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Sample records for medial branch block

  1. Spinal Cord Injury During Ultrasound-Guided C7 Cervical Medial Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghwi; Seong, Min Yong; Kim, Ha Yong; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided cervical medial branch block (CMBB) is commonly performed to diagnose and treat head, neck, and shoulder pain. However, its use at the C7 level has been shown to be less accurate than at other levels, which may increase the chance of injury owing to the imprecision of needle site provided by the ultrasound guide. We report the first case of iatrogenic spinal cord injury from an ultrasound-guided C7 CMBB. The patient, upon receiving this procedure, had fainted shortly after experiencing an electrical sensation that ran from the neck to the toe. The patient complained of weakness and tingling sensation in the left upper extremity. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hematoma in the cervical spinal cord, and an electrophysiological study, which was performed at 3 weeks after the incident, revealed an injury at the left C3-T2 anterior horn. After 2 months of rehabilitation, the patient showed moderate improvement in the strength of the left proximal upper extremity; however, there was no improvement in the strength of the left distal upper extremity. Therefore, we recommend caution when performing ultrasound-guided CMBB at the C7 level, as the guide particularly at this level is relatively inaccurate, posing a risk of spinal cord injury.

  2. [Interventions on facet joints. Techniques of facet joint injection, medial branch block and radiofrequency ablation].

    PubMed

    Artner, J; Klessinger, S

    2015-10-01

    Fluoroscopy-guided interventions on facet joints have been used for decades for the symptomatic management of pain in spinal disorders. A large number of imaging techniques are used to achieve a precise and safe needle placement in interventional procedures. Pulsed fluoroscopy is one of the most widely used and well-accepted tools for these procedures. This article presents a technical overview of commonly used fluoroscopy-guided interventions on the facet joints of the cervical and lumbar spine, such as facet joint injection, blockade of the medial nerve branches and radiofrequency ablation.

  3. Detection of Intravascular Injection During Lumbar Medial Branch Blocks: A Comparison of Aspiration, Live Fluoroscopy, and Digital Subtraction Technology.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David J; Mattie, Ryan; Scott Hamilton, Alan; Conrad, Bryan; Smuck, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Medial branch blocks may have unrecognized vascular uptake potentially resulting in false- negative results. To determine the rate of unintended vascular injection of contrast medium during medial branch blocks (MBB) with digital subtraction (DS) technology in the context of negative vascular uptake as determined by live fluoroscopy. Prospective Study in an academic medical center. 344 consecutive MBBs in 80 subjects. The presence of vascular flow as determined by live fluoroscopy and DS technology. Unintended vascular injection of contrast medium was determined on 344 consecutive MBBs in 84 subjects, first using live fluoroscopy followed by DS. If live fluoroscopy initially detected vascular uptake, the needle was repositioned until no vascular flow was detected. Once no vascular uptake was confirmed by live fluoroscopy, a contrast medium was then injected while being visualized with DS to again assess the presence or absence of vascular flow undetected by live fluoroscopy. Live fluoroscopy revealed inadvertent vascular uptake in 38 of the 344 blocks [11% (95% CI 8.0-15%)]. DS uncovered an additional 27 of the 344 blocks [7.8% (95% CI 5.3-11.4%)] with evidence of vascular uptake that were not detected with conventional live fluoroscopy. DS enhances the ability to detect inadvertent vascular flow during medial branch blocks. This study demonstrates that standard live fluoroscopy can miss a small percentage of cases with unintentional vascular uptake during MBB when compared with DS and may contribute to occasional false-negative responses. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bundle Branch Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart to pump blood efficiently through your circulatory system. There's no specific treatment for bundle branch block itself. However, any underlying health condition that caused bundle branch block, such as heart disease, will need to be treated. In most people, ...

  5. The Role of Thoracic Medial Branch Blocks in Managing Chronic Mid and Upper Back Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Active-Control Trial with a 2-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Falco, Frank J. E.; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Fellows, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Study Design. A randomized, double-blind, active-control trial. Objective. To determine the clinical effectiveness of therapeutic thoracic facet joint nerve blocks with or without steroids in managing chronic mid back and upper back pain. Summary of Background Data. The prevalence of thoracic facet joint pain has been established as 34% to 42%. Multiple therapeutic techniques utilized in managing chronic thoracic pain of facet joint origin include medial branch blocks, radiofrequency neurotomy, and intraarticular injections. Methods. This randomized double-blind active controlled trial was performed in 100 patients with 50 patients in each group who received medial branch blocks with local anesthetic alone or local anesthetic and steroids. Outcome measures included the numeric rating scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, and work status, at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Results. Significant improvement with significant pain relief and functional status improvement of 50% or more were observed in 80% of the patients in Group I and 84% of the patients in Group II at 2-year followup. Conclusions. Therapeutic medial branch blocks of thoracic facets with or without steroids may provide a management option for chronic function-limiting thoracic pain of facet joint origin. PMID:22851967

  6. Radiofrequency Neurotomy of Cervical Medial Branches for Chronic Cervicobrachialgia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Woo-Ram; Shin, Dong-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Ah

    2006-01-01

    Chronic neck and arm pain or cervicobrachialgia commonly occurs with the degeneration of cervical spine. Authors investigated the usefulness of radiofrequency (RF) neurotomies of cervical medial branches in patients with cervicobrachialgia and analyzed the factors which can influence the treatment outcome. Demographic data, types of pain distribution, responses of double controlled blocks, electrical stimulation parameters, numbers and levels of neurotomies, and surgical outcomes were evaluated after mean follow-up of 12 months. Pain distribution pattern was not significantly correlated with the results of diagnostic blocks. Average stimulation intensity was 0.45 V, ranging from 0.3 to 0.69, to elicit pain response in cervical medial branches. The most common involvement of nerve branches was C4 (89%), followed by C5 (82%), C6 (75%), and C7 (43%). Among total of 28 patients, nineteen (68%) reported successful outcome according to outcome criteria after 6 months of follow-up (p=0.001), and eight (42%) of 19 patients reported complete relief (100%) of pain. Four patients showed recurrence of pain between 6 and 12 months. It was therefore concluded that cervical medial branch neurotomy is considered useful therapeutic modality for the management of cervicobrachialgia in selected patients, particularly in degenerative zygapophyseal disorders. PMID:16479077

  7. Radiofrequency neurotomy of cervical medial branches for chronic cervicobrachialgia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Ram; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Shin, Dong-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Ah

    2006-02-01

    Chronic neck and arm pain or cervicobrachialgia commonly occurs with the degeneration of cervical spine. Authors investigated the usefulness of radiofrequency (RF) neurotomies of cervical medial branches in patients with cervicobrachialgia and analyzed the factors which can influence the treatment outcome. Demographic data, types of pain distribution, responses of double controlled blocks, electrical stimulation parameters, numbers and levels of neurotomies, and surgical outcomes were evaluated after mean follow-up of 12 months. Pain distribution pattern was not significantly correlated with the results of diagnostic blocks. Average stimulation intensity was 0.45 V, ranging from 0.3 to 0.69, to elicit pain response in cervical medial branches. The most common involvement of nerve branches was C4 (89%), followed by C5 (82%), C6 (75%), and C7 (43%). Among total of 28 patients, nineteen (68%) reported successful outcome according to outcome criteria after 6 months of followup (p=0.001), and eight (42%) of 19 patients reported complete relief (100%) of pain. Four patients showed recurrence of pain between 6 and 12 months. It was therefore concluded that cervical medial branch neurotomy is considered useful therapeutic modality for the management of cervicobrachialgia in selected patients, particularly in degenerative zygapophyseal disorders.

  8. Superficial radial sensory neuropathy: Medial and lateral branch injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Soon; Kim, Ki Hoon; Park, Byung Kyu; Kim, Dong Hwee

    2016-05-01

    Superficial radial sensory nerve (SRN) injury may involve the main nerve or its distal medial or lateral branch. We investigated the utility of SRN conduction studies on the medial and lateral branches in patients with suspected SRN injury. Fifteen patients with symptoms of SRN neuropathy were studied. Their clinical and electrophysiological findings were assessed according to sensory symptom areas. Three active recording electrode positions were used: snuff box (position A); medial branch (position B); and lateral branch (position C). In 7 patients with medial area symptoms, abnormal findings were seen in position B (100%) and position A (71%). In 3 patients with medial and lateral area symptoms, abnormal findings were seen in all positions. In 5 patients with lateral symptoms, abnormal findings were seen in position C only. Nerve conduction studies for each branch of the SRN are useful in patients with suspected SRN neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Masquerading bundle branch block: a variety of right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Elizari, Marcelo V; Baranchuk, Adrian; Chiale, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    The so-called 'masquerading' type of right bundle branch block is caused by the simultaneous presence of a high-degree left anterior fascicular block often accompanied with severe left ventricular enlargement and/or fibrotic block in the anterolateral wall of the left ventricle. These conditions tend to reorient the terminal electrical forces of the QRS complex towards the left and upwards, in such a way that the characteristic slurred S wave in lead I becomes smaller or even disappears. In many cases of standard masquerading right bundle branch block, a small Q wave in lead I is present due to the initial forces of the left anterior fascicular block, which are oriented rightwards and inferiorly. However, in some cases, the Q wave in lead I also vanishes, and the mimicking of a left bundle branch block becomes perfect in standard leads. This is commonly associated with an inferior myocardial infarction or severe inferior fibrosis in cardiomyopathies. The typical QRS changes of right bundle branch block may eventually be concealed even in the right precordial leads; under such circumstances, the ECG diagnosis may be mistaken and the right bundle branch block totally missed. The masquerading right bundle branch block carries a poor prognosis, since it always implies the presence of a severe underlying heart disease.

  10. Branching Patterns of Medial and Inferior Calcaneal Nerves Around the Tarsal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Suk; Choung, Phil Woo; Kwon, Soon Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the bifurcation pattern of the tibial nerve and its branches. Methods Eleven legs of seven fresh cadavers were dissected. The reference line for the bifurcation point of tibial nerve branches was an imaginary horizontal line passing the tip of the medial malleolus. The distances between the reference line and the bifurcation points were measured. The bifurcation branching patterns were categorized as type I, the pattern in which the medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) branched most proximally; type II, the pattern in which the three branches occurred at the same point; and type III, in which MCN branched most distally. Results There were seven cases (64%) of type I, three cases (27%) of type III, and one case (9%) of type II. The median MCN branching point was 0.2 cm (range, -1 to 3 cm). The median bifurcation points of the lateral plantar nerves and inferior calcaneal nerves was -0.6 cm (range, -1.5 to 1 cm) and -2.5 cm (range, -3.5 to -1 cm), respectively. Conclusion MCN originated from the tibial nerve in most cases, and plantar nerves were bifurcated below the medial malleolus. In all cases, inferior calcaneal nerves originated from the lateral plantar nerve. These anatomical findings could be useful for performing procedures, such as nerve block or electrophysiologic studies. PMID:25750872

  11. Medially constrained deformable modeling for segmentation of branching medial structures: Application to aortic valve segmentation and morphometry.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Tian, Sijie; Takebe, Manabu; Yuan, Jiefu; Gorman, Robert; Cheung, Albert T; Wang, Hongzhi; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    Deformable modeling with medial axis representation is a useful means of segmenting and parametrically describing the shape of anatomical structures in medical images. Continuous medial representation (cm-rep) is a "skeleton-first" approach to deformable medial modeling that explicitly parameterizes an object's medial axis and derives the object's boundary algorithmically. Although cm-rep has effectively been used to segment and model a number of anatomical structures with non-branching medial topologies, the framework is challenging to apply to objects with branching medial geometries since branch curves in the medial axis are difficult to parameterize. In this work, we demonstrate the first clinical application of a new "boundary-first" deformable medial modeling paradigm, wherein an object's boundary is explicitly described and constraints are imposed on boundary geometry to preserve the branching configuration of the medial axis during model deformation. This "boundary-first" framework is leveraged to segment and morphologically analyze the aortic valve apparatus in 3D echocardiographic images. Relative to manual tracing, segmentation with deformable medial modeling achieves a mean boundary error of 0.41 ± 0.10 mm (approximately one voxel) in 22 3DE images of normal aortic valves at systole. Deformable medial modeling is additionally demonstrated on pathological cases, including aortic stenosis, Marfan syndrome, and bicuspid aortic valve disease. This study demonstrates a promising approach for quantitative 3DE analysis of aortic valve morphology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Laughter-induced left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Desai, Dipan; Spragg, David D; Zakaria, Sammy

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a patient with ischemic heart disease and intermittent left bundle branch block, reproducibly induced by laughter. Following treatment of ischemia with successful deployment of a drug-eluting stent, no further episodes of inducible LBBB were seen. Transient ischemia, exacerbated by elevated intrathoracic pressure during laughter, may have contributed to onset of this phenomenon.

  13. Treatment of nocturnal leg cramps by blockade of the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve after lumbar spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Namba, Takanori; Shirasawa, Eiki; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with lumbar spine disease sometimes complain of nocturnal leg cramps. We sought to investigate the effectiveness of blocking the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve as treatment for nocturnal leg cramps after spinal surgery for lumbar spine disease. Methods We evaluated 66 postoperative patients in this prospective comparative study of a group of patients with a nerve block (n = 41) and a control group without (n = 25). In the block group, the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve was blocked at the distal two-thirds of the interspace between the first and second metatarsals using 5.0 mL of 1.0% lidocaine. Results Two weeks after the block, the frequency of nocturnal leg cramps was reduced to less than a quarter of pretreatment baseline frequency in 61.0% of patients (n = 25) and less than half in 80.5% (n = 33). In the control group, the frequency of the leg cramps was reduced from baseline in 32.0% of patients (n = 8), and was unchanged or increased in 68.0% (n = 17) at 2 weeks. Cramp frequency was reduced to less than a quarter or less than half of baseline frequency in a significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) larger percentage of patients in the block group. The severity of each cramp was less in about two-thirds of patients (63.4%; n = 26) in the block group and was unchanged in one-third (31.7%; n = 13). Conclusions Blocking the medial branch of the peroneal nerve can be an effective, long-lasting, and simple treatment with low risk for nocturnal cramps sustained after lumbar spine surgery. PMID:26445706

  14. Treatment of nocturnal leg cramps by blockade of the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Uchida, Kentaro; Namba, Takanori; Shirasawa, Eiki; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-09-01

    Patients with lumbar spine disease sometimes complain of nocturnal leg cramps. We sought to investigate the effectiveness of blocking the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve as treatment for nocturnal leg cramps after spinal surgery for lumbar spine disease. We evaluated 66 postoperative patients in this prospective comparative study of a group of patients with a nerve block (n = 41) and a control group without (n = 25). In the block group, the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve was blocked at the distal two-thirds of the interspace between the first and second metatarsals using 5.0 mL of 1.0% lidocaine. Two weeks after the block, the frequency of nocturnal leg cramps was reduced to less than a quarter of pretreatment baseline frequency in 61.0% of patients (n = 25) and less than half in 80.5% (n = 33). In the control group, the frequency of the leg cramps was reduced from baseline in 32.0% of patients (n = 8), and was unchanged or increased in 68.0% (n = 17) at 2 weeks. Cramp frequency was reduced to less than a quarter or less than half of baseline frequency in a significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) larger percentage of patients in the block group. The severity of each cramp was less in about two-thirds of patients (63.4%; n = 26) in the block group and was unchanged in one-third (31.7%; n = 13). Blocking the medial branch of the peroneal nerve can be an effective, long-lasting, and simple treatment with low risk for nocturnal cramps sustained after lumbar spine surgery.

  15. Effect of the Steindler procedure on the median nerve branches to the medial epicondylar muscles.

    PubMed

    Chantelot, C; Feugas, C; Migaud, H; Guillem, F; Chapnikoff, D; Fontaine, C

    2000-06-01

    Usually the median nerve gives off six branches to the muscles arising from the medial epicondyle, which could be tightened during Steindler's procedure. We studied these branches before and after Steindler's procedure in 20 fresh cadavers and observed a considerable variation in the origin of the branches. The muscular branches arising from the median nerve did not seem to limit the mobilization of the medial epicondyle when performing Steindler's transfer. The limitation of the flexion observed after Steindler's procedure was mainly related to the tension of the transferred forearm flexor muscles. The variability of the origin of the branch to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle could explain a lesion of this branch when Steindler's procedure is carried out with Brunelli's modification. The lateral transfer and the anterior transfer on to the humeral shaft did not influence the limitation of elbow flexion or result in tightness in any nerve branch to the transferred muscles.

  16. Multiple unilateral variations in medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus and their branches

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shivi; Kumar, Ashwani; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During routine dissection of the upper extremity of an adult male cadaver, multiple variations in branches of medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus were encountered. Three unique findings were observed. First, intercordal neural communications between the lateral and medial cords were observed. Second, two lateral pectoral nerves and one medial pectoral nerve were seen to arise from the lateral and medial cord respectively. The musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce the coracobrachialis. Finally, the ulnar nerve arose by two roots from the medial cord. Knowledge of such variations is of interest to anatomists, radiologists, neurologists, anesthesiologists, and surgeons. The aim of our study is to provide additional information about abnormal brachial plexus and its clinical implications. PMID:24693486

  17. Differential conduction block in branches of a bifurcating axon.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Y; Parnas, I; Spira, M E

    1979-01-01

    1. Propagation of action potentials at high frequency was studied in a branching axon of the lobster by means of simultaneous intracellular recording both before and after the branch point. 2. Although the branching axon studied has a geometrical ratio close to one (perfect impedance matching) conduction across the branch point failed at stimulation frequencies above 30 Hz. 3. The block of conduction after high frequency stimulation occurred at the branch point per se. The parent axon and daughter branches continued to conduct action potentials. 4. Conduction block after high frequency stimulation appeared first in the thicker daughter branch and only later in the thin branch. 5. With high frequency stimulation there was a 10-15% reduction in amplitude of the action potential in the parent axon, a corresponding decrease in the rate of rise of the action potential, a 25-30% decrease in conduction velocity, marked increase in threshold and prolongation of the refractory period. In addition the membrane was depolarized by 1-3 mV. 6. Measurements of the membrane current using the patch clamp technique showed a large decrease in the phase of inward current associated with the action potential, before the branching point. 7. The small membrane depolarization seen after high frequency stimulation is not the sole cause of the conduction block. Imposed prolonged membrane depolarization (8 mV for 120 sec) was insufficient to produce conduction block. 8. In vivo chronic extracellular recordings from the main nerve bundle (which contains the parent axon) and the large daughter branch revealed that: (a) the duration and frequency of trains of action potentials along the axons exceeded those used in the isolated nerve experiments and (b) conduction failure in the large daughter branch could be induced in the whole animal by electrical stimulation of the main branch as in the isolated preparation. 9. Possible mechanisms underlying block of conduction after high frequency

  18. Differential conduction block in branches of a bifurcating axon.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Y; Parnas, I; Spira, M E

    1979-10-01

    1. Propagation of action potentials at high frequency was studied in a branching axon of the lobster by means of simultaneous intracellular recording both before and after the branch point. 2. Although the branching axon studied has a geometrical ratio close to one (perfect impedance matching) conduction across the branch point failed at stimulation frequencies above 30 Hz. 3. The block of conduction after high frequency stimulation occurred at the branch point per se. The parent axon and daughter branches continued to conduct action potentials. 4. Conduction block after high frequency stimulation appeared first in the thicker daughter branch and only later in the thin branch. 5. With high frequency stimulation there was a 10-15% reduction in amplitude of the action potential in the parent axon, a corresponding decrease in the rate of rise of the action potential, a 25-30% decrease in conduction velocity, marked increase in threshold and prolongation of the refractory period. In addition the membrane was depolarized by 1-3 mV. 6. Measurements of the membrane current using the patch clamp technique showed a large decrease in the phase of inward current associated with the action potential, before the branching point. 7. The small membrane depolarization seen after high frequency stimulation is not the sole cause of the conduction block. Imposed prolonged membrane depolarization (8 mV for 120 sec) was insufficient to produce conduction block. 8. In vivo chronic extracellular recordings from the main nerve bundle (which contains the parent axon) and the large daughter branch revealed that: (a) the duration and frequency of trains of action potentials along the axons exceeded those used in the isolated nerve experiments and (b) conduction failure in the large daughter branch could be induced in the whole animal by electrical stimulation of the main branch as in the isolated preparation. 9. Possible mechanisms underlying block of conduction after high frequency

  19. Study of the anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches in the distal medial leg

    PubMed Central

    Torres, André Leal Gonçalves; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2012-01-01

    Objective Determine, through dissection in fresh cadavers, the topographic anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches at the ankle, in relation to the tarsal tunnel. Methods Bilateral dissections were performed on 26 fresh cadavers and the locations of the tibial nerve bifurcation and its branches were measured in millimeters. For the calcaneal branches, the amount and their respective nerves of origin were also analyzed. Results The tibial nerve bifurcation occurred under the tunnel in 88% of the cases and proximally in 12%. As for the calcaneal branches, the medial presented with one (58%), two (34%) and three (8%) branches, with the most common source occurring in the tibial nerve (90%) and the lower with a single branch per leg and lateral plantar nerve as the most common origin (70%). Level of Evidence, V Expert opinion. PMID:24453596

  20. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Heel Pain With Radiofrequency Neural Ablation of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Medial Calcaneal Nerve Branches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aydın; Koca, Tuba Tulay; Utkan, Ali; Sevimli, Resit; Akel, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    From March 2012 to February 2013, 37 patients experiencing plantar heel pain for ≥6 months despite treatment with physical therapy and other conservative treatment modalities were followed up. If neurogenic heel pain originating from the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve was present, with or without the medial calcaneal nerve, diagnostic nerve blocks to these nerves were performed for confirmation. If the pain was determined to be of neurogenic origin, radiofrequency neural ablation (RFNA) was applied to the corresponding sensory nerve endings. Pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale, and patients were followed for at least one year. A total of 41 feet from 37 patients (30 [81.1%] females, 7 [18.9%] males; mean age, 50.7 ± 1.6 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)) were included. The mean visual analog scale scores improved significantly from 1 to 6 to 12 months after the procedure relative to before the procedure, with 88% of all patients rating the treatment as either very successful or successful at 12 months postoperatively. RFNA applied to both the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and the medial calcaneal nerve sensory branches (16 [39%] feet) and only the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve sensory branches (25 [61%] feet) showed similarly high levels of success. Of the 41 feet, 28 [68.3%] had received extracorporeal shockwave therapy, 35 [85.4%] had received steroid injections, and 22 [53.7%] had received both extracorporeal shockwave therapy and steroid injections before RFNA as an index procedure. All were unresponsive to these previous treatments. In contrast, almost all (88%) were treated successfully with RFNA. Despite a high incidence of neurologic variations, with a precise diagnosis and good application of the technique using the painful points, chronic plantar heel pain can be treated successfully with RFNA.

  1. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia.

  2. The terminal branches of the medial femoral circumflex artery: the arterial supply of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, L E; Klinger, C E; Sculco, P K; Helfet, D L; Lorich, D G

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates and defines the topographic anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) terminal branches supplying the femoral head (FH). Gross dissection of 14 fresh-frozen cadaveric hips was undertaken to determine the extra and intracapsular course of the MFCA's terminal branches. A constant branch arising from the transverse MFCA (inferior retinacular artery; IRA) penetrates the capsule at the level of the anteroinferior neck, then courses obliquely within the fibrous prolongation of the capsule wall (inferior retinacula of Weitbrecht), elevated from the neck, to the posteroinferior femoral head-neck junction. This vessel has a mean of five (three to nine) terminal branches, of which the majority penetrate posteriorly. Branches from the ascending MFCA entered the femoral capsular attachment posteriorly, running deep to the synovium, through the neck, and terminating in two branches. The deep MFCA penetrates the posterosuperior femoral capsular. Once intracapsular, it divides into a mean of six (four to nine) terminal branches running deep to the synovium, within the superior retinacula of Weitbrecht of which 80% are posterior. Our study defines the exact anatomical location of the vessels, arising from the MFCA and supplying the FH. The IRA is in an elevated position from the femoral neck and may be protected from injury during fracture of the femoral neck. We present vascular 'danger zones' that may help avoid iatrogenic vascular injury during surgical interventions about the hip.

  3. Medial pterygoid trismus (myospasm) following inferior alveolar nerve block: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward F

    2011-01-01

    A patient developed a medial pterygoid trismus (myospasm) the day after receiving three inferior alveolar nerve blocks and a routine restoration. She had a significantly restricted mouth opening and significant medial pterygoid muscle pain when she opened beyond the restriction; however, she had no swelling, lymphadenopathy, or fever. A medial pterygoid myospasm can occur secondary to an inferior alveolar nerve block. This disorder generally is treated by the application of heat, muscle stretches, analgesic and/or muscle relaxant ingestion, and a physical therapy referral. The severity of the disorder typically dictates the extent of therapy that is needed.

  4. Masquerading Bundle Branch Block: A Poor Prognostic Sign Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dhanse, Suheil; Kareem, Hashir; Devasia, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Masquerading bundle branch block is a rare but important finding on the Electrocardiogram (ECG). It is an indication of severe and diffuse conduction system disease and usually indicates poor prognosis. The precordial leads show a Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB) pattern while the limb leads resemble a Left Bundle Branch Block (LBBB). This finding on an ECG is almost invariably associated with severe underlying heart disease. It is extremely important to be aware of this finding as it is a marker of poor cardiac outcomes. We report the case of a 68-year-old gentleman, who presented with progressive dyspnoea on exertion over three months. ECG showed a broad QRS complex with a RBBB pattern on the precordial leads and a LBBB pattern on the limb leads (suggestive of masquerading bundle branch block). A coronary angiogram revealed severe Triple Vessel Disease (TVD). The patient was scheduled for an early Coronary Artery By-Pass Grafting Surgery. However, his clinical condition deteriorated and he died while awaiting the surgery. PMID:27790494

  5. Thermocoagulation of the Medial Branch of the Dorsal Branch of the Lumbal Spinal Nerve: Flouroscopy Versus CT.

    PubMed

    Feigl, G C; Dreu, M; Kastner, M; Rosmarin, W; Ulz, H; Kniesel, B; Likar, R

    2017-01-01

    For radiofrequency neurotomy of the medial branch of the lumbar dorsal rami, physicians use techniques guided either by fluoroscopy or computerized tomography (CT), and advocate for their respective techniques. Crucial to the choice of technique is how well each can capture the target nerve. The present study was, therefore, undertaken to assess in cadavers the accuracy of fluoroscopic-guided and CT-guided techniques. In10 cadavers preserved with Thiel's method, electrodes with 10mm active tips were placed in supine position on the right using a fluoroscopic-guided technique, and on the left using a CT-guided technique. Using a special dissection approach, the relationship between the target nerve and the tip of the electrode was revealed. The displacement between electrode and the nerve, and the extent to which the electrode was parallel to the nerve, were measured with callipers. Under fluoroscopy guidance, electrodes were placed accurately beside the nerve, and were parallel to it for 9 ±1.9 mm. In only two cases did the electrode pass too deeply. Under CT guidance, electrodes often failed to reach the nerve, but when they did they were parallel to it for only 3.2 ± 3.2 mm. In seven cases, the electrode passed too deeply beyond the target nerve. The fluoroscopy-guided technique can be relied upon to achieve optimal placement of electrodes on the lumbar medial branches. The CT-guided technique fails to do so, and should not be used in practice until a modified version has been developed and validated.

  6. TopMaker: A Technique for Automatic Multi-Block Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D. (Technical Monitor); Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block topology generation technique has been developed. Very general configurations are addressable by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, the multiblock topology is generated with no user intervention required. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in the area of computational fluid dynamics where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid generation process.

  7. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury after brachial plexus block: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi Jin; Byun, Ha Young; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Seung Won; Oh, Min-Kyun; Shin, Heesuk

    2013-12-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous (MABC) nerve injury associated with iatrogenic causes has been rarely reported. Local anesthesia may be implicated in the etiology of such injury, but has not been reported. Two patients with numbness and painful paresthesia over the medial aspect of the unilateral forearm were referred for electrodiagnostic study, which revealed MABC nerve lesion in each case. The highly selective nature of the MABC nerve injuries strongly suggested that they were the result of direct nerve injury by an injection needle during previous brachial plexus block procedures. Electrodiagnostic studies can be helpful in evaluating cases of sensory disturbance after local anesthesia. To our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of isolated MABC nerve injury following ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  8. Rare Manifestation of Digoxin Toxicity: Right Bundle Branch Block

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Dalvir; Zaidi, Samana

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female, with medical history significant for systolic congestive heart failure, who presented to the emergency department with lethargy and abdominal pain with diarrhea for the past 3 weeks. Due to hypotension, the patient received multiple boluses of isotonic saline and was started on norepinephrine. Laboratories were significant for severe digoxin toxicity (29 ng/mL), in setting of acute kidney injury. Electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed a new right bundle branch block (RBBB). She was given Digibind and her repeat digoxin level was 20 ng/mL. Repeat EKG showed resolved RBBB. This case identifies that patients with digoxin toxicity are at risk for RBBB. This is a rare finding and is not commonly recognized. Emergency medicine physicians are often the first to encounter patients with digoxin toxicity and need to be aware of such EKG findings. PMID:28104974

  9. Medial approach of ultrasound-guided costoclavicular plexus block and its effects on regional perfussion.

    PubMed

    Nieuwveld, D; Mojica, V; Herrera, A E; Pomés, J; Prats, A; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block in the costoclavicular space located between the clavicle and the first rib, reaches the secondary trunks when they are clustered together and lateral to the axillary artery. This block is most often performed through a lateral approach, the difficulty being finding the coracoid process an obstacle and guiding the needle towards the vessels and pleura. A medial approach, meaning from inside to outside, will avoid these structures. Traditionally the assessment of a successful block is through motor or sensitive responses but a sympathetic fibre block can also be evaluated measuring the changes in humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and/or perfusion index. To describe the medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block evaluating its development by motor and sensitive response and measurement of sympathetic changes. Description of the technique and administration of 20ml of contrast in a fresh cadaver model, evaluating the distribution with CT-scan and sagittal sections of the anatomic piece. Subsequently in a clinical phase, including 11 patients, we evaluated the establishment of motor, sensitive and sympathetic blocks. We evaluated the sympathetic changes reflected by humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and distal perfusion index. In the anatomical model the block was conducted without difficulties, showing an adequate periclavicular distribution of the contrast in the CT-scan and in sagittal sections, reaching the interscalenic space as far as the secondary trunks. Successful blocks were observed in 91% of patients after 25minutes. All the parameters reflecting sympathetic block increased significantly. The humeral artery blood flow showed an increase from 108 ± 86 to 188±141ml/min (P=.05), skin temperature from 32.1±2 to 32.8±9°C (P=.03) and perfusion index from 4±3 to 9±5 (P=.003). The medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block is anatomically feasible, with high

  10. The Effect of Radiofrequency Neurotomy of Lower Cervical Medial Branches on Cervicogenic Headache

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Sook; Nam, Taek Kyun; Cho, Tack-Geun

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cervicogenic headache (CGH) is known to be mainly related with upper cervical problems. In this study, the effect of radiofrequency neurotomy (RFN) for lower cervical (C4-7) medial branches on CGH was evaluated. Methods Eleven patients with neck pain and headache, who were treated with lower cervical RFN due to supposed lower cervical zygapophysial joint pain without symptomatic intervertebral disc problem or stenosis, were enrolled in this study. CGH was diagnosed according to the diagnostic criteria of the cervicogenic headache international study group. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score and degree of VAS improvement (VASi) (%) were checked for evaluation of the effect of lower cervical RFN on CGH. Results The VAS score at 6 months after RFN was 2.7±1.3, which were significantly decreased comparing to the VAS score before RFN, 8.1±1.1 (p<0.001). The VASi at 6 months after RFN was 63.8±17.1%. There was no serious complication. Conclusion Our data suggest that lower cervical disorders can play a role in the genesis of headache in addition to the upper cervical disorders or independently. PMID:22323937

  11. The left bundle branch block revised with novel imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, J.; Mannaerts, H.F.J.; Germans, T.; Hauer, H.A.; Knaapen, P.; Visser, C.A.; Kamp, O.

    2006-01-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is related to abnormal cardiac conduction and mechanical asynchrony and is associated with hypertension and coronary artery disease. Improved evaluation of left ventricular (LV) mechanical asynchrony is needed, because of the increasing number of patients with LBBB and heart failure. In this paper, we describe tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), strain (rate) imaging and tissue tracking in LBBB patients. A variety of patterns of mechanical activation can be observed in LBBB patients. A recent development, referred to as tissue synchronisation imaging, colour codes TDI time-to-peak systolic velocities of segments and displays mechanical asynchrony. Furthermore, real-time 3D echocardiography provides new regional information about mechanical asynchrony. Contained in an LV model and projected on a bull's eye plot, this modality helps to display the spatial distribution of mechanical asynchrony. Finally, segmental time-to-peak circumferential strain curves, produced by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, provide additional quantification of LV mechanical asynchrony. Effects of LBBB on regional and global cardiac function are impressive, myocardial involvement seems to play a role and with the help of these novel imaging modalities, new insights continue to develop. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696572

  12. A Clinical and Follow-up Study of Right and Left Bundle Branch Block

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-03

    I’SAFSAM) The pur- pose of the study was to group subjects with bundle branch block into various fascicular combinations and to compare and...and left bundle branch block with no clinically apparent cardiovascular disease have revealed a mild diffuse abnormality of the ventricular

  13. Electrical remodelling in patients with iatrogenic left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Engels, Elien B; Poels, Thomas T; Houthuizen, Patrick; de Jaegere, Peter P T; Maessen, Jos G; Vernooy, Kevin; Prinzen, Frits W

    2016-12-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is induced in approximately one-third of all transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures. We investigated electrophysiological remodelling in patients with TAVI-induced LBBB. This retrospective study comprises 107 patients with initially narrow QRS complex of whom 40 did not and 67 did develop persistent LBBB after TAVI. 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) taken before TAVI, within 24 hours ('acute'), and 1-12 months after TAVI ('chronic') were used to reconstruct vectorcardiograms. From these vectorcardiograms, QRS and T-wave area were calculated as comprehensive indices of depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, respectively. TAVI-induced LBBB resulted in significant acute depolarization and repolarization changes while further repolarization changes were observed with longer lasting LBBB. The amount of long-term repolarization changes (remodelling) was highly variable between patients. The change in T-wave area between acute and chronic LBBB ranged from +57% to - 77%. After dividing the LBBB cohort into tertiles based on the change in T-wave area, only baseline QRS area was larger in the tertile with no significant change in T-wave area. During longer lasting LBBB, the spatial vector gradient (SVG) changed orientation towards the direction of the QRS-vector, indicating that later-activated regions developed shorter action potential duration. This study in patients with TAVI-induced LBBB shows that repolarization changes develop within months after onset of LBBB, and that these changes are highly variable between individual patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Ventricular fibrillation associated with complete right bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Takatsuki, Seiji; Kimura, Takehiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Fukumoto, Kotaro; Tanimoto, Yoko; Tanimoto, Kojiro; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Chinushi, Masaomi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Ogawa, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Antzelevitch, Charles; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A substantial number of patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) present with no specific electrocardiographic (ECG) findings. OBJECTIVE To evaluate complete right bundle branch block (RBBB) in patients with IVF. METHODS Patients with IVF showing complete RBBB were included in the present study. Structural and primary electrical diseases were excluded, and provocation tests were performed to exclude the presence of spastic angina or Brugada syndrome (BrS). The prevalence of complete RBBB and the clinical and ECG parameters were compared either in patients with IVF who did not show RBBB or in the general population and age and sex comparable controls with RBBB. RESULTS Of 96 patients with IVF, 9 patients were excluded for the presence of BrS. Of 87 patients studied, 10 (11.5%) patients showed complete RBBB. None had structural heart diseases, BrS, or coronary spasms. The mean age was 44 ± 15 years, and 8 of 10 patients were men. Among the ECG parameters, only the QRS duration was different from that of the other patients with IVF who did not show complete RBBB. Ventricular fibrillation recurred in 3:2 in the form of storms, which were well suppressed by isoproterenol. Complete RBBB was found less often in control subjects (1.37%; P < .0001), and the QRS duration was more prolonged in patients with IVF: 139 ± 10 ms vs 150 ± 14 ms (P = .0061). CONCLUSIONS Complete RBBB exists more often in patients with IVF than in controls. A prolonged QRS complex suggests a conduction abnormality. Our findings warrant further investigation of the role of RBBB in the development of arrhythmias in patients with IVF. PMID:23499623

  15. Segmentation of the Aortic Valve Apparatus in 3D Echocardiographic Images: Deformable Modeling of a Branching Medial Structure.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Tian, Sijie; Takabe, Manabu; Wang, Hongzhi; Yuan, Jiefu; Cheung, Albert T; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    3D echocardiographic (3DE) imaging is a useful tool for assessing the complex geometry of the aortic valve apparatus. Segmentation of this structure in 3DE images is a challenging task that benefits from shape-guided deformable modeling methods, which enable inter-subject statistical shape comparison. Prior work demonstrates the efficacy of using continuous medial representation (cm-rep) as a shape descriptor for valve leaflets. However, its application to the entire aortic valve apparatus is limited since the structure has a branching medial geometry that cannot be explicitly parameterized in the original cm-rep framework. In this work, we show that the aortic valve apparatus can be accurately segmented using a new branching medial modeling paradigm. The segmentation method achieves a mean boundary displacement of 0.6 ± 0.1 mm (approximately one voxel) relative to manual segmentation on 11 3DE images of normal open aortic valves. This study demonstrates a promising approach for quantitative 3DE analysis of aortic valve morphology.

  16. Segmentation of the Aortic Valve Apparatus in 3D Echocardiographic Images: Deformable Modeling of a Branching Medial Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pouch, Alison M.; Tian, Sijie; Takabe, Manabu; Wang, Hongzhi; Yuan, Jiefu; Cheung, Albert T.; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Yushkevich, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    3D echocardiographic (3DE) imaging is a useful tool for assessing the complex geometry of the aortic valve apparatus. Segmentation of this structure in 3DE images is a challenging task that benefits from shape-guided deformable modeling methods, which enable inter-subject statistical shape comparison. Prior work demonstrates the efficacy of using continuous medial representation (cm-rep) as a shape descriptor for valve leaflets. However, its application to the entire aortic valve apparatus is limited since the structure has a branching medial geometry that cannot be explicitly parameterized in the original cm-rep framework. In this work, we show that the aortic valve apparatus can be accurately segmented using a new branching medial modeling paradigm. The segmentation method achieves a mean boundary displacement of 0.6 ± 0.1 mm (approximately one voxel) relative to manual segmentation on 11 3DE images of normal open aortic valves. This study demonstrates a promising approach for quantitative 3DE analysis of aortic valve morphology. PMID:26247062

  17. A histone octamer blocks branch migration of a Holliday junction.

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriev, M; Hsieh, P

    1997-01-01

    The Holliday junction is a key intermediate in genetic recombination. Here, we examine the effect of a nucleosome core on movement of the Holliday junction in vitro by spontaneous branch migration. Histone octamers consisting of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 are reconstituted onto DNA duplexes containing an artificial nucleosome-positioning sequence consisting of a tandem array of an alternating AT-GC sequence motif. Characterization of the reconstituted branch migration substrates by micrococcal nuclease mapping and exonuclease III and hydroxyl radical footprinting reveal that 70% of the reconstituted octamers are positioned near the center of the substrate and the remaining 30% are located at the distal end, although in both cases some translational degeneracy is observed. Branch migration assays with the octamer-containing substrates reveal that the Holliday junction cannot migrate spontaneously through DNA organized into a nucleosomal core unless DNA-histone interactions are completely disrupted. Similar results are obtained with branch migration substrates containing an octamer positioned on a naturally occurring sequence derived from the yeast GLN3 locus. Digestion of Holliday junctions with T7 endonuclease I establishes that the junction is not trapped by the octamer but can branch migrate in regions free of histone octamers. Our findings suggest that migration of Holliday junctions during recombination and the recombinational repair of DNA damage requires proteins not only to accelerate the intrinsic rate of branch migration but also to facilitate the passage of the Holliday junction through a nucleosome. PMID:9372946

  18. Perfusion-Related Complications are Similar for DIEP and MS FTRAM Flaps Harvested on Medial or Lateral Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Branch Perforators for Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Patrick B.; Salavati, Seroos; Feng, Lei; Butler, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Anatomic studies suggest the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) medial branch perfuses more tissue across the midline than the lateral branch. We hypothesized that unilateral DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps based on medial branch perforators would have fewer perfusion-related complications. Methods We evaluated 2043 consecutive free flap breast reconstructions and included unilateral reconstructions where DIEP or MS FTRAM flaps were definitively harvested from a single DIEA branch. We grouped flaps by tissue volume, i.e., Hemiflaps, Cross-Midline Flaps, and Total Flaps. Primary outcome measures were fat necrosis and partial flap necrosis. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between patient and reconstruction characteristics and perfusion outcomes. Results We included 228 patients: 120 (52.6%) medial and 108 (47.4%) lateral branch flaps. Mean follow-up was 33.2 months. Cross-Midline Flaps (79.8%) were most common, followed by Hemiflaps (15.4%) and Total Flaps (4.8%). Overall fat necrosis and partial flap necrosis rates were 10.5% and 3.1%, respectively. Medial and lateral branch flaps had similar rates of fat necrosis (8.3% vs. 13.0%, respectively; p=0.26) and partial flap necrosis (3.3% vs. 2.8%, respectively; p=1.0). DIEP and MS FTRAM flaps had no difference in the incidence of fat necrosis (10.2% vs. 11.3%; p=0.81) or partial necrosis (3.2% vs. 2.8%; p=1.0). Medial and lateral branch flap perfusion-related complications were also similar among the flap volume classifications. Conclusions We suggest that surgeons base their decisions regarding DIEA branch harvest on the clinical assessment of perforator perfusion quality rather than relying on the theoretic benefit of medial branch perforator harvest. PMID:22094755

  19. Aneurysm of the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery at the medial branch: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, H; Kobayashi, N; Yoshiharu, S; Kazuo, H; Dohi, K; Sasaki, K; Matsumoto, K

    1999-08-01

    Distal aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are rare. Most have been located at the cerebellopontine angle. Only three cases, including ours, located in the medial branch of the AICA have been reported in the literature. A 55-year-old female presented with epilepsy that she experienced for the first time. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed no abnormality. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) disclosed a rare aneurysm at the medial branch of the distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery. In the blood workup on her admission, a mild inflammatory sign was found, and bacterial aneurysm was suggested as the presumptive differential diagnosis. Repeated DSA was performed 3 months after admission, but the aneurysm did not disappear. She then underwent a suboccipital craniotomy in the prone position. The aneurysm was clipped and partially resected for the pathological examination. Histologic examination revealed a true aneurysm. She was discharged without neurological deficit. In this report, we summarize the previous cases and discuss the location and clinical manifestations of aneurysms of the AICA through a review of the literature.

  20. A case report of different degrees of the left anterior, septal and posterior fascicular branch block.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaqun; Hong, Yupeng; Jin, Tao

    2015-03-01

    We present a rare case of various conduction defects involving the left anterior, septal, and posterior branch in one patient. The different degrees of block of anterior, septal, and posterior fascicular of the left bundle branch indicate pathological changes in left ventricle. However, the values of this electrocardiographic presentation indicating the left ventricular function still need more investigations.

  1. Risk of advanced heart block during extradural anaesthesia in patients with right bundle branch block and left anterior hemiblock.

    PubMed

    Coriat, P; Harari, A; Ducardonet, A; Tarot, J P; Viars, P

    1981-05-01

    Electrocardiographic recording by Holter monitoring demonstrated the absence of any modification, however minimal, of the intranodal conduction during surgical procedures under extradural anaesthesia in 20 patients with right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior hemiblock (LAHB) but without symptoms. These data suggest that extradural anaesthesia can be used safely in patients with asymptomatic chronic RBBB and LAHB without prophylactic insertion of pacemakers. However, patients having experienced either syncope or transient Mobitz II second degree AV block are likely to have a trifascicular block and increased risk of advanced heart block during extradural anaesthesia.

  2. Electrocardiographic criteria of left ventricular hypertrophy in left bundle-branch block.

    PubMed Central

    Cokkinos, D V; Demopoulos, J N; Heimonas, E T; Mallios, C; Papazoglou, N; Vorides, E M

    1978-01-01

    In order to determine whether the electrocardiographic criteria of left ventricular hypertrophy apply in the presence of left bundle-branch block we studied 79 cases of intermittent left bundle-branch block and compared the QRS voltage and axis before and after its onset. Cases of incomplete left bundle-branch block were excluded. There was a statistically significant correlation between pre- and post-left bundle-branch block values of R or S wave voltage in leads I, V1, V2, V5, and V6, the Sokolow index (R V5 or V6 + S V1), and the QRS axis. There was a statistically significant reduction in R wave voltage in leads I, V5, and V6, an increase in S wave voltage in V1 and V2, and leftward shift of QRS axis, but the Sokolow index remained unchanged, after the onset of left bundle-branch block. The Sokolow criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy apply satisfactorily even in the presence of left bundle-branch block, though specificity is low, but QRS axis is unhelpful. Images PMID:147697

  3. Localized disruption of Narp in medial prefrontal cortex blocks reinforcer devaluation performance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alexander W.; Han, Sungho; Blouin, Ashley M.; Saini, Jasjit; Worley, Paul F.; During, Matthew J.; Holland, Peter C.; Baraban, Jay M.; Reti, Irving M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulated pentraxin (Narp) is a secreted protein that regulates α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPAR) aggregation and synaptogenesis. Mapping of Narp-positive neurons in brain has revealed it is prominently expressed in several limbic system projection pathways. Consistent with this localization pattern, Narp knockout mice show deficits in using the current value of a reinforcer to guide behavior, a critical function of the limbic system. To help assess whether this behavioral deficit is due to impairment of synaptogenesis during development or in modulating synaptic signaling in the mature brain, we have used a dominant negative Narp viral construct which blocks trafficking of endogenous Narp to axons. Focal injection of this viral construct into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adult mice, a region containing Narp-positive projection neurons, blocked reinforcer devaluation. Thus, these results indicate that Narp released from mPFC neurons plays a key role in mediating synaptic changes underlying instrumental reinforcer devaluation. PMID:21127001

  4. Localized disruption of Narp in medial prefrontal cortex blocks reinforcer devaluation performance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander W; Han, Sungho; Blouin, Ashley M; Saini, Jasjit; Worley, Paul F; During, Matthew J; Holland, Peter C; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2010-12-01

    Neuronal activity regulated pentraxin (Narp) is a secreted protein that regulates α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPAR) aggregation and synaptogenesis. Mapping of Narp-positive neurons in brain has revealed it is prominently expressed in several limbic system projection pathways. Consistent with this localization pattern, Narp knockout mice show deficits in using the current value of a reinforcer to guide behavior, a critical function of the limbic system. To help assess whether this behavioral deficit is due to impairment of synaptogenesis during development or in modulating synaptic signaling in the mature brain, we have used a dominant negative Narp viral construct which blocks trafficking of endogenous Narp to axons. Focal injection of this viral construct into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adult mice, a region containing Narp-positive projection neurons, blocked reinforcer devaluation. Thus, these results indicate that Narp released from mPFC neurons plays a key role in mediating synaptic changes underlying instrumental reinforcer devaluation.

  5. Pulsed Dose Radiofrequency Before Ablation of Medial Branch of the Lumbar Dorsal Ramus for Zygapophyseal Joint Pain Reduces Post-procedural Pain.

    PubMed

    Arsanious, David; Gage, Emmanuel; Koning, Jonathon; Sarhan, Mazin; Chaiban, Gassan; Almualim, Mohammed; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential side effects with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) includes painful cutaneous dysesthesias and increased pain due to neuritis or neurogenic inflammation. This pain may require the prescription of opioids or non-opioid analgesics to control post-procedural pain and discomfort. The goal of this study is to compare post-procedural pain scores and post-procedural oral analgesic use in patients receiving continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation versus patients receiving pulsed dose radiofrequency immediately followed by continuous thermal radiofrequency ablation for zygopophaseal joint disease. This is a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Patients who met all the inclusion criteria and were not subject to any of the exclusion criteria were required to have two positive diagnostic medial branch blocks prior to undergoing randomization, intervention, and analysis. University hospital. Eligible patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either receive thermal radiofrequency ablation alone (standard group) or pulsed dose radiofrequency (PDRF) immediately followed by thermal radiofrequency ablation (investigational group), all of which were performed by a single Board Certified Pain Medicine physician. Post-procedural pain levels between the two groups were assessed using the numerical pain Scale (NPS), and patients were contacted by phone on post-procedural days 1 and 2 in the morning and afternoon regarding the amount of oral analgesic medications used in the first 48 hours following the procedure. Patients who received pulsed dose radiofrequency followed by continuous radiofrequency neurotomy reported statistically significantly lower post-procedural pain scores in the first 24 hours compared to patients who received thermal radiofrequency neurotomy alone. These patients also used less oral analgesic medication in the post-procedural period. These interventions were carried out by one board accredited pain physician at one

  6. Excess mortality and morbidity associated with right bundle branch and left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Pine, M B; Oren, M; Ciafone, R; Rosner, B; Hirota, Y; Rabinowitz, B; Abelmann, W H

    1983-05-01

    Excess mortality and morbidity associated with right bundle branch and left anterior fascicular block were evaluated in 108 patients with block (age 74 +/- 10 years, 69% male) and 108 age- and sex-matched control patients with normal conduction. Clinical characteristics were similar initially except for more congestive heart failure in patients with block. Life table analysis revealed a higher 12 year mortality with block, even after omitting patients with moderate or severe congestive heart failure (risk ratio 1.47, p less than 0.05). Compared with control subjects, the group of patients with block had more sudden death and deaths of unknown cause, but a similar number of noncardiac and diagnosed cardiac deaths. More patients with block developed new second and third degree atrioventricular block or new overt coronary artery disease, but this finding did not support prophylactic pacing in asymptomatic patients. The importance of internal controls in assessing the natural history of clinical and electrocardiographic abnormalities is emphasized.

  7. Usefulness of the ajmaline test in patients with latent bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Chiale, P A; Przybylski, J; Laiño, R A; Halpern, M S; Nau, G J; Sánchez, R A; Lázzari, J O; Elizari, M V; Rosenbaum, M B

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients were studied with intermittent bundle branch block whose conduction disturbance disappeared completely and could no longer be recorded even after provoked changes in heart rate. Premature atrial stimulation and atrial pacing at rapid rates were performed in nine patients; in none of these nine were these procedures able to evoke the complete bundle branch block pattern that all patients exhibited before the spontaneous normalization of conduction. In marked contrast, the administration of ajmaline (1 mg/kg body weight, intravenously in 90 seconds) caused the bundle branch block pattern to reappear in 10 (83.3 percent) of the 12 patients 30 to 120 seconds after the end of the injection, and in 11 patients (91.6 percent) when additional atrial stimulation was performed in 1 of the 2 "failures." This pharmacologic test was much more rapid and simple than electrophysiologic testing and it was noninvasive. Results of this study suggest that some form of subclinical fascicular injury was present (or had persisted) at a time when intraventricular conduction was persistently normal even though no significant physiologic alteration could be demonstrated by the atrial stimulation techniques. The ajmaline test may become a valuable tool for uncovering cases of latent bundle branch block and furthering our knowledge of the early natural history of intraventricular block.

  8. Effect of adductor canal block on medial compartment knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Lee, Michael Y.; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disease in middle-aged and elderly people. Pain is the chief complaint of symptomatic KOA and a leading cause of chronic disability, which is most often found in medial knees. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of pain relief and functional improvement in KOA patients treated with ultrasound-guided adductor canal block (ACB). This is a 3-month retrospective case-controlled comparative study. Two hundred patients with anteromedial knee pain owing to KOA that was unresponsive to 3-month long conservative treatments. Ninety-two patients received ACB with 9 mL of 1% of lidocaine and 1 mL of 10 mg triamcinolone acetonide (ACB group), and 108 continued conservative treatments (control group). The main outcome measure was visual analog scale (VAS) of the average knee pain level for the past one week. Secondary outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the timed up and go test, numbers of analgesic ingestion per day, and opioid consumption per day. During the 3-month follow-up, 86 patients in ACB group and 92 in control group were analyzed. There was no significant difference, with the exception of the duration of symptoms, between the 2 groups in age, sex, body mass index, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests showed improvement of VAS (at month 1), WOMAC (at month 1), and opioid consumption per day (at month 1 and 2) in ACB group. No adverse events were reported. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the efficacy of ACB for patients with KOA. ACB is an effective and safe treatment and can be an option for patients who are either unresponsive or unable to take analgesics. PMID:28328826

  9. Medial Amygdala Lesions Selectively Block Aversive Pavlovian–Instrumental Transfer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Margaret G.; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioned stimuli (CSs) play an important role in the reinforcement and motivation of instrumental active avoidance (AA). Conditioned threats can also invigorate ongoing AA responding [aversive Pavlovian–instrumental transfer (PIT)]. The neural circuits mediating AA are poorly understood, although lesion studies suggest that lateral, basal, and central amygdala nuclei, as well as infralimbic prefrontal cortex, make key, and sometimes opposing, contributions. We recently completed an extensive analysis of brain c-Fos expression in good vs. poor avoiders following an AA test (Martinez et al., 2013, Learning and Memory). This analysis identified medial amygdala (MeA) as a potentially important region for Pavlovian motivation of instrumental actions. MeA is known to mediate defensive responding to innate threats as well as social behaviors, but its role in mediating aversive Pavlovian–instrumental interactions is unknown. We evaluated the effect of MeA lesions on Pavlovian conditioning, Sidman two-way AA conditioning (shuttling) and aversive PIT in rats. Mild footshocks served as the unconditioned stimulus in all conditioning phases. MeA lesions had no effect on AA but blocked the expression of aversive PIT and 22 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in the AA context. Interestingly, MeA lesions failed to affect Pavlovian freezing to discrete threats but reduced freezing to contextual threats when assessed outside of the AA chamber. These findings differentiate MeA from lateral and central amygdala, as lesions of these nuclei disrupt Pavlovian freezing and aversive PIT, but have opposite effects on AA performance. Taken together, these results suggest that MeA plays a selective role in the motivation of instrumental avoidance by general or uncertain Pavlovian threats. PMID:25278858

  10. The mischievous bundle: a case of varying degrees of right bundle branch block on alternate beats during exercise stress testing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhvinder

    2013-05-01

    A 78-year-old male was referred for exercise stress testing. He developed incomplete right bundle branch block during first stage of exercise and later on developed incomplete and complete right bundle branch block on alternate beats (2:1). During first minute of recovery he developed complete right bundle branch block on all beats (1:1). At 3 minutes of recovery, baseline electrocardiographic pattern was resumed. Variable degree of right bundle branch block on alternate beats is a rare phenomenon. The plausible mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are being discussed. ©2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Significance of complete right bundle-branch block when an isolated finding. An echocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Dancy, M; Leech, G; Leatham, A

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with complete right bundle-branch block as the only abnormal finding were studied using high speed M-mode echocardiography to determine the effect of the electrical delay on the mechanical events of right ventricular systole. Pulmonary valve opening (PVOm) was delayed in all cases. In some the delay was mainly between mitral valve closure (MVC) and tricuspid valve closure (TVC), and this was designated proximal block. In the others the main delay was between tricuspid valve closure and pulmonary valve opening and this was designated distal block. The patients were divided into those with proximal and those with distal block by calculating the ratio TVC-PVOm/MVC-TVC. Twelve out of 13 of those with distal delay but only one out of 14 of those with proximal delay had episodes of syncope or near syncope. These results are consistent with previous theories about the pathophysiology of right bundle-branch block. Echocardiography may offer a non-invasive method to estimate the prognosis in isolated right bundle-branch block. PMID:7104112

  12. Intravenous lipid emulsion in wide complex arrhythmia with alternating bundle branch block pattern from cocaine overdose.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Ria; Almasri, Hamzeh; Moza, Ankush; Ghose, Abhimanyu; Assaly, Ragheb

    2013-01-01

    We describe the management of a young patient who had experienced a cocaine overdose. The patient presented with altered mental status and seizures and subsequently developed a wide complex arrhythmia with a rare alternating bundle branch block pattern. Intravenous lipid emulsion was administered following initial resuscitation and endotracheal intubation, because conservative methods of treating the persistent cardiac arrhythmias failed.

  13. Left bundle branch block (LBBB) masks changes due to hyperkalemia: a myth.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Shah, Neel; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Left bundle branch block masks ischemic changes but not those due to electrolyte imbalance. Peaking of T waves, prolongation of PR interval, diminution/absence of P wave, and widening of QRS complex can still be appreciated if one carefully compares the baseline ECG to the presenting ECG. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. [Can signal-averaged electrocardiograms be interpreted in cases of complete bundle branch block?].

    PubMed

    Brembilla-Perrot, B; Beurrier, D; Terrier de La Chaise, A; Djaballah, K; Jacquemin, L; Danchin, N

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of signal-averaged (SA) ECG in cases of complete right (RBBB) or left bundle branch block (LBBB). One hundred and seven patients had RBBB; 42 without cardiac disease (0), 56 with chronic myocardial infarction (MI) and 9 with primary cardiomyopathy (CMP). Seventy-four patients had LBBB: 20 without cardiac disease, 26 with chronic myocardial infarction and 28 with primary cardiomyopathy. A SA ECG (Cardionics, Fidelity) was performed with a 40 Hz band pass and compared with the recordings of 72 healthy controls without bundle branch block. The duration of the averaged QRS (QRS dur), the voltage of the last 40 milliseconds (RMS40) and duration of terminal activity < 40 microV (LAS) were measured. The analysis of results showed that QRS dur was significantly longer in subjects with ventricular tachycardia (VT) (p < 0.05) and in those with advanced cardiac disease (p < 0.05), whatever the type of bundle branch block, and that only the RMS40 distinguished patients with VT from those without VT, irrespective of the underlying cardiac disease and the type of bundle branch block. However, the study of the diagnostic value of each parameter showed very mediocre results: RMS 40 < 20 microV in myocardial infarction and < 17 microV in cardiomyopathy had sensitivities and specificities in RBBB of 73% and 50% respectively, incalculable in CMP, in LBBB 70% and 33%, 77% and 60% respectively; the LAS was unusable. The authors conclude that it is hazardous to interprete SA ECG in bundle branch block, especially in advanced cardiac disease where the specificity of the criteria becomes very low (< 50%).

  15. Comparative effects of ajmaline on intermittent bundle branch block and the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chiale, P A; Przybylski, J; Halpern, M S; Lazzari, J O; Elizari, M V; Rosenbaum, M B

    1977-05-04

    Phase 4 or phase 3 block or both occurred in the His bundle branch system of 11 patients with intermittent bundle branch block and in the anomalous bundle of 6 of 46 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (13%). Administration of a single dose of ajmaline (50 mg intravenously) in these patients caused a similar response: expansion of the range of phase 3 and phase 4 block at the expense of the intermediate normal conduction range and total interruption of conduction in the affected fascicle when the effect of the drug was maximal. The great similarity in physiologic behavior and pharmacologic response in these groups of patients suggests that the anomalous bundle was probably diseased or abnormal in the six patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White conduction. In addition, ajmaline caused the first appearance of phase 4 or phase 3 block, or both, but not total interruption of conduction in 26 of the 46 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White conduction (56.5%). Ajmaline does not cause fascicular block in normal subjects; thus this finding suggests either that the anomalous bundle is diseased or that the safety margin for conduction in the anomalous bundle is much narrower than in the bundle branch system. The conduction-depressing action of ajmaline may be greater at relatively rapid or relatively slow rates of stimulation, and smaller or absent at intermediate rates.

  16. [Intervention among patients with right bundle branch block and left anterior hemiblock. Operatory risk (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Coriat, P; Harari, A; Tarot, J P; Ducardonnet, A; Viars, P

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the risk of advanced heart block during anesthesia in patients with right bundle branch block and left anterior hemiblock, 35 consecutive patients were monitored throughout the pre-, intra- and postoperative period. As conventional ECG monitoring may only detect advanced atrioventricular block, patients were monitored according to the Holter method which can easily detect even minor changes of atrioventricular conduction namely slight increased PR interval or dropped P wave. All patients were asymptomatic, in normal sinus rhythm without second degree AV block. Surgical procedures were performed under general anesthesia (n = 15) and epidural anesthesia using lidocaine (n = 20). No episode of second or third degree atrioventricular block occurred. The only modifications observed were rare and transient increase of PR, occurring during surgical procedures in 5 patients, always associated with a sinus bradycardia. They immediately regressed at the termination of the sinus bradycardia either spontaneously or following atropine injection, strongly suggesting the responsability of increased vagal tone. Thus general or epidural anesthesia did not compromise infranodal conduction in any of the observed patients. These data indicate that anesthesia can be safely used without prophylactic preoperative insertion of pacemakers in patients with asymptomatic chronic right bundle branch block and left anterior hemi-block.

  17. Effects of an Isolated Complete Right Bundle Branch Block on Mechanical Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Xue, Minghua; Li, Zhan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Xinling; Meng, Haiyan; Hou, Yinglong

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an isolated complete right bundle branch block on mechanical ventricular function. Two groups of participants were enrolled in this study: a block group, consisting of 98 patients with isolated complete right bundle branch blocks without structural heart disease, and a control group, consisting of 92 healthy adults. The diameter, end-diastolic area, end-systolic area, and right ventricular (RV) fractional area change were obtained to evaluate morphologic and systolic function by 2-dimensional sonographic technology. Systolic and diastolic velocities and time interval parameters were measured to assess mechanical ventricular performance using pulsed wave tissue Doppler imaging. Although there was no significant difference in the RV fractional area change between the patients with blocks and controls, the diameter, end-diastolic area, and end-systolic area of the RV were significantly larger in the patients with blocks (P < .05). In the patients with blocks, the peak velocities during systole and early diastole and the ratio of the peak velocities during early and late diastole decreased. The block group had a prolonged pre-ejection period, electromechanical delay time, and isovolumic relaxation time, a decreased ejection time, and an increased pre-ejection period/ejection time ratio, and the myocardial performance index (Tei index) at the basal RV lateral wall was significantly increased. There were no significant differences in any echocardiographic parameters at different sites of the left ventricle. In patients with isolated complete right bundle branch blocks, systolic and diastolic functions are impaired in the RV, and follow-up is needed. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B with tachycardia-dependent (phase 3) block in the accessory pathway and in left bundle-branch coexisting with rate-unrelated right bundle-branch block.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, I J; Castellanos, A; Sung, R J

    1980-01-01

    A patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B developed 2:1 atrioventricular block resulting from the association of persistent right bundle-branch block with tachycardia-dependent (phase 3) left bundle-branch block. Electrophysiological studies disclosed the coexistence of a tachycardia-dependent (phase 3) block in the accessory pathway. This conduction disturbance was exposed, not by carotid sinus massage as in previous studies, but by pacing-induced prolongation of the interval between two consecutively conducted atrial impulses. Furthermore, the surface electrocardiogram showed, at different times, ventricular complexes resulting from: (1) exclusive atrioventricular conduction through the normal pathway without bundle-branch block; (2) predominant, or exclusive, atrioventricular conduction through a right-sided accessory pathway; (3) exclusive atrioventricular conduction through the normal pathway with right bundle-branch block; (4) exclusive conduction through the normal pathway, with left bundle-branch block; (5) fusion between (1) and (2); and finally, (6) fusion between (2) and (3) However, QRS complexes resulting from simultaneously occurring Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block could not be identified. Future electrophysiological investigations should re-evaluate the criteria used to diffrentiate between true and false patterns of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B coexisting with left bundle-branch block. PMID:7397051

  19. Combination of diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve block followed by pulsed radiofrequency for plantar fascitis pain: A new modality.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Deepak; Ahuja, Vanita

    2014-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is the most common cause of chronic heel pain which may be bilateral in 20 to 30% of patients. It is a very painful and disabling condition which can affect the quality of life. The management includes both pharmacological and operative procedures with no single proven effective treatment modality. In the present case series, we managed three patients with PF (one with bilateral PF). Following a diagnostic medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) block at its origin, we observed reduction in verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) in all the three patients. Two patients has relapse of PF pain which was managed with MCN block followed with pulsed radio frequency (PRF). All the patients were pain-free at the time of reporting. This case series highlights the possible role of combination of diagnostic MCN block near its origin followed with PRF as a new modality in management of patients with PF.

  20. [Ultrasound-guided cutaneous intercostal branches nerves block: A good analgesic alternative for gallbladder open surgery].

    PubMed

    Fernández Martín, M T; López Álvarez, S; Mozo Herrera, G; Platero Burgos, J J

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases. However, there are still some patients for whom conversion to open surgery is required. This surgery can produce significant post-operative pain. Opioids drugs have traditionally been used to treat this pain, but side effects have led to seeking alternatives (plexus, nerve or fascia blocks or wound). The cases are presented of 4 patients subjected to ultrasound-guided intercostal branches blocks in the mid-axillary line from T6 to T12 with levobupivacaine as an analgesic alternative in open surgery of gallbladder, with satisfactory results.

  1. Is It Complete Left Bundle Branch Block? Just Ablate the Right Bundle.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussam; Lupo, Pierpaolo; Foresti, Sara; De Ambroggi, Guido; Epicoco, Gianluca; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Cappato, Riccardo

    2017-03-01

    Complete left bundle branch block (LBBB) is established according to standard electrocardiographic criteria. However, functional LBBB may be rate-dependent or can perpetuate during tachycardia due to repetitive concealed retrograde penetration of impulses through the contralateral bundle "linking phenomenon." In this brief article, we present two patients with basal complete LBBB in whom ablating the right bundle unmasked the actual antegrade conduction capabilities of the left bundle. These cases highlight intriguing overlap between electrophysiological concepts of complete block, linking, extremely slow, and concealed conduction.

  2. Medial and Lateral Pectoral Nerve Block with Liposomal Bupivacaine for the Management of Postsurgical Pain after Submuscular Breast Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Mark; Carpin, Kimberly; Piña, Edward M.; Casso, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary: This report describes an ultrasound-guided medial and lateral pectoralis nerve block using liposome bupivacaine, performed before the surgical incision, in a patient undergoing submuscular breast augmentation. The anatomic basis and technique are described. This procedure may be offered to patients undergoing submuscular insertion of a breast implant or tissue expander. Advancements in ultrasound guidance allow for more precise anatomic placement of local anesthetic agents. The injection technique used for this procedure resulted in complete relaxation of the pectoralis major, facilitating the surgical dissection and markedly diminishing postsurgical pain and muscle spasms. PMID:25587516

  3. Aortic root abscess presenting as alternating bundle branch block: Infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh; Kader, Muneer; Sajeev, C.G.; Krishnan, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1%–2% of the population. Among various complications, incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in the bicuspid aortic valve population is high with higher rate of periannular extension resulting in conduction disturbances. Here we are reporting a rare case of infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve presented with alternating bundle branch block. PMID:26138186

  4. [Type A Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with left bundle-branch block. Electrocardiographic, vectorcardiographic, and endocavitary electrophysiological study].

    PubMed

    Baudouy, M; Molina, B; Varenne, A; Guiran, J B

    1976-05-01

    The rate association of a "type A" W.P.W. syndrome with a left bundle branch block gives a characteristic electrocardiographic picture:--the left bundle branch block is partially masked, the delay in the basial region of the left ventricle being in part cancelled by pre-excitation--the features of the W.P.W. syndrome are also modified, since the ventricular axis is corrected by the left bundle branch block. The electrocardiographic tracings taken during the various tachycardias and during treatment for arrhythmia, together with the intra-cavitary recordings allow a precise diagnosis to be made. In this case, vectocardiography was particularly useful as it gave a clear demonstration of the median delay of the ventricular loop, the only pathognomic feature of left bundle branch block, during a period when the left bundle of Kent was functioning.

  5. [Intermittent left bundle branch block - reversal to normal conduction during general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Maria Oliveira Correia da; Silva, Emília Alexandra Gaspar Lima da

    Transient changes in intraoperative cardiac conduction are uncommon. Rare cases of the development or remission of complete left bundle branch block under general and locoregional anesthesia associated with myocardial ischemia, hypertension, tachycardia, and drugs have been reported. Complete left bundle branch block is an important clinical manifestation in some chronic hypertensive patients, which may also be a sign of coronary artery disease, aortic valve disease, or underlying cardiomyopathy. Although usually permanent, it can occur intermittently depending on heart rate (when heart rate exceeds a certain critical value). This is a case of complete left bundle branch block recorded in the preoperative period of urgent surgery that reverted to normal intraoperative conduction under general anesthesia after a decrease in heart rate. It resurfaced, intermittently and in a heart-rate-dependent manner, in the early postoperative period, eventually reverting to normal conduction in a sustained manner during semi-intensive unit monitoring. The test to identify markers of cardiac muscle necrosis was negative. Pain due to the emergency surgical condition and in the early postoperative period may have been the cause of the increase in heart rate up to the critical value, causing blockage. Although the development or remission of this blockade under anesthesia is uncommon, the anesthesiologist should be alert to the possibility of its occurrence. It may be benign; however, the correct diagnosis is very important. The electrocardiographic manifestations may mask or be confused with myocardial ischemia, factors that are especially important in a patient under general anesthesia unable to report the characteristic symptoms of ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. The surface electrocardiogram predicts risk of heart block during right heart catheterization in patients with preexisting left bundle branch block: implications for the definition of complete left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Padanilam, Benzy J; Morris, Kent E; Olson, Jeff A; Rippy, Janet S; Walsh, Mary Norine; Subramanian, Natrajan; Vidal, Alex; Prystowsky, Eric N; Steinberg, Leonard A

    2010-07-01

    Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) undergoing right heart catheterization can develop complete heart block (CHB) or right bundle branch block (RBBB) in response to right bundle branch (RBB) trauma. We hypothesized that LBBB patients with an initial r wave (>or=1 mm) in lead V1 have intact left to right ventricular septal (VS) activation suggesting persistent conduction over the left bundle branch. Trauma to the RBB should result in RBBB pattern rather than CHB in such patients. Between January 2002 and February 2007, we prospectively evaluated 27 consecutive patients with LBBB developing either CHB or RBBB during right heart catheterization. The prevalence of an r wave >or=1 mm in lead V1 was determined using 118 serial LBBB electrocardiographs (ECGs) from our hospital database. Catheter trauma to the RBB resulted in CHB in 18 patients and RBBB in 9 patients. All 6 patients with >or=1 mm r wave in V1 developed RBBB. Among these 6 patients q wave in lead I, V5, or V6 were present in 3. Four patients (3 in CHB group and 1 in RBBB group) developed spontaneous CHB during a median follow-up of 61 months. V1 q wave >or=1 mm was present in 28% of hospitalized complete LBBB patients. An initial r wave of >or=1 mm in lead V1 suggests intact left to right VS activation and identifies LBBB patients at low risk of CHB during right heart catheterization. These preliminary findings indicate that an initial r wave of >or=1 mm in lead V1, present in approximately 28% of ECGs with classically defined LBBB, may constitute a new exclusion criterion when defining complete LBBB.

  7. Medial Versus Traditional Approach to US-guided TAP Blocks for Open Inguinal Hernia Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-30

    Abdominal Muscles/Ultrasonography; Adult; Ambulatory Surgical Procedures; Anesthetics, Local/Administration & Dosage; Ropivacaine/Administration & Dosage; Ropivacaine/Analogs & Derivatives; Hernia, Inguinal/Surgery; Humans; Nerve Block/Methods; Pain Measurement/Methods; Pain, Postoperative/Prevention & Control; Ultrasonography, Interventional

  8. Hybrid Bacterial Foraging and Particle Swarm Optimization for detecting Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Kora, Padmavathi; Kalva, Sri Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal cardiac beat identification is a key process in the detection of heart diseases. Our present study describes a procedure for the detection of left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) Electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns. The electrical impulses that control the cardiac beat face difficulty in moving inside the heart. This problem is termed as bundle branch block (BBB). BBB makes it harder for the heart to pump blood effectively through the heart circulatory system. ECG feature extraction is a key process in detecting heart ailments. Our present study comes up with a hybrid method combining two heuristic optimization methods: Bacterial Forging Optimization (BFO) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for the feature selection of ECG signals. One of the major controlling forces of BFO algorithm is the chemotactic movement of a bacterium that models a test solution. The chemotaxis process of the BFO depends on random search directions which may lead to a delay in achieving the global optimum solution. The hybrid technique: Bacterial Forging-Particle Swarm Optimization (BFPSO) incorporates the concepts from BFO and PSO and it creates individuals in a new generation. This BFPSO method performs local search through the chemotactic movement of BFO and the global search over the entire search domain is accomplished by a PSO operator. The BFPSO feature values are given as the input for the Levenberg-Marquardt Neural Network classifier.

  9. A Modified Posterolateral Approach for Radiofrequency Denervation of the Medial Branch of the Cervical Segmental Nerve in Cervical Facet Joint Pain Based on Anatomical Considerations.

    PubMed

    van Eerd, Maarten; Lataster, Arno; Sommer, Micha; Patijn, Jacob; van Kleef, Maarten

    2016-10-13

    The cervical facet joints, also called the zygapophyseal joints, are a potential source of neck pain (cervical facet joint pain). The cervical facet joints are innervated by the cervical medial branches (CMBs) of the cervical segmental nerves. Cervical facet joint pain has been shown to respond to multisegmental radiofrequency denervation of the cervical medial branches. This procedure is performed under fluoroscopic guidance. Currently, three approaches are described and used. Those three techniques of radiofrequency treatment of the CMBs, classified on the base of the needle trajectory toward the anatomical planes, are as follows: the posterolateral technique, the posterior technique, and the lateral technique. We describe the three techniques with their advantages and disadvantages. Anatomical studies providing a topographic anatomy of the course of the CMBs are reviewed. We developed a novel approach based on the observed strengths and weaknesses of the three currently used approaches and based on recent anatomical findings. With this fluoroscopic-guided approach, there is always bone (the facet column) in front of the needle, which makes it safer, and the insertion point is easier to determine without the risk of positioning the radiofrequency needle too dorsally.

  10. Efficacy of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Cervical 2-3 Posterior Medial Branches in Treating Chronic Migraine: A Randomized, Controlled, and Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuecheng; Huang, Xuehua; Fan, Yinghui; Wang, Yingwei; Ma, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) in the treatment of chronic migraine (CM) on cervical 2-3 posterior medial branches. Methods. This randomized, double-blind, and controlled clinical trial included 40 subjects with CM, who were randomly divided into two groups: treatment (treated by PRF) and sham (treated by sham treatment). Pain intensity, headache duration (days), the Migraine Disability Assessment Questionnaire (MIDAS), and aspirin dose taken by patients were evaluated at 1, 2, and 6 months after the intervention. Side effects were observed from the time of treatment and throughout the follow-up period. Results. During the follow-up, pain intensity, headache duration (days), disability score, and the analgesic dose were significantly improved in the treatment group compared to the sham group (P < 0.001) and the baseline (P < 0.001) at all measured time points after intervention. No serious complications were reported. Conclusion. PRF on the cervical 2-3 posterior medial branches could provide satisfactory efficacy in the treatment of CM without obvious adverse effects. PMID:26170880

  11. His bundle recordings in right bundle-branch block coexisting with iatrogenic right ventricular pre-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Agustin; Castillo, Cesar A.

    1972-01-01

    Iatrogenic right ventricular pre-excitation failed to abolish right bundle-branch block in two patients. When `exclusive' His bundle pacing was performed, the QRS complexes, St-V, and St-LVE intervals were similar to the ventricular deflections, H-V, and V-LVE (intervals) recorded during sinus rhythm. `Exclusive' pacing of the ordinary muscle at the right ventricular inflow tract produced a complete left bundle-branch block pattern without abnormal left axis deviation. Pacing of both His bundle and ordinary muscle yielded combination complexes in which the right bundle-branch block pattern persisted. The ventricular activation process was studied in these beats, as well as during the right and left bundle-branch block induced by coupled atrial stimulation. It appeared as if certain areas of the right septal surface behaved, electrophysiologically, as if they belonged to the left ventricle. Impulses emerging from these sites were not propagated to the right ventricular free wall. The latter was activated by the excitation front emerging through the left bundle system. During right bundle-branch block the endocardium of the right ventricular inflow was activated before the peak of the R in V1. Bipolar leads, 1 mm apart (with the possible exception of the ones over the tricuspid valve), were helpful in mapping the spread of activation in the human heart. Images PMID:18610233

  12. Biomechanical effects of calcar screws and bone block augmentation on medial support in locked plating of proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Katthagen, Jan Christoph; Schwarze, Michael; Meyer-Kobbe, Josefin; Voigt, Christine; Hurschler, Christof; Lill, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of medial fracture gap augmentation in locked plating of an unstable 2-part proximal humeral fracture with calcar screws and insertion of a corticocancellous bone block. Furthermore the mechanical behavior of dynamic locking screws in the non-parallel arrangement of a proximal humeral plate was of interest. Thirty-two fresh frozen humeri were randomized in four equal groups. An unstable 2-part fracture was fixed by locked plating in all specimens. The basic screw setup was supplemented by additional calcar screws in one group. Humeral head screws were replaced by dynamic locking screws in a second group. The third group featured an additional corticocancellous femoral head allograft. Assessment of stiffness was followed by cyclic loading and load to failure tests. Resulting stiffness, fracture gap deflection and ultimate load were compared utilizing Bonferroni corrected t-test for independent samples. The mechanical effect of additional calcar screws was non-significant as compared to the basic screw configuration whereas bone block insertion significantly increased construct stiffness and failure load. The use of dynamic locking screws did not significantly reduce construct stiffness when compared to conventional locking screws. Additional calcar screws alone did not improve the initial biomechanical properties of an unstable 2-part proximal humeral fracture model. However bone block augmentation appeared to be a reliable alternative of additional bony support by raising stiffness and failure load. Dynamic locking screws did not show their expected dynamic component when used in a non-parallel arrangement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the calculation QRS angle for bundle branch block detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeirmanto, L.; Mengko, R.; Rajab, T. L.

    2016-04-01

    QRS angle represent condition of blood circulation in the heart. Normally QRS angle is between -30 until 90 degree. Left Axis Defiation (LAD) and Right Axis Defiation (RAD) are abnormality conditions that lead to Bundle Branch Block. QRS angle is calculated using common method from physicians and compared to mathematical method using difference amplitudos and difference areas. We analyzed the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram data from MITBIH physiobank database. All methods using lead I and lead avF produce similar QRS angle and right QRS axis quadrant. QRS angle from mathematical method using difference areas is close to common method from physician. Mathematical method using difference areas can be used as a trigger for detecting heart condition.

  14. Onset of recent exertional dyspnoea in a firefighter with left bundle-branch block

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Roberto; Ratti, Gennaro; Lamberti, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of a left bundle-branch block (LBBB) among firefighters raises questions about stratifying risk of subsequent cardiovascular events as this conduction disorder may mask underlying coronary artery disease. This report describes the case of a firefighter with a history LBBB with exertional dyspnoea of recent onset after work activity. Case report A 39-year-old male firefighter with LBBB developed exertional dyspnoea after a prolonged session of work. ECG and treadmill test only showed a permanent LBBB; echocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy did not add to this. However, multislice CT (MSCT) showed a significant stenosis in the mid-left anterior descending artery (LAD). Coronary angiography confirmed the stenosis with subsequent placement of a coronary stent. Conclusions An occupational physician should take into account that factors such as age and low cardiovascular risk do not always exclude heart disease, especially when there are conduction system abnormalities that can mask possible coronary artery disease. PMID:25352387

  15. Adenosine Stress Induced Left Bundle Branch Block During Technetium-99m Tetrofosmin Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, Mohan Roop; Sasikumar, Arun; Gorla, Arun Kumar Reddy; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of left bundle branch block (LBBB) in electrocardiogram during exercise testing is a relatively rare finding. The incidence of LBBB during exercise testing ranges from 0.5% to 1.1%. The mechanism of exercise-induced LBBB (EI-LBBB) is poorly understood, but ischemia is a proposed etiology. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can be useful in patients with EI-LBBB to rule out coronary artery disease. Adenosine vasodilator stress is the preferred mode of stress in patients with LBBB for performing stress-MPI. Here we present an interesting case of adenosine-induced LBBB during stress-MPI in a 67-year-old female patient with normal coronary angiography. PMID:28217027

  16. Thallium-201 myocardial SPECT in a patient with mirror-image dextrocardia and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Bülent; Kitapci, Mehmet T; Temiz, N Hakan; Unlü, Mustafa; Erselcan, Taner

    2003-09-01

    A 53-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of situs inversus with mirror-image dextrocardia underwent thallium-201 (Tl-201) stress-redistribution myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Electrocardiogram (ECG) obtained on right hemithorax revealed constant complete left bundle branch block. Tl-201 stress-redistribution SPECT images revealed abnormal perfusion with reversible ischemia in the anteroseptal, septal and inferoseptal walls. Coronary angiography performed 1 month after SPECT study was normal. This case illustrates that false positive reversible perfusion defects can be seen in patients with mirror-image dextrocardia associated with constant complete left bundle branch block. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mirror-image dextrocardia and constant complete left bundle branch block with false positive Tl-201 SPECT findings.

  17. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block: electrophysiologic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovec, P.; Kranjec, I.; Fettich, J.J.; Jakopin, J.; Fidler, V.; Turk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Coinciding left bundle-branch block and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B, a very rare electrocardiographic occurrence, was found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrophysiologic study revealed eccentric retrograde atrial activation during ventricular pacing, suggesting right-sided accessory pathway. At programmed atrial pacing, effective refractory period of the accessory pathway was 310 ms; at shorter pacing coupling intervals, normal atrioventricular conduction with left bundle-branch block was seen. Left bundle-branch block was seen also with His bundle pacing. Radionuclide phase imaging demonstrated right ventricular phase advance and left ventricular phase delay; both right and left ventricular phase images revealed broad phase distribution histograms. Combined electrophysiologic and radionuclide investigations are useful to disclose complex conduction abnormalities and their mechanical correlates.

  18. Diagnosis, management, and outcomes of patients with syncope and bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Moya, Angel; García-Civera, Roberto; Croci, Francesco; Menozzi, Carlo; Brugada, Josep; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Del Rosso, Attilio; Bellver-Navarro, Alejandro; Garcia-Sacristán, Jesús; Bortnik, Miriam; Mont, Lluis; Ruiz-Granell, Ricardo; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    Although patients with syncope and bundle branch block (BBB) are at high risk of developing atrio-ventricular block, syncope may be due to other aetiologies. We performed a prospective, observational study of the clinical outcomes of patients with syncope and BBB following a systematic diagnostic approach. Patients with ≥1 syncope in the last 6 months, with QRS duration ≥120 ms, were prospectively studied following a three-phase diagnostic strategy: Phase I, initial evaluation; Phase II, electrophysiological study (EPS); and Phase III, insertion of an implantable loop recorder (ILR). Overall, 323 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction 56 ± 12%) were studied. The aetiological diagnosis was established in 267 (82.7%) patients (102 at initial evaluation, 113 upon EPS, and 52 upon ILR) with the following aetiologies: bradyarrhythmia (202), carotid sinus syndrome (20), ventricular tachycardia (18), neurally mediated (9), orthostatic hypotension (4), drug-induced (3), secondary to cardiopulmonary disease (2), supraventricular tachycardia (1), bradycardia-tachycardia (1), and non-arrhythmic (7). A pacemaker was implanted in 220 (68.1%), an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in 19 (5.8%), and radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed in 3 patients. Twenty patients (6%) had died at an average follow-up of 19.2 ± 8.2 months. In patients with syncope, BBB, and mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 56 ± 12%, a systematic diagnostic approach achieves a high rate of aetiological diagnosis and allows to select specific treatment.

  19. A study of ventricular contraction sequence in complete right bundle branch block by phase analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T; Toyama, H; Iida, K; Masuoka, T; Ajisaka, R; Kuga, K; Satoh, M; Sugahara, S; Jin, W; Ishikawa, N

    1991-03-01

    Twenty-four patients with complete right bundle branch block (CRBBB) combined with and without left axis deviation (LAD) on ECG, were compared with 17 normal subjects to evaluate the right ventricular contraction sequence and pattern in detail. Blood pool scintigrams were obtained in the left anterior oblique projection, and these images were analyzed by first component Fourier harmonics. In the normal subjects, the phase value distribution representing the pattern of ventricular contraction was almost homogeneous in both the right and left ventricles (RV & LV). In the CRBBB patients without LAD, the phase images showed apparent phase delay in the right ventricle. In the CRBBB patients with LAD, the phase images showed many different contraction patterns varying from normal to RV phase delay, owing to the effects of the hemi-block. Quantitative analysis of the absolute values, showed that the mean (RV-LV) value was 6.6 +/- 8.4 msec in the normal subjects. In the CRBBB patients without LAD, the duration of the QRS complex correlated with the mean (RV-LV) value, whereas no difference was observed between the duration of the QRS complex and the standard deviation of the right ventricle. Using phase analysis the degree of the RBBB can be determined from the phase images, and can be quantitatively analyzed as in electrical studies.

  20. Diagnosis, management, and outcomes of patients with syncope and bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Angel; García-Civera, Roberto; Croci, Francesco; Menozzi, Carlo; Brugada, Josep; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Del Rosso, Attilio; Bellver-Navarro, Alejandro; Garcia-Sacristán, Jesús; Bortnik, Miriam; Mont, Lluis; Ruiz-Granell, Ricardo; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Aims Although patients with syncope and bundle branch block (BBB) are at high risk of developing atrio-ventricular block, syncope may be due to other aetiologies. We performed a prospective, observational study of the clinical outcomes of patients with syncope and BBB following a systematic diagnostic approach. Methods and results Patients with ≥1 syncope in the last 6 months, with QRS duration ≥120 ms, were prospectively studied following a three-phase diagnostic strategy: Phase I, initial evaluation; Phase II, electrophysiological study (EPS); and Phase III, insertion of an implantable loop recorder (ILR). Overall, 323 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction 56 ± 12%) were studied. The aetiological diagnosis was established in 267 (82.7%) patients (102 at initial evaluation, 113 upon EPS, and 52 upon ILR) with the following aetiologies: bradyarrhythmia (202), carotid sinus syndrome (20), ventricular tachycardia (18), neurally mediated (9), orthostatic hypotension (4), drug-induced (3), secondary to cardiopulmonary disease (2), supraventricular tachycardia (1), bradycardia–tachycardia (1), and non-arrhythmic (7). A pacemaker was implanted in 220 (68.1%), an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in 19 (5.8%), and radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed in 3 patients. Twenty patients (6%) had died at an average follow-up of 19.2 ± 8.2 months. Conclusion In patients with syncope, BBB, and mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 56 ± 12%, a systematic diagnostic approach achieves a high rate of aetiological diagnosis and allows to select specific treatment. PMID:21444367

  1. Bundle brunch reentrant ventricular tachycardia with two distinct conduction patterns in a patient with complete right bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Enjoji, Yoshihisa; Mizobuchi, Masahiro; Shibata, Kensaku; Ono, Tsuyoshi; Funatsu, Atsushi; Kanbayashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Nakamura, Shigeru

    2006-12-01

    We report a rare case of bundle branch reentrant ventricular tachycardia [BBRVT]. A 67-year-old female was admitted for management of wide QRS tachycardia (right bundle branch block [RBBB] and a southwest axis). The mapping procedure revealed the tachycardia circuit consisted of the left anterior fascicle (LAF) as an antegrade, and the right bundle as a retrograde pathway. She presented RBBB during sinus rhythm. LAF ablation changed the tachycardia configuration to a northwest axis and prolonged the cycle length. Left posterior fascicle ablation terminated the tachycardia, and complete atrioventricular block occurred, which showed the unidirectional conduction over the right bundle.

  2. Contrasting effects of verapamil and procainamide on rate-dependent bundle branch block: pharmacologic evidence for the role of depressed sodium channel responses.

    PubMed

    Chiale, P A; Pastori, J D; Sánchez, R A; Elizari, M V; Rosenbaum, M B

    1990-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for intermittent bundle branch block are still under debate. The role of the time-dependent behavior of the slow calcium channel has recently been emphasized. To test this hypothesis and ascertain the possible involvement of the fast sodium channel, the effects of the slow calcium channel blocker verapamil and the fast sodium channel blocker procainamide were compared in 10 patients with intermittent bundle branch block. All 10 patients showed bundle branch block during spontaneous sinus rhythm. Maneuvers to slow cardiac rate (that is, carotid sinus massage, Valsalva maneuver) were performed to identify normal conduction as well as phase 4 bundle branch block. Thus, the ranges of diastolic intervals (RR) resulting in phase 3 (tachycardia-dependent) bundle branch block, phase 4 (bradycardia-dependent) bundle branch block and normal conduction were measured in two control studies performed before intravenous administration of verapamil (control 1) and procainamide (control 2) and at the peak effect of both drugs. In the control studies, all 10 patients showed phase 3 bundle branch block, whereas phase 4 bundle branch block occurred in only 4 patients. The ranges of phase 3 bundle branch block, phase 4 bundle branch block and normal conduction were very similar in control studies 1 and 2. The phase 3 bundle branch block range was slightly shortened by verapamil (983 +/- 83.5 ms in control 1; 930 +/- 69.4 ms at the peak effect of verapamil), whereas phase 4 bundle branch block remained unchanged. In contrast, conduction was systematically worsened by procainamide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Protective Role of False Tendon in Subjects with Left Bundle Branch Block: A Virtual Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Lekadir, Karim; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2016-01-01

    False tendons (FTs) are fibrous or fibromuscular bands that can be found in both the normal and abnormal human heart in various anatomical forms depending on their attachment points, tissue types, and geometrical properties. While FTs are widely considered to affect the function of the heart, their specific roles remain largely unclear and unexplored. In this paper, we present an in silico study of the ventricular activation time of the human heart in the presence of FTs. This study presents the first computational model of the human heart that includes a FT, Purkinje network, and papillary muscles. Based on this model, we perform simulations to investigate the effect of different types of FTs on hearts with the electrical conduction abnormality of a left bundle branch block (LBBB). We employ a virtual population of 70 human hearts derived from a statistical atlas, and run a total of 560 simulations to assess ventricular activation time with different FT configurations. The obtained results indicate that, in the presence of a LBBB, the FT reduces the total activation time that is abnormally augmented due to a branch block, to such an extent that surgical implant of cardiac resynchronisation devices might not be recommended by international guidelines. Specifically, the simulation results show that FTs reduce the QRS duration at least 10 ms in 80% of hearts, and up to 45 ms for FTs connecting to the ventricular free wall, suggesting a significant reduction of cardiovascular mortality risk. In further simulation studies we show the reduction in the QRS duration is more sensitive to the shape of the heart then the size of the heart or the exact location of the FT. Finally, the model suggests that FTs may contribute to reducing the activation time difference between the left and right ventricles from 12 ms to 4 ms. We conclude that FTs may provide an alternative conduction pathway that compensates for the propagation delay caused by the LBBB. Further investigation is

  4. Association between right ventricular systolic function and electromechanical delay in patients with right bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Bong Joon; You, Ga In; Im, Sung Il; Kim, Hyun Su; Heo, Jeong Ho

    2017-11-01

    Elevated right ventricle (RV) pressure and/or volume can place stress on the right bundle branch block (RBBB) and its associated Purkinje network, which can affect its electrical properties, resulting in conduction delay or block. We hypothesized that prolonged R' wave duration in lead V1 would extend the later portion of the QRS complex and can act as an indicator of reduced RV function in patients with RBBB. Kosin University Gospel Hospital echocardiography and electrocardiography (ECG) database was reviewed to identify patients with complete RBBB between 2013 and 2015. ECGs recorded closest to the time of the echocardiography were carefully reviewed, and QRS and R' wave duration were measured. RV systolic dysfunction was defined as an RV fractional area change (FAC) less than 35%, as indicated by echocardiography guidelines. Compared to patients with normal RV function (n=241), patients with RV dysfunction (n=123) showed prolonged QRS duration (145.3±19.3ms vs. 132.2±13.4ms, p<0.001), predominantly due to R' prolongation (84.8±13.0ms vs. 102.9±12.0ms, p<0.001). R' duration was significantly associated with RV FAC (r=-0.609, p<0.001), RV systolic pressure (r=0.142, p=0.008), RV dimension (r=0.193, p<0.001), and RV myocardial performance index (r=0.199, p<0.001). On receiving operator characteristic curve analysis, V1 R' duration ≥93ms was associated with RV dysfunction with 90% sensitivity and 87% specificity (area under the curve: 0.883, 95% confidence interval=0.845-0.914, p<0.001). Prolonged R' wave duration in lead V1 is an indicator of RV dysfunction and pressure and/or volume overload in patients with RBBB. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictors and prognostic impact of new left bundle branch block after surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Khounlaboud, Moukda; Flécher, Erwan; Fournet, Maxime; Le Breton, Hervé; Donal, Erwan; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe; Leguerrier, Alain; Daubert, Claude

    2017-09-27

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) induces mechanical dyssynchrony that may lead to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. To evaluate the incidence, predictors and clinical impact of new LBBB in patients undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). After exclusion of patients with pre-existing LBBB, a previous pacemaker or a paced rhythm at hospital discharge, 547 consecutive patients undergoing SAVR were included. All-cause death, cardiovascular death and the combined outcome of all-cause death or a first heart failure event were assessed at 3months and 1year. Patients with and without new LBBB were compared. New LBBB occurred in 4.6% of patients after SAVR (compared with 16.4% of patients treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation during the study period). Previous valve surgery and an immediate postoperative paced rhythm were independent predictors of new LBBB. At 1-year follow-up, there were no significant differences in all-cause death, cardiovascular death, or the combined outcome of all-cause death or a first heart failure event between patients with and without new LBBB. However, new LBBB was associated with a trend towards functional deterioration and more heart failure events at 1year. At 1-year follow-up, new LBBB did not have a significant impact on clinical outcome, but was associated with worse functional status and more heart failure events. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Effect of rate-dependent left bundle branch block on global and regional left ventricular function

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlet, D.A.; Morris, K.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Albert, D.; Cobb, F.R.

    1983-05-01

    Seven subjects with rate-dependent left bundle branch block (RDLBBB) and 13 subjects with normal conduction (control group) underwent upright bicycle exercise radionuclide angiography to determine the effects of the development of RDLBBB on global and regional left ventricular function. Six of the seven subjects with RDLBBB had atypical chest pain syndromes; none had evidence of cardiac disease based on clinical examination and either normal cardiac catheterization or exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy. Radionuclide angiograms were recorded at rest and immediately before and after RDLBBB in the test group, and at rest and during intermediate and maximal exercise in the control group. The development of RDLBBB was associated with an abrupt decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in six of seven patients (mean decrease 6 +/- 5%) and no overall increase in LVEF between rest and maximal exercise (65 +/- 9% and 65 +/- 12%, respectively). In contrast, LVEF in the control group was 62 +/- 8% at rest and increased to 72 +/- 8% at intermediate and 78 +/- 7% at maximal exercise. The onset of RDLBBB was associated with the development of asynchronous left ventricular contraction in each patient and hypokinesis in four of seven patients. All patients in the control group had normal wall motion at rest and exercise. These data indicate that the development of RDLBBB is associated with changes in global and regional ventricular function that may be confused with development of left ventricular ischemia during exercise.

  7. Detection of left anterior descending coronary artery disease in patients with left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Civelek, A C; Gozukara, I; Durski, K; Ozguven, M A; Brinker, J A; Links, J M; Camargo, E E; Wagner, H N; Flaherty, J T

    1992-12-15

    The detection of coronary artery disease is difficult if a patient has electrocardiographic evidence of left bundle branch block (BBB). Septal blood flow may be reduced in patients with left BBB, despite no angiographic evidence of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery disease. We have developed a new method of quantification of Thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images with the aim of better separating patients with left BBB and LAD disease from those with left BBB alone. The study cohort comprised 8 normal subjects (group I) and 20 patients with left BBB and chest pain who underwent thallium-201 SPECT imaging and coronary angiography. Eight patients (group II) had < or = 50% LAD stenosis, and 12 (group III) had > or = 70% LAD stenosis. Septal abnormality scores on the second short-axis slice from the base were computed, based on comparison of each subject's short-axis circumferential profile with a normal reference curve. This followed a procedure in which each profile was scaled to minimize differences in its absolute level in relation to the reference curve. Septal abnormality scores on stress images were 0.8 +/- 22 for group I, 27 +/- 43 for group II, and 165 +/- 67 for group III (p = 0.15 for group I vs II, and p < 0.0001 between groups I and III, and II and III).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A New Formula for Estimating the True QT Interval in Left Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binhao; Zhang, L I; Cong, Peixin; Chu, Huimin; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jinqiu; Surkis, William; Xia, Yunlong

    2017-06-01

    QT prolongation is an independent risk factor for cardiac mortality. Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is more common in patients as they age. Widening of the QRS in LBBB causes false QT prolongation and thus makes true QT assessment difficult. We aimed to develop a simple formula to achieve a good estimate of the QT interval in the presence of LBBB. To determine the effect of QRS duration on the QT interval, QRS and QT were measured in sinus rhythm and during right ventricular apical pacing in 62 patients (age 55 ± 11 years, 60% male) undergoing electrophysiology studies. A QT formula for LBBB (QT-LBBB) was derived based on the effect of increased QRSLBBB on QTLBBB . The predictive accuracy of the QT-LBBB formula was then tested in 22 patients (age 66 ± 13 years, 64% male) with intermittent LBBB with comparisons to prior QT formulae and JT index. On average, the net increase in QRSLBBB constituted 92% of the net increase in QTLBBB . A new formula, QT-LBBB = QTLBBB - (0.86 * QRSLBBB - 71), which takes the net increase in QRSLBBB into account, best predicted the QT interval with heart rate corrected QTc in the test set of LBBB ECGs when compared to the baseline value and prior formulae. The QT-LBBB formula developed in this study best estimates the true QT interval in the presence of LBBB. It is simple and therefore can be easily utilized in clinical practice. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, J.F.; Wood, W.C.; Moinuddin, M.; Loveless, V.; Parrish, B. )

    1990-06-01

    Tl-201 exercise imaging in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) has proven to be indeterminate for significant left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery stenosis because of the presence of immediate septal perfusion defects with redistribution on delayed images in almost all cases. Tl-201 redistribution occurs regardless of the presence or absence of LAD stenosis. Nineteen patients having LBBB were evaluated with dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT. Fourteen of these subjects had normal dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT imaging. Three patients had normal coronary angiograms. None of the remaining 11 patients with normal dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT images was found to have clinical coronary artery disease in a 5-11 month follow-up period. Five patients had abnormal septal perfusion. Four underwent coronary angiography. One had a significant LAD stenosis. The single patient with septal redistribution who refused to undergo coronary angiography died shortly thereafter of clinical coronary artery disease. This preliminary work suggests that dipyridamole Tl-201 SPECT may be more useful for excluding LAD stenosis in patients with LBBB than Tl-201 exercise imaging.

  10. Right Bundle Branch Block and Electromechanical Coupling of the Right Ventricle: An Echocardiographic Study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian Edward; Rajsheker, Srinivas; López-Candales, Angel

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the presence of a right bundle branch block (RBBB) is a negative prognostic indicator in patients with and without preexisting heart disease. Even though electromechanical activation of the right ventricle (RV) in patients with RBBB and pulmonary hypertension (PH) has been investigated; a direct comparison of the presence of RBBB, on the duration of RV mechanical systole using echocardiography has not been studied. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the echocardiograms of 40 patients by measuring the magnitude and timing of tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and tricuspid annulus systolic velocity (TA S'). Patients were selected to form four groups of ten patients based on the presence or absence of RBBB and PH to determine if RBBB has any effect on the time-to-peak of TAPSE or TA S', which for our purposes serves as a measure of duration of RV mechanical systole. Our results demonstrate that RBBB leads to a measurable prolongation of TAPSE and TA S' in patients without PH. Time-to-peak of TAPSE or TA S' was not significantly prolonged in patients with PH. The results of this pilot study show that RV mechanical systole is prolonged in patients with RBBB, and the addition of PH attenuates this change. Additional prospective studies are now required to elucidate further the electrical and mechanical dyssynchrony that occurs as a result of RBBB, and how these new echocardiographic measurements can be applied clinically to risk stratify patients with RBBB and PH.

  11. Drug nanoparticles by emulsion-freeze-drying via the employment of branched block copolymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wais, Ulrike; Jackson, Alexander W; Zuo, Yanming; Xiang, Yu; He, Tao; Zhang, Haifei

    2016-01-28

    A large percentage of drug compounds exhibit low water solubility and hence low bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. This may be addressed by preparation of drug nanoparticles, leading to enhanced dissolution rate and direct use for treatment. Various methods have been developed to produce drug nanocrystals, including wet milling, homogenization, solution precipitation, emulsion diffusion, and the recently developed emulsion freeze-drying. The drawback for these methods may include difficult control in particles size, use of surfactants & polymer, and low ratio of drug to stabilizer. Here, biocompatible branched block copolymer nanoparticles with lightly-crosslinked hydrophobic core and hydrophilic surface groups are synthesized by the direct monomer-to-particle methodology, characterized, and then used as scaffold polymer/surfactant to produce drug nanoparticles via the emulsion-freeze-drying approach. This method can be used for model organic dye and different poorly water-soluble drugs. Aqueous drug nanoparticle dispersions can be obtained with high ratio of drug to stabilizer and relatively uniform nanoparticle sizes.

  12. Inducible Nitric Oxide Inhibitors Block NMDA Antagonist-Stimulated Motoric Behaviors and Medial Prefrontal Cortical Glutamate Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Hadley C.; Darvesh, Altaf S.; Berger, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS) for studying the neurobehavioral effects of non-competitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801) and phencyclidine (PCP). This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS) aminoguanidine (AG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG, or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP, or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine) and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated mPFC glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in “green tea” and chocolate) may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia. PMID:26696891

  13. Inducible Nitric Oxide Inhibitors Block NMDA Antagonist-Stimulated Motoric Behaviors and Medial Prefrontal Cortical Glutamate Efflux.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Hadley C; Darvesh, Altaf S; Berger, S P

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS) for studying the neurobehavioral effects of non-competitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801) and phencyclidine (PCP). This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS) aminoguanidine (AG) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG, or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP, or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine) and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated mPFC glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in "green tea" and chocolate) may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia.

  14. Effect of adductor canal block on medial compartment knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis: Retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Lee, Michael Y; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disease in middle-aged and elderly people. Pain is the chief complaint of symptomatic KOA and a leading cause of chronic disability, which is most often found in medial knees. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of pain relief and functional improvement in KOA patients treated with ultrasound-guided adductor canal block (ACB).This is a 3-month retrospective case-controlled comparative study. Two hundred patients with anteromedial knee pain owing to KOA that was unresponsive to 3-month long conservative treatments. Ninety-two patients received ACB with 9 mL of 1% of lidocaine and 1 mL of 10 mg triamcinolone acetonide (ACB group), and 108 continued conservative treatments (control group). The main outcome measure was visual analog scale (VAS) of the average knee pain level for the past one week. Secondary outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), the timed up and go test, numbers of analgesic ingestion per day, and opioid consumption per day.During the 3-month follow-up, 86 patients in ACB group and 92 in control group were analyzed. There was no significant difference, with the exception of the duration of symptoms, between the 2 groups in age, sex, body mass index, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests showed improvement of VAS (at month 1), WOMAC (at month 1), and opioid consumption per day (at month 1 and 2) in ACB group. No adverse events were reported.To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the efficacy of ACB for patients with KOA. ACB is an effective and safe treatment and can be an option for patients who are either unresponsive or unable to take analgesics.

  15. Novel "star anise"-like nano aggregate prepared by self-assembling of preformed microcrystals from branched crystalline-coil alternating multi-block copolymer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si-Chong; Wu, Gang; Shi, Jing; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2011-04-14

    Nano aggregates in aqueous medium with a novel "star anise"-like morphology were prepared from a branched alternating multi-block copolymer composed of 3-arm star-like hydrophobic poly(p-dioxanone) block and linear hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) block. The influence of block length on the morphology of the nano aggregate was investigated.

  16. Right ventricular failure predicted from right bundle branch block: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging validation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sameer; Ahmad, Ali; Sood, Mike; El Sergany, Amaar; Sacchi, Terrence; Saul, Barry; Gaglani, Rahul; Heitner, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Right ventricular (RV) failure has proven to be independently associated with adverse outcomes. Electrocardiographic parameters assessing RV function are largely unknown, making echocardiography the first line for RV function assessment. It is however, limited by geometrical assumptions and is inferior to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) which is widely regarded as the most accurate tool for assessing RV function. Methods We seek to determine the correlation of ECG parameters of right bundle branch block (RBBB) with RV ejection fraction (EF) and RV dimensions using the CMRI. QRS duration, R amplitude and R’ duration were obtained from precordial lead V1; S duration and amplitude were obtained from lead I and AVL. RV systolic dysfunction was defined as RV EF <40%. RV systolic dysfunction group (mean EF of 24±10%) were compared with normal RV systolic function group which acted as control (mean EF of 48±8%). CMRI and ECG parameters were compared between the two groups. Rank correlations and scatter diagrams between individual CMRI parameters and ECG parameters were done using medcalc for windows, version 12.5. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated. Results RV systolic dysfunction group was found to have larger RV end systolic volumes (90±42 vs. 59±40 mL, P=0.02). ECG evaluation of RV dysfunction group revealed longer R’ duration (103±22 vs. 84±18 msec, P=0.005) as compared to the control group. The specificity of R’ duration >100 msec to detect RV systolic dysfunction was found to be 93%. R’ duration was found to have an inverse correlation with RV EF (r=−0.49, P=0.007). Conclusions Larger RV end systolic volumes seen with RV dysfunction can affect the latter part of right bundle branch leading to prolonged R’ duration. We here found prolonged R’ duration in lead V1 to have a highly specific inverse correlation to RV systolic function. ECG can be used as an inexpensive tool for RV function

  17. Right ventricular failure predicted from right bundle branch block: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging validation.

    PubMed

    Devarapally, Santhosh R; Arora, Sameer; Ahmad, Ali; Sood, Mike; El Sergany, Amaar; Sacchi, Terrence; Saul, Barry; Gaglani, Rahul; Heitner, John

    2016-10-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure has proven to be independently associated with adverse outcomes. Electrocardiographic parameters assessing RV function are largely unknown, making echocardiography the first line for RV function assessment. It is however, limited by geometrical assumptions and is inferior to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) which is widely regarded as the most accurate tool for assessing RV function. We seek to determine the correlation of ECG parameters of right bundle branch block (RBBB) with RV ejection fraction (EF) and RV dimensions using the CMRI. QRS duration, R amplitude and R' duration were obtained from precordial lead V1; S duration and amplitude were obtained from lead I and AVL. RV systolic dysfunction was defined as RV EF <40%. RV systolic dysfunction group (mean EF of 24±10%) were compared with normal RV systolic function group which acted as control (mean EF of 48±8%). CMRI and ECG parameters were compared between the two groups. Rank correlations and scatter diagrams between individual CMRI parameters and ECG parameters were done using medcalc for windows, version 12.5. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated. RV systolic dysfunction group was found to have larger RV end systolic volumes (90±42 vs. 59±40 mL, P=0.02). ECG evaluation of RV dysfunction group revealed longer R' duration (103±22 vs. 84±18 msec, P=0.005) as compared to the control group. The specificity of R' duration >100 msec to detect RV systolic dysfunction was found to be 93%. R' duration was found to have an inverse correlation with RV EF (r=-0.49, P=0.007). Larger RV end systolic volumes seen with RV dysfunction can affect the latter part of right bundle branch leading to prolonged R' duration. We here found prolonged R' duration in lead V1 to have a highly specific inverse correlation to RV systolic function. ECG can be used as an inexpensive tool for RV function assessment and should be used alongside echocardiography

  18. Complete right bundle-branch block: echophonocardiographic study of first heart sound and right ventricular contraction times.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, N; Leech, G; Leatham, A

    1979-01-01

    High speed enchocardiograms of the mitral, tricuspid, and pulmonary valves were recorded with a simultaneous electrocardiogram and phonocardiogram in 20 patients with complete right bundle-branch block and in 67 normal subjects. Late opening of the pulmonary valve indicating late right ventricular ejection was found in all patients. In 8 patients with wide splitting of the first heart sound the late ejection was related mainly to delay in tricuspid valve closure, suggesting a late onset of the right ventricular pressure pulse. In 10 patients with a single first heart sound the delayed ejection was associated with a long interval between tricuspid valve closure and pulmonary valve opening, suggesting a slow rising right ventricular pressure pulse; 3 of these patients also had late tricuspid valve closure but the tricuspid component of the first sound was absent. Late onset of pressure rise is thought to result from block in the main right bundle-branch, and a slow rising pulse from block in the distal Purkinje network. These findings explain the conflicting results in previous studies of the first heart sound and right ventricular pressure pulse in patients with right bundle-branch block, and may have prognostic significance. Images PMID:465238

  19. Myocardial blood flow assessment with 82rubidium-PET imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Andréa; Chalela, William; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Imada, Rodrigo; Soares, José; Do Val, Renata; Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Izaki, Marisa; Filho, Roberto Kalil; Meneghetti, José C

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Perfusion abnormalities are frequently seen in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) when a left bundle branch block is present. A few studies have shown decreased coronary flow reserve in the left anterior descending territory, regardless of the presence of coronary artery disease. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography imaging in the assessment of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve in patients with left bundle branch block. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with left bundle branch block (GI), median age 63.5 years, 22 (58%) female, 12 with coronary artery disease (≥70%; GI-A) and 26 with no evidence of significant coronary artery disease (GI-B), underwent rest-dipyridamole stress 82Rb-positron emission tomography with absolute quantitative flow measurements using Cedars-Sinai software (mL/min/g). The relative myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were assessed in 17 segments. These parameters were compared with those obtained from 30 patients with normal 82Rb-positron emission tomography studies and without left bundle branch block (GII). RESULTS: Stress myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve were significantly lower in GI than in GII (p<0.05). The comparison of coronary flow reserve between GI-A and GI-B showed that it was different from the global coronary flow reserve (p<0.05) and the stress flow was significantly lower in the anterior than in the septal wall for both groups. Perfusion abnormalities were more prevalent in GI-A (p=0.06) and the left ventricular ejection fraction was not different between GI-A and GI-B, whereas it was lower in GI than in GII (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The data confirm that patients with left bundle branch block had decreased myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve and coronary flow reserve assessed by 82Rb-positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in identifying coronary artery disease in patients with

  20. Automatic QRS Selvester scoring system in patients with left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaojuan; Wieslander, Björn; Strauss, David G; Wagner, Galen S; Zareba, Wojciech; Moss, Arthur J; Couderc, Jean-Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The Selvester QRS scoring system uses quantitative criteria from the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) to estimate the myocardial scar size of patients, including those with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Automation of the scoring system could facilitate the clinical use of this technique which requires a set of multiple QRS patterns to be identified and measured. We developed a series of algorithms to automatically detect and measure the QRS parameters required for Selvester scoring. The 'QUantitative and Automatic REport of Selvester Score' was designed specifically for the analysis of ECGs from patients meeting new strict criteria for complete LBBB. The algorithms were designed using a training (n = 36) and a validation (n = 180) set of ECGs, consisting of signal-averaged 12-lead ECGs (1000 Hz sampling) recorded from 216 LBBB patients from the MADIT-CRT. We assessed the performance of the methods using expert manually adjudicated ECGs. The average of absolute differences between automatic and adjudicated Selvester scoring was 1.2 ± 1.5 points. The range of average differences for continuous measurements of wave locations and interval durations varied between 0 and 6 ms. Erroneous detection of Q, R, S, R', and S' waves (oversensed or missed) were 3, 1, 1, 16, and 6%, respectively. Seven percent of notches detected in the first 40 ms were misdetected. We propose an efficient computerized method for the automatic measurement of the Selvester score in patients with the strict LBBB. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Wall motion abnormalities and hemodynamic parameters in patients with left bundle branch block during exercise echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Dupliakov, D V; Vozhdaeva, Z I; Sysuenkova, E V; Zemlianova, M E; Lotina, A S; Goleva, S V; Svetlakova, A P; Khokhlunov, S M

    2011-01-01

    Study aim was to investigate dynamics of local contractility and hemodynamic parameters during exercise stress echocardiography (EEcho) in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). We examined 23 patients (15 men, 8 women) aged 48-65 years (mean age 53.9+/-8.1 years). Bicycle EEcho was accomplished according to standard protocol. Patients without clinical signs of ischemic heart disease (n=11) comprised group 1, patients after myocardial infarction (n=12) - group 2 (subgroup 2A - with negative test result, subgroup 2B - with worsening of local left ventricular contractility during EEcho). At baseline group 1 patients had significantly better hemodynamic parameters (ejection fraction - EF, left ventricular end diastolic volume - LVEDV) and no abnormalities of local contractility. Exercise tolerance was also the highest in this group. Insignificant worsening of postexercise EF occurred in patients of subgroup 2B (from 46+/-10.5 to 44,2+/-9.4%). In group 1 EF significantly increased (from 56.8+/-10.5% to 64.7+/-15.4%, <0.05), in subgroup 2A tendency to EF increase up to 48.7+/-9.9% was registered. Lowering of local contractility abnormalities index was noted also only in patients of subgroup 2B (from 1.54+/-0.4 to 2.17+/-0.37 (p<0.01). LVEDV compared with initial values tended to decrease in both groups (however differences between groups were not significant). Positive echocardiographic response was associated with significant changes of transmitral blood flow. Angiographically clean coronary arteries were found in 8 of 10 patients in group 1. Six group 2 patients with history of typical clinical picture of angina and myocardial infarction) had multivessel lesions in coronary vascular bed. EEcho result was positive in 5 of 6 group 2 patients. Thus EEcho possesses high potential for diagnosis of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with LBBB. This allows recommending it as a first line method in patients with this pathology.

  2. Dipyridamole stress myocardial perfusion by computed tomography in patients with left bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Cabeda, Estêvan Vieira; Falcão, Andréa Maria Gomes; Soares Jr., José; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Nomura, César Higa; Ávila, Luiz Francisco Rodrigues; Parga, José Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Background Functional tests have limited accuracy for identifying myocardial ischemia in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Objective To assess the diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole-stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) by 320-detector CT in patients with LBBB using invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) (stenosis ≥ 70%) as reference; to investigate the advantage of adding CTP to coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and compare the results with those of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Methods Thirty patients with LBBB who had undergone SPECT for the investigation of coronary artery disease were referred for stress tomography. Independent examiners performed per-patient and per-coronary territory assessments. All patients gave written informed consent to participate in the study that was approved by the institution’s ethics committee. Results The patients’ mean age was 62 ± 10 years. The mean dose of radiation for the tomography protocol was 9.3 ± 4.6 mSv. With regard to CTP, the per-patient values for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were 86%, 81%, 80%, 87%, and 83%, respectively (p = 0.001). The per-territory values were 63%, 86%, 65%, 84%, and 79%, respectively (p < 0.001). In both analyses, the addition of CTP to CTA achieved higher diagnostic accuracy for detecting myocardial ischemia than SPECT (p < 0.001). Conclusion The use of the stress tomography protocol is feasible and has good diagnostic accuracy for assessing myocardial ischemia in patients with LBBB. PMID:26421532

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance features of mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Revah, Giselle; Wu, Vincent; Huntjens, Peter R; Piekarski, Eve; Chyou, Janice Y; Axel, Leon

    2016-09-01

    Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) can exhibit mechanical dyssynchrony which may contribute to heart failure; such patients may benefit from cardiac resynchronization treatment (CRT). While cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has become a common part of heart failure work-up, CMR features of mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with LBBB have not been well characterized. This study aims to investigate the potential of CMR to characterize mechanical features of LBBB. CMR examinations from 43 patients with LBBB on their electrocardiogram, but without significant focal structural abnormalities, and from 43 age- and gender-matched normal controls were retrospectively reviewed. The following mechanical features of LBBB were evaluated: septal flash (SF), apical rocking (AR), delayed aortic valve opening measured relative to both end-diastole (AVOED) and pulmonic valve opening (AVOPVO), delayed left-ventricular (LV) free-wall contraction, and curvatures of the septum and LV free-wall. Septal displacement curves were also generated, using feature-tracking techniques. The echocardiographic findings of LBBB were also reviewed in those subjects for whom they were available. LBBB was significantly associated with the presence of SF and AR; within the LBBB group, 79 % had SF and 65 % had AR. Delayed AVOED, AVOPVO, and delayed LV free-wall contraction were significantly associated with LBBB. AVOED and AVOPVO positively correlated with QRS duration and negatively correlated with ejection fraction. Hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of LBBB showed lower septal-to-LV free-wall curvature ratios at end-diastole compared to normal controls. CMR can be used to identify and evaluate mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with LBBB. None of the normal controls showed the mechanical features associated with LBBB. Moreover, not all patients with LBBB showed the same degree of mechanical dyssynchrony, which could have implications for CRT.

  4. Effect of bundle branch block patterns on mortality in hospitalized patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Barsheshet, Alon; Leor, Jonathan; Goldbourt, Uri; Garty, Moshe; Schwartz, Roseline; Behar, Solomon; Luria, David; Eldar, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2008-05-01

    A widened QRS interval is associated with increased mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). However, the prognostic significance of the type of bundle branch block (BBB) pattern in these patients is unclear. The data of 4,102 patients with HF hospitalized during a prospective national survey were analyzed to investigate the association between BBB type and 1-year mortality in 3,737 patients without pacemakers. Right BBB (RBBB) was present in 381 patients (10.2%) and left BBB (LBBB) in 504 patients (13.5%). RBBB and LBBB were associated with increased 1-year mortality on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 1.81, and OR 1.20, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.47, respectively). In patients with systolic HF, after adjusting for multiple risk factors, only RBBB was found to be an independent predictor of mortality (RBBB vs no BBB OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.33, and RBBB vs LBBB OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.69). This correlation was stronger in patients with lower left ventricular ejection fractions and was also maintained in patients without acute myocardial infarctions. Analyzing the data for all patients with HF, there was a trend for increased mortality in the RBBB group only (adjusted OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.56). LBBB was not related to mortality in patients with either systolic HF or preserved ejection fractions. In conclusion, RBBB rather than LBBB is an independent predictor of mortality in hospitalized patients with systolic HF. This prognostic marker could be used for risk stratification and the selection of treatment.

  5. Prognostic implications of bundle branch block in patients undergoing primary coronary angioplasty in the stent era.

    PubMed

    Vivas, David; Pérez-Vizcayno, María Jose; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Bañuelos, Camino; Escaned, Javier; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; De Agustín, Jose Alberto; Núñez-Gil, Ivan; González-Ferrer, Juan Jose; Macaya, Carlos; Alfonso, Fernando

    2010-05-01

    The presence of bundle branch block (BBB) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction has been associated with a poor outcome. However, the implications of BBB in patients undergoing primary angioplasty in the stent era are poorly established. Furthermore, the prognostic implications of BBB type (right vs left and previous vs transient or persistent) remain unknown. We analyzed the data from 913 consecutive patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary angioplasty. All clinical, electrocardiographic, and angiographic data were prospectively collected. The median follow-up period was 19 months. The primary end point was the combined outcome of death and reinfarction. BBB was documented in 140 patients (15%). Right BBB (RBBB) was present in 119 patients (13%) and was previous in 27 (23%), persistent in 45 (38%), and transient in 47 (39%). Left BBB (LBBB) was present in 21 patients (2%) and was previous in 8 (38%), persistent in 9 (43%), and transient in 4 (19%). Patients with BBB were older, and more frequently had diabetes, anterior infarctions, a greater Killip class, a lower left ventricular ejection fraction, and greater mortality (all p <0.005) than patients without BBB. The short- and long-term primary outcome occurred more frequently in patients with persistent RBBB/LBBB than in those with previous or transient RBBB/LBBB. On multivariate analysis, persistent RBBB/LBBB emerged as an independent predictor of death and reinfarction. In conclusion, in patients undergoing primary angioplasty in the stent era, BBB is associated with poor short- and long-term prognosis. This risk appears to be particularly high among patients with persistent BBB. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Circumferential myocardial strain in cardiomyopathy with and without left bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to decrease mortality in 60-70% of advanced heart failure patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) and QRS duration > 120 ms. There have been intense efforts to find reproducible non-invasive parameters to predict CRT response. We hypothesized that different left ventricular contraction patterns may exist in LBBB patients with depressed systolic function and applied tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to assess circumferential strain in this population. Methods We determined myocardial circumferential strain at the basal, mid, and apical ventricular level in 35 subjects (10 with ischemic cardiomyopathy, 15 with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, and 10 healthy controls). Patterns of circumferential strain were analyzed. Time to peak systolic circumferential strain in each of the 6 segments in all three ventricular slices and the standard deviation of time to peak strain in the basal and mid ventricular slices were determined. Results Dyskinesis of the anterior septum and the inferior septum in at least two ventricular levels was seen in 50% (5 out of 10) of LBBB patients while 30% had isolated dyskinesis of the anteroseptum, and 20% had no dyskinesis in any segments, similar to all of the non-LBBB patients and healthy controls. Peak circumferential strain shortening was significantly reduced in all cardiomyopathy patients at the mid-ventricular level (LBBB 9 ± 6%, non-LBBB 10 ± 4% vs. healthy 19 ± 4%; both p < 0.0001 compared to healthy), but was similar among the LBBB and non-LBBB groups (p = 0.20). The LBBB group had significantly greater dyssynchrony compared to the non-LBBB group and healthy controls assessed by opposing wall delays and 12-segment standard deviation (LBBB 164 ± 30 ms vs. non-LBBB 70 ± 17 ms (p < 0.0001), non-LBBB vs. healthy 65 ± 17 ms (p = 0.47)). Conclusions Septal dyskinesis exists in some patients with LBBB. Myocardial circumferential strain analysis enables

  7. Circumferential myocardial strain in cardiomyopathy with and without left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuchi; Chan, Jonathan; Haber, Idith; Peters, Dana C; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J; Yeon, Susan B

    2010-01-05

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to decrease mortality in 60-70% of advanced heart failure patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) and QRS duration > 120 ms. There have been intense efforts to find reproducible non-invasive parameters to predict CRT response. We hypothesized that different left ventricular contraction patterns may exist in LBBB patients with depressed systolic function and applied tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to assess circumferential strain in this population. We determined myocardial circumferential strain at the basal, mid, and apical ventricular level in 35 subjects (10 with ischemic cardiomyopathy, 15 with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, and 10 healthy controls). Patterns of circumferential strain were analyzed. Time to peak systolic circumferential strain in each of the 6 segments in all three ventricular slices and the standard deviation of time to peak strain in the basal and mid ventricular slices were determined. Dyskinesis of the anterior septum and the inferior septum in at least two ventricular levels was seen in 50% (5 out of 10) of LBBB patients while 30% had isolated dyskinesis of the anteroseptum, and 20% had no dyskinesis in any segments, similar to all of the non-LBBB patients and healthy controls. Peak circumferential strain shortening was significantly reduced in all cardiomyopathy patients at the mid-ventricular level (LBBB 9 +/- 6%, non-LBBB 10 +/- 4% vs. healthy 19 +/- 4%; both p < 0.0001 compared to healthy), but was similar among the LBBB and non-LBBB groups (p = 0.20). The LBBB group had significantly greater dyssynchrony compared to the non-LBBB group and healthy controls assessed by opposing wall delays and 12-segment standard deviation (LBBB 164 +/- 30 ms vs. non-LBBB 70 +/- 17 ms (p < 0.0001), non-LBBB vs. healthy 65 +/- 17 ms (p = 0.47)). Septal dyskinesis exists in some patients with LBBB. Myocardial circumferential strain analysis enables detailed characterization of

  8. Left ventricular regional contraction abnormalities by echocardiographic speckle tracking in combined right bundle branch with left anterior fascicular block compared to left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Leeters, Irene P M; Davis, Ashlee; Zusterzeel, Robbert; Atwater, Brett; Risum, Niels; Søgaard, Peter; Klem, Igor; Nijveldt, Robin; Wagner, Galen S; Gorgels, Anton P M; Kisslo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to LBBB patients less is known about patients with RBBB+LAFB regarding LV contractile abnormalities and the potential role of CRT. This study investigated whether patients with RBBB+LAFB morphology have echocardiographic mechanical strain abnormalities between the inferior and anterior LV walls, similar to abnormalities between septal and lateral walls in LBBB. Ten healthy volunteers with no-BBB, 28 LBBB and 28 RBBB+LAFB heart failure patients were included in this retrospective study. Two-dimensional regional-strains were obtained by speckle-tracking. Scar was assessed by CMR. Response on echo was defined as normal, classical, borderline or other pattern. The number of classical patterns in LBBB was significantly higher than in RBBB+LAFB and no-BBB groups (p<0.001 for both). Contrary, the RBBB+LAFB group showed a significantly higher number of borderline patterns compared to other groups (LBBB: p=0.042, no-block: p=0.012). In addition, RBBB+LAFB patients had more scar than LBBB patients (9.9% vs 3.4%, p=0.041), and the average amount of scar in each wall was also higher in RBBB+LAFB (<5% in LBBB and <16% in RBBB+LAFB). Patients with RBBB+LAFB on ECG and clinical HF demonstrate echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities between inferior and anterior LV walls, similar to abnormalities found between septal and lateral LV walls in patients with LBBB and HF. Fewer patients with RBBB+LAFB showed a classical pattern of opposing wall motion compared to LBBB. Factors that might alter strain patterns in RBBB+LAFB, including the detailed presence or absence of LV scar and coexisting block of the central fascicle, should be assessed in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient left bundle branch block induced by left-sided cardiac catheterization in patients without pre-existing conduction abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, T; Nakata, Y; Sumiyoshi, M; Ogura, S; Takaya, J; Sakurai, H; Yamaguchi, H

    1998-02-01

    A traumatic left bundle branch block (LBBB) is uncommon in a patient with intact atrioventricular conduction. Three of our patients developed LBBB during a left-sided catheterization. Two patients suffered from angina pectoris and the other had an abdominal aneurysm. Two of them had a history of hypertension. None of the patients had ever shown any conduction abnormalities before the catheterization. The electrocardiogram just before the examination was normal in all 3 patients. LBBB was observed when a catheter was introduced into the left ventricle, and lasted 2--4 min without significant change in heart rates. Examination revealed no significant stenosis proximal to the first septal perforator and normal left ventricular contraction in all patients. One patient developed permanent LBBB 14 months later. Catheter-induced LBBB may occur easily with certain anatomical characteristics of the left bundle branch or the distal His bundle, with or without some concealed damage to the conduction system. It is important to keep this complication in mind and to pay adequate attention to patients' electrocardiograms as well as their angiographical findings, especially in those with pre-existing right bundle branch block.

  10. The inhibition of prions through blocking prion conversion by permanently charged branched polyamines of low cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yong-beom; Mays, Charles E; Kim, Younghwan; Titlow, William B; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2010-03-01

    Branched polyamines are effective in inhibiting prions in a cationic surface charge density dependent manner. However, toxicity associated with branched polyamines, in general, often hampers the successful application of the compounds to treat prion diseases. Here, we report that constitutively maintained cationic properties in branched polyamines reduced the intrinsic toxicity of the compounds while retaining the anti-prion activities. In prion-infected neuroblastoma cells, quaternization of amines in polyethyleneimine (PEI) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers markedly increased the nontoxic concentration ranges of the compounds and still supported, albeit reduced, an appreciable level of anti-prion activity in clearing prions from the infected cells. Furthermore, quaternized PEI was able to degrade prions at acidic pH conditions and inhibit the in vitro prion propagation facilitated by conversion of the normal prion protein isoform to its misfolded counterpart, although such activities were decreased by quaternization. Quaternized PAMAM was least effective in degrading prions but efficiently inhibited prion conversion with the same efficacy as unmodified PAMAM. Our results suggest that quaternization represents an effective strategy for developing nontoxic branched polyamines with potent anti-prion activity. This study highlights the importance of polyamine structural control for developing polyamine-based anti-prion agents and understanding of an action mechanism of quaternized branched polyamines.

  11. Transcatheter Heart Valve Selection and Permanent Pacemaker Implantation in Patients With Pre-Existent Right Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    van Gils, Lennart; Tchetche, Didier; Lhermusier, Thibault; Abawi, Masieh; Dumonteil, Nicolas; Rodriguez Olivares, Ramón; Molina-Martin de Nicolas, Javier; Stella, Pieter R; Carrié, Didier; De Jaegere, Peter P; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M

    2017-03-03

    Right bundle branch block is an established predictor for new conduction disturbances and need for a permanent pacemaker (PPM) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the absolute rates of transcatheter aortic valve replacement related PPM implantations in patients with pre-existent right bundle branch block and categorize for different transcatheter heart valves. We pooled data on 306 transcatheter aortic valve replacement patients from 4 high-volume centers in Europe and selected those with right bundle branch block at baseline without a previously implanted PPM. Logistic regression was used to evaluate whether PPM rate differed among transcatheter heart valves after adjustment for confounders. Mean age was 83±7 years and 63% were male. Median Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 6.3 (interquartile range, 4.1-10.2). The following transcatheter valve designs were used: Medtronic CoreValve (n=130; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN); Edwards Sapien XT (ES-XT; n=124) and Edwards Sapien 3 (ES-3; n=32; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA); and Boston Scientific Lotus (n=20; Boston Scientific Corporation, Marlborough, MA). Overall permanent pacemaker implantation rate post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement was 41%, and per valve design: 75% with Lotus, 46% with CoreValve, 32% with ES-XT, and 34% with ES-3. The indication for PPM implantation was total atrioventricular block in 98% of the cases. Lotus was associated with a higher PPM rate than all other valves. PPM rate did not differ between ES-XT and ES-3. Ventricular paced rhythm at 30-day and 1-year follow-up was present in 81% at 89%, respectively. Right bundle branch block at baseline is associated with a high incidence of PPM implantation for all transcatheter heart valves. PPM rate was highest for Lotus and lowest for ES-XT and ES-3. Pacemaker dependency remained high during follow-up. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by

  12. Reduced Glutamatergic Currents and Dendritic Branching of Layer 5 Pyramidal Cells Contribute to Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Crystle J.; Huang, Mei; Meltzer, Herbert; Martina, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have demonstrated that neuropathic pain is associated with major reorganization in multiple brain areas. In line with the strong emotional salience of chronic pain, involvement of the limbic system appears particularly important. Within the past few years, it has become clear that the functional deactivation of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for both the cognitive/emotional and the sensory components of pain. However, at the cellular level, details of this deactivation remain in large part unclear. Here we show that 1 week after a peripheral neuropathic injury (Spared Nerve Injury model) pyramidal cells in layer 5 (L5) of the rat medial PFC show responses to excitatory glutamatergic inputs that are reduced by about 50%, as well as reduced frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents. Additionally, these cells have reduced membrane capacitance and increased input resistance. All these findings are consistent with decreased dendritic length, thus we performed a detailed morphological analysis on a subset of the recorded neurons. We found that the apical dendrites proximal to the soma (excluding the tuft) are shorter and less complex in SNI animals, in agreement with the reduced capacitance and glutamatergic input. Finally, we used in vivo microdialysis to compare the basal concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PFC of sham and SNI rats and found that ambient glutamate is decreased in SNI rats. Taken together, these data show that impaired glutamatergic transmission contributes to the functional deactivation of the mPFC in neuropathic pain. Additionally, the reduced branching of apical dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons may underlay the gray matter reduction in chronic pain. PMID:27252623

  13. Depressive-like behaviours and decreased dendritic branching in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice with tumors: A novel validated model of cancer-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Nashed, Mina G; Seidlitz, Eric P; Frey, Benicio N; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-11-01

    Depression is commonly comorbid in cancer patients and has detrimental effects on disease progression. Evidence suggests that biological mechanisms may induce the onset of cancer-induced depression (CID). The present investigation aims to establish a validated preclinical animal model of CID. Female BALB/c mice were allocated to four groups: control (n=12), chronic oral exposure to corticosterone (CORT) (n=12), CORT exposure followed by chronic low dose fluoxetine (FLX) treatment (n=12), and subcutaneous inoculation of 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells (n=13). Anhedonia was evaluated using the sucrose preference test (SPT), and behavioural despair was evaluated using the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Sholl analyses were used to examine the dendritic morphology of Golgi-Cox impregnated neurons from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). CORT exposure and tumor burden were both associated with decreased sucrose preference, increased FST immobility, and decreased basilar and apical dendritic branching of neurons in the mPFC. CORT-induced behavioural and dendritic morphological changes were reversible by FLX. No differences in TST immobility were observed between groups. On the secondary TST outcome measure, CORT exposure and tumor burden were associated with a trend towards decreased power of movement. CORT exposure induced a positive control model of a depressive-like state, with FLX treatment confirming the predictive validity of the model. This verified the sensitivity of behavioural and histological tests, which were used to assess the CID model. The induction of a depressive-like state in this model represents the first successfully validated animal model of CID.

  14. A complete right bundle-branch block masking Brugada syndrome: a case

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Makoto; Kitazawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Masahito; Okabe, Masaaki; Antzelevitch, Charles; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old man without structural heart disease was admitted for syncope. His electrocardiogram displayed complete right bundle branch (CRBBB). A coved type ST elevation was observed with transient normalization of CRBBB giving rise to a normal QRS. These findings suggest that Brugada syndrome can be masked by CRBBB. PMID:22832153

  15. Influence of BMI, gender, and sports on pain decrease and medication usage after facet–medial branch neurotomy or SI joint lateral branch cooled RF-neurotomy in case of low back pain: original research in the Austrian population

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Wolfgang; Stelzer, Valentin; Stelzer, Dominik; Braune, Monika; Duller, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective original research was designed to illustrate the general outcome after radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of lumbar medial branch (MB) and posterior ramus of the sacroiliac joint of 160 patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Methods Visual Analog Scale (VAS) 0–10 pain scores, quality of life, body mass index (BMI), medication usage, and frequency of physical exercise/sports participation (none, 1–3×/week, more) were collected before the procedure, at 1 month post procedure (n=160), and again at 6 (n=73) and 12 months (n=89) post procedure. Results A VAS decrease of 4 points on a 10-point scale (from 8 to 4) in the overall group was seen after 6 months and of 4.5 after 12 months. Lower medication usage was reported, with opioids decreased by 40% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by 60%. Decreased pain lasted for 12 months. Significantly better outcomes were reported by patients with BMIs <30. No gender-specific differences occurred in the reported decrease in VAS. Analysis of the “no-sports” group versus the more active (1–3 times weekly sports) group showed a better pain decrease after 1 year in the active group. Conclusion The data suggest RF treatment for chronic LBP that can lead to long-term improvement. Patients with a BMI >30 are less likely to report decreased pain. The better long-term pain relief in the sports participating group is a motivation for the authors to keep the patients in motion. PMID:28144161

  16. Predictors of advanced His-Purkinje conduction disturbances in patients with unexplained syncope and bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Boulé, Stéphane; Ouadah, Aïcha; Langlois, Carole; Botcherby, Edward J; Verbrugge, Eric; Huchette, David; Salleron, Julia; Mostefa Kara, Meriem; Kouakam, Claude; Brigadeau, François; Klug, Didier; Marquié, Christelle; Guédon-Moreau, Laurence; Wissocque, Ludivine; Escande, William; Lacroix, Dominique; Kacet, Salem

    2014-06-01

    For patients presenting with syncope and bundle branch block (BBB), results during electrophysiological studies (EPS) might depend on the electrocardiographic pattern of conduction disturbances. We sought to identify predictors of advanced His-Purkinje conduction disturbances (HPCDs) in these patients. In this retrospective multicentre study, patients were included who: (1) presented with unexplained syncope; (2) had BBB (QRS duration ≥ 120 ms); and (3) were investigated with EPS. HPCD was diagnosed if the baseline His-ventricular interval was ≥ 70 ms or if second- or third-degree His-Purkinje block was observed during atrial pacing or pharmacological challenge. Of the 171 patients studied (72 ± 13 years, 64% male sex, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 57 ± 9%), advanced HPCD was found in 73 patients (43%). The following electrocardiographic features were associated with HPCD (P = 0.01): isolated right BBB (34.4%), right BBB with left anterior fascicular block (36.4%), left BBB (46.2%), and right BBB with left posterior fascicular block (LPFB, 78.6%). Multivariate analysis identified first-degree atrioventricular block (odds ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.7; P = 0.01) and LPFB (odds ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-18.5; P = 0.02) as the only 2 independent predictors of advanced HPCD. For patients presenting with syncope and BBB, first-degree atrioventricular block and LPFB increased the likelihood of finding HPCDs during EPS. However, no single electrocardiographic feature could consistently predict the outcome of EPS, so this investigation is still necessary in assessing the need for pacemaker implantation, irrespective of the precise appearance of abnormalities on ECG. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac resynchronization therapy for heart failure induced by left bundle branch block after transcatheter closure of ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Du, Rong-Zeng; Qian, Jun; Wu, Jun; Liang, Yi; Chen, Guang-Hua; Sun, Tao; Zhou, Ye; Zhao, Yang; Yan, Jin-Chuan

    2014-12-01

    A 54-year-old female patient with congenital heart disease had a persistent complete left bundle branch block three months after closure by an Amplatzer ventricular septal defect occluder. Nine months later, the patient suffered from chest distress, palpitation, and sweating at daily activities, and her 6-min walk distance decreased significantly (155 m). Her echocardiography showed increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter with left ventricular ejection fraction of 37%. Her symptoms reduced significantly one week after received cardiac resynchronization therapy. She had no symptoms at daily activities, and her echo showed left ventricular ejection fraction of 46% and 53%. Moreover, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter decreased 6 and 10 months after cardiac resynchronization therapy, and 6-min walk distance remarkably increased. This case demonstrated that persistent complete left bundle branch block for nine months after transcatheter closure with ventricular septal defect Amplatzer occluder could lead to left ventricular enlargement and a significant decrease in left ventricular systolic function. Cardiac resynchronization therapy decreased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and increased left ventricular ejection fraction, thereby improving the patient's heart functions.

  18. Tachycardia-dependent bilateral bundle branch block in ischemic heart disease with systolic dysfunction: case report and review of prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Castagnetto, Federico; Vidal, Alejandro; Ricca-Mallada, Roberto; Nogara, Romina; Marichal, Pablo; Martínez, Fabián

    2015-10-16

    A proper characterization of frequency-dependent bundle branch blocks can provide useful prognostic information in some clinical situations. Often, this physiological event may be due to an extensive damage of infrahisian system, which poses a high risk of developing advanced atrioventricular block requiring pacemaker implantation. We describe the case of a 62 year-old man with chronic ischemic heart disease who exhibited alternating tachycardia-dependent bundle branch block during stress test. We discuss the main prognostic implications of this unusual event in the context of systolic dysfunction.

  19. Branched ZnO nanostructures as building blocks of photoelectrodes for efficient solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Qiu, Yongcai; Yang, Shihe

    2012-08-21

    ZnO nanotetrapods are distinguished by their unique nanocrystalline geometric form with four tetrahedrally directed arms, which endows them the ability to handily assemble three-dimensional network structures. Such network structures, coupled with the intrinsically excellent electronic properties of the semiconducting ZnO, have proved advantageous for building photoelectrodes in energy conversion devices since they allow fast vectorial electron transport. In this review article, we summarize recent efforts, with partial emphasis on our own, in the development of ZnO nanotetrapod-based devices for solar energy conversion, including dye-sensitized solar cells and photoelectrochemical cells for water splitting. A pure ZnO nanotetrapod network was firstly demonstrated to have excellent charge collection properties even with just physical contacts. Composition design of ZnO nanotetrapods/SnO(2) nanoparticles yielded a high efficiency of 4.91% in flexible DSSCs. More significantly, by secondary branching and nitrogen doping, a record performance for water splitting has been achieved. A perspective on future research directions in ZnO nanotetrapod-based solar energy conversion devices is also discussed together with possible strategies of pursuit. It is hoped that the results obtained so far with the ZnO nanotetrapods could inspire and catalyze future developments of solar energy conversion systems based on branched nanostructural materials, contributing to solving global energy and environmental issues.

  20. Branch Pathway Blocking in Artemisia annua is a Useful Method for Obtaining High Yield Artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zongyou; Zhang, Fangyuan; Pan, Qifang; Fu, Xueqing; Jiang, Weimin; Shen, Qian; Yan, Tingxiang; Shi, Pu; Lu, Xu; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-03-01

    There are many biosynthetic pathways competing for the metabolic flux with the artemisinin biosynthetic pathway in Artemisia annua L. To study the relationship between genes encoding enzymes at branching points and the artemisinin biosynthetic pathway, β-caryophyllene, β-farnesene and squalene were sprayed on young seedlings of A. annua. Transient expression assays indicated that the transcription levels of β-caryophyllene synthase (CPS), β-farnesene synthase (BFS) and squalene synthase (SQS) were inhibited by β-caryophyllene, β-farnesene and squalene, respectively, while expression of some artemisinin biosynthetic pathway genes increased. Thus, inhibition of these genes encoding enzymes at branching points may be helpful to improve the artemisinin content. For further study, the expression levels of four branch pathway genes CPS, BFS, germacrene A synthase (GAS) and SQS were down-regulated by the antisense method in A. annua. In anti-CPS transgenic plants, mRNA levels of BFS and ADS were increased, and the contents of β-farnesene, artemisinin and dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA) were increased by 212, 77 and 132%, respectively. The expression levels of CPS, SQS, GAS, amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), amorphadiene 12-hydroxylase (CYP71AV1) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) were increased in anti-BFS transgenic plants and, at the same time, the contents of artemisinin and DHAA were increased by 77% and 54%, respectively, and the content of squalene was increased by 235%. In anti-GAS transgenic plants, mRNA levels of CPS, BFS, ADS and ALDH1 were increased. The contents of artemisinin and DHAA were enhanced by 103% and 130%, respectively. In anti-SQS transgenic plants, the transcription levels of BFS, GAS, CPS, ADS, CYP71AV1 and ALDH1 were all increased. Contents of artemisinin and DHAA were enhanced by 71% and 223%, respectively, while β-farnesene was raised to 123%. The mRNA level of artemisinic aldehyde Δ11(13) reductase (DBR2) had changed little in

  1. Molecular changes in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens are associated with blocking the behavioral sensitization to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Huang, Can; Zhang, Xiuwu

    2015-11-05

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization is associated with persistent functional and structural alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc); however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes have not been elucidated. In this study, the behavioral sensitization to cocaine was established in Sprague Dawley rats and was measured by locomotion and behavioral rating. The brain tissue homogenization was used for measuring the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the expression and activity of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), level of protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation at serine 473 and threonine 308, and the expression of p75(NTR), TrkA, and TrkB protein. The Results showed that cocaine sensitization was associated with increased BDNF, ILK activity, phospho-Akt Ser(473), p75(NTR), and TrkB protein levels in the mPFC and NAc core. The combination of pergolide and ondansetron normalized not only behavioral sensitization, but also the increases in these molecular markers. Dual immunofluoresence staining showed that ILK expression is co-distributed with p75(NTR) and TrkA expression in both the mPFC and NAc core. Results suggested that the BDNF-TrkA/p75(NTR)-ILK-Akt signaling pathway may be active in cocaine sensitization and associated neural plasticity in the mPFC and NAc core.

  2. Mechanism of estradiol-induced block of voltage-gated K+ currents in rat medial preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Druzin, Michael; Malinina, Evgenya; Grimsholm, Ola; Johansson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize possible rapid effects of 17-β-estradiol on voltage-gated K(+) channels in preoptic neurons and, in particular, to identify the mechanisms by which 17-β-estradiol affects the K(+) channels. Whole-cell currents from dissociated rat preoptic neurons were studied by perforated-patch recording. 17-β-Estradiol rapidly (within seconds) and reversibly reduced the K(+) currents, showing an EC(50) value of 9.7 µM. The effect was slightly voltage dependent, but independent of external Ca(2+), and not sensitive to an estrogen-receptor blocker. Although 17-α-estradiol also significantly reduced the K(+) currents, membrane-impermeant forms of estradiol did not reduce the K(+) currents and other estrogens, testosterone and cholesterol were considerably less effective. The reduction induced by estradiol was overlapping with that of the K(V)-2-channel blocker r-stromatoxin-1. The time course of K(+) current in 17-β-estradiol, with a time-dependent inhibition and a slight dependence on external K(+), suggested an open-channel block mechanism. The properties of block were predicted from a computational model where 17-β-estradiol binds to open K(+) channels. It was concluded that 17-β-estradiol rapidly reduces voltage-gated K(+) currents in a way consistent with an open-channel block mechanism. This suggests a new mechanism for steroid action on ion channels.

  3. Mechanism of Estradiol-Induced Block of Voltage-Gated K+ Currents in Rat Medial Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Druzin, Michael; Malinina, Evgenya; Grimsholm, Ola; Johansson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize possible rapid effects of 17-β-estradiol on voltage-gated K+ channels in preoptic neurons and, in particular, to identify the mechanisms by which 17-β-estradiol affects the K+ channels. Whole-cell currents from dissociated rat preoptic neurons were studied by perforated-patch recording. 17-β-estradiol rapidly (within seconds) and reversibly reduced the K+ currents, showing an EC50 value of 9.7 µM. The effect was slightly voltage dependent, but independent of external Ca2+, and not sensitive to an estrogen-receptor blocker. Although 17-α-estradiol also significantly reduced the K+ currents, membrane-impermeant forms of estradiol did not reduce the K+ currents and other estrogens, testosterone and cholesterol were considerably less effective. The reduction induced by estradiol was overlapping with that of the KV-2-channel blocker r-stromatoxin-1. The time course of K+ current in 17-β-estradiol, with a time-dependent inhibition and a slight dependence on external K+, suggested an open-channel block mechanism. The properties of block were predicted from a computational model where 17-β-estradiol binds to open K+ channels. It was concluded that 17-β-estradiol rapidly reduces voltage-gated K+ currents in a way consistent with an open-channel block mechanism. This suggests a new mechanism for steroid action on ion channels. PMID:21625454

  4. Cardiac pacing in heart failure patients with left bundle branch block: impact of pacing site for optimizing left ventricular resynchronization.

    PubMed

    Pappone, C; Rosanio, S; Oreto, G; Tocchi, M; Gulletta, S; Salvati, A; Dicandia, C; Santinelli, V; Mazzone, P; Veglia, F; Ding, J; Sallusti, L; Spinelli, J; Vicedomini, G

    2000-07-01

    Acute left ventricular pacing has been associated with hemodynamic improvement in patients with congestive heart failure and wide QRS complex. We hypothesized that pacing two left ventricular sites simultaneously would produce faster activation and better systolic function than single-site pacing. We selected 14 heart failure patients (NYHA functional class III or IV) in normal sinus rhythm with left bundle branch block and QRS > 150 ms. An 8F dual micromanometer catheter was placed in the aorta for measuring +dP/dt (mmHg/s), aortic pulse pressure (mmHg), and end-diastolic pressure (mmHg). Pacing leads were positioned via coronary veins at the posterior base and lateral wall. Patients were acutely paced VDD at the posterior base, lateral wall, and both sites (dual-site) with 5 atrioventricular delays (from 8 ms to PR -30 ms). Pacing sequences were executed in randomized order using a custom external computer (FlexStim, Guidant CRM). Dual-site pacing increased peak +dP/dt significantly more than posterior base and lateral wall pacing. Dual-site and posterior base pacing raised aortic pulse pressure significantly more than lateral wall pacing. Dual-site pacing shortened QRS duration by 22 %, whereas posterior base and lateral wall pacing increased it by 2 and 12%, respectively (p = 0.006). In heart failure patients with left bundle branch block, dual-site pacing improves systolic function more than single-site stimulation. Improved ventricular activation synchrony, expressed by paced QRS narrowing, may account for the additional benefit of dual- vs single-site pacing in enhancing contractility. This novel approach deserves consideration for future heart failure pacing studies.

  5. Mechanical analysis of congestive heart failure caused by bundle branch block based on an electromechanical canine heart model.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jianhong; Xia, Ling; Zhang, Yu; Shou, Guofa; Wei, Qing; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2009-01-21

    Asynchronous electrical activation, induced by bundle branch block (BBB), can cause reduced ventricular function. However, the effects of BBB on the mechanical function of heart are difficult to assess experimentally. Many heart models have been developed to investigate cardiac properties during BBB but have mainly focused on the electrophysiological properties. To date, the mechanical function of BBB has not been well investigated. Based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine heart model, the mechanical properties of complete left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) were simulated. The anatomical model as well as the fiber orientations of a dog heart was reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI). Using the solutions of reaction-diffusion equations and with a strategy of parallel computation, the asynchronous excitation propagation and intraventricular conduction in BBB was simulated. The mechanics of myocardial tissues were computed with time-, sarcomere length-dependent uniaxial active stress initiated at the time of depolarization. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony of BBB was then investigated using the finite-element method with an eight-node isoparametric element. The simulation results show that (1) there exists inter- and intraventricular systolic dyssynchrony during BBB; (2) RBBB may have more mechanical synchrony and better systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) than LBBB; (3) the ventricles always move toward the early-activated ventricle; and (4) the septum experiences higher stress than left and right ventricular free walls in BBB. The simulation results validate clinical and experimental recordings of heart deformation and provide regional quantitative estimates of ventricular wall strain and stress. The present work suggests that an electromechanical heart model, incorporating real geometry and fiber orientations, may be helpful for better

  6. Prevalence and Prognostic Implications of Bundle Branch Block in Comatose Survivors of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Grand, Johannes; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas; Erlinge, David; Wiberg, Sebastian; Wanscher, Michael; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Hassager, Christian

    2016-10-15

    This study reports the prevalence and prognostic impact of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left bundle branch block (LBBB) in the admission electrocardiogram (ECG) of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The present study is part of the predefined electrocardiographic substudy of the prospective randomized target temperature management trial, which found no benefit of targeting 33°C over 36°C in terms of outcome. Six-hundred eighty-two patients were included in the substudy. An admission ECG, which defined the present study population, was available in 602 patients (88%). These ECGs were stratified by the presence of LBBB, RBBB, or no-BBB (reference) on admission. End points were mortality and neurologic outcome 6 months after OHCA. RBBB was present in 79 patients (13%) and LBBB in 65 patients (11%), and the majority of BBBs (92%) had resolved 4 hours after admission. RBBB was associated with significantly higher 6 months mortality (RBBB: hazard ratio [HR]unadjusted 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30 to 2.43; LBBB: HRunadjusted 1.26, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.81), but this did not reach a level of significance in the adjusted model (HRadjusted 1.33, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.87). Similar findings were seen for neurologic outcome in the unadjusted and adjusted analyses. RBBB was further independently associated with higher odds of unfavorable neurologic outcome (RBBB: adjusted odds ratio 1.97, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.71). In conclusion, BBBs after OHCA were transient in most patients, and RBBB was directly associated with higher mortality and independently associated with higher odds of unfavorable neurologic outcome. RBBB is seemingly an early indicator of an unfavorable prognosis after OHCA.

  7. Factors determining the magnitude of the pre-ejection leftward septal motion in left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Remme, Espen W; Niederer, Steven; Gjesdal, Ola; Russell, Kristoffer; Hyde, Eoin R; Smith, Nicolas; Smiseth, Otto A

    2016-12-01

    An abnormal large leftward septal motion prior to ejection is frequently observed in left bundle branch block (LBBB) patients. This motion has been proposed as a predictor of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Our goal was to investigate factors that influence its magnitude. Left (LVP) and right ventricular (RVP) pressures and left ventricular (LV) volume were measured in eight canines. After induction of LBBB, LVP and, hence, the transmural septal pressure (PLV-RV = LVP-RVP) increased more slowly (P < 0.01) during the phase when septum moved leftwards. A biventricular finite-element LBBB simulation model confirmed that the magnitude of septal leftward motion depended on reduced rise of PLV-RV. The model showed that leftward septal motion was decreased with shorter activation delay, reduced global or right ventricular (RV) contractility, septal infarction, or when the septum was already displaced into the LV at end diastole by RV volume overload. Both experiments and simulations showed that pre-ejection septal hypercontraction occurs, in part, because the septum performs more of the work pushing blood towards the mitral valve leaflets to close them as the normal lateral wall contribution to this push is lost. Left bundle branch block lowers afterload against pre-ejection septal contraction, expressed as slowed rise of PLV-RV, which is a main cause and determinant of the magnitude of leftward septal motion. The motion may be small or absent due to septal infarct, impaired global or RV contractility or RV volume overload, which should be kept in mind if this motion is to be used in evaluation of CRT response. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Mechanical analysis of congestive heart failure caused by bundle branch block based on an electromechanical canine heart model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jianhong; Xia, Ling; Zhang, Yu; Shou, Guofa; Wei, Qing; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Asynchronous electrical activation, induced by bundle branch block (BBB), can cause reduced ventricular function. However, the effects of BBB on the mechanical function of heart are difficult to assess experimentally. Many heart models have been developed to investigate cardiac properties during BBB but have mainly focused on the electrophysiological properties. To date, the mechanical function of BBB has not been well investigated. Based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine heart model, the mechanical properties of complete left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) were simulated. The anatomical model as well as the fiber orientations of a dog heart was reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI). Using the solutions of reaction-diffusion equations and with a strategy of parallel computation, the asynchronous excitation propagation and intraventricular conduction in BBB was simulated. The mechanics of myocardial tissues were computed with time-, sarcomere length-dependent uniaxial active stress initiated at the time of depolarization. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony of BBB was then investigated using the finite-element method with an eight-node isoparametric element. The simulation results show that (1) there exists inter- and intraventricular systolic dyssynchrony during BBB; (2) RBBB may have more mechanical synchrony and better systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) than LBBB; (3) the ventricles always move toward the early-activated ventricle; and (4) the septum experiences higher stress than left and right ventricular free walls in BBB. The simulation results validate clinical and experimental recordings of heart deformation and provide regional quantitative estimates of ventricular wall strain and stress. The present work suggests that an electromechanical heart model, incorporating real geometry and fiber orientations, may be helpful for better

  9. Intermittent bundle-branch block in patients with accessory atrio-His or atrio-AV nodal pathways. Variants of the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Befeler, B; Castellanos, A; Aranda, J; Gutierrez, R; Lazzara, R

    1976-02-01

    Intracardiac electrophysiological studies were performed in two patients with a documented history of repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Case 1, with short PR interval and narrow QRS complexes had a short AH interval and intermittent right bundle-branch block. Thus the short PR wide QRS syndrome is not always a result of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome but can also be seen in the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome coexisting with bundle-branch block. Case 2, with normal PR and AH at the lower limits of normal, showed the dual pathway response to atrial pacing that can occur in patients with Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome. He also had tachycardia-dependent right bundle-branch block and left posterior hemiblock. Therefore, neither the short PR interval nor the narrow QRS complexes characterized these forms of pre-excitation. The constant features were, from the clinical viewpoint, the occurrence of repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, and electrophysiologically the abnormal response to atrial stimulation.

  10. Ceftriaxone upregulates the glutamate transporter in medial prefrontal cortex and blocks reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in a condition place preference paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Miller, Joseph D.; Wu, Jinhua; Choi, Doo-Sup; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate signaling plays an essential role in drug-seeking behavior. Using reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP), we determined whether ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic known to increase the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter (EAAT2) on glial cells, blocks methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of CPP. Rats acquired methamphetamine CPP following 7 consecutive days of conditioning, during which each animal received pairings of alternating morning methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, IP) and afternoon saline (IP). Animals showing CPP were successfully extinguished with repeated twice daily saline administration over a 7-day period. Ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, IP) was administered (vs. saline) once a day for 7 days during the extinction period. Upon successful extinction, animals received a single dose of methamphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, IP) for reinstatement and were tested for CPP one day later. Using real time PCR, EAAT2 mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were quantified in response to ceftriaxone. Ceftriaxone blocked methamphetamine-triggered reinstatement of CPP and significantly increased EAAT2 mRNA levels in the mPFC, with a trend towards significance in the NAc. In conclusion, Ceftriaxone modulated the expression of the glutamate transporter in a critical region of the cortico-striatal addiction circuitry and attenuated drug-seeking behavior in rats. Further research is needed to test the efficacy of compounds targeting the EAAT2 in human methamphetamine-dependent users. PMID:22521042

  11. A subset of yeast vacuolar protein sorting mutants is blocked in one branch of the exocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harsay, Edina; Schekman, Randy

    2002-01-21

    Exocytic vesicles that accumulate in a temperature-sensitive sec6 mutant at a restrictive temperature can be separated into at least two populations with different buoyant densities and unique cargo molecules. Using a sec6 mutant background to isolate vesicles, we have found that vacuolar protein sorting mutants that block an endosome-mediated route to the vacuole, including vps1, pep12, vps4, and a temperature-sensitive clathrin mutant, missort cargo normally transported by dense exocytic vesicles, such as invertase, into light exocytic vesicles, whereas transport of cargo specific to the light exocytic vesicles appears unaffected. Immunoisolation experiments confirm that missorting, rather than a changed property of the normally dense vesicles, is responsible for the altered density gradient fractionation profile. The vps41Delta and apl6Delta mutants, which block transport of only the subset of vacuolar proteins that bypasses endosomes, sort exocytic cargo normally. Furthermore, a vps10Delta sec6 mutant, which lacks the sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y (CPY), accumulates both invertase and CPY in dense vesicles. These results suggest that at least one branch of the yeast exocytic pathway transits through endosomes before reaching the cell surface. Consistent with this possibility, we show that immunoisolated clathrin-coated vesicles contain invertase.

  12. Detection of inter-patient left and right bundle branch block heartbeats in ECG using ensemble classifiers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Left bundle branch block (LBBB) and right bundle branch block (RBBB) not only mask electrocardiogram (ECG) changes that reflect diseases but also indicate important underlying pathology. The timely detection of LBBB and RBBB is critical in the treatment of cardiac diseases. Inter-patient heartbeat classification is based on independent training and testing sets to construct and evaluate a heartbeat classification system. Therefore, a heartbeat classification system with a high performance evaluation possesses a strong predictive capability for unknown data. The aim of this study was to propose a method for inter-patient classification of heartbeats to accurately detect LBBB and RBBB from the normal beat (NORM). Methods This study proposed a heartbeat classification method through a combination of three different types of classifiers: a minimum distance classifier constructed between NORM and LBBB; a weighted linear discriminant classifier between NORM and RBBB based on Bayesian decision making using posterior probabilities; and a linear support vector machine (SVM) between LBBB and RBBB. Each classifier was used with matching features to obtain better classification performance. The final types of the test heartbeats were determined using a majority voting strategy through the combination of class labels from the three classifiers. The optimal parameters for the classifiers were selected using cross-validation on the training set. The effects of different lead configurations on the classification results were assessed, and the performance of these three classifiers was compared for the detection of each pair of heartbeat types. Results The study results showed that a two-lead configuration exhibited better classification results compared with a single-lead configuration. The construction of a classifier with good performance between each pair of heartbeat types significantly improved the heartbeat classification performance. The results showed a

  13. Detection of inter-patient left and right bundle branch block heartbeats in ECG using ensemble classifiers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huifang; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Ruiping; Hu, Guangshu

    2014-06-05

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) and right bundle branch block (RBBB) not only mask electrocardiogram (ECG) changes that reflect diseases but also indicate important underlying pathology. The timely detection of LBBB and RBBB is critical in the treatment of cardiac diseases. Inter-patient heartbeat classification is based on independent training and testing sets to construct and evaluate a heartbeat classification system. Therefore, a heartbeat classification system with a high performance evaluation possesses a strong predictive capability for unknown data. The aim of this study was to propose a method for inter-patient classification of heartbeats to accurately detect LBBB and RBBB from the normal beat (NORM). This study proposed a heartbeat classification method through a combination of three different types of classifiers: a minimum distance classifier constructed between NORM and LBBB; a weighted linear discriminant classifier between NORM and RBBB based on Bayesian decision making using posterior probabilities; and a linear support vector machine (SVM) between LBBB and RBBB. Each classifier was used with matching features to obtain better classification performance. The final types of the test heartbeats were determined using a majority voting strategy through the combination of class labels from the three classifiers. The optimal parameters for the classifiers were selected using cross-validation on the training set. The effects of different lead configurations on the classification results were assessed, and the performance of these three classifiers was compared for the detection of each pair of heartbeat types. The study results showed that a two-lead configuration exhibited better classification results compared with a single-lead configuration. The construction of a classifier with good performance between each pair of heartbeat types significantly improved the heartbeat classification performance. The results showed a sensitivity of 91.4% and a positive

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of exercise thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Larcos, G; Gibbons, R J; Brown, M L

    1991-09-15

    Recent reports have proposed that abnormal apical or anterior wall perfusion with exercise thallium-201 imaging may increase diagnostic accuracy for disease of the left anterior descending artery in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). To evaluate these suggestions, 83 patients with LBBB who underwent thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and coronary angiography within an interval of 3 months were retrospectively reviewed. There were 59 men and 24 women aged 33 to 84 years (mean 65). Myocardial perfusion to the apex, anterior wall and anterior septum were scored qualitatively by consensus of 2 experienced observers and by quantitative analysis in comparison with a normal data base. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of perfusion defects in these segments were then expressed according to angiographic findings. Significant stenosis of vessels within the left anterior descending artery territory was present in 38 patients. By receiver-operator characteristic analysis, a fixed or reversible defect within the apex by the qualitative method was the best criterion for coronary artery disease. However, although highly sensitive (79 and 85% by the qualitative and quantitative methods, respectively), an apical defect was neither specific (38 and 16%, respectively), nor accurate (57 and 46%, respectively). Perfusion abnormalities in the anterior wall and septum were also of limited diagnostic accuracy. Thus, modified interpretative criteria in patients with LBBB are not clinically useful in the assessment of left anterior descending artery disease.

  15. Myocardial perfusion SPECT identifies patients with left bundle branch block patterns at high risk for future coronary events.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Tim J F; Kelder, Johannes C; Plokker, Herbert W M; Verzijlbergen, J Fred; van Hemel, Norbert M

    2010-04-01

    The value of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) for patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) or right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing seems reduced. The prognosis of patients with only abnormal activation related perfusion defects (AARD) due to LBBB or RVA-pacing is similar to those with a normal MPS. We assessed the prognostic value of MPS in patients with LBBB or RVA pacing. Patients with LBBB or RVA pacing referred for vasodilator stress MPS between April 2002 and January 2006 were analyzed. Group 1 are patients with normal MPS and MPS with AARD. Group 2 are patients with an MPS with a perfusion defect extending outside the AARD area. Events were cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction and coronary revascularization. In Group 1 (101 patients) 12 events and in Group 2 (96 patients) 45 events occurred during a mean follow-up of 2.6 +/- 1.5 years. The prognosis of Group 2 was significantly worse (49%) compared with Group 1 (91%). The annual cardiac death rate was 0.7%/year in Group 1 and 6.4%/year in Group 2 (P < .001). The prognosis of patients with LBBB was not different from those with RVA pacing. Group 2 had a significantly worse cardiac prognosis compared to Group 1. The annual cardiac death rate of <1% in Group 1 warrants a watchful waiting strategy, whereas the cardiac death rate in Group 2 warrants aggressive invasive coronary strategies.

  16. Patients with left bundle branch block pattern and high cardiac risk myocardial SPECT: does the current management suffice?

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, T J F; Kelder, J C; Plokker, H W M; Verzijlbergen, J F; van Hemel, N M

    2013-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) is frequently used for cardiovascular risk stratification. The significance of MPS in patients with abnormal electrical ventricular activation is often questionable. This review assesses the value of MPS for risk stratification of patients with intrinsic left bundle branch block or that due to right ventricular apical pacing. We reviewed the literature by a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1980 to September 2010). The terms prognosis or prognostic value were combined with SPECT and LBBB or pacing or pacemakers. MPS was categorised as low and high risk according to the original definitions. We identified 11 studies suitable for review. A low-risk MPS is associated with a low risk of cardiac events whereas high-risk MPS carries a 4.8-fold increased risk, 95% CI [3.2 - 7.2] (p < 0.0001). Despite secondary prevention and an improved medical and interventional care, these figures have hardly changed over time. A low-risk MPS permits a policy of watchful waiting whereas a high-risk MPS requires further analysis and treatment. The persistent high cardiac death and acute myocardial infarction rate after a high-risk MPS suggest that the current management of these patients does not suffice and needs reconsideration.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of exercise thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with left bundle branch block

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Gibbons, R.J.; Brown, M.L. )

    1991-09-15

    Recent reports have proposed that abnormal apical or anterior wall perfusion with exercise thallium-201 imaging may increase diagnostic accuracy for disease of the left anterior descending artery in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). To evaluate these suggestions, 83 patients with LBBB who underwent thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and coronary angiography within an interval of 3 months were retrospectively reviewed. There were 59 men and 24 women aged 33 to 84 years (mean 65). Myocardial perfusion to the apex, anterior wall and anterior septum were scored qualitatively by consensus of 2 experienced observers and by quantitative analysis in comparison with a normal data base. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of perfusion defects in these segments were then expressed according to angiographic findings. Significant stenosis of vessels within the left anterior descending artery territory was present in 38 patients. By receiver-operator characteristic analysis, a fixed or reversible defect within the apex by the qualitative method was the best criterion for coronary artery disease. However, although highly sensitive (79 and 85% by the qualitative and quantitative methods, respectively), an apical defect was neither specific (38 and 16%, respectively), nor accurate (57 and 46%, respectively). Perfusion abnormalities in the anterior wall and septum were also of limited diagnostic accuracy. Thus, modified interpretative criteria in patients with LBBB are not clinically useful in the assessment of left anterior descending artery disease.

  18. Thallium-201 myocardial SPECT in left bundle branch block: diagnosis of myocardial ischemia with a disease-specific reference database.

    PubMed

    Zupán, Kristóf; Kári, Béla; Fontos, Géza; Dékány, Péter; Pártos, Oszkár

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of a myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reference file for patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Tl-201 stress-redistribution myocardial perfusion SPECT studies of patients with complete, permanent LBBB were reviewed retrospectively. To develop a reference database, 18 patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD) were selected. Left ventricular regional average and standard deviation (SD) values of the reference file images were calculated. The diagnostic performance was tested on perfusion images of 49 patients with LBBB, undergoing both scintigraphic and coronary angiographic evaluation, and was compared with a commercial quantitative analysis system using a general reference database. The LBBB reference file performed significantly better in detecting epicardial CAD than did the general reference database (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.835 +/- 0.06 vs 0.580 +/- 0.08, p < .01). Disease localization also was improved significantly in the territory of the left anterior descending and of the right coronary arteries. The use of a reference file of patients with LBBB and a low likelihood of CAD aids the detection and the localization of myocardial ischemia on Tl-201 myocardial SPECT images of this patient group.

  19. Exercise thallium-201 imaging in complete left bundle branch block and the prevalence of septal perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Jazmati, B.; Sadaniantz, A.; Emaus, S.P.; Heller, G.V. )

    1991-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of septal defects in a generalized referral population, the records of 93 consecutive patients with complete left bundle branch block (BBB) who underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing with thallium-201 myocardial imaging over a 3-year period were reviewed. Segmental analysis of the planar thallium-201 images was performed in a blinded fashion with agreement by consensus. Computerized quantitative analysis of the images also was independently performed, and was correlated with the visual interpretations. Forty-seven patients (51%) had normal images, and 46 (49%) had defects of greater than or equal to 2 segments. In the abnormal studies, only 13 patients (14% of the total population) had septal defects, while a much higher number of patients, 33 (39%), had inferior or apical defects, or both. Coronary angiography was performed in 6 patients with septal defects: Significant narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery was found in 4 patients, a narrowed right coronary artery was found in 1, and normal coronary arteries were seen in the other patient. In conclusion, whereas previous studies have suggested a high percentage of false-positive septal defects in patients with left BBB, this study demonstrates a low prevalence (14%) of septal defects in a large population of unselected patients presenting for exercise thallium-201 imaging. Therefore, exercise thallium-201 imaging remains a useful procedure for evaluating patients with complete left BBB.

  20. Persistent left bundle branch block in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy that improved with low dose carvedilol therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Bunji; Sato, Takao; Nakatani, Yosuke; Katsuda, Shoji; Taguchi, Tomio; Nitta, Yutaka; Hiraiwa, Yoshio

    2008-03-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese woman with dilated cardiomyopathy had complete left ventricular bundle branch block (CLBBB), which had persisted for at least two years. At the time of admission, the serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration was 502 pg/mL (normal range, 0-18 pg/mL), the left ventricular diastolic dimension (LVDd) was 59 mm, the left ventricular systolic dimension (LVDs) was 54 mm, the %fractional shortening (FS) was 8%, and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 19.7% by echocardiography. Low dose carvedilol was initiated for the treatment of heart failure. Adverse effects, such as progression of cardiac conduction disturbances, did not occur after initiation of carvedilol therapy. About one year after initiation of carvedilol therapy, the CLBBB disappeared and a significant improvement in left ventricular function was noted. The LVDd was 44 mm, the LVDs was 30 mm, the %FS was 33%, and the LVEF was 61%, and the serum BNP concentration was decreased to 18.5 pg/mL. We describe a case in which low dose carvedilol was effective for treating both CLBBB and left ventricular function.

  1. Asymptomatic Left Bundle Branch Block Predicts New-Onset Congestive Heart Failure and Death From Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Azadani, Peyman N.; Soleimanirahbar, Ata; Marcus, Gregory M.; Haight, Thaddeus J.; Hollenberg, Milton; Olgin, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Byron K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Left bundle branch block (LBBB) has been proposed as a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We sought to characterize the strength of these associations in a population without preexisting clinical heart disease. Methods The association between LBBB and new-onset congestive heart failure (CHF) or death from cardiovascular diseases was examined in 1,688 participants enrolled in the SPPARCS study who were free of known CHF or previous myocardial infarction. SPPARCS is a community-based cohort study in residents of Sonoma, California that are > 55 years. Medical history and 12-lead ECGs were obtained every 2 years for up to 6 years of follow-up. LBBB at enrollment or year 2 was considered “baseline” and assessed as a predictor of CHF and cardiovascular death ascertained at years 4 and 6. Results The prevalence of LBBB at baseline was 2.5% (n = 42). During 6 years of follow-up, 70 (4.8%) people developed new CHF. Incidence of CHF was higher in patients with LBBB than in participants without LBBB. This association persisted after controlling for potential confounders (odds ratio (OR): 2.85; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01 - 8.02; P = 0.047). A higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases was also found in participants with LBBB after adjusting for potential confounders (OR: 2.35, 95%CI: 1.02 - 5.41; P = 0.044). Conclusions LBBB in the absence of a clinically detectable heart disease is associated with new-onset CHF and death from cardiovascular diseases. Further study is warranted to determine if additional diagnostic testing or earlier treatment in patients with asymptomatic LBBB can decrease cardiovascular morbidity or mortality.

  2. Assessment of Smith Algorithms for the Diagnosis of Acute Myocardial Infarction in the Presence of Left Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Andrea; Anguera, Ignasi; Rodríguez, Marcos; Sionis, Alessandro; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Rodríguez, Jany; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Sánchez-Salado, José Carlos; Díaz-Nuila, Mario; Masotti, Mónica; Villuendas, Roger; Dallaglio, Paolo; Gómez-Hospital, Joan Antoni; Cequier, Ángel

    2017-07-01

    Recently, a new electrocardiography algorithm has shown promising results for the the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in the presence of left bundle branch block (LBBB). We aimed to assess these new electrocardiography rules in a cohort of patients referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Retrospective observational cohort study that included all patients with suspected myocardial infarction and LBBB on the presenting electrocardiogram, referred for pPCI to 4 tertiary hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. A total of 145 patients were included. Fifty four (37%) had an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) equivalent. Among patients with STEMI, 25 (46%) presented in Killip class III or IV, and in-hospital mortality was 15%. Smith I and II rules performed better than Sgarbossa algorithms and showed good specificity (90% and 97%, respectively) but their sensitivity was 67% and 54%, respectively. In a strategy guided by Smith I or Smith II rules, 18 (33%) or 25 (46%) patients with STEMI would have not received a pPCI, respectively. Moreover, the severity and prognosis of STEMI patients was similar regardless of the positivity of Smith rules. Cardiac biomarkers were positive in 54% of non-STEMI patients, limiting their usefulness for initial diagnostic screening. Diagnosis of STEMI in the presence of LBBB remains a challenge. Smith rules can be useful but are limited by suboptimal sensitivity. The search for new electrocardiography algorithms should be encouraged to avoid unnecessary aggressive treatments in the majority of patients, while providing timely reperfusion to a high-risk subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrocardiogram Performance in the Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Patients With Left Bundle Branch Block

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Paula Freitas Martins; Luna Filho, Bráulio; Costa, Francisco de Assis; Bombig, Maria Teresa Nogueira; de Souza, Dilma; Bianco, Henrique Tria; Oliveira Filho, Japy Angelini; Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; Póvoa, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular events, and its detection usually begins with an electrocardiogram (ECG). Objective To evaluate the impact of complete left bundle branch block (CLBBB) in hypertensive patients in the diagnostic performance of LVH by ECG. Methods A total of 2,240 hypertensive patients were studied. All of them were submitted to an ECG and an echocardiogram (ECHO). We evaluated the most frequently used electrocardiographic criteria for LVH diagnosis: Cornell voltage, Cornell voltage product, Sokolow-Lyon voltage, Sokolow-Lyon product, RaVL, RaVL+SV3, RV6/RV5 ratio, strain pattern, left atrial enlargement, and QT interval. LVH identification pattern was the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) obtained by ECHO in all participants. Results Mean age was 11.3 years ± 58.7 years, 684 (30.5%) were male and 1,556 (69.5%) were female. In patients without CLBBB, ECG sensitivity to the presence of LVH varied between 7.6 and 40.9%, and specificity varied between 70.2% and 99.2%. In participants with CLBBB, sensitivity to LVH varied between 11.9 and 95.2%, and specificity between 6.6 and 96.6%. Among the criteria with the best performance for LVH with CLBBB, Sokolow-Lyon, for a voltage of ≥ 3,0mV, stood out with a sensitivity of 22.2% (CI 95% 15.8 - 30.8) and specificity of 88.3% (CI 95% 77.8 - 94.2). Conclusion In hypertensive patients with CLBBB, the most often used criteria for the detection of LVH with ECG showed significant decrease in performance with regards to sensitivity and specificity. In this scenario, Sokolow-Lyon criteria with voltage ≥3,0mV presented the best performance. PMID:27992034

  4. Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients With Right Bundle Branch Block on Presentation.

    PubMed

    Chan, William K; Goodman, Shaun G; Brieger, David; Fox, Keith A A; Gale, Chris P; Chew, Derek P; Udell, Jacob A; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Huynh, Thao; Yan, Raymond T; Singh, Sheldon M; Yan, Andrew T

    2016-03-01

    We examined the relations between right bundle branch block (RBBB) and clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes among a broad spectrum of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Admission electrocardiograms of patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) electrocardiogram substudy and the Canadian ACS Registry I were analyzed independently at a blinded core laboratory. We performed multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess the independent prognostic significance of admission RBBB on in-hospital and 6-month mortality. Of 11,830 eligible patients with ACS (mean age 65; 66% non-ST-elevation ACS), 5% had RBBB. RBBB on admission was associated with older age, male sex, more cardiovascular risk factors, worse Killip class, and higher GRACE risk score (all p <0.01). Patients with RBBB less frequently received in-hospital cardiac catheterization, coronary revascularization, or reperfusion therapy (all p <0.05). The RBBB group had higher unadjusted in-hospital (8.8% vs 3.8%, p <0.001) and 6-month mortality rates (15.1% vs 7.6%, p <0.001). After adjusting for established prognostic factors in the GRACE risk score, RBBB was a significant independent predictor of in-hospital death (odds ratio 1.45, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.07, p = 0.039), but not cumulative 6-month mortality (odds ratio 1.29, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.74, p = 0.098). There was no significant interaction between RBBB and the type of ACS for either in-hospital or 6-month mortality (both p >0.50). In conclusion, across a spectrum of ACS, RBBB was associated with preexisting cardiovascular disease, high-risk clinical features, fewer cardiac interventions, and worse unadjusted outcomes. After adjusting for components of the GRACE risk score, RBBB was a significant independent predictor of early mortality.

  5. Adaptive CRT in patients with normal AV conduction and left bundle branch block: Does QRS duration matter?

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiro; Lustgarten, Daniel; Cerkvenik, Jeffrey; Birnie, David; Gasparini, Maurizio; Lee, Kathy Lia-Fun; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Varma, Niraj; Lemke, Bernd; Starling, Randall C; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2017-08-01

    Adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy (aCRT) is a dynamic optimization algorithm which paces only the left ventricle (LV) when atrio-ventricular (AV) conduction is normal, thus reducing right ventricular (RV) pacing. However, the impact of QRS duration on aCRT efficacy remains uncertain. We examined whether QRS duration impacts aCRT effectiveness in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) and preserved AV conduction. Randomized patients in the Adaptive CRT trial, which enrolled NYHA III/IV patients, were used in this analysis. Patients were randomized to receive aCRT or echo-optimized bi-ventricular CRT (control arm). Endpoints for this analysis were clinical composite score (CCS) at 6months post-implant and time to first heart failure (HF) hospitalization or death. Among the 199 patients with LBBB and normal AV intervals at baseline, 80 patients (40%) had a baseline moderately wide QRS of 120-150ms. In this subgroup, a greater proportion of aCRT patients had an improved CCS (79% vs. 50%) at 6months compared to the control group (p=0.03). There was also a trend toward a lower risk of death or HF hospitalization (hazard ratio: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.24-1.15; p=0.10) in the moderately wide QRS subgroup with aCRT compared to the control arm. In the wide QRS subgroup, the efficacy was comparable in both treatment arms. Adaptive CRT was associated with improved patient outcomes over echo-optimized bi-ventricular CRT in patients with preserved AV conduction, LBBB, and moderately wide QRS. The adaptive cardiac resynchronization therapy trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00980057) was sponsored by Medtronic plc, Mounds View, MN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic Implication of the QRS Axis and its Association with Myocardial Scarring in Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Soon; Cha, Myung-jin; Choi, Eue-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Left bundle branch block (LBBB) with left axis deviation (LAD) has a worse prognosis than LBBB with a normal axis, and myocardial dysfunction has been suggested as a cause of left axis deviation. This study investigated the prognostic significance of the QRS axis in patients with LBBB and analyzed its relationship with the amount of myocardial scarring. Subjects and Methods A total of 829 patients were diagnosed with LBBB at Seoul National University Hospital from October 2004 to June 2014. Of these, 314 who were asymptomatic and had no previous history of cardiac disease were included in the present study. Myocardial scarring was calculated using the Selvester QRS scoring system, and LAD was defined as a QRS axis between -180° and -30°. Results Of the total patients, 91 (29%) had LAD, and patients were followed for a median of 30 months. During follow-up, two patients were hospitalized for de novo heart failure, four had pacemaker implants, and 10 died. There was a significant inverse correlation between myocardial scar score and the QRS axis (r=-0.356, p<0.001). Patients with concomitant LAD had a higher rate of major cardiac adverse events compared with patients with a normal axis (5.5% vs. 1.3%, log-rank p=0.010); the prognostic value was attenuated in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 4.117; 95% confidence interval 0.955-17.743; p=0.058). Conclusion Concomitant LAD is an indicator of poor prognosis for patients with LBBB and may be associated with greater myocardial scarring. PMID:28382083

  7. Relation of bundle branch block to long-term (four-year) mortality in hospitalized patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Barsheshet, Alon; Goldenberg, Ilan; Garty, Moshe; Gottlieb, Shmuel; Sandach, Amir; Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Eldar, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2011-02-15

    There is controversy regarding type of bundle branch block (BBB) that is associated with increased mortality risk in patients with heart failure (HF). The present study was designed to explore the association between BBB pattern and long-term mortality in hospitalized patients with systolic HF. Risk of 4-year all-cause mortality was assessed in 1,888 hospitalized patients with systolic HF (left ventricular ejection function <50%) without a pacemaker in a prospective national survey. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to compare mortality risk in patients with right BBB (RBBB; 10%), left BBB (LBBB; 14%), and no BBB (76%) on admission electrocardiogram. At 4 years of follow up, mortality rates were highest in patients with RBBB (69%), intermediate in those with LBBB (63%), and lowest in those without BBB (50%, p <0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant 36% increased mortality risk in patients with RBBB versus no BBB (p = 0.002) but no significant difference in mortality risk for patients with LBBB versus no BBB (hazard ratio 1.04, p = 0.66). RBBB versus LBBB was associated with a 29% (p = 0.035) increased risk for 4-year mortality in the total population and with a 58% (p = 0.015) increased risk in patients with ejection fraction <30%. In conclusion, RBBB but not LBBB on admission electrocardiogram is associated with a significant increased long-term mortality risk in hospitalized patients with systolic HF. Deleterious effects of RBBB compared to LBBB appear to be more pronounced in patients with more advanced left ventricular dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early Changes in QRS Frequency Following Cardiac Resynchronization Predict Hemodynamic Response in Left Bundle Branch Block Patients.

    PubMed

    Niebauer, Mark J; Rickard, John; Tchou, Patrick J; Varma, Niraj

    2016-05-01

    QRS characteristics are the cornerstone of patient selection in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and the presence of left bundle branch block (LBBB) and baseline QRS ≥150 milliseconds portends a good outcome. We previously showed that baseline QRS frequency analysis adds predictive value to LBBB alone and have hypothesized that a change in frequency characteristics following CRT may produce additional predictive value. We examined the QRS frequency characteristics of 182 LBBB patients before and soon after CRT. Patients were assigned to responder and nonresponder groups. Responders were defined by a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) ≥15% following CRT. We analyzed the QRS in ECG leads I, AVF, and V3 before and soon after CRT using the discrete Fourier transform algorithm. The percentage of total QRS power within discrete frequency intervals before and after CRT was calculated. The reduction in lead V3 power <10 Hz was the best indicator of response. Baseline QRS width was similar between the responders and nonresponders (162.2 ± 17.2 milliseconds vs. 158 ± 22.1 milliseconds, respectively; P = 0.180). Responders exhibited a greater reduction in QRS power <10 Hz (-17.0 ± 11.9% vs. -6.6 ± 12.5%; P < 0.001) and a significant AUC (0.743; P < 0.001). A ≥8% decline in QRS power <10 Hz produced the best predictive values (PPV = 84%, NPV = 59%). Importantly, when patients with baseline QRS <150 milliseconds were compared, the AUC improved (0.892, P < 0.001). Successful CRT produces a significant reduction in QRS power below 10 Hz, particularly when baseline QRS <150 milliseconds. These results indicate that QRS frequency changes after CRT provide additional predictive value to QRS alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Evaluation of T-Wave Morphology in Patients With Left Bundle Branch Block and Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meyers, H Pendell; Jaffa, Elias; Smith, Stephen W; Drake, Weiying; Limkakeng, Alexander T

    2016-09-01

    T-wave morphology in the setting of left bundle branch block (LBBB) has been proposed as an indicator of myocardial ischemia. We sought to identify T-wave morphology findings in patients with LBBB that predict non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). We hypothesized that two or more contiguous leads with concordant T waves would be predictive of NSTEMI. This was a retrospective cohort study performed by chart review in a tertiary care center emergency department. We identified a consecutive cohort who presented with LBBB and symptoms consistent with acute coronary syndrome. Exclusion criteria were diastolic blood pressure > 120 mm Hg, heart rate > 130 beats/min, positive pressure ventilation, potassium > 5.5 mEq/L, and cardiac arrest without prearrest electrocardiogram (ECG) available. We collected ECGs and classified T waves into five categories based on morphology, blinded to clinical outcome. Clinical outcome data were collected blinded to ECG findings. Those with ECG diagnostic of STEMI by modified Sgarbossa criteria were excluded from the primary analysis, which was sensitivity and specificity of two or more contiguous leads with concordant T waves for NSTEMI. There were 246 patients included. Mean age was 73 years; 160 (65%) were female, and 32 had myocardial infarction. Thirty percent had two or more contiguous precordial leads with partially or completely concordant T waves. For NSTEMI, the sensitivity and specificity of this finding were 19% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8-37) and 68% (95% CI 61-74). We found no clinically useful relationship between T-wave concordance and myocardial infarction in our patient population. Future investigation of LBBB T-wave morphology should focus on alternative populations and findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Supernormal and alternating conduction in intermittent bundle branch block and intermittent or concealed ventricular preexcitation. Electrophysiological study, mechanisms and clinical considerations].

    PubMed

    Costantini, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    Supernormal and alternating conduction are not rare in clinical arrhythmology, detectable at various levels of the conduction system in different pathophysiological conditions, and often associated, so as to justify the search for a possible link between them. In order to define a possible relationship between supernormal and alternating conduction, the electrophysiological data of two patient groups were analyzed. Group 1 included 9 patients with intermittent bundle branch block in the presence of supernormal conduction through the pathological branch. Group 2 included 16 patients with ventricular preexcitation, intermittent or concealed, in the presence of supernormal conduction through the atrioventricular accessory pathway. In group 1, 8 patients had a phase 3 and 1 patient a phase 3 and phase 4 bundle branch block. In all 9 patients, the area of phase 3 block was interrupted by a window of unexpected conductivity detectable by atrial premature stimulation. In 7/9 cases, by modulating the atrial rate, alternating conduction through the branch was observed, and the cardiac cycle of occurrence of the phenomenon was in the range of supernormal conduction in 6/7 cases. In group 2, 11 patients showed conduction through the accessory pathway only for a narrow range of cardiac cycles, during atrial premature stimulation. One patient had a prolonged accessory pathway refractory period (phase 3 block), but a window of unexpected supernormal conduction within the refractory zone was observed at atrial premature stimulation. Another patient presented a tachycardia and bradycardia-dependent block along the accessory pathway (phase 3 and phase 4 block) and the phase 3 block area was interrupted by a window of supernormal conduction. In the other three cases, supernormal conduction was manifested as unexpected resumption of conductivity through the accessory pathway for atrial cycles more precocious than the actual duration of its effective refractoriness. By modulating the

  11. ECG Case of the Month: IRREGULARLY IRREGULAR CARDIAC RHYTHM IN AN 87-YEAR-OLD WOMAN. MULTIFOCAL ATRIAL TACHYCARDIA; RIGHT BUNDLE BRANCH BLOCK.

    PubMed

    Glancy, D Luke; Chen, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal atrial tachycardia; right bundle branch block. The rhythm is totally irregular at a rate of 103 beats/min and originally was read as atrial fibrillation. Close examination, however, reveals a P wave before each QRS and ≥ 3 different P- wave morphologies with no dominant morphology. These are the criteria for multifocal atrial tachycardia MAT, also known as chaotic atrial rhythm,1 chaotic atrial tachycardia,2 and chaotic atrial mechanism.3 The wide QRS complexes ≥ 0.12 s with broad S waves in leads I, aVL, and the lateral precordial leads and broad R or R´ waves in leads aVR and V1 indicate right bundle branch block. MAT is frequently seen in patients with acute pulmonary or other non-cardiac disease and tends to resolve when the underlying disease is brought under control. Patients with MAT also tend to have bouts of other arrhythmias,2 and 3 months earlier this.

  12. Thoracic interfascial nerve block for breast surgery in a pregnant woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seok-Hwa; Kim, Bum June; Song, Seunghyun; Yoon, Yeomyung

    2017-01-01

    Regional anesthesia for non-obstetric surgery in parturients is a method to decrease patient and fetal risk during general anesthesia. Thoracic interfascial nerve block can be used as an analgesic technique for surgical procedures of the thorax. The Pecs II block is an interfascial block that targets not only the medial and lateral pectoral nerves, but also the lateral cutaneous branch of the intercostal nerve. Pecto-intercostal fascial block (PIFB) targets the anterior cutaneous branch of the intercostal nerve. The authors successfully performed a modified Pecs II block and PIFB without complications in a parturient who refused general anesthesia for breast surgery. PMID:28367293

  13. Intermittent bundle-branch block in patients with accessory atrio-His or atrio-AV nodal pathways. Variants of the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Befeler, B; Castellanos, A; Aranda, J; Gutierrez, R; Lazzara, R

    1976-01-01

    Intracardiac electrophysiological studies were performed in two patients with a documented history of repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Case 1, with short PR interval and narrow QRS complexes had a short AH interval and intermittent right bundle-branch block. Thus the short PR wide QRS syndrome is not always a result of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome but can also be seen in the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome coexisting with bundle-branch block. Case 2, with normal PR and AH at the lower limits of normal, showed the dual pathway response to atrial pacing that can occur in patients with Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome. He also had tachycardia-dependent right bundle-branch block and left posterior hemiblock. Therefore, neither the short PR interval nor the narrow QRS complexes characterized these forms of pre-excitation. The constant features were, from the clinical viewpoint, the occurrence of repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, and electrophysiologically the abnormal response to atrial stimulation. PMID:1259830

  14. Impact of intraventricular conduction delay on coronary haemodynamics: a study with intracoronary Doppler in patients with bundle branch blocks and normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Sattler, Katherine; von Birgelen, Clemens; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Rechenberg, Wolfram; Sack, Stefan; Dagres, Nikolaos; Erbel, Raimund

    2006-03-01

    The impact of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left bundle branch block (LBBB) on myocardial perfusion is not completely understood as data are often blurred by underlying cardiac disease. The present study investigates whether conduction delays per se affect coronary perfusion-an indirect measure of myocardial oxygen demand. Intracoronary Doppler and ultrasound were performed in 8 patients with RBBB, 10 patients with LBBB, and 10 control subjects. All patients had angiographically normal coronary arteries and normal left ventricular function. Baseline (bAPV) and adenosine-induced hyperaemic average flow velocity and coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) were measured in left anterior descending arteries. Intravascular ultrasound showed no difference in lumen cross-sectional area and plaque burden between groups. Patients with RBBB and LBBB had higher bAPV values than controls (19.0 +/- 4.9, 21.9 +/- 5.1, and 14.6 +/- 2.4 cm/s, respectively; ANOVA P = 0.003). There was no difference between patients with LBBB and RBBB compared with controls in CFVR (2.8 +/- 0.5, 3.0 +/- 1.0, and 3.4 +/- 0.7, respectively; ANOVA P = 0.21). Bundle branch blocks, in particular LBBB, are associated with an increased coronary flow velocity, which indicates enhanced myocardial oxygen demand on the basis of mechanoenergetic disturbance. This may contribute to the unfavourable outcome of patients with intraventricular conduction delay.

  15. Clinical and angiographic importance of right bundle branch block in the setting of acute anterior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Uğur; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Tavil, Yusuf; Ozdemir, Murat; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-04-01

    To investigate functional status of patients (Killip class), left ventricular contractility, angiographic anatomy and severity of coronary lesions in patients with and without right bundle branch block (RBBB) in the setting of anterior myocardial infarction (MI). Patients who admitted to coronary care unit with the diagnosis of acute anterior MI between 1999 and 2005 were retrospectively searched from our database. Out of 792 patients, 37 had RBBB (RBBB group) either at admission or in the course of anterior MI. Forty patients who developed no intraventricular conduction defect during the course of anterior MI with the same demographic characteristics were selected as the control group. Out of 37 patients, 30 had RBBB on admission and 7 developed RBBB in the course of acute MI. Left anterior descending artery (LAD) proximal lesion was more commonly detected in the RBBB group [23 (62.2%) vs. 11 (27.5%) patients, p=0.003]. Left ventricular ejection fraction was lower (33.0+/-4.2% vs 36.7+/-4.9%, p=0.003) and end-systolic volume was higher (84.1+/-24.9 ml vs 74.6+/-22.0 ml, p=0.012) in patients with RBBB. Number of patients with high Killip grade (III and IV) was more in the RBBB group [7 (18.9%) vs 3 (7.5%), RR: 1.75, %95 CI 0.92-3.32, p=0.14], and number of patients with Killip grade I was more in the control group [34 (85.0%) vs 22 (59.5%), p=0.012]. Besides mean Killip class was higher in the RBBB group (1.65+/-0.90 vs 1.25+/-0.67, p=0.03). Three patients (8.1%) in the RBBB group and 2 patients (5.0%) in the control group died during hospitalization (p=0.67). Left ventricular ejection fraction decreases and Killip grade increases in case of RBBB in the setting of acute anterior MI. Culprit lesion in patients with RBBB is more commonly a LAD proximal lesion and threatened myocardial tissue is larger in patients with RBBB.

  16. Assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in left bundle branch block canine model: Comparison between cine and tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Saporito, Salvatore; van Assen, Hans C; Houthuizen, Patrick; Aben, Jean-Paul M M; Strik, Marc; van Middendorp, Lars B; Prinzen, Frits W; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    To compare cine and tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for left ventricular dyssynchrony assessment in left bundle branch block (LBBB), using the time-to-peak contraction timing, and a novel approach based on cross-correlation. We evaluated a canine model dataset (n = 10) before (pre-LBBB) and after induction of isolated LBBB (post-LBBB). Multislice short-axis tagged and cine MRI images were acquired using a 1.5 T scanner. We computed contraction time maps by cross-correlation, based on the timing of radial wall motion and of circumferential strain. Finally, we estimated dyssynchrony as the standard deviation of the contraction time over the different regions of the myocardium. Induction of LBBB resulted in a significant increase in dyssynchrony (cine: 13.0 ± 3.9 msec for pre-LBBB, and 26.4 ± 5.0 msec for post-LBBB, P = 0.005; tagged: 17.1 ± 5.0 msec at for pre-LBBB, and 27.9 ± 9.8 msec for post-LBBB, P = 0.007). Dyssynchrony assessed by cine and tagged MRI were in agreement (r = 0.73, P = 0.0003); differences were in the order of time difference between successive frames of 20 msec (bias: -2.9 msec; limit of agreement: 10.1 msec). Contraction time maps were derived; agreement was found in the contraction patterns derived from cine and tagged MRI (mean difference in contraction time per segment: 3.6 ± 13.7 msec). This study shows that the proposed method is able to quantify dyssynchrony after induced LBBB in an animal model. Cine-assessed dyssynchrony agreed with tagged-derived dyssynchrony, in terms of magnitude and spatial direction. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:956-963. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Greater response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with true complete left bundle branch block: a PREDICT substudy.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Mark Jonathan; Green, Martin S; Redpath, Calum J; Nery, Pablo B; Keren, Arieh; Beanlands, Robert S; Birnie, David H

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) benefits patients with heart failure and a wide QRS complex. Still, one-third derive no clinical benefit and a majority of patients demonstrate no objective improvement of left ventricular (LV) function. Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is a strong predictor of response to CRT. We evaluated whether absence of electrocardiogram (ECG) markers of residual left bundle (LB) conduction in guideline-defined LBBB predicted a greater response to CRT. An r wave ≥1 mm in lead V1 (r-V1) and/or a q wave ≥1 mm in lead aVL (q-aVL) was used to identify patients with residual LB conduction. Forty patients with a wide QRS were prospectively enrolled and subdivided into three groups: complete LBBB (cLBBB), LBBB without r-V1 or q-aVL (n = 12); LBBB with residual LB conduction (rLBBB), LBBB with r-V1 and/or q-aVL (n = 15); and non-specific intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD), (n = 13). Following CRT: mean change in left ventricular ejection fraction was 11.9 ± 11.9% in cLBBB, 3.8 ± 5.4% in rLBBB (P= 0.045), and 2.5 ± 4.4% in IVCD (P= 0.02 cLBBB vs. IVCD); mean reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume was 26.4 ± 39.2% in cLBBB, 14.3 ± 22.9% in rLBBB (P= 0.35), and 5.6 ± 17.3% in IVCD (P= 0.11 cLBBB vs. IVCD); mean change in native QRS duration was -8.0 ± 11.0 ms in cLBBB, -0.8 ± 8.24 ms in rLBBB (P= 0.07), and 0.15 ± 8.0 ms in IVCD (P= 0.048 cLBBB vs. IVCD). In patients with guideline-defined LBBB, the absence of ECG markers of residual LB conduction was predictive of a greater improvement in LV function with CRT.

  18. Fetal development of deep back muscles in the human thoracic region with a focus on transversospinalis muscles and the medial branch of the spinal nerve posterior ramus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuo; Koizumi, Masahiro; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Bao Jian; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Fetal development of human deep back muscles has not yet been fully described, possibly because of the difficulty in identifying muscle bundle directions in horizontal sections. Here, we prepared near-frontal sections along the thoracic back skin (eight fetuses) as well as horizontal sections (six fetuses) from 14 mid-term fetuses at 9–15 weeks of gestation. In the deep side of the trapezius and rhomboideus muscles, the CD34-positive thoracolumbar fascia was evident even at 9 weeks. Desmin-reactivity was strong and homogeneous in the superficial muscle fibers in contrast to the spotty expression in the deep fibers. Thus, in back muscles, formation of the myotendinous junction may start from the superficial muscles and advance to the deep muscles. The fact that developing intramuscular tendons were desmin-negative suggested little possibility of a secondary change from the muscle fibers to tendons. We found no prospective spinalis muscle or its tendinous connections with other muscles. Instead, abundant CD68-positive macrophages along the spinous process at 15 weeks suggested a change in muscle attachment, an event that may result in a later formation of the spinalis muscle. S100-positive intramuscular nerves exhibited downward courses from the multifidus longus muscle in the original segment to the rotatores brevis muscles in the inferiorly adjacent level. The medial cutaneous nerve had already reached the thoracolumbar fascia at 9 weeks, but by 15 weeks the nerve could not penetrate the trapezius muscle. Finally, we propose a folded myotomal model of the primitive transversospinalis muscle that seems to explain a fact that the roofing tile-like configuration of nerve twigs in the semispinalis muscle is reversed in the multifidus and rotatores muscles. PMID:21954879

  19. Trastuzumab (Herceptin)-associated cardiomyopathy presented as new onset of complete left bundle-branch block mimicking acute coronary syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chung-Ming; Chu, Kai-Ming; Yang, Shin-Ping; Cheng, Shu-Mung; Wang, Wen-Been

    2009-09-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is well documented in reducing suffering and mortality from breast cancer. The clinically most important side effect of Herceptin is cardiotoxicity, which is reported in 2.6% to 4.5% of patients receiving trastuzumab alone and in as many as 27% of patients when trastuzumab is combined with an anthracycline in metastatic disease. We reported the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department (ED) because of chest pain and shortness of breath. On physical examination, holosystolic murmur over apex could be heard. Pulmonary and abdominal examinations were unremarkable. Twelve-lead electrocardiography showed sinus tachycardia and new onset of complete left bundle-branch block. Emergent transthoracic echocardiography revealed generalized hypokinesia of left ventricle and akinesia over interventricular septum and apex. She subsequently underwent immediate coronary angiography that revealed normal coronary angiography, and left ventriculogram revealed generalized hypokinesia with severe left ventricle dysfunction with ejection fraction of 33%. During right heart catheterization and endomyocardial biopsy, cardiac tamponade developed and was successfully relieved by pericardial window. She was discharged event-free 3 weeks later with conservative treatment. Although new onset of complete left bundle-branch block in a patient with chest pain may be acute coronary syndrome, careful review of medicine history is mandatory to avoid unnecessary procedure and complications.

  20. Right bundle branch block without overt heart disease predicts higher risk of pacemaker implantation: the study of atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Saburo; Kawano, Hiroaki; Makita, Naomasa; Ichimaru, Shinichiro; Kaku, Takashi; Haruta, Daisuke; Hida, Ayumi; Sera, Nobuko; Imaizumi, Misa; Nakashima, Eiji; Maemura, Koji; Akahoshi, Masazumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the clinical course of complete right bundle branch block (RBBB) or RBBB with axis deviation (AD) in terms of subsequent pacemaker implantation for high-degree atrioventricular (AV) block or sick sinus syndrome (SSS). Among the 16,170 atomic-bomb survivors in our biennial health examination between July 1967 and December 2010, we detected 520 newly-acquired RBBB subjects with no organic heart disease, and selected 1038 age- (at RBBB diagnosis) and sex-matched subjects without RBBB to serve as comparison subjects. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of pacemaker implantation due to all causes, AV block or SSS between RBBB and comparison subjects and between RBBB subjects with and without AD. The risk of pacemaker implantation for RBBB was 4.79 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.89-12.58; P=0.001), 3.77 (95% CI, 1.09-13.07; P=0.036), and 6.28 (95% CI, 1.24-31.73, P=0.026) when implantation was for all causes, AV block and SSS, respectively. RBBB subjects with AD had a higher risk for all-cause pacemaker implantation than subjects without AD (HR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.00-9.13, P=0.049). RBBB subjects with AD were younger than subjects without AD at the time of RBBB diagnosis (59.4±7.6 vs 74.4±3.1 years old, P=0.019), and their progression from diagnosis to pacemaker implantation took longer (15.1±6.6 vs 6.4±3.0 years, P=0.032). RBBB, especially with AD, progresses to AV block and SSS that requires pacemaker implantation; the mechanisms by which the conduction defect progresses differ among patients with and without AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Defect images in stress thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in patients with complete left bundle branch block: comparison of exercise stress and pharmacological stress.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideki; Shimizu, Mitsuyuki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Okazaki, Fumiko; Mizokami, Tsuneo; Kusaka, Masafumi; Uehara, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2007-04-01

    Stress thallium-201 (201Tl) myocardial scintigraphy can demonstrate perfusion abnormalities, especially in the septum in patients with complete left bundle branch block (CLBBB) even with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Differences in the images between exercise and pharmacological stress 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy were evaluated in patients with CLBBB and normal coronary arteries. Forty-five patients with CLBBB underwent exercise stress using treadmill or pharmacological (adenosine triphosphate) stress 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy from October 1997 to February 2003. Patients with myocardial diseases were excluded, such as cardiomyopathy and coronary artery diseases detected by echocardiography and/or cardiac catheterization. The myocardial segment was classified according to the American Heart Association style for coronary artery disease. Peak blood pressure levels and heart rates were significantly higher in the exercise stress group than in the pharmacological stress group (p < 0.001). The rate of defects in stress images was significantly higher in the exercise stress group (72.4%; 21/29 cases) than in the pharmacological stress group (18.8%; 3/16 cases) (p < 0.01). The rate of redistribution of observed defects in delayed images was 76.2% (16/21 cases) in the exercise stress group, and 0% (0/3 cases)in the pharmacological stress group (p < 0.01). The myocardial segments showing defects were different between the exercise stress group and the pharmacological stress group. Patients with CLBBB showed different frequencies of defects by stress 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy according to the stress method. Moreover, defects also occured in areas other than the septum. Blood pressure and heart rate were involved in the mechanisms of defects in left bundle branch block.

  2. Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT in patients with left bundle branch block suspected for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Elsemiek M; Timmer, Jorik R; Mouden, Mohamed; Knollema, Siert; Jager, Pieter L; Ottervanger, Jan Paul

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on sequential single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/ CT imaging starting with stress-first SPECT. Consecutive symptomatic low- to intermediate-risk patients without a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for SPECT/CT were included from an observational registry. If stress SPECT was abnormal, additional rest SPECT and, if feasible, coronary CT angiography (CCTA) were acquired. Of the 5,018 patients, 218 (4.3 %) demonstrated LBBB. Patients with LBBB were slightly older than patients without LBBB (65±12 vs. 61±11 years, p<0.001). Stress SPECT was more frequently abnormal in patients with LBBB (82 % vs. 46 %, p<0.001). After reviewing stress and rest images, SPECT was normal in 43 % of the patients with LBBB, compared to 77 % of the patients without LBBB (p<0.001). Sixty-four of the 124 patients with LBBB and abnormal stress-rest SPECT underwent CCTA (52 %), which could exclude obstructive CAD in 46 of the patients (72 %). Sequential SPECT/CT imaging starting with stress SPECT is not the optimal imaging protocol in patients with LBBB, as the majority of these patients have potentially false-positive stress SPECT. First-line testing using CCTA may be more appropriate in low- to intermediate-risk patients with LBBB. • Stress-first SPECT imaging is attractive if many patients demonstrate normal stress perfusion. • The majority of left bundle branch block patients have abnormal stress-first SPECT. • Coronary CT excluded obstructive CAD in many LBBB patients with abnormal SPECT. • Stress-first SPECT imaging is not the optimal imaging protocol in LBBB patients. • In LBBB patients imaging with initial coronary CT may be more appropriate.

  3. Comparison of the relation between left ventricular anatomy and QRS duration in patients with cardiomyopathy with versus without left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dulciana D; Wu, Katherine C; Loring, Zak; Galeotti, Loriano; Gerstenblith, Gary; Tomaselli, Gordon; Weiss, Robert G; Wagner, Galen S; Strauss, David G

    2014-05-15

    QRS duration (QRSd) is used to diagnose left bundle branch block (LBBB) and is important to determine cardiac resynchronization therapy eligibility. The same QRSd thresholds established decades ago are used for all patients. However, significant interpatient variability of normal QRSd exists, and individualized QRSd thresholds might improve diagnosis and intervention strategies. Previous work reported left ventricular (LV) mass and papillary muscle location predicted QRSd in healthy subjects, but the relation in diseased ventricles is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between LV anatomy and QRSd in patients with cardiomyopathy. Patients referred for primary prevention implantable defibrillators (n = 166) received cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and those with normal conduction (without bundle branch or fascicular block) and LBBB were studied. The LV mass, length, internal diameter, LV end-diastolic volume, septal and lateral wall thicknesses, and papillary muscle location were measured. In patients with normal conduction, LV length (r = 0.35, p <0.001), mass (r = 0.32, p <0.001), diameter (r = 0.20, p = 0.03), and septal wall thickness (r = 0.20, p = 0.03) had positive correlations with QRSd. In patients with LBBB, LV length (r = 0.32, p = 0.03), mass (r = 0.39, p = 0.01), diameter (r = 0.34, p = 0.02), and LV end-diastolic volume (r = 0.32, p = 0.04) had positive correlations with QRSd. Contrary to previous studies in healthy subjects, papillary muscle angle (location) was not associated with QRSd in cardiomyopathy patients with normal conduction or LBBB. In conclusion, increasing LV anatomical measurements were associated with increasing QRSd in patients with cardiomyopathy. Future work should investigate the use of LV anatomical measurements in developing individualized QRSd thresholds for diagnosing conduction abnormalities such as LBBB and identifying candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  4. [Ultrasound-guided axillary block: anatomical variations of terminal branches of the brachial plexus in relation to the brachial artery].

    PubMed

    Silva, M G; Sala-Blanch, X; Marín, R; Espinoza, X; Arauz, A; Morros, C

    2014-01-01

    To describe the distribution of the terminal branches of the brachial plexus at the axillary level and define distribution patterns after ultrasound evaluation. Fifty volunteers underwent ultrasound bilateral axillary brachial plexus scanning exploration. Nerve distribution around the humeral artery was described and the distance between each nerve and the center of the artery was measured. The distance and relationship between the ulnar nerve and the humeral vein were also recorded. The median nerve was located in the anterolateral quadrant (-29±40°) and at a mean distance of 2.1±0.9mm from the artery (85%). The ulnar nerve was found at 53±26° and at 4.2±2.1mm from the artery in the anteromedial quadrant (90%), anterolateral to the vein in 46% of cases, and deep to it in 54%. The radial nerve was at 122±38° and at 3.3±1.7mm from the artery in the posteromedial quadrant (86%). The musculocutaneous nerve was found at -103±22° and 9.3±5.6mm from the artery in the posterolateral quadrant (90%) and in the anterolateral quadrant (-55±16°) at 4.8±2.7mm (10%). There were no differences regarding laterality, gender or overweight patients. Our results allow defining four different anatomical patterns, two based in the position of the musculocutaneous nerve and two based on the disposition of the ulnar nerve with respect to the humeral vein. These patterns were not related to laterality, gender or body weight. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. QRS frequency characteristics help predict response to cardiac resynchronization in left bundle branch block less than 150 milliseconds.

    PubMed

    Niebauer, Mark J; Rickard, John; Polakof, Landon; Tchou, Patrick J; Varma, Niraj

    2014-12-01

    Baseline QRS duration (QRSd) ≥150 ms is a recognized predictor of clinical improvement by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), particularly for those with left bundle branch (LBBB). Patients with QRSd <150 ms are considered less likely to respond. The purpose of this study was to test our theory that left ventricular dyssynchrony, although usually associated with wider QRSd, also exhibits lower QRS frequency characteristics and that low-frequency content predicts CRT response in LBBB patients. We retrospectively examined the QRS frequency content of 170 heart failure patients with LBBB and QRSd ≥120 ms using Fourier transformation. Ninety-four responders to CRT (defined as reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume by ≥15% from baseline) were compared to 76 nonresponders (<15% reduction). Analysis of 3 standard ECG leads (I, aVF, and V3) representing the 3 dimensions of depolarization was performed, and V3 provided the best predictive value. The QRSd of responders (160.3 ± 17.8 ms) and nonresponders (161.8 ± 21.1 ms, P = .604) were similar. We found that the percentage of total QRS frequency power below 10 Hz that exceeded 52% was most predictive of CRT response compared to other cutoff values. However, the percentage of patients with total QRS power >52% below 10 Hz was especially predictive of response in those with QRSd <150 ms. In these patients, this power threshold was highly predictive of CRT response (positive predictive value 85.7%, negative predictive value 71.4%). In this group of CRT recipients with LBBB, retrospective analysis of QRS frequency content below 10 Hz had greater predictive value for CRT response than baseline QRSd, particularly in those with QRSd <150 ms. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic Desipramine Prevents Acute Stress-Induced Reorganization of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Architecture by Blocking Glutamate Vesicle Accumulation and Excitatory Synapse Increase

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Giulia; Liebenberg, Nico; Chen, Fenghua; Popoli, Maurizio; Wegener, Gregers; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although a clear negative influence of chronic exposure to stressful experiences has been repeatedly demonstrated, the outcome of acute stress on key brain regions has only just started to be elucidated. Although it has been proposed that acute stress may produce enhancement of brain plasticity and that antidepressants may prevent such changes, we still lack ultrastructural evidence that acute stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter physiology are coupled with structural synaptic modifications. Methods: Rats were pretreated chronically (14 days) with desipramine (10mg/kg) and then subjected to acute foot-shock stress. By means of serial section electron microscopy, the structural remodeling of medial prefrontal cortex glutamate synapses was assessed soon after acute stressor cessation and stress hormone levels were measured. Results: Foot-shock stress induced a remarkable increase in the number of docked vesicles and small excitatory synapses, partially and strongly prevented by desipramine pretreatment, respectively. Acute stress-induced corticosterone elevation was not affected by drug treatment. Conclusions: Since desipramine pretreatment prevented the stress-induced structural plasticity but not the hormone level increase, we hypothesize that the preventing action of desipramine is located on pathways downstream of this process and/or other pathways. Moreover, because enhancement of glutamate system remodeling may contribute to overexcitation dysfunctions, this aspect could represent a crucial component in the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. PMID:25522419

  7. Helical computed tomographic dacryocystography and its role in the diagnosis and management of lacrimal drainage system blocks and medial canthal masses

    PubMed Central

    Udhay, Priti; Noronha, Olma Veena

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the indications, technique and diagnostic utility of helical computed tomographic dacryocystography (CTDCG). Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 13 patients who underwent CTDCG with subsequent surgical intervention, during the period January 2003 to December 2005, was done. Axial plain computed tomography (CT) scan was performed, followed by administration of water-soluble contrast in the conjunctival cul de sac or by cannulation of the lacrimal passages. Thin-slice helical CT with two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) coronal and sagittal reformation was done. Results: Four patients were males and 9 were females. Age range was 5 to 62 years. Seven patients presented with watering and 6 patients with a medial canthal mass. Three patients had history of trauma. CTDCG was performed by instillation technique in 10 patients and by cannulation in 3 patients. CTDCG showed mass lesion displacing the sac in 5 cases, nasolacrimal duct obstruction in 6 cases and mucocele in 2 cases. Based on the findings on CTDCG, 5 patients underwent mass excision, 7 underwent dacryocystorhinostomy and 1 patient underwent primary silicone tube intubation. Conclusion: Helical CTDCG is a safe and useful diagnostic tool for the lacrimal surgeon. Instillation technique is a physiological and convenient method, and cannulation is needed only in cases where adequate visualization is not achieved. PMID:18158401

  8. Too Much of a Good Thing: Blocking Noradrenergic Facilitation in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Prevents the Detrimental Effects of Chronic Stress on Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Jett, Julianne D; Morilak, David A

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments associated with dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are prominent in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We have shown that enhancing noradrenergic tone acutely in the rat mPFC facilitated extra-dimensional (ED) set-shifting on the attentional set-shifting test (AST), whereas chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) impaired ED. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the acute facilitatory effect of norepinephrine (NE) in mPFC becomes detrimental when activated repeatedly during CUS. Using microdialysis, we showed that the release of NE evoked in mPFC by acute stress was unchanged at the end of CUS treatment. Thus, to then determine if repeated elicitation of this NE activity in mPFC during CUS may have contributed to the ED deficit, we infused a cocktail of α1-, β1-, and β2-adrenergic receptor antagonists into the mPFC prior to each CUS session, then tested animals drug free on the AST. Antagonist treatment prevented the CUS-induced ED deficit, suggesting that NE signaling during CUS compromised mPFC function. We confirmed that this was not attributable to sensitization of adrenergic receptor function following chronic antagonist treatment, by administering an additional microinjection into the mPFC immediately prior to ED testing. Acute antagonist treatment did not reverse the beneficial effects of chronic drug treatment during CUS, nor have any effect on baseline ED performance in chronic vehicle controls. Thus, we conclude that blockade of noradrenergic receptors in mPFC protected against the detrimental cognitive effects of CUS, and that repeated elicitation of noradrenergic facilitatory activity is one mechanism by which chronic stress may promote mPFC cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23132268

  9. Epidemiological and evolutionary characteristics of heart failure in patients with left bundle branch block – A Moroccan center-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bouqata, N.; Kheyi, J.; Miftah, F.; Sabor, H.; Bouziane, A.; Bouzelmat, H.; Chaib, A.; Benyass, A.; Moustaghfir, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with heart failure, left bundle branch block (LBBB) seems to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine the in-hospital outcome of congestive heart failure patients with LBBB versus those without. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study at the Department of Intensive Care and Rhythmology at the Mohammed V Military Hospital of Rabat, where 330 patients were admitted for heart failure between January 2008 and September 2012. Screening out patients with missing data yielded a cohort of 274 patients. Among the 274 patients, only 110 had LBBB and a left ventricular ejection fraction lower than 50%. We randomly selected a subset of 110 patients diagnosed as non-LBBB to ensure a significant statistical comparison between LBBB and non-LBBB patients. We therefore considered two groups in our analysis: 110 heart failure (HF) patients with LBBB and 110 HF patients without LBBB. Patients with incomplete records were excluded. Results Male gender was dominant in both groups (82.7% vs. 66.7%, p = 0.005). Patients with LBBB had a higher prevalence of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (39.1% vs. 4.8%, p < 0.001); and a higher prevalence of previous hospitalization for heart failure (64.5% vs. 23.3%, p < 0.001). The left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower in the group with LBBB (25.49% vs. 39.53%, p < 0.001). Age, cardiovascular risk factors, rhythmic and thromboembolic complications did not significantly differ. In patients with LBBB, 61.8% received cardiac resynchronization therapy performed both during the index hospital stay (50.9%) and previously (10.9%). Hospital outcome was marked by 20 in-hospital deaths in the group with LBBB and eight deaths in the group without LBBB (p = 0.008). Conclusion Our analysis emphasizes increased in-hospital mortality and higher disease severity, over a short period of stay, in heart failure patients with

  10. A new experimentally validated formula to calculate the QT interval in the presence of left bundle branch block holds true in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Bogossian, Harilaos; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Ninios, Ilias; Pechlivanidou, Eleni; Hasan, Fuad; Nguyen, Quy Suu; Mijic, Dejan; Kloppe, Axel; Karosiene, Zana; Margkarian, Artak; Bandorski, Dirk; Schultes, Dominik; Erkapic, Damir; Seyfarth, Melchior; Lemke, Bernd; Eckardt, Lars; Zarse, Markus

    2017-03-01

    The evaluation of the QT interval in the presence of left bundle branch block (LBBB) is associated with the challenge to discriminate native QT interval from the prolongation due to the increase in QRS duration. The newest formula to evaluate QT interval in the presence of LBBB suggests: modified QT during LBBB = measured QT interval minus 50% of LBBB duration. The purpose of this study is therefore to validate the abovementioned formula in the clinical setting. Validation in two separate groups of patients: Patients who alternated between narrow QRS and intermittent LBBB and patients with narrow QRS who developed LBBB after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The acquired mean native QTc intervals and those calculated by the presented formula displayed no significant differences (p > .99 and p > .75). In this study we proved for the first time the validity and applicability of the experimentally acquired formula for the evaluation of the QT interval in the presence of LBBB in a clinical setting. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Improved specificity of myocardial thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with left bundle branch block by dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.J.; Galligan, L.; Wright, L.M.; Lawand, S.; Burke, R.J.; Gladstone, P.J. )

    1991-08-15

    Reduced septal uptake of thallium-201 during exercise is frequently observed in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) and normal coronary arteries. This may reflect normal coronary autoregulation in response to lower septal oxygen demand; thus, dipyridamole, which uniformly exploits flow reserve, would be more accurate for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixteen patients with LBBB underwent exercise and dipyridamole thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and coronary angiography within 3 months. Sensitivity for detection of left anterior descending CAD (greater than 50% stenosis) was 0.83 for exercise and 1.00 for dipyridamole. Specificity was 0.30 (visual) or 0.20 (quantitative analysis) for exercise and 0.80 (visual) or 0.90 (quantitative) for dipyridamole (p less than 0.05). Dipyridamole combined with quantitative analysis also improved specificity of CAD detection overall (p less than 0.01). These data demonstrate that pharmacologic vasodilation is more accurate than exercise when diagnosing CAD by myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in patients with LBBB.

  12. Assessing coronary artery disease in patients with anginal chest pain and left bundle branch block: an emerging role for a new parameter of cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Gomez, Maria Angeles; Garcia-Baute, Maria del Carmen; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Avanzas, Pablo; Lara-Padron, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is used in cardiology to grade the severity of heart failure and to assess its prognosis. However, it is unknown whether CPET may be a useful technique to rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with anginal chest pain and left bundle branch block (LBBB). The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CPET to identify CAD in these patients. A cohort of 90 patients with anginal chest pain, 45 with LBBB (group A) and 45 non-LBBB (group B), were studied with CPET and a single-photon emission computed tomographic myocardial perfusion study during the same period. The following variables of CPET were analyzed: peak oxygen uptake (VO2), VO2 at anaerobic threshold, and time to reach the anaerobic threshold (TAT). Group A values were lower compared with group B in peak VO2 (23 ± 6.2 vs. 28 ± 7.6 mLO2 · kg · min; P = 0.002), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (16.1 ± 3.6 vs. 18.9 ± 4.1 mLO2 · kg · min; P =0.001), and TAT (2.7 ± 0.96 vs. 4.4 ± 2.1 min; P < 0.001). Group A showed higher perfusion abnormalities in myocardial perfusion study than group B [27 (60%) vs. 12 (26.7%); P = 0.003]. Multivariate analysis showed that TAT (odds ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.39; P = 0.02) was the only independent predictor of CAD, after controlling for other factors. Receiver operator characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.78 for TAT (95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.86; P < 0.0001). In conclusion, our findings suggest that a new functional parameter such as TAT significantly predicts CAD in patients with anginal chest pain and LBBB.

  13. Comparison of Echocardiographic Markers of Cardiac Dyssynchrony and Latest Left Ventricular Activation Site in Heart Failure Patients with and without Left Bundle Branch Block

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Roomi, Zahra Savand; Kasemisaeid, Ali; Sadeghian, Hakimeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several echocardiographic markers have been introduced to assess the left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony. We studied dyssynchrony markers and the latest LV activation site in heart failure patients with and without left bundle branch block (LBBB). Methods: Conventional echocardiography and tissue velocity imaging were performed for 78 patients (LV ejection fraction ≤ 35%), who were divided into two groups: LBBB (n = 37) and non-LBBB (n = 41). Time-to-peak systolic velocity (Ts) was measured in 12 LV segments in the mid and basal levels. Seven dyssynchrony markers were defined: delay and standard deviation (SD) of Ts in all and basal segments, septal-lateral and anteroseptal-posterior wall delay (at the basal level), and interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD). Results: The LBBB patients had significantly higher QRS duration and IVMD. The posterior wall was the latest activated site in the LBBB and the inferior wall was the latest in the non-LBBB patients. The most common dyssynchrony marker in the LBBB group was the SD of Ts in all segments (73%), whereas it was Ts delay in the basal segments in the non-LBBB group (48.8%). Ts delay and SD of all LV segments, septal lateral delay, septal-to-posterior wall delay by M-mode, pre-ejection period of the aortic valve, and IVMD were significantly higher in the LBBB group than in the non-LBBB group. Also, 29.3% of the non-LBBB and 10.8% of the LBBB patients did not show dyssynchrony by any marker. The number of patients showing dyssynchrony by ≥ 3 markers was remarkably higher in the LBBB patients (73% vs. 43.9%, respectively; p value = 0.044). Conclusion: The LBBB patients presented with a higher prevalence of dyssynchrony according to the frequently used echocardiographic markers. The latest activation site was different between the groups. PMID:23967031

  14. Comparison of Echocardiographic Markers of Cardiac Dyssynchrony and Latest Left Ventricular Activation Site in Heart Failure Patients with and without Left Bundle Branch Block.

    PubMed

    Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Roomi, Zahra Savand; Kasemisaeid, Ali; Sadeghian, Hakimeh

    2013-04-01

    Several echocardiographic markers have been introduced to assess the left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony. We studied dyssynchrony markers and the latest LV activation site in heart failure patients with and without left bundle branch block (LBBB). Conventional echocardiography and tissue velocity imaging were performed for 78 patients (LV ejection fraction ≤ 35%), who were divided into two groups: LBBB (n = 37) and non-LBBB (n = 41). Time-to-peak systolic velocity (Ts) was measured in 12 LV segments in the mid and basal levels. Seven dyssynchrony markers were defined: delay and standard deviation (SD) of Ts in all and basal segments, septal-lateral and anteroseptal-posterior wall delay (at the basal level), and interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD). The LBBB patients had significantly higher QRS duration and IVMD. The posterior wall was the latest activated site in the LBBB and the inferior wall was the latest in the non-LBBB patients. The most common dyssynchrony marker in the LBBB group was the SD of Ts in all segments (73%), whereas it was Ts delay in the basal segments in the non-LBBB group (48.8%). Ts delay and SD of all LV segments, septal lateral delay, septal-to-posterior wall delay by M-mode, pre-ejection period of the aortic valve, and IVMD were significantly higher in the LBBB group than in the non-LBBB group. Also, 29.3% of the non-LBBB and 10.8% of the LBBB patients did not show dyssynchrony by any marker. The number of patients showing dyssynchrony by ≥ 3 markers was remarkably higher in the LBBB patients (73% vs. 43.9%, respectively; p value = 0.044). The LBBB patients presented with a higher prevalence of dyssynchrony according to the frequently used echocardiographic markers. The latest activation site was different between the groups.

  15. Alterations in in vivo knee joint kinematics following a femoral nerve branch block of the vastus medialis: Implications for patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Frances T; Borotikar, Bhushan S; Behnam, Abrahm J; Alter, Katharine E

    2012-07-01

    A potential source of patellofemoral pain, one of the most common problems of the knee, is believed to be altered patellofemoral kinematics due to a force imbalance around the knee. Although no definitive etiology for this imbalance has been found, a weak vastus medialis is considered a primary factor. Therefore, this study's purpose was to determine how the loss of vastus medialis obliquus force alters three-dimensional in vivo knee joint kinematics during a volitional extension task. Eighteen asymptomatic female subjects with no history of knee pain or pathology participated in this IRB approved study. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics were derived from velocity data acquired using dynamic cine-phase contrast MRI. The same kinematics were then acquired immediately after administering a motor branch block to the vastus medialis obliquus using 3-5ml of 1% lidocaine. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test the null hypothesis that the post- and pre-injection kinematics were no different. The null hypothesis was rejected for patellofemoral lateral shift (P=0.003, max change=1.8mm, standard deviation=1.7mm), tibiofemoral lateral shift (P<0.001, max change=2.1mm, standard deviation=2.9mm), and tibiofemoral external rotation (P<0.001, max change=3.7°, standard deviation=4.4°). The loss of vastus medialis obliquus function produced kinematic changes that mirrored the axial plane kinematics seen in individuals with patellofemoral pain, but could not account for the full extent of these changes. Thus, vastus medialis weakness is likely a major factor in, but not the sole source of, altered patellofemoral kinematics in such individuals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Alterations in in vivo Knee Joint Kinematics Following a Femoral Nerve Branch Block of the Vastus Medialis: Implications for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Frances T.; Borotikar, Bhushan S.; Behnam, Abrahm J; Alter, Katharine E.

    2012-01-01

    Background A potential source of patellofemoral pain, one of the most common problems of the knee, is believed to be altered patellofemoral kinematics due to a force imbalance around the knee. Although no definitive etiology for this imbalance has been found, a weak vastus medialis is considered a primary factor. Therefore, this study’s purpose was to determine how the loss of vastus medialis obliquus force alters three-dimensional in vivo knee joint kinematics during a volitional extension task. Methods Eighteen asymptomatic female subjects with no history of knee pain or pathology participated in this IRB approved study. During the first visit, the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics were derived from velocity data acquired using dynamic cine-phase contrast MRI. The same kinematics were then acquired immediately after administering a motor branch block to the vastus medialis obliquus using 3–5cc of 1% lidocaine. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test the null hypothesis that the post- and pre-injection kinematics were no different. Findings The null hypothesis was rejected for patellofemoral lateral shift (p=0.003, max change=1.8mm, standard deviation=1.7mm), tibiofemoral lateral shift (p<0.001, max change=2.1mm, standard deviation=2.9mm), and tibiofemoral external rotation (p<0.001, max change=3.7°, standard deviation=4.4°). Interpretation The loss of vastus medialis obliquus function produced kinematic changes that mirrored the axial plane kinematics seen in individuals with patellofemoral pain, but could not account for the full extent of these changes. Thus, vastus medialis weakness is likely a major factor in, but not the sole source of, altered patellofemoral kinematics in such individuals. PMID:22244738

  17. A quantitative analysis of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with a reduced ejection fraction, with or without concomitant left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Daskalov, Ivaylo Rilkov; Gotchev, Dobromir Tenev

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to prove that a mathematical model can be used to quantify the relationship between the left ventricular filling pressure (LVFP) determined as the E/e' ratio and the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) assessed by right heart catheterization (RHC) in patients with reduced ejection fractions (EF), with or without a left bundle branch block (LBBB). We hypothesize that such an approach will be clinically beneficial, especially for patients in the so-called "gray area," for whom E/e' is not a reliable index for assessment of the LVFP. We enrolled 64 patients in sinus rhythm and with a reduced EF, 31 of whom exhibited a LBBB on an ECG. The e' was obtained from the septal (e'(sept)) and lateral sites (e'(lat)) of the mitral annulus. The averaged e' (e'(aver)) was also calculated (e'(sept) + e'(lat)/2). Although we found a good correlation (r = 0.641; e'(lat)/0.641; e'(sept)/0.607; e'(aver)) between E/e' and the mean PCWP in patients without LBBB, regardless of the e' used, the equation only yielded significance (P = 0.03) when the e'(aver) was used (PCWP = 6.7 + E/e'(aver)). In patients with LBBB, we found a moderate correlation between the LVFP and the mean PCWP (r = 0.451; e'(lat)/r = 0.413; e'(sept)/r = 0.454; e'(aver)), although all of the used e' positions lacked significance (P = 0.065 e'(lat)/0.075 e'(sept)/0.082 e'(aver)). Our results suggest that in patients with reduced EF and without LBBB, it is possible to quantify the LVFP using an equation. These results are of great clinical benefit, especially for "gray area" patients. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Myocardial perfusion gated single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with left bundle branch block: comparison between the end-diastolic images and the ungated images.

    PubMed

    Edet-Sanson, Agathe; Hitzel, Anne; Guernou, Mohamed; Véra, Pierre; Manrique, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Septal perfusion abnormalities are frequently observed in patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). The aim of this study was to compare myocardial perfusion imaging obtained from ungated and diastolic thallium gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images in patients with LBBB. Stress/rest SPECT was performed in 70 patients with LBBB [38 with coronary artery disease (CAD) (G1), 32 without (G2)] and 19 control participants (G3). Diastolic images were obtained as the sum of four diastolic bins. Perfusion was assessed by summed stress, rest, and difference scores for both diastolic and ungated images. In G1, there was no difference between diastolic and ungated perfusion scores. In G2, summed stress score and summed rest score were increased in diastolic versus ungated imaging, and perfusion defect extent was increased on diastolic versus ungated images at stress (diastole: 6.2 +/- 9.9% vs. ungated: 5.1 +/- 9.70/%, P = 0.01) and rest (diastole: 4.3 +/- 9.3% vs. ungated: 2.8 +/- 9.50%, P = 0.0014), with an increased extent of reversible defect (diastole: 3.4 4.7% vs. ungated: 2.3 3.7%, P = 0.01). In G2, diastolic images failed to correct septal perfusion abnormalities. The number of normal SPECT did not increase with diastolic versus ungated imaging (24 and 180% in G1, 66 and 53% in G2, respectively). Otherwise, a significant association between left ventricular dysfunction and CAD was found, stress ejection fraction being decreased in 20 patients (53%) in G1 and seven patients (22%) in G2 (CHI2 = 6.93, P < 0.01). In patients with LBBB, diastolic imaging did not provide additional information to ungated perfusion imaging, but left ventricular dysfunction was associated with CAD.

  19. Septal and anterior reverse mismatch of myocardial perfusion and metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease and left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Fang, Wei; Yang, Min-Fu; Tian, Yue-Qin; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Rui; Sun, Xiao-Xin; Guo, Feng; Wang, Dao-Yu; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    The effects of left bundle branch block (LBBB) on left ventricular myocardial metabolism have not been well investigated. This study evaluated these effects in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).Sixty-five CAD patients with complete LBBB (mean age, 61.8 ± 9.7 years) and 65 without LBBB (mean age, 59.9 ± 8.4 years) underwent single photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and contrast coronary angiography. The relationship between myocardial perfusion and metabolism and reverse mismatch score, and that between QRS length and reverse mismatch score and wall motion score were evaluated.The incidence of left ventricular septum and anterior wall reverse mismatching between the two groups was significantly different (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The incidences of normal myocardial perfusion and metabolism in the left ventricular lateral and inferior walls were also significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The incidence of septal reverse mismatching in patients with mild to moderate perfusion was significantly higher among those with LBBB than among those without LBBB (P < 0.001). In CAD patients with LBBB, septal reverse mismatching was significantly more common among those with mild to moderate perfusion than among those with severe perfusion defects (P = 0.002). The correlation between the septal reverse mismatch score and QRS length was significant (P = 0.026).In patients with CAD and LBBB, septal and anterior reverse mismatching of myocardial perfusion and metabolism was frequently present; the septal reverse mismatch score negatively correlated with the QRS interval.

  20. Dilated cardiomyopathy and left bundle branch block associated with ingestion of colloidal gold and silver is reversed by British antiLewisite and vitamin E: the potential toxicity of metals used as health supplements.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stephen Lawrence

    2008-05-01

    A case of left bundle branch block and a dilated, nonhypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with ingestion of colloidal gold and silver as an 'energy tonic' is described. The cardiac disease was reversed within two months by a course of dimercaprol (Akorn Inc, USA) (British antiLewisite) and vitamin E. This is the first case of gold and silver cardiomyopathy in humans, and highlights the risks of these colloidal metal 'health supplements'.

  1. Function of the ramus communicans of the medial and lateral palmar nerves of the horse.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Taintor, J; Schumacher, J; Degraves, F; Schramme, M; Wilhite, R

    2013-01-01

    The role of the communicating branch between the medial and lateral palmar nerves of horses (i.e. the ramus communicans) in conveying sensory impulses proximally should be determined to avoid errors in interpreting diagnostic anaesthesia of the palmar nerves. Sensory nerve fibres in the ramus communicans of horses pass proximally from the lateral palmar nerve to merge with the medial palmar nerve, but not vice versa. To determine the direction of sensory impulses through the ramus communicans between lateral and medial palmar nerves. Pain in a thoracic foot was created with set-screw pressure applied to either the medial or lateral aspect of the sole of each forelimb of 6 horses. The palmar nerve on the side of the sole in which pain was created was anaesthetised proximal to the ramus communicans with local anaesthetic. Lameness was evaluated objectively by using a wireless, inertial, sensor-based, motion analysis system (Lameness Locator). Lameness was also evaluated subjectively by using a graded scoring system. Local anaesthetic was then administered adjacent to the ramus communicans to determine the effect of anaesthesia of the ramus communicans on residual lameness. When pain originated from the medial or the lateral aspect of the sole, anaesthesia of the ipsilateral palmar nerve proximal to the ramus communicans did not entirely resolve lameness. Anaesthesia of the ramus communicans further attenuated or resolved lameness. Sensory fibres pass in both directions in the ramus communicans to connect the medial and lateral palmar nerves. When administering a low palmar nerve block, both palmar nerves should be anaesthetised distal to the ramus communicans to avoid leaving nondesensitised sensory nerve fibres passing through this neural connection. Alternatively, local anaesthetic could also be deposited adjacent to the ramus communicans when anaesthetising the palmar nerves. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  2. The medial sural artery perforator free flap.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, P C; Sanz-Giménez-Rico, J R; Gutierrez-de la Cámara, A; Navarro-Monzonís, A; Soler-Nomdedeu, S; Martínez-Soriano, F

    2001-11-01

    The medial sural artery supplies the medial gastrocnemius muscle and sends perforating branches to the skin. The possible use of these musculocutaneous perforators as the source of a perforator-based free flap was investigated in cadavers. Ten legs were dissected, and the topography of significant perforating musculocutaneous vessels on both the medial and the lateral gastrocnemius muscles was recorded. A mean of 2.2 perforators (range, 1 to 4) was noted over the medial gastrocnemius muscle, whereas in only 20 percent of the specimens was a perforator of moderate size noted over the lateral gastrocnemius muscle. The perforating vessels from the medial sural artery clustered about 9 to 18 cm from the popliteal crease. When two perforators were present (the most frequent case), the perforators were located at a mean of 11.8 cm (range, 8.5 to 15 cm) and 17 cm (range, 15 to 19 cm) from the popliteal crease. A series of six successful clinical cases is reported, including five free flaps and one pedicled flap for ipsilateral lower-leg and foot reconstruction. The dissection is somewhat tedious, but the vascular pedicle can be considerably long and of suitable caliber. Donor-site morbidity was minimal because the muscle was not included in the flap. Although the present series is short, it seems that the medial sural artery perforator flap can be a useful flap for free and pedicled transfer in lower-limb reconstruction.

  3. Surgical anatomy of the pudendal nerve and its branches in South Africans.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, S; Oettlé, A C; Patel, H R H

    2015-07-01

    Dissection of the pudendal nerve (PN) and its branches in 71 cadavers revealed anatomic variations not previously described. Knowledge of this variation is necessary to prevent nerve injury resulting in sexual of sensory dysfunction. Because descriptions vary, this study re-evaluated the anatomy of the PN as implicated in perineal procedures in South Africans. The course of the PN from the gluteal region into the perineum was dissected in an adult sample of both sexes and of African and European ancestry. Distances between PN and branches to applicable landmarks were measured. Basic descriptive statistics and comparisons were carried out between groups. In 5/13 African females, the inferior rectal nerve (IRN) entered the gluteal region separately and in 12/13 cases it passed medial to the ischial spine with the PN. The dorsal nerve of the clitoris or penis (DNC/DNP) was closer to the bony frame in those of European ancestry. The IRN branches were more superficial in females, but deeper in males of European ancestry. In African females, a PN block and Richter stitch should be placed more medial. Outside-in transobturator tape procedures might endanger the DNC/DNP in obese individuals. In females of European ancestry the IRN branches are compromised during ischioanal abscess drainage. In males of European ancestry, the dorsal penile nerve block might be less effective. Predictions should be verified clinically.

  4. Medial circumflex femoral artery flap for ischial pressure sore

    PubMed Central

    Palanivelu, S.

    2009-01-01

    A new axial pattern flap based on the terminal branches of the medial circumflex femoral artery is described for coverage of ischial pressure sore. Based on the terminal branches of the transverse branch of medial circumflex femoral artery, which exit through the gap between the quadratus femoris muscle above and the upper border of adductor magnus muscle below, this fascio cutaneous flap is much smaller than the posterior thigh flap but extremely useful to cover ischeal pressure sores. The skin redundancy below the gluteal fold allows a primary closure of the donor defect. It can also be used in combination with biceps femoris muscle flap. PMID:19881020

  5. Carbamate-linked lactose: design of clusters and evidence for selectivity to block binding of human lectins to (neo)glycoproteins with increasing degree of branching and to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; Specker, Daniel; Bovin, Nicolai V; Lensch, Martin; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Wittmann, Valentin

    2009-09-01

    Various pathogenic processes are driven by protein(lectin)-glycan interactions, especially involving beta-galactosides at branch ends of cellular glycans. These emerging insights fuel the interest to design potent inhibitors to block lectins. As a step toward this aim, we prepared a series of ten mono- to tetravalent glycocompounds with lactose as a common headgroup. To obtain activated carbonate for ensuing carbamate formation, conditions for the facile synthesis of pure isomers from anomerically unprotected lactose were identified. To probe for the often encountered intrafamily diversity of human lectins, we selected representative members from the three subgroups of adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins as receptors. Diversity of the glycan display was accounted for by using four (neo)glycoproteins with different degrees of glycan branching as matrices in solid-phase assays. Cases of increased inhibitory potency of lactose clusters compared to free lactose were revealed. Extent of relative inhibition was not directly associated with valency in the glycocompound and depended on the lectin type. Of note for screening protocols, efficacy of blocking appeared to decrease with increased degree of glycan branching in matrix glycoproteins. Binding to tumor cells was impaired with selectivity for galectins-3 and -4. Representative compounds did not impair growth of carcinoma cells up to a concentration of 5 mM of lactose moieties (valence-corrected value) per assay. The reported bioactivity and the delineation of its modulation by structural parameters of lectins and glycans set instructive examples for the further design of selective inhibitors and assay procedures.

  6. Clinical considerations of the glandular branch of the lacrimal artery.

    PubMed

    Kluckman, Matthew; Fan, Jerry; Balsiger, Heather; Scott, Gabriel; Gest, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The lacrimal artery is classically described as a branch of the ophthalmic artery supplied by the internal carotid. In this study, 25 orbits were dissected to identify variations in glandular branching and to compare them to previously published accounts. The glandular branching patterns of the lacrimal artery fall into two categories, those that branch (56%) and those that do not branch (44%). We found the medial and lateral glandular branches to be equal in diameter with a divergence of 2.67-40.58 mm proximal to the gland parenchyma. The long glandular branches run alongside the superolateral aspect of the orbit. The lateral branch runs lateral to the lateral rectus muscle. The medial branch runs superomedial to the lateral rectus muscle and lateral to the superior rectus muscle. In relation to the lacrimal gland, the medial branch enters the superior aspect of the gland parenchyma and the lateral branch enters its inferior aspect. The average branch lengths were 17.88 mm (medial) and 13.51 mm (lateral) as measured with a Mitutoyo Absolute 1/100 mm caliper. We could not confirm the existence of a third branch supplying the lacrimal gland, as posited by other authors. The key finding in this study is that the lacrimal gland is predominantly supplied by two significant arterial branches, both of which must be identified during procedures involving the lateral orbit.

  7. Relation of QRS Duration to Clinical Benefit of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure Patients Without Left Bundle Branch Block: The Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Substudy.

    PubMed

    Biton, Yitschak; Kutyifa, Valentina; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Goldenberg, Ilan; Klein, Helmut; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Ruwald, Anne Christine; Ruwald, Martin H; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech

    2016-02-01

    There are conflicting data regarding the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) and without left bundle branch block. We evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes of 537 non-left bundle branch block patients with mild HF enrolled in the Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT) study by QRS duration or morphology further stratified by PR interval. At 7 years of follow-up, the cumulative probability of HF hospitalization or death was 45% versus 56% among patients randomized to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and CRT with defibrillator (CRT-D), respectively (P=0.209). Multivariable-adjusted subgroup analysis by QRS duration showed that patients from the lower quartile QRS duration group (≤ 134 ms) experienced 2.4-fold (P=0.015) increased risk for HF hospitalization or death with CRT-D versus implantable cardioverter-defibrillator only therapy, whereas the effect of CRT-D in patients from the upper quartiles group (QRS>134 ms) was neutral (hazard ratio [HR] =0.97, P=0.86; P value for interaction =0.024). In a second analysis incorporating PR interval, patients with prolonged QRS (>134 ms) and prolonged PR (>230 ms) were protected with CRT-D (HR=0.31, P=0.003), whereas the association was neutral with prolonged QRS (>134 ms) and shorter PR (≤ 230 ms;, HR=1.19, P=0.386; P value for interaction =0.002). The effect was neutral, regardless of morphology, right bundle branch block (HR=1.01, P=0.975), and intraventricular conduction delay (HR=1.31, P=0.172). Overall, patients with mild HF but without left bundle branch block morphology did not derive clinical benefit with CRT-D during long-term follow-up. Relatively shorter QRS was associated with a significantly increased risk with CRT-D relative to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator -only. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00180271, NCT01294449, and NCT02060110. © 2016

  8. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries ... Treatment Coping With an MCL Injury About MCL Injuries A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) is a ...

  9. Medial canthal support structures: the medial retinaculum: a review.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Asamoto, Ken; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    The medial canthus is supported by several structures with a complicated 3-dimensional arrangement in a narrow space. Although the medial canthal tendon occupies a major portion of the area, the medial canthal support structures include the following entities: Horner's muscle, the medial rectus capsulopalpebral fascia including the medial check ligament, the medial horn of the levator aponeurosis, the medial horn supporting ligament, the medial horn of the lower eyelid retractors, the preseptal part of the orbicularis oculi muscle, and 3 variations of the Lockwood's ligament. We named the composite of these structures the "medial retinaculum," which is similar to the "lateral retinaculum" of the lateral canthus. Profound comprehension and consideration of the medial retinaculum warrants safe and effective surgery in the medial canthal region.

  10. Chuave Medial Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses two syntactic processes known as chaining and linkage, insofar as they are relevant to Chuave, a Papuan language spoken in the East New Guinea Highlands. These processes are discussed in relation to Chuave medial verbs. (CLK)

  11. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel.

  12. Biophysical characterization of hyper-branched polyethylenimine-graft-polycaprolactone-block-mono-methoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers (hy-PEI-PCL-mPEG) for siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Samsonova, Olga; Sproat, Brian; Merkel, Olivia; Kissel, Thomas

    2011-08-10

    A library of mono-methoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL) modified hyperbranched PEI copolymers (hy-PEI-PCL-mPEG) was synthesized to establish structure function relationships for siRNA delivery. These amphiphilic block-copolymers were thought to provide improved colloidal stability and endosomal escape of polyplexes containing siRNA. The influence of the mPEG chain length, PCL segment length, hy-PEI molecular weight and the graft density on their biophysical properties was investigated. In particular, buffer capacity, complex formation constants, gene condensation, polyplex stability, polyplex size and zeta-potential were measured. It was found that longer mPEG chains, longer PCL segments and higher graft density beneficially affected the stability and formation of polyplexes and reduced the zeta-potential of siRNA polyplexes. Significant siRNA mediated knockdown was observed for hy-PEI25k-(PCL900-mPEG2k)(1) at N/P 20 and 30, implying that the PCL hydrophobic segment played a very important role in siRNA transfection. These gene delivery systems merit further investigation under in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Linear and Branched Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Poly(Lactide) Block Copolymers for the Preparation of Films and Solution Electrospun Meshes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Martina; Groll, Juergen; Tessmar, Joerg

    2016-03-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (PEG-PLA) block copolymers are processed to solvent cast films and solution electrospun meshes. The effect of polymer composition, architecture, and number of anchoring points for the plasticizer on swelling, degradation, and mechanical properties of these films and meshes is investigated as potential barrier device for the prevention of peritoneal adhesions. As a result, adequate properties are achieved for the massive films with a longer retention of the plasticizer PEG for star-shaped block copolymers than for the linear triblock copolymers and consequently more endurable mechanical properties during degradation. For electrospun meshes fabricated using the same polymers, similar trends are observed, but with an earlier start of fragmentation and lower tensile strengths. To overcome the poor mechanical strengths and an occurring shrinkage during incubation, which may impair the coverage of the wound, further adaptions of the meshes and the fabrication process are necessary. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lateral lid lysis for medial lid and medial canthus lacerations.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S D; Dijkstal, D

    1985-02-01

    Techniques are now being used to provide adequate healing time for medial lid and medial canthal full-thickness lacerations. Lateral upper and lower lid lysis allows the needed extended period of healing.

  15. Anterior Approach Total Ankle Arthroplasty: Superficial Peroneal Nerve Branches at Risk.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Jeffrey E; DeMill, Shyler L; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    In ankle arthroplasty, little attention has been given to intraoperative nerve injury and its postoperative sequelae. The aim of the present anatomic study was to determine the relationship of the superficial peroneal nerve to the standard anterior approach for total ankle arthroplasty. The superficial peroneal nerve was dissected in 10 below-the-knee cadaver specimens. The medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches were identified. A needle was placed at the ankle joint. The following measurements were recorded: bifurcation into the medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches, reference needle to the branches of the medial and intermediate superficial peroneal nerve, and the crossing branches of the medial dorsal cutaneous nerve. Two specimens (20%) had a medial dorsal cutaneous branch cross from medially to laterally. Eight specimens (80%) had a crossing branch of the medial dorsal cutaneous branch within 5 cm of the incision. No intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches were within the incision. The results from the present cadaver study suggest that during an anterior ankle approach, aberrant branches of the superficial peroneal nerve could require transection in 20% of patients at the joint level and ≤80% of patients with distal extension >35 mm from the ankle joint. The risk of injury to branches of the superficial peroneal nerve is substantial. The risk of nerve injury can be decreased with meticulous operative technique, smaller incisions, and the avoidance of aggressive retraction.

  16. New branched DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Madhavaiah; Keller, Sascha; Gloeckner, Christian; Bornemann, Benjamin; Marx, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The Watson-Crick base pairing of DNA is an advantageous phenomenon that can be exploited when using DNA as a scaffold for directed self-organization of nanometer-sized objects. Several reports have appeared in the literature that describe the generation of branched DNA (bDNA) with variable numbers of arms that self-assembles into predesigned architectures. These bDNA units are generated by using cleverly designed rigid crossover DNA molecules. Alternatively, bDNA can be generated by using synthetic branch points derived from either nucleoside or non-nucleoside building blocks. Branched DNA has scarcely been explored for use in nanotechnology or from self-assembling perspectives. Herein, we wish to report our results for the synthesis, characterization, and assembling properties of asymmetrical bDNA molecules that are able to generate linear and circular bDNA constructs. Our strategy for the generation of bDNA is based on a branching point that makes use of a novel protecting-group strategy. The bDNA units were generated by means of automated DNA synthesis methods and were used to generate novel objects by employing chemical and biological techniques. The entities generated might be useful building blocks for DNA-based nanobiotechnology.

  17. Medial plica syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sznajderman, Tal; Smorgick, Yossi; Lindner, Dror; Beer, Yiftah; Agar, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Synovial plicae are membranous inward folds of the synovial lining of the knee joint capsula. Such folds are regularly found in the human knee, but most are asymptomatic and of little clinical consequence. However, they can become symptomatic and cause knee pain. In this review, we will discuss medial plica syndrome. Medial plica irritation of the knee is a common source of anterior knee pain. The main complaint is an intermittent, dull, aching pain in the area medial to the patella above the joint line and in the supramedial patellar area. Pain increases with activity, especially when knee flexion and extension are required. Treatment includes physiotherapy, reducing activity, and rest. In cases that do not respond initially to an exercise program, corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal antiinflammatory medication are given. Results of conservative treatment seem to be more appropriate in young patients with a short duration of symptoms. If conservative treatment fails, surgical treatment using arthroscopy is appropriate. During arthroscopy, excision of the whole plica should be achieved.

  18. Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Arie; Simons, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tubular structures are a fundamental anatomical theme recurring in a wide range of animal species. In mammals, tubulogenesis underscores the development of several systems and organs, including the vascular system, the lungs, and the kidneys. All tubular systems are hierarchical, branching into segments of gradually diminishing diameter. There are only two cell types that form the lumen of tubular systems – either endothelial cells in the vascular system, or epithelial cells in all other organs. The most important feature in determining the morphology of the tubular systems is the frequency and geometry of branching. Hence, deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the sprouting of new branches from pre-existing ones is the key to understanding the formation of tubular systems. The morphological similarity between the various tubular systems is underscored by similarities between the signaling pathways which control their branching. A prominent feature common to these pathways is their duality – an agonist counterbalanced by an inhibitor. The formation of the tracheal system in Drosophila melanogaster is driven by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and inhibited by Sprouty/Notch. In vertebrates, the analogous pathways are FGF and transforming growth factor β in epithelial tubular systems, or vascular endothelial growth factor and Notch in the vascular system. PMID:19179661

  19. Medial canthus retiform hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Faky, Yasser H; Al-Mosallam, Abdul Rahman; Al-Rikabi, Ammar C; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed O

    2014-01-01

    Retiform hemangioendothelioma (RH) is a distinct entity in the spectrum of vascular tumors with a high local recurrence rate. It is considered a low-grade, well-differentiated cutaneous angiosarcoma with low metastatic potential. We report here for the first time a case of medial canthus recurrent RH. It may be helpful in our practice to include RH as a differential diagnosis of eyelid lesions. It is noteworthy that the progressive course and recurrence tendency of RH might be misdiagnosed as angiosarcoma or basal cell carcinoma (BCC), if not expected and carefully evaluated by the pathologist. PMID:24817752

  20. Prognosis assessment of persistent left bundle branch block after TAVI by an electrophysiological and remote monitoring risk-adapted algorithm: rationale and design of the multicentre LBBB–TAVI Study

    PubMed Central

    Massoullié, Grégoire; Bordachar, Pierre; Irles, Didier; Caussin, Christophe; Da Costa, Antoine; Defaye, Pascal; Jean, Frédéric; Mechulan, Alexis; Mondoly, Pierre; Souteyrand, Géraud; Pereira, Bruno; Ploux, Sylvain; Eschalier, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Percutaneous aortic valve replacement (transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)) notably increases the likelihood of the appearance of a complete left bundle branch block (LBBB) by direct lesion of the LBB of His. This block can lead to high-grade atrioventricular conduction disturbances responsible for a poorer prognosis. The management of this complication remains controversial. Method and analysis The screening of LBBB after TAVI persisting for more than 24 hours will be conducted by surface ECG. Stratification will be performed by post-TAVI intracardiac electrophysiological study. Patients at high risk of conduction disturbances (≥70 ms His–ventricle interval (HV) or presence of infra-Hisian block) will be implanted with a pacemaker enabling the recording of disturbance episodes. Those at lower risk (HV <70 ms) will be implanted with a loop recorder device with remote monitoring of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Clinical, ECG and implanted device follow-up will also be performed at 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary objective is to assess the efficacy and safety of a decisional algorithm based on electrophysiological study and remote monitoring of CIEDs in the prediction of high-grade conduction disturbances in patients with LBBB after TAVI. The primary end point is to compare the incidence (rate and time to onset) of high-grade conduction disturbances in patients with LBBB after TAVI between the two groups at 12 months. Given the proportion of high-grade conduction disturbances (20–40%), a sample of 200 subjects will allow a margin of error of 6–7%. The LBBB–TAVI Study has been in an active recruiting phase since September 2015 (21 patients already included). Ethics and dissemination Local ethics committee authorisation was obtained in May 2015. We will publish findings from this study in a peer-reviewed scientific journal and present results at national and international conferences. Trial

  1. Comparison of baroreceptive to other afferent synaptic transmission to the medial solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Michael C; Peters, James H

    2008-11-01

    Cranial nerve visceral afferents enter the brain stem to synapse on neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). The broad heterogeneity of both visceral afferents and NTS neurons makes understanding afferent synaptic transmission particularly challenging. To study a specific subgroup of second-order neurons in medial NTS, we anterogradely labeled arterial baroreceptor afferents of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) with lipophilic fluorescent tracer (i.e., ADN+) and measured synaptic responses to solitary tract (ST) activation recorded from dye-identified neurons in medial NTS in horizontal brain stem slices. Every ADN+ NTS neuron received constant-latency ST-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) (jitter < 192 micros, SD of latency). Stimulus-recruitment profiles showed single thresholds and no suprathreshold recruitment, findings consistent with EPSCs arising from a single, branched afferent axon. Frequency-dependent depression of ADN+ EPSCs averaged approximately 70% for five shocks at 50 Hz, but single-shock failure rates did not exceed 4%. Whether adjacent ADN- or those from unlabeled animals, other second-order NTS neurons (jitters < 200 micros) had ST transmission properties indistinguishable from ADN+. Capsaicin (CAP; 100 nM) blocked ST transmission in some neurons. CAP-sensitive ST-EPSCs were smaller and failed over five times more frequently than CAP-resistant responses, whether ADN+ or from unlabeled animals. Variance-mean analysis of ST-EPSCs suggested uniformly high probabilities for quantal glutamate release across second-order neurons. While amplitude differences may reflect different numbers of contacts, higher frequency-dependent failure rates in CAP-sensitive ST-EPSCs may arise from subtype-specific differences in afferent axon properties. Thus afferent transmission within medial NTS differed by axon class (e.g., CAP sensitive) but was indistinguishable by source of axon (e.g., baroreceptor vs. nonbaroreceptor).

  2. Combining living anionic polymerization with branching reactions in an iterative fashion to design branched polymers.

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Kenji; Yoo, Hee-Soo; Hayashi, Mayumi; Hirao, Akira

    2010-06-16

    This paper reviews the precise synthesis of many-armed and multi-compositional star-branched polymers, exact graft (co)polymers, and structurally well-defined dendrimer-like star-branched polymers, which are synthetically difficult, by a commonly-featured iterative methodology combining living anionic polymerization with branched reactions to design branched polymers. The methodology basically involves only two synthetic steps; (a) preparation of a polymeric building block corresponding to each branched polymer and (b) connection of the resulting building unit to another unit. The synthetic steps were repeated in a stepwise fashion several times to successively synthesize a series of well-defined target branched polymers.

  3. How I Do It: Medial Flap Inferior Turbinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Barham, Henry P; Knisely, Anna; Harvey, Richard J; Sacks, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for inferior turbinate reduction vary from complete turbinectomy to limited cauterization. Surgical methods differ on the degree of tissue reduction and reliance on surgical tissue removal versus tissue ablation. The technique and surgical steps of our preferred method of turbinate reduction are presented. Critical steps include proper design of the medial flap and removal of turbinate bone and lateral mucosa to allow lateral positioning of the medial flap. Bipolar cautery of the inferior turbinate artery branches allows complete haemostasis and undermining of the head allows proper debulking of the anterior aspect of the turbinate and widening of the nasal valve area. The medial flap inferior turbinoplasty provides consistent, robust results. Long-term relief of obstructive symptoms without additional risk of complication is expected with this procedure.

  4. Fault Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Poliakov, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Theoretical stress analysis for a propagating shear rupture suggests that the propensity of the rupture path to branch is determined by rupture speed and by the preexisting stress state. See Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice (JGR, submitted April 2001, URL below). Deviatoric stresses near a mode II rupture tip are found to be much higher to both sides of the fault plane than directly ahead, when rupture speed becomes close to the Rayleigh speed. However, the actual pattern of predicted Coulomb failure on secondary faults is strongly dependent on the angle between the fault and the direction of maximum compression Smax in the pre-stress field. Steep Smax angles lead to more extensive failure on the extensional side, whereas shallow angles give comparable failure regions on both. Here we test such concepts against natural examples. For crustal thrust faults we may assume that Smax is horizontal. Thus nucleation on a steeply dipping plane, like the 53 ° dip for the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, is consistent with rupture path kinking to the extensional side, as inferred. Nucleation on a shallow dip, like for the 12 ° -18 ° of the 1985 Kettleman Hills event, should activate both sides, as seems consistent with aftershock patterns. Similarly, in a strike slip example, Smax is inferred to be at approximately 60 ° with the Johnson Valley fault where it branched to the extensional side onto the Landers-Kickapoo fault in the 1992 event, and this too is consistent. Further, geological examination of the activation of secondary fault features along the Johnson Valley fault and the Homestead Valley fault consistently shows that most activity occurs on the extensional side. Another strike-slip example is the Imperial Valley 1979 earthquake. The approximate Smax direction is north-south, at around 35 ° with the main fault, where it branched, on the extensional side, onto Brawley fault, again interpretable with the concepts developed.

  5. Different regions of latest electrical activation during left bundle-branch block and right ventricular pacing in cardiac resynchronization therapy patients determined by coronary venous electro-anatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Mafi Rad, Masih; Blaauw, Yuri; Dinh, Trang; Pison, Laurent; Crijns, Harry J; Prinzen, Frits W; Vernooy, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Current targeted left ventricular (LV) lead placement strategy is directed at the latest activated region during intrinsic activation. However, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is most commonly applied by simultaneous LV and right ventricular (RV) pacing without contribution from intrinsic conduction. Therefore, targeting the LV lead to the latest activated region during RV pacing might be more appropriate. We investigated the difference in LV electrical activation sequence between left bundle-branch block (LBBB) and RV apex (RVA) pacing using coronary venous electro-anatomic mapping (EAM). Twenty consecutive CRT candidates with LBBB underwent intra-procedural coronary venous EAM during intrinsic activation and RVA pacing using EnSite NavX. Left ventricular lead placement was aimed at the latest activated region during LBBB according to current recommendations. In all patients, LBBB was associated with a circumferential LV activation pattern, whereas RVA pacing resulted in activation from the apex of the heart to the base. In 10 of 20 patients, RVA pacing shifted the latest activated region relative to LBBB. In 18 of 20 patients, the LV lead was successfully positioned in the latest activated region during LBBB. For the whole study population, LV lead electrical delay, expressed as percentage of QRS duration, was significantly shorter during RVA pacing than during LBBB (72 ± 13 vs. 82 ± 5%, P = 0.035). Right ventricular apex pacing alters LV electrical activation pattern in CRT patients with LBBB, and shifts the latest activated region in a significant proportion of these patients. These findings warrant reconsideration of the current practice of LV lead targeting for CRT. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  6. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Vanderheyden, Marc; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Francis, Darrel; Heynens, Joeri; Stegemann, Berthold; Cornelussen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in LV+dP/dtmax from baseline atrial pacing compared to the following configurations: BiV pacing with the LV lead in a one of lateral veins, while pacing from the distal, mid, or proximal electrode and all 3 electrodes together (i.e. MSP). All measurements were repeated 4 times at 5 different atrioventricular delays. We also measured QRS-width and individual Q-LV durations. Results Protocol was completed in 24 patients, all with LBBB (QRS width 171±20 ms) and 58% ischemic aetiology. The percentage change in LV+dP/dtmax for MSP pacing was 31.0±3.3% (Mean±SE), which was not significantly superior to any BiV pacing configuration: 28.9±3.2% (LV-distal), 28.3±2.7% (LV-mid), and 29.5±3.0% (LV-prox), respectively. Correlation between LV+dP/dtmax and either QRS-width or Q-LV ratio was poor. Conclusions In patients with LBBB MultiSPOT LV pacing demonstrated comparable improvement in contractility to best conventional BiV pacing. Optimization of atrioventricular delay is important for the best performance for both BiV and MultiSPOT pacing configurations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01883141 PMID:27124724

  7. An unusually medial axillary arch muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dharap, A

    1994-01-01

    In the left upper limb of an adult male cadaver a triangular muscular slip, 3.5 cm long and 2.5 cm wide, arose from the lower border of latissimus dorsi just proximal to its tendon of insertion. It was inserted by a slender 6 cm long tendon mainly into the coracoid process of the scapula. Three short fibrous strands radiated from this slender tendon to gain attachments to pectoralis minor and the common tendon of origin of the short head of biceps brachii and coracobrachialis. In addition 2 flat tendinous bands attached the margin of this muscular slip to teres major. The thoracodorsal nerve entered the main bulk of latissimus dorsi close to the muscular slip but did not supply a separate branch to the latter. This is an axillary arch muscle in an unusually medial location. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7928652

  8. Congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    We report two patients, one with congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles and one with absence of the medial rectus muscles; in addition, one of them had absence of the lateral rectus muscles. While absence of the superior oblique and superior rectus has been more commonly reported in literature, especially with craniofacial syndromes, our patients were nonsyndromic. Considering the risk of anterior segment ischemia, correction of the large-angle exotropia was performed by horizontal rectus muscle surgery where possible, along with transfer of the superior oblique tendon to the superior part of the normal medial rectus muscle insertion area to create a tethering effect with a good outcome. PMID:28300745

  9. Comparison of the prognostic effect of left versus right versus no bundle branch block on presenting electrocardiogram in acute myocardial infarction patients treated with primary angioplasty in the primary angioplasty in myocardial infarction trials.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Mayra; Harjai, Kishore; Stone, Gregg W; Brodie, Bruce; Cox, David; Boura, Judy; Grines, Lorelei; O'Neill, William; Grines, Cindy

    2005-08-15

    The presence of bundle branch block (BBB) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients who have acute myocardial infarction. Whether this is true in the angioplasty era is not known. We sought to evaluate the outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction and BBB who were treated with primary angioplasty. We evaluated 3,053 patients who underwent emergency catheterization in the PAMI trials. Patients who had left BBB (n = 48, 1.6%) on presenting electrocardiogram were compared with patients who had right BBB (n = 95, 3.1%) or no BBB (n = 2,910, 95.3%). Patients who had BBB were older and more frequently had diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and previous coronary artery bypass grafting. They had lower ejection fraction and more multivessel disease. There were no significant differences in door-to-balloon time, final Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow grade or stent use. In-hospital major adverse cardiac events (death, ischemic target vessel revascularization, and reinfarction) were higher in patients who had BBB due primarily to increased in-hospital death (left BBB 14.6%, right BBB 7.4%, no BBB 2.8%, p < 0.0001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, left BBB was an independent predictor of in-hospital death (odds ratio 5.53, 95% confidence interval 1.89 to 16.1, p = 0.002). In conclusion, patients who have acute myocardial infarction and BBB have increased co-morbidities and higher mortality rates despite treatment with primary angioplasty. Despite early identification of multivessel disease with triage to angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting, if necessary, similar treatment times, and final Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade 3 flow, the presence of left BBB on admission electrocardiogram in patients who have acute myocardial infarction is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Because 85% of deaths in patients who have left BBB occur within the first week, these patients should be recognized

  10. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Jose Antonio; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Oñativia, Jose I.; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent patellofemoral dislocation is usually a multifactorial pathology. Different surgical techniques have been described according to the etiology of dislocation. In absence of a severe malalignment or an anatomical patellofemoral dysplasia, reconstruction of Medial Patello-femoral Ligament (MPFL) can restore the normal tracking of the patella, avoiding lateral excursion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and complications in patients who underwent a MPFL reconstruction. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 19 patients who underwent an anatomic MPFL reconstruction using autologous semitendinosus graft between 2007 and 2012. Exclusion criteria were patients with less than three years of follow-up and those with an associated procedure such as distal realignment or trochleoplasty. Clinical outcomes were measured using Kujala score and return to sport rate. We registered the postoperative complications and recurrence rate. Results: Nine patients were men and 10 women with a mean age of 25 years. Average follow-up was 5.8 years. Nine patients (47.4%) returned to their previous sport level, 8 (42.1%) changed to another sport or decreased their level and 2 (10.5%) were unable to practice any sports at all. Kujala score improvement was from 62.8 preoperative to 88.8 postoperative. One patient decreased the Kujala score. Eighty-nine percent of patients were satisfied with their outcome. One patient had a patellar fracture and four developed an arthrofibrosis and required mobilization under anesthesia. No recurrences were registered. Conclusion: Isolated MPFL reconstruction for recurrent patellofemoral dislocation is an effective alternative in absence of severe malalignment or anatomical dysplasia. Although no recurrences where registered at minimum 3-year follow-up, almost half of the patients were not able to return to their previous sport level.

  11. Effect of conduction block at axon bifurcations on synaptic transmission to different postsynaptic neurones in the leech.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X N

    1991-01-01

    1. The cutaneous receptive field of the medial pressure (mP) sensory neurone in the leech has been examined. The cell has one major receptive field and an anterior and a posterior minor receptive field, principally on lateral and dorsal skin. The two minor receptive fields are contiguous with the major receptive field and are innervated by fine anterior and posterior axons, but there is no overlap between major and minor receptive fields. 2. At low frequencies of stimulation of the minor receptive fields, conduction block takes place in the mP cell at the central branch point within the leech ganglion. 3. The mP cell synapses directly with many other cells in the leech ganglion, including the anterior pagoda (AP) cell, longitudinal (L) motoneurone and the annulus erector (AE) motoneurone, which were studied as a group of postsynaptic neurones. Conduction block in the mP cell affects its synaptic transmission to all three postsynaptic neurones, but the effect can be different in different postsynaptic neurones. Block at the central branch point for an impulse travelling along the anterior axon reduces transmission to the AE cell much more than to the AP or L cells, while block at the central branch for an impulse travelling along the posterior axon has the reverse effect. 4. The distribution of functional connections of the branches of the mP cell with each postsynaptic cell was studied. For this analysis, branches of the mP cell were selectively silenced either during conduction block or by laser microsurgery. Generally, nearly all of the functional connections with the L and AP cell are made by anterior branches of the mP cell while the connection with the AE cell was primarily made by posterior branches of the mP cell. 5. The possible sites of contact between the mP cell and postsynaptic cells were determined by injecting separate markers into the mP cell and a postsynaptic cell. In confirmation of physiology, the mP cell's posterior branches had few, if any

  12. Temporary Medial Upper Eyelid Lagophthalmos after External Dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, I O; Meienberg, O; Pimentel de Figueiredo, A R

    2016-04-01

    Background. Report of three cases of medial upper eyelid lagophthalmos as complication of external dacryocystorhinostomy. History and Signs. Shortly after dacryocystorhinostomy (skin incision on the side of the nose), three of ten consecutive patients (28 ± 4 years; mean ± standard deviation), presented with an ipsilateral lagophthalmos of 4 ± 1 mm in voluntary eyelid closure and 6 ± 1 mm in spontaneous blink. The lagophthalmos was due to a selective paresis of the medial part of the orbicularis oculi muscle of the upper eyelid. Patient 1 complained bitterly of dry eye symptoms and of her lagophthalmos. Patient 2 had mild symptoms but became very concerned after peers made her aware of her asymmetric blink. Patient 3 was asymptomatic and did not notice anything particular. Therapy and Outcome. Lagophthalmos resolved spontaneously within three months after surgery, first by improvement of voluntary eyelid closure and then of spontaneous blinking. Conclusions. Temporary lagophthalmos can occur as a complication of external dacryocystorhinostomy, most likely due to damage of the (only recently described) superficial buccal and/or zygomatic branches of the facial nerve that run upward to cross over the medial ligament and innervate the medial part of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. The vertical medial thigh lift.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    This article discusses management of the post-weight loss thigh deformity. Beginning with an explanation of the soft tissue variables contributing to the thigh and medial thigh deformity in the postbariatric individual, the article describes the important elements of selecting and screening candidates for surgery and the ideal sequence of procedures that should be followed to optimize results in this patient population. A detailed step-by-step description of the author's technique for medial thigh lift is provided along with multiple examples of outcomes. Aftercare is reviewed along with potential complications and their management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Posterior Branches of Lumbar Spinal Nerves - part II: Lumbar Facet Syndrome - Pathomechanism, Symptomatology and Diagnostic Work-up.

    PubMed

    Kozera, Katarzyna; Ciszek, Bogdan; Szaro, Paweł

    2017-04-12

    Posterior branches of the lumbar spinal nerves are the anatomic substrate of pain in the lower back, sacrum and the gluteal area. Such pain may be associated with various pathologies which cause pain in the posterior branches of the lumbar spinal nerves due to entrapment, mechanical irritation or inflammatory reaction and/or degeneration. The posterior branches are of significant functional importance, which is related to the function of the structures they supply, including facet joints, which are the basic biomechanical units of the spine. Low back pain caused by facet joint pathology may be triggered e.g. by simple activities, such as body rotations, unnatural positions, lifting heavy weights or excessive bending as well as chronic overloading with spinal hyperextension. Pain usually presents at the level of the lumbosacral junction (L 5 -S 1 ) and in the lower lumbar spine (L 4-5 , L 3-4 ). In the absence of specific diagnostic criteria, it is only possible to conclude that patients display tenderness at the level of the affected facet joint and that the pain is triggered by extension. Differential diagnosis for low back pain is difficult, since the pain may originate from various structures. The most reliable method of identifying Lumbar Facet Syndrome has been found to be a positive response to an analgesic procedure in the form of a block of the medial branch or intraarticular injection. There appear to be good grounds for conducting further studies and developing unequivocal diagnostic tests.

  15. The perforator-based conjoint (chimeric) medial Sural(MEDIAL GASTROCNEMIUS) free flap.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazufumi; Hallock, Geoffrey G; Hamazaki, Masahiro; Daicyo, Yoshihiro

    2004-12-01

    The prototypical conjoint or so-called "chimeric" free flap heretofore has been composed of several large independent flaps, each supplied by a separate major branch, that ultimately arise from a common source vessel. The perforator-based type of chimeric flap is a relatively new concept, usually involving multiple muscle perforator flaps each based on a solitary musculocutaneous perforator, but still arising from the same "mother" vessel. This principle of split cutaneous perforator flaps has been now successfully adapted to the medial suralMEDIAL GASTROCNEMIUS perforator free flap on 2 separate occasions. As a chimeric flap, there was greater flexibility in insetting, and overall flap width may be larger but still narrow enough to allow primary donor site closure; and yet, by definition, only a single recipient site was needed for any microanastomoses. This is further proof that the perforator-based chimeric free flap may be an option for any muscle perforator flap donor site, so that potential donor territories for conjoint flaps have become virtually unlimited.

  16. Bundle Branch Reentrant Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Alexander; Kusniec, Jairo; Strasberg, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Bundle branch reentrant (BBR) tachycardia is an uncommon form of ventricular tachycardia (VT) incorporating both bundle branches into the reentry circuit. The arrhythmia is usually seen in patients with an acquired heart disease and significant conduction system impairment, although patients with structurally normal heart have been described. Surface ECG in sinus rhythm (SR) characteristically shows intraventricular conduction defects. Patients typically present with presyncope, syncope or sudden death because of VT with fast rates frequently above 200 beats per minute. The QRS morphology during VT is a typical bundle branch block pattern, usually left bundle branch block, and may be identical to that in SR. Prolonged His-ventricular (H-V) interval in SR is found in the majority of patients with BBR VT, although some patients may have the H-V interval within normal limits. The diagnosis of BBR VT is based on electrophysiological findings and pacing maneuvers that prove participation of the His- Purkinje system in the tachycardia mechanism. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of a bundle branch can cure BBR VT and is currently regarded as the first line therapy. The technique of choice is ablation of the right bundle. The reported incidence of clinically significant conduction system impairment requiring implantation of a permanent pacemaker varies from 0% to 30%. Long-term outcome depends on the underlying cardiac disease. Patients with poor systolic left ventricular function are at risk of sudden death or death from progressive heart failure despite successful BBR VT ablation and should be considered for an implantable cardiovertor-defibrillator. PMID:16943949

  17. Ulnar entrapment neuropathy along the medial intermuscular septum in the midarm.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masashi; Ono, Nobuko; Kojima, Tomoko; Kusunose, Koichi

    2009-05-01

    We report a patient with primary ulnar entrapment neuropathy in the midarm. Stimulation of multiple sites along the ulnar nerve showed a motor conduction block at a distance of 7.5-10 cm proximal to the medial epicondyle, where the nerve was compressed by the medial intermuscular septum. Anatomically, the possibility of ulnar nerve entrapment in this segment has long been suggested, and stimulation at least 10 cm above the medial epicondyle may reveal the entrapment. Muscle Nerve 39: 707-710, 2009.

  18. Posterior Branches of Lumbar Spinal Nerves - Part I: Anatomy and Functional Importance.

    PubMed

    Kozera, Katarzyna; Ciszek, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare anatomic descriptions of posterior branches of the lumbar spinal nerves and, on this basis, present the location of these structures. The majority of anatomy textbooks do not describe these nerves in detail, which may be attributable to the fact that for many years they were regarded as structures of minor clinical importance. The state of knowledge on these nerves has changed within the last 30 years. Attention has been turned to their function and importance for both diagnostic practice and therapy of lower back pain. Summarising the available literature, we may conclude that the medial and lateral branches separate at the junction of the facet joint and the distal upper edge of the transverse process; that the size, course and area supplied differ between the lateral and the medial branch; and that facet joints receive multisegmental innervation. It has been demonstrated that medial branches are smaller than the respective lateral branches and they have a more constant course. Medial branches supply the area from the midline to the facet joint line, while lateral branches innervate tissues lateral to the facet joint. The literature indicates difficulties with determining specific anatomic landmarks relative to which the lateral branch and the distal medial branch can be precisely located. Irritation of sensory fibres within posterior branches of the lumbar spinal nerves may be caused by pathology of facet joints, deformity of the spine or abnormalities due to overloading or injury. The anatomic location and course of posterior branches of spinal nerves should be borne in mind to prevent damaging them during low-invasive analgesic procedures.

  19. Facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain: an evaluation of prevalence and false-positive rate of diagnostic blocks.

    PubMed

    Manchukonda, Rajeev; Manchikanti, Kavita N; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2007-10-01

    A retrospective review. Evaluation of the prevalence of facet or zygapophysial joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar origin by using controlled, comparative local anesthetic blocks and evaluation of false-positive rates of single blocks in the diagnosis of chronic spinal pain of facet joint origin. Facet or zygapophysial joints are clinically important sources of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The previous studies have demonstrated the value and validity of controlled, comparative local anesthetic blocks in the diagnosis of facet joint pain, with a prevalence of 15% to 67% variable in lumbar, thoracic, and cervical regions. False-positive rates of single diagnostic blocks also varied from 17% to 63%. Five hundred consecutive patients receiving controlled, comparative local anesthetic blocks of medial branches for the diagnosis of facet or zygapophysial joint pain were included. Patients were investigated with diagnostic blocks using 0.5 mL of 1% lidocaine per nerve. Patients with lidocaine-positive results were further studied using 0.5 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine per nerve on a separate occasion. Medial branch blocks were performed with intermittent fluoroscopic visualization, at 2 levels to block a single joint. A positive response was considered as one with at least 80% pain relief from a block of at least 2 hours duration when lidocaine was used, and at least 3 hours or longer than the duration of relief with lidocaine when bupivacaine was used, and also the ability to perform prior painful movements. A total of 438 patients met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of facet joint pain was 39% in the cervical spine [95% confidence interval (CI), 32%-45%]; 34% (95% CI, 22%-47%) in the thoracic pain; and 27% (95% CI, 22%-33%) in the lumbar spine. The false-positive rate with a single block in the cervical region was 45%, in the thoracic region was 42%, and in the lumbar region 45%. This retrospective review once again

  20. New branches of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Crisostomi, M.; Koyama, K.; Pilo, L.; Tasinato, G.

    2015-06-01

    The basic building block for Lorentz-invariant and ghost-free massive gravity is the square root of the combination g-1η , where g-1 is the inverse of the physical metric and η is a reference metric. Since the square root of a matrix is not uniquely defined, it is possible to have physically inequivalent potentials corresponding to different branches. We show that around the Minkowski background, the only perturbatively well-defined branch is the potential proposed by de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley. On the other hand, if Lorentz symmetry is broken spontaneously, other potentials exist with a standard perturbative expansion. We show this explicitly building new Lorentz-invariant, ghost-free massive gravity potentials for theories that in the background preserve rotational invariance but break Lorentz boosts.

  1. Cocaine-induced increases in medial prefrontal cortical GABA transmission involves glutamatergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Prathiba; Steketee, Jeffery D

    2006-02-15

    A recent study showed that cocaine-induced sensitization is associated with an increase in GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since previous studies have demonstrated that sensitization is associated with enhanced medial prefrontal cortex glutamatergic transmission, the present study examined the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid/kainate (AMPA/KA) receptors in cocaine-induced increases in medial prefrontal cortex GABA levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received four daily injections of saline (1 ml/kg, i.p.) or cocaine (15 mg/kg). One day later, animals were infused with NMDA or AMPA/KA antagonists 3-[(R)-2 carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), respectively, into medial prefrontal cortex via microdialysis probe for 60 min before receiving systemic challenge injections of saline or cocaine. Cocaine-sensitized animals showed an increase in extracellular medial prefrontal cortex GABA levels that was blocked by prior medial prefrontal cortex infusion of DNQX, but not CPP. These data indicate that enhanced medial prefrontal cortex GABA transmission seen in cocaine-sensitized animals involves glutamatergic stimulation of AMPA receptors.

  2. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  3. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  4. Management of the Postbariatric Medial Thigh Deformity.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F; Matarasso, Alan

    2016-05-01

    Thigh contour deformities-in particular, those of the medial thighs-are a common concern for many individuals seeking body contouring. Despite the frequency of this concern, some plastic surgeons have often been reluctant to embrace the medial thigh-lift procedure because of the risk for significant complications and relatively poor results. The authors' approach to medial thigh contouring is to address the variables outside of the medial thighs affecting the medial thighs before considering a medial thigh-lift procedure with a vertical component. In this article, the authors review the senior author's (J.F.C.) experience of 350 vertical medial thigh lifts in the weight-loss patient. The charts of 350 consecutive individuals who had undergone vertical medial thigh lifts were reviewed for complications and other variables. The procedures were all performed by the senior author between February of 2000 and February of 2014. The preoperative markings, current surgical technique, and postoperative care are described. There were 326 women and 24 men in the study, with an average age of 43 years. The overall complication rate was 45.14 percent. Skin dehiscence and seroma formation were the most frequent complications, at 31.14 percent and 18.18 percent, respectively. The vast majority of patients were pleased with the aesthetic and functional results of their surgery. The medial thigh deformities of the weight-loss patient are effectively addressed by a vertical medial thigh lift when the variables adjacent to the medial thighs are first treated by a body lift. Therapeutic, IV.

  5. Medial Patella Subluxation: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mark A.; Bollier, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Medial patella subluxation is a disabling condition typically associated with previous patellofemoral instability surgery. Patients often describe achy pain with painful popping episodes. They often report that the patella shifts laterally, which occurs as the medial subluxed patella dramatically shifts into the trochlear groove during early knee flexion. Physical examination is diagnostic with a positive medial subluxation test. Nonoperative treatment, such as focused physical therapy and patellofemoral stabilizing brace, is often unsuccessful. Primary surgical options include lateral retinacular repair/imbrication or lateral reconstruction. Prevention is key to avoid medial patella subluxation. When considering patellofemoral surgery, important factors include appropriate lateral release indications, consideration of lateral retinacular lengthening vs release, correct MPFL graft placement and tension, and avoiding excessive medialization during tubercle transfer. This review article will analyze patient symptoms, diagnostic exam findings and appropriate treatment options, as well as pearls to avoid this painful clinical entity. PMID:26361441

  6. Melons are Branched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan; Ryan, James P.

    2014-11-01

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  7. Randomized branch sampling

    Treesearch

    Harry T. Valentine

    2002-01-01

    Randomized branch sampling (RBS) is a special application of multistage probability sampling (see Sampling, environmental), which was developed originally by Jessen [3] to estimate fruit counts on individual orchard trees. In general, the method can be used to obtain estimates of many different attributes of trees or other branched plants. The usual objective of RBS is...

  8. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  9. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  10. The snapping medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; O'driscoll, Shawn W; Smith, Jay; Skinner, John A; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Snapping elbow is a well-known condition where elbow flexion and extension elicits a painful, popping sensation. The most frequent etiology is anterior dislocation of the ulnar nerve over the medial epicondyle. Four patients (3 females and 1 male) presented with complaints of a popping sensation in the elbow, pain over the medial aspect of the forearm, and ulnar neuritis. All patients underwent preoperative dynamic ultrasound and surgical exploration of the medial elbow. Intraoperatively, snapping of the MABC over the medial epicondyle was discovered in all four patients. In three patients, there was abnormal displacement of the medial triceps and ulnar nerve: in two of these, both structures dislocated over the medial epicondyle and in one patient both structures subluxated. In each case, the MABC was decompressed (n = 1) and transposed (n = 3), and in three cases, the medial triceps and ulnar nerve were addressed as well. Symptomatic improvement was achieved in all cases. Retrospective review of the ultrasound revealed the snapping MABC, though it was less effective prospectively in the cases when snapping MABC was not suspected. In conclusion, snapping of the MABC broadens the spectrum of disorders that results in snapping elbow. To our knowledge, we are unaware of prior reports of this entity.

  11. Fine-Branched Ridges

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-14

    This image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft shows numerous branching ridges with various degrees of sinuosity. These branching forms resemble tributaries funneling and draining into larger channel trunks towards the upper portion of the scene. The raised relief of these branching ridges suggests that these are ancient channels are inverted due to lithification and cementation of the riverbed sediment, which made it more resistant to erosion than the surrounding material. Wind-blown bedforms are abundant and resemble small ridges that are aligned in an approximately north-south direction. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20006

  12. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  13. Wnt/PCP proteins regulate stereotyped axon branch extension in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Branching morphology is a hallmark feature of axons and dendrites and is essential for neuronal connectivity. To understand how this develops, I analyzed the stereotyped pattern of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons, which have single axons branches that extend dorsally and medially. I found that components of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway control MB axon branching. frizzled mutant animals showed a predominant loss of dorsal branch extension, whereas strabismus (also known as Van Gogh) mutants preferentially lost medial branches. Further results suggest that Frizzled and Strabismus act independently. Nonetheless, branching fates are determined by complex Wnt/PCP interactions, including interactions with Dishevelled and Prickle that function in a context-dependent manner. Branching decisions are MB-autonomous but non-cell-autonomous as mutant and non-mutant neurons regulate these decisions collectively. I found that Wnt/PCP components do not need to be asymmetrically localized to distinct branches to execute branching functions. However, Prickle axonal localization depends on Frizzled and Strabismus. PMID:22147954

  14. Restoration technology branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The mission of Leetown Science Center (LSC), Restoration Technology Branch (RTB) is to conduct research needed to restore or protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of desirable aquatic systems.

  15. The Olive Branch Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnack, William

    1984-01-01

    The first annual Olive Branch Awards, sponsored by the Writers' and Publishers Alliance and the Editors' Organizing Committee, were given to ten magazines, out of 60 that submitted entries. Winning entries are described briefly. (IM)

  16. The Olive Branch Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnack, William

    1984-01-01

    The first annual Olive Branch Awards, sponsored by the Writers' and Publishers Alliance and the Editors' Organizing Committee, were given to ten magazines, out of 60 that submitted entries. Winning entries are described briefly. (IM)

  17. Branched Nanowire Architectures for Compact Power Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-13

    down to the level of single bacteria . First, methods for the predictable and controlled synthesis of branched nanaowires consisting of well-defined...focused on controlled synthesis and characterization of nanowire building blocks that can function as probes of fundamental biofuel cell processes. the...fabrication of new nanoscale electrodes enabling studies of microbial fuel cells down to the level of single bacteria . The results from these studies have

  18. The medial habenula: still neglected

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Humsini; Carter, Asasia Q.; Baldwin, Philip R.; Molfese, David L.; Salas, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The habenula is a small, bilateral brain structure located at the dorsal end of the diencephalon. This structure sends projections to the dopaminergic striatum and receives inputs from the limbic forebrain, making the habenula a unique modulator of cross-talk between these brain regions. Despite strong interest in the habenula during the seventies and eighties (Herkenham and Nauta, 1977; Beckstead, 1979; Beckstead et al., 1979; Herkenham and Nauta, 1979; Caldecott-Hazard et al., 1988), interest waned due to lack of a clearly identifiable functional role. Following Matsumoto and Hikosaka's seminal work on the lateral habenula as a predictor of negative reward in monkeys, the habenula has undergone a resurgence of scientific interest. Matsumoto and Hikosaka demonstrated an increase in habenular neuron firing when monkeys did not receive an expected juice reward (Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2007). Studies have shown that increased habenular activity inactivates dopaminergic cells in the Rostromedial Tegmental Nucleus (RMTg) through GABAergic mechanisms (Jhou et al., 2009a,b). Additional studies link habenular activity to the regulation of serotonin and norepinephrine, suggesting the habenula modulates multiple brain systems (Strecker and Rosengren, 1989; Amat et al., 2001). These discoveries ushered in a series of new studies that have refocused attention on the lateral habenula and the importance of this small brain structure (Bianco and Wilson, 2009; Jhou et al., 2009a; Matsumoto and Hikosaka, 2009; Sartorius et al., 2010; Savitz et al., 2011). Recently, Geisler and Trimble reviewed this renewed interest in: The Lateral Habenula: No Longer Neglected (Geisler and Trimble, 2008). While the lateral habenula (LHb) has been extensively studied, the anatomically and histochemically distinct medial habenula (MHb) remains largely understudied. This short review argues that the MHb is functionally important and should be studied more aggressively. PMID:24478666

  19. [Tibial periostitis ("medial tibial stress syndrome")].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Etienne

    2003-06-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is characterised by complaints along the posteromedial tibia. Runners and athletes involved in jumping activities may develop this syndrome. Increased stress to stabilize the foot especially when excessive pronation is present explain the occurrence this lesion.

  20. Stab Wound in the Skull Treated with a Medial Supraorbital Craniotomy Through an Incision in the Eyebrow-a Minimally Invasive Approach.

    PubMed

    Araujo, João Luiz Vitorino; Ferraz, Vinicius Ricieri; Vilela, Denes; Sette, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    The eyebrow incision associated with medial supraorbital craniotomy is a minimally invasive alternative approach to the lesions located in the medial anterior cranial fossa. The main advantages of the medial supraorbital craniotomy regarding frontolateral supraorbital craniotomy are the absence of manipulation of the temporal muscle, less risk of injury to the frontotemporal branch of the facial nerve and a more medial view of the anterior structures such as frontal sinus, olfatory groove and frontal lobe. We report a unique case of cranial stab wound in which a piece of the knife stayed in the frontal sinus and removal was performed using the medial supraorbital approach. There were no complications during surgery, the patient reported mild hypoesthesia in the left frontal region and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day. During follow-up after 2 months, good cosmetic result of the surgical wound and preserved sensitivity of the left frontal region were noted.

  1. Medial medullary infarction: abnormal ocular motor findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Soo; Choi, K-D; Oh, S-Y; Park, S-H; Han, M-K; Yoon, B-W; Roh, J-K

    2005-10-25

    In 20 consecutive patients with isolated medial medullary infarction, abnormal ocular motor findings included nystagmus (n = 8), ocular contrapulsion (n = 5), and contralesional ocular tilt reaction (n = 2). The nystagmus was ipsilesional (n = 4), gaze-evoked (n = 5), upbeating (n = 4), and hemiseesaw (n = 1). The ocular motor abnormalities may be explained by involvements of the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, medial longitudinal fasciculus or efferent fibers from the vestibular nuclei, climbing fibers, and cells of the paramedian tracts.

  2. Neuromuscular block.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them specially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are specially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of special interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors.

  3. TopMaker: Technique Developed for Automatic Multiblock Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The TopMaker technique was developed in an effort to reduce the time required for grid generation in complex numerical studies. Topology generation accounts for much of the man-hours required for structured multiblock grids. With regard to structured multiblock grids, topology refers to how the blocks are arranged and connected. A two-dimensional multiblock topology generation technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Very general configurations can be addressed by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, a multiblock topology can be generated without user intervention. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns, where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in computational fluid dynamics, where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid-generation process.

  4. Vasculature of a Medial Femoral Condyle Free Flap in Intact and Osteotomized Flaps.

    PubMed

    Rysz, Maciej; Grabczan, Wojciech; Mazurek, Maciej Jan; Krajewski, Romuald; Grzelecki, Dariusz; Ciszek, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    A small size and difficulties with shaping a medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap are factors limiting its use. The goal of this study was to evaluate range of vascular supply to a medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap to determine whether harvesting of larger flaps and performing a flap osteotomy would compromise the vasculature of a flap's bone. Twenty-four limbs were dissected and medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flaps were harvested with skin paddles. Thirteen of 24 flaps had subperiosteal osteotomies simulating shaping a bone for reconstruction. A pedicle artery was perfused with red latex. Medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap vascularization was evaluated by cutting the bone into 1-cm blocks and assessing the number of Haversian canals filled with red latex. Length of harvested flaps was 7 to 13 cm, thickness was 0.5 to 3 cm, and width was 1 to 3 cm. Pedicle length was between 3.5 and 9 cm (mean ± SD, 6.6 ± 1.6 cm). Red latex filled bone vessels at a distance of 6 to 11.5 cm from the distal end of a flap (8.2 ± 1.4 cm). Skin paddles were filled with latex in all cases. A medial femoral condyle corticocancellous bone flap had sufficient blood supply, allowing for harvesting flaps up to 11 cm long, and subperiosteal osteotomy did not compromise the vasculature of the flap's bone.

  5. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  6. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  7. Branched Hamiltonians and supersymmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2014-03-21

    Some examples of branched Hamiltonians are explored both classically and in the context of quantum mechanics, as recently advocated by Shapere and Wilczek. These are in fact cases of switchback potentials, albeit in momentum space, as previously analyzed for quasi-Hamiltonian chaotic dynamical systems in a classical setting, and as encountered in analogous renormalization group flows for quantum theories which exhibit RG cycles. In conclusion, a basic two-worlds model, with a pair of Hamiltonian branches related by supersymmetry, is considered in detail.

  8. Composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery: a new design for repairing composite tissue defects in anterior knee.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangfeng; Nie, Kaiyu; Jin, Wenhu; Wei, Zairong; Qi, Jianping; Wang, Dali

    2015-01-01

    So far it has been difficult to repair and reconstruct the composite tissue defects in knee. Saphenous artery flap has been widely used to repair complex wounds, but the design and clinical application of composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery were not reported. In this research, we design a new composite tissue flap by carrying fascial flap in the medial gastrocnemius muscle with perforators flap in saphenous artery to repair and reconstruct the composite tissue defects in knee. By anatomic observation and analysis, we find that there exists blood-supply in netty form among saphenous arteries, medial artery below the knee, intermuscular branch in high-order position of posterior tibial artery and perforating branch in medial artery of calf. We chose saphenous artery as blood-supplying artery; utilized the netty blood-supplying mode in middle-up and medial part of shank; cut the composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery with fascial flap carried in the medial gastrocnemius muscle; reconstructed the ligamentum patellae using medial head of gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles's tendon; and covered the wounds at front side of knee with flap. Composite tissues were survived completely, free from infection at wounds and exosmosis of joint fluid. Motion function of knee-joint proved satisfactory, and ambulatory function was recovered. There was no complication in donor site. Composite tissue flap at perforating branches of saphenous artery with fascial flap carried in the medial gastrocnemius muscle is one of the most ideal solutions for repairing the composite tissue defects at front side of knee joint.

  9. Reanimation of elbow extension with medial pectoral nerve transfer in partial injuries to the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in operative treatment of the brachial plexus authorized more extensive repairs and, currently, elbow extension can be included in the rank of desirable functions to be restored. This study aims to describe the author's experience in using the medial pectoral nerve for reinnervation of the triceps brachii in patients sustaining C5-7 palsies of the brachial plexus. This is a retrospective study of the outcomes regarding recovery of elbow extension in 12 patients who underwent transfer of the medial pectoral nerve to the radial nerve or to the branch of the long head of the triceps. The radial nerve was targeted in 3 patients, and the branch to the long head of the triceps was targeted in 9. Grafts were used in 6 patients. Outcomes assessed as Medical Research Council Grades M4 and M3 for elbow extension were noted in 7 (58%) and 5 (42%) patients, respectively. The medial pectoral nerve is a reliable donor for elbow extension recovery in patients who have sustained C5-7 nerve root injuries.

  10. Isolated lesion of the medial orbital wall following endonasal surgery. Isolated fractures of the medial orbital wall.

    PubMed

    Scassellati-Sforzolini, G; Cavina, C; Scassellati-Sforzolini, B; Vancini, F; Cavina, C

    Isolated fractures of the medial orbital wall are infrequent. The diagnostic triad includes: adduction block, exotropia with diplopia in all directions of gaze, positive passive duction in abduction. Sometimes a slight enophthalmos is present. Computed tomography shows the extension and the seat of the fracture. The authors illustrate the case of a 60 year old male who presented with a breach of the medial orbital wall following endonasal surgery. The patient was successfully operated using an iliac bone graft inserted via an eyebrow-nasal cutaneous approach, after a previous attempt with a transconjunctival approach performed in another hospital had failed. A good functional and aesthetic result was observed within the first year after surgery. After almost 11 years a full adduction is still present and diplopia is absent. The authors underline the importance of an early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. The fat-muscle entrapment should be removed and the bone defect closed. A close cooperation between ophthalmologist and plastic surgeon is suggested.

  11. Importance of anatomically locating the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve in reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament using flexor tendons☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar; Resina, André França; Pedro, Gabriel; Neto, Ildefonso Angelo Mora; Almagro, Marco Antonio Pires; da Silva, Phelipe Augusto Cintra; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the path of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve (IBSN) using the medial joint line, anterior tibial tuberosity (ATT), tibial collateral ligament and a horizontal line parallel to the medial joint line that passes over the ATT, as reference points, in order to help surgeons to diminish the likelihood of injuring this nerve branch during reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using flexor tendons. Methods Ten frozen knees that originated from amputations were examined. Through anatomical dissection performed with the specimens flexed, we sought to find the IBSN, from its most medial and proximal portion to its most lateral and distal portion. Following this, the anatomical specimens were photographed and, using the ImageJ software, we determined the distance from the IBSN to the medial joint line and to a lower horizontal line going through the ATT and parallel to the first line. We also measured the angle of the direction of the path of the nerve branch in relation to this lower line. Results The mean angle of the path of the nerve branch in relation to the lower horizontal line was 17.50 ± 6.17°. The mean distance from the IBSN to the medial joint line was 2.61 ± 0.59 cm and from the IBSN to the lower horizontal line, 1.44 ± 0.51 cm. Conclusion The IBSN was found in all the knees studied. In three knees, we found a second branch proximal to the first one. The direction of its path was always from proximal and medial to distal and lateral. The IBSN was always proximal and medial to the ATT and distal to the medial joint line. The medial angle between its direction and a horizontal line going through the ATT was 17.50 ± 6.17°. PMID:26229872

  12. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  13. Block Busters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noblitt, Bill

    1994-01-01

    A number of college publications editors and designers share their secrets for coping with writer's block and other forms of creative anxiety. Suggested techniques include a change of scenery, guarding one's time, sharing ideas with others, thorough research, and organization. (MSE)

  14. Branching in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2011-02-01

    Rice branching, including the formation of tillers and panicle branches, has been well investigated over the past several years because of its agronomic importance. A major breakthrough in elucidating rice tillering in the recent years was the discovery of strigolactones, a specific group of terpenoid lactones that can inhibit axillary bud outgrowth. Since that discovery, new tillering mutants, that is, dwarf 27 (d27) or dwarf14 (d14, also reported as d88 or htd2), have been identified with reduced strigolactone levels or strigolactone response. DWARF27 (D27) and DWARF14 (D14) probably act on strigolactone biosynthesis and signal transduction, respectively. Additionally, several genes controlling panicle branches have been identified recently. DEP1 and IPA1/WFP are essential dominant/semidominant regulators that determine rice panicle branches and thus affect the grain yields. More importantly, dep1 and ipa1 alleles have been shown to be applicable for the improvement of rice grain yields in molecular breeding. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  16. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  17. Medial thighplasty: Current concepts and practices.

    PubMed

    Bertheuil, N; Carloni, R; De Runz, A; Herlin, C; Girard, P; Watier, E; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    Medial thighplasty, also known as medial thigh lift, is a procedure that has been carried out for five decades. The original "Lewis" technique has undergone many changes, and thereby been rendered widely available to plastic surgeons. Given the increasingly high number of surgical reconstructions after massive weight loss, this technique is now an integral part of a surgeon's therapeutic arsenal as he strives to meet the evolving demands of patients. The objective of this article, which is based on a comprehensive review of the literature, is to summarize current knowledge on medial thighplasty and thereby allow plastic surgeons to adopt the operating technique best suited to the deformations presented by their patients and to the overall context. The different techniques, outcomes and complications are successively discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Lipids in biocalcification: contrasts and similarities between intimal and medial vascular calcification and bone by NMR.

    PubMed

    Reid, David G; Shanahan, Catherine M; Duer, Melinda J; Arroyo, Luis G; Schoppet, Michael; Brooks, Roger A; Murray, Rachel C

    2012-08-01

    Pathomechanisms underlying vascular calcification biogenesis are still incompletely understood. Biomineral from human atherosclerotic intimal plaques; human, equine, and bovine medial vascular calcifications; and human and equine bone was released from collagenous organic matrix by sodium hydroxide/sodium hypochlorite digestion. Solid-state (13)C NMR of intimal plaque mineral shows signals from cholesterol/cholesteryl esters and fatty acids. In contrast, in mineral from pure medial calcifications and bone mineral, fatty acid signals predominate. Refluxing (chloroform/methanol) intimal plaque calcifications removes the cholesterylic but not the fatty acyl signals. The lipid composition of this refluxed mineral now closely resembles that of the medial and bone mineral, which is unchanged by reflux. Thus, intimal and medial vascular calcifications and bone mineral have in common a pool of occluded mineral-entrained fatty acyl-rich lipids. This population of fatty acid may contain methyl-branched fatty acids, possibly representing lipoprotein particle remnants. Cell signaling and mechanistic parallels between physiological (orthotopic) and pathological (ectopic) calcification are also reflected thus in the NMR spectroscopic fingerprints of mineral-associated and mineral-entrained lipids. Additionally the atherosclerotic plaque mineral alone shows a significant independent pool of cholesterylic lipids. Colocalization of mineral and lipid may be coincidental, but it could also reflect an essential mechanistic component of biomineralization.

  19. Unusual and Unique Variant Branches of Lateral Cord of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Implications- A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Padur, Ashwini Aithal; Shanthakumar, Swamy Ravindra; Shetty, Surekha Devadas; Prabhu, Gayathri Sharath; Patil, Jyothsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adequate knowledge on variant morphology of brachial plexus and its branches are important in clinical applications pertaining to trauma and surgical procedures of the upper extremity. Aim Current study was aimed to report variations of the branches of the lateral cord of brachial plexus in the axilla and their possible clinical complications. Materials and Methods Total number of 82 upper limbs from 41 formalin embalmed cadavers was dissected. Careful observation was made to note the formation and branching pattern of lateral cord. Meticulous inspection for absence of branches, presence of additional or variant branches and presence of abnormal communications between its branches or with branches of other cords was carried out. Results In the present study, we noted varied branching pattern of lateral cord in 6 out of 82 limbs (7%). In one of the limb, the median nerve was formed by three roots; two from lateral cord and one from medial cord. Two limbs had absence of lateral pectoral nerve supplemented by medial pectoral nerves. One of which had an atypical ansa pectoralis. In 2 upper limbs, musculocutaneous nerve was absent and in both cases it was supplemented by median nerve. In one of the limb, coracobrachialis had dual nerve supply by musculocutaneous nerve and by an additional branch from the lateral cord. Conclusion Variations of brachial plexus and its branches could pose both intraoperative and postoperative complications which eventually affect the normal sensory and motor functions of the upper limb. PMID:27190783

  20. Os subtibiale: Mimicking medial malleolar fracture.

    PubMed

    Topal, Murat; Köse, Ahmet; Dinçer, Recep; Baran, Tuncay; Köse, Mehmet; Çağatay Engin, M

    2017-06-01

    There are numerous sesamoids and accessory ossicles around the foot which can easily be misdiagnosed as fractures. Os subtibiale is a very rare normal variant of the medial malleolus which is usually diagnosed incidentally in routine ankle radiographs. In this report, we present a case series of 3 patients with os subtibiale who were admitted to the emergency department with ankle sprains and misdiagnosed as medial malleolar fractures. We would like to raise awareness to the very rare and usually asymptomatic os subtibiale as a diagnostic pitfall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modified lateral block of the suprascapular nerve: a safe approach and how much to inject? A morphological study.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Georg Christoph; Anderhuber, Friedrich; Dorn, Christian; Pipam, Wolfgang; Rosmarin, Walter; Likar, Rudolph

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of a modified lateral suprascapular nerve block with easy orientation, low risk of displacement of the needle, and with an assessment of 2 different volumes to propose an ideal volume for a successful block. Both shoulders of 34 cadavers were investigated. Insertion point of the needle was determined in the angle of the lateral end of the clavicle, acromion, and the spine of the scapula. The needle was directed toward the medial, dorsal, and caudad direction. Ten mL of diluted contrast agent for computerized tomography was injected in the 34 right sides (group A) and 5 mL in the 34 left sides (group B). Immediately after injection, all shoulders were investigated by computerized tomography scans and 3-dimensional reconstruction to document the constrast dissemination. Five sides of each group were injected with colored contrast and dissected after computerized tomography investigation. Group A showed a distribution to the entire supraspinous fossa in all cases and the contrast was pressed out of the suprascapular notch in 4 cases with a maximal extension into the axillary fossa in 3 cases. In group B, the supraspinous fossa was filled in 24 cases, with a maximal extension to the axillary fossa in 2 cases. In 9 cases, the contrast agent stayed in the lateral half of the supraspinous fossa. In 1 case we had a medial spread only which still surrounded the suprascapular notch, in another case a superficial spread with misplacement of the needle. Based on this cadaver study, the lateral modified approach appears to be a safe technique for a suprascapular nerve block, which might be preferred as a single shot technique. A 5 mL volume appears sufficient to fill the supraspinous fossa and to reach the suprascapular nerve, which branches in this anatomical compartment.

  2. Proximal Scaphoid Arthroplasty Using the Medial Femoral Trochlea Flap

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James P.; Burger, Heinze K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial trochlea of the femur (medial femoral trochlea, MFT) provides a source of convex osteocartilaginous vascularized bone that has been demonstrated to have a similar contour to the proximal scaphoid. This provides a potential solution for difficult recalcitrant proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Materials and Methods Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent MFT proximal scaphoid arthroplasty were reviewed. Follow-up data were recorded at a minimum of 6 months, with an average of 14 months. The results of this cohort were previously reported in detail but are summarized herein. Description of Technique The ability to reconstruct both bone and cartilage of the nonunion enables the surgeon to resect the nonunited proximal pole to prepare for scaphoid reconstruction. A segment of osteocartilaginous MFT is harvested in dimensions required by the scaphoid defect. The MFT segment is harvested on the transverse branch of the descending geniculate vessels. Fixation may be achieved with ease due to the size of the reconstructed segment. Results Computed tomography imaging demonstrated 15 of 16 reconstructed scaphoids achieving osseous union. Follow-up range of motion (ROM) of the wrist averaged 46.0° extension (range 28-80°) and 43.8° flexion (range 10-80°), which was similar to preoperative (average 45.7° extension and 43.0° flexion). Scapholunate angles remained unaffected (51.6° preoperatively and 48.6° postoperatively), indicating preservation of carpal relationships. Conclusions Vascularized MFT flaps provide a useful tool in the treatment of difficult proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Early follow-up demonstrates high rate of achieving union with acceptable ROM and good pain relief. PMID:24436821

  3. Medial Canthoplasty Combined with Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy for the Treatment of Delayed Medial Telecanthal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hua; Li, Yang; Huang, Qian; Ding, Jing-Wen; Hou, Zhi-Jia; Li, Dong-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rupture of the medial canthal ligament can be caused by many events. It remains a challenge to rebuild the drainage system and restore the function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of medial canthoplasty combined with conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) in patients with medial telecanthal deformities and lacrimal drainage system damage. Methods: Twenty-two patients (22 eyes) treated with medial canthoplasty and CDCR during June 2012 to June 2014 were included in this retrospective study. For all patients, a self-tapping, titanium, low-profile head microscrew was drilled into the solid bone on the posterior aspect of the anterior lacrimal crest at the attachment position of the medial canthal ligament. Medpor-coated tear drainage tubes were applied. Distance of patient's lateral displacement before and after operation was recorded and compared. The complications of CDCR were described. Results: Before the surgery, distance of patient's canthal displacement was 4–6 mm. The canthal distance between two eyes of patients with surgery was 1 mm or less. Among patients with CDCR, four patients had proximal obstruction and two patients had distal obstruction. Five patients had tube malposition, for example, tube extrusion 1–3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Medial canthoplasty combined with CDCR is an effective surgical method for treatment of patients with medial telecanthal deformity and lacrimal drainage system obstruction. The study indicates that medial canthoplasty combined with CDCR surgery rebuilds normal appearance of eyelid and contour of the medial canthus and successfully repairs the function of the lacrimal drainage system. PMID:28303853

  4. [A case of medial medullary infarction with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery].

    PubMed

    Jin, Kazutaka; Aihara, Naoto; Tsukamoto, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of vomiting, dizziness and vertigo. Neurological examination on admission revealed only upbeat nystagmus without cranial nerve symptoms, paresis, cerebellar signs or sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance(MR) images demonstrated a new T 2 high intensity and T 1 iso-intensity signal lesion in the right upper medial medulla. This medial medullary infarction caused central vestibular dysfunction. MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) originating from the right internal carotid artery to the vertebrobasilar artery associated with the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery at the level of the cervical bifurcation. This is the first report of medullary infarction with persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis. We suspected this medullary infarction was caused by artery to artery embolism in the branch of the right vertebral artery through the PPHA distal originated from the stenosis of the right internal carotid artery.

  5. Branching structure and strain hardening of branched metallocene polyethylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Enrique; Li, Si-Wan; Costeux, Stéphane; Dealy, John M.

    2015-09-15

    There have been a number of studies of a series of branched metallocene polyethylenes (BMPs) made in a solution, continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) polymerization. The materials studied vary in branching level in a systematic way, and the most highly branched members of the series exhibit mild strain hardening. An outstanding question is which types of branched molecules are responsible for strain hardening in extension. This question is explored here by use of polymerization and rheological models along with new data on the extensional flow behavior of the most highly branched members of the set. After reviewing all that is known about the effects of various branching structures in homogeneous polymers and comparing this with the structures predicted to be present in BMPs, it is concluded that in spite of their very low concentration, treelike molecules with branch-on-branch structure provide a large number of deeply buried inner segments that are essential for strain hardening in these polymers.

  6. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Medial Patellar Instability: Treatment and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Moatshe, Gilbert; Cram, Tyler R.; Chahla, Jorge; Cinque, Mark E.; Godin, Jonathan A.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Historically, a lateral retinacular release was one of the primary surgical interventions used to treat lateral patellar instability. However, disruption of the lateral structures during this procedure has been associated with medial instability of the patella. Hypothesis: We hypothesize that good to excellent outcomes can be achieved at midterm follow-up after lateral patellotibial ligament reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Thirteen patients were treated for medial patellar instability with a lateral patellotibial ligament reconstruction between May 2011 and December 2013 by a single surgeon. All patients had previously undergone a lateral release procedure and had symptomatic medial patellar instability. Patients were evaluated using patient-reported outcome scores at a minimum of 2 years postsurgery. Results: The mean Lysholm score improved from 45.6 (range, 11-76) to 71.9 (range, 30-91). The median preoperative Tegner activity scale score was 3 (range, 1-7), while the median postoperative score was 4 (range, 1-9). The median Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) total score improved from 38 (range, 1-57) preoperatively to 6 postoperatively (range, 0-52). The mean patient satisfaction postoperatively was 8.2 (range, 5-10). Conclusion: Significantly improved outcomes can be achieved at midterm follow-up with a low rate of complications when reconstructing the lateral patellotibial ligament in the setting of iatrogenic medial patellar instability. PMID:28451613

  8. Affective Aprosodia from a Medial Frontal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Kenneth M.; Leon, Susan A.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Whereas injury to the left hemisphere induces aphasia, injury to the right hemisphere's perisylvian region induces an impairment of emotional speech prosody (affective aprosodia). Left-sided medial frontal lesions are associated with reduced verbal fluency with relatively intact comprehension and repetition…

  9. Affective Aprosodia from a Medial Frontal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Kenneth M.; Leon, Susan A.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Whereas injury to the left hemisphere induces aphasia, injury to the right hemisphere's perisylvian region induces an impairment of emotional speech prosody (affective aprosodia). Left-sided medial frontal lesions are associated with reduced verbal fluency with relatively intact comprehension and repetition…

  10. Medial elbow injury in young throwing athletes

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Bonnie; Nyland, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary This report reviews the anatomy, overhead throwing biomechanics, injury mechanism and incidence, physical examination and diagnosis, diagnostic imaging and conservative treatment of medial elbow injuries in young throwing athletes. Based on the information a clinical management decision-making algorithm is presented. PMID:23888291

  11. Leading Process Branch Instability in Lis1+/− Nonradially Migrating Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Pallavi P.; Simonet, Jacqueline C.; Shapiro, William

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian forebrain development requires extensive migration, yet the mechanisms through which migrating neurons sense and respond to guidance cues are not well understood. Similar to the axon growth cone, the leading process and branches of neurons may guide migration, but the cytoskeletal events that regulate branching are unknown. We have previously shown that loss of microtubule-associated protein Lis1 reduces branching during migration compared with wild-type neurons. Using time-lapse imaging of Lis1+/− and Lis1+/+ cells migrating from medial ganglionic eminence explant cultures, we show that the branching defect is not due to a failure to initiate branches but a defect in the stabilization of new branches. The leading processes of Lis1+/− neurons have reduced expression of stabilized, acetylated microtubules compared with Lis1+/+ neurons. To determine whether Lis1 modulates branch stability through its role as the noncatalytic β regulatory subunit of platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase 1b, exogenous PAF was applied to wild-type cells. Excess PAF added to wild-type neurons phenocopies the branch instability observed in Lis1+/− neurons, and a PAF antagonist rescues leading process branching in Lis1+/− neurons. These data highlight a role for Lis1, acting through the PAF pathway, in leading process branching and microtubule stabilization. PMID:19861636

  12. Role of the medial septum cholinoceptors in anxiogenic-like effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Tajik, Rohjan; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2013-07-02

    The medial septum which is extensively connected to the hippocampus is involved in cholinergic theta oscillation control as well as the anxiety related disorders. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the medial septum cholinoceptors in the nicotine-induced anxiogenic-like behaviors in rats, using the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. Intraperitoneal administration of nicotine at 0.6 and 0.8 mg/kg, decreased the open-arms time percentage (%OAT) and open-arms entries percentage (%OAE); indicating an anxiogenic-like response. Intra-medial septum microinjection of mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist at the doses of 1-4 μg/rat, increased %OAT (4 μg/rat), suggesting an anxiolytic-like effect. This however, did not alter the anxiogenic-like response induced by the effective dose of nicotine (0.6 mg/kg). Moreover, co-administration of the subthreshold dose of mecamylamine (2 μg/rat) plus nicotine at the dose of 0.5 or 0.6 mg/kg, increased or decreased the anxiolytic-like behaviors, respectively. On the other hand, sole intra-medial septum infusion of atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, induced an anxiolytic (0.05 μg/rat) and anxiogenic (0.25 μg/rat)-like effects, respectively. The dose of 0.05 μg/rat however, blocked the nicotine response. Furthermore, intra-medial septum microinjection of the highest dose of mecamylamine (4 μg/rat) plus nicotine (0.6 mg/kg) decreased the locomotor activity, while other treatments had no effect on this parameter. Our results suggested that, nicotine-induced anxiogenic-like behaviors may be mediated via the activation of cholinoceptors and possibly other receptor mechanism(s) in the medial septum.

  13. Detail, bridge plaque, at northwest end block of north (plymouth) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, bridge plaque, at northwest end block of north (plymouth) approach span, from east - Breslau Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Susquehanna River at Hannover Street, Plymouth, Luzerne County, PA

  14. 19. DETAIL, METAL LIGHT STANDARD, AT NORTH END BLOCK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL, METAL LIGHT STANDARD, AT NORTH END BLOCK OF EAST PARAPET, FROM WEST, SHOWING SIMPLE ORNAMENTATION OF BASE OF STANDARD, WITH 'UNION METAL' IMPRINT - Fifth Street Viaduct, Spanning Bacon's Quarter Branch Valley on Fifth Street, Richmond, Independent City, VA

  15. Larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension may trigger posterior root tear of medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun Young; Song, Hyung Keun; Jung, Myung Kuk; Oh, Hyeong Tak; Kim, Joon Ho; Yoon, Ji-Sang; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The major meniscal functions are load bearing, load distribution, and shock absorption by increasing the tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) contact area and dissipating axial loads by conversion into hoop stresses. The increased hoop strain stretches the meniscus in outward direction towards radius, causing extrusion, which is associated with the root tear and resultant degenerative osteoarthritis. Since the larger contact area of medial TFJ may increase the hoop stresses, we hypothesized that the larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension would contribute to the development of medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT). Thus, the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between MMPRT and medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension. A case-control study was conducted to compare medial femoral to tibial condylar dimensions of patients with complete MMPRT (n = 59) with those of demography-matched controls (n = 59) during the period from 2010 to 2013. In each patient, MRIs were reviewed and several parameters were measured including articulation width of medial femoral condyle (MFC) at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°, medial tibial condyle (MTC) width, degree of meniscal extrusion, and medial femoral to tibial condylar width ratio (MFC/MTC) at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. Demographic and radiographic data were assessed. A larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension was associated with MMPRT at 0° and 30° knee angles. Patients with MFC/MTC greater than 0.9 at 0° also showed about 2.5-fold increase in the chance of MMPRT. Those with meniscal extrusion greater than 3 mm also had about 17.1 times greater chance for the presence of MMPRT accordingly. A larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension may be considered as one of the regional contributors to the outbreak of MMPRT, and medial femoral to tibial condylar width ratio greater than 0.9 at 0° knee angle may be considered as a significant risk factor for MMPRT. III.

  16. Suppression of the late component of the carotid occlusion reflex by lesion of the medial forebrain bundle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lopes, O U; Timo-Iaria, C; Leitão-Filho, H A

    1981-04-01

    1. The pressor response to a prolonged carotid occlusion in the rat has two components: an early, fast increase in blood pressure, and a late, slow and sustained hypertension. Since the second component can be blocked by a disconnecting lesion near the medial side of the medial forebrain bundle, the hypothesis that this complex structure is involved in the integration of the late pressor reflex was tested. 2. The medial forebrain bundle was partially or completely destroyed, or a disconnecting lesion was made to interrupt some of its medially running afferents and/or efferents. Incomplete lesion caused a transient suppression of the second component in 4 rats, whereas complete lesion in 5 rats or probable interruption of the medial efferent pathways in 3 rats led to suppression of the late component when the one-minute occlusion was performed within one hour after the lesion. 3. The data show that the medial forebrain bundle plays an important role in the integration of the late component of the pressor response to prolonged carotid occlusion.

  17. Anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery with respect to the vascularity of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zlotorowicz, M; Szczodry, M; Czubak, J; Ciszek, B

    2011-11-01

    We performed a series of 16 anatomical dissections on Caucasian cadaver material to determine the surgical anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) and its anastomoses. These confirmed that the femoral head receives its blood supply primarily from the MFCA via a group of posterior superior nutrient arteries and the posterior inferior nutrient artery. In terms of anastomoses that may also contribute to the blood supply, the anastomosis with the inferior gluteal artery, via the piriformis branch, is the most important. These dissections provide a base of knowledge for further radiological studies on the vascularity of the normal femoral head and its vascularity after dislocation of the hip.

  18. Thermal Energy Conversion Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielozer, Matthew C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey, G.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch (5490) leads the way in designing, conducting, and implementing research for the newest thermal systems used in space applications at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Specifically some of the most advanced technologies developed in this branch can be broken down into four main areas: Dynamic Power Systems, Primary Solar Concentrators, Secondary Solar Concentrators, and Thermal Management. Work was performed in the Dynamic Power Systems area, specifically the Stirling Engine subdivision. Today, the main focus of the 5490 branch is free-piston Stirling cycle converters, Brayton cycle nuclear reactors, and heat rejection systems for long duration mission spacecraft. All space exploring devices need electricity to operate. In most space applications, heat energy from radioisotopes is converted to electrical power. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) already supplies electricity for missions such as the Cassini Spacecraft. The focus of today's Stirling research at GRC is aimed at creating an engine that can replace the RTG. The primary appeal of the Stirling engine is its high system efficiency. Because it is so efficient, the Stirling engine will significantly reduce the plutonium fuel mission requirements compared to the RTG. Stirling is also being considered for missions such as the lunar/Mars bases and rovers. This project has focused largely on Stirling Engines of all types, particularly the fluidyne liquid piston engine. The fluidyne was developed by Colin D. West. This engine uses the same concepts found in any type of Stirling engine, with the exception of missing mechanical components. All the working components are fluid. One goal was to develop and demonstrate a working Stirling Fluidyne Engine at the 2nd Annual International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

  19. Combustion Branch Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The NASA combustion branch is a leader in developing and applying combustion science to focused aerospace propulsion systems concepts. It is widely recognized for unique facilities, analytical tools, and personnel. In order to better communicate the outstanding research being done in this Branch to the public and other research organization, a more substantial website was desired. The objective of this project was to build an up-to-date site that reflects current research in a usable and attractive manner. In order to accomplish this, information was requested from all researchers in the Combustion branch, on their professional skills and on the current projects. This information was used to fill in the Personnel and Research sections of the website. A digital camera was used to photograph all personnel and these photographs were included in the personnel section as well. The design of the site was implemented using the latest web standards: xhtml and external css stylesheets. This implementation conforms to the guidelines recommended by the w3c. It also helps to ensure that the web site is accessible by disabled users, and complies with Section 508 Federal legislation (which mandates that all Federal websites be accessible). Graphics for the new site were generated using the gimp (www.gimp.org) an open-source graphics program similar to Adobe Photoshop. Also, all graphics on the site were of a reasonable size (less than 20k, most less than 2k) so that the page would load quickly. Technologies such as Macromedia Flash and Javascript were avoided, as these only function on some clients which have the proper software installed or enabled. The website was tested on different platforms with many different browsers to ensure there were no compatibility issues. The website was tested on windows with MS IE 6, MSIE 5 , Netscape 7, Mozilla and Opera. On a Mac, the site was tested with MS IE 5 , Netscape 7 and Safari.

  20. Combustion Branch Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The NASA combustion branch is a leader in developing and applying combustion science to focused aerospace propulsion systems concepts. It is widely recognized for unique facilities, analytical tools, and personnel. In order to better communicate the outstanding research being done in this Branch to the public and other research organization, a more substantial website was desired. The objective of this project was to build an up-to-date site that reflects current research in a usable and attractive manner. In order to accomplish this, information was requested from all researchers in the Combustion branch, on their professional skills and on the current projects. This information was used to fill in the Personnel and Research sections of the website. A digital camera was used to photograph all personnel and these photographs were included in the personnel section as well. The design of the site was implemented using the latest web standards: xhtml and external css stylesheets. This implementation conforms to the guidelines recommended by the w3c. It also helps to ensure that the web site is accessible by disabled users, and complies with Section 508 Federal legislation (which mandates that all Federal websites be accessible). Graphics for the new site were generated using the gimp (www.gimp.org) an open-source graphics program similar to Adobe Photoshop. Also, all graphics on the site were of a reasonable size (less than 20k, most less than 2k) so that the page would load quickly. Technologies such as Macromedia Flash and Javascript were avoided, as these only function on some clients which have the proper software installed or enabled. The website was tested on different platforms with many different browsers to ensure there were no compatibility issues. The website was tested on windows with MS IE 6, MSIE 5 , Netscape 7, Mozilla and Opera. On a Mac, the site was tested with MS IE 5 , Netscape 7 and Safari.

  1. Isolated Medial Rectus Palsy: Rare Presentation of Mesencephalon Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yindan; Hong, Wenke; Fan, Zhenyi; Li, Da; Chang, Xianchao; Fan, Weinv

    2017-04-01

    Isolated medial rectus palsy due to mesencephalon lesion is extremely rare. We here describe a patient of midbrain infarction involving the medial rectus subnuclei presenting as isolated medial rectus palsy. Axial diffusion-weighted and coronal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic lesion in mesencephalon. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Tom; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in fiscal year 2000. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics, spacecraft trajectory, attitude analysis, and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  3. Applied anatomy of the fasciocutaneous branch of the third perforator artery of the deep femoral artery

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Netto, Belmino Corrêa; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; de Oliveira Santos, Ivan Dunshee Abranches

    2003-01-01

    A study of the anatomy of the fasciocutaneous branch of the third perforator artery of the deep femoral artery was performed to help the elaboration of a fasciocutaneous flap for the reconstruction of skin and subcutaneous and deep fascia of the knee and popliteal region. Forty thighs in 27 fresh cadavers were dissected. In all of the thighs, the third perforator artery was found to arise from the deep femoral artery and reach the posterior aspect of the thigh after perforating the adductor magnus muscle. At that point it was also found that the third perforator artery gives off a branch that emerges through the intermuscular septum between the vast lateral muscle and the long head of the biceps femoral muscle, then crosses the posterior cutaneous nerve and moves directly on to perforate the deep fascia and then to bifurcate into two other branches: one ascending and one descending. The cutaneous area of the flap of the thigh’s posterior region, nourished by the fasciocutaneous branch, was evaluated through the injection of dye. Dying of the upper medial, middle medial, lower medial and lower lateral areas of the flap was not successful in all of the dissected thighs. Nevertheless, the upper lateral and the middle lateral areas were dyed successfully in all 40 dissected thighs of the 27 cadavers. PMID:24115846

  4. Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Roldan, Victoria; Fermas, Soraya; Brewer, Philip B; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Dun, Elizabeth A; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Letisse, Fabien; Matusova, Radoslava; Danoun, Saida; Portais, Jean-Charles; Bouwmeester, Harro; Bécard, Guillaume; Beveridge, Christine A; Rameau, Catherine; Rochange, Soizic F

    2008-09-11

    A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence that carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 shoot branching mutants of pea are strigolactone deficient and that strigolactone application restores the wild-type branching phenotype to ccd8 mutants. Moreover, we show that other branching mutants previously characterized as lacking a response to the branching inhibition signal also lack strigolactone response, and are not deficient in strigolactones. These responses are conserved in Arabidopsis. In agreement with the expected properties of the hormonal signal, exogenous strigolactone can be transported in shoots and act at low concentrations. We suggest that endogenous strigolactones or related compounds inhibit shoot branching in plants. Furthermore, ccd8 mutants demonstrate the diverse effects of strigolactones in shoot branching, mycorrhizal symbiosis and parasitic weed interaction.

  5. Branching toughens fibrous networks.

    PubMed

    Koh, C T; Oyen, M L

    2012-08-01

    Fibrous collagenous networks are not only stiff but also tough, due to their complex microstructures. This stiff yet tough behavior is desirable for both medical and military applications but it is difficult to reproduce in engineering materials. While the nonlinear hyperelastic behavior of fibrous networks has been extensively studied, the understanding of toughness is still incomplete. Here, we identify a microstructure mimicking the branched bundles of a natural type I collagen network, in which partially cross-linked long fibers give rise to novel combinations of stiffness and toughness. Finite element analysis shows that the stiffness of fully cross-linked fibrous networks is amplified by increasing the fibril length and cross-link density. However, a trade-off of such stiff networks is reduced toughness. By having partially cross-linked networks with long fibrils, the networks have comparable stiffness and improved toughness as compared to the fully cross-linked networks. Further, the partially cross-linked networks avoid the formation of kinks, which cause fibril rupture during deformation. As a result, the branching allows the networks to have stiff yet tough behavior.

  6. Pen Branch Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Stieve, A.L.; Aadland, R.

    1990-09-28

    Evidence from subsurface mapping and seismic reflection surveys at Savannah River Site (SRS) suggests the presence of a fault which displaces Cretaceous through Tertiary (90--35 million years ago) sediments. This feature has been described and named the Pen Branch fault (PBF) in a recent Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) paper (DP-MS-88-219). Because the fault is located near operating nuclear facilities, public perception and federal regulations require a thorough investigation of the fault to determine whether any seismic hazard exists. A phased program with various elements has been established to investigate the PBF to address the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines represented in 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. The objective of the PBF program is to fully characterize the nature of the PBF (ESS-SRL-89-395). This report briefly presents current understanding of the Pen Branch fault based on shallow drilling activities completed the fall of 1989 (PBF well series) and subsequent core analyses (SRL-ESS-90-145). The results are preliminary and ongoing: however, investigations indicate that the fault is not capable. In conjunction with the shallow drilling, other activities are planned or in progress. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Masseter and medial pterygoid muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, R; Rishi, Sudhirkumar; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2011-09-26

    Hypertrophy refers to an enlargement caused by an increase in the size but not in the number of cells. Generalised masticatory muscle hypertrophy may affect the temporalis muscle, masseters and medial pterygoids in a variety of combinations. Masseteric hypertrophy may present as either unilateral or bilateral painless swelling of unknown origin in the region of angle of mandible. It is a relatively rare condition and presents a diagnostic dilemma. While the history and clinical examination are important in differentiating this benign condition from parotid or dental pathology, they cannot necessarily exclude rare malignant lesion within the muscle. Advanced imaging modalities like CT and MRI are essential to confirm the diagnosis. Here the authors are reporting a unique case of masseter muscle hypertrophy along with medial pterygoid hypertrophy which was missed clinically but confirmed using CT and MRI.

  8. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  9. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Masseter and medial pterygoid muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    R, Guruprasad; Rishi, Sudhirkumar; Nair, Preeti P; Thomas, Shaji

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophy refers to an enlargement caused by an increase in the size but not in the number of cells. Generalised masticatory muscle hypertrophy may affect the temporalis muscle, masseters and medial pterygoids in a variety of combinations. Masseteric hypertrophy may present as either unilateral or bilateral painless swelling of unknown origin in the region of angle of mandible. It is a relatively rare condition and presents a diagnostic dilemma. While the history and clinical examination are important in differentiating this benign condition from parotid or dental pathology, they cannot necessarily exclude rare malignant lesion within the muscle. Advanced imaging modalities like CT and MRI are essential to confirm the diagnosis. Here the authors are reporting a unique case of masseter muscle hypertrophy along with medial pterygoid hypertrophy which was missed clinically but confirmed using CT and MRI. PMID:22679271

  11. Posterior sternoclavicular Salter-Harris fracture-dislocation in a patient with unossified medial clavicle epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas; Crawford, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Sternoclavicular injuries are relatively rare, composing less than 1 % of all musculoskeletal fractures or dislocations. When sternoclavicular injuries do occur, they typically present as an isolated dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint without associated fracture of the clavicle or manubrium. However, in patients with unfused medial clavicle physis, sternoclavicular joint injuries can present as a fracture-dislocation through the unfused physis. These physeal injuries are important to recognize as the displaced epiphysis can block reduction of the sternoclavicular joint. We present a case of a 15-year-old female basketball player presenting with suspected sternoclavicular joint injury after sustaining a direct blow to the left shoulder. An initial shoulder CT confirmed the presence of the clinically suspected posterior sternoclavicular dislocation without fracture identified. An MRI of the left sternoclavicular joint was then performed for suspected physeal fracture, which confirmed the presence of a fracture through the medial clavicle physis with anterior displacement of the unossified epiphysis, blocking reduction of the metaphysis. Given the findings on MRI, the pediatric orthropedic surgeon was able to counsel the family of the high likelihood of failed closed reduction of the sternoclavicular joint requiring conversion to open reduction and internal fixation. The patient underwent successful open reduction and internal fixation of the medial clavical physeal fracture after an initial gentle attempt at closed reduction was unsuccessful.

  12. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  13. Medial septal lesion enhances general anesthesia response.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Ma, Jingyi; Shen, Bixia; Nachim, Ilan; Luo, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Electrolytic lesion of the medial septum, a basal forebrain nucleus that projects to the hippocampus, prolonged the emergence from general anesthesia in rats. Septal lesioned rats required a longer time to recover from a loss of righting reflex (LORR) and a loss of tail-pinch response after injectable (20 mg/kg i.p. pentobarbital, 5mg/kg i.v. propofol) or volatile (1.5% halothane, 2% isoflurane) anesthetic. When incremental doses of propofol were given i.p., septal lesioned rats as compared to control rats showed LORR at a lower dose of propofol. Similarly, when the rats were exposed to increasing concentrations of isoflurane, the percent of rats showing LORR was leftward shifted for lesioned rats as compared to control rats. Septal lesioned rats as compared to control rats showed decreased locomotor activity when exposed to 1.5% halothane. Lesion of the medial septum was confirmed by thionin-stained histological sections as well as loss of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) staining in the hippocampus, indicating a depletion of septohippocampal cholinergic afferents. Medial septal lesion resulted in a near complete loss of hippocampal theta rhythm during walking and a general decrease in power of the hippocampal EEG at all frequencies (0-100 Hz), during walking or immobility. It is concluded that lesion of medial septum, in part through a loss of septohippocampal cholinergic afferents, increased the anesthesia response to volatile and injectable general anesthetics, during both induction and emergence. It is suggested that the septohippocampal system participates in many components of general anesthesia including hypnosis, immobility, and analgesia.

  14. Osteochondrosis of the accessory ossification centre of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Farsetti, Pasquale; Dragoni, Massimiliano; Potenza, Vito; Caterini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a painful accessory ossification centre of the medial malleolus in an 11-year-old girl who was not involved in sports activities. The patient was treated conservatively, with complete clinical and radiographic healing of the medial malleolus 6 months after the first presentation. We ruled out the uncommon pathological conditions causing chronic pain in the medial malleolus during skeletal growth, such as traction apophysitis of the medial malleolus, osteochondrosis, osteochondritis or avascular necrosis of the distal tibial epiphysis. We speculate that this painful condition may be classified as an osteochondrosis of the accessory ossification centre of the medial malleolus.

  15. Synthesis of branched polysaccharides with tunable degree of branching.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Jelena; Loos, Katja

    2013-03-01

    An in vitro enzyme-catalyzed tandem reaction using the enzymes phosphorylase b from rabbit muscle and Deinococcus geothermalis glycogen branching enzyme (Dg GBE) to obtain branched polyglucans with tunable degree of branching (2% ÷ 13%) is presented. The tunable degree of branching is obtained by varying the reaction conditions such as pH value, the choice of reducing agent and its concentration and reaction time. Linear amylose is formed by the phosphorylase-catalyzed propagation of glucose-1-phosphate while Dg GBE introduces branching points on the α-(1→6) position by relocating short oligosaccharide chains. Our results show that the best way to obtain different degrees of branching with this set of enzymes is by regulation of the reaction time.

  16. Topographical anatomy of the radial nerve and its muscular branches related to surface landmarks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyejin; Lee, Hye-Yeon; Gil, Young-Chun; Choi, Yun-Rak; Yang, Hee-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Understanding of the anatomy of the radial nerve and its branches is vital to the treatment of humeral fracture or the restoration of upper extremity function. In this study, we dissected 40 upper extremities from adult cadavers to locate the course of the radial nerve and the origins and insertions of the branches of the radial nerve using surface landmarks. The radial nerve reached and left the radial groove and pierced the lateral intermuscular septum, at the levels of 46.7, 60.5, and 66.8% from the acromion to the transepicondylar line, respectively. Branches to the long head of the triceps brachii originated in the axilla, and branches to the medial and lateral heads originated in the axilla or in the arm. The muscular attachments to the long, medial, and lateral heads were on average 34.0 mm proximal, 16.4 mm distal, and 19.3 mm proximal to the level of inferior end of the deltoid muscle, respectively. The radial nerve innervated 65.0% of the brachialis muscles. Branches to the brachioradialis and those to the extensor carpi radialis longus arose from the radial nerve above the transepicondylar line. Branches to the extensor carpi radialis brevis usually arose from the deep branch of radial nerve (67.5%); however, in some cases, branches to the extensor carpi radialis brevis arose from either the radial nerve (20.0%) or the superficial branch of the radial nerve (12.5%). Using these data, the course of the radial nerve can be estimated by observing the surface of the arm.

  17. Variations in the origin of the medial calcaneal nerve.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee; Kim, Jaesuk; Spaulding, Cecily M

    2002-02-01

    Previous anatomic studies of the medial heel region were done on embalmed human cadavers. Here, the innervation of the medial heel region was studied by dissecting living tissue with the use of 3.5-power loupe magnification during decompression of the medial ankle for tarsal tunnel syndrome in 85 feet. The medial heel was found to be innervated by just one medial calcaneal nerve in 37% of the feet, by two medial calcaneal nerves in 41%, by three medial calcaneal nerves in 19%, and by four medial calcaneal nerves in 3%. An origin for a medial calcaneal nerve from the medial plantar nerve was found in 46% of the feet. This nerve most often innervates the skin of the posteromedial arch, where it is at risk for injury during calcaneal spur removal or plantar fasciotomy. Knowledge of the variations in location of the medial calcaneal nerves may prevent neuroma formation during surgery and provide insight into the variability of heel symptoms associated with tarsal tunnel syndrome.

  18. Glutamatergic synaptic depression by synthetic amyloid beta-peptide in the medial septum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Torres, Julio; Fuente, Antonio; Criado, Jose Maria; Riolobos, Adelaida Sanchez; Heredia, Margarita; Yajeya, Javier

    2007-02-15

    The medial septum/diagonal band region, which participates in learning and memory processes via its cholinergic and GABAergic projection to the hippocampus, is one of the structures affected by beta amyloid (betaA) deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The acute effects of betaA (25-35 and 1-40) on action potential generation and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in slices of the medial septal area of the rat brain were studied using current and patch-clamp techniques. The betaA mechanism of action through M1 muscarinic receptors and voltage-dependent calcium channels was also addressed. Excitatory evoked responses decreased (30-60%) in amplitude after betaA (2 microM) perfusion in 70% of recorded cells. However, the firing properties were unaltered at the same concentration. This depression was irreversible in most cases, and was not prevented or reversed by nicotine (5 microM). In addition, the results obtained using a paired-pulse protocol support pre- and postsynaptic actions of the peptide. The betaA effect was blocked by calcicludine (50 nM), a selective antagonist of L-type calcium channels, and also by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine (5 muM) or pirenzepine (1 microM), a more specific M1-receptor blocker. We show that in the medial septal area this oligomeric peptide acts through calcium channels and muscarinic receptors. As blocking any of these pathways blocks the betaA effects, we propose a joint action through both mechanisms. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology at the onset of AD. This understanding will be required for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  19. Application of Additional Medial Plate in Treatment of Proximal Humeral Fractures With Unstable Medial Column

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu; He, Jiliang; Wang, Fu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Bomin; Xu, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to use finite element analysis to compare the biomechanical characteristics after lateral locking plate (LLP) or LLP with a medial anatomical locking plate (LLP-MLP) fixation of proximal humeral fractures with an unstable medial column. First, a 3-dimensional, finite element analysis model was developed. Next, LLP and LLP-MLP implants were instrumented into the proximal humeral fracture models. Compressive and rotational loads were then applied to the humerus model to determine the biomechanical characteristics. Both normal and osteoporotic proximal humerus fractures were simulated using 2 internal fixation methods each under 7 loading conditions. To assess the biomechanical characteristics, the construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and stress distribution on the implants were recorded and compared. The LLP-MLP method provided both lateral and medial support that reduced the stress on the LLP and the amount of displacement in the fracture region. In contrast, the LLP method resulted in more instability in the medial column and larger magnitudes of stress. In osteoporotic bone, the LLP was more inclined to fail than LLP-MLP. The LLP-MLP method provides a strong support for the medial column and increases the stability of the region surrounding the fracture. PMID:26469918

  20. Percutaneous Partial Medial Collateral Ligament Release (PPMCLR) Does Not Result in Residual Medial Collateral Laxity (MCL)

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, M. Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The intra-articular posterior medial knee can be difficult to approach during arthroscopy. This is especially true for medial meniscal tears, medial meniscal repairs or medial meniscal transplantation. Various methods and instruments have been proposed to help with this approach. PPMCLR is one of these methods. This study found that this is a safe technique and does not result in measurable laxity of the MCL. Methods: 50 consecutive patients took part in the study. The patients were then randomized into a control or partial percutaneous release group (25 in each group). Prior to arthroscopy each patient had standardized 30 degree valgus stress radiograph performed. The MCL was stressed with the Telos Stress Device GA/III at 30 degrees of flexion; utilizing 150 Newton's of stress. The stress radiographs were measured independently for the maximal separation at the medial compartment. At six weeks the stress radiographs were repeated and the results again recorded. The postoperative care for each group was the same. Results: The results were then statistically evaluated using the, finding no radiographic evidence of residual laxity P<.005. There was also no difference in the control and PPMCLR group p<.0005. No patient complained of residual laxity. Patient follow up will be discussed. Conclusion: PPMCLR is an effective and safe method to reach the intra-articular posterior aspect of the knee during arthroscopy. PPMCLR does not result in measurable laxity of the MCL.

  1. Contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasonography of medial iliac lymph nodes in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Gaschen, Lorrie; Angelette, Nik; Stout, Rhett

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we describe the normal contrast-enhanced harmonic, color, and power Doppler ultrasonographic characteristics of the medial iliac lymph nodes in healthy dogs. Contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasonography of the medial iliac lymph nodes was performed on 14 healthy dogs after intravenous administration of the lipoprotein-bound inert gas-filled microbubble contrast media Definity. Time-pixel intensity curves were generated for 1-min postinjection. Quantification of these curves was performed using Philips QLab software. Non-contrast-enhanced power and color Doppler examinations were performed in each node to assess vascular patterns subjectively. Normal lymph nodes exhibited a mean contrast wash-in phase beginning at 6.3 s from the time of injection with mean peak pixel intensity at 12.1s. Angioarchitecture was best visualized with contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasound compared with power and color Doppler. Normal lymph nodes in dogs have a central artery with a centrifugal and uniform branching pattern. Contrast-enhanced harmonic ultrasonography is a noninvasive examination that demonstrates improved visibility of the intranodal architecture of healthy medial iliac lymph nodes in dogs compared with conventional, non-contrast-enhanced Doppler methods that may have future clinical applications.

  2. Persistently active neurons in human medial frontal and medial temporal lobe support working memory.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Jan; Sullivan, Shannon; Chung, Jeffrey M; Ross, Ian B; Mamelak, Adam N; Rutishauser, Ueli

    2017-04-01

    Persistent neural activity is a putative mechanism for the maintenance of working memories. Persistent activity relies on the activity of a distributed network of areas, but the differential contribution of each area remains unclear. We recorded single neurons in the human medial frontal cortex and medial temporal lobe while subjects held up to three items in memory. We found persistently active neurons in both areas. Persistent activity of hippocampal and amygdala neurons was stimulus-specific, formed stable attractors and was predictive of memory content. Medial frontal cortex persistent activity, on the other hand, was modulated by memory load and task set but was not stimulus-specific. Trial-by-trial variability in persistent activity in both areas was related to memory strength, because it predicted the speed and accuracy by which stimuli were remembered. This work reveals, in humans, direct evidence for a distributed network of persistently active neurons supporting working memory maintenance.

  3. Persistently active neurons in human medial frontal and medial temporal lobe support working memory

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, J; Sullivan, S; Chung, JM; Ross, IB; Mamelak, AN; Rutishauser, U

    2017-01-01

    Persistent neural activity is a putative mechanism for the maintenance of working memories. Persistent activity relies on the activity of a distributed network of areas, but the differential contribution of each area remains unclear. We recorded single neurons in the human medial frontal cortex and the medial temporal lobe while subjects held up to three items in memory. We found persistently active neurons in both areas. Persistent activity of hippocampal and amygdala neurons was stimulus-specific, formed stable attractors, and was predictive of memory content. Medial frontal cortex persistent activity, on the other hand, was modulated by memory load and task set but was not stimulus-specific. Trial-by-trial variability in persistent activity in both areas was related to memory strength, because it predicted the speed and accuracy by which stimuli were remembered. This work reveals, in humans, direct evidence for a distributed network of persistently active neurons supporting working memory maintenance. PMID:28218914

  4. Management of medial-sided knee injuries, part 1: medial collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Milford H; Tibor, Lisa M; Sekiya, Jon K; Hardaker, William T; Garrett, William E; Taylor, Dean C

    2011-05-01

    The medial collateral ligament complex is a primary stabilizer that combines static and dynamic resistance to direct valgus stress while contributing significant restraints to rotatory motion and anterior-posterior translation. Varying opinions exist among investigators regarding injury classification and treatment algorithms. Whereas most agree that the majority of isolated medial collateral ligament complex injuries can be treated nonoperatively, isolated injuries with chronic instability and multiligament injuries may require operative intervention. Substantial confounding factors are present within published reports, making comparative analyses and systematic review challenging. This review focuses on the anatomy and biomechanics of the medial structures of the knee; it discusses the clinical evaluation of complex injuries; and it reviews nonoperative and operative treatment methods.

  5. Post-ablative reconstruction of the medial canthus and medial orbital wall using conchal cartilage graft with three illustrative cases.

    PubMed

    Dagregorio, G; Darsonval, V

    2005-12-01

    When the medial third of the upper or lower eyelid has to be reconstructed after full-thickness tumour excision, we usually use Hübner tarsomarginal grafts, but when medial canthal lesions spread to the medial orbital wall without invading the orbital margin, conchal graft becomes our first surgical option. Previously reported solutions to this difficult problem are few and concern more directly medial orbital wall fractures. We found no article dealing specifically with the use of conchal graft in post-ablative reconstruction of the medial orbital wall. Nevertheless the concha presents great advantages over bone grafting or rib cartilage, because it is more flexible and malleable. And it is less prone to extrusion or infection as may be allografts implants. It is a very effective way to repair medial orbital defects, but graft reorientation must be perfect to match exactly the medial orbital wall concavity.

  6. Methods and Technologies Branch (MTB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Methods and Technologies Branch focuses on methods to address epidemiologic data collection, study design and analysis, and to modify technological approaches to better understand cancer susceptibility.

  7. Branches in the Everett interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Arthur J.

    2014-05-01

    Hugh Everett III describes a quantum measurement as resulting in the "branching" of the quantum state of observer and measured system, with all possible measurement outcomes represented by the ensuing branches of the total quantum state. But Everett does not specify a general rule for decomposing a quantum state into branches, and commentators have long puzzled over how, and even whether, to regard Everett's notion of branching states as physically meaningful. It is common today to appeal to decoherence considerations as a way of giving physical content to the Everettian notion of branches, but these appeals to decoherence are often regarded as considerations foreign to Everett's own approach. This paper contends that this assessment is only half right: though he does not invoke environmental decoherence, Everett does appeal to decoherence considerations, broadly understood, in his treatment of measurement. Careful consideration of his idealized models of measurement, and of the significance he ascribes to the branching of states corresponding to definite measurement outcomes, reveals that his notion of branching refers to a special physical characteristic of elements of a particular decomposition, namely the absence of interference between these component states as a result of the particular dynamics governing the evolution of the system. Characterizations of branching that appeal to the results of modern decoherence theory should therefore be regarded as a natural development of Everett's own physically meaningful conception of branching.

  8. The control of branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Iber, Dagmar; Menshykau, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Many organs of higher organisms are heavily branched structures and arise by an apparently similar process of branching morphogenesis. Yet the regulatory components and local interactions that have been identified differ greatly in these organs. It is an open question whether the regulatory processes work according to a common principle and how far physical and geometrical constraints determine the branching process. Here, we review the known regulatory factors and physical constraints in lung, kidney, pancreas, prostate, mammary gland and salivary gland branching morphogenesis, and describe the models that have been formulated to analyse their impacts. PMID:24004663

  9. Analysis of long branch extraction and long branch shortening

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Long branch attraction (LBA) is a problem that afflicts both the parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis techniques. Research has shown that parsimony is particularly vulnerable to inferring the wrong tree in Felsenstein topologies. The long branch extraction method is a procedure to detect a data set suffering from this problem so that Maximum Likelihood could be used instead of Maximum Parsimony. Results The long branch extraction method has been well cited and used by many authors in their analysis but no strong validation has been performed as to its accuracy. We performed such an analysis by an extensive search of the branch length search space under two topologies of six taxa, a Felsenstein-like topology and Farris-like topology. We also examine a long branch shortening method. Conclusions The long branch extraction method seems to mask the majority of the search space rendering it ineffective as a detection method of LBA. A proposed alternative, the long branch shortening method, is also ineffective in predicting long branch attraction for all tree topologies. PMID:21047381

  10. Neurilemmoma of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve causing tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Ka Bon; Lui, Tun Hing; Lo, Wing Nin

    2009-12-01

    In this article, the authors report a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by neurilemmoma of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve, with symptom resolved after excision. A 42-year-old man presented with left medial heel pain radiating to the lateral sole for 6 months. On examination, there was positive Tinel sign over the medial heel with pain radiating to the lateral sole. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of a 1-cm neurogenic tumor inside the tarsal tunnel. Intraoperatively, a 1-cm neurilemmoma was found at the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve inside the tarsal tunnel. The lesion was excised completely with preservation of its fascicle. The symptom resolved completely after the operation.

  11. The lateral column lengthening and medial column stabilization procedures.

    PubMed

    Chi, T D; Toolan, B C; Sangeorzan, B J; Hansen, S T

    1999-08-01

    The results of medial column stabilization, lateral column lengthening, and combined medial and lateral procedures were reviewed in the treatment of adult acquired flatfoot secondary to posterior tibialis tendon insufficiency. All bony procedures were accompanied by transfer of the flexor digitorum longus tendon to the medial cuneiform or stump of the posterior tibialis tendon and tendoachilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession. Medial column fusion was performed for naviculocuneiform and cuneiform first metatarsal sag; lateral column lengthening was performed for calcaneovalgus deformity with a flat pitch angle; and combined procedures were performed for complex combined deformities. At 1 to 4 year followup of 65 feet, 88% of the feet that had lateral column lengthening, 80% that had medial column stabilization, and 88% of the feet that had medial and lateral procedures had a decrease in pain or were pain free. The lateral talar first metatarsal angle improved by 16 degrees in the patients in the lateral column lengthening group, 20 degrees in the patients in the medial column stabilization group, and 24 degrees in the patients in the combined medial and lateral procedures group. The anteroposterior talonavicular coverage angle improved by 14 degrees in the patients in the lateral column lengthening group, 10 degrees in the patients in the medial column stabilization group, and 14 degrees in the patients in the combined medial and lateral procedures group. These techniques effectively correct deformity without disrupting the essential joints of the hindfoot and midfoot.

  12. An anatomical evaluation of the serratus anterior plane block.

    PubMed

    Mayes, J; Davison, E; Panahi, P; Patten, D; Eljelani, F; Womack, J; Varma, M

    2016-09-01

    The serratus anterior plane block has been described for analgesia of the hemithorax. This study was conducted to determine the spread of injectate and investigate the anatomical basis of the block. Ultrasound-guided serratus anterior plane block was performed on six soft-fix embalmed cadavers. All cadavers received bilateral injections, on one side performed with 20 ml latex and on the other with 20 ml methylene blue. Subsequent dissection explored the extent of spread and nerve involvement. Photographs were taken throughout dissection. The intercostal nerves were involved on three occasions with dye, but not with latex. The lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerve contained dye and latex on all occasions. The serratus plane block appears to be mediated through blockade of the lateral cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerves. Anatomically, serratus plane block does not appear to be equivalent to paravertebral block for rib fracture analgesia.

  13. Preoperative color Doppler ultrasound assessment of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap and its branching pattern.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kensuke; Harima, Mitsunobu; Mito, Daisuke; Shibata, Takashi; Furuya, Megumi; Kato, Motoi; Yamamoto, Takumi; Yamashita, Shuji; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Iida, Takuya; Koshima, Isao

    2015-06-01

    The anatomy of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap remains controversial, but this region is extremely useful as a reconstructive donor site. In this report, we describe the usefulness of the preoperative color Doppler ultrasound evaluation for the harvesting of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap, and we clarify its branching pattern. Twenty-seven patients underwent the preoperative color Doppler ultrasound assessment before perforator flaps were harvested. We evaluated the branching pattern and the diameter of the flaps by direct observation. All flaps were successfully transferred, and it was found that the branching pattern of the lateral thoracic perforator is divided into three groups: the superficial branch, the medial branch, and the deep branch. Their appearance ratios were 48.1% (13/27), 14.8% (4/27), and 81.5% (22/27), respectively. The lateral thoracic artery perforator flap has a great deal of anatomical variation, and vessels with relatively small diameters compared to those of other flaps. This is why flaps from this region are not currently popular. This study revealed the superiority of the color Doppler ultrasound for preoperative planning of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap elevation. Furthermore, the branching pattern and the diameters of the different branches were specified.

  14. The Effects of Elbow Bracing on Medial Elbow Joint Space Gapping Associated With Repetitive Throwing in High School Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Takei, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    Throwing athletes risk medial elbow injury from extreme valgus stress generated across the medial elbow during throwing. Braces have been developed to protect the elbow joint; however, no previous study has investigated the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping associated with repetitive throwing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping during repetitive throwing. Our hypothesis was that an elbow brace may reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five high school baseball players participated in this study. Each subject pitched 100 times under 2 conditions: control (without elbow brace) and elbow brace. The ulnohumeral joint space was measured ultrasonically before pitching and after every block of 20 pitches. Measurement of the ulnohumeral joint space was carried out using ultrasound with the forearm hanging by the side. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used to compare ulnohumeral joint space with repeated pitching and between the elbow brace and control conditions. In the control condition, ulnohumeral joint space after 60 pitches was significantly greater than that before pitching (P < .01). In contrast, in the elbow brace condition, ulnohumeral joint space was not significantly different after repeated pitching. When comparing these 2 conditions, ulnohumeral joint space in the control condition was significantly greater than that in the elbow brace condition after 60 pitches (P < .01). An elbow brace has the effect of preventing medial elbow joint space gapping with repeated throwing when determined ultrasonically by measuring the ulnohumeral joint space under gravity load. An elbow brace worn during baseball pitching practice may help reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping.

  15. The Effects of Elbow Bracing on Medial Elbow Joint Space Gapping Associated With Repetitive Throwing in High School Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Takei, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Background: Throwing athletes risk medial elbow injury from extreme valgus stress generated across the medial elbow during throwing. Braces have been developed to protect the elbow joint; however, no previous study has investigated the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping associated with repetitive throwing. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping during repetitive throwing. Our hypothesis was that an elbow brace may reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-five high school baseball players participated in this study. Each subject pitched 100 times under 2 conditions: control (without elbow brace) and elbow brace. The ulnohumeral joint space was measured ultrasonically before pitching and after every block of 20 pitches. Measurement of the ulnohumeral joint space was carried out using ultrasound with the forearm hanging by the side. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used to compare ulnohumeral joint space with repeated pitching and between the elbow brace and control conditions. Results: In the control condition, ulnohumeral joint space after 60 pitches was significantly greater than that before pitching (P < .01). In contrast, in the elbow brace condition, ulnohumeral joint space was not significantly different after repeated pitching. When comparing these 2 conditions, ulnohumeral joint space in the control condition was significantly greater than that in the elbow brace condition after 60 pitches (P < .01). Conclusion: An elbow brace has the effect of preventing medial elbow joint space gapping with repeated throwing when determined ultrasonically by measuring the ulnohumeral joint space under gravity load. Clinical Relevance: An elbow brace worn during baseball pitching practice may help reduce mechanical stress

  16. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty: technical pearls

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Unicondylar knee arthroplasty implantation is extremely demanding as the prosthesis needs to be integrated in the natural anatomy of the knee. It ensures the integrity of the natural knee kinematic. Some studies and registries data have shown lower success rate in comparison with total knee arthroplasty, and patient-related factors may have an impact on outcome. While, better results have been published by high volume centres. The indications for surgery should be reconsidered critically, even if medial osteoarthritis of the knee remains the most common. This article sets out the diagnostic, and surgical steps in order to fine tuning the unicompartmental replacement of the knee. PMID:26605256

  17. Supravital morphology of small branches of lateral striate arteries as observed with Nomarski optics.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, C J

    1996-01-01

    Lateral striate arteries were dissected from the fixed brains of 6 patients of increasing age. Small branches of arteries were observed--unprocessed and unstained--by Nomarski optics. Among the findings there was fibrous intimal proliferation, replacement of medial muscle by collagen, tortuosity, twisting or coiling. The severity of changes seemed to progress with aging. The advantages of the used methodology that aims at avoiding artifacts of processing are discussed briefly.

  18. The electrocardiographic diagnosis of intraventricular blocks coexisting with ventricular preexcitation.

    PubMed

    Chiale, Pablo A; Elizari, Marcelo V

    2012-09-01

    The electrocardiographic diagnosis of intraventricular conduction disturbances may be hindered by the coexistence of ventricular preexcitation. In fact, the premature depolarization of ventricular myocardium through an accessory pathway tends to conceal any electrocardiographic manifestation of a bundle-branch block. However, there are several conditions favoring the diagnosis of bundle-branch block associated with ventricular preexcitation: intermittency of ventricular preexcitation and/or bundle-branch block, fast atrioventricular (AV) nodal impulse propagation, slow conduction over the accessory pathway or between its ventricular insertion site and the remaining myocardium, and presence of atrioventricular junctional ectopic beats exposing the intraventricular conduction disturbance. This article reexamines the available data on preexcitation in patients with intraventricular blocks and presents clinical examples to emphasize the importance of a thorough examination of the electrocardiogram to attain the correct diagnosis of this association.

  19. Modeling branching in cereals.

    PubMed

    Evers, Jochem B; Vos, Jan

    2013-10-10

    Cereals and grasses adapt their structural development to environmental conditions and the resources available. The primary adaptive response is a variable degree of branching, called tillering in cereals. Especially for heterogeneous plant configurations the degree of tillering varies per plant. Functional-structural plant modeling (FSPM) is a modeling approach allowing simulation of the architectural development of individual plants, culminating in the emergent behavior at the canopy level. This paper introduces the principles of modeling tillering in FSPM, using (I) a probability approach, forcing the dynamics of tillering to correspond to measured probabilities. Such models are particularly suitable to evaluate the effect structural variables on system performance. (II) Dose-response curves, representing a measured or assumed response of tillering to an environmental cue. (III) Mechanistic approaches to tillering including control by carbohydrates, hormones, and nutrients. Tiller senescence is equally important for the structural development of cereals as tiller appearance. Little study has been made of tiller senescence, though similar concepts seem to apply as for tiller appearance.

  20. Branching N-linked oligosaccharides in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Korczak, B; Goss, P; Fernandez, B; Baker, M; Dennis, J W

    1994-01-01

    Tumor progression in rodent and human tumors is commonly associated with changes in glycoprotein glycosylation, in particular increased beta 1-6GlcNAc-branching, a regulatory step in expression of polylactosamine and extended-chain Lewis antigens. Loss of the branched oligosaccharides in murine tumor cells either due to somatic mutation, or treatment of the cells with the oligosaccharide processing inhibitor swainsonine, blocks tumor cells invasion in vitro and reduces solid tumor growth in vivo. Swainsonine and other inhibitors of N-linked oligosaccharide processing may be useful anti-cancer drugs, a premise which has begun to be tested in humans.

  1. Anterior medial prefrontal cortex implements social priming of mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Antonia F. de C.

    2015-01-01

    The neural and cognitive mechanisms by which primed constructs can impact on social behavior are poorly understood. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore how scrambled sentence priming can impact on mimicry behavior. Sentences involving pro/antisocial events from a first/third-person point of view were presented in short blocks, followed by a reaction-time assessment of mimicry. Behavioral results showed that both prosociality and viewpoint impact on mimicry, and fMRI analysis showed this effect is implemented by anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC). We suggest that social primes may subtly modulate processing in amPFC in a manner linked to the later behavior, and that this same region also implements the top-down control of mimicry responses. This priming may be linked to processing of self-schemas in amPFC. Our findings demonstrate how social priming can be studied with fMRI, and have important implications for our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of prime-to-behavior effects as well as for current theories in social psychology. PMID:25009194

  2. Anterior medial prefrontal cortex implements social priming of mimicry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2015-04-01

    The neural and cognitive mechanisms by which primed constructs can impact on social behavior are poorly understood. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore how scrambled sentence priming can impact on mimicry behavior. Sentences involving pro/antisocial events from a first/third-person point of view were presented in short blocks, followed by a reaction-time assessment of mimicry. Behavioral results showed that both prosociality and viewpoint impact on mimicry, and fMRI analysis showed this effect is implemented by anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC). We suggest that social primes may subtly modulate processing in amPFC in a manner linked to the later behavior, and that this same region also implements the top-down control of mimicry responses. This priming may be linked to processing of self-schemas in amPFC. Our findings demonstrate how social priming can be studied with fMRI, and have important implications for our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of prime-to-behavior effects as well as for current theories in social psychology.

  3. Impact of Video Technology for Improving Success of Medial Canthus Episcleral Anesthesia in Ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, Gilles; Rothschild, Pierre-Raphaël; Lehmann, Mathieu; Azan, Frédéric; Baillard, Christophe

    2017-09-28

    Efficient learning of regional anesthesia in ophthalmology remains challenging because trainees are afforded limited opportunity to practice ocular anesthesia. The aim of this prospective, randomized, blinded study was to determine whether teaching with video improves regional anesthesia skills of residents in ophthalmology. From January to October 2016, 32 novice anesthesiology residents were evaluated while performing medial canthus episcleral procedures during a 5-day rotation. Residents were randomly assigned to either receive or not receive a video review of their performance at day 3. The primary outcome was a comparison of akinesia using a 12-point scale before incision assessed by the blinded surgeon. A total of 288 blocks were performed by 32 residents and were assessed by 3 surgeons before the intervention (144 blocks) and after the intervention (144 blocks). Residents in the review group improved to a greater degree compared with residents in the no-review group. The median overall akinesia scores for the review and no-review groups were similarly low (6; interquartile range [IQR], 2-11; and 6 [IQR, 2-9], respectively) on day 1 of the rotation, whereas anesthesia performed by residents in the video group provided a better akinesia score (12 [IQR, 10-12] vs 8 [IQR, 6-10]; P < 0.001) on day 5 of the rotation. Video-assisted teaching significantly improves performance of medial canthus episcleral anesthesia performed by novice trainees.

  4. A Branch Meeting in Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Kathryn; Coles, Alf

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) exists for, and is run by, its members. Branch meetings are so much more than the "grass roots" of the association--it can be a powerhouse of inspiration and creativity. In this article, the authors provide commentaries on a recent branch meeting.

  5. A Branch Meeting in Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Kathryn; Coles, Alf

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) exists for, and is run by, its members. Branch meetings are so much more than the "grass roots" of the association--it can be a powerhouse of inspiration and creativity. In this article, the authors provide commentaries on a recent branch meeting.

  6. Medial knee joint loading increases in those who respond to hyaluronan injection for medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Briem, Kristin; Axe, Michael J; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause of decline in function and the medial compartment is often affected. Intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) is indicated as a symptom modifying treatment with at least 6 months passing between consecutive injection series. The effects of HA injection on gait variables have not been extensively examined. Therefore, our objective was to investigate the effects of HA injection on gait in people with medial knee OA. Twenty-seven subjects were included; each was tested prior to treatment (baseline), no later than 3 weeks following the last injection (post-HA), and again 5 months after treatment ended (follow-up). Responder criteria were defined to identify responders and non-responders. Subjects underwent 3D gait analysis, muscle activity was sampled, and co-contraction indices were calculated. Responders experienced increased peak knee adduction moments post-HA, whereas non-responders did not. Improved self-report scores were associated with increased knee adduction moments and increased medial co-contraction. Pain relief may result in higher loading onto the already vulnerable medial compartment due to changes in lower limb mechanics and muscle activation patterns. Eventually this may result in a more rapid progression of joint deterioration.

  7. A positive approach to branching.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Bart J; Drummond, Revel S M; Ledger, Susan E; Snowden, Kimberley C

    2010-04-01

    Plants regulate the development of branches in response to environmental and developmental signals in order to maximize reproductive success. A number of hormone signals are involved in the regulation of branching and both their production and transmission affect axillary meristem outgrowth. With the identification of strigolactones as root-derived branch inhibitors it seems likely that a biochemical pathway starting from a carotenoid and resulting in production of a strigolactone hormone is present in most plants. Our observation that loss of CCD7 or CCD8 also results in production of a promoter of branching from roots shows the branching pathway has multiple levels of control which allows a high degree of sensitivity to subtle differences in environmental and developmental signals.

  8. Medial subluxation of the patella without previous lateral retinacular release.

    PubMed

    Richman, N M; Scheller, A D

    1998-07-01

    This case presented a 17-year-old patient with persistent complaints localized to the right patellofemoral joint. Clinical examination demonstrated increased medial translation of the patella on manual stress. In contrast to previous published reports on medial patellar subluxation, this patient had not undergone prior lateral retinacular release. Arthroscopic examination documented medial tracking of the patella as well as excess medial translation. Imbrication of the patient's lateral patellar retinaculum centralized patella tracking and diminished medial translation on stress testing as observed arthroscopically and clinically. This case illustrates that medial patellar subluxation is a subtle problem that may be overlooked in the patient presenting with patellofemoral complaints and should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  9. Biomechanical consequences of patellar component medialization in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Anglin, Carolyn; Brimacombe, Jill M; Wilson, David R; Masri, Bassam A; Greidanus, Nelson V; Tonetti, Jérôme; Hodgson, Antony J

    2010-08-01

    The optimal amount of patellar component medialization in knee arthroplasty is unknown. We measured the impact, on patellofemoral kinematics and contact force distribution, of 0.0-, 2.5-, and 5.0-mm patellar component medialization in 7 cadaveric specimens implanted with knee arthroplasty components. The knees were flexed dynamically in a weight-bearing rig. Medialization led to lateral shift of the patellar bone, slight medial shift of the patellar component in the femoral groove, lateral tilt of the patella, reduced patellofemoral contact force in later flexion, and lateral shift of the center of pressure in early flexion. Effects on shift and tilt were proportional to the amount of medialization. As a result of this investigation, we recommend medializing the patellar component slightly-on the order of 2.5 mm. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Medial epicondylitis. Etiology, diagnosis, therapeutic modalities].

    PubMed

    Tschantz, P; Meine, J

    1993-01-01

    Medial epicondylitis is rather uncommon, less frequent than external epicondylitis. For this reason, the diagnosis is thought of rather late. While taking the history, one should try to find out the possible causative effects. Symptoms of irritation of the cubital nerve, which are present in one out of five cases should be looked for. Several sports such as baseball, javelin or weight throwing, volleyball, climbing, tennis, golf, which need a strong flexion of the hand and fingers can induce this condition. However, in more than half of our patients, sports or professional activities were not in cause. The majority were housewives and do-it-yourself enthusiasts. Among our 55 operated cases, out of which few had professional or sports activities, we did not encounter during the operation the macroscopic tendinous lesions that are sometimes described by some authors. The treatment should be conservative in all cases. This includes rest, anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, muscular stretching, immobilisation in a cast, steroid infiltrations. One patient out of ten will have to be operated on. The operative techniques differ on some details, but they all include the desinsertion of the flexor muscles on the medial epicondyle. When there are clinical signs of irritation of the cubital nerve, it should be transposed anteriorly. The result of these operations is good in more than 90 per cent of the cases. However, a come back to professional sport can take as long as 8 months.

  11. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Amit Kanta, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis. PMID:28070434

  12. The medial tibial stress syndrome. A cause of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, S J; Gould, R N; Lee, Y F; Schmidt, D A; Hargens, A R

    1982-01-01

    The medial tibial stress syndrome is a symptom complex seen in athletes who complain of exercise-induced pain along the distal posterior-medial aspect of the tibia. Intramuscular pressures within the posterior compartments of the leg were measured in 12 patients with this disorder. These pressures were not elevated and therefore this syndrome is a not a compartment syndrome. Available information suggests that the medial tibial stress syndrome most likely represents a periostitis at this location of the leg.

  13. Medial Prefrontal-Medial Temporal Theta Phase Coupling in Dynamic Spatial Imagery.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Raphael; Bush, Daniel; Bisby, James A; Horner, Aidan J; Meyer, Sofie S; Burgess, Neil

    2017-03-01

    Hippocampal-medial prefrontal interactions are thought to play a crucial role in mental simulation. Notably, the frontal midline/medial pFC (mPFC) theta rhythm in humans has been linked to introspective thought and working memory. In parallel, theta rhythms have been proposed to coordinate processing in the medial temporal cortex, retrosplenial cortex (RSc), and parietal cortex during the movement of viewpoint in imagery, extending their association with physical movement in rodent models. Here, we used noninvasive whole-head MEG to investigate theta oscillatory power and phase-locking during the 18-sec postencoding delay period of a spatial working memory task, in which participants imagined previously learned object sequences either on a blank background (object maintenance), from a first-person viewpoint in a scene (static imagery), or moving along a path past the objects (dynamic imagery). We found increases in 4- to 7-Hz theta power in mPFC when comparing the delay period with a preencoding baseline. We then examined whether the mPFC theta rhythm was phase-coupled with ongoing theta oscillations elsewhere in the brain. The same mPFC region showed significantly higher theta phase coupling with the posterior medial temporal lobe/RSc for dynamic imagery versus either object maintenance or static imagery. mPFC theta phase coupling was not observed with any other brain region. These results implicate oscillatory coupling between mPFC and medial temporal lobe/RSc theta rhythms in the dynamic mental exploration of imagined scenes.

  14. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography for clinical medial epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Young; Lee, Sung-Moon; Lee, Michael Y

    2008-04-01

    To assess the ultrasonographic findings and to evaluate the value of ultrasonography as a diagnostic method for detecting clinical medial epicondylitis. A prospective, single-blind study. An outpatient rehabilitation clinic in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty-one elbows from 18 patients with clinical medial epicondylitis and 25 elbows without medial epicondylitis were evaluated. Not applicable. The clinical diagnosis of medial epicondylitis was based on the patient's symptoms and clinical signs in a physical examination performed by a physiatrist. An experienced radiologist made the real-time ultrasonographic diagnosis based on the detection of at least one of the following abnormal findings: a focal hypoechoic or anechoic area, tendon nonvisualization, intratendinous calcifications, and cortical irregularity. Ultrasonography revealed positive findings in 20 of 21 elbows with medial epicondylitis and was negative in 23 of 25 without medial epicondylitis. Ultrasonography showed sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for clinical medial epicondylitis of 95.2%, 92%, 93.5%, 90.9%, and 95.8%, respectively. Tendinosis was observed in 15 elbows, and a partial-thickness tear, including 1 intrasubstance tear, was detected in 5 elbows. The most common ultrasonographic abnormality was a focal echogenic abnormality (15 hypoechoic, 5 anechoic) of the tendons. Our results indicate that ultrasonography is informative and accurate for the detection of clinical medial epicondylitis. Therefore, ultrasonography should be considered as an initial imaging method for evaluating medial epicondylitis.

  15. Medial and Lateral Discoid Menisci of Both Knees

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Minami, Ginjiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Discoid menisci on both the medial and lateral sides are rare, and there are very few reports on cases involving both sides. We report a case of a 52-year-old female with medial and lateral discoid menisci in both knees. Arthroscopy revealed the lateral menisci of both knees were complete discoid menisci, and partial meniscectomy was performed. The medial menisci were incomplete discoid menisci, but there were no findings of abnormal mobility or injury; therefore, the medial menisci were observed without treatment. At six months postoperatively, her pain and range of motion restrictions disappeared. PMID:27894182

  16. A light and electron microscopic examination of the vagal hepatic branch of the rat.

    PubMed

    Prechtl, J C; Powley, T L

    1987-01-01

    The rat's vagal hepatic branch and associated tissues were studied using light and electron microscopy. Whole mounts, serial sections, and vascular endocasts were used to characterize the tissue from the anterior vagal trunk to the porta hepatis. Fiber number and caliber as well as intraneural organization were analyzed from complete cross-sectional electron micrographic montages of the hepatic branch sampled at its point of separation from the anterior vagal trunk. The hepatic branch ramified from the anterior vagus in one (in 47% of the specimens), two (in 37%) or three (in 16%) bundles. The single bundled hepatic branch contained 2887 +/- 287 unmyelinated fibers, and their size distribution, with a mean diameter of 0.66 +/- 0.02 micron, was Gaussian. Myelinated fibers numbered only 21 +/- 4 per branch and had a complex size distribution ranging from 0.5 to 1.8 micron with a mean of 1.2 +/- 0.03 micron. Forty four +/- 6% of the myelinated fibers were found in a single "subfascicle" in the dorso-medial pole of the nerve. Whole mounts at this level revealed that a distinct bundle, here designated an extrinsic "hepato-gastric bundle", occurred within the hepatic branch and linked the omental hepatic branch and the distal anterior gastric branch, apparently without central vagal connections. In the lesser omentum, between the esophagus and the hepatic artery proper, the hepatic branch formed a plexus which was characterized by numerous nerve divisions, anastomoses and large paraganglia (196-463 glomus cells per paraganglion). This plexiform segment ended with the recombining of the hepatic branch into 5-7 bundles which variously ascended in the porta, descended on the hepatic artery proper, or traversed the portal vein. Through its omental course, the hepatic branch traveled in close apposition to the hepato-esophageal artery and the corresponding vein as well as a prominent lymphatic vessel with associated hemolymph nodes.

  17. Cellular components of the human medial amygdaloid nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Aline; Xavier, Léder L; Hilbig, Arlete; Ferme, Denise; Moreira, Jorge E; Achaval, Matilde; Rasia-Filho, Alberto A

    2013-02-15

    The medial nucleus (Me) is a superficial component of the amygdaloid complex. Here we assessed the density and morphology of the neurons and glial cells, the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity, and the ultrastructure of the synaptic sites in the human Me. The optical fractionator method was applied. The Me presented an estimated mean neuronal density of 1.53 × 10⁵ neurons/mm³ (greater in the left hemisphere), more glia (72% of all cells) than neurons, and a nonneuronal:neuronal ratio of 2.7. Golgi-impregnated neurons had round or ovoid, fusiform, angular, and polygonal cell bodies (10-30 μm in diameter). The length of the dendrites varied, and pleomorphic spines were found in sparsely spiny or densely spiny cells (1.5-5.2 spines/dendritic μm). The axons in the Me neuropil were fine or coarsely beaded, and fibers showed simple or notably complex collateral terminations. The protoplasmic astrocytes were either isolated or formed small clusters and showed GFAP-immunoreactive cell bodies and multiple branches. Furthermore, we identified both asymmetrical (with various small, clear, round, electron-lucent vesicles and, occasionally, large, dense-core vesicles) and symmetrical (with small, flattened vesicles) axodendritic contacts, also including multisynaptic spines. The astrocytes surround and may compose tripartite or tetrapartite synapses, the latter including the extracellular matrix between the pre- and the postsynaptic elements. Interestingly, the terminal axons exhibited a glomerular-like structure with various asymmetrical contacts. These new morphological data on the cellular population and synaptic complexity of the human Me can contribute to our knowledge of its role in health and pathological conditions.

  18. Lipids in biocalcification: contrasts and similarities between intimal and medial vascular calcification and bone by NMR[S

    PubMed Central

    Reid, David G.; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Duer, Melinda J.; Arroyo, Luis G.; Schoppet, Michael; Brooks, Roger A.; Murray, Rachel C.

    2012-01-01

    Pathomechanisms underlying vascular calcification biogenesis are still incompletely understood. Biomineral from human atherosclerotic intimal plaques; human, equine, and bovine medial vascular calcifications; and human and equine bone was released from collagenous organic matrix by sodium hydroxide/sodium hypochlorite digestion. Solid-state 13C NMR of intimal plaque mineral shows signals from cholesterol/cholesteryl esters and fatty acids. In contrast, in mineral from pure medial calcifications and bone mineral, fatty acid signals predominate. Refluxing (chloroform/methanol) intimal plaque calcifications removes the cholesterylic but not the fatty acyl signals. The lipid composition of this refluxed mineral now closely resembles that of the medial and bone mineral, which is unchanged by reflux. Thus, intimal and medial vascular calcifications and bone mineral have in common a pool of occluded mineral-entrained fatty acyl-rich lipids. This population of fatty acid may contain methyl-branched fatty acids, possibly representing lipoprotein particle remnants. Cell signaling and mechanistic parallels between physiological (orthotopic) and pathological (ectopic) calcification are also reflected thus in the NMR spectroscopic fingerprints of mineral-associated and mineral-entrained lipids. Additionally the atherosclerotic plaque mineral alone shows a significant independent pool of cholesterylic lipids. Colocalization of mineral and lipid may be coincidental, but it could also reflect an essential mechanistic component of biomineralization. PMID:22651923

  19. Branch strategies - Modeling and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubey, Pradeep K.; Flynn, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors provide a common platform for modeling different schemes for reducing the branch-delay penalty in pipelined processors as well as evaluating the associated increased instruction bandwidth. Their objective is twofold: to develop a model for different approaches to the branch problem and to help select an optimal strategy after taking into account additional i-traffic generated by branch strategies. The model presented provides a flexible tool for comparing different branch strategies in terms of the reduction it offers in average branch delay and also in terms of the associated cost of wasted instruction fetches. This additional criterion turns out to be a valuable consideration in choosing between two strategies that perform almost equally. More importantly, it provides a better insight into the expected overall system performance. Simple compiler-support-based low-implementation-cost strategies can be very effective under certain conditions. An active branch prediction scheme based on loop buffers can be as competitive as a branch-target-buffer based strategy.

  20. The Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex Regulates Sensitivity to Outcome Value

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kelsey S.; Allen, Amanda G.; Taylor, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    An essential component of goal-directed decision-making is the ability to maintain flexible responding based on the value of a given reward, or “reinforcer.” The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC), a subregion of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, is uniquely positioned to regulate this process. We trained mice to nose poke for food reinforcers and then stimulated this region using CaMKII-driven Gs-coupled designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs). In other mice, we silenced the neuroplasticity-associated neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Activation of Gs-DREADDs increased behavioral sensitivity to reinforcer devaluation, whereas Bdnf knockdown blocked sensitivity. These changes were accompanied by modifications in breakpoint ratios in a progressive ratio task, and they were recapitulated in Bdnf+/− mice. Replacement of BDNF selectively in the mOFC in Bdnf+/− mice rescued behavioral deficiencies, as well as phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Thus, BDNF expression in the mOFC is both necessary and sufficient for the expression of typical effort allocation relative to an anticipated reinforcer. Additional experiments indicated that expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos was aberrantly elevated in the Bdnf+/− dorsal striatum, and BDNF replacement in the mOFC normalized expression. Also, systemic administration of an MAP kinase kinase inhibitor increased breakpoint ratios, whereas the addition of discrete cues bridging the response–outcome contingency rescued breakpoints in Bdnf+/− mice. We argue that BDNF–ERK1/2 in the mOFC is a key regulator of “online” goal-directed action selection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Goal-directed response selection often involves predicting the consequences of one's actions and the value of potential payoffs. Lesions or chemogenetic inactivation of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) in rats induces failures in retrieving outcome

  1. Anterior cingulate pyramidal neurons display altered dendritic branching in depressed suicides.

    PubMed

    Hercher, Christa; Canetti, Lilian; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2010-04-01

    It is hypothesized that mood disorders are accompanied by altered wiring and plasticity in key limbic brain regions such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). To test this hypothesis at the cellular level, we analyzed basilar dendritic arborizations extended by layer VI pyramidal neurons in silver-impregnated postmortem ACC samples from well-characterized depressed suicide subjects (n=12) and matched sudden-death controls (n=7). One cm(3) tissue blocks were stained using a Golgi preparation, cut on a microtome, and mounted on slides. Basilar dendritic arbors from 195 neurons were reconstructed, and the number, length, and diameter of branches were determined at each branch order. The size and number of spines borne by these branches were also assessed. Third-order branches were significantly reduced in number (24% fewer; p=0.00262) in depressed suicides compared to controls. The size and average length of these branches, as well as their number of spines/length were unaltered. On average, for each pyramidal neuron analyzed in depressed subjects, the fewer third-order branches resulted in a significant reduction in branch length (28% shorter; p=0.00976) at this branch order. These results provide the first evidence of altered cortical dendritic branching in mood disorders. Given that proximal dendritic branches grow during perinatal development, and that they are generally less plastic at maturity than distal segments, we speculate that these differences in dendritic branching may reflect a biological predisposition to depression and suicide.

  2. Medialized repair for retracted rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Jung, Kyu-Hak; Won, Jun-Sung; Cho, Seung-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of medialized rotator cuff repair and the continuity of repaired tendon in chronic retracted rotator cuff tears. Thirty-five consecutive patients were selected from 153 cases that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for more than medium-sized posterosuperior rotator cuff tears between July 2009 and July 2012 performed with the medialized repair. All cases were available for at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The visual analog scale of pain, muscle strength, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and University of California-Los Angeles score were evaluated. At the final follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved. The visual analog scale score for pain improved from 6 ± 1 preoperatively to 2 ± 1 postoperatively. The range of motion increased from preoperatively to postoperatively: active forward elevation, from 134° ± 49° to 150° ± 16°; active external rotation at the side, from 47° ± 15° to 55° ± 10°; and active internal rotation, from L3 to L1. The shoulder score also improved: Constant score, from 53.5 ± 16.7 to 79 ± 10; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, from 51 ± 15 to 82 ± 8; and University of California-Los Angeles score, from 14 ± 4 to 28 ± 4. The retear cases at the final follow-up were 6 (17%). Medialized repair may be useful in cases in which anatomic bone-to-tendon repair would be difficult because of the excessive tension of the repaired tendon and a torn tendon that does not reach the anatomic insertion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects.

    PubMed

    Kivisaari, Sasa L; Tyler, Lorraine K; Monsch, Andreas U; Taylor, Kirsten I

    2012-12-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer's disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  4. Consequences of temporary inhibition of the medial amygdala on social recognition memory performance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Julia; Murau, Rita; Engelmann, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Different lines of investigation suggest that the medial amygdala is causally involved in the processing of information linked to social behavior in rodents. Here we investigated the consequences of temporary inhibition of the medial amygdala by bilateral injections of lidocaine on long-term social recognition memory as tested in the social discrimination task. Lidocaine or control NaCl solution was infused immediately before learning or before retrieval. Our data show that lidocaine infusion immediately before learning did not affect long-term memory retrieval. However, intra-amygdalar lidocaine infusions immediately before choice interfered with correct memory retrieval. Analysis of the aggressive behavior measured simultaneously during all sessions in the social recognition memory task support the impression that the lidocaine dosage used here was effective as it—at least partially—reduced the aggressive behavior shown by the experimental subjects toward the juveniles. Surprisingly, also infusions of NaCl solution blocked recognition memory at both injection time points. The results are interpreted in the context of the importance of the medial amygdala for the processing of non-volatile odors as a major contributor to the olfactory signature for social recognition memory. PMID:25972782

  5. Coulomb branch Hilbert series and three dimensional Sicilian theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Stefano; Hanany, Amihay; Mekareeya, Noppadol; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2014-09-01

    We evaluate the Coulomb branch Hilbert series of mirrors of three dimensional Sicilian theories, which arise from compactifying the 6 d (2 , 0) theory with symmetry G on a circle times a Riemann surface with punctures. We obtain our result by gluing together the Hilbert series for building blocks T ρ ( G), where ρ is a certain partition related to the dual group of G, which we evaluated in a previous paper. The result is expressed in terms of a class of symmetric functions, the Hall-Littlewood polynomials. As expected from mirror symmetry, our results agree at genus zero with the superconformal index prediction for the Higgs branch Hilbert series of the Sicilian theories and extend it to higher genus. In the A 1 case at genus zero, we also evaluate the Coulomb branch Hilbert series of the Sicilian theory itself, showing that it only depends on the number of external legs.

  6. [Variation in the flow and branching of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries].

    PubMed

    Kulenović, Amela; Dilberović, Faruk; Ovcina, Fehim

    2003-01-01

    We used injection and corrosion method to study path, caliber and branching of anterior and middle cerebral artery, which supplies anterior two thirds of medial and external surface of cerebral hemispheres and associated subcortical structures. When we studied our specimens, we observed that internal carotid artery always bifurcates and gives anterior and middle cerebral artery. Precommunicant segment of anterior cerebral artery has variable appearance. In 65 percent this path of anterior cerebral artery is arch shaped with convexity laterally and forward, but in 44 percent it is straight and oblique in direction. We observer that in 1 percent of cases precommunicant segment of anterior cerebral artery has wavey path. In one percent of the cases anterior third of pericallosal artery is branching from anterior communicating artery. This third pericallosal artery is smaller than the other pair of pericallosal arteries branching from anterior cerebral artery. Initial segment of middle cerebral artery(pars sphenoidalis) is 2.5 cm long. In 70 percent of cases terminal part of sphenidal segment of middle cerebral artery bifurcates, in 30 percent of cases we studied this segment trifucates. Insular segment of the middle cerebral artery branches into several segments which are narrower. When we studied our specimens we found one rare variation branching from middle cerebral artery where it bifurcated into anterior smaller and posterior larger branch, than they divide into multiple smaller branches in periinsular segment.

  7. Variants of the popliteal artery terminal branches as detected by multidetector ct angiography

    PubMed Central

    Oztekin, Pelin Seher; Ergun, Elif; Cıvgın, Esra; Yigit, Hasan; Kosar, Pınar Nercis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate variants of the popliteal artery (PA) terminal branches with 64-multidetector computed tomographic angiography (64-MD CTA). Materials and Methods A total of 495 extremities (251 right, 244 left) of 253 patients undergoing a 64-MD CTA examination were included in the study. Of these, 242 extremities were evaluated bilaterally, whereas 11 were evaluated unilaterally. The terminal branching pattern of the PA was classified according to the classification scheme proposed by Kim; the distance between the medial tibial plateau and the origin of the anterior tibial artery (A) and the length of the tibioperoneal trunk (B) have been measured and recorded. Results In 459 cases (92.7%) branching of PA occurred distal to the knee joint (Type I); in 18 cases (2.8%) PA branching was superior to the knee joint (Type II); and hypoplasia of the PA branches was found in 27 cases (5.5%) (Type III). Among these types the most frequent branching patterns were Type IA (87.5%), Type IIIA (3.9%), and Type IB (3.8%). The ranges of A and B mean distances were 47.6 mm and 29.6 mm, respectively Conclusion Variations in popliteal artery terminal branching pattern occurred in 7.4% to 17.6% of patients. Pre-surgical detection of these variations with MD CTA may help to reduce the risk of iatrogenic arterial injury by enabling a better surgical treatment plan. PMID:28352741

  8. Revision Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jacob T; Bates, Dwight D; Postma, Gregory N

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the indications, results, and safety of revision Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty (GML). A retrospective chart review of 156 patients that underwent GML procedures between the years 1998-2002. Study population consisted of those patients who required revision surgery for any reason. Sixteen patients required 22 revision procedures. Indications for revision were divided into 2 groups, complications and glottal closure problems. Complications included extruded or displaced implants (n = 4). The most common glottal closure problem was undercorrection (n = 9). Others included anterior overcorrection (n = 1) and persistent posterior glottal gap (n = 2). Revision procedures included GML (n = 9), injection augmentation (n = 9), endoscopic implant removal (n = 2), and arytenoid adduction (n = 2). In patients with glottal closure problems, the GCI improved in all 10 and the voice rating scale improved in 9. Reasons for revision of GML are variable, the most common being undercorrection. A variety of safe, effective revision techniques are available with a high success rate.

  9. Motor unit organization of human medial gastrocnemius.

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, R A; O'Donovan, M J; Stephens, J A; Taylor, A

    1979-01-01

    1. The properties of fifty-seven motor units in human medial gastrocnemius have been studied using controlled intramuscular microstimulation, glycogen depletion and muscle biopsy. 2. Motor units could be divided into three classes on the basis of their mechanical properties. Type S units were slow, small and fatigue resistant. Type FR units were fast, intermediate in size, and fatigue resistant. Type FF units were fast, large and fatigable. 3. Glycogen depletion of a number of type S and FF units revealed them to be composed of type 1 and type 2b muscle fibres respectively. 4. The results suggest that during slowly increasing voluntary contractions where units are recruited in order of size, type 1 and 2a muscle fibres would be employed at low force levels followed by type 2b muscle fibres in stronger contractions. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:430414

  10. Motor unit organization of human medial gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Garnett, R A; O'Donovan, M J; Stephens, J A; Taylor, A

    1979-02-01

    1. The properties of fifty-seven motor units in human medial gastrocnemius have been studied using controlled intramuscular microstimulation, glycogen depletion and muscle biopsy. 2. Motor units could be divided into three classes on the basis of their mechanical properties. Type S units were slow, small and fatigue resistant. Type FR units were fast, intermediate in size, and fatigue resistant. Type FF units were fast, large and fatigable. 3. Glycogen depletion of a number of type S and FF units revealed them to be composed of type 1 and type 2b muscle fibres respectively. 4. The results suggest that during slowly increasing voluntary contractions where units are recruited in order of size, type 1 and 2a muscle fibres would be employed at low force levels followed by type 2b muscle fibres in stronger contractions.

  11. Diversity of axonal ramifications belonging to single lateral and medial olivocochlear neurons.

    PubMed

    Warr, W Bruce; Boche, Jo Ellen

    2003-12-01

    A classification of olivocochlear (OC) neurons based on their location in either the lateral or medial region of the superior olivary complex provides a powerful tool for predicting their terminations beneath the inner (IHC) or outer hair cells (OHC) of the cochlea, respectively. Yet the morphology of axonal terminations belonging to single lateral OC (LOC) and medial OC (MOC) neurons, which can provide clues about the functional capabilities of individual efferent neurons, has been relatively unexplored. Following injections of biotinylated dextran amine into regions containing OC neurons in the rat, we reconstructed 19 LOC and 15 MOC axons in surface preparations of the cochlea. Confirming previous studies, LOC axons could be classified as either intrinsic or shell based on the length (short versus long) of their terminal ramifications beneath the IHC. However, intrinsic LOC axons were of two types, those that traveled to the organ of Corti without branching (simple intrinsic) and those that had three or more branches that converged on the same discrete patch of IHCs (converging intrinsic). Regarding shell neurons, we found that they may have as many as four intraganglionic branches that could innervate as much as 41% of cochlear length. Lastly, we found that MOC neurons were extremely diverse, not only in the number of their tunnel-crossing fibers (1-15), but also in both the number of boutons they formed (1-48) and in their basal-apical spans (1-45%). Analysis revealed that the number of tunnel-crossing fibers formed by a given axon was closely related to the total number of its terminal boutons, but not to its cochlear span. Analysis further suggested the existence of two distinct subtypes of MOC neurons on the basis of the number of tunnel-crossing fibers and boutons each possessed: the more common sparsely-branched and the quite rare highly-branched MOC neurons. In conclusion, the variety of axonal ramifications of individual LOC and MOC neurons has

  12. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  13. Medial humeral epicondylitis in clinically affected cats.

    PubMed

    Streubel, Ronny; Bilzer, Thomas; Grest, Paula; Damur, Daniel; Montavon, Pierre M

    2015-10-01

    To describe the clinical signs and histologic changes in cats clinically affected with medial humeral epicondylitis (MHE) and evaluate long-term outcome after either conservative or surgical treatment. Prospective cohort study. Client-owned cats (n = 17) with MHE. Cats diagnosed with MHE, based on clinical signs, radiographs and computed tomography (CT), were prospectively recruited. Cats were treated conservatively for an initial 4 weeks, followed by either surgery or continued conservative treatment. Followup examinations were performed at 6 and 12 weeks and at 6-49 months. Cats had a mean age of 10.3 years and presented for chronic lameness. Examination revealed pain on palpation caudodistal to the medial epicondyle and by exerting antebrachial supination/pronation with elbow and carpal flexion. Lameness was restricted to 1 limb although CT revealed bilateral disease in 11/17 cats. Free mineralized joint bodies were identified in 9/17 cats. Nine cats were treated surgically and 8 cats were treated conservatively. Intraoperative findings included new bone formation at the origin of the humeral head of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle with displacement and adhesions of the ulnar nerve. Microscopic examination revealed neurogenic myopathy in 4/9 cats treated surgically. Seven of 9 cats treated surgically were free from lameness by 12 weeks. Seven of 8 cats treated conservatively were chronically lame throughout the study. Cats with forelimb lameness should be evaluated for MHE. This condition is associated with free joint bodies and neurogenic myopathy. Surgical treatment is associated with excellent outcome in the majority of cats. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M; Reilly, Richard B; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400-650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation.

  15. Forefoot flexibility and medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shintarou; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the association between medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and morphology and flexibility of the foot arches. 131 feet from 74 healthy subjects and 31 feet from 27 patients with MTSS were classified as normal feet (n=78 in 40 subjects), flat feet (n=53 in 34 subjects), or MTSS feet (n=31 in 27 patients). The medial longitudinal arch (MLA) ratio and the transverse arch length (TAL) were measured in both rearfoot and forefoot loading positions. The difference between the 2 positions indicated the flexibility of the MLA (diff-MLA ratio) and the transverse arch (diff- TAL). The MLA ratio was higher in normal feet than MTSS feet or flat feet (15.1% vs. 12.8% vs. 12.3%, p<0.001). The diff-TAL was lower in MTSS feet than normal feet or flat feet (0.4% vs. 0.8% vs. 0.9%, p<0.001]). The 3 groups were comparable in terms of the diff-MLA ratio and the TAL. Respectively for the MLA ratio and the diff-TAL, the cut-off value was 11.9% and 0.61% based on the Youden index. The sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratio of the cut-off value were 0.4, 0.9, and 4.8 for the MLA ratio, and 0.6, 0.7, and 9.8 for the diff-TAL, respectively. Decreased flexibility of the transverse arch and decreased MLA ratio are risk factors for MTSS. In contrast, the flexibility of the MLA and the height of the transverse arch were not risk factors for MTSS.

  16. Fault branching and rupture directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliss, Sonia; Bhat, Harsha S.; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.

    2005-06-01

    Could the directivity of a complex earthquake be inferred from the ruptured fault branches it created? Typically, branches develop in forward orientation, making acute angles relative to the propagation direction. Direct backward branching of the same style as the main rupture (e.g., both right lateral) is disallowed by the stress field at the rupture front. Here we propose another mechanism of backward branching. In that mechanism, rupture stops along one fault strand, radiates stress to a neighboring strand, nucleates there, and develops bilaterally, generating a backward branch. Such makes diagnosing directivity of a past earthquake difficult without detailed knowledge of the branching process. As a field example, in the Landers 1992 earthquake, rupture stopped at the northern end of the Kickapoo fault, jumped onto the Homestead Valley fault, and developed bilaterally there, NNW to continue the main rupture but also SSE for 4 km forming a backward branch. We develop theoretical principles underlying such rupture transitions, partly from elastostatic stress analysis, and then simulate the Landers example numerically using a two-dimensional elastodynamic boundary integral equation formulation incorporating slip-weakening rupture. This reproduces the proposed backward branching mechanism based on realistic if simplified fault geometries, prestress orientation corresponding to the region, standard lab friction values for peak strength, and fracture energies characteristic of the Landers event. We also show that the seismic S ratio controls the jumpable distance and that curving of a fault toward its compressional side, like locally along the southeastern Homestead Valley fault, induces near-tip increase of compressive normal stress that slows rupture propagation.

  17. Novel side branch ostial stent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Liang; Lv, Shu-Zheng; Kwan, Tak W

    2009-04-01

    Bifurcation lesions are technically challenging and plagued by a high incidence of restenosis, especially at the side branch orifice, which results in a more frequent need for revascularization during the follow-up period. This report discusses two clinical experiences with a novel side branch ostial stent, the BIGUARD stent, designed for the treatment of bifurcation lesions; procedural success with no in-hospital complications was observed in types IVb and Ia lesions.

  18. Medial pivot knee in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Francesco; Salama, Wael; Sabatini, Luigi; Mousa, Shazly; Khalefa, Abdelrahman

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a medial pivot design was developed in order to mimic normal knee kinematics; the highly congruent medial compartment implant should improve clinical results and decrease contact stresses. Clinical and radiographic mid-term outcomes are satisfactory, but we need other studies to evaluate long-term results and indications for unusual cases.

  19. Medial patellofemoral ligament and medial patellotibial ligament reconstruction in children: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Sadigursky, David; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo; Armede, Maurício; Oliveira, Lucas Rodrigues de; Carneiro, Rogério Jamil Fernandes; Colavolpe, Paulo Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament associated with the medial patellotibial ligament in skeletally immature patients. This is a case series study in patients with patellar instability with open physis. In total, seven patients were evaluated: four males and three females were operated using the proposed technique. Patients with open physis who had more than two episodes of recurring patellar dislocation were included. No patients underwent additional procedures. The distance from the anterior tibial tuberosity to the trochlea grove (TT-TG) was measured in all patients. On physical examination, the inverted J-sign, the apprehension sign, and the knee range of motion parameters were used in the pre- and post-operative period. In addition, the Kujala and Lysholm scores were applied before and 12 months after surgery. The results were analyzed with the Wilcoxon test. The mean age of the patients was 11.28 in both genders. Comparing the data of the pre- and post-operative period, the inverted J-sign was present in six patients (85.7%) vs. absent in one (14.3%). The apprehension sign was absent in cases in the postoperative period; the range of motion was 117.85 ± 8.09 vs. 148.57 ± 3.77. The Kujala score was 42.57 ± 8.9 vs. 88.57 ± 5.09 and the Lysholm scores were classified as excellent or good in 28.6% and 71.4%, respectively. The combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the medial patellotibial ligament in skeletally immature patients with predisposing factors, presents satisfactory results without episodes of recurrence or residual subluxation; according to these preliminary results, it should be considered as a treatment option.

  20. Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 annual report of the Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch reflects the majority of the work performed by the branch staff during the 2002 calendar year. Its purpose is to give a brief review of the branch s technical accomplishments. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch develops innovative computational tools, benchmark experimental data, and solutions to long-term barrier problems in the areas of propulsion aeroelasticity, active and passive damping, engine vibration control, rotor dynamics, magnetic suspension, structural mechanics, probabilistics, smart structures, engine system dynamics, and engine containment. Furthermore, the branch is developing a compact, nonpolluting, bearingless electric machine with electric power supplied by fuel cells for future "more electric" aircraft. An ultra-high-power-density machine that can generate projected power densities of 50 hp/lb or more, in comparison to conventional electric machines, which generate usually 0.2 hp/lb, is under development for application to electric drives for propulsive fans or propellers. In the future, propulsion and power systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures, and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance and economic viability. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is working to achieve these complex, challenging goals.

  1. Long chain branching of PLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liangliang; Xu, Yuewen; Fahnhorst, Grant; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2017-05-01

    A trifunctional aziridine linker, trimethylolpropane tris(2-methyl-1-aziridinepropionate) (TTMAP), was melt blended with linear polylactic acid (PLA) to make star branched PLA. Adding pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) led to long chain branched (LCB) PLA. Mixing torque evolution during melt processing revealed high reactivity of aziridine with the carboxyl end group on PLA and an incomplete reaction of PMDA with the hydroxyl end group. Star-shaped PLA exhibited higher viscosity but no strain hardening in extensional flow while LCB PLA showed significant extensional hardening. Excess TTMAP in the branching reaction resulted in gel formation, which led to failure at low strain in extension. PMDA conversion was estimated based on gelation theory. The strain rate dependence of extensional hardening indicated that the LCB PLA had a low concentration of long chain branched molecules with an H-shaped topology. Unlike current methods used to branch PLA, free radical chemistry or use of an epoxy functional oligomers, our branching strategy produced strain hardening with less increase in shear viscosity. This study provides guidelines for design of polymers with low shear viscosity, which reduces pressure drop in extrusion, combined with strong extensional hardening, which enhances performance in processes that involve melt stretching.

  2. Evaluation of Lumbar Facet Joint Nerve Blocks in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial with a 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay; Falco, Frank J.E.; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2010-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Objective: To determine the clinical effectiveness of therapeutic lumbar facet joint nerve blocks with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain of facet joint origin. Summary of Background Data: Lumbar facet joints have been shown as the source of chronic pain in 21% to 41% of low back patients with an average prevalence of 31% utilizing controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks. Intraarticular injections, medial branch blocks, and radiofrequency neurotomy of lumbar facet joint nerves have been described in the alleviation of chronic low back pain of facet joint origin. Methods: The study included 120 patients with 60 patients in each group with local anesthetic alone or local anesthetic and steroids. The inclusion criteria was based upon a positive response to diagnostic controlled, comparative local anesthetic lumbar facet joint blocks. Outcome measures included the numeric rating scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, and work status, at baseline, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Results: Significant improvement with significant pain relief of ≥ 50% and functional improvement of ≥ 40% were observed in 85% in Group 1, and 90% in Group II, at 2-year follow-up. The patients in the study experienced significant pain relief for 82 to 84 weeks of 104 weeks, requiring approximately 5 to 6 treatments with an average relief of 19 weeks per episode of treatment. Conclusions: Therapeutic lumbar facet joint nerve blocks, with or without steroids, may provide a management option for chronic function-limiting low back pain of facet joint origin. PMID:20567613

  3. Currently Recommended TON Injectate Volumes Concomitantly Block the GON: Clinical Implications for Managing Cervicogenic Headache.

    PubMed

    Wahezi, Sayed E; Silva, Kyle; Shaparin, Naum; Lederman, Andrew; Emam, Mohammed; Haramati, Nogah; Downie, Sherry A

    2016-01-01

    Headache (HA) is a significant cause of morbidity globally. Despite many available treatment options, HAs that are refractory to conservative management can be challenging to treat. Third occipital nerve (TON) and greater occipital nerve (GON) irritation are potential etiologic agents of primary and cervicogenic HAs that can be targeted using minimally invasive treatment options such as nerve blocks or radiofrequency ablation. However, a substantial number of patients that undergo radiofrequency ablation do not experience pain relief despite a positive diagnostic medial branch block (MBB). In this study, we investigate the underlying cause for the high rate of false positives associated with MBBs by evaluating injectate spread in cadaveric subjects. Cadaveric study. Academic medical center. After obtaining exemption status from our Institutional Review Board, TON injections were performed on 5 preserved cadavers, a total of 10 TONs, using anatomic landmarks, partial dissection, and palpation to guide needle placement. Cadaveric dissections were performed to evaluate the location, vertical spread, and grossly observed injectate coating of the TON and GON for each quantity of methylene blue injectate, 0.3 mL and 0.5 mL, administered. The average distance between the TON and GON at their respective foraminal exit points was 1.81 cm. The average vertical spread for 0.3 mL and 0.5 mL of methylene blue injectate was 2.02 + 0.35 cm and 3.26 + 0.48 cm when performing a TON block. When using 0.3 mL injectate, both the TON and GON were simultaneously coated 60% of the time. After increasing the injectate volume to 0.5 mL, both the TON and GON were simultaneously coated 100% of the time. The cadaveric design of this study presents limitations when translating cadaveric findings to the clinical setting. Also, the small sample size limits its power and generalizability. Lastly, the potential for researcher bias exists as the investigators were not blinded. This study

  4. Delay and block of cardiac impulse caused by enhanced phase-4 depolarization in the His-Purkinje system.

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, A; Da Rous, H O; Palumbo, J R

    1975-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of bradycardia-dependent bundle-branch and paroxysmal atrioventricular block appears to be enhancement of phase-4 depolarization in a branch or in a natural or acquired monofascicular pathway. Clinical records of these forms of impaired conduction occurring in the bundle-branches, with either longer or shorter cardiac cycle lengths, are presented and analysed. These also include the combination of Mobitz typw I atrioventricular block with variable degrees of bundle-branch block, as a representative example of narrow ventricular escape beats firing in the zone where prominent diastolic depolarization is present. PMID:123463

  5. Principles of branch formation and branch patterning in Hydrozoa.

    PubMed

    Berking, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The freshwater polyp Hydra produces buds which separate from the parent. Other Hydrozoa produce branches which remain connected to the parent, thus forming a colony. Some Hydrozoa grow by means of an organ that is like a shoot apical meristem. Others display a sympodial type of growth. In this article, I propose that these different types of branches are organized by a common pattern-forming system. This system has self-organizing properties. It causes branch tip formation and is kept active in the tip when the tip finally differentiates into a hypostome of a polyp. The system does not cause structure formation directly but rather, determines a tissue property called positional value, in such a way that a gradient of values forms in the tissue of the bud or branch. The local value determines the local morphodynamic processes, including differentiation of the hypostome (highest positional value), tentacles and basal disc and of the exoskeleton pattern along the shoot. A high positional value favors the onset of a new self-organizing process and by lateral inhibition, such a process prevents the initiation of a further process in its surroundings. Small quantitative differences in the range of the signals involved determine whether a bud or a branch forms and whether monopodial and sympodial growth follows.

  6. Quantitative macroinvertebrate survey of Pen Branch and Indian Grave Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    A total of 80 species were collected at all sites on Pen Branch and Indian Grave Branch during the 28 day period for colonization of the multiplate artificial substrate samplers. The two upstream sites demonstrated the highest species richness. During the sampling interval a release of significant proportion entered Indian Grave Branch, affecting all downstream sites. This effect was most severe at sites 3, 4, and 7, apparently resulting in heavy scouring of the multiplate samplers. Nevertheless, much colonization did occur at sites 3 and 4, with hydropsychid caddisflies, blackflies and midges predominant. At sites 5 and 6 a greater degree of recovery was noted, due to the lessened scouring in the broad floodplain. These downstream sites had significant numbers of mayflies along with the numerous midges. Considered overall, colonization during the period since the K Reactor has ceased releasing thermal effluent into Pen Branch and Indian Grave Branch has been substantial, introducing a substantial proportion of the species known from other nearby streams. 29 tabs.

  7. Vascularized Medial Femoral Condyle Bone Graft for Resistant Nonunion of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Nonunion involving the metaphyseal region of the distal radius is exceedingly rare, usually involving co-morbidity. Patients that have failed multiple prior conventional surgical interventions represent an even more difficult subset to treat; this investigation examined the utility of a specially designed free vascularized medial femoral condyle flap consisting of a central structural block graft with an extended corticoperiosteal sleeve to wrap around the junctions. Six patients (5 males, 1 female) with a mean age of 52 years had failed to achieve union involving the distal radius metaphysis after a mean of 3.7 prior surgeries occurring over a mean period of 24 months. Comorbidities included smoking, alcoholism, chronic nutritional deficiency, and prior osteomyelitis. The unique descending genicular artery medial femoral condyle flap designed to address these patients consisted of a central structural block graft in continuity with an extended corticoperiosteal sleeve. The structural block filled the bone defect, and the corticoperiosteal sleeve wrapped around the bone junctions and the neighboring bone margins. The mean flap size was 5.3 (+/- 1.3) cm long by 4.5 (+/- 0.9) cm wide. Pre-operative to post-operative DASH scores were compared using the paired student' s t-test, with p < 0.05. All flaps achieved union at a mean of 6.8 (+/- 2.1) weeks following surgery, using the criteria of bridging trabeculae on all 3 radiographs: coronal, sagittal, and oblique. The mean pre-operative DASH score of 63 (+/- 10) was statistically significantly different compared to the mean post-operative DASH score of 18 (+/- 8). With few alternative solutions able to address this unique and difficult problem, the structural block of vascularized bone with the extended corticoperiosteal sleeve proved able to achieve a union that had failed multiple previous attempts and able to resist reactivation of infection, in a challenging group of patients with comorbidities.

  8. Localized Disruption of Narp in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Blocks Reinforcer Devaluation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alexander W.; Han, Sungho; Blouin, Ashley M.; Saini, Jasjit; Worley, Paul F.; During, Matthew J.; Holland, Peter C.; Baraban, Jay M.; Reti, Irving M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulated pentraxin (Narp) is a secreted protein that regulates [alpha]-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPAR) aggregation and synaptogenesis. Mapping of Narp-positive neurons in brain has revealed it is prominently expressed in several limbic system projection pathways. Consistent with this…

  9. Localized Disruption of Narp in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Blocks Reinforcer Devaluation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alexander W.; Han, Sungho; Blouin, Ashley M.; Saini, Jasjit; Worley, Paul F.; During, Matthew J.; Holland, Peter C.; Baraban, Jay M.; Reti, Irving M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulated pentraxin (Narp) is a secreted protein that regulates [alpha]-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPAR) aggregation and synaptogenesis. Mapping of Narp-positive neurons in brain has revealed it is prominently expressed in several limbic system projection pathways. Consistent with this…

  10. Tarsal tunnel syndrome associated with a perforating branch from posterior tibial artery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Luenam, Suriya; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-03-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome, a compressive neuropathy of the tibial nerve or its branches with in the tarsal tunnel, is an uncommon condition. Various etiologies of the syndrome have been described. We report a rare case of tarsal tunnel syndrome associated with a perforating branch from the posterior tibial artery. A 56-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of paresthesia and hypoesthesia in the medial and lateral plantar area of the left foot. Tinel's sign was elicited at the tarsal tunnel. Electrodiagnostic studies confirmed the diagnosis of left tarsal tunnel syndrome. Intraoperatively, the perforating branch from posterior tibial artery which traveled through a split in the tibial nerve was encountered. The patient's symptom improved significantly at 2 years after tarsal tunnel release and vascular ligation. Only a minor degree of paresthesia remains in the forefoot.

  11. Medial capsule reefing in patellar instability.

    PubMed

    Cerciello, Simone; Vasso, Michele; Corona, Katia; Del Regno, Chiara; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of medial capsule reefing in the treatment of patellar instability is well documented. Aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of an all-arthroscopic medial capsule reefing technique in young patients with painful patella syndrome and potential patellar instability. Thirty patients with painful patellar syndrome and potential patellar instability having undergone a minimum of 6 months of intensive rehabilitation were enrolled in the present study. All subjects were evaluated with physical examination, clinical and functional outcomes and complete imaging study. All patients were reviewed at an intermediate follow-up of 72 months. Average Kujala score improved from 72.9±15.0 to 88.4±7.6 (p<0.0001), average Larsen score from 15.0±2.5 to 17.2±2.2 (p<0.002), average Lysholm from 63.8±16.7 to 87.9±11.7 (p<0.0001) and average Fulkerson score from 69.5±21.5 to 90.8±9.8 (p<0.0001). No intraoperative or postoperative complications were recorded. Ninety per cent of patients were very satisfied or satisfied with their functional result. Twenty-eight patients were reviewed at the final follow-up, 120 months after surgery. Average Kujala was 87.7±8.8 (p<0.0001), average Larsen was 16.8±2.7 (p<0.01), average Lysholm was 87.6±14.3 (p<0.0001), and average Fulkerson was 87.2±13.9 (p<0.0001). Almost 86% of patients were very satisfied or satisfied with their result. However, slight deterioration of the outcomes over time was observed. At the final follow-up, the outcomes of all-arthroscopic technique were significantly improved from preoperative values; however, they were slightly inferior at the 72 months follow-up. This slight deterioration of the outcomes may be the consequence of the reduction in physical activities. Case series, Level IV.

  12. Adductor canal block can result in motor block of the quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junping; Lesser, Jonathan B; Hadzic, Admir; Reiss, Wojciech; Resta-Flarer, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The block of nerves in the adductor canal is considered to cause a sensory block without a motor component. In this report, we describe a case of significant quadriceps muscle weakness after an adductor canal block (ACB). A 65-year-old female patient for ambulatory knee surgery was given an ACB for postoperative pain management. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance at the midthigh level using the transsartorial approach. Twenty milliliters of 0.5% ropivacaine was deposited adjacent to the anterior and posterior areas of the femoral artery. On discharge from the hospital, the patient realized that her thigh muscles were weak and she was unable to extend her leg at the knee. A neuromuscular examination indicated that the patient had no strength in her quadriceps muscle, along with sensory deficit in the medial-anterior lower leg and area in front of knee up to the midthigh. The weakness lasted 20 hours, and the sensory block lasted 48 hours before complete recovery. The optimal level and amount of local anesthetic for adductor canal block are currently not well defined. Proximal spread of local anesthetic and anatomical variation may explain our observation. Several studies have reported that ACB involves no motor blockade. However, our case report illustrates that the ACB can result in clinically significant quadriceps muscle paralysis. This report suggests that patients should be monitored vigilantly for this occurrence to decrease the risk of falls.

  13. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  14. Photovoltaic measurements and performance branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, S. E.; Dippo, P.

    1990-05-01

    The Photovoltaic (PV) Measurements and Performance Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) provides comprehensive PV materials, device and component characterization, measurement, fabrication, and modeling research and support for the international PV research community in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's PV m goals. The progress of the Branch is summarized. The seven technical sections present a succinct overview of the capabilities and accomplishments of each group in the Branch. The Branch is comprised of the following groups; Surface and Interface Analysis, Materials Characterization, Device Development, Electro-Optical Characterization, Cell Performance, Advanced Module Testing and Performance, and Surface and Interface Modification and Stability. The main research projects completed in FY 1989 are highlighted including measurements and tests of PV materials, cells, submodules and modules. The report contains a comprehensive bibliography of the more than 80 branch-originated journal and conference publications which were authored in collaboration with, or in support of, approximately 130 university, industrial, government, and in-house research groups.

  15. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to the MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.

  16. The medial scaffold of 3D unorganized point clouds.

    PubMed

    Leymarie, Frederic F; Kimia, Benjamin B

    2007-02-01

    We introduce the notion of the medial scaffold, a hierarchical organization of the medial axis of a 3D shape in the form of a graph constructed from special medial curves connecting special medial points. A key advantage of the scaffold is that it captures the qualitative aspects of shape in a hierarchical and tightly condensed representation. We propose an efficient and exact method for computing the medial scaffold based on a notion of propagation along the scaffold itself, starting from initial sources of the flow and constructing the scaffold during the propagation. We examine this method specifically in the context of an unorganized cloud of points in 3D, e.g., as obtained from laser range finders, which typically involve hundreds of thousands of points, but the ideas are generalizable to data arising from geometrically described surface patches. The computational bottleneck in the propagation-based scheme is in finding the initial sources of the flow. We thus present several ideas to avoid the unnecessary consideration of pairs of points which cannot possibly form a medial point source, such as the "visibility" of a point from another given a third point and the interaction of clusters of points. An application of using the medial scaffold for the representation of point samplings of real-life objects is also illustrated.

  17. Molecular mechanisms in the formation of the medial longitudinal fascicle

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Mansoor; Riley, Kerry-lyn; Schubert, Frank R

    2007-01-01

    The first neurons in the vertebrate brain form a stereotypical array of longitudinal and transversal axon tracts, the early axon scaffold. This scaffold is thought to lay down the basic structure for the later, more complex neuronal pathways in the brain. The ventral longitudinal tract is pioneered by neurons located at the ventral midbrain–forebrain boundary, which form the medial longitudinal fascicle. Recent studies have shed some light on the molecular mechanisms that control the development of the medial longitudinal fascicle. Here, we show that patterning molecules, notably the ventralizing signalling molecule Shh, are involved in the formation of medial longitudinal fascicle neurons and in medial longitudinal fascicle axon guidance. Downstream of Shh, several homeobox genes are expressed in the tegmentum. We describe the expression patterns of Sax1, Emx2, Six3, Nkx2.2 and Pax6 in the mesencephalon and pretectum in detail. Furthermore, we review the evidence of their molecular interactions, and their involvement in neuronal fate specification. In particular, Sax1 plays a major role in fate determination of medial longitudinal fascicle neurons. Finally, we discuss the available data on axon guidance mechanisms for the medial longitudinal fascicle, which suggest that different guidance molecules such as class 3 Semaphorins, Slits and Netrins act to determine the caudal and ventral course of the medial longitudinal fascicle axons. PMID:17623036

  18. A dysexecutive syndrome of the medial thalamus.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Daniela; Ploner, Christoph J; Kraft, Antje; Kopp, Ute A; Ostendorf, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Thalamic stroke is associated with neurological and cognitive sequelae. Resulting neuropsychological deficits vary with the vascular territory involved. Whereas sensory, motor and memory deficits following thalamic stroke are comparatively well characterized, the exact relationship between executive dysfunction and thalamic damage remains more ambiguous. To assess the pattern of executive-cognitive deficits following thalamic stroke and its possible association with distinct thalamic nuclei, 19 patients with focal thalamic lesions were examined with high-resolution structural imaging and neuropsychological testing. Twenty healthy individuals served as controls. Patient MRIs were co-registered to an atlas of the human thalamus. Lesion overlap and subtraction analyses were used for lesion-to-symptom mapping. In eight patients (42.1%), neuropsychological assessment demonstrated a disproportionate deficit in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), while other executive and memory functions were much less affected. Subtraction analysis revealed an area in the left medial thalamus, mainly consisting of the centromedian and parafascicular nuclei (CM-Pf complex) that was damaged in these patients and spared in patients with normal WCST performance. Thus, damage to the CM-Pf complex may yield a distinct dysexecutive syndrome in which deficient maintenance and shifting between cognitive sets predominates. We hypothesize that the CM-Pf complex may contribute to maintenance and shifting of cognitive sets by virtue of its dense connections with the striatum. The pattern of executive dysfunction following thalamic stroke may vary considerably with lesion location.

  19. Medial olivocochlear reflex in ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Beyazal, M S; Özgür, A; Terzi, S; Çeliker, M; Dursun, E

    2016-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease. Via autoimmune mediators, AS can damage the auditory system similar to other systems. Otoacoustic emission studies in AS patients showed that the damage that causes hearing loss was in the outer hair cells. The medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex is used to evaluate the MOC efferent system (MOES), which includes the outer hair cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of subclinical damage in the inner ear with the aid of the MOC reflex test in AS patients with no hearing complaints. Thirty-four patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. Otoacoustic emission responses, MOC reflex results, and frequency-specific and total suppression findings were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings for the AS patients, and the MOC reflex data were also investigated. Reduced MOC reflex response (p = 0.04) and suppression (p = 0.019) were detected in AS patients. When the clinical and laboratory findings for the AS patients and the MOC reflex test results were compared, a significant correlation was found only between the MOC reflex and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The results showed that AS can damage the inner ear, especially the MOES, and can reduce the MOC reflex response without clinical hearing loss.

  20. Chronic medial instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; O'Brien, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Damage to the medial collateral ligament of the elbow from an instability episode usually heals with non-operative treatment. In some cases, residual instability may occur, leading to functional impairment.Non-operative management can be successful when bracing, taping and therapy are used to stabilise the elbow.A recent report detailing the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in effectively treating ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries in throwers has shown promise. However, there remain specific groups that should be considered for repair or reconstruction. These may include throwing athletes, wrestlers and some individuals involved in highly active physical activity which demands stability of the elbow.The results of surgical repair and reconstruction allowing a return to sports are quite good, ranging from 84% to 94%. Complications are generally low and mostly centred on ulnar nerve injuries.This report represents a review of the literature concerning valgus instability over the past five years, supplemented by selective older articles where relevant. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:1-6. DOI:10.1302/2058-5241.2.160037.

  1. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  2. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  3. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex.

    PubMed

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2015-02-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-unconstrained but not task-constrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of a Femur Nonunion with Microsurgical Corticoperiosteal Pedicled Flap from the Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Guzzini, Matteo; Guidi, Marco; Civitenga, Carolina; Ferri, Germano; Ferretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The vascularized corticoperiosteal flap is harvested from the medial femoral condyle and it is nourished by the articular branch of the descending genicular artery and the superomedial genicular artery. This flap is usually harvested as a free flap for the reconstruction of bone defects at forearm, distal radius, carpus, hand, and recently at lower limb too. Case Report. A 50-year-old Caucasian man referred to our department for hypertrophic nonunion of the distal femur, refractory to the conservative treatments. The first surgical choice was the revision of the nail and the bone reconstruction with a corticoperiosteal pedicled flap from the medial femoral condyle. We considered union to have occurred 3.5 months after surgery when radiographs showed bridging of at least three of the four bony cortices and clinically the patient was able to walk with full weight bearing without any pain. At the last follow-up (25 months), the patient was completely satisfied with the procedure. Discussion. The corticoperiosteal flap allows a faster healing of fractures with a minimal morbidity at the donor site. We suggest that the corticoperiosteal pedicled flap graft is a reliable and effective treatment for distal femur nonunion. PMID:27064589

  5. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    Can the rupture directivity of past earthquakes be inferred from fault geometry? Nakata et al. [J. Geogr., 1998] propose to relate the observed surface branching of fault systems with directivity. Their work assumes that all branches are through acute angles in the direction of rupture propagation. However, in some observed cases rupture paths seem to branch through highly obtuse angles, as if to propagate ``backwards". Field examples of that are as follows: (1) Landers 1992. When crossing from the Johnson Valley to the Homestead Valley (HV) fault via the Kickapoo (Kp) fault, the rupture from Kp progressed not just forward onto the northern stretch of the HV fault, but also backwards, i.e., SSE along the HV [Sowers et al., 1994, Spotila and Sieh, 1995, Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995, Rockwell et al., 2000]. Measurements of surface slip along that backward branch, a prominent feature of 4 km length, show right-lateral slip, decreasing towards the SSE. (2) At a similar crossing from the HV to the Emerson (Em) fault, the rupture progressed backwards along different SSE splays of the Em fault [Zachariasen and Sieh, 1995]. (3). In crossing from the Em to Camp Rock (CR) fault, again, rupture went SSE on the CR fault. (4). Hector Mine 1999. The rupture originated on a buried fault without surface trace [Li et al., 2002; Hauksson et al., 2002] and progressed bilaterally south and north. In the south it met the Lavic Lake (LL) fault and progressed south on it, but also progressed backward, i.e. NNW, along the northern stretch of the LL fault. The angle between the buried fault and the northern LL fault is around -160o, and that NNW stretch extends around 15 km. The field examples with highly obtuse branch angles suggest that there may be no simple correlation between fault geometry and rupture directivity. We propose that an important distinction is whether those obtuse branches actually involved a rupture path which directly turned through the obtuse angle (while continuing

  6. Pharyngeal airway wall mechanics using tagged magnetic resonance imaging during medial hypoglossal nerve stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Brennick, Michael J; Pickup, Stephen; Dougherty, Lawrence; Cater, Jacqueline R; Kuna, Samuel T

    2004-01-01

    To better understand pharyngeal airway mechanics as it relates to the pathogenesis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea, we have developed a novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with non-invasive tissue tagging to measure pharyngeal wall tissue motion during active dilatation of the airway. Eleven anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were surgically prepared with platinum electrodes for bilateral stimulation of the medial branch of the hypoglossus nerve that supplies motor output to the protrudor and intrinsic tongue muscles. Images of the pharyngeal airway were acquired before and during stimulation using a gated multislice, spoiled gradient recalled (SPGR) imaging protocol in a 4.7 T magnet. The tag pulses, applied before stimulation, created a grid pattern of magnetically imbedded dark lines that revealed tissue motion in images acquired during stimulation. Stimulation significantly increased cross-sectional area, and anteroposterior and lateral dimensions in the oropharyngeal and velopharyngeal airways when results were averaged across the rostral, mid- and caudal pharynx (P < 0.001). Customized software for tissue motion-tracking and finite element-analysis showed that changes in airway size were associated with ventral displacement of tissues in the ventral pharyngeal wall in the rostral, mid- and caudal pharyngeal regions (P < 0.0032) and ventral displacement of the lateral walls in the mid- and caudal regions (P < 0.0001). In addition, principal maximum stretch was significantly increased in the lateral walls (P < 0.023) in a ventral–lateral direction in the mid- and caudal pharyngeal regions and principal maximum compression (perpendicular to stretch) was significantly increased in the ventral walls in all regions (P < 0.0001). Stimulation did not cause lateral displacement of the lateral pharyngeal walls at any level. The results reveal that the increase in pharyngeal airway size resulting from stimulation of the medial branch of the

  7. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used. (b...

  8. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used. (b...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used. (b...

  11. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the...

  12. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used. (b...

  15. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used. (b...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the...

  17. 17 CFR 166.4 - Branch offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Branch offices. 166.4 Section... RULES § 166.4 Branch offices. Each branch office of each Commission registrant must use the name of the.... The act, omission or failure of any person acting for the branch office, within the scope of...

  18. Double-branched vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E. R.; Westphal, R. V.; Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the suitability of using a double branched vortex generator in parametric studies involving vortex interactions, an experimental study of the main vortex and secondary flows produced by a double branched vortex generator was conducted in a 20-by-40 cm indraft wind tunnel. Measurements of the cross flow velocities were made with a five hole pressure probe from which vorticity contours and vortex parameters were derived. The results showed that the optimum configuration consisted of chord extensions with the absence of a centerbody.

  19. Quantitation of breast sensibility following reduction mammaplasty: a comparison of inferior and medial pedicle techniques.

    PubMed

    Mofid, Mehrdad M; Dellon, A Lee; Elias, John J; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2002-06-01

    The preservation of sensitivity within the nipple-areola complex is of paramount importance to patients presenting for reconstructive and aesthetic breast procedures. Previous attempts to measure sensation in the breast before and after surgery have relied primarily on the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test, which is an imprecise study that measures the logarithm of force necessary to bend a series of six to 20 filaments. Within the last 10 years, various authors have published normative pressure threshold data for the breast that have varied by a magnitude of greater than 10-fold. Recently, precise anatomic studies have been performed that have elucidated the innervation of the nipple-areola complex medially and laterally from cutaneous branches of the intercostal nerves. Despite this knowledge, no quantitative sensibility studies have yet been performed that compare postoperative sensation when medially versus laterally innervated pedicles have been used in reduction mammaplasty. The present study is the first to use computer-assisted neurosensory testing to generate normal breast sensation data and to compare sensory outcomes between the inferior and the medial pedicle techniques of reduction mammaplasty.A total of 34 patients were divided into four groups and underwent breast sensory testing (67 breasts total) using the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device, a computer-assisted force transducer that measures static and moving one and two-point discrimination. Sensation in the nipple and in the four quadrants of the areola was measured. Groups I and II were composed of 17 unoperated controls with breast sizes ranging from 34A to 36C (group I; 18 breasts) and 36DD to 46EE (group II; 16 breasts) who presented to a general plastic surgery clinic. Groups III and IV were composed of 17 patients who underwent either medial or inferior pedicle reduction mammaplasty between July of 1997 and March of 1999. Pressure thresholds in the most sensitive breasts were as low as 0

  20. [Relevance of nerve blocks in treating and diagnosing low back pain--is the quality decisive?].

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, J

    2001-12-01

    Diagnostic nerve blocks: The popularity of neural blockade as a diagnostic tool in painful conditions, especially in the spine, is due to features like the unspecific character of spinal pain, the irrelevance of radiological findings and the purely subjective character of pain. It is said that apart from specific causes of pain and clear radicular involvement with obvious neurological deficits and corresponding findings of a prolapsed disc in MRI or CT pictures, a diagnosis of the anatomical cause of the pain can only be established if invasive tests are used [5]. These include zygapophyseal joint blocks, sacroiliacal joint blocks, disc stimulation and nerve root blocks. Under controlled conditions, it has been shown that among patients with chronic nonradicular low back pain, some 10-15% have zygapophyseal joint pain [58], some 15-20% have sacroiliacal joint pain [36, 59] and 40% have pain from internal disc disruption [60]. The diagnostic use of neural blockade rests on three premises. First, pathology causing pain is located in an exact peripheral location, and impulses from this site travel via a unique and consistent neural root. Second, injection of local aneasthetic totally abolishes sensory function of intended nerves and does not affect other nerves. Third, relief of pain after local anaesthetic block is attributable solely to block of the target afferent neural pathway. The validity of these assumptions is limited by complexities of anatomy, physiology, and psychology of pain perception and the effect of local anaesthetics on impulse conduction [28]. Facet joints: The prevalence of zygapophyseal joint pain among patients with low back pain seems to be between 15% and 40% [62], but apparently only 7% of patients have pure facet pain [8, 29]. Facet blockade is achieved either by injection of local anaesthetic into the joint space or around the medial branches of the posterior medial rami of the spinal nerves that innervate the joint. There are several

  1. Efficient learning mechanisms hold in the social domain and are implemented in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Seid-Fatemi, Azade; Tobler, Philippe N

    2015-05-01

    When we are learning to associate novel cues with outcomes, learning is more efficient if we take advantage of previously learned associations and thereby avoid redundant learning. The blocking effect represents this sort of efficiency mechanism and refers to the phenomenon in which a novel stimulus is blocked from learning when it is associated with a fully predicted outcome. Although there is sufficient evidence that this effect manifests itself when individuals learn about their own rewards, it remains unclear whether it also does when they learn about others' rewards. We employed behavioral and neuroimaging methods to address this question. We demonstrate that blocking does indeed occur in the social domain and it does so to a similar degree as observed in the individual domain. On the neural level, activations in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) show a specific contribution to blocking and learning-related prediction errors in the social domain. These findings suggest that the efficiency principle that applies to reward learning in the individual domain also applies to that in the social domain, with the mPFC playing a central role in implementing it.

  2. Efficient learning mechanisms hold in the social domain and are implemented in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, Philippe N.

    2015-01-01

    When we are learning to associate novel cues with outcomes, learning is more efficient if we take advantage of previously learned associations and thereby avoid redundant learning. The blocking effect represents this sort of efficiency mechanism and refers to the phenomenon in which a novel stimulus is blocked from learning when it is associated with a fully predicted outcome. Although there is sufficient evidence that this effect manifests itself when individuals learn about their own rewards, it remains unclear whether it also does when they learn about others’ rewards. We employed behavioral and neuroimaging methods to address this question. We demonstrate that blocking does indeed occur in the social domain and it does so to a similar degree as observed in the individual domain. On the neural level, activations in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) show a specific contribution to blocking and learning-related prediction errors in the social domain. These findings suggest that the efficiency principle that applies to reward learning in the individual domain also applies to that in the social domain, with the mPFC playing a central role in implementing it. PMID:25326037

  3. Crack Propagation and Branching in Burning Solid Propellants and Ignition of Nitramine-Based Composite Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    AND BRANCHING IN BURNING SOLID PROPELLANTS AND IGNITION OF NITRAMINE-BASED Nov. 1,1984 - Dec. 31 1985 COMPOSITE Pw)PELLANTS s. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...on teer** aid* II nec.omwy and Identify by block number) Ignition , Nitramine propellants , Thermal decomposition, Reaction mechanisms, Ignition delay...period of inves- tigation were: -fi) crack propagation and branching in burning solid propellants , jii) ignition of nitramine-based composite

  4. Symptomatic Trifascicular Block in Steinert's Disease: Is It Too Soon for a Pacemaker?

    PubMed Central

    Roberti, Roberto; LaCapra, Gina; Ramirez, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 62-year-old male with Steinert's disease who presented with progressive intermittent episodes of lightheadedness five years after he was diagnosed with the disease. On evaluation, he developed a new onset trifascicular block (first degree atrioventricular block, new onset right bundle branch block, and left anterior fascicular block). A dual chamber pacemaker was inserted and lightheadedness improved significantly. PMID:27022487

  5. Medial temporal lobe and topographical memory.

    PubMed

    Urgolites, Zhisen J; Hopkins, Ramona O; Squire, Larry R

    2017-08-08

    There has been interest in the idea that medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures might be especially important for spatial processing and spatial memory. We tested the proposal that the MTL has a specific role in topographical memory as assessed in tasks of scene memory where the viewpoint shifts from study to test. Building on materials used previously for such studies, we administered three different tasks in a total of nine conditions. Participants studied a scene depicting four hills of different shapes and sizes and made a choice among four test images. In the Rotation task, the correct choice depicted the study scene from a shifted perspective. MTL patients succeeded when the study and test images were presented together but failed the moment the study scene was removed (even at a 0-s delay). In the No-Rotation task, the correct choice was a duplicate of the study scene. Patients were impaired to the same extent in the No-Rotation and Rotation tasks after matching for difficulty. Thus, an inability to accommodate changes in viewpoint does not account for patient impairment. In the Nonspatial-Perceptual task, the correct choice depicted the same overall coloring as the study scene. Patients were intact at a 2-s delay but failed at longer, distraction-filled delays. The different results for the spatial and nonspatial tasks are discussed in terms of differences in demand on working memory. We suggest that the difficulty of the spatial tasks rests on the neocortex and on the limitations of working memory, not on the MTL.

  6. Unloader Braces for Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Dan K.; Russell, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: For persons with unicompartment knee osteoarthritis (OA), off-unloader braces are a mechanical intervention designed to reduce pain, improve physical function, and possibly slow disease progression. Pain relief is thought to be mediated by distracting the involved compartment via external varus or valgus forces applied to the knee. In so doing, tibiofemoral alignment is improved, and load is shifted off the degenerative compartment, where exposure to potentially damaging and provocative mechanical stresses are reduced. Objectives: To provide a synopsis of the evidence documented in the scientific literature concerning the efficacy of off-loader knee braces for improving symptomatology associated with painful disabling medial compartment knee OA. Search Strategy: Relevant peer-reviewed publications were retrieved from a MEDLINE search using the terms with the reference terms osteoarthritis, knee, and braces (per Medical Subject Headings), plus a manual search of bibliographies from original and review articles and appropriate Internet resources. Results: For persons with combined unicompartment knee OA and mild to moderate instability, the strength of recommendation reported by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International in the ability of off-loader knee braces to reduce pain, improve stability, and diminish the risk of falling was 76% (95% confidence interval, 69%-83%). The more evidence the treatment is effective, the higher the percentage. Conclusions: Given the encouraging evidence that off-loader braces are effective in mediating pain relief in conjunction with knee OA and malalignment, bracing should be fully used before joint realignment or replacement surgery is considered. With the number of patients with varus deformities and knee pain predicted to increase as the population ages, a reduction of patient morbidity for this widespread chronic condition in combination with this treatment modality could have a positive impact on health care

  7. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; De Winter, Theodorus C

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise, with pain on palpation of the tibia over a length of at least 5 cm. Histological studies fail to provide evidence that MTSS is caused by periostitis as a result of traction. It is caused by bony resorption that outpaces bone formation of the tibial cortex. Evidence for this overloaded adaptation of the cortex is found in several studies describing MTSS findings on bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis is made based on physical examination, although only one study has been conducted on this subject. Additional imaging such as bone, CT and MRI scans has been well studied but is of limited value. The prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic subjects means that results should be interpreted with caution. Excessive pronation of the foot while standing and female sex were found to be intrinsic risk factors in multiple prospective studies. Other intrinsic risk factors found in single prospective studies are higher body mass index, greater internal and external ranges of hip motion, and calf girth. Previous history of MTSS was shown to be an extrinsic risk factor. The treatment of MTSS has been examined in three randomized controlled studies. In these studies rest is equal to any intervention. The use of neoprene or semi-rigid orthotics may help prevent MTSS, as evidenced by two large prospective studies.

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Bollier, Matthew; Smith, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries have evolved over the past 30 years. A detailed physical examination along with careful review of the magnetic resonance imaging and stress radiographs will guide decision making. Early ACL reconstruction and acute MCL repair are recommended when there is increased medial joint space opening with valgus stress in extension, a significant meniscotibial deep MCL injury (high-riding medial meniscus), or a displaced tibial-sided superficial MCL avulsion (stener lesion of the knee). Delayed ACL reconstruction to allow for MCL healing is advised when increased valgus laxity is present only at 30 degrees of flexion and not at 0 degree. However, at the time of ACL surgery, medial stability has to be re-assessed after the reconstruction is completed. In patients with neutral alignment in the chronic setting, graft reconstruction of both the ACL and MCL is recommended.

  9. Evaluation of the medial elbow in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Creighton, R Alexander; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2006-06-01

    The valgus forces generated by throwing athletes can cause injuries and permanently damage the medial elbow structures. Clinicians must have a clear understanding of the ulnar collateral ligament complex and the associated medial elbow structures at risk in these athletes. Taking a detailed history, conducting a physical examination, and obtaining imaging studies will aid in making the correct diagnosis and giving these injuries the appropriate treatment. Pain around the medial elbow is of concern to throwing athletes, coaches, and medical staff. Valgus forces generated by the throwing motion add considerable stress to the medial elbow structures and thus potentially cause injury. Baseball players, particularly pitchers, are most often affected, but athletes participating in sports such as football, volleyball, water polo, tennis, and javelin throwing can also be affected.

  10. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  12. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  13. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  14. Cash efficiency for bank branches.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Julia García

    2013-01-01

    Bank liquidity management has become a major issue during the financial crisis as liquidity shortages have intensified and have put pressure on banks to diversity and improve their liquidity sources. While a significant strand of the literature concentrates on wholesale liquidity generation and on the alternative to deposit funding, the management of an inventory of cash holdings within the banks' branches is also a relevant issue as any significant improvement in cash management at the bank distribution channels may have a positive effect in reducing liquidity tensions. In this paper, we propose a simple programme of cash efficiency for the banks' branches, very easy to implement, which conform to a set of instructions to be imposed from the bank to their branches. This model proves to significantly reduce cash holdings at branches thereby providing efficiency improvements in liquidity management. The methodology we propose is based on the definition of some stochastic processes combined with renewal processes, which capture the random elements of the cash flow, before applying suitable optimization programmes to all the costs involved in cash movements. The classical issue of the Transaction Demand for the Cash and some aspects of Inventory Theory are also present. Mathematics Subject Classification (2000) C02, C60, E50.

  15. 76 FR 13272 - Branch Offices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Branch Offices AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION... 1995, 44 U.S.C. 3507. The Office of Thrift Supervision within the Department of the Treasury...

  16. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Catherine; Bertheloot, Jessica; Leduc, Nathalie; Andrieu, Bruno; Foucher, Fabrice; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply. PMID:25628627

  17. Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Wasserman Schultz, Debbie [D-FL-20

    2009-06-17

    10/01/2009 Became Public Law No: 111-68. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: Division A is the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2010. Division B is the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2010. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  19. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Wasserman Schultz, Debbie [D-FL-20

    2009-06-17

    10/01/2009 Became Public Law No: 111-68. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: Division A is the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2010. Division B is the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2010. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. National Zoological Park Branch Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Kay A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the functions of the National Zoological Park Branch of the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, which is dedicated to supporting the special information needs of the zoo. Topics covered include the library's history, collection, programs, services, future plans, and relations with other zoo libraries. (two references) (Author/CLB)

  2. Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Wasserman Schultz, Debbie [D-FL-20

    2009-06-17

    10/01/2009 Became Public Law No: 111-68. (PDF) (All Actions) Notes: Division A is the Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2010. Division B is the Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2010. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  4. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  5. Living with Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Block First-degree heart block may ... whether you need ongoing care for your condition. Living With a Pacemaker People who have third-degree ...

  6. GABAergic Projections from the Medial Septum Selectively Inhibit Interneurons in the Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Sulser, Alfredo; Parthier, Daniel; Candela, Antonio; McClure, Christina; Pastoll, Hugh; Garden, Derek; Sürmeli, Gülşen

    2014-01-01

    The medial septum (MS) is required for theta rhythmic oscillations and grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). While GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurons project from the MS to the MEC, their synaptic targets are unknown. To investigate whether MS neurons innervate specific layers and cell types in the MEC, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 in mouse MS neurons and used patch-clamp recording in brain slices to determine the response to light activation of identified cells in the MEC. Following activation of MS axons, we observed fast monosynaptic GABAergic IPSPs in the majority (>60%) of fast-spiking (FS) and low-threshold-spiking (LTS) interneurons in all layers of the MEC, but in only 1.5% of nonstellate principal cells (NSPCs) and in no stellate cells. We also observed fast glutamatergic responses to MS activation in a minority (<5%) of NSPCs, FS, and LTS interneurons. During stimulation of MS inputs at theta frequency (10 Hz), the amplitude of GABAergic IPSPs was maintained, and spike output from LTS and FS interneurons was entrained at low (25–60 Hz) and high (60–180 Hz) gamma frequencies, respectively. By demonstrating cell type-specific targeting of the GABAergic projection from the MS to the MEC, our results support the idea that the MS controls theta frequency activity in the MEC through coordination of inhibitory circuits. PMID:25505326

  7. GABAergic projections from the medial septum selectively inhibit interneurons in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sulser, Alfredo; Parthier, Daniel; Candela, Antonio; McClure, Christina; Pastoll, Hugh; Garden, Derek; Sürmeli, Gülşen; Nolan, Matthew F

    2014-12-10

    The medial septum (MS) is required for theta rhythmic oscillations and grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). While GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurons project from the MS to the MEC, their synaptic targets are unknown. To investigate whether MS neurons innervate specific layers and cell types in the MEC, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 in mouse MS neurons and used patch-clamp recording in brain slices to determine the response to light activation of identified cells in the MEC. Following activation of MS axons, we observed fast monosynaptic GABAergic IPSPs in the majority (>60%) of fast-spiking (FS) and low-threshold-spiking (LTS) interneurons in all layers of the MEC, but in only 1.5% of nonstellate principal cells (NSPCs) and in no stellate cells. We also observed fast glutamatergic responses to MS activation in a minority (<5%) of NSPCs, FS, and LTS interneurons. During stimulation of MS inputs at theta frequency (10 Hz), the amplitude of GABAergic IPSPs was maintained, and spike output from LTS and FS interneurons was entrained at low (25-60 Hz) and high (60-180 Hz) gamma frequencies, respectively. By demonstrating cell type-specific targeting of the GABAergic projection from the MS to the MEC, our results support the idea that the MS controls theta frequency activity in the MEC through coordination of inhibitory circuits.

  8. Medial entorhinal cortex and medial septum contribute to self-motion-based linear distance estimation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Pierre-Yves; Gordillo-Salas, Marta; Facchini, Justine; Poucet, Bruno; Save, Etienne; Sargolini, Francesca

    2017-02-04

    Path integration is a navigation strategy that requires animals to integrate self-movements during exploration to determine their position in space. The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) has been suggested to play a pivotal role in this process. Grid cells, head-direction cells, border cells as well as speed cells within the MEC collectively provide a dynamic representation of the animal position in space based on the integration of self-movements. All these cells are strongly modulated by theta oscillations, thus suggesting that theta rhythmicity in the MEC may be essential for integrating and coordinating self-movement information during navigation. In this study, we first show that excitotoxic MEC lesions, but not dorsal hippocampal lesions, impair the ability of rats to estimate linear distances based on self-movement information. Next, we report similar deficits following medial septum inactivation, which strongly impairs theta oscillations in the entorhinal-hippocampal circuits. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a major role of the MEC and MS in estimating distances to be traveled, and point to theta oscillations within the MEC as a neural mechanism responsible for the integration of information generated by linear self-displacements.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Axonal Branch Dynamics in the Developing Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ethan K.; Goodhill, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Branching is an important mechanism by which axons navigate to their targets during neural development. For instance, in the developing zebrafish retinotectal system, selective branching plays a critical role during both initial pathfinding and subsequent arborisation once the target zone has been reached. Here we show how quantitative methods can help extract new information from time-lapse imaging about the nature of the underlying branch dynamics. First, we introduce Dynamic Time Warping to this domain as a method for automatically matching branches between frames, replacing the effort required for manual matching. Second, we model branch dynamics as a birth-death process, i.e. a special case of a continuous-time Markov process. This reveals that the birth rate for branches from zebrafish retinotectal axons, as they navigate across the tectum, increased over time. We observed no significant change in the death rate for branches over this time period. However, blocking neuronal activity with TTX slightly increased the death rate, without a detectable change in the birth rate. Third, we show how the extraction of these rates allows computational simulations of branch dynamics whose statistics closely match the data. Together these results reveal new aspects of the biology of retinotectal pathfinding, and introduce computational techniques which are applicable to the study of axon branching more generally. PMID:26998842

  10. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall.

  11. Determination of the Wiener Molecular Branching Index for the General Tree.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    RO-Ali57 486 DETERMINATION OF THE WJIENER MOLECULAR BRANCHING INDEX i/i FOR THE GENERAL TREE (U) GEORGIA UNIV ATHENS E R CANFIELD ET AL. 24 JUN 85 TR...Index for the General Tree by E.R. Canfield* R.W. Robinson: and D.H. Rouvray Prepared for Publication *_ in Journal of Computational Chemistry University...block number) * Wiener index * molecular branching graph theory chemical trees 20. SSTACT Coninue on reversee I yeea and Identify by block teWee rnhn

  12. Convergent synthesis of 4,5-branched inner-core oligosaccharides of lipopoly- and lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ruiqin; Narimoto, Hirofumi; Nozoe, Miku; Ichiyanagi, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The convergent synthesis of branched inner-core oligosaccharides of lipopoly- and lipooligosaccharide with a 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) disaccharide acceptor was achieved. The l-glycero-d-manno-heptopyranose (Hep) units for the branched core oligosaccharide Galβ(1-4)Glcβ(1-4)Hep and Hepα(1-3)Hep were prepared from the corresponding Hep building blocks. To obtain 4,5-branched core oligosaccharide structures, the common acceptor Kdoα(2-4)Kdo was glycosylated with the Hep units.

  13. Branched Projections in the Auditory Thalamocortical and Corticocortical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kishan, Amar U.; Lee, Charles C.; Winer, Jeffery A.

    2008-01-01

    Branched axons (BAs) projecting to different areas of the brain can create multiple feature-specific maps or synchronize processing in remote targets. We examined the organization of BAs in the cat auditory forebrain using two sensitive retrograde tracers. In one set of experiments (n=4), the tracers were injected into different frequency-matched loci in the primary auditory area (AI) and the anterior auditory field (AAF). In the other set (n=4), we injected primary, non-primary, or limbic cortical areas. After mapped injections, percentages of double labeled cells (PDLs) in the medial geniculate body (MGB) ranged from 1.4% (ventral division) to 2.8% (rostral pole). In both ipsilateral and contralateral areas AI and AAF, the average PDLs were <1%. In the unmapped cases, the MGB PDLs ranged from 0.6% (ventral division) after insular cortex injections to 6.7% (dorsal division) after temporal cortex injections. Cortical PDLs ranged from 0.1% (ipsilateral AI injections) to 3.7% AII (contralateral AII injections). PDLs within the smaller (minority) projection population were significantly higher than those in the overall population. About 2% of auditory forebrain projection cells have BAs and such cells are organized differently than those in the subcortical auditory system, where BAs can be far more numerous. Forebrain branched projections follow different organizational rules than their unbranched counterparts. Finally, the relatively larger proportion of visual and somatic sensory forebrain BAs suggests modality specific rules for BA organization. PMID:18294776

  14. Traumatic fracture of the medial coronoid process in 24 dogs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Desmond K; Canapp, Sherman O; Leasure, Christopher S; Dycus, David L; O'Donnell, Erica

    2016-07-19

    To describe traumatic fracture of the medial coronoid process in dogs as a clinically distinct disease unrelated to congenital elbow dysplasia. Clinical records of dogs with acute, traumatic, unilateral lameness attributable to medial coronoid process disease were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical interpretation included findings on physical examination, orthopaedic examination, and subjective gait analysis. Radiographs of the affected and contralateral elbows were obtained and reviewed for pathology. Arthroscopy of the elbow joints was performed by one of three surgeons and findings were compared to preoperative diagnostics. Postoperative follow-up was continued for 16 weeks. Twenty-four dogs were included in this study. All dogs in this study were free of radiographic evidence of medial coronoid pathology. All dogs were diagnosed with a single, large, displaced or non-displaced fracture of the medial coronoid process, with no other joint pathology. Dogs generally had an excellent short-term outcome following arthroscopic treatment of the fractured medial coronoid process. Traumatic fracture of the medial coronoid process should be considered a clinical disease distinct from dysplasia-related fragmentation and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs that are presented with the complaint of acute unilateral elbow discomfort or lameness, especially after concussive activities involving the forelimb. .

  15. Symptomatic Accessory Medial Meniscus Associated With Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Funk, Shawn S; Block, J Jake; Martus, Jeffrey E; Schoenecker, Jonathan G

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of the meniscus are uncommon. These anomalous formations have been predominately described in the lateral compartment of the knee. Congenital abnormalities of the medial meniscus are rare. Chart and radiographic review of a single patient with a symptomatic congenital abnormality of the medial meniscus. The patient was a 5-year-old boy with popliteal pterygium who developed painful snapping in the medial knee after anterior hemiepiphyseodesis to improve his knee extension. The patient had achieved full-knee extension from a preoperative 45-degree flexion contracture. The newly developed snapping was attributed to the hemiepiphyseodesis implants. After implant removal, the snapping persisted and was localized at the medial joint line. Through an arthrotomy, a medial meniscus abnormality was identified and excised with resolution of symptoms. This report describes a symptomatic congenital abnormality of the medial meniscus in a child with popliteal pterygium. The patient was treated with excision of the anomalous structure with complete resolution of the symptoms. This is the first report of an intra-articular knee anomaly associated with popliteal pterygium syndrome.

  16. Arrange Time into Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepeda, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Block scheduling can help high school principals become staff-development leaders. It gives teachers more time to help individual students and contributes to improved achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. This paper describes the results of research on block scheduling in urban high schools and concludes that block scheduling can support…

  17. Blocked Tear Duct

    MedlinePlus

    Blocked tear duct Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff When you have a blocked tear duct, your tears can't drain normally, leaving you ... in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns. The condition usually gets ...

  18. Neuropilin-2 promotes branching morphogenesis in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Bae, Donggoo; Pursell, Bryan; Gouvin, Lindsey M; Lu, Shaolei; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2011-07-01

    Although the neuropilins were characterized as semaphorin receptors that regulate axon guidance, they also function as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors and contribute to the development of other tissues. Here, we assessed the role of NRP2 in mouse mammary gland development based on our observation that NRP2 is expressed preferentially in the terminal end buds of developing glands. A floxed NRP2 mouse was bred with an MMTV-Cre strain to generate a mammary gland-specific knockout of NRP2. MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mice exhibited significant defects in branching morphogenesis and ductal outgrowth compared with either littermate MMTV-Cre;NRP2(+/loxP) or MMTV-Cre mice. Mechanistic insight into this morphological defect was obtained from a mouse mammary cell line in which we observed that VEGF(165), an NRP2 ligand, induces branching morphogenesis in 3D cultures and that branching is dependent upon NRP2 as shown using shRNAs and a function-blocking antibody. Epithelial cells in the mouse mammary gland express VEGF, supporting the hypothesis that this NRP2 ligand contributes to mammary gland morphogenesis. Importantly, we demonstrate that VEGF and NRP2 activate focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and promote FAK-dependent branching morphogenesis in vitro. The significance of this mechanism is substantiated by our finding that FAK activation is diminished significantly in developing MMTV-Cre;NRP2(loxP/loxP) mammary glands compared with control glands. Together, our data reveal a VEGF/NRP2/FAK signaling axis that is important for branching morphogenesis and mammary gland development. In a broader context, our data support an emerging hypothesis that directional outgrowth and branching morphogenesis in a variety of tissues are influenced by signals that were identified initially for their role in axon guidance.

  19. The medial geniculate body afferents from the cerebellum in the rabbit as studied with the method of orthograde degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zimny, R; Sobusiak, T; Kotecki, A; Deja, A

    1981-01-01

    The brain stems of 10 rabbits subject to operation of several lesions of cerebellar cortex and nuclei were examined. Survival time was 4 to 10 days. The course and termination of degenerating nerve fibres into the medial geniculate nuclei (MGN) of both sides were analyzed in frozen sections of the cerebellum and the brain stem impregnated according to various modifications of Nauta method. Degenerated nerve fibres in the MGN were found only when the fastigial nucleus of heterolateral side, or fibres originating in this nucleus were damaged. Cerebellofugal fibres run in two bundles to their termination spot in the magnocellular part of the medial geniculate nucleus. The first bundle separates from the main trunk of the uncinate fascicle, and running medially to the vestibular nuclei, terminates in the MGN after passing through the lateral lemniscus and the ventral lemniscal nucleus. The second bundle separates from the ascending branch of the uncinate fascicle and after passing through the dorsal lemniscal nucleus, also in composition of the lateral lemniscus, it terminates in the same region of the MGN.

  20. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  1. Progressive Familial Heart Block Type I in a Korean Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Kun; Jang, Jin Kun; Jang, Kyeong-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Cheong, Sang-Sig; Yoo, Sang-Yong

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was referred to the emergency department with a complaint of abdominal pain and dizziness. He had experienced two previous syncopal episodes. His family history revealed that his mother and his two uncles had received permanent pacemaker implantation. His initial heart rate was 49 beats per minute. The electrocardiography (ECG) showed atrial flutter and right bundle branch block (RBBB) with left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). On admission, 24-hour Holter showed ventricular pause up to 16 seconds during syncope. Radio frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial flutter was performed. The ECG revealed bifascicular block (RBBB and LAFB) and first-degree atrioventricular block. He received a permanent pacemaker implantation. His brother's and his sister's ECGs also showed trifascicular block and the pedigree showed autosomal dominant inheritance. This patient was diagnosed with a progressive familial heart block (PFHB) type I. This would be the first report of a PFHB type I case documented in Korea. PMID:21731570

  2. The Space Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ciba-Geigy Corporation's "Space Block," technically known as TDT-177-51 Ren Shape epoxy model block, is a two-foot by two-foot by five- inch plastic block from which master models of the Space Shuttle protective tiles are cut by NC machines. Space Block is made of epoxy resin with low viscosity and slow curing time, enabling the large block to cure uniformly without cracking. Rockwell International uses master models of Shuttle tiles to check accuracy of NC machines accurately by comparing model dimensions with specifications. New epoxy resins are attracting broad interest as a replacement for traditional materials used in modeling auto, aerospace or other parts.

  3. To branch or not to branch: Numerical modeling of dynamically branching faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedontney, N. L.; Templeton Barrett, E. L.; Rice, J. R.; Dmowska, R.

    2009-12-01

    Branched fault geometries, and branched rupture paths, occur in strike-slip as well as dip-slip settings [e.g., Poliakov et al., JGR, 2002; Kame et al., JGR, 2003]. The Wenchuan earthquake illustrates such a branched geometry [Hubbard and Shaw, 2009] in a fold and thrust belt, and surface ruptures provide constraints on which faults were activated co-seismically. Additionally, a branched structure, the Central Basin Decollement [Shaw & Suppe, 1996], underlies the Los Angeles Basin. By simulating the dynamic rupture path selection, using explicit finite element methods here, we are able to estimate which faults should be activated under given conditions. Factors that influence coseismic branch activation have been extensively studied [Poliakov et al.; Kame et al.; Oglesby et al., 2003, 2004; Bhat et al., 2004, 2007]. The results show that the rupture velocity, pre-stress orientation and fault geometry influence rupture path selection. We show further that the ratio of σ1/σ3 (equivalently, the seismic S ratio) and the relative frictional fault strength also play a significant role in determining which faults are activated. Our methodology has recently included the use of a regularized friction routine [Ranjith & Rice, 2001; Cochard & Rice, 2000] which reduces the growth of numerical noise throughout the simulations. A difficulty arises in the treatment of surface interactions at the branch junction. When local opening does not occur there, slip on the branch fault must vanish at the junction, a constraint that we impose on the FE model. However, the FE contact routine used demands that slip always be constrained to zero on one or the other fault at such a junction, which is problematic when opening occurs. There is then no fundamental basis for constraining slip at the junction to zero on either fault, and the choice made affects the slip distributions and rupture path selection. Many analyses that we perform are elastic and the same material is used on both sides

  4. Longitudinal Effects of Ketamine on Dendritic Architecture In Vivo in the Mouse Medial Frontal Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Phoumthipphavong, Victoria; Barthas, Florent; Hassett, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, leads to fast-acting antidepressant effects. In rodent models, systemic ketamine is associated with higher dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, reflecting structural remodeling that may underlie the behavioral changes. However, turnover of dendritic spines is a dynamic process in vivo, and the longitudinal effects of ketamine on structural plasticity remain unclear. The purpose of the current study is to use subcellular resolution optical imaging to determine the time course of dendritic alterations in vivo following systemic ketamine administration in mice. We used two-photon microscopy to visualize repeatedly the same set of dendritic branches in the mouse medial frontal cortex (MFC) before and after a single injection of ketamine or saline. Compared to controls, ketamine-injected mice had higher dendritic spine density in MFC for up to 2 weeks. This prolonged increase in spine density was driven by an elevated spine formation rate, and not by changes in the spine elimination rate. A fraction of the new spines following ketamine injection was persistent, which is indicative of functional synapses. In a few cases, we also observed retraction of distal apical tuft branches on the day immediately after ketamine administration. These results indicate that following systemic ketamine administration, certain dendritic inputs in MFC are removed immediately, while others are added gradually. These dynamic structural modifications are consistent with a model of ketamine action in which the net effect is a rebalancing of synaptic inputs received by frontal cortical neurons. PMID:27066532

  5. Longitudinal Effects of Ketamine on Dendritic Architecture In Vivo in the Mouse Medial Frontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Phoumthipphavong, Victoria; Barthas, Florent; Hassett, Samantha; Kwan, Alex C

    2016-01-01

    A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, leads to fast-acting antidepressant effects. In rodent models, systemic ketamine is associated with higher dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, reflecting structural remodeling that may underlie the behavioral changes. However, turnover of dendritic spines is a dynamic process in vivo, and the longitudinal effects of ketamine on structural plasticity remain unclear. The purpose of the current study is to use subcellular resolution optical imaging to determine the time course of dendritic alterations in vivo following systemic ketamine administration in mice. We used two-photon microscopy to visualize repeatedly the same set of dendritic branches in the mouse medial frontal cortex (MFC) before and after a single injection of ketamine or saline. Compared to controls, ketamine-injected mice had higher dendritic spine density in MFC for up to 2 weeks. This prolonged increase in spine density was driven by an elevated spine formation rate, and not by changes in the spine elimination rate. A fraction of the new spines following ketamine injection was persistent, which is indicative of functional synapses. In a few cases, we also observed retraction of distal apical tuft branches on the day immediately after ketamine administration. These results indicate that following systemic ketamine administration, certain dendritic inputs in MFC are removed immediately, while others are added gradually. These dynamic structural modifications are consistent with a model of ketamine action in which the net effect is a rebalancing of synaptic inputs received by frontal cortical neurons.

  6. Branching processes in disease epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarabjeet

    Branching processes have served as a model for chemical reactions, biological growth processes and contagion (of disease, information or fads). Through this connection, these seemingly different physical processes share some common universalities that can be elucidated by analyzing the underlying branching process. In this thesis, we focus on branching processes as a model for infectious diseases spreading between individuals belonging to different populations. The distinction between populations can arise from species separation (as in the case of diseases which jump across species) or spatial separation (as in the case of disease spreading between farms, cities, urban centers, etc). A prominent example of the former is zoonoses -- infectious diseases that spill from animals to humans -- whose specific examples include Nipah virus, monkeypox, HIV and avian influenza. A prominent example of the latter is infectious diseases of animals such as foot and mouth disease and bovine tuberculosis that spread between farms or cattle herds. Another example of the latter is infectious diseases of humans such as H1N1 that spread from one city to another through migration of infectious hosts. This thesis consists of three main chapters, an introduction and an appendix. The introduction gives a brief history of mathematics in modeling the spread of infectious diseases along with a detailed description of the most commonly used disease model -- the Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR) model. The introduction also describes how the stochastic formulation of the model reduces to a branching process in the limit of large population which is analyzed in detail. The second chapter describes a two species model of zoonoses with coupled SIR processes and proceeds into the calculation of statistics pertinent to cross species infection using multitype branching processes. The third chapter describes an SIR process driven by a Poisson process of infection spillovers. This is posed as a

  7. An anatomical measurement of medial femoral torsion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Y; Lee, Sang K; Lee, Neung K; Choy, Won S

    2012-11-01

    Medial femoral torsion (MFT) can be corrected with derotational osteotomy. Derotational osteotomies can be performed in the proximal or the distal part of the femur. Similar results have been reported for these two procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic location of the MFT by measuring the degree of infratrochanteric and supratrochanteric torsion (STT) of the femur using computed tomography (CT) scans. The current study was carried out in patients with the chief complaint of an in-toeing gait because of the MFT. Sixty-seven patients were enrolled in the study. Forty-one patients (72 lower extremities) were included in the intervention group; 20 patients were included in the cerebral palsy (CP) group (35 lower extremities) and 21 patients were included in the developmental MFT group [developmental femoral torsional (DF) group, 37 lower extremities]. The control group included 26 patients (33 lower extremities) with uninjured limbs with a femoral or a tibial fracture. In this study, torsional angles [MFT, STT and infratrochanteric torsion (ITT)] were measured on CT scan using picture archiving and communication system measurement tools. To measure the STT and ITT, the most prominent points of the lesser and the greater trochanter were marked on CT scans; these two points were connected and were defined as the intertrochanteric line (ITL). The angle between the ITL and the axis of the femoral neck was defined as the STT. The angle between the ITL and the axis of the condylar axis was defined as the ITT. Two authors measured the MFT, STT, and ITT angles of each femur independently. The twisting of the femur had occurred in a different location for each case. In all groups, however, STT was reduced with increasing age; this change was statistically significantly. ITT of the each group showed a random distribution. The means of the ITT in the control group and the DF group did not change significantly, and that of the CP group tended to decrease

  8. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  9. Sp4-dependent repression of Neurotrophin-3 limits dendritic branching

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Belén; Valín, Alvaro; Sun, Xinxin; Gill, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of neuronal gene expression is critical to establish functional connections in the mammalian nervous system. The transcription factor Sp4 regulates dendritic patterning during cerebellar granule neuron development by limiting branching and promoting activity-dependent pruning. Here, we investigate neurotrophin-3 (NT3) as a target gene important for Sp4-dependent dendritic morphogenesis. We found that Sp4 overexpression reduced NT3 promoter activity whereas knockdown of Sp4 increased NT3 promoter activity and mRNA. Moreover, Sp4 bound to the NT3 promoter in vivo, supporting a direct role for Sp4 as a repressor of NT3 expression. Addition of exogenous NT3 promoted dendritic branching in cerebellar granule neurons. Furthermore, sequestering NT3 blocked the continued addition of dendritic branches observed upon Sp4 knockdown, but had no effect on dendrite pruning. These findings demonstrate that, during cerebellar granule neuron development, Sp4-dependent repression of neurotrophin-3 is required to limit dendritic branching and thereby promote acquisition of the mature dendritic pattern. PMID:19555762

  10. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  11. 4. DETAIL OF STONE BLOCK CONSTRUCTION AND IRON HARDWARE (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF STONE BLOCK CONSTRUCTION AND IRON HARDWARE (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  12. Breaking the Block: Basic Writers in the Electronic Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kish, Judith Mara

    2000-01-01

    Fuses theories about Basic Writers and writer's block. Addresses, through the use of hypertext, how computers can help Basic Writers who experience this writing difficulty. Discusses the two main branches of students' difficulties (problems with genre and problems with the linearity of texts) which may be partially alleviated through the…

  13. 20. DETAIL, METAL BRIDGE PLATE, AT SOUTH END BLOCK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL, METAL BRIDGE PLATE, AT SOUTH END BLOCK OF EAST PARAPET, FROM SOUTH, RECORDING 1933 CONSTRUCTION OF FIFTH STREET VIADUCT BY RICHMOND BRIDGE CORPORATION IN COOPERATION WITH THE CITY OF RICHMOND - Fifth Street Viaduct, Spanning Bacon's Quarter Branch Valley on Fifth Street, Richmond, Independent City, VA

  14. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Foot motion may alter the load on the medial tibiofemoral joint and hence affect the KAM. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and the KAM in people with medial compartment knee OA. Method Motion of the knee, tibia, rearfoot and forefoot and knee moments were evaluated in 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA, predominantly in the medial compartment. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between peak values of tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and 1st peak KAM, 2nd peak KAM, and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). Results Lateral tilt of the tibia was significantly associated with increased 1st peak KAM (r = 0.60, p < 0.001), 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.67, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.82, p = 0.001). Increased peak rearfoot eversion was significantly correlated with decreased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.50, p = 0.004). Decreased rearfoot internal rotation was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.44, p = 0.01) and KAAI (r = −0.38, p = 0.02), while decreased rearfoot internal rotation relative to the tibia was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.43, p = 0.01). Significant negative correlations were found between peak forefoot eversion relative to the rearfoot and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.53, p = 0.002) and KAAI (r = −0.51, p = 0.003) and between peak forefoot inversion and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.54, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = −0.48, p = 0.005). Conclusion Increased rearfoot

  15. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Horizontal-branch stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of canonical theory for the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars are examined. Particular attention is given to how an HB star maintains the appropriate composition distribution within the semiconvective zone and how this composition is affected by the finite time-dependence with which convective boundaries actually move. Newly developed models based on time-dependent overshooting are presented for both the core-helium-exhaustion and main HB phases.

  17. Geodynamics Branch research report, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D. (Editor); Cohen, S. C. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The research program of the Geodynamics Branch is summarized. The research activities cover a broad spectrum of geoscience disciplines including space geodesy, geopotential field modeling, tectonophysics, and dynamic oceanography. The NASA programs which are supported by the work described include the Geodynamics and Ocean Programs, the Crustal Dynamics Project, the proposed Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX) and Geopotential Research Mission. The individual papers are grouped into chapters on Crustal Movements, Global Earth Dynamics, Gravity Field Model Development, Sea Surface Topography, and Advanced Studies.

  18. Design of branched and chiral solvatochromic probes: toward quantifying polarity gradients in dendritic macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Milosevic, Petar; Hecht, Stefan

    2005-10-27

    [reaction: see text] A pair of chiral, branched monomer building blocks, consisting of a solvatochromic probe and a spectroscopically inactive volume dummy, has been developed. The probe can selectively be excited, and its fluorescence characteristics provide information about local polarity. Incorporation of these monomers into high-generation polyester dendrimers should enable a detailed investigation of the polarity/density profile in dendritic architectures and ultimately allow for the realization of energy gradients from one chromophore building block only.

  19. Contribution of the medial malleolus to tibiotalar joint contact characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lareau, Craig R; Bariteau, Jason T; Paller, David J; Koruprolu, Sarath C; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    Isolated medial malleolus fractures are typically treated operatively to minimize the potential for articular incongruity, instability, nonunion, and posttraumatic arthritis. The literature, however, has not clearly demonstrated inferior outcomes with conservative treatment of these injuries. This study measured the effects of medial malleolus fracture and its resultant instability on tibiotalar joint contact characteristics. We hypothesized that restoration of anatomical alignment and stability through fixation would significantly improve contact characteristics. A Tekscan pressure sensor was inserted and centered over the talar dome in 8 cadaveric foot and ankle specimens. Each specimen was loaded at 700 N in multiple coronal and sagittal plane orientations. After testing fractured samples, the medial malleolus was anatomically fixed before repeat testing. Contact area and pressure were analyzed using a 2-way repeated-measure ANOVA. In treated fractures, contact areas were higher, and mean contact pressures were lower for all positions. These differences were statistically significant in the majority of orientations and approached statistical significance in pure plantarflexion and pure inversion. Decreases in contact area varied from 15.1% to 42.1%, with the most dramatic reductions in positions of hindfoot eversion. These data emphasize the importance of the medial malleolus in maintaining normal tibiotalar contact area and pressure. The average decrease in contact area after simulated medial malleolar fractures was 27.8% (>40% in positions of hindfoot eversion). Such differences become clinically relevant in cases of medial malleolar nonunion or malunion. Therefore, we recommend anatomical reduction and fixation of medial malleolus fractures with any displacement. Therapeutic Level V-Cadaveric Study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  20. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  1. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Walker Branch Watershed is located on the U. S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation near Oak Ridge, in Anderson County, Tennessee. The Walker Branch Watershed Project began in 1967 under sponsorship of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U. S. Department of Energy). Initially, the project centered primarily on the geologic and hydrologic processes that control the amounts and chemistry of water moving through the watershed. Past projects have included: • U. S. Department of Energy funded studies of watershed hydrology and forest nutrient dynamics • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funded studies of forest micrometeorology • Studies of atmospheric deposition under the National Atmospheric Deposition Program • The International Biological Program Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome Project • National Science Foundation sponsored studies of trace element cycling and stream nutrient spiraling • Electric Power Research Institute funded studies of the effects of acidic deposition on canopy processes and soil chemistry. These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  2. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  3. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  4. Medial Frontal Event Related Potentials and Reward Prediction: Do Responses Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura E.; Potts, Geoffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    Medial frontal event-related potentials (ERPs) following rewarding feedback index outcome evaluation. The majority of studies examining the feedback related medial frontal negativity (MFN) employ active tasks during which participants’ responses impact their feedback, however, the MFN has been elicited during passive tasks. Many of the studies examining the MFN show enhanced effects when an error in reward prediction occurs (i.e. expected rewards are not delivered). To clarify the roles of reward prediction error and active responding in producing the MFN, the current study employed a reward prediction design with active and passive task blocks. Following the presentation of a reward predictor, participants (active task) or the computer (passive task) indicated whether participants would receive the outcome associated with a stimulus presented on the left or right of the reward predictor. The MFN was largest when the trial outcome was worse than predicted and that this effect was enhanced when the participant, rather than the computer, made the choice. These results show that both reward prediction error and active choice impact the neural system of outcome monitoring with the largest MFN when the individual’s decision led to the negative outcome. PMID:21621891

  5. Kisspeptin in the medial amygdala and sexual behavior in male rats.

    PubMed

    Gresham, Rebecca; Li, Shengyun; Adekunbi, Daniel A; Hu, Minghan; Li, Xiao Feng; O'Byrne, Kevin T

    2016-08-03

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is crucial for sexual behavior; kisspeptin (Kiss1) also plays a role in sexual function. Kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r) knockout mice display no sexual behavior. Recently Kiss1 and Kiss1r have been discovered in the posterodorsal subnucleus of the medial amygdala (MePD). We hypothesised that Kiss1 in the MePD may have an influence on male sexual behavior. To test this we bilaterally cannulated the MePD and infused kisspeptin-10 in male rats. This caused the rats to have multiple erections, an effect specific to Kiss1 receptor activation, because Kiss1r antagonism blocked the erectile response. When Kiss1 was infused into the lateral cerebroventricle, there were no observed erections. We also measured the plasma levels of LH when Kiss1 is infused into the MePD or lateral cerebroventricle; Kiss1 increased plasma LH to comparable levels when infused into both sites. We conclude that Kiss1 has a role in male sexual behavior, which is specific to the MePD.

  6. Synthesis of Biomimetic Branched Polymer Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciel, Amanda; Mai, Danielle; Schroeder, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Development of sequence-defined or structurally-precise polymers as high-performance materials is a major challenge in materials science. In this work, we report a facile synthesis platform to produce monodisperse and stereochemically precise nucleotidomimetic polymers. Based on a top-down approach, we are able to precisely incorporate a wide-variety of functional group modifications in a simple two-step process. First, we utilize the natural ability of DNA polymerase to enzymatically incorporate chemically-modified monomers (e.g., C5-dibenzocyclooctyl dUTP) in a template-directed fashion. Second, we employ copper-free click chemistry to integrate the desired chemical functionality at precise locations along the polymer chain. In this way, we produced a variety of branched DNA homopolymer architectures including 3-arm star, symmetric H, and block-brush. Overall, this synthetic strategy allows for the systematic variation of oligomer length, stoichiometry, concentration, and environmental conditions to rapidly explore nucleotidomimetic polymer phase behavior for materials discovery.

  7. Bird exclosures for branches and whole trees.

    Treesearch

    Robert W. Campbell; Torolf R. Torgersen; Steven C. Forrest; Lorna C. Youngs

    1981-01-01

    Two types of lightweight, portable bird exclosures are described. One is for individual branches or branch tips; the other is for whole trees up to 9 m tall. Several alternative configurations and uses of these exclosures are discussed.

  8. Managing occurrence branching in qualitative simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, L.

    1996-12-31

    Qualitative simulators can produce common sense abstractions of complex behaviors given only partial knowledge about a system. One of the problems which limits the applicability of qualitative simulators is the intractable branching of successor states encountered with model of even modest size. Some branches may be unavoidable due to the complex nature of a system. Other branches may be accidental results of the model chosen. A common source of intractability is occurrence branching. Occurrence branching occurs when the state transitions of two variables are unordered with respect to each other. This paper extends the QSIM model to distinguish between interesting occurrence branching and uninteresting occurrence branching. A representation, algorithm, and simulator for efficiently handling uninteresting branching is presented.

  9. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  10. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  11. Organ printing: tissue spheroids as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J; Markwald, Roger R

    2009-04-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion - a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with "built-in" perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering.

  12. Ultrastructure of medial rectus muscles in patients with intermittent exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J; Wang, X; Ren, H; Liu, G; Lu, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the ultrastructure of the medial rectus in patients with intermittent exotropia at different ages. Patients and methods The medial recti were harvested surgically from 20 patients with intermittent exotropia. Patients were divided into adolescent (age<18 years, n=10) and adult groups (age >18 years, n=10). The normal control group included five patients without strabismus and undergoing eye enucleation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy were used to visualize the medial recti. Western blot was used to determine the levels of myosin and actin. Results Varying fiber thickness, atrophy, and misalignment of the medial recti were visualized under optical microscope in patients with exotropia. Electron microscopy revealed sarcomere destruction, myofilament disintegration, unclear dark and light bands, collagen proliferation, and fibrosis. The adolescent group manifested significantly higher levels of myosin and actin than the adult group (P<0.05). Conclusion Younger patients with intermittent exotropia show stronger contraction of the medial recti compared with older patients. Our findings suggest that childhood was the appropriate time for surgery as the benefit of the intervention was better than in adulthood. PMID:26514242

  13. Excised larynx evaluation of subthyroid cartilage approach to medialization thyroplasty.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James D; Hoffman, Matthew R; Scholp, Austin; Devine, Erin E; Jiang, Jack J; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2017-09-11

    To describe an alternative approach to medialization thyroplasty involving dissection underneath the thyroid cartilage with placement of a Gore-Tex implant, and to evaluate its effect on a range of phonatory measures using an excised canine larynx model. Animal model. On each of eight excised canine larynges, the conditions of normal, paralysis, medialization thyroplasty by standard transthyroid cartilage approach, and medialization thyroplasty by experimental subthyroid cartilage approach were performed. Aerodynamic, acoustic, and mucosal wave parameters were measured for each condition. Compared to the vocal fold paralysis state, both the transthyroid and subthyroid approaches for Gore-Tex insertion resulted in significant decreases in phonation threshold pressure and phonation threshold flow. Both approaches also significantly decreased percent jitter, decreased percent shimmer, and improved signal-to-noise ratio. The mucosal wave was preserved after insertion of the Gore-Tex implant for both approaches. For all the phonatory measures except phonation threshold flow, there were no significant differences between the transthyroid and subthyroid approaches. Gore-Tex implantation via a subthyroid approach in an excised canine larynx model can produce effective medialization, preserve the mucosal wave, and significantly improve aerodynamic and acoustic parameters without meaningful difference compared to a traditional transthyroid approach. The subthyroid approach does not require creation of a thyroid cartilage window and could be a potentially valuable alternative method of performing medialization thyroplasty. NA Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Lateral–Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex–Hypothalamus Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC–hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  15. The Effects of a Branch Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Donald; Wang, Yaqin

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effects of a branch campus on the social welfare of the host country and the foreign university. Overall, we find that a branch campus increases both the domestic social welfare (measured by the aggregate student utility) and the tuition revenue of the foreign university. The effect of a branch campus on the brain drain is…

  16. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Summaries are presented of fiscal year 1989 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. Highlights from the branch's major work areas include aeroelasticity, vibration control, dynamic systems, and computation structural methods. A listing of the fiscal year 1989 branch publications is given.

  17. Introduction of Branching Degrees of Octane Isomers.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The concept of branching degrees is introduced. In the case of octane isomers it is derived from the values of a set of their physicochemical properties, calculating for each isomer the average of the normalized values and these averages are defined as branching degrees of octane isomers. The sequence of these branching degrees of octane isomers does not differ much from the »regular« one defined earlier. 2,2-Dimethylhexane appears to be less branched than 3,4-dimethylhexane and 3-ethyl, 2-methylpentane, whereas 2,3,4-trimethylpentane appears to be less branched than 3-ethyl, 3-methylpentane. While the increasing number of branches gives rise to increasing branching degrees, the peripheral position of branches and the separation between branches decreases the value of the branching degree. The central position of branches increases it. A bigger branch increases it more than a smaller one. The quantification of these structural features and their correlations with few indices is given as well.

  18. Guide to the Seattle Archives Branch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Richard, Comp.

    The guide presents an overview of the textual and microfilmed records located at the Seattle Branch of the National Archives of the United States. Established in 1969, the Seattle Archives Branch is one of 11 branches which preserve and make available for research those U.S. Government records of permanent value created and maintained by Federal…

  19. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Calif. 42 1 •1 90 NEW LEGEND 80 A VIBORG, DENMARK, BLOCKS A VIBORG, DENMARK, ASPHALTIC CONCRETE AFTER 00 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, BLOCKS VIBRATION MEAN ...the load-distributing characteristics of the Mlock pavements. *. 45 -, , - t 171 LEGENDT 0 CONCRETE BASE, MEAN OF 8 TESTS,9 KNAPTON (1978) I RANGE OF...45 to 60 min. 90. Table 11 summarizes the results of these tests. The mean penetration of water through the block pavements with a slope of I per

  20. Free Vascularized Medial Femoral Condyle Structural Flaps for Septic Terminal Digital Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2015-12-01

    A unique clinical problem exists when the majority of distal bone stock in a digit is destroyed by osteomyelitis, leaving a residual soft tissue envelope with tenuous, random perfusion surrounding a nidus of scar tissue. Pulp pinch is lost in the absence of bony support, and limited options exist. Apart from toe transfer or revision amputation with shortening, non-vascularized bone grafting inside the residual soft tissue envelope risks graft resorption and reactivation of infection. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of free vascularized medial femoral condyle structural bone flaps to restore lost pulp pinch in such cases. Nine patients (8 males, 1 female) with a mean age of 43 years sustained extensive terminal bone loss near digital tips following osteomyelitis. The mean length of bone defect was 28 mm (± 8.4). The patients were reconstructed at a mean of 12 weeks from initial trauma/infection, having undergone a mean of two prior surgeries. A structural block of vascularized bone from the medial femoral condyle replaced the missing bone at the digital tip defect, temporarily fixed with K-wires. The bone flap was encased by the residual soft tissue envelope after removing scar tissue from the prior trauma and infection. All bone flaps incorporated fully, restoring pulp pinch function to the respective digits with a mean time to union of 8.6 (± 2.1) weeks; range 6-11 weeks. With few alternative solutions able to address this unique and difficult problem, the structural block of vascularized bone proved able to resist resorption, nonunion, and reactivation of infection; the problems normally encountered under this scenario.

  1. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  2. A pseudo-iatrogenic case of medial clavicular fracture

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Heleen Muriel; Willems, Willem Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Medial fractures are the least common type of clavicular fracture (2–10%). The patient is a 29-year-old gynaecology resident with hyper-laxity and sternoclavicular instability. The latter had been surgically stabilized with Dacron® tape, which eroded the bone causing an usura. Acute right shoulder pain occurred 10 years later. CT revealed medial clavicular stress fracture. After 4 weeks of conservative management, internal fixation followed. Five months postoperatively the patient performed all activities without pain. In this patient the weakened medial clavicle due to usura clearly played a role in both the site and nature of the fracture. Furthermore, CT is essential in arriving at the correct diagnosis. PMID:18427920

  3. A pseudo-iatrogenic case of medial clavicular fracture.

    PubMed

    Poelmann, Tibor Antonius Johannes; Staal, Heleen Muriel; Willems, Willem Jacob

    2008-04-01

    Medial fractures are the least common type of clavicular fracture (2-10%). The patient is a 29-year-old gynaecology resident with hyper-laxity and sternoclavicular instability. The latter had been surgically stabilized with Dacron((R)) tape, which eroded the bone causing an usura. Acute right shoulder pain occurred 10 years later. CT revealed medial clavicular stress fracture. After 4 weeks of conservative management, internal fixation followed. Five months postoperatively the patient performed all activities without pain. In this patient the weakened medial clavicle due to usura clearly played a role in both the site and nature of the fracture. Furthermore, CT is essential in arriving at the correct diagnosis.

  4. Traumatic fragmented medial coronoid process in a Chihuahua.

    PubMed

    Hadley, H S; Wheeler, J L; Manley, P A

    2009-01-01

    Fragmented medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a disease process that has not previously been reported in toy-breed dogs. This report describes a presumptive case of FMCP in a 14-month-old Chihuahua that was presented for evaluation approximately four weeks following acute onset of moderate lameness in the left forelimb. Definitive diagnosis of a fragmented medial coronoid process was based upon computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan also demonstrated moderate joint incongruity in the affected elbow. Surgical removal of the fragment and subtotal coronoidectomy were performed via a medial arthrotomy. An ulnar ostectomy was also performed to address joint incongruity. Histology of specimens removed at surgery did not demonstrate evidence of microdamage as characteristic of FMCP in large breed dogs, and instead, suggested that the fracture was acute and traumatic in nature. Rapid return to function was observed following surgery.

  5. Isolated medial foot compartment syndrome after ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Cortina, Josep; Amat, Carles; Selga, Jordi; Corona, Pablo Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Foot compartment syndrome is a serious potential complication of foot crush injury, fractures, surgery, and vascular injury. An acute compartment syndrome isolated to the medial compartment of the foot after suffering an ankle sprain is a rare complication. We report the case of a 31-year-old man who developed a medial foot compartment syndrome after suffering a deltoid ligament rupture at ankle while playing football. The patient underwent a medial compartment fasciotomy with resolution of symptoms. Compartment syndromes of the foot are rare and have been reported to occur after severe trauma. But, there are some reports in the literature of acute exertional compartment syndrome. In our case, the compartment syndrome appeared after an ankle sprain without vascular injuries associated. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction in the baseball Pitcher's elbow.

    PubMed

    Erne, Holger C; Zouzias, Ioannis C; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2009-08-01

    Pitchers are prone to elbow injuries because of high and repetitive valgus stresses on the elbow. The anterior bundle of the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MCL) of the elbow is the primary restraint and is often attenuated with time, leading to functional incompetence and ultimate failure. Pitchers with a history of medial elbow pain, reduced velocity, and loss of command may have an MCL injury in evolution. Physical examination and imaging can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment begins with rest and activity modification. All medial elbow pain is not MCL injury. Surgery is considered only for talented athletes who wish to return to competitive play and may include elite scholastic and other collegiates and professionals. The technique for MCL reconstruction was first described in 1986. Many variations have been offered since then, which can result in predictable outcomes, allowing many to return to the same level of competitive play.

  7. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  8. Changes in articular cartilage following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Martin; Schocke, Michael; Hoser, Christian; Fink, Christian; Mayr, Raul; Rosenberger, Ralf E

    2016-05-01

    To examine degenerative changes in all cartilage surfaces of the knee following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. For this prospective cohort study, 14 patients (five female) with a mean age of 47.9 ± 12.9 years who had undergone isolated arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy were evaluated. Cartilage-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired from the operated knees before the index operations, as well as at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The MRI scans were assessed for the prevalence, severity, and size of cartilage degenerations. The clinical outcome was assessed using the SF-36 physical and mental component score and the International Knee Documentation Committee Knee Evaluation Form and was correlated with radiological findings. There was a significant increase in the severity of cartilage lesions in the medial tibial plateau (P = 0.019), as well as a trend towards an increase in the lateral tibial plateau. The size of the cartilage lesions increased significantly in the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.005) and lateral femoral condyle (P = 0.029), as well as in the patella (P = 0.019). Functional outcome scores improved significantly throughout the follow-up period. There was no correlation between cartilage wear and functional outcome. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is associated with adverse effects on articular cartilage and may lead to an increase in the severity and size of cartilage lesions. Post-operative cartilage wear predominantly affected the medial compartment and also affected the other compartments of the knee. Strategies to reduce subsequent osteoarthritic changes need to involve all compartments of the knee. IV.

  9. Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty for treatment of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Hendricker, Ryan M; deSilva, Brad W; Forrest, L Arick

    2010-04-01

    Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty is a well described procedure for the management of glottal incompetence with associated phonatory disturbance. Limited literature exists describing the use of this procedure in the management of dysphagia. We describe our experience with Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty and the treatment of dysphagia. Case series with chart review. Tertiary referral center. Between April 2000 and September 2008, 189 Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasties were performed on 180 patients by the senior author. Complete records and analysis were available for and performed on 121 procedures for 113 patients. The main outcome measures were discontinuation of gastrostomy tube (g-tube) use or avoidance of g-tube, as well as clinical subjective improvement in swallowing function. Fifty-seven of 113 (50%) patients had complaints of dysphagia at presentation, with 47 of 57 (82%) having an objective swallowing evaluation. Thirty-two of 47 (68%) had documented penetration and/or aspiration. Twenty of 57 (35%) patients with dysphagia required g-tubes for alimentation. Eleven of 20 (55%) patients were able to discontinue g-tube use after Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty, and an additional five patients with aspiration were able to avoid need for g-tubes with Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty and swallowing therapy. Gore-Tex medialization laryngoplasty is a well tolerated and well described treatment for the management of glottal incompetence. The procedure is an appropriate adjunct in dysphagia management for the appropriate patient population. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. S-branch CARS applicability to thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Akihama, K.; Asai, T. )

    1990-07-20

    The pressure and temperature dependence of background-free {ital S}-branch CARS spectra of N{sub 2} are investigated in the temperature range of 300--700 K for pressures of 1--20 atm. Collisional narrowing for {ital S}-branch CARS spectra is proved to be negligible. Individual {ital S}-branch lines are clearly resolved in the entire range, enabling unequivocal determination of temperatures by their peak ratios. Advantages and disadvantages of {ital S}-branch CARS thermometry are discussed on the basis of experimental results. The dual narrowband Stokes CARS technique is also discussed as a practical method of {ital S}-branch CARS thermometry.

  11. S-branch CARS applicability to thermometry.

    PubMed

    Akihama, K; Asai, T

    1990-07-20

    The pressure and temperature dependence of background-free S-branch CARS spectra of N(2) are investigated in the temperature range of 300-700 K for pressures of 1-20 atm. Collisional narrowing for S-branch CARS spectra is proved to be negligible. Individual S-branch lines are clearly resolved in the entire range, enabling unequivocal determination of temperatures by their peak ratios. Advantages and disadvantages of S-branch CARS thermometry are discussed on the basis of experimental results. The dual narrowband Stokes CARS technique is also discussed as a practical method of S-branch CARS thermometry.

  12. Evolutionary branching under slow directional evolution.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi C; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2014-11-07

    Evolutionary branching is the process by which ecological interactions induce evolutionary diversification. In asexual populations with sufficiently rare mutations, evolutionary branching occurs through trait-substitution sequences caused by the sequential invasion of successful mutants. A necessary and sufficient condition for evolutionary branching of univariate traits is the existence of a convergence stable trait value at which selection is locally disruptive. Real populations, however, undergo simultaneous evolution in multiple traits. Here we extend conditions for evolutionary branching to bivariate trait spaces in which the response to disruptive selection on one trait can be suppressed by directional selection on another trait. To obtain analytical results, we study trait-substitution sequences formed by invasions that possess maximum likelihood. By deriving a sufficient condition for evolutionary branching of bivariate traits along such maximum-likelihood-invasion paths (MLIPs), we demonstrate the existence of a threshold ratio specifying how much disruptive selection in one trait direction is needed to overcome the obstruction of evolutionary branching caused by directional selection in the other trait direction. Generalizing this finding, we show that evolutionary branching of bivariate traits can occur along evolutionary-branching lines on which residual directional selection is sufficiently weak. We then present numerical analyses showing that our generalized condition for evolutionary branching is a good indicator of branching likelihood even when trait-substitution sequences do not follow MLIPs and when mutations are not rare. Finally, we extend the derived conditions for evolutionary branching to multivariate trait spaces.

  13. Growth of branched actin networks against obstacles.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A E

    2001-01-01

    A method for simulating the growth of branched actin networks against obstacles has been developed. The method is based on simple stochastic events, including addition or removal of monomers at filament ends, capping of filament ends, nucleation of branches from existing filaments, and detachment of branches; the network structure for several different models of the branching process has also been studied. The models differ with regard to their inclusion of effects such as preferred branch orientations, filament uncapping at the obstacle, and preferential branching at filament ends. The actin ultrastructure near the membrane in lamellipodia is reasonably well produced if preferential branching in the direction of the obstacle or barbed-end uncapping effects are included. Uncapping effects cause the structures to have a few very long filaments that are similar to those seen in pathogen-induced "actin tails." The dependence of the growth velocity, branch spacing, and network density on the rate parameters for the various processes is quite different among the branching models. An analytic theory of the growth velocity and branch spacing of the network is described. Experiments are suggested that could distinguish among some of the branching models. PMID:11566765

  14. Medial Meniscal Extrusion Relates to Cartilage Loss in Specific Femorotibial Subregions- Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bloecker, K.; Wirth, W.; Guermazi, A.; Hunter, DJ; Resch, H.; Hochreiter, J.; Eckstein, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medial meniscal extrusion is known to be related to structural progression of knee OA. However, it is unclear whether medial meniscal extrusion is more strongly associated with cartilage loss in certain medial femorotibial subregions than to others. Methods Segmentation of the medial tibial and femoral cartilage (baseline; 1-year follow-up) and the medial meniscus (baseline) was performed in 60 participants with frequent knee pain (age 61.3±9.2y, BMI 31.3±3.9 kg/m2) and with unilateral medial radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) grade 1–3, using double echo steady state MR-images. Medial meniscal extrusion distance and extrusion area (%) between the external meniscal and tibial margin at baseline, and longitudinal medial cartilage loss in eight anatomical subregions were determined. Results A significant association (Pearson correlation coefficient) was seen between medial meniscus extrusion area in JSN knees and cartilage loss over one year throughout the entire medial femorotibial compartment. The strongest correlation was with cartilage loss in the external medial tibia (r=−0.34 [p<0.01] in JSN, and r=−0.30 [p=0.02] in noJSN knees). Conclusion Medial meniscus extrusion was associated with subsequent medial cartilage loss. The external medial tibial cartilage may be particularly vulnerable to thinning once the meniscus extrudes and its surface is “exposed” to direct, non-physiological, cartilage-cartilage contact. PMID:25988986

  15. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  16. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the adductor magnus tendon: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Matthias; Reischl, Nikolaus; Bergmann, Mathias; Bouaicha, Samy; Djonov, Valentin; Magnussen, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the anatomic feasibility of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a part of the adductor magnus tendon and to identify possible risks. Twenty cadaveric knees were dissected. The distal part of the adductor magnus tendon was evaluated with respect to the anatomic topography and its utility for MPFL reconstruction. To estimate the risk of injuring the neurovascular structures, the distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was evaluated. An MPFL reconstruction was carried out by preserving the distal insertion on the adductor tubercle and redirecting the proximal portion of the tendon to the medial aspect of the patella. The anatomic investigation showed the following relationships: The mean distance from the adductor tubercle to the adductor hiatus was 99 ± 14 mm (range, 80 to 120 mm). A graft length of 52 ± 5 mm (range, 45 to 63 mm) with the addition of 10 to 20 mm for fixation was found to be necessary for MPFL reconstruction. The difference between the desired graft length and the distance to the adductor hiatus was found to be at least 30 mm in all cases (mean, 46 mm). Leaving the graft attached to the adductor tubercle resulted in a nearly anatomic femoral attachment of the reconstructed MPFL. Complete detachment of the distal adductor magnus attachment was consistently avoidable. The adductor magnus tendon was found to be a useful graft for MPFL reconstruction. However, anatomic dangers (damage to the neurovascular bundle of the adductor hiatus, the saphenous nerve, or the saphenous branch of the descending genicular artery) during graft harvest must be considered. Anatomic knowledge is essential during adductor magnus tendon harvest to avoid damage to neurovascular structures. The adductor magnus tendon is an interesting alternative graft option for MPFL reconstruction if anatomic dangers are considered and avoided. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America