewed. PMID:17455486

  7. Social Justice and Media. Media Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. (CFR)

  8. Self-Assembling Diblock Polypeptide Hydrogels: Effects of Salt and Cell-Growth Media on the Self-assembly Process and Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakstis, Lisa; Ozbas, Bulent; Pochan, Darrin; Nowak, Andrew; Deming, Timothy

    2003-03-01

    Self-assembling peptide based hydrogels having a unique nano- and microscopic morphology are being studied for potential use as tissue engineering scaffolds. Low molecular weight ( 20 kg/mol), amphiphilic, diblock polypeptides of hydrophilic, polyelectrolyte cationic lysine (K) or anionic glutamic acid (E) and hydrophobic leucine (L) or valine (V) form hydrogels in aqueous solution at neutral pH and at very low volume fraction of polymer (vol. fraction polypeptide less than 0.5 wtbeen characterized using laser confocal microscopy (LCM), ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) imaging. Studies of the self-assembly process with and without significant ionic solution strength (i.e. in the presence of salt and cell growth medium) will be discussed. Interactions of the hydrogels with bacterial and mammalian cells reveal that these materials are non-cytotoxic and biocompatible. Hence, the chemistry of the assembled diblock polypeptides allows for cellular proliferation whereas the same chemistry in the homopolymeric form is cytotoxic. Proper molecular design for optimal cell viability and gel integrity in the presence of high ionic strength aqueous solution will be discussed.

  9. Novel process of bio-chemical ammonia removal from air streams using a water reflux system and zeolite as filter media.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Sebastian; Charles, Wipa; Ho, Goen; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    A novel biofilter that removes ammonia from air streams and converts it to nitrogen gas has been developed and operated continuously for 300 days. The ammonia from the incoming up-flow air stream is first absorbed into water and the carrier material, zeolite. A continuous gravity reflux of condensed water from the exit of the biofilter provides moisture for nitrifying bacteria to develop and convert dissolved ammonia (ammonium) to nitrite/nitrate. The down-flow of the condensed water reflux washes down nitrite/nitrate preventing ammonium and nitrite/nitrate accumulation at the top region of the biofilter. The evaporation caused by the inflow air leads to the accumulation of nitrite to extremely high concentrations in the bottom of the biofilter. The high nitrite concentrations favour the spontaneous chemical oxidation of ammonium by nitrite to nitrogen (N2). Tests showed that this chemical reaction was catalysed by the zeolite filter medium and allowed it to take place at room temperature. This study shows that ammonia can be removed from air streams and converted to N2 in a fully aerated single step biofilter. The process also overcomes the problem of microorganism-inhibition and resulted in zero leachate production. PMID:26363328

  10. Novel process of bio-chemical ammonia removal from air streams using a water reflux system and zeolite as filter media.

    PubMed

    Vitzthum von Eckstaedt, Sebastian; Charles, Wipa; Ho, Goen; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    A novel biofilter that removes ammonia from air streams and converts it to nitrogen gas has been developed and operated continuously for 300 days. The ammonia from the incoming up-flow air stream is first absorbed into water and the carrier material, zeolite. A continuous gravity reflux of condensed water from the exit of the biofilter provides moisture for nitrifying bacteria to develop and convert dissolved ammonia (ammonium) to nitrite/nitrate. The down-flow of the condensed water reflux washes down nitrite/nitrate preventing ammonium and nitrite/nitrate accumulation at the top region of the biofilter. The evaporation caused by the inflow air leads to the accumulation of nitrite to extremely high concentrations in the bottom of the biofilter. The high nitrite concentrations favour the spontaneous chemical oxidation of ammonium by nitrite to nitrogen (N2). Tests showed that this chemical reaction was catalysed by the zeolite filter medium and allowed it to take place at room temperature. This study shows that ammonia can be removed from air streams and converted to N2 in a fully aerated single step biofilter. The process also overcomes the problem of microorganism-inhibition and resulted in zero leachate production.

  11. MediaTracker system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D. M.; Strittmatter, R. B.; Abeyta, J. D.; Brown, J.; Marks, T. , Jr.; Martinez, B. J.; Jones, D. B.; Hsue, W.

    2004-01-01

    The initial objectives of this effort were to provide a hardware and software platform that can address the requirements for the accountability of classified removable electronic media and vault access logging. The Media Tracker system software assists classified media custodian in managing vault access logging and Media Tracking to prevent the inadvertent violation of rules or policies for the access to a restricted area and the movement and use of tracked items. The MediaTracker system includes the software tools to track and account for high consequence security assets and high value items. The overall benefits include: (1) real-time access to the disposition of all Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM), (2) streamlined security procedures and requirements, (3) removal of ambiguity and managerial inconsistencies, (4) prevention of incidents that can and should be prevented, (5) alignment with the DOE's initiative to achieve improvements in security and facility operations through technology deployment, and (6) enhanced individual responsibility by providing a consistent method of dealing with daily responsibilities. In response to initiatives to enhance the control of classified removable electronic media (CREM), the Media Tracker software suite was developed, piloted and implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in July 2000. The Media Tracker software suite assists in the accountability and tracking of CREM and other high-value assets. One component of the MediaTracker software suite provides a Laboratory-approved media tracking system. Using commercial touch screen and bar code technology, the MediaTracker (MT) component of the MediaTracker software suite provides an efficient and effective means to meet current Laboratory requirements and provides new-engineered controls to help assure compliance with those requirements. It also establishes a computer infrastructure at vault entrances for vault access logging, and can accommodate

  12. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Molly E; May, Christine N; Ding, Eric Y; Kunz, Werner H; Hayes, Rashelle; Oleski, Jessica L

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly using online social networks (ie, social media) to connect with other patients and health care professionals—a trend called peer-to-peer health care. Because online social networks provide a means for health care professionals to communicate with patients, and for patients to communicate with each other, an opportunity exists to use social media as a modality to deliver behavioral interventions. Social media-delivered behavioral interventions have the potential to reduce the expense of behavioral interventions by eliminating visits, as well as increase our access to patients by becoming embedded in their social media feeds. Trials of online social network-delivered behavioral interventions have shown promise, but much is unknown about intervention development and methodology. In this paper, we discuss the process by which investigators can translate behavioral interventions for social media delivery. We present a model that describes the steps and decision points in this process, including the necessary training and reporting requirements. We also discuss issues pertinent to social media-delivered interventions, including cost, scalability, and privacy. Finally, we identify areas of research that are needed to optimize this emerging behavioral intervention modality. PMID:26825969

  13. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery.

    PubMed

    Pagoto, Sherry; Waring, Molly E; May, Christine N; Ding, Eric Y; Kunz, Werner H; Hayes, Rashelle; Oleski, Jessica L

    2016-01-29

    Patients are increasingly using online social networks (ie, social media) to connect with other patients and health care professionals--a trend called peer-to-peer health care. Because online social networks provide a means for health care professionals to communicate with patients, and for patients to communicate with each other, an opportunity exists to use social media as a modality to deliver behavioral interventions. Social media-delivered behavioral interventions have the potential to reduce the expense of behavioral interventions by eliminating visits, as well as increase our access to patients by becoming embedded in their social media feeds. Trials of online social network-delivered behavioral interventions have shown promise, but much is unknown about intervention development and methodology. In this paper, we discuss the process by which investigators can translate behavioral interventions for social media delivery. We present a model that describes the steps and decision points in this process, including the necessary training and reporting requirements. We also discuss issues pertinent to social media-delivered interventions, including cost, scalability, and privacy. Finally, we identify areas of research that are needed to optimize this emerging behavioral intervention modality.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  15. Optical Recording Media Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Tom

    1987-01-01

    This presentation is intended to provide the listener with a general overview of the optical media market. It deals with the basic questions and concerns expressed by those who are about to become involved in optical storage. Areas touched upon include the various types of optical media available, their storage capacities, how they're made, how they are used, life expectancy of media, states of various standards efforts, current and projected pricing and availability, market trends, and growth projecting for the next five years.

  16. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  17. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  18. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  19. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school libraries and media centers, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  20. Communications and media services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcculla, James W.; Kukowski, James F.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's internal and external communication methods are reviewed. NASA information services for the media, for the public, and for employees are discussed. Consideration is given to electron information distribution, the NASA TV-audio system, the NASA broadcast news service, astronaut appearances, technology and information exhibits, speaker services, and NASA news reports for internal communications. Also, the NASA worldwide electronic mail network is described and trends for future NASA communications and media services are outlined.

  1. Media and technology in adolescent sexual education and safety.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    2011-01-01

    Media play an important role in the lives of adolescents, providing them with opportunities for education and socialization. Media content is increasingly permeated with violence and sexual references that can be highly influential as adolescents continue the developmental process. Providing patient education is one of the cornerstones of nursing practice, and nurses are ideally suited to affect adolescent and parental education about the sexual and violent content of media.

  2. Media and technology in adolescent sexual education and safety.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    2011-01-01

    Media play an important role in the lives of adolescents, providing them with opportunities for education and socialization. Media content is increasingly permeated with violence and sexual references that can be highly influential as adolescents continue the developmental process. Providing patient education is one of the cornerstones of nursing practice, and nurses are ideally suited to affect adolescent and parental education about the sexual and violent content of media. PMID:21284726

  3. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents

  4. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents

  5. Sub-Saharan Africa's media and neocolonialism.

    PubMed

    Domatob, J K

    1988-01-01

    Given the heavy Western metropolitan bias of the media in sub-Saharan Africa, the ideology of neocolonialism continues to exert a dominant influence on economic, social, political, and cultural life. This neocolonial influence is further reinforced by advertising that champions a consumerist culture centered around Western goods. The capital of multinational firms plays a crucial role in the strategy of media imperialism. The dramatic growth of monopolies and the creation of military-industrial-information conglomerates in the 1970s and 1980s have been reflected in the international exchange of information and the interlinkage of mass communication systems in sub-Saharan Africa. Another media strategy that reinforces neocolonialism is the use of satellite communication. If cultural autonomy is defined as sub-Saharan Africa's capacity to decide on the allocation of its environmental resources, then cultural synchronization is a massive threat to that autonomy. Few African nations have the resources or expertise necessary to design, establish, or maintain communication systems that could accurately reflect their own culture. Nonetheless, there are some policy options. Personnel can be trained to respect African values and to recognize the dangers of neocolonial domination. The production of indigenous programs could reduce the media's foreign content. The incorporation of traditional drama and dance in the media could enhance this process. Above all, a high degree of planning is necessary if sub-Saharan African states intend to tackle the media and its domination by neocolonialist ideology. PMID:12281808

  6. Sub-Saharan Africa's media and neocolonialism.

    PubMed

    Domatob, J K

    1988-01-01

    Given the heavy Western metropolitan bias of the media in sub-Saharan Africa, the ideology of neocolonialism continues to exert a dominant influence on economic, social, political, and cultural life. This neocolonial influence is further reinforced by advertising that champions a consumerist culture centered around Western goods. The capital of multinational firms plays a crucial role in the strategy of media imperialism. The dramatic growth of monopolies and the creation of military-industrial-information conglomerates in the 1970s and 1980s have been reflected in the international exchange of information and the interlinkage of mass communication systems in sub-Saharan Africa. Another media strategy that reinforces neocolonialism is the use of satellite communication. If cultural autonomy is defined as sub-Saharan Africa's capacity to decide on the allocation of its environmental resources, then cultural synchronization is a massive threat to that autonomy. Few African nations have the resources or expertise necessary to design, establish, or maintain communication systems that could accurately reflect their own culture. Nonetheless, there are some policy options. Personnel can be trained to respect African values and to recognize the dangers of neocolonial domination. The production of indigenous programs could reduce the media's foreign content. The incorporation of traditional drama and dance in the media could enhance this process. Above all, a high degree of planning is necessary if sub-Saharan African states intend to tackle the media and its domination by neocolonialist ideology.

  7. Self-Cleaning Particulate Prefilter Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Olivia; Lalwani, San-jiv; Sharma, Anjal

    2012-01-01

    A long-term space mission requires efficient air revitalization performance to sustain the crew. Prefilter and particulate air filter media are susceptible to rapid fouling that adversely affects their performance and can lead to catastrophic failure of the air revitalization system, which may result in mission failure. For a long-term voyage, it is impractical to carry replacement particulate prefilter and filter modules due to the usual limitations in size, volume, and weight. The only solution to this problem is to reagentlessly regenerate prefilter and filter media in place. A method was developed to modify the particulate prefilter media to allow them to regenerate reagentlessly, and in place, by the application of modest thermocycled transverse or reversed airflows. The innovation may allow NASA to close the breathing air loop more efficiently, thereby sustaining the vision for manned space exploration missions of the future. A novel, self-cleaning coatings technology was developed for air filter media surfaces that allows reagentless in-place regeneration of the surface. The technology grafts thermoresponsive and nonspecific adhesion minimizing polymer nanolayer brush coatings from the prefilter media. These polymer nanolayer brush architectures can be triggered to contract and expand to generate a "pushing-off" force by the simple application of modestly thermocycled (i.e. cycling from ambient cabin temperature to 40 C) air streams. The nonspecific adhesion-minimizing properties of the coatings do not allow the particulate foulants to adhere strongly to the filter media, and thermocycled air streams applied to the media allow easy detachment and in-place regeneration of the media with minimal impact in system downtime or astronaut involvement in overseeing the process.

  8. Developing a social media platform for nurses.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer; Kennedy, Maggie

    2015-11-18

    Social media tools provide opportunities for nurses to connect with colleagues and patients and to advance personally and professionally. This article describes the process of developing an innovative social media platform at a large, multi-centre teaching hospital, The Ottawa Hospital, Canada, and its benefits for nurses. The platform, TOH Nurses, was developed using a nursing process approach, involving assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation. The aim of this initiative was to address the barriers to communication inherent in the large number of nurses employed by the organisation, the physical size of the multi-centre hospital and the shift-work nature of nursing. The platform was used to provide educational materials for clinical nurses, and to share information about professional practice. The implications of using a social media platform in a healthcare setting were considered carefully during its development and implementation, including concerns regarding privacy and confidentiality. PMID:26576914

  9. National Media Laboratory media testing results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularie, William

    1993-01-01

    The government faces a crisis in data storage, analysis, archive, and communication. The sheer quantity of data being poured into the government systems on a daily basis is overwhelming systems ability to capture, analyze, disseminate, and store critical information. Future systems requirements are even more formidable: with single government platforms having data rate of over 1 Gbit/sec, greater than Terabyte/day storage requirements, and with expected data archive lifetimes of over 10 years. The charter of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is to focus the resources of industry, government, and academia on government needs in the evaluation, development, and field support of advanced recording systems.

  10. Why Social Media Must Have a Place in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krutka, Daniel G.; Carpenter, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    While most young people regularly consume and produce social media content, many schools focus on what students should not do with these technologies rather than address what students and teachers can do. The authors share ways that some educators leverage social media to enhance the who, when, where, why, how, and what of educational processes.

  11. Information Skills: Library Media. Suggested Learner Outcomes: Grades K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    Designed to aid local districts in implementing local school improvement plans, this three-part curriculum guide begins by addressing the long-range planning of library media programs. The first part suggests a 10-step process for planning and provides an example of a 5-year improvement plan for library media programs, a checklist for evaluating a…

  12. The Effects of Media Violence on Attitudes, Emotions, and Cognitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Brendan Gail; Ferguson, Tamara J.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies mediating factors between the viewing of violent media and aggressive behavior. Discusses the role of cognitive and emotional arousal processes, and the interplay among these factors and attitudes toward aggression. Describes the effects of media exposure on arousal, emotional desensitization, and the excitement of the observer's…

  13. Curricula for Media Literacy Education According to International Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander; Levitskaya, Anastasia; Camarero, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes the results of the international experts' survey regarding the curriculum of media literacy education, which was administrated by the authors in September-October 2015. The expert panel includes specialists actively involved in the real process of media literacy education in schools, universities and other educational…

  14. A Comparison of Gratification Models of Media Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgreen, Philip; Rayburn, J. D., II

    To enhance knowledge of media consumption processes, a study compared the abilities of six alternative gratification models to predict media satisfaction, specifically, satisfaction with television news. The models were three different formulations of gratifications sought/obtained discrepancies--two emphasizing gratifications obtained and one…

  15. Views of Nonprint Media: A Case for Expanded Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Deborah Dashow

    The process of becoming literate today means both visual and verbal literacy. There is no need, however, to choose between print and nonprint media as teaching tools. Today's "new media" serve to expand and accentuate the world of printed words and provide valuable means of learning in and of themselves. Visual literacy implies developing an…

  16. The Implications of a Mixed Media Network for Information Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, John W.

    A mixed media network for information interchange is what we are always likely to have. Amid the current permutations of the storage and distribution media we see the emergence of two trends -- toward the common denominators of electronic display on the TV system and of digital processing and control. The economic implications of a mixed network…

  17. The Space for Social Media in Structured Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Gilly; Ross, Bella; Pechenkina, Ekaterina; Chase, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the benefits of using social media in an online educational setting, with a particular focus on the use of Facebook and Twitter by participants in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) developed to enable educators to learn about the Carpe Diem learning design process. We define social media as digital social tools and…

  18. How to Craft Social Media for Graduate Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2011-01-01

    Social media now offer a fresh opportunity to enliven the learning process. But to gain traction, they will have to prove their relevance. Librarians are quite vocal in advocating for the preservation of human interaction around digital media; one might say that it is their charge to be certain that the human factors within digital libraries are…

  19. The Rest of the Elephant: Perspectives on the Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John D.; Porter, William E.

    This book presents an analytical introduction to the study of the mass media. Aspects of media that have received little attention--audiences, economics, working processes and ethics--are treated in the four sections of the book. Section one covers symbiosis between the medium and the audience. Section two discusses the way in which business and…

  20. Open Media Training Session

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-19

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  1. Foams in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  2. Open Media Training Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  3. Feasibility study on pliant media drying using fluidized bed dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, J. H.; Zaid, M. H. H. M.; Batcha, M. F. M.; Asmuin, N.

    2015-09-01

    The usage of pliant media for blasting in surface preparation has gained substantial interest in various industries, particularly oil and gas. Being a clean technology, this relatively new method of surface preparation has become an alternative to conventional abrasive blasting technique which lowers fugitive emissions from blasting process and hence lowering risk to workers in the industry. Despite proven to be effective and cost efficient, the usage of pliant media in tropical climate poses a new challenge due to the torrential rain in the monsoon season. During rainy and wet conditions, the pliant media was literally soaked and the recovery rate of the pliant media for a continuous blasting becomes retarded. A viable technique for drying of this pliant media has then become imperative. The present study proposes to dry water laden pliant media in a Swirling Fluidized Bed Dryer (SFBD). In this preliminary study, three bed loadings of 1.7, 2.0 and 2.3 kg of pliant media was dried in the SfBd at 80°C, 90°C and 100°C. The experimental works revealed that the SFBD has shown excellent potential to dry the pliant media with a relatively short drying time. The behaviour of moisture ratio and drying rate against time are discussed. The findings conclude that the SFBD is a feasible technique for wet pliant media drying and can be extended for continuous processing system.

  4. Using the media.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    To use the mass media (newspaper, radio, and TV) to reach a large audience with information about AIDS, it is important to choose the media outlets carefully, since they use information that satisfies their audience in content and style. For example, radio, TV, or videos are best to reach illiterate groups. Ways to approach each sector of the written and electronic media include press releases, news conferences, information kits, and personal contacts. Letters to the editor and offers of submitting articles for publication are additional ways to approach newspapers. Audio- or videocassettes with interviews or images conveying HIV/AIDS prevention messages can be submitted to TV and radio stations. It is important to present the information attractively to gain the journalists' attention. News releases should include sources of information and a contact name. It is important to inform the mass media of successes revolving around AIDS prevention, emphasizing local successes. One should identify what media slots have the most influence. For example, a medical officer in Chiang Mai, Thailand, notes that popular disc jockeys have more influence than do government information broadcasts. It is best to promote facts that probably will increase support for AIDS prevention campaigns. If possible, groups should seek free space or air time for AIDS prevention messages. AIDS prevention messages should not use fear because it does not promote safer sexual behavior. Instead, they should link condom use with a sense of independence, responsibility, and being fashionable. Leaflets, posters, videotapes, slides, displays, slogans, audiocassettes, T-shirts, stickers, and other activities or products reinforce the effectiveness of media campaigns. Interviews with or feature articles and programs about people infected or affected by HIV/AIDS chip away at the belief that "AIDS could never happen to me." PMID:12287965

  5. Media and risky behaviors.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some form of electronic media. Second, the authors demonstrate that American adolescents are engaging in a number of unhealthful behaviors that impose huge societal costs. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson detail the extent of five critical types of adolescent health risk behaviors identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-obesity, smoking, drinking, sexual risk taking, and violence. Obesity, the authors note, has become an epidemic among America's young people. Cigarette smoking among adolescents is one of the ten leading health indicators of greatest government concern. Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are widespread problems among the nation's youth and are the source of the three leading causes of death among youth. More than 20 percent of American high school students have sexual intercourse for the first time before they reach the age of fourteen. And twelve- to twenty-year-olds perpetrated 28 percent of the single-offender and 41 percent of multiple-offender violent crimes in the United States in 2005. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson present and evaluate research findings on the influence of electronic media on these five risk behaviors among adolescents. Researchers, they say, have found modest evidence that media consumption contributes to the problem of obesity, modest to strong evidence that it contributes to drinking and smoking, and strong evidence that it contributes to violence. Research has been insufficient to find links between heavy media exposure and early sexual initiation. The authors note the need for more large-scale longitudinal studies that specifically examine the cumulative effects of

  6. Developing a Social Media and Marketing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulds, David J.; Mangold, W. Glynn

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the process used and experiences gained in developing a social media and marketing course. As the first known paper on this topic appearing in the marketing education literature, the paper provides educators with a framework for developing similar courses. The course was developed using a sound instructional design model, the…

  7. Seeking an Online Social Media Radar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ter Veen, James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how the application of Systems Engineering tools and techniques can be applied to rapidly process and analyze the vast amounts of data present in social media in order to yield practical knowledge for Command and Control (C2) systems. Design/methodology/approach: Based upon comparative analysis of…

  8. Certification Model for Professional School Media Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Librarians, Chicago, IL.

    A three-part, model certification scheme for school media personnel is presented. The first part is a discussion of the planning of state certification designs including point-of-entry into the profession, continuing development of competencies, and basic entry-level competencies. The candidate assessment process is discussed in the second part…

  9. The New Media and Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matijevic, Milan

    2011-01-01

    At the end of the last millennium, schools received strong competition from the Internet, multimedia and other developed electronic media thanks to the new possibilities for gathering, processing, searching for and sending information. Furthermore, young people and adults now travel a lot, and by travelling they also learn. Never before in the…

  10. Media and Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, William H.

    The public information media provides information on current events (news), entertainment (programming), and opinions offered by trusted public sources (e.g., business, academic or religious spokespersons, journalists, and government officials). Consequently, it is a major force in shaping a populace's attitudes toward significant social issues and of great interest to intervention planners. The chapter attempts to provide modelers and intervention analysts alike with sufficient understanding of media mechanisms and current research that they can begin contributing to, and benefiting from this important area of study.

  11. National Media Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Robert

    1992-01-01

    A review of the National Media Laboratory (NML) is presented. The mission of the NML is to support current government user data storage needs and assist them in getting the most efficient 'commercial' solutions in the future. The motivation for a National Media Laboratory is as follows: recording systems are the major government image and data exploitation bottleneck; government data recording performance and storage requirements lead commercial practice by 3-5 years; the supporting commercial recorder industry is large but principally focused on video not data formats; lack of standards; and lack of transfer of commercial knowledge base to program offices and operational sites.

  12. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients. PMID:24439877

  13. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  14. Practical Guide for the Selection of Audio Visual Media. General Criteria System and Evaluation Procedure for Educational Media Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepzig, H. J.; Weiss, M.

    Designed to aid in making concrete decisions on the acquisition and use of media, the criteria system and evaluation procedure described is a multiphase, objective-based decision making process. This report includes guidelines for setting up goal systems and developing criteria for the evaluation of media based on a goal system; an outline of…

  15. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhalifah, T.; Tsvankin, I.

    1994-08-01

    The main difficulty in extending seismic processing to anisotropic media is the recovery of anisotropic velocity fields from surface reflection data. Velocity analysis for transversely isotropic (TI) media can be done by inverting the dependence of P-wave moveout velocities on the ray parameter. P-wave NMO velocity in homogeneous TI media with a vertical symmetry axis depends just on the zero-dip value V{sub nmo} and a new effective parameter {eta} that reduces to the difference between Thomsen parameters {epsilon} and {delta} in the limit of weak anisotropy. It is possible to obtain {eta} and reconstruct the NMO velocity as a function of ray parameter using moveout velocities for two different dips. Moreover, V{sub nmo}(0) and {eta} determine not only the NMO velocity, but also also long-spread (nonhyperbollic) P-wave moveout for horizontal reflectors and time-migration impulse response. Inversion of dip-moveout information allows performance of all time-processing steps in TI media using only surface P-wave data. Isotropic time-processing methods remain entirely valid for elliptical anisotropy ({epsilon} = {delta}). Accurate time-to-depth conversion, however, requires the vertical velocity V{sub P0} be resolved independently. If I-P0 is known, then allisotropies {epsilon} and {delta} can be found by inverting two P-wave NMO velocities corresponding to a horizontal and a dipping reflector. If no information is available, all three parameters (V {sub P0}, {epsilon}, and {delta}) can be obtained by combining inversion results with shear-wave information. such as the P-SV or SV-SV wave NMO velocities for a horizontal reflector. Generalization of Tsvankin`s single-layer NMO equation for layered anisotropic media with a dipping reflector provides a basis for extending anisotropic velocity analysis to vertically inhomogeneous media. The influence of a stratified overburden on moveout velocity can be stripped through a Dix-type differentiation procedure.

  16. Implicit Media Knowledge Experiments & Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Muy-Chu; Germaneau, Alexis

    2011-08-01

    Implicit Media Knowledge aims to provide relevant information related to visual media without effort. It is based on the analysis of media usage from several users (e.g. a community). Algorithms based on clustering methods that extract relevant information (e.g. tags, taxonomy trees) related to a media from its usage are detailed. To validate our new approach, we propose to apply our concept and algorithms on a specific media use such as the analysis of how multiple users organize their media files. Significant results of two experiments will be highlighted. Perspectives of our work will be finally presented.

  17. Transport phenomena in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Jacob; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    The Advanced Study Institute on Fundamentals of Transport Phenomena in Porous Media, held July 14-23, 1985 in Newark, Del. and directed by Jacob Bear (Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa) and M. Yavuz Corapcioglu (City College of New York), under the auspices of NATO, was a sequel to the NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) held in 1982 (proceedings published as Fundamentals of Transport Phenomena in Porous Media, J. Bear, and M.Y. Corapcioglu (Ed.), Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, the Netherlands, 1984). The meeting was attended by 106 participants and lecturers from 21 countries.As in the first NATO/ASI, the objective of this meeting—which was a combination of a conference of experts and a teaching institute— was to present and discuss selected topics of transport in porous media. In selecting topics and lecturers, an attempt was made to bridge the gap that sometimes exists between research and practice. An effort was also made to demonstrate the unified approach to the transport of mass of a fluid phase, components of a fluid phase, momentum, and heat in a porous medium domain. The void space may be occupied by a single fluid phase or by a number of such phases; each fluid may constitute a multicomponent system; the solid matrix may be deformable; and the whole process of transport in the system may take place under nonisothermal conditions, with or without phase changes. Such phenomena are encountered in a variety of disciplines, e.g., petroleum engineering, civil engineering (in connection with groundwater flow and contamination), soil mechanics, and chemical engineering. One of the goals of the 1985 NATO/ASI, as in the 1982 institute, was to bring together experts from all these disciplines and enhance communication among them.

  18. Cyberbullying via Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a surge of research on cyberbullying. In this article, three studies examined prevalence rates of cyberbullying among college-age students, venues through which cyberbullying occurs, with a particular focus on social media, and perceptions of cyberbullying as a function of features of the target (e.g., peer, celebrity,…

  19. The Media in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John

    1980-01-01

    Provides a brief history of television and radio in China and describes the use of television, radio, and film there, noting the number of television sets, radios, public loudspeakers, and cinemas. Article is comprised of extracts from the author's 193-page publication "China Media Industry Report 1980." (JD)

  20. Media Ideas Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, John T., Comp.

    Library and media personnel from the Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency contributed to this handbook, which provides teaching, administrative, organizational, and management materials applicable to a K-12 school environment. These materials are divided into such categories as literature, storytime, promotions, equipment operation and usage,…

  1. Looking at Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sive, Mary Robinson

    1979-01-01

    This article offers a bibliography of recent inexpensive filmstrips, slide sets, and study prints that can expand students' awareness of such issues as psychic manipulation in TV commercials, the intrusion of show biz into news reporting, and the role of the advertiser in determining media content. (Editor/SJL)

  2. Media, Place, and Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyrowitz, Joshua; Maguire, John

    1993-01-01

    Explores the role of television in American culture. America may be more diverse than ever in race, ethnicity, and religion, but, because of mass media, there is less diversity in experience, perspectives, and expectation. Subcultures that once manifested existence locally now look to television for verification of their existence. (SLD)

  3. Media and Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugunasiri, Suwanda H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that Canadian media are not more multiculturally sensitive because (1) they are owned and operated by Whites (mostly of British background), who fail to see that Canada's racial composition has changed; and (2) their profit motive restricts social responsiveness. Offers a model of how personal multiculturalism can lead to a multicultural…

  4. Media Literacy: Good News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Adam; Rivera, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    Media has always had the power to affect people on a nonverbal and emotional level. At its best, it can be a source of aesthetic pleasure and deep personal satisfaction. At its worst, citizens and consumers are exposed to psychological and political manipulation which may make them anxious and depressed, dissatisfied with what they have,…

  5. Media for Multicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestro-Scherer, Jane B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A cross-cultural course sequence at Iowa State University which offers a Third World cultural experience and introduces students to Third World views about such crucial world problems as population pressures, food supplies, and energy resources has a continuing need for media resources, e.g., films and slides. (CMV)

  6. Different Media, Different Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, George

    This paper discusses the use of different media for art instruction and creative activities with preschoolers at the Reggio Emilia preschools in Italy. Drawing made with markers, paper constructions, clay sculpture, and wooden constructions are all used to deepen children's understanding of a particular theme or concept. Typically, a small group…

  7. Magazines in Special Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    This is a descriptive listing of periodicals available in special media to blind and physically handicapped persons throughout the country. Part 1 lists all magazines produced by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) for its free reading program. Magazines listed in Part 1 are available at no charge through…

  8. Magazines in Special Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    This catalog lists periodicals available in special media to blind and physically handicapped persons throughout the United States. Part 1 lists and describes all magazines produced by the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) of the Library of Congress for its free reading program. These magazines are available…

  9. Basic Media in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, John

    Intended as a guide to the use of different media for use in the classroom, this document demonstrates alternative approaches that may be taken to depicting and communicating images and concepts to others. Some basic tools and materials--including a ruler, matte knife, rubber cement, stapler, felt-tip pens, paint brushes, and lettering pens--are…

  10. Media and Risky Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some…

  11. [Contrast media in echography].

    PubMed

    Derchi, L E; Rizzatto, G; Solbiati, L

    1992-09-01

    In medical US, the use of specific contrast media to increase the echogenicity of structures and organs changes their absorption of the US beam, and modifies the through-transmission velocity. This can be of great diagnostic value. Contrast media can help depict vessels and cavities, increase the sensitivity of Doppler examination, and make the differentiation of normal and pathologic tissues easier. The products which are currently available do not completely fulfill the needs of clinical researchers. The first papers reporting on some clinical applications of these contrast media in humans are now appearing in literature. Contrast media for diagnostic US can be classified in five groups: 1) free gas bubbles; 2) stabilized gas bubbles; 3) colloidal suspensions; 4) emulsions; 5) aqueous solutions. These agents are quite different, as to both chemical and physical features and distribution within living tissues. Different clinical applications are thus possible for each of them; a unique contrast medium which will meet all the needs of the various clinical situations seems inconceivable at present. Most probably, a variety of products will develop, each with its own application field; in clinical practice, it seems likely that different products will be used, according to the specific clinical needs.

  12. A New Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Meta A.

    A new media center is planned for a K-8 Department of Defense Dependents School (DoDDS) with approximately 850 students in Heilbronn, West Germany. Heilbronn has a U.S. Army community with the majority of the students being military dependents. The faculty and administration are made up of educators from all over the United States. Although at the…

  13. Microphones and Educational Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marilyn

    This paper describes the types of microphones that are available for use in media production. Definitions of 16 words and phrases used to describe microphones are followed by detailed descriptions of the two kinds of microphones as classified by mode of operation, i.e., velocity, or ribbon microphones, and pressure operated microphones, which…

  14. Mass Media and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alan

    Designed to serve as a basic text for general liberal arts courses in mass communication, this book presents essays, largely from recent magazine articles, written from the layman (although there are a few more overtly scholarly articles). It begins with an examination of the media industries in the United States, treating them as complex…

  15. Libraries/Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents K-12 and college libraries/media centers considered outstanding in a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, highlighting concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the…

  16. Optical Media in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of five major systems utilizing optical media, including basic descriptions, applications, configurations, and advantages and disadvantages. Systems covered are interactive videodisc, compact disc read only memory (CD-ROM), integrated systems, digital video interactive, and QuickTime and Video for Windows. (five references)…

  17. The Indian Media Scenario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eapen, K. E.

    As background information for a discussion of India's communication system and its potential for social change, this paper briefly describes the country's physical characteristics, some of its cultural heritage and demographics, and the development of its education and railways. After a discussion of the folk media (traditional changes) of…

  18. Media Evaluations 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James E.

    Evaluations are presented of recently produced media products designed for use in schools. The materials are grouped in three main categories--films, filmstrips and others, including kits, charts, tapes, filmloops and slides. Within categories, the products are arranged by the following subject matters: man as an individual, man as a social…

  19. Media Embedded Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    A review of literature and two surveys, one of college students and one of a random sample of adults, were used to examine four aspects of media embedded interactions (social behavior in front of a TV or radio): their functions, their environment, their effects, and the reactions of the interactants to them. Television is seen as performing a…

  20. Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee

    2007-01-01

    This pioneering book, by one of the founders of the media literacy field, provides evidence of the impact of media literacy on the academic achievement of adolescents. Read about the practice of high school teachers who prepared their students to critically analyze all aspects of contemporary media culture. These teachers incorporated popular and…

  1. Vision for the Net Generation Media Specialist. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the net generation (NG) of learners and how the net generation media specialist could help students in their needs. The NG media specialist creates a program that serves students who are diverse economically, culturally, and academically. Thus, if the NG media specialist provides resources, facilities, and…

  2. Media Now: A Historical Review of a Media Literacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesem, Yonty; Quaglia, Diane; Crane, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The Elizabeth Thoman Archive at the Harrington School of Communication and Media, University of Rhode Island, has the last complete kit of one of the milestones in the early chronology of media literacy, the 1972 Media Now curriculum. This curriculum was the first of its kind, using self-contained lesson modules that were part of a larger series…

  3. Need for Orientation, Media Uses and Gratifications, and Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, David

    In order to study the influence of need for orientation and media gratifications on media use and media effects in political communication, two previous surveys were studied to compare the causal modeling approach and the contingent conditions approach. In the first study, 339 personal interviews were conducted with registered voters during a…

  4. Looking to the future of new media in health marketing: deriving propositions based on traditional theories.

    PubMed

    Della, Lindsay J; Eroglu, Dogan; Bernhardt, Jay M; Edgerton, Erin; Nall, Janice

    2008-01-01

    Market trend data show that the media marketplace continues to rapidly evolve. Recent research shows that substantial portions of the U.S. media population are "new media" users. Today, more than ever before, media consumers are exposed to multiple media at the same point in time, encouraged to participate in media content generation, and challenged to learn, access, and use the new media that are continually entering the market. These media trends have strong implications for how consumers of health information access, process, and retain health-related knowledge. In this article we review traditional information processing models and theories of interpersonal and mass media access and consumption. We make several theory-based propositions for how traditional information processing and media consumption concepts will function as new media usage continues to increase. These propositions are supported by new media usage data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's entry into the new media market (e.g., podcasting, virtual events, blogging, and webinars). Based on these propositions, we conclude by presenting both opportunities and challenges that public health communicators and marketers will face in the future.

  5. Developing a successful mass media campaign.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    This brief looks at the potential benefits of using a mass media campaign as an education tool for reaching Medicare beneficiaries and their families. It provides basic information about how to plan a campaign in your community with a focus on process--what needs to be done, and suggestions for ways to do it. The campaign described here had two components: a Medicare information guide and media exposure through television and newspaper stories. These can be tailored to the capacity of your organization and the needs of your community. Consider combining your media campaign with a series of workshops to reinforce the information in your publication and provide a forum for people to ask questions about their specific concerns.

  6. Media content management on the DTV platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Boon-Lock; Yeung, Minerva M.

    1998-12-01

    Digital TV offers many advantages over analog TV. The obvious advantages are higher picture resolution and superior quality, more programs for the same channel bandwidth, and potential for mixed video and data broadcasting. In addition, the reception of video, audio, and data in digital form, offer new opportunities for better filtering, management and organization of the content, during and after the broadcast. The platform on which these media content management operations are performed is similar to the computing platform, with which we are familiar. Hence, the goals are to process incoming bits of data and to generate output for users' reception and/or interactivity. In this paper, we present our vision and summarize our research activities in media content management on the DTV platform. In particular, we will focus on three key areas, namely, channel surfing, digital video recording, and content filtering. We will also demonstrate how media content management can offer new and better viewing experiences in the era of DTV.

  7. Participatory advocacy: a counter to media imperialism.

    PubMed

    Brown, M

    1996-01-01

    Western media have a history of defining news worldwide, presenting news from a Western perspective which distorts and denies the truth as perceived from developing countries. Western news coverage of developing countries seems to emphasize countries' fragility, instability, and corruption, leading people to believe that the economic problems of developing countries are due to internal failures. That view is then transferred back to indigenous peoples and communities through major Western news agencies and mass media. Participatory communication is based upon the notion that people have the right to decide how they want themselves and their situations to be portrayed, to decide what information is useful to them and their community, and to be integral players in the communication process. With regard to media imperialism, the author discusses implications for advocacy activities, participatory communication approaches, participatory advocacy, participatory advocacy in South Asia, girl child drama in Nepal, drug abuse television drama in Nepal, and the advocacy challenge.

  8. Learning-based imaging through scattering media.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Ryoichi; Takagi, Ryosuke; Tanida, Jun

    2016-06-27

    We present a machine-learning-based method for single-shot imaging through scattering media. The inverse scattering process was calculated based on a nonlinear regression algorithm by learning a number of training object-speckle pairs. In the experimental demonstration, multilayer phase objects between scattering plates were reconstructed from intensity measurements. Our approach enables model-free sensing, where it is not necessary to know the sensing processes/models. PMID:27410537

  9. Pyrolysis process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chang-Kuei

    1983-01-01

    This invention discloses a process and apparatus for pyrolyzing particulate coal by heating with a particulate solid heating media in a transport reactor. The invention tends to dampen fluctuations in the flow of heating media upstream of the pyrolysis zone, and by so doing forms a substantially continuous and substantially uniform annular column of heating media flowing downwardly along the inside diameter of the reactor. The invention is particularly useful for bituminous or agglomerative type coals.

  10. Social media in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape.

  11. Media multitasking and behavioral measures of sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Brandon C W; Thomson, David R; Seli, Paul; Carriere, Jonathan S A; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In a series of four studies, self-reported media multitasking (using the media multitasking index; MMI) and general sustained-attention ability, through performance on three sustained-attention tasks: the metronome response task (MRT), the sustained-attention-to-response task (SART), and a vigilance task (here, a modified version of the SART). In Study 1, we found that higher reports of media multitasking were associated with increased response variability (i.e., poor performance) on the MRT. However, in Study 2, no association between reported media multitasking and performance on the SART was observed. These findings were replicated in Studies 3a and 3b, in which we again assessed the relation between media multitasking and performance on both the MRT and SART in two large online samples. Finally, in Study 4, using a large online sample, we tested whether media multitasking was associated with performance on a vigilance task. Although standard vigilance decrements were observed in both sensitivity (A') and response times, media multitasking was not associated with the size of these decrements, nor was media multitasking associated with overall performance, in terms of either sensitivity or response times. Taken together, the results of the studies reported here failed to demonstrate a relation between habitual engagement in media multitasking in everyday life and a general deficit in sustained-attention processes. PMID:25280520

  12. Media multitasking and behavioral measures of sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Brandon C W; Thomson, David R; Seli, Paul; Carriere, Jonathan S A; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In a series of four studies, self-reported media multitasking (using the media multitasking index; MMI) and general sustained-attention ability, through performance on three sustained-attention tasks: the metronome response task (MRT), the sustained-attention-to-response task (SART), and a vigilance task (here, a modified version of the SART). In Study 1, we found that higher reports of media multitasking were associated with increased response variability (i.e., poor performance) on the MRT. However, in Study 2, no association between reported media multitasking and performance on the SART was observed. These findings were replicated in Studies 3a and 3b, in which we again assessed the relation between media multitasking and performance on both the MRT and SART in two large online samples. Finally, in Study 4, using a large online sample, we tested whether media multitasking was associated with performance on a vigilance task. Although standard vigilance decrements were observed in both sensitivity (A') and response times, media multitasking was not associated with the size of these decrements, nor was media multitasking associated with overall performance, in terms of either sensitivity or response times. Taken together, the results of the studies reported here failed to demonstrate a relation between habitual engagement in media multitasking in everyday life and a general deficit in sustained-attention processes.

  13. [Media for 21st century--towards human communication media].

    PubMed

    Harashima, H

    2000-05-01

    Today, with the approach of the 21st century, attention is focused on multi-media communications combining computer, visual and audio technologies. This article discusses the communication media target and the technological problems constituting the nucleus of multi-media. The communication media is becoming an environment from which no one can escape. Since the media has such a great power, what is needed now is not to predict the future technologies, but to estimate the future world and take to responsibility for future environments.

  14. Transmedia Play: Literacy across Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Meryl; Herr-Stephenson, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Transmedia play is a new way to understand how children develop critical media literacy and new media literacies through their interactions with contemporary media that links stories and structures across platforms. This essay highlights five characteristics of transmedia play that make it particularly useful for learning:…

  15. The Impact of Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Pearl G.

    In order to bring the student's contemporary environment into the classroom for study and to avoid topicality, this book provides general principles by which to evaluate current media offerings, outlines the patterns from which media materials are cut for public consumption, and focuses the student's attention on the mass media themselves. Each of…

  16. Media Studies: Texts and Supplements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The 24 reviews in this article include textbooks on journalism and media studies; multimedia kits on advertising, TV news, reporting, and the "grammar" of media; resources on making ad interpreting films in the classroom; supplements on writing for both print and nonprint media; and professional references on improving visual literacy. (Editor)

  17. Media Literacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    The media play an increasingly strong role in transmitting values; behaviors; social norms; attitudes; and knowledge to youth and adults. Media literacy involves the ability to ask questions about what is watched, heard, or read. It involves learning what to look for, what to ask, and how to question these many influences. Media literacy also…

  18. Media Will Never Influence Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses different points of view about the impact of media on learning, motivation, and efficiency gains from instruction. The author's arguments about research and theory of media effects are summarized; reactions to the claim that media do not influence learning are characterized; and responses are given to Robert Kozma's specific criticisms…

  19. Media Violence and Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, Harold R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of a connection between violence in the media and actual adolescent behavior. Explores the nature of the connection, why it exists, and possible courses of action to correct the problem. States that 3,000 studies have explored the link between media violence and adolescent behavior. Concludes that the media should show…

  20. Media Literacy and Cultural Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Through an analysis of two representative media--romance fiction and television news--the author argues for production of a media-literate citizenry. Suggestions governed by the Freirean objective of co-intentional education are offered to support media literacy as a form of cultural politics and to advocate its adoption. (Author/CH)

  1. Issues in Media Management, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, David R., Ed.

    Nine papers from a two-day workshop concentrate on curriculum development, guidance, and counseling. Topics covered in these papers include media and instruction, humanistic education, the instructional team approach, media and methods, Title IV Elementary Secondary Education Act, media and guidance, and the art of writing a grant. (DS)

  2. Media Literacy Is the Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trampiets, Frances

    1995-01-01

    Highlights the importance of using music, multimedia, video, and computers to enrich and enhance religious education, and of integrating media education into faith formation. Suggests that media literacy plays an important role in increasing awareness of the influence of mass media on society. (DJM)

  3. Digital Media's Transformative Role in Education: Beyond Potential to Essential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Ming-tso

    2012-01-01

    Achieving effective learning via digital media continues to be a major concern in contemporary education. The daily use of all forms of digital media is part of our lives and therefore becomes a key component of education. Educators must consider the process of digital media curriculum as a learning model and form of experience adapted to…

  4. Critically Redefining and Repositioning Media Texts in Early Childhood Teacher Education: What If? And Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souto-Manning, Mariana; Price-Dennis, Detra

    2012-01-01

    Given the prevalence of popular media in the lives of young children today, early childhood teacher education stands to benefit from fostering critical media literacy practices. Through the use of critical media literary practices, early childhood teacher educators can facilitate a process whereby preservice teachers learn how to critically…

  5. Media Literacy Education in the Balkan Countries: The Greece and Turkey Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanriverdi, Belgin

    2008-01-01

    The mass communication process via (mass) media has a great potential of reaching people all around the world. This may foster cosmopolitanism and democracy, but it also holds the danger of an increasing manipulation because of the fact that media can never be neutral and value-free. While some studies do not see a harmful impact of media, most…

  6. Conceptualizing Media Stimuli in Experimental Research: Psychological versus Attribute-Based Definitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Chen-Chao; Bucy, Erik P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues for a clearer conceptualization of media stimuli in experimental research and identifies 3 issues impeding our understanding of message processing: (a) assumptions bolstered by manipulation checks about homogeneity of response to media stimuli, (b) conflation of 2 different classes of variables--media attributes and psychological…

  7. Considerations of Learning and Learning Research: Revisiting the "Media Effects" Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Mitchell; Robinson, Cecil

    2001-01-01

    Examines the "media effects" debate-whether media in and of itself affects learning-and presents an analysis of various arguments from a learning theory perspective. Proposes a dynamic process of instructional design where assessments are aimed at instructional practices as well as learning outcomes, and instructional media and method are…

  8. Cuban Mass Media: Organization, Control and Functions. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The mass media as interdependent parts of a larger social system both control and are controlled by other subsystems. The various combinations of control, in turn, determine the functions the media system will serve. In the 1960's, the Cuban mass media underwent frequent change that reflected the volatility of the revolutionary process. Today,…

  9. The challenge of evaluating complex interventions: a framework for evaluating media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Stead, Martine; Hastings, Gerard; Eadie, Douglas

    2002-06-01

    New health promotion and public health approaches such as media advocacy pose particular evaluation challenges. Evaluation is important to provide feedback to media advocacy practitioners on how to enhance their efforts, and to funders and researchers seeking to assess media advocacy's effectiveness as a health promotion strategy. The media advocacy evaluation literature contains some examples of promising evaluation approaches but is still evolving. A comprehensive framework for the evaluation of media advocacy is presented. Building on existing approaches to evaluation in media advocacy and on current thinking regarding evaluation in health promotion, it proposes a series of indicators and research methods for evaluating media advocacy at the levels of formative, process and outcome evaluation. The framework can be used to encourage strategic reflection on the media advocacy process, to guide evaluation of specific interventions, and to demonstrate to funders the importance and complexity of evaluation in this promising field.

  10. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  11. Repetitive Regeneration of Media #1 in a Dynamic Column Extraction using Brine #1

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Garland

    2015-10-14

    This data is from a regeneration study from a dynamic column extraction experiment where we ran a solution of REE's through a column of media #1 then stripped the REE's off the media using 2M HNO3 solution. We then re-equilibrated the media and repeated the process of running a REE solution through the column and stripping the REE's off the media and comparing the two runs.

  12. Use of social media in health promotion: purposes, key performance indicators, and evaluation metrics.

    PubMed

    Neiger, Brad L; Thackeray, Rosemary; Van Wagenen, Sarah A; Hanson, Carl L; West, Joshua H; Barnes, Michael D; Fagen, Michael C

    2012-03-01

    Despite the expanding use of social media, little has been published about its appropriate role in health promotion, and even less has been written about evaluation. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) outline purposes for social media in health promotion, (b) identify potential key performance indicators associated with these purposes, and (c) propose evaluation metrics for social media related to the key performance indicators. Process evaluation is presented in this article as an overarching evaluation strategy for social media.

  13. [Media, cloning, and bioethics].

    PubMed

    Costa, S I; Diniz, D

    2000-01-01

    This article was based on an analysis of three hundred articles from mainstream Brazilian periodicals over a period of eighteen months, beginning with the announcement of the Dolly case in February 1997. There were two main objectives: to outline the moral constants in the press associated with the possibility of cloning human beings and to identify some of the moral assumptions concerning scientific research with non-human animals that were published carelessly by the media. The authors conclude that there was a haphazard spread of fear concerning the cloning of human beings rather than an ethical debate on the issue, and that there is a serious gap between bioethical reflections and the Brazilian media.

  14. SETI and the Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shostak, Seth

    2004-06-01

    Of all the research areas of modern discovery science, few attract more attention than the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. This is partially due to the fact that SETI is accessible, since the public can readily understand the goals of the research. The man in the street also finds SETI particularly exciting, a fact reflected by the ubiquitous presence of extraterrestrials in popular culture. The media interact with SETI in three areas: (1) reporting on research efforts, (2) being the principal conduit of information in case of a SETI detection, and (3) linking the subject deliberately or otherwise to the many stories of alien visitation. In this paper we will discuss the way science meets the media, and how and whether this often dicey relationship might serve to raise the general level of science literacy.

  15. [Mental illness and media].

    PubMed

    Magli, Erica; Buizza, Chiara; Pioli, Rosaria

    2004-06-01

    Many knowledges on the mental disease that the community possesses are turning out of information disclosed from the media. It's common in the press to connect actions of violence and murders to the mental diseases. For this reason, the reader is induced to infer that murders and other violent actions are more frequent in people who have suffered from mentally ill, than in the general population. The mystifying impression provided by media accrues from the fact that these reports are rarely compensated from positive reports. Objective of the present study is to characterize the type of information concerning mental illness diffused from the local daily paper "Giornale di Brescia" in the year 2001. The results show that many articles connote negatively the mental disease. The journalistic sensationalism, denounced facing the speech of the prejudgment in the comparisons of the mentally ill people, seems to still remain, in the considered year of publication, one unchanging tendency. PMID:15248412

  16. Media Makes for Public Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Learning from media: what studies of media projects can help us understand about informing the public about science issues. Saul Rockman, has studied a variety of television and radio projects funded by NSF, NASA, and foundations. He will highlight findings that inform strategies to increase learning about science content and issues through the media, as well as inform policy on communicating complex scientific ideas to citizens of all ages. Rockman has gathered evidence from science media ranging from Bill Nye The Science Guy to BURN, An Energy Journal.Media for Children vs. Adults

  17. Michael Faraday, media man.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles. PMID:16332391

  18. Michael Faraday, media man.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2006-03-01

    Michael Faraday was an enthusiastic portrait collector, and he welcomed the invention of photography not only as a possible means of recording observations accurately, but also as a method for advertising science and its practitioners. This article (which is part of the Science in the Industrial Revolution series) shows that like many eminent scientists, Faraday took advantage of the burgeoning Victorian media industry by posing in various roles.

  19. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image

  20. Media Literacy: 21st Century Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Frank W.

    2011-01-01

    The media, for better or worse, deliver the news and the gossip; they entertain, educate and inform. The media have not always been in American classrooms. Yes, teachers teach with media, but rarely do they teach "about" the media. It's called media literacy. Most students are not receiving adequate media literacy instruction, mostly because their…

  1. Update on Otitis Media in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoem, Scott R.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses otitis media in children. It addresses risk factors for otitis media, pathogenesis, diagnosis, bacteria causing otitis media, and treatment for acute otitis media, recurrent acute otitis media, and persistent otitis media with effusion, including antibiotics, steroids, allergy control, autoinflation, mechanical ventilation,…

  2. Coupling flood forecasting and social media crowdsourcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Milan; Kliment, Tomas; Salamon, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Social and mainstream media monitoring is being more and more recognized as valuable source of information in disaster management and response. The information on ongoing disasters could be detected in very short time and the social media can bring additional information to traditional data feeds (ground, remote observation schemes). Probably the biggest attempt to use the social media in the crisis management was the activation of the Digital Humanitarian Network by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in response to Typhoon Yolanda. The network of volunteers performing rapid needs & damage assessment by tagging reports posted to social media which were then used by machine learning classifiers as a training set to automatically identify tweets referring to both urgent needs and offers of help. In this work we will present the potential of coupling a social media streaming and news monitoring application ( GlobalFloodNews - www.globalfloodsystem.com) with a flood forecasting system (www.globalfloods.eu) and the geo-catalogue of the OGC services discovered in the Google Search Engine (WMS, WFS, WCS, etc.) to provide a full suite of information available to crisis management centers as fast as possible. In GlobalFloodNews we use advanced filtering of the real-time Twitter stream, where the relevant information is automatically extracted using natural language and signal processing techniques. The keyword filters are adjusted and optimized automatically using machine learning algorithms as new reports are added to the system. In order to refine the search results the forecasting system will be triggering an event-based search on the social media and OGC services relevant for crisis response (population distribution, critical infrastructure, hospitals etc.). The current version of the system makes use of USHAHIDI Crowdmap platform, which is designed to easily crowdsource information using multiple channels, including SMS, email

  3. SOCIAL MEDIA MINING SHARED TASK WORKSHOP.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Abeed; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Social media has evolved into a crucial resource for obtaining large volumes of real-time information. The promise of social media has been realized by the public health domain, and recent research has addressed some important challenges in that domain by utilizing social media data. Tasks such as monitoring flu trends, viral disease outbreaks, medication abuse, and adverse drug reactions are some examples of studies where data from social media have been exploited. The focus of this workshop is to explore solutions to three important natural language processing challenges for domain-specific social media text: (i) text classification, (ii) information extraction, and (iii) concept normalization. To explore different approaches to solving these problems on social media data, we designed a shared task which was open to participants globally. We designed three tasks using our in-house annotated Twitter data on adverse drug reactions. Task 1 involved automatic classification of adverse drug reaction assertive user posts; Task 2 focused on extracting specific adverse drug reaction mentions from user posts; and Task 3, which was slightly ill-defined due to the complex nature of the problem, involved normalizing user mentions of adverse drug reactions to standardized concept IDs. A total of 11 teams participated, and a total of 24 (18 for Task 1, and 6 for Task 2) system runs were submitted. Following the evaluation of the systems, and an assessment of their innovation/novelty, we accepted 7 descriptive manuscripts for publication--5 for Task 1 and 2 for Task 2. We provide descriptions of the tasks, data, and participating systems in this paper.

  4. Filter Media Tests Under Simulated Martian Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will require the optimal utilization of planetary resources. One of its abundant resources is the Martian atmosphere that can be harvested through filtration and chemical processes that purify and separate it into its gaseous and elemental constituents. Effective filtration needs to be part of the suite of resource utilization technologies. A unique testing platform is being used which provides the relevant operational and instrumental capabilities to test articles under the proper simulated Martian conditions. A series of tests were conducted to assess the performance of filter media. Light sheet imaging of the particle flow provided a means of detecting and quantifying particle concentrations to determine capturing efficiencies. The media's efficiency was also evaluated by gravimetric means through a by-layer filter media configuration. These tests will help to establish techniques and methods for measuring capturing efficiency and arrestance of conventional fibrous filter media. This paper will describe initial test results on different filter media.

  5. "Othering" agricultural biotechnology: Slovenian media representation of agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zajc, Jožica; Erjavec, Karmen

    2014-08-01

    While studies on media representations of agricultural biotechnology mostly analyse media texts, this work is intended to fill a research gap with an analysis of journalistic interpretations of media representations. The purpose of this project was to determine how news media represent agricultural biotechnology and how journalists interpret their own representations. A content and critical discourse analysis of news texts published in the Slovenian media over two years and in-depth interviews with their authors were conducted. News texts results suggest that most of the news posts were "othering" biotechnology and biotechnologists: biotechnology as a science and individual scientists are represented as "they," who are socially irresponsible, ignorant, arrogant, and "our" enemies who produce unnatural processes and work for biotechnology companies, whose greed is destroying people, animals, and the environment. Most journalists consider these representations to be objective because they have published the biotechnologists' opinions, despite their own negative attitudes towards biotechnology.

  6. Using Entertainment Media to Inform Student Affairs Teaching and Practice Related to Sex and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tracy L.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents several strategies for teaching about sex and gender using entertainment media and explores critical issues related to content development, the delivery process, and evaluation methods.

  7. Missed Programs (You Can't TiVo This One): Why Psychologists Should Study Media.

    PubMed

    Okdie, Bradley M; Ewoldsen, David R; Muscanell, Nicole L; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A; Velez, John A; Dunn, Robert A; O'Mally, Jamie; Smith, Lauren Reichart

    2014-03-01

    Media psychology involves the scientific examination of the cognitive processes and behavior involved in the selection, use, interpretation, and effects of communication across a variety of media (e.g., via the Internet, television, telephone, film). Media are central to people's lives, with projections indicating that an average person spent over 3,515 hours using media in 2012. New technologies are increasing the importance of media. Data from two content analyses demonstrate the underrepresentation of media psychology in mainstream psychological literature and in undergraduate and graduate psychology course offerings. We argue for the importance of a psychological approach to the study of media because of its presence in people's lives and because psychologists use it in their research and their choices may affect the external validity of their findings. We provide a useful framework from which psychologists can approach the study of media, and we conclude with recommendations for further areas of scientific inquiry relevant to psychological science.

  8. Poromechanics of microporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard, L.; Vandamme, M.; Pellenq, R. J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Microporous media, i.e., porous media made of pores with a nanometer size, are important for a variety of applications, for instance for sequestration of carbon dioxide in coal, or for storage of hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks. In a pore of nanometer size, fluid molecules are not in their bulk state anymore since they interact with the atoms of the solid: they are said to be in an adsorbed state. For such microporous media, conventional poromechanics breaks down. In this work we derive poroelastic constitutive equations which are valid for a generic porous medium, i.e., even for a porous medium with pores of nanometer size. The complete determination of the poromechanical behavior of a microporous medium requires knowing how the amount of fluid adsorbed depends on both the fluid bulk pressure and the strain of the medium. The derived constitutive equations are validated with the help of molecular simulations on one-dimensional microporous media. Even when a microporous medium behaves linearly in the absence of any fluid (i.e., its bulk modulus does not depend on strain), we show that fluid adsorption can induce non-linear behavior (i.e., its drained bulk modulus can then depend significantly on strain). We also show that adsorption can lead to an apparent Biot coefficient of the microporous medium greater than unity or smaller than zero. The poromechanical response of a microporous medium to adsorption significantly depends on the pore size distribution. Indeed, the commensurability (i.e., the ratio of the size of the pores to that of the fluid molecules) proves to play a major role. For a one-dimensional model of micropores with a variety of pore sizes, molecular simulations show that the amount of adsorbed fluid depends linearly on the strain of the medium. We derive linearized constitutive equations which are valid when such a linear dependence of the adsorbed amount of fluid on the strain is observed. As an application, the case of methane and coal is

  9. Acoustic Signature of Evaporation from Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapsas, N. K.; Shokri, N.

    2012-12-01

    During evaporation from saturated porous media, rapid interfacial jumps at the pore scale, known as Haines jumps, occur as air invades the pore network and displaces the evaporating fluid. This process produces crackling noises that can be detected using an acoustic emission (AE) machine. In this study, we investigated the acoustic signature of evaporation from porous media using Hele-Shaw cells packed with seven types of sand and glass beads differing in particle size distribution and surface roughness. Each sample was saturated with dyed water, left to evaporate under constant atmospheric conditions on a digital balance in an environmental chamber, and digitally imaged every 20 minutes to quantify phase distribution. An AE sensor was fixed to each column to record the features of observed AE events (hits) such as amplitude, absolute energy, and duration. Results indicate that the cumulative number of hits is strongly related to evaporative mass loss through time in all configurations. Additionally, the cumulative number of hits shares an inverse relationship with particle size and roughness. Finally, image analysis of the liquid phase distribution during evaporation reveals a strong correlation between the area invaded by air and the cumulative AE hits detected in each column. This confirms that AEs are generated by receding liquid menisci and the propagation of drying fronts in porous media. These results suggest that AE techniques may potentially be used to non-invasively analyze the drying of porous media.

  10. Maxwell Equations for Slow-Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the Minkowski equations obtained on the basis of theory of relativity are used to describe electromagnetic fields in moving media. But important electromagnetic processes run under non-relativistic conditions of slow-moving media. Therefore, one should carry out its description in terms of classical mechanics. Hertz derived electrodynamic equations for moving media within the frame of classical mechanics on the basis of the Maxwell theory. His equations disagree with the experimental data concerned with the moving dielectrics. In the paper, a way of description of electromagnetic fields in slow-moving media on the basis of the Maxwell theory within the frame of classical mechanics is offered by combining the Hertz approach and the experimental data concerned with the movement of dielectrics in electromagnetic fields. Received Maxwell equations lack asymmetry in the description of the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor and conform to known experimental data. Comparative analysis of the Minkowski and Maxwell models is carried out.

  11. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research. PMID:26331344

  12. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research.

  13. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Schuring, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  15. Book and media reviews.

    PubMed

    Cook, C

    2000-07-01

    Books reviewed in this article: Book reviews in this column will primarily be of titles focusing completely, or in part, on biological aspects of addiction. However, significant titles of general relevance to the addictions field will also be included, even if they are not "biologi cal", as will titles of general methodological and clinical relevance, even if they are not on "addictions". Similar considerations will apply to other media (software, audio tapes and CDs, videos, etc). However, specific "addictions" software applications seem to be relatively uncommon and, as these items are rarely reviewed elsewhere, we will endeavour to include reviews of some of the older programmes that are still useful, as well as new titles that appear. I would appreciate suggesti ons of any items suitable for reviews, but especially software and other media of specific relevance to the addictions. Please contact: Dr David Ball, National Addiction Centre, 4 Windsor Walk, London SE5 8AF, UK. Evaluating the Treatment of Drug Abuse in the European Union. EMCDDA scientific monograph series no. 3 Genetics and Criminality. The Potential Misuse of Scientific Information in Court JEFFREY R. BOTKIN, WILLIAM M. McMAHON & LESLIE PICKERING Dimensions of Forgiveness, Psychological Research and Theological Perspectives EVERETT L. WORTHINGTON Jr Handbook of Psychiatry for Primary Care C. W. ALLWOOD & C. A. GAGIANO Scientific Unit Conversion, 2nd edn FRANCOIS CARDARELLI (English translation by M.J. SHIELDS).

  16. Chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a common cause of hearing impairment and disability. Occasionally it can lead to fatal intracranial infections and acute mastoiditis, especially in developing countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic suppurative otitis media in adults and in children? What are the effects of treatments for cholesteatoma in adults and in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 51 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: topical ear cleansing, surgery for cholesteatoma, systemic antibiotics, topical antibiotics, topical antibiotics plus topical corticosteroids, topical antiseptics, topical corticosteroids, tympanoplasty (with or without mastoidectomy). PMID:23870746

  17. Outlooks on Children and Media: Child Rights, Media Trends, Media Research, Media Literacy, Child Participation, Declarations. Children and Media Violence Yearbook, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Feilitzen, Cecilia; Bucht, Catharina

    Focusing on media literacy, this yearbook compiles information on recent and current trends in media effects, including research on children and media, declarations related to the area, and a selection of relevant organizations and Web sites. The report first delineates children's rights as stipulated in the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the…

  18. Public health and media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns.

  19. Adolescent sexuality and the media.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1989-06-01

    Teenagers spend more time with the media than they do in any other activity except sleeping. Is it mere coincidence that the rises in rates of adolescent sexual intercourse during the past 30 years have coincided with the new era of electronic media? Do the media merely reflect society's changes, or do they have the capacity to influence human behavior as well? Although currently part of the problem of teenage pregnancy, the media could become part of the solution, if they were to portray human sexuality responsibly and allow the advertising of contraception. PMID:2660095

  20. Adolescent sexuality and the media.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1989-06-01

    Teenagers spend more time with the media than they do in any other activity except sleeping. Is it mere coincidence that the rises in rates of adolescent sexual intercourse during the past 30 years have coincided with the new era of electronic media? Do the media merely reflect society's changes, or do they have the capacity to influence human behavior as well? Although currently part of the problem of teenage pregnancy, the media could become part of the solution, if they were to portray human sexuality responsibly and allow the advertising of contraception.

  1. Quantum-dot based nanothermometry in optical plasmonic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Maestro, Laura Martinez; Zhang, Qiming; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min; Jaque, Daniel

    2014-11-03

    We report on the direct experimental determination of the temperature increment caused by laser irradiation in a optical recording media constituted by a polymeric film in which gold nanorods have been incorporated. The incorporation of CdSe quantum dots in the recording media allowed for single beam thermal reading of the on-focus temperature from a simple analysis of the two-photon excited fluorescence of quantum dots. Experimental results have been compared with numerical simulations revealing an excellent agreement and opening a promising avenue for further understanding and optimization of optical writing processes and media.

  2. Application of impediometry to rapid assessment of liquid culture media.

    PubMed

    Strassburger, J; Hossbach, J; Seidel, R

    1991-01-01

    The impedance method provides as unique opportunity to determine microbial activity and kinetics. Since the metabolic processes depend on the nature and quality of the culture medium, impediometry allows the assessment of liquid culture media. Impedance microbiology represents an approach to quantitative microbiology. We investigated the influence of pH, composition and variation of the amounts of industrially made dry media, overheating during the dissolving or sterilisation processes, and qualitative differences between batches of the same culture medium. Using glucose broth as an example, we showed that impediometry allows quantitative, microbial assessment of culture media. Inaccurate preparation of the culture medium could be detected quickly by the use of impediometry. The method is very simple to perform, requires no sample preparation, allows rapid assessment of liquid culture media, and interprets results automatically with the aid of a microcomputer. PMID:1863317

  3. Mass Media Use by Children and Media Education in Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilke, Jurgen; Eschenauer, Barbara

    Efforts to include the mass media in school instruction in Germany date back almost as far as the modern mass media themselves. However, the latter were, at best, nearly always used as an instrumental means and not as a subject of education in their own right. The basic findings of a representative survey of teachers in the Federal Republic of…

  4. Social Media as Collaborative Media in Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kristopher J.; Akdere, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    As a result of rapid changes in technology, much is discussed about the use of social media in branding, marketing, and in general corporate communications. The intensity with which social media tools--blogs, wikis, Twitter, instant messaging (IM) and Facebook, among others--have proliferated is staggering. Increasingly important is the role of…

  5. Mass Media Preference Patterns: A Cross-Media Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dwight A., Jr.

    This study defined "preference types" (types of people who use various media) and looked at constructs people used in deciding their preferences. Preferences in one medium were compared with preferences in another medium for the same group of people. The six media studied were television, radio, movies, magazines, brand commercials, and political…

  6. Microscale transport in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.; Rinker, R.

    1996-04-01

    In-pore transport processes in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media have been investigated using novel 3D imaging techniques. The experimental system consists of a clear column packed with clear particles and a refractive index-matched fluid seeded with fluorescent tracers and an organic solute dye. By illuminating the porous regions within the column with a planar sheet of laser beam, flow and transport processes through the porous medium can be observed microscopically, and qualitative and quantitative in-pore transport information can be obtained at a good resolution and a high accuracy. Fluorescent images are captured and recorded at every vertical plane location while sweeping back and forth across the test section. These digitized transport images are then analyzed and accumulated over a 3D volume within the column. This paper reports on pore-scale observations of velocity, chemical concentration, and fluxes. Tests were undertaken with two separate columns. One is a rectangular column for chemical transport and bioremediation studies in aqueous heterogeneous systems and the other is a cylindrical column for flow and transport investigations in nonaqueous homogeneous systems.

  7. Characterization of an impinging jet into porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Alhani, Salwan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, characteristic behavior of a liquid jet into porous hydrophobic / hydrophilic particle media is investigated. In porous media, the capillary effect becomes significant, especially when the jet Reynolds Number is low. To analyze the cavity creation phenomena, the effect of jet's diameter, speed and acceleration as well as particles' size are carefully studied. Such knowledge of fluid behavior will provide guidance for medicine injection process. This work is supported by Caltech GALCIT STEM program.

  8. Nature of phosphorescence kinetics of xanthene dyes in biological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryakhina, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper the experimental results on the nature of the phosphorescence of xanthene dyes in biological media are discussed. Phosphorescence is a monomolecular process and should have exponential type. However, the kinetics of the phosphorescence of xanthene dyes has two-exponential type in biological media. Analysis of data by experimental and theoretical methods showed that the second exponent connects on the phosphorescence of dye dimers. It can be used in biomedical investigation for dose selection of preparation delivery.

  9. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  10. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  11. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  12. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  13. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  14. How to be a local media celebrity.

    PubMed

    Trent, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Building relationships with the media in your region can turn you into a local "media darling. "As a PR-savvy doctor, there are certain techniques to get you the media attention you desire. This article will offer tips for getting local media on your side and working with media, and ways to mobilize your vendors to garner PR in your region.

  15. In Situ Cleanable Alternative HEPA Filter Media

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, D. J.; Terry, M. T.

    2002-02-28

    Energy's Hazardous Facilities'', found that conventional glass fiber HEPA filters are structurally weak and easily damaged by water or fire. The structurally stronger sintered metal and ceramic filters would reduce the potential of a catastrophic HEPA filter failure due to filter media breakthrough in the process ventilation system. An in situ regenerable system may also find application in recovering nuclear materials, such as plutonium, collected on glove box exhaust HEPA filters. This innovative approach of the in situ regenerative filtration system may be a significant improvement upon the shortfalls of conventional disposable HEPA filters.

  16. Media and the making of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Moira

    This dissertation explores how scientists and science students respond to fictional, visual media about science. I consider how scientists think about images of science in relation to their own career paths from childhood onwards. I am especially interested in the possibility that entertainment media can inspire young people to learn about science. Such inspiration is badly needed, as schools are failing to provide it. Science education in the United States is in a state of crisis. Studies repeatedly find low levels of science literacy in the U.S. This bleak situation exists during a boom in the popularity of science-oriented television shows and science fiction movies. How might entertainment media play a role in helping young people engage with science? To grapple with these questions, I interviewed a total of fifty scientists and students interested in science careers, representing a variety of scientific fields and demographic backgrounds, and with varying levels of interest in science fiction. Most respondents described becoming attracted to the sciences at a young age, and many were able to identify specific sources for this interest. The fact that interest in the sciences begins early in life, demonstrates a potentially important role for fictional media in the process of inspiration, perhaps especially for children without access to real-life scientists. One key aspect to the appeal of fiction about science is how scientists are portrayed as characters. Scientists from groups traditionally under-represented in the sciences often sought out fictional characters with whom they could identify, and viewers from all backgrounds preferred well-rounded characters to the extreme stereotypes of mad or dorky scientists. Genre is another aspect of appeal. Some respondents identified a specific role for science fiction: conveying a sense of wonder. Visual media introduce viewers to the beauty of science. Special effects, in particular, allow viewers to explore the

  17. Holodiagrams in birefringent media.

    PubMed

    Rabal, Héctor; Cap, Nelly; Gottschalk, Karin V; Simon, María C

    2003-10-10

    The modifications to the holodiagram concept to describe free propagation (the extraordinary ray) inside birefringent materials are described. Holodiagrams are graphs showing the loci where the sum or the difference in the optical path from a generic point to two foci is the same. The holodiagrams obtained in this way give the shape of the surfaces that satisfy Fermat's principle, conjugate by reflection of one focus into the other, and represent the interference fringes obtained if both points are coherent sources. The reflection law in birefringent media is investigated in relation to this diagram. One direction for the optical axis is considered: parallel to the line joining the source and the observation point. Quartz-type and calcite-type crystals are studied. PMID:14577535

  18. [Isotretinoin, depression and medias].

    PubMed

    Wolkenstein, P

    2010-11-01

    Acne is a frequent disease with a strong impact upon quality of life. The most effective treatment of severe acne is isotretinoin. Cases of suicid have been reported during isotretinoin treatments in adolescents and were mediatised. Now a day, the link between isotretinoin intake and psychiatric troubles is not established at populational level. The pressure of public and medias led the French Drug Agency to send a letter to health professionals to summarize the scientific question. An explanative video is on line on the website of the French Society of Dermatology www.dermato-info.fr. This video summarizes the state of the art concerning the context of isotretinoin for public, dermatologists and other physicians To summarize isotretinoin is the drug for severe acne in case of failure of first line classical treatment. Dermatologists must stay the first line prescribers reminding that adolescence is a fragile period.

  19. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell

    2001-09-10

    The fieldwork associated with Task 1 (Baseline Assessment) was completed this quarter. Detailed cyclone inspections completed at all but one plant during maintenance shifts. Analysis of the test samples is also currently underway in Task 4 (Sample Analysis). A Draft Recommendation was prepared for the management at each test site in Task 2 (Circuit Modification). All required procurements were completed. Density tracers were manufactured and tested for quality control purposes. Special sampling tools were also purchased and/or fabricated for each plant site. The preliminary experimental data show that the partitioning performance for all seven HMC circuits was generally good. This was attributed to well-maintained cyclones and good operating practices. However, the density tracers detected that most circuits suffered from poor control of media cutpoint. These problems were attributed to poor x-ray calibration and improper manual density measurements. These conclusions will be validated after the analyses of the composite samples have been completed.

  20. Combustion in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.

    1999-09-01

    A 2.8-liter tube-shaped combustion vessel was constructed to study flame propagation and quenching in porous media. For this experiment, hydrogen-air flames propagating horizontally into abed of 6 mm diameter glass beads were studied. Measurements of pressure and temperature along the length of the tube were used to observe flame propagation of quenching. The critical hydrogen concentration for Hz-air mixtures was found to be 11.5%, corresponding to a critical Peclet number of Pe* = 37. This value is substantially less than the value of Pe* = 65 quoted in the literature, for example Babkin et al. (1991). It is hypothesized that buoyancy and a dependence of Pe on the Lewis number account for the discrepancy between these two results.

  1. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common problem facing general practitioners, paediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the aetiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history, complications and management of AOM. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'AOM', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take-home message? AOM is a very common problem affecting the majority of children at least once and places a large burden on health care systems throughout the world. Although symptomatic relief is often enough for most children, more severe and protracted cases require treatment with antibiotics, especially in younger children. PMID:25913598

  2. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell

    2002-04-11

    The test data obtained from the Baseline Assessment that compares the performance of the density traces to that of different sizes of coal particles is now complete. The experimental results show that the tracer data can indeed be used to accurately predict HMC performance. The following conclusions were drawn: (i) the tracer curve is slightly sharper than curve for coarsest size fraction of coal (probably due to the greater resolution of the tracer technique), (ii) the Ep increases with decreasing coal particle size, and (iii) the Ep values are not excessively large for the well-maintained HMC circuits. The major problems discovered were associated with improper apex-to-vortex finder ratios and particle hang-up due to media segregation. Only one plant yielded test data that were typical of a fully optimized level of performance.

  3. Porous polymer media

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2002-01-01

    Highly crosslinked monolithic porous polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a porous polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.

  4. The Media and the Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    The experiences of Columbine and El Cajon high schools with media onslaughts following traumatic shooting incidents underscore the importance of getting the message across and sticking to known facts. In a crisis, speculation can hurt everyone. The most important elements in crisis communications are planning and media relations. (MLH)

  5. Media power and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Julia B.

    2015-04-01

    Fingers are often pointed directly at the news media for their powerful influence and ineffective reporting of climate change. But is that the best place to point? And are there more effective ways to conceptualize the power of the media and to consider whom they serve?

  6. Media How-To Notebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durbo, Alec

    Designed to assist public relations personnel deal effectively with print and non-print media, this booklet contains guidelines for: (1) analyzing an audience and selecting the appropriate media; (2) developing persuasion techniques; (3) writing for public relations; (4) determining newsworthy events; (5) detailed planning; (6) assessing results;…

  7. Particle Deposition in Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1992-01-01

    Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

  8. Digital Media and Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hisrich, Katy; Blanchard, Jay

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses digital media and its potential effects on emergent literacy skills development for young children. While the impact of digital media exposure on children's emergent literacy development is largely unknown, it is becoming a significant issue, as more and more young children throughout the world observe and use various forms…

  9. Media and Young Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkorian, Heather L.; Wartella, Ellen A.; Anderson, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic media, particularly television, have long been criticized for their potential impact on children. One area for concern is how early media exposure influences cognitive development and academic achievement. Heather Kirkorian, Ellen Wartella, and Daniel Anderson summarize the relevant research and provide suggestions for maximizing the…

  10. Building Relationships with Local Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwai, Sabrina

    2007-01-01

    One of ACTE's goals is to improve the image of career and technical education (CTE) through outreach to the media. As media relations manager, the author receives calls from reporters asking questions about the types of students who participate in CTE. Reporters often have a misconception that CTE students are troubled or "at the bottom of the…

  11. "Media Now"--and Forever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Iris

    1978-01-01

    Students in a course called "Media Now" in a Washington, D.C., high school use various media hardware and production techniques to film and record their own television commercials, with emphasis on becoming more discerning about the effect that mass communications have on people's lives. (MF)

  12. Social Media in Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Students in the United States use technology and social media platforms for both educational and noneducational purposes. Integration of social media in music education classes can help facilitate learning experiences that would be less likely to happen in a brick-and-mortar setting. However, issues such as privacy and cyberbullying continue to…

  13. Creating Critical Media Analysis Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortuna, Carolyn

    This paper describes a unit of instruction about media images--how they work, ways they affect people, and means to use them--in which young adolescents learn the consequences of becoming a media-literate consumer. The paper explains that in the unit, divided into 2 "clusters," 110 Boston-area eighth graders share 5 core academic teachers: math,…

  14. Teachers Need Media Literacy, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetze, Sandra K.; Brown, Diane S.; Schwarz, Gretchen

    2005-01-01

    If media literacy is to become part of the K-12 school experience, enabling transformation in both curriculum and teaching, then teachers need to become literate first. Teachers cannot teach what they have not learned, and learned to value, themselves. Although more American teachers are becoming knowledgeable about media literacy, much remains to…

  15. Developing World and Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Organization of Journalists, Prague (Czechoslovakia).

    This volume presents six keynote papers submitted by noted scholars to the Working Group on Mass Media and Developing Nations at the International Scientific Conference of the International Association for Mass Communication Research held at Leipzig, Germany, in September 1974. The following titles are included: "Mass Media and Developing Nations:…

  16. Media and Technology. Section IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorito, Eunice; And Others

    This document contains three papers about media and technology presented at a national conference on the nonwhite disabled. In "Overcoming" (E. Fiorito and J. Doherty), a comparison is made between treatment of blacks and the disabled as inferior citizens. Ways in which both populations can work more closely with the media to promote awareness and…

  17. Media Construction of Presidential Campaigns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Chris; Sperry, Sox

    2007-01-01

    The next American president will likely be the candidate who crafts the best "impression" in the media. It is the job of social studies teachers to help students separate impressions from substance and to understand the role that media play in crafting people's meaning making and shaping their decision making. Social studies teachers can help…

  18. Introduction to Media Literacy History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordac, Sarah Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    Why is it important for us to consider the history of media literacy? Beyond forging connections of the past to the present, exploring the history of the field can deepen intellectual curiosity and understanding for those who work in media literacy education, ignite interest in others, and drive investigation into understanding the relationships…

  19. You and the Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franza, August

    This student workbook provides information about mass media and invites students to consider and respond to that information. Students are encouraged to use reading, writing, researching, critical thinking, interpreting, and debating skills in their responses. The book is organized into 8 chapters: (1) "The World of Media"; (2) "Television: Is…

  20. Media Advocacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Media advocacy is an environmental strategy that can be used to support alcohol and other drug prevention and policy development efforts. It helps shift the focus from understanding public health issues as individual problems to understanding them as social conditions that require collective behavior changes. Successful media advocacy uses the…