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Sample records for medial pterygoid muscles

  1. Development of medial pterygoid muscle fibers in rabbits fed with a liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Kozue; Morita, Takumi; Takasu, Hiroki; Saito, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Takuya; Hiraba, Katsunari; Goto, Shigemi

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of decreased functional load on the medial pterygoid muscle during mastication in rabbits fed with a liquid-diet. Medial pterygoid muscles from 54 rabbits (solid- and liquid-diet groups, n=48; unweaned group, n=6) were histochemically examined at 4, 9, 12, 18, and 33 weeks after birth. Six fiber types (I, IC, IIC, IIA, IIAB, and IIB) were distinguished via mATPase staining. Significant increases in the diameters of all fiber types were seen up to 33 weeks of age in the solid-diet group; however, no significant increase was noted in fiber types I and IC, from 4 to 33 weeks of age, in the liquid-diet group. The proportion of slow fibers increased up to 12 weeks followed by an increase in the number of fast fibers in the solid-diet group, whereas in the liquid-diet group, the number of slow fiber declined after weaning. Liquid-diet consumption caused muscle fiber atrophy and an increase in the number of fast fibers during early developmental stages after weaning. Furthermore, the growth pattern of the medial pterygoid muscle in the liquid-diet group was different from that in the solid-diet group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Myositis ossificans traumatica of the medial pterygoid muscle following a third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Torres, A M; Nardis, A C; da Silva, R A; Savioli, C

    2015-04-01

    Myositis ossificans (MO) is a rare disease involving heterotopic ossification in the muscle or soft tissue. Myositis ossificans traumatica (MOT) disease presents as a calcification within the injured muscle, resulting from a single or repetitive injury. There are few reports of MOT in the masticatory muscles. The case of a patient with MOT in the medial pterygoid muscle caused by a complication related to the extraction of an erupted upper third molar is reported. The major symptom was severe trismus. Despite surgical treatment, the disease relapsed. MOT can lead to serious consequences for the patient. Its aetiopathogenesis needs to be better understood, so that the most appropriate treatment is established and relapses are minimized. This will improve the quality of life of these patients. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Restricted Mandibular Movement Attributed to Ossification of Mandibular Depressors and Medial Pterygoid Muscles in Patients With Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: A Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Tetsuko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Inoue, Akio; Kusukawa, Jingo

    2017-09-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by congenital malformation and progressive heterotopic ossification (HO) caused by a recurrent single nucleotide substitution at position 617 in the ACVR1 gene. As the condition progresses, HO leads to joint ankylosis, breathing difficulties, and mouth-opening restriction, and it can shorten the patient's lifespan. This report describes 3 cases of FOP confirmed by genetic testing in patients with restricted mouth opening. Each patient presented a different onset and degree of jaw movement restriction. The anatomic ossification site of the mandibular joint was examined in each patient using reconstructed computed tomographic (CT) images and 3-dimensional reconstructed CT (3D-CT) images. A 29-year-old woman complained of jaw movement restriction since 13 years of age. 3D-CT image of the mandibular joint showed an osseous bridge, formed by the mandibular depressors that open the mouth, between the hyoid bone and the mentum of the mandible. A 39-year-old man presented with jaw movement restriction that developed at 3 years of age after a mouth injury. 3D-CT image of the jaw showed ankylosis of the jaw from ossification of the mandibular depressors that was worse than in patient 1. CT images showed no HO findings of the masticatory muscles. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first 2 case descriptions of the anatomic site of ankylosis involving HO of the mandibular depressors in the jaw resulting from FOP. In contrast, a 62-year-old bedridden woman with an interincisal distance longer than 10 mm (onset, 39 years of age) had no HO of the mandibular depressors and slight HO of the medial pterygoid muscle on the right and left sides. These findings suggest that restricted mouth opening varies according to the presence or absence of HO of the mandibular depressors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cadaveric validation of dry needle placement in the lateral pterygoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Jiménez, Juan A; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Jesús; de-la-Hoz-Aizpurua, José L; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this anatomical study was to determine if a needle is able to reach the lateral pterygoid muscle during the application of dry needling technique. A dry needling approach using 2 needles of 50 to 60 mm in length, one inserted over the zygomatic process posterior at the obituary arch (for the superior head) and other inserted below the zygomatic process between the mandibular condyle and the coronoid process (for the inferior head), was proposed. A progressive dissection into 3 stages was conducted into 2 heads of fresh male cadavers. First, dry needling of the lateral pterygoid muscle was applied on the cadaver. Second, a block dissection containing the lateral pterygoid was harvested. Finally, the ramus of the mandible was sectioned by osteotomy to visualize the lateral pterygoid muscle with the needle placements. With the needles inserted into the cadaver, the block dissection revealed that the superior needle reached the superior (sphenoid) head of the lateral pterygoid muscle and the inferior needle reached the inferior (pterygoid) head of the muscle. At the final stage of the dissection, when the ramus of the mandible was sectioned by osteotomy, it was revealed that the superior needle entered into the belly of the superior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle. This anatomical study supports that dry needling technique for the lateral pterygoid muscle can be properly conducted with the proposed approach. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of the lateral pterygoid muscle in the sagittal fracture of mandibular condyle (SFMC) healing process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chng-Kui; Liu, Ping; Meng, Fan-Wen; Deng, Bang-Lian; Xue, Yang; Mao, Tian-Qiu; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of the lateral peterygoid muscle in the reconstruction of the shape of the condyle during healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle. Twenty adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: all had a unilateral operation on the right side when the anterior and posterior attachments of the discs were cut, and an oblique vertical osteotomy was made from the lateral pole of the condyle to the medial side of the condylar neck. Ten sheep had the lateral pterygoid muscle cut, and the other 10 sheep did not. Sheep were killed at 4 weeks (n=2 from each group), 12 weeks (n=4), and 24 weeks (n=4) postoperatively. Computed tomograms (CT) were taken before and after operations. We dissected the joints, and recorded with the naked eye the shape, degree of erosion, and amount of calcification of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In the group in which the lateral peterygoid muscle had not been cut the joints showed overgrowth of new bone and more advanced ankylosis. Our results show that the lateral pterygoid muscle plays an important part in reconstructing the shape of the condyle during the healing of a sagittal fracture of the mandibular condyle, and combined with the dislocated and damaged disc is an important factor in the aetiology of traumatic ankylosis of the TMJ. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The medial pterygoid tubercle in the Atapuerca Early and Middle Pleistocene mandibles: evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de Castro, José-María; Quam, Rolf; Martinón-Torres, María; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have attempted to identify the presence of uniquely derived (autoapomorphic) Neandertal features. Here, we deal with the medial pterygoid tubercle (MTP), which is usually present on the internal face of the ascending ramus of Neandertal specimens. Our study stems from the identification of a hypertrophied tubercle in ATD6-96, an Early Pleistocene mandible recovered from the TD6 level of the Atapuerca-Gran Dolina site and attributed to Homo antecessor. Our review of the literature and study of numerous original fossil specimens and high quality replicas confirm that the MTP occurs at a high frequency in Neandertals (ca. 89%) and is also present in over half (ca. 55%) of the Middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos (SH) hominins. In contrast, it is generally absent or minimally developed in other extinct hominins, but can be found in variable frequencies (

  7. Examination of the heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle on the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Coskun Akar, Gulcan; Govsa, Figen; Ozgur, Zuhal

    2009-01-01

    The lateral pterygoid muscles (LPMs) function as a unit during precise mandibular positioning movements that occur during such activities as speech, singing, or playing musical instruments. The LPM has been the focus of an attempt to explain problems associated with the temporomandibular joint and anterior displacement of the meniscus of the joint. The aim of the study was to define the general morphology, describing the position and shape of the heads of the LPMs. In the course of dissection, the heads of the LPMs were noted, as well as the pattern, position of the origin and insertion, and course under 2.5x loupe magnification in 25 adult male human cadavers. The LPM has the general form of an irregular pyramid that narrows progressively toward the front. As a result of the macroscopic examination, the LPM was found to originate, with 3 heads as the superior LPM (SLPM), the inferior LPM (ILPM), and inner LPM. It was realized that the ILPM width was 3 times more than that of the SLPM. The SLPM ending fibers of LPM had a more tendinous structure compared with the ILPM ending fibers. The SLPM and ILPM were observed as being adhered mostly to the pterygoid fovea. The study has shown that the muscle has atypical penniform structure made up of 8 tendinous layers that were particularly well developed. It is an indisputable fact that the success in surgical strategy and planning mainly relies on the surgeon's knowledge of the variable origins and insertions of the LPM.

  8. Jaw Dysfunction Related to Pterygoid and Masseter Muscle Dosimetry After Radiation Therapy in Children and Young Adults With Head-and-Neck Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Krasin, Matthew J., E-mail: matthew.krasin@stjude.org; Wiese, Kristin M.; Spunt, Sheri L.

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between jaw function, patient and treatment variables, and radiation dosimetry of the mandibular muscles and joints in children and young adults receiving radiation for soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four pediatric and young adult patients with head-and-neck sarcomas were treated on an institutional review board-approved prospective study of focal radiation therapy for local tumor control. Serial jaw depression measurements were related to radiation dosimetry delivered to the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, masseter muscles, and temporomandibular joints to generate mathematical models of jaw function. Results: Baseline jaw depression was only influenced by themore » degree of surgical resection. In the first 12 weeks from initiation of radiation, surgical procedures greater than a biopsy, administration of cyclophosphamide containing chemotherapy regimes, and large gross tumor volumes adversely affected jaw depression. Increasing dose to the pterygoid and masseter muscles above 40 Gy predicted loss of jaw function over the full course of follow-up. Conclusions: Clinical and treatment factors are related to initial and subsequent jaw dysfunction. Understanding these complex interactions and the affect of specific radiation doses may help reduce the risk for jaw dysfunction in future children and young adults undergoing radiation therapy for the management of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas.« less

  9. Desmin and nerve terminal expression during embryonic development of the lateral pterygoid muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masahito; Shinomiya, Takashi; Kishi, Asuka; Yamane, Shigeki; Umezawa, Takashi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Abe, Shinichi

    2014-09-01

    In adults, the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) is usually divided into the upper and lower head, between which the buccal nerve passes. Recent investigations have demonstrated foetal developmental changes in the topographical relationship between the human LPM and buccal nerve. However, as few studies have investigated this issue, we clarified the expression of desmin and nerve terminal distribution during embryonic development of the LPM in mice. We utilized immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcription chain reaction (RT-PCR) to clarify the expression of desmin and nerve terminal distribution. We observed weak expression of desmin in the LPM at embryonic day (ED) 11, followed by an increase in expression from embryonic days 12-15. In addition, starting at ED 12, we observed preferential accumulation of desmin in the vicinity of the myotendinous junction, a trend that did not change up to ED 15. Nerve terminal first appeared at ED 13 and formed regularly spaced linear arrays at the centre of the muscle fibre by ED 15. The results of immunohistochemical staining agreed with those of RT-PCR analysis. We found that desmin accumulated in the vicinity of the myotendinous junction starting at ED 12, prior to the onset of jaw movement. We speculate that the accumulation of desmin is due to factors other than mechanical stress experienced during early muscle contraction. Meanwhile, the time point at which nerve terminals first appeared roughly coincided with the onset of jaw movement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel method for intraoral access to the superior head of the human lateral pterygoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aleli Tôrres; Camilo, Anderson Aparecido; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Monteiro, André Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX), of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects.

  11. A Novel Method for Intraoral Access to the Superior Head of the Human Lateral Pterygoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Aleli Tôrres; Camilo, Anderson Aparecido; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Monteiro, André Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background. The uncoordinated activity of the superior and inferior parts of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) has been suggested to be one of the causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement. A therapy for this muscle disorder is the injection of botulinum toxin (BTX), of the LPM. However, there is a potential risk of side effects with the injection guide methods currently available. In addition, they do not permit appropriate differentiation between the two bellies of the muscle. Herein, a novel method is presented to provide intraoral access to the superior head of the human LPM with maximal control and minimal hazards. Methods. Computational tomography along with digital imaging software programs and rapid prototyping techniques were used to create a rapid prototyped guide to orient BTX injections in the superior LPM. Results. The method proved to be feasible and reliable. Furthermore, when tested in one volunteer it allowed precise access to the upper head of LPM, without producing side effects. Conclusions. The prototyped guide presented in this paper is a novel tool that provides intraoral access to the superior head of the LPM. Further studies will be necessary to test the efficacy and validate this method in a larger cohort of subjects. PMID:24963484

  12. Variations of the attachment of the superior head of human lateral pterygoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Maria; Iatrou, Ioannis; Paraschos, Alexandros; Anagnostopoulou, Sophia

    2013-09-01

    The superior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM), is closely related to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and plays a role in the aetiology of temporomandibular disorders. Increased activity of this muscle has been implicated in the anterior displacement of the TMJ disc. However, there is uncertainty about the manner of the LPM attachment to the disc-condyle complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the exact anatomy of the attachment of the superior head of the LPM (SLPM) to the disc-condyle complex of the TMJ. Thirty-six TMJs were examined - both sides of 18 Greek cadavers (eight males and 10 females, mean age 79.6 years). Examination of the attachment of the SLPM was undertaken viewed under the dissecting microscope. Variation in the attachment of the SLPM was categorized into three types: in type I, the SLPM inserted into the condyle and the disc-capsule complex (55.5%). In type II, the SLPM only inserted into the condyle (27.8%). In type III, the SLPM inserted purely into the disc-capsule complex (16.7%). This study demonstrates that there are three different attachment types of the SLPM to the disc-condyle complex. The type III variation could be involved in the TMJ pathology. The knowledge of the variations of the SLPM attachment could be useful for precise surgical and pharmaceutical approaches. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fetal developmental change in topographical relationship between the human lateral pterygoid muscle and buccal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Katori, Y; Yamamoto, M; Asakawa, S; Maki, H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Murakami, G; Abe, S

    2012-01-01

    In adults, the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) is usually divided into the upper and lower heads, between which the buccal nerve passes. Using sagittal or horizontal sections of 14 fetuses and seven embryos (five specimens at approximately 20–25 weeks; five at 14–16 weeks; four at 8 weeks; seven at 6–7 weeks), we examined the topographical relationship between the LPM and the buccal nerve. In large fetuses later than 15 weeks, the upper head of the LPM was clearly discriminated from the lower head. However, the upper head was much smaller than the lower head in the smaller fetuses. Thus, in the latter, the upper head was better described as an ‘anterior slip’ extending from the lower head or the major muscle mass to the anterior side of the buccal nerve. The postero-anterior nerve course seemed to be determined by a branch to the temporalis muscle (i.e. the anterior deep temporal nerve). At 8 weeks, the buccal nerve passed through the roof of the small, fan-like LPM. At 6–7 weeks, the LPM anlage was embedded between the temporobuccal nerve trunk and the inferior alveolar nerve. Therefore, parts of the LPM were likely to ‘leak’ out of slits between the origins of the mandibular nerve branches at 7–8 weeks, and seemed to grow in size during weeks 14–20 and extend anterosuperiorly along the infratemporal surface of the prominently developing greater wing of the sphenoid bone. Consequently, the topographical relationship between the LPM and the buccal nerve appeared to ‘change’ during fetal development due to delayed development of the upper head. PMID:22352373

  14. Biomechanical implications of lateral pterygoid contribution to biting and jaw opening in humans.

    PubMed

    Osborn, J W

    1995-12-01

    The contributions of the lateral pterygoid muscle to a variety of different tasks were analysed by a linear programming mode based on the equations for static equilibrium in three dimensions and containing 12 muscles. The model was used to study lateral pterygoid activity at maximum bite force (MBF) for changes in (i) the direction and point of application of the bite force, (ii) the orientation of the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles and (iii) the slope of the articular eminence (glenoid slope). The effects on MBF of removing one or both lateral pterygoids were also examined. Lateral pterygoid provided a very important indirect contribution to some clenching forces. Under some conditions removing one lateral pterygoid muscle (simulating guarding an injured muscle) halved the MBF. Its activity at MBF was reduced as masseter was tilted more forward, the glenoid slope was made more horizontal and the bite force was made more vertical. The muscle helped to oppose (balance) the horizontal reaction forces at the bite point and joints, which potentially pushed the condyle backward. A balancing muscle is now defined as one (like lateral pterygoid) whose activity increases the output force by far more than its direct contribution to that force. In a larger model containing 16 muscles, every muscle was most active when its line of action was parallel to the output force. Finally, in a model which divided lateral pterygoid into superior and inferior heads, activity suddenly switched from the superior head to the inferior head when the angle of opening changed from 120 degrees (forward from the vertical) to 140 degrees.

  15. Relationship between dimensions of muscles of mastication (masseter and lateral pterygoid) and skeletal dimensions: study of 40 cases.

    PubMed

    Azaroual, Mohammed Faouzi; Fikri, Meriem; Abouqal, Redouan; Benyahya, Hicham; Zaoui, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    The masticatory muscles play an important part in determining the morphology of the facial skeleton. Skeletal typology and the characteristics of the masticatory muscles are closely linked. Several authors have studied muscle characteristics as related to facial typology. The aim of this work is to study the relationship between vertical and transverse skeletal dimensions and the dimensions (length, width and thickness) of two muscles of mastication, the masseter and the lateral pterygoid. Our study was based on CT-scan examinations of a sample composed of patients consulting the X-ray department of the Rabat-Salé Teaching Hospital, and for whom a CT-scan had been requested. Forty CT examinations of the skull, performed in the context of sinus explorations or pre-surgical work-ups in the radiology department of the Rabat-Salé Teaching Hospital, were selected for this study. The sample comprised 19 women and 21 men aged between 20 and 45, with a mean of 40.9 ± 12.8. A Siemens 32-row 64-slice spiral CT-scan device was used for spiral acquisition of data around the facial bones, with the mouth closed. The study was carried out in the parenchymal window for the muscle measurements, in the axial and coronal planes. Bone measurements were performed after 3D reconstruction in VRT mode. Our study showed that, for the masseter muscle, thickness is the dimension that correlates significantly with skeletal dimensions in the vertical, transverse and sagittal directions. For the lateral pterygoid muscle, length and width both present significant correlations with transverse skeletal dimensions. Analysis of these results shows that the dimensional characteristics of the masticatory muscles vary according to the vertical and transverse skeletal typology of the subjects concerned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and their innervating nerves with special reference to the lateral pterygoid and the midmedial and discotemporal muscle bundles of temporalis

    PubMed Central

    AKITA, KEIICHI; SHIMOKAWA, TAKASHI; SATO, TATSUO

    2000-01-01

    For an accurate assessment of jaw movement, it is crucial to understand the comprehensive formation of the masticatory muscles with special reference to the relationship to the disc of the temporomandibular joint. Detailed dissection was performed on 26 head halves of 14 Japanese cadavers in order to obtain precise anatomical information of the positional relationships between the masticatory muscles and the branches of the mandibular nerve. After complete removal of the bony elements, the midmedial muscle bundle in all specimens and the discotemporal muscle bundle in 6 specimens, derivatives of the temporalis, which insert into the disc were observed. On the anterior area of the articular capsule and the disc of the temporomandibular joint, the upper head of the lateral pterygoid, the midmedial muscle bundle of temporalis and the discotemporal bundle of temporalis were attached mediolaterally, and in 3 specimens the posterosuperior margin of the zygomaticomandibularis was attached to the anterolateral area of the disc. It is suggested that these muscles and muscle bundles contribute to various mandibular movements. Although various patterns of the positional relationships between the muscles and muscle bundles and the their innervating nerves are observed in the present study, relative positional relationships of the muscles and muscle bundles and of nerves of the mandibular nerve are consistent. A possible scheme of the developmental formation of the masticatory muscles based on the findings of the positional relationships between the muscles and the nerves is presented. PMID:11005720

  17. Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacture-Derived Needle Guide for Injection of Botulinum Toxin into the Lateral Pterygoid Muscle in Patients with Oromandibular Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin administration into the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle of patients with jaw opening dystonia by using a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM)-derived needle guide. A total of 17 patients with jaw opening dystonia were enrolled. After the patient's computed tomography (CT) scan was imported and fused with a scan of a plaster cast model of the maxilla, the optimal needle insertion site over the lateral pterygoid muscle was determined using the NobelClinician software. A total of 13 patients were injected both with and without the guide, and 4 patients underwent guided injection alone. The therapeutic effects of botulinum toxin injection and its associated complications were statistically compared between the guided and unguided procedures using paired t test. Botulinum toxin therapy was performed 42 and 32 times with and without the guides, respectively. The needle was easily inserted without any complications in all procedures. There was a significant difference (P < .001) between the mean comprehensive improvements observed with (66.3%) and without (54.4%) the guides. The findings suggest that the use of needle guides during the injection of botulinum toxin into the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle is very useful for aiding the accurate and safe administration of botulinum toxin therapy for jaw opening dystonia.

  18. Involvement of pterygoid venous plexus in patulous eustachian tube symptoms.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Takeshi; Ogura, Masaki; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Hori, Yoko; Mugikura, Shunji; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2007-07-01

    The pterygoid venous plexus (PVP) is an important factor in the mechanism of eustachian tube (ET) closure under conditions that can cause increased venous pressure in the head, such as during neck compression and postural change from the sitting/standing to the recumbent position. The symptoms of patulous ET are usually improved by neck compression or postural change (from sitting/standing to recumbent position). Venous congestion around the ET and/or gravitational change may be involved in the changing degree of symptoms, but its mechanism is not understood. This study investigated whether the PVP is involved. The dimensions of soft tissues surrounding ET were measured on magnetic resonance images before and after neck compression. The lateral pterygoid muscle became enlarged after neck compression. Simultaneously, the volume of venous plexus observed between the medial pterygoid muscle and tensor veli palatini muscle was increased. Such enlargement was probably due to blood pooling in the PVP, resulting in protrusion of the ET anterior wall to the luminal side, and decreased ET patency.

  19. The evaluation of lateral pterygoid muscle pathologic changes and insertion patterns in temporomandibular joints with or without disc displacement using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Imanimoghaddam, M; Madani, A S; Hashemi, E M

    2013-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is a common disorder in patients with internal derangement. Certain anatomic features of TMJ may make the patient prone to this condition, namely lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) insertion variations. The aim of this study was to investigate LPM attachments and their relationships with disc displacement and subsequent pathologic changes. A total of 26 patients with clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and a control group of 14 unaffected individuals were studied. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were taken to evaluate LPM insertion patterns, superior LPM head pathologic changes, and relative disc to condyle position. Data registration and analysis were done using SPSS v. 16.0. The most common variation (type I) was shown to be the superior head with two bundles, one attached to the disc and another to the condyle. No significant relationship between LPM insertion type and disc displacement or pathologic changes of the muscle was found. However, a link between disc displacement and muscle pathologic changes was established (P=0.001). Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative jaw muscle anatomy in kangaroos, wallabies, and rat-kangaroos (marsupialia: macropodoidea).

    PubMed

    Warburton, Natalie Marina

    2009-06-01

    The jaw muscles were studied in seven genera of macropodoid marsupials with diets ranging from mainly fungi in Potorous to grass in Macropus. Relative size, attachments, and lamination within the jaw adductor muscles varied between macropodoid species. Among macropodine species, the jaw adductor muscle proportions vary with feeding type. The relative mass of the masseter is roughly consistent, but grazers and mixed-feeders (Macropus and Lagostrophus) had relatively larger medial pterygoids and smaller temporalis muscles than the browsers (Dendrolagus, Dorcopsulus, and Setonix). Grazing macropods show similar jaw muscle proportions to "ungulate-grinding" type placental mammals. The internal architecture of the jaw muscles also varies between grazing and browsing macropods, most significantly, the anatomy of the medial pterygoid muscle. Potoroines have distinctly different jaw muscle proportions to macropodines. The masseter muscle group, in particular, the superficial masseter is enlarged, while the temporalis group is relatively reduced. Lagostrophus fasciatus is anatomically distinct from other macropods with respect to its masticatory muscle anatomy, including enlarged superficial medial pterygoid and deep temporalis muscles, an anteriorly inflected masseteric process, and the shape of the mandibular condyle. The enlarged triangular pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone, in particular, is distinctive of Lagsotrophus. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Comparative techniques of medial rectus muscle retraction for endoscopic exposure of the medial intraconal space.

    PubMed

    Lin, Giant C; Freitag, Suzanne K; Kocharyan, Armine; Yoon, Michael K; Lefebvre, Daniel R; Bleier, Benjamin S

    2016-05-01

    The medial rectus muscle (MRM) is the medial boundary to the intraconal space of the orbit, and retraction of the MRM is oftentimes necessary for endoscopic removal of intraconal tumors, e.g., orbital hemangioma. We evaluated each of the reported methods of MRM retraction for endoscopic orbital surgery and quantified the degree of intraconal exposure conferred by each method. Eight orbits from four cadaver heads were dissected. In each orbit, medial orbital decompression was performed and the MRM was retracted by using four previously described techniques: (1) external MRM retraction at the globe insertion point by using vessel loop (external group), (2) transseptal MRM retraction by using vessel loop (transseptal group), (3) transchoanal retraction of the MRM by using vessel loop (choanal group), and (4) transseptal four-handed technique by using double ball retraction by a second surgeon (transseptal double ball group). The length, height, and area of exposure of the medial intraconal space were quantified and compared. The average ± standard deviation (SD) anterior-posterior exposures for the external group, transseptal group, and transseptal double ball group were 17.51 ± 3.39 mm, 16.59 ± 4.16 mm, and 18.0 ± 15.25 mm, respectively. The choanal group provided significantly less exposure (12.39 ± 3.44 mm, p = 0.049) than the other groups. The average ± SD vertical exposures for the transseptal group, choanal group, and transseptal double ball group were 12.53 ± 4.38 mm, 13.05 ± 5.86 mm, and 13.57 ± 3.74 mm, respectively. The external group provided significantly less exposure (4.51 ± 1.56 mm, p = 0.0072) than the other groups. The transseptal and transseptal double ball groups provided the greatest total access by surface area (58.88 ± 26.96 mm(2) and 62.94 ± 34.74 mm(2), respectively) compared with the external and choanal groups (34.82 ± 23.37 mm(2) and 43.10 ± 23.68 mm(2), respectively). Although the transseptal trajectory of MRM retraction was

  2. Jaw muscles in older overdenture patients.

    PubMed

    Newton, James P; McManus, Frank C; Menhenick, Stephen

    2004-03-01

    To determine, using computer tomography (CT), whether the retention of a small number of teeth in the older adult used to support overdentures could affect the cross-sectional area (CSA) and X-ray density of two jaw closing muscles. Cross-sectional study of a group of older patients subdivided into dentate, edentulous and those wearing overdentures supported by two to five teeth. The sample consisted of 24 subjects aged 55-68 years. CSA and X-ray density of two jaw closing muscles, masseter and medial pterygoid were measured and evaluated using CT. There were no significant differences between left and right jaw muscles, but the CSA of the masseter muscles were significantly larger than the medial pterygoid muscles. The CSA of the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles was significantly smaller in edentulous subjects compared with dentate subjects but no significant difference was observed between subjects wearing overdentures and those with a natural dentition. No significant differences were observed with the X-ray density between different muscles or dental states. The retention of a small number of teeth in the older adult used to support overdentures appears to sustain the CSA of two jaw closing muscles and therefore could enhance these patients' masticatory ability compared with those who were edentulous.

  3. [Morphometric and stereometric analysis of the masticatory muscles in cases of progeny].

    PubMed

    Solov'ev, V A; Golikov, D I; Shinkarenko, T V

    2009-01-01

    The data of microscopic and ultramicroscopric analysis of the muscles of mastication were presented of 12 male patients with progeny. There were determined differentiating peculiarities of muscles fibers of masseter and medial pterygoid in cases of progeny. The results of comperative analysis showed some decreasing of muscular quota and increasing connective tissue's quota; some decreasing muscular fibers' diameters and quantity of blood capillaries; some increasing muscular fibers type I in the muscles of mastication in progeny cases.

  4. Quantitative Contributions of the Muscles of the Tongue, Floor-of-Mouth, Jaw, and Velum to Tongue-to-Palate Pressure Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Jaffe, Debra M.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Finnegan, Eileen M.; Van Daele, Douglas J.; Luschei, Erich S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between tongue-to-palate pressure and the electromyography (EMG) measured from the mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, geniohyoid, medial pterygoid, velum, genioglossus, and intrinsic tongue muscles. Methods: Seven healthy adults performed tongue-to-palate pressure…

  5. Ultrastructure of medial rectus muscles in patients with intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Wang, X; Ren, H; Liu, G; Lu, P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To study the ultrastructure of the medial rectus in patients with intermittent exotropia at different ages.PATIENTS AND METHODS The medial recti were harvested surgically from 20 patients with intermittent exotropia. Patients were divided into adolescent (age<18 years, n=10) and adult groups (age >18 years, n=10). The normal control group included five patients without strabismus and undergoing eye enucleation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy were used to visualize the medial recti. Western blot was used to determine the levels of myosin and actin.RESULTS Varying fiber thickness, atrophy, and misalignment of the medial recti were visualized under optical microscope in patients with exotropia. Electron microscopy revealed sarcomere destruction, myofilament disintegration, unclear dark and light bands, collagen proliferation, and fibrosis. The adolescent group manifested significantly higher levels of myosin and actin than the adult group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION Younger patients with intermittent exotropia show stronger contraction of the medial recti compared with older patients. Our findings suggest that childhood was the appropriate time for surgery as the benefit of the intervention was better than in adulthood.

  6. How does passive lengthening change the architecture of the human medial gastrocnemius muscle?

    PubMed

    Bolsterlee, Bart; D'Souza, Arkiev; Gandevia, Simon C; Herbert, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    There are few comprehensive investigations of the changes in muscle architecture that accompany muscle contraction or change in muscle length in vivo. For this study, we measured changes in the three-dimensional architecture of the human medial gastrocnemius at the whole muscle level, the fascicle level and the fiber level using anatomical MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Data were obtained from eight subjects under relaxed conditions at three muscle lengths. At the whole muscle level, a 5.1% increase in muscle belly length resulted in a reduction in both muscle width (mean change -2.5%) and depth (-4.8%). At the fascicle level, muscle architecture measurements obtained at 3,000 locations per muscle showed that for every millimeter increase in muscle-tendon length above the slack length, average fascicle length increased by 0.46 mm, pennation angle decreased by 0.27° (0.17° in the superficial part and 0.37° in the deep part), and fascicle curvature decreased by 0.18 m -1 There was no evidence of systematic variation in architecture along the muscle's long axis at any muscle length. At the fiber level, analysis of the diffusion signal showed that passive lengthening of the muscle increased diffusion along fibers and decreased diffusion across fibers. Using these measurements across scales, we show that the complex shape changes that muscle fibers, whole muscles, and aponeuroses of the medial gastrocnemius undergo in vivo cannot be captured by simple geometrical models. This justifies the need for more complex models that link microstructural changes in muscle fibers to macroscopic changes in architecture. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Novel MRI and DTI techniques revealed changes in three-dimensional architecture of the human medial gastrocnemius during passive lengthening. Whole muscle belly width and depth decreased when the muscle lengthened. Fascicle length, pennation, and curvature changed uniformly or near uniformly along the muscle during passive lengthening

  7. [A rare cause of oral pain: The pterygoid hamulus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bandini, M; Corre, P; Huet, P; Khonsari, R H

    2015-12-01

    Pterygoid hamulus syndrome (PHS) is a rare cause of orofacial and oropharyngeal pain. PHS can be associated with a hamulus hypertrophy or with a bursitis of the palatosalpingeus but it has not always an anatomic cause. A 36-year-old woman was seen for a constant posterior palatal pain spreading towards oropharynx, increasing during swallowing and lasting for more than 6 months. Physical examination showed an erythema of the soft palate, medially to the hamulus. Hamulus palpation was painful and revealed hamulus hypertrophia on both sides. A bilateral PHS was evocated. This observation is typical of a PHS. We propose a review of the literature of this little-known syndrome. Treatment is initially conservative (corticosteroids) but surgery can be proposed in case of morphological anomalies of the hamulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Shifting gears: dynamic muscle shape changes and force-velocity behavior in the medial gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Dick, Taylor J M; Wakeling, James M

    2017-12-01

    When muscles contract, they bulge in thickness or in width to maintain a (nearly) constant volume. These dynamic shape changes are tightly linked to the internal constraints placed on individual muscle fibers and play a key functional role in modulating the mechanical performance of skeletal muscle by increasing its range of operating velocities. Yet to date we have a limited understanding of the nature and functional implications of in vivo dynamic muscle shape change under submaximal conditions. This study determined how the in vivo changes in medial gastrocnemius (MG) fascicle velocity, pennation angle, muscle thickness, and subsequent muscle gearing varied as a function of force and velocity. To do this, we obtained recordings of MG tendon length, fascicle length, pennation angle, and thickness using B-mode ultrasound and muscle activation using surface electromyography during cycling at a range of cadences and loads. We found that that increases in contractile force were accompanied by reduced bulging in muscle thickness, reduced increases in pennation angle, and faster fascicle shortening. Although the force and velocity of a muscle contraction are inversely related due to the force-velocity effect, this study has shown how dynamic muscle shape changes are influenced by force and not influenced by velocity. NEW & NOTEWORTHY During movement, skeletal muscles contract and bulge in thickness or width. These shape changes play a key role in modulating the performance of skeletal muscle by increasing its range of operating velocities. Yet to date the underlying mechanisms associated with muscle shape change remain largely unexplored. This study identified muscle force, and not velocity, as the mechanistic driving factor to allow for muscle gearing to vary depending on the contractile conditions during human cycling. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. [Features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in oral and maxillofacial region and MRI analysis of facial muscles].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y H; Ma, Y X; Hu, J; Gao, G D; Wu, Y K; Zhang, Z Y

    2016-12-09

    Objective: To investigate the manifestation of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) in oral and maxillofacial region. Methods: A total of 12 patients diagnosed as FSHD and 20 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Their medical history was collected from these patients. The decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT), calculus index-simplified (CI-S), occlusal relationship, maximal opening of mouth and maximum bite force were recorded. The impressions were taken to measure the maximal hight of palate and the width of palate. The lateral cephalometric radiographs were also taken to measure the mandibular plane-frankfurt horizontal plane angle (MP-FH). They finally received oral and maxillofacial region MRI examination to observe the masseter muscle, medial pterygoid muscle and lateral pterygoid muscle. The data were analyzed by t -test or Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: There was no significant gender difference in FSHD group. The average age of treatment was (27.5 ± 8.1) years and the average age of onset was (15.7±7.5) years. Nine patients liked to eat soft foods, 4 patients had difficulties of closing eyes, 8 patients had difficulties of cheek-bulging, 10 patients showed pouty lips and 9 patients had mesio-malocclusion. DMFT (4.0±2.3), CI-S (5.8±2.1), male maximal hight of palate (20.5±2.1) mm , female maximal hight of palate (17.9±1.6) mm, MP-FH (31.8°±2.2°) of FSHD group were greater than those of the control group. Male width of palate (34.8±1.4) mm, female width of palate (33.7±1.5) mm, male maximum bite force (451.7 ± 39.0) N, female maximum bite force (326.7 ± 21.6) N, maximal opening of mouth (3.5 ± 0.4) cm of FSHD group were less than those of the control group ( P <0.05). Maxillofacial MRI showed muscle asymmetr in 11 cases of masseter and 6 cases of medial pterygoid muscle, 5 cases of lateral pterygoid, and these muscle showed mild fatty infiltration mainly concentrating in the grade 0, grade 1 and grade 2. Conclusions: The

  10. Motor units in the human medial gastrocnemius muscle are not spatially localized or functionally grouped.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin E; Brown, Harrison J; Inglis, J Timothy; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-08-15

    Human medial gastrocnemius (MG) motor units (MUs) are thought to occupy small muscle territories or regions, with low-threshold units preferentially located distally. We used intramuscular recordings to measure the territory of muscle fibres from MG MUs and determine whether these MUs are grouped by recruitment threshold or joint action (ankle plantar flexion and knee flexion). The territory of MUs from the MG muscle varied from somewhat localized to highly distributed, with approximately half the MUs spanning at least half the length and width of the muscle. There was also no evidence of regional muscle activity based on MU recruitment thresholds or joint action. The CNS does not have the means to selectively activate regions of the MG muscle based on task requirements. Human medial gastrocnemius (MG) motor units (MUs) are thought to occupy small muscle territories, with low-threshold units preferentially located distally. In this study, subjects (n = 8) performed ramped and sustained isometric contractions (ankle plantar flexion and knee flexion; range: ∼1-40% maximal voluntary contraction) and we measured MU territory size with spike-triggered averages from fine-wire electrodes inserted along the length (seven electrodes) or across the width (five electrodes) of the MG muscle. Of 69 MUs identified along the length of the muscle, 32 spanned at least half the muscle length (≥ 6.9 cm), 11 of which spanned all recording sites (13.6-17.9 cm). Distal fibres had smaller pennation angles (P < 0.05), which were accompanied by larger territories in MUs with fibres located distally (P < 0.05). There was no distal-to-proximal pattern of muscle activation in ramp contraction (P = 0.93). Of 36 MUs identified across the width of the muscle, 24 spanned at least half the muscle width (≥ 4.0 cm), 13 of which spanned all recording sites (8.0-10.8 cm). MUs were not localized (length or width) based on recruitment threshold or contraction type, nor was there a

  11. The Acute Effects of Static and Cyclic Stretching on Muscle Stiffness and Hardness of Medial Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Noriaki; Urabe, Yukio; Tsutsumi, Shogo; Sakai, Shogo; Fujishita, Hironori; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Asaeda, Makoto; Hirata, Kazuhiko; Mikami, Yukio; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the acute effects of static stretching (SS) and cyclic stretching (CS) on muscle stiffness and hardness of the medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) by using ultrasonography, range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint and ankle plantar flexor. Twenty healthy men participated in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to SS, CS and control conditions. Each session consisted of a standard 5-minute cycle warm-up, accompanied by one of the subsequent conditions in another day: (a) 2 minutes static stretching, (b) 2 minutes cyclic stretching, (c) control. Maximum ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM max) and normalized peak torque (NPT) of ankle plantar flexor were measured in the pre- and post-stretching. To assess muscle stiffness, muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement (the length changes in tendon and muscle) and MTJ angle (the angle made by the tendon of insertion and muscle fascicle) of MG were measured using ultrasonography at an ankle dorsiflexion angle of -10°, 0°, 10° and 20° before and after SS and CS for 2 minutes in the pre- and post-stretching. MG hardness was measured using ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE). The results of this study indicate a significant effect of SS for ROM maximum, MTJ angle (0°, 10°, 20°) and RTE (10°, 20°) compared with CS (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in MTJ displacement between SS and CS. CS was associated with significantly higher NPT values than SS. This study suggests that SS of 2 minutes' hold duration significantly affected muscle stiffness and hardness compared with CS. In addition, CS may contribute to the elongation of muscle tissue and increased muscle strength.

  12. Muscle stiffness of posterior lower leg in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saeki, J; Nakamura, M; Nakao, S; Fujita, K; Yanase, K; Ichihashi, N

    2018-01-01

    Previous history of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a risk factor for MTSS relapse, which suggests that there might be some physical factors that are related to MTSS development in runners with a history of MTSS. The relationship between MTSS and muscle stiffness can be assessed in a cross-sectional study that measures muscle stiffness in subjects with a history of MTSS, who do not have pain at the time of measurement, and in those without a history of MTSS. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear elastic modulus, which is an index of muscle stiffness, of all posterior lower leg muscles of subjects with a history of MTSS and those with no history and investigate which muscles could be related to MTSS. Twenty-four male collegiate runners (age, 20.0±1.7 years; height, 172.7±4.8 cm; weight, 57.3±3.7 kg) participated in this study; 14 had a history of MTSS, and 10 did not. The shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior were measured using shear wave elastography. The shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly higher in subjects with a history of MTSS than in those with no history. However, there was no significant difference in the shear elastic moduli of other muscles. The results of this study suggest that flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior stiffness could be related to MTSS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Histological study of the human temporo-mandibular joint and its surrounding muscles.

    PubMed

    Bravetti, P; Membre, H; El Haddioui, A; Gérard, H; Fyard, J P; Mahler, P; Gaudy, J F

    2004-10-01

    This is a histological study of the human temporo-mandibular joint and its surrounding muscles. Using a microscopic study of serial sections from anatomical specimens from six subjects, the detailed anatomy of the joint is presented with particular regard to the histology. This study has allowed, in particular, the description of the ligaments and capsule as well as the insertions of the masticatory muscles (temporalis, masseter, lateral pterygoid) on this joint. These observations are then compared with the anatomical and histological data already reported on this subject. This study shows that the bulk of the muscular fibres of the lateral pterygoid passes under the foot of the disc is attached over the whole height of the condylar, unite and extend as far as the medial pole of the joint under the insertion of the articular disc. An insertion of the temporo-masseter musculo-tendinous complex on the anterior and lateral capsulo-discal structures was observed. The lateral pterygoid is composed of a succession of tendinous and fleshy fibres. This study confirms the thickening of the lateral capsule that corresponds to a lateral collateral ligament, and the absence of a medial collateral ligament. Medial stability is conferred by the lateral ligament of the contralateral joint.

  14. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring.

  15. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring. PMID:28210048

  16. Muscle contributions to medial tibiofemoral compartment contact loading following ACL reconstruction using semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts.

    PubMed

    Konrath, Jason M; Saxby, David J; Killen, Bryce A; Pizzolato, Claudio; Vertullo, Christopher J; Barrett, Rod S; Lloyd, David G

    2017-01-01

    The muscle-tendon properties of the semitendinosus (ST) and gracilis (GR) are substantially altered following tendon harvest for the purpose of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). This study adopted a musculoskeletal modelling approach to determine how the changes to the ST and GR muscle-tendon properties alter their contribution to medial compartment contact loading within the tibiofemoral joint in post ACLR patients, and the extent to which other muscles compensate under the same external loading conditions during walking, running and sidestep cutting. Motion capture and electromyography (EMG) data from 16 lower extremity muscles were acquired during walking, running and cutting in 25 participants that had undergone an ACLR using a quadruple (ST+GR) hamstring auto-graft. An EMG-driven musculoskeletal model was used to estimate the medial compartment contact loads during the stance phase of each gait task. An adjusted model was then created by altering muscle-tendon properties for the ST and GR to reflect their reported changes following ACLR. Parameters for the other muscles in the model were calibrated to match the experimental joint moments. The medial compartment contact loads for the standard and adjusted models were similar. The combined contributions of ST and GR to medial compartment contact load in the adjusted model were reduced by 26%, 17% and 17% during walking, running and cutting, respectively. These deficits were balanced by increases in the contribution made by the semimembranosus muscle of 33% and 22% during running and cutting, respectively. Alterations to the ST and GR muscle-tendon properties in ACLR patients resulted in reduced contribution to medial compartment contact loads during gait tasks, for which the semimembranosus muscle can compensate.

  17. Surgical Responses of Medial Rectus Muscle Recession in Thyroid Eye Disease-Related Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, In Jeong; Lee, Ju-Yeun; Kong, Mingui; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the surgical outcomes and surgical responses of medial rectus muscle (MR) recession patients with thyroid eye disease (TED)-related esotropia (ET). The surgical dose-response curves 1 week postoperatively and at the final visit were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were applied to investigate factors influencing surgical dose-response. A total of 43 patients with TED-related ET that underwent MR recession were included. The final success rate was 86.0% and the rate of undercorrection was 14.0%. The surgical dose-response curves of TED-related ET showed a gentle slope compared with those of standard surgical tables. In the univariable model, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was the only significant factor influencing surgical dose-response of MR recession in TED-related ET (β = -0.397, P = 0.044). In a model adjusted for age, sex, type of surgery, and preoperative horizontal angle of deviation, simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession showed marginal significance (β = -0.389, P = 0.064). The surgical dose-response curve of TED-related ET was unique. Simultaneous vertical rectus muscle recession was associated with increased surgical dose-response in TED-related ET. PMID:26796354

  18. Properties of single motor units in medial gastrocnemius muscles of adult and old rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kadhiresan, V A; Hassett, C A; Faulkner, J A

    1996-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of motor unit remodelling in the deficit that develops in the maximum isometric tetanic force (Fo) of whole medial gastrocnemius (MGN) muscles in old compared with adult rats. The Fo values and morphological data were determined for MGN muscles and eighty-two single motor units in muscles of adult (10-12 months) and sixty-two units in those of old (24-26 months) F344 rats. During an unfused tetanus, fast and slow (S) motor units were identified by the presence and absence of sag, respectively. Fast-fatigable (FF) and fast-fatigue-resistant (FR) units were classified by fatigue indices less than or greater than 0.50, respectively. 2. For old rats, whole MGN muscle Fo was 29% less than the value of 11.2 N measured for adult rats. The deficit in whole muscle Fo of old rats resulted from equivalent decreases in the number of motor units, 16% smaller than the adult value of ninety-seven, and in the mean motor unit Fo value, 14% less than the adult value of 117 mN. 3. With ageing, little motor unit remodelling occurred in FR units, whereas the S and FF motor units demonstrated dramatic, but opposing, changes. For S units, the number of units remained constant, but the number of fibres per motor unit increased 3-fold from 57 to 165. In contrast, the number of FF units decreased by 34% and the number of fibres per motor unit of the remaining units decreased to 86% of the adult value of 333. The age-related remodelling of motor units appeared to involve denervation of fast muscle fibres with reinnervation of denervated fibres by axonal sprouting from slow fibres. PMID:8782115

  19. Masticatory motor patterns in ungulates: a quantitative assessment of jaw-muscle coordination in goats, alpacas and horses.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan H; Vinyard, Christopher J; Wall, Christine E; Hylander, William L

    2007-04-01

    We investigated patterns of jaw-muscle coordination during rhythmic mastication in three species of ungulates displaying the marked transverse jaw movements typical of many large mammalian herbivores. In order to quantify consistent motor patterns during chewing, electromyograms were recorded from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, posterior temporalis and medial pterygoid muscles of goats, alpacas and horses. Timing differences between muscle pairs were evaluated in the context of an evolutionary model of jaw-muscle function. In this model, the closing and food reduction phases of mastication are primarily controlled by two distinct muscle groups, triplet I (balancing-side superficial masseter and medial pterygoid and working-side posterior temporalis) and triplet II (working-side superficial masseter and medial pterygoid and balancing-side posterior temporalis), and the asynchronous activity of the working- and balancing-side deep masseters. The three species differ in the extent to which the jaw muscles are coordinated as triplet I and triplet II. Alpacas, and to a lesser extent, goats, exhibit the triplet pattern whereas horses do not. In contrast, all three species show marked asynchrony of the working-side and balancing-side deep masseters, with jaw closing initiated by the working-side muscle and the balancing-side muscle firing much later during closing. However, goats differ from alpacas and horses in the timing of the balancing-side deep masseter relative to the triplet II muscles. This study highlights interspecific differences in the coordination of jaw muscles to influence transverse jaw movements and the production of bite force in herbivorous ungulates.

  20. Tendon entheses of the human masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Hems, T; Tillmann, B

    2000-09-01

    Tendons attach to the limb skeleton via chondral-apophysary or periosteal-diaphysary entheses. It was the aim of the present study to investigate the tendon entheses of the temporal, the masseter, as well as the medial and lateral pterygoid muscles, considering the biomechanics and the mode of osteogenesis at the attachment sites. The origin and insertion zones of the four masticatory muscles were studied histologically and by polarization light microscopy in six halves of human heads. Contrary to the limb skeleton no causal relationship between the histological structure of the tendon entheses and the osteogenic mode of the bone areas involved was observed in the masticatory muscles that were studied. Based on the histological findings, a purely structural classification of the tendon attachments irrespective of the osteogenesis is therefore proposed that is applicable to the entire skeleton. It is possible to distinguish between tendon entheses inserting into periosteum, into bone or into fibrocartilage. Tendon attachments with periosteal insertion are found at the temporal plane, the retromolar triangle, zygomatic arch, lateral pterygoid plate, in the caudal zone of the pterygoid fovea of the neck of mandible as well as major portions of the ramus and angle of the mandible. The attachment zones in which collagen fibrils of tendons insert into the bone via the periosteum correspond in their structure to plane periosteal-diaphysary insertions into the diaphyses of long bones. Attachment zones to the bone are present at the inferior temporal line, the base of the coronoid process, the caudal surface of the zygomatic arch, the cranial zones of the pterygoid fovea of the neck of the mandible as well as at circumscribed areas of the ramus and angle of the mandible. In these zones the collagen fibers of the tendon insert immediately into the bone without any mediation of other tissues. The entheses resemble those of circumscribed periosteal-diaphysary attachments to

  1. Effect of plantar intrinsic muscle training on medial longitudinal arch morphology and dynamic function.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Edward P; Cook, Patrick G

    2013-10-01

    A specific training program emphasizing the neuromuscular recruitment of the plantar intrinsic foot muscles, colloquially referred to as "short foot" exercise (SFE) training, has been suggested as a means to dynamically support the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) during functional tasks. A single-group repeated measures pre- and post-intervention study design was utilized to determine if a 4-week intrinsic foot muscle training program would impact the amount of navicular drop (ND), increase the arch height index (AHI), improve performance during a unilateral functional reaching maneuver, or the qualitative assessment of the ability to hold the arch position in single limb stance position in an asymptomatic cohort. 21 asymptomatic subjects (42 feet) completed the 4-week SFE training program. Subject ND decreased by a mean of 1.8 mm at 4 weeks and 2.2 mm at 8 weeks (p < 0.05). AHI increased from 28 to 29% (p < 0.05). Intrinsic foot muscle performance during a static unilateral balancing activity improved from a grade of fair to good (p < 0.001) and subjects experienced a significant improvement during a functional balance and reach task in all directions with the exception of an anterior reach (p < 0.05). This study offers preliminary evidence to suggest that SFE training may have value in statically and dynamically supporting the MLA. Further research regarding the value of this exercise intervention in foot posture type or pathology specific patient populations is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Subset of Palisade Endings Only in the Medial and Inferior Rectus Muscle in Monkey Contain Calretinin

    PubMed Central

    Lienbacher, Karoline; Ono, Seiji; Fleuriet, Jérome; Mustari, Michael; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To further chemically characterize palisade endings in extraocular muscles in rhesus monkeys. Methods Extraocular muscles of three rhesus monkeys were studied for expression of the calcium-binding protein calretinin (CR) in palisade endings and multiple endings. The complete innervation was visualized with antibodies against the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa and combined with immunofluorescence for CR. Six rhesus monkeys received tracer injections of choleratoxin subunit B or wheat germ agglutinin into either the belly or distal myotendinous junction of the medial or inferior rectus muscle to allow retrograde tracing in the C-group of the oculomotor nucleus. Double-immunofluorescence methods were used to study the CR content in retrogradely labeled neurons in the C-group. Results A subgroup of palisade and multiple endings was found to express CR, only in the medial and inferior rectus muscle. In contrast, the en plaque endings lacked CR. Accordingly, within the tracer-labeled neurons of the C-group, a subgroup expressed CR. Conclusions The study indicates that two different neuron populations targeting nontwitch muscle fibers are present within the C-group for inferior rectus and medial rectus, respectively, one expressing CR, one lacking CR. It is possible that the CR-negative neurons represent the basic population for all extraocular muscles, whereas the CR-positive neurons giving rise to CR-positive palisade endings represent a specialized, perhaps more excitable type of nerve ending in the medial and inferior rectus muscles, being more active in vergence. The malfunction of this CR-positive population of neurons that target nontwitch muscle fibers could play a significant role in strabismus.

  3. Medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscle-tendon unit, fascicle, and tendon interaction during walking in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Barber, Lee; Carty, Chris; Modenese, Luca; Walsh, John; Boyd, Roslyn; Lichtwark, Glen

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the in vivo function of the medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscle-tendon units (MTU), fascicles, and tendons during walking in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and an equinus gait pattern. Fourteen children with CP (9 males, 5 females; mean age 10y 6mo, standard deviation [SD] 2y 11mo; GMFCS level I=8, II=6), and 10 typically developing (6 males, 4 females; mean age 10y, SD 2y 1mo) undertook full body 3D gait analysis and simultaneous B-mode ultrasound images of the medial gastrocnemius and soleus fascicles during level walking. Fascicle lengths were analysed using a semi-automated tracking algorithm and MTUs using OpenSim. Statistical parametric mapping (two-sample t-test) was used to compare differences between groups (p<0.05). In the CP group medial gastrocnemius fascicles lengthened during mid-stance gait and remained longer into late-stance compared to the typically developing group (p<0.001). CP medial gastrocnemius fascicles shortened less during stance (1.16mm [SD 1.47mm]) compared to the typically developing group (4.48mm [SD 1.94mm], p<0.001). In the CP group the medial gastrocnemius and soleus MTU and tendon were longer during early- and mid-stance (p<0.001). Ankle power during push-off (p=0.015) and positive work (p<0.002) and net work (p<0.001) were significantly lower in the CP group. Eccentric action of the CP medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles during mid-stance walking is consistent with reduced volume and neuromuscular control of impaired muscle. Reduced ankle push-off power and positive work in the children with CP may be attributed to reduced active medial gastrocnemius fascicle shortening. These findings suggest a reliance on passive force generation for forward propulsion during equinus gait. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Selective activation of human soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles during walking in water.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, T; Satoh, T; Nakazawa, K; Komeda, T; Yano, H

    2000-07-01

    During walking in water (WW) the vertical component of ground reaction forces decreases, while the greater propulsive force is required to move forward against the greater resistance of water. In such reduced gravity environment, Hutchison et al. (1989) have demonstrated that the relative activation of rat medial gastrocnemius (MGAS) increased compared to that of the soleus (SOL) during swimming, suggesting different effects of peripheral information on motoneuron excitability of these muscles. It is conceivable that both buoyancy and resistance of water have different effects on the activation patterns of triceps surae muscles during WW, since the reduced weight in water might decrease the peripheral inflow relating load information while greater volitional command might be needed to propel a body forward against the water resistance. The present study was designed to assess each peripheral inflow and efferent input by adjusting the load and walking speed voluntarily during WW. The aim of this study is to investigate the dissociative activation pattern between the SOL and the MGAS during WW.

  5. Ankle and toe muscle strength characteristics in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Junya; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nakao, Sayaka; Fujita, Kosuke; Yanase, Ko; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-01-01

    A high proportion of flexor digitorum longus attachment is found at the posteromedial border of the tibia, which is the most common location of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Therefore, plantar flexion strength of the lesser toes could be related to MTSS; however, the relationship between MTSS and muscle strength of the hallux and lesser toes is not yet evaluated due to the lack of quantitative methods. This study investigated the muscle strength characteristics in runners with a history of MTSS by using a newly developed device to measure the muscle strength of the hallux, lesser toes, and ankle. This study comprised 27 collegiate male runner participants (20.0 ± 1.6 years, 172.1 ± 5.1 cm, 57.5 ± 4.0 kg). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque of the plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion of the ankle were measured by using an electric dynamometer. MVIC torque of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) and 2nd-5th MTPJ were measured by using a custom-made torque-measuring device. MVIC torques were compared between runners with and without a history of MTSS. MVIC torque of the 1st MTPJ plantar flexion was significantly higher in runners with a history of MTSS than in those without it. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the MVIC torque values of the 2nd-5th MTPJ plantar flexion and each MVIC torque of the ankle between runners with and without a history of MTSS. A history of MTSS increased the isometric FHL strength.

  6. A central mesencephalic reticular formation projection to medial rectus motoneurons supplying singly and multiply innervated extraocular muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Martin O; Warren, Susan; May, Paul J

    2017-06-01

    We recently demonstrated a bilateral projection to the supraoculomotor area from the central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF), a region implicated in horizontal gaze changes. C-group motoneurons, which supply multiply innervated fibers in the medial rectus muscle, are located within the primate supraoculomotor area, but their inputs and function are poorly understood. Here, we tested whether C-group motoneurons in Macaca fascicularis monkeys receive a direct cMRF input by injecting this portion of the reticular formation with anterograde tracers in combination with injection of retrograde tracer into the medial rectus muscle. The results indicate that the cMRF provides a dense, bilateral projection to the region of the medial rectus C-group motoneurons. Numerous close associations between labeled terminals and each multiply innervated fiber motoneuron were present. Within the oculomotor nucleus, a much sparser ipsilateral projection onto some of the A- and B- group medial rectus motoneurons that supply singly innervated fibers was observed. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated a direct synaptic linkage between anterogradely labeled reticular terminals and retrogradely labeled medial rectus motoneurons in all three groups. These findings reinforce the notion that the cMRF is a critical hub for oculomotility by proving that it contains premotor neurons supplying horizontal extraocular muscle motoneurons. The differences between the cMRF input patterns for C-group versus A- and B-group motoneurons suggest the C-group motoneurons serve a different oculomotor role than the others. The similar patterns of cMRF input to C-group motoneurons and preganglionic Edinger-Westphal motoneurons suggest that medial rectus C-group motoneurons may play a role in accommodation-related vergence. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fetal development of deep back muscles in the human thoracic region with a focus on transversospinalis muscles and the medial branch of the spinal nerve posterior ramus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuo; Koizumi, Masahiro; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Bao Jian; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Fetal development of human deep back muscles has not yet been fully described, possibly because of the difficulty in identifying muscle bundle directions in horizontal sections. Here, we prepared near-frontal sections along the thoracic back skin (eight fetuses) as well as horizontal sections (six fetuses) from 14 mid-term fetuses at 9–15 weeks of gestation. In the deep side of the trapezius and rhomboideus muscles, the CD34-positive thoracolumbar fascia was evident even at 9 weeks. Desmin-reactivity was strong and homogeneous in the superficial muscle fibers in contrast to the spotty expression in the deep fibers. Thus, in back muscles, formation of the myotendinous junction may start from the superficial muscles and advance to the deep muscles. The fact that developing intramuscular tendons were desmin-negative suggested little possibility of a secondary change from the muscle fibers to tendons. We found no prospective spinalis muscle or its tendinous connections with other muscles. Instead, abundant CD68-positive macrophages along the spinous process at 15 weeks suggested a change in muscle attachment, an event that may result in a later formation of the spinalis muscle. S100-positive intramuscular nerves exhibited downward courses from the multifidus longus muscle in the original segment to the rotatores brevis muscles in the inferiorly adjacent level. The medial cutaneous nerve had already reached the thoracolumbar fascia at 9 weeks, but by 15 weeks the nerve could not penetrate the trapezius muscle. Finally, we propose a folded myotomal model of the primitive transversospinalis muscle that seems to explain a fact that the roofing tile-like configuration of nerve twigs in the semispinalis muscle is reversed in the multifidus and rotatores muscles. PMID:21954879

  8. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  9. Runx2 Expression in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Required for Arterial Medial Calcification in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mu-En; Chen, Theodore; Leaf, Elizabeth M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial medial calcification (AMC) is a hallmark of aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) transition to an osteogenic phenotype is a common feature of AMC, and is preceded by expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a master regulator of bone development. Whether SMC-specific Runx2 expression is required for osteogenic phenotype change and AMC remains unknown. We therefore created an improved targeting construct to generate mice with floxed Runx2 alleles (Runx2f/f) that do not produce truncated Runx2 proteins after Cre recombination, thereby preventing potential off-target effects. SMC-specific deletion using SM22–recombinase transgenic allele mice (Runx2ΔSM) led to viable mice with normal bone and arterial morphology. After vitamin D overload, arterial SMCs in Runx2f/f mice expressed Runx2, underwent osteogenic phenotype change, and developed severe AMC. In contrast, vitamin D–treated Runx2ΔSM mice had no Runx2 in blood vessels, maintained SMC phenotype, and did not develop AMC. Runx2 deletion did not affect serum calcium, phosphate, fibroblast growth factor-23, or alkaline phosphatase levels. In vitro, Runx2f/f SMCs calcified to a much greater extent than those derived from Runx2ΔSM mice. These data indicate a critical role of Runx2 in SMC osteogenic phenotype change and mineral deposition in a mouse model of AMC, suggesting that Runx2 and downstream osteogenic pathways in SMCs may be useful therapeutic targets for treating or preventing AMC in high-risk patients. PMID:25987250

  10. Knee Moment-Angle Characteristics and Semitendinosus Muscle Morphology in Children with Spastic Paresis Selected for Medial Hamstring Lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T.; Rutz, Erich; Becher, Jules G.; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.; Witbreuk, Melinda M.; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald

    2016-01-01

    To increase knee range of motion and improve gait in children with spastic paresis (SP), the semitendinosus muscle (ST) amongst other hamstring muscles is frequently lengthened by surgery, but with variable success. Little is known about how the pre-surgical mechanical and morphological characteristics of ST muscle differ between children with SP and typically developing children (TD). The aims of this study were to assess (1) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology in children with SP selected for medial hamstring lengthening differ from TD children, as well as (2) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology are related. In nine SP and nine TD children, passive knee moment-angle characteristics and morphology of ST (i.e. fascicle length, muscle belly length, tendon length, physiological cross-sectional area, and volume) were assessed by hand-held dynamometry and freehand 3D ultrasound, respectively. At net knee flexion moments above 0.5 Nm, more flexed knee angles were found for SP compared to TD children. The measured knee angle range between 0 and 4 Nm was 30% smaller in children with SP. Muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area, and fascicle length normalized to femur length were smaller in SP compared to TD children (62%, 48%, and 18%, respectively). Sixty percent of the variation in knee angles at 4 Nm net knee moment was explained by ST fascicle length. Altered knee moment-angle characteristics indicate an increased ST stiffness in SP children. Morphological observations indicate that in SP children planned for medial hamstring lengthening, the longitudinal and cross-sectional growth of ST muscle fibers is reduced. The reduced fascicle length can partly explain the increased ST stiffness and, hence, a more flexed knee joint in these SP children. PMID:27861523

  11. Knee Moment-Angle Characteristics and Semitendinosus Muscle Morphology in Children with Spastic Paresis Selected for Medial Hamstring Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T; Rutz, Erich; Becher, Jules G; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A; Witbreuk, Melinda M; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2016-01-01

    To increase knee range of motion and improve gait in children with spastic paresis (SP), the semitendinosus muscle (ST) amongst other hamstring muscles is frequently lengthened by surgery, but with variable success. Little is known about how the pre-surgical mechanical and morphological characteristics of ST muscle differ between children with SP and typically developing children (TD). The aims of this study were to assess (1) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology in children with SP selected for medial hamstring lengthening differ from TD children, as well as (2) how knee moment-angle characteristics and ST morphology are related. In nine SP and nine TD children, passive knee moment-angle characteristics and morphology of ST (i.e. fascicle length, muscle belly length, tendon length, physiological cross-sectional area, and volume) were assessed by hand-held dynamometry and freehand 3D ultrasound, respectively. At net knee flexion moments above 0.5 Nm, more flexed knee angles were found for SP compared to TD children. The measured knee angle range between 0 and 4 Nm was 30% smaller in children with SP. Muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area, and fascicle length normalized to femur length were smaller in SP compared to TD children (62%, 48%, and 18%, respectively). Sixty percent of the variation in knee angles at 4 Nm net knee moment was explained by ST fascicle length. Altered knee moment-angle characteristics indicate an increased ST stiffness in SP children. Morphological observations indicate that in SP children planned for medial hamstring lengthening, the longitudinal and cross-sectional growth of ST muscle fibers is reduced. The reduced fascicle length can partly explain the increased ST stiffness and, hence, a more flexed knee joint in these SP children.

  12. Motor unit recruitment and firing rate in medial gastrocnemius muscles during external perturbations in standing in humans.

    PubMed

    Pollock, C L; Ivanova, T D; Hunt, M A; Garland, S J

    2014-10-01

    There is limited investigation of the interaction between motor unit recruitment and rate coding for modulating force during standing or responding to external perturbations. Fifty-seven motor units were recorded from the medial gastrocnemius muscle with intramuscular electrodes in response to external perturbations in standing. Anteriorly directed perturbations were generated by applying loads in 0.45-kg increments at the pelvis every 25-40 s until 2.25 kg was maintained. Motor unit firing rate was calculated for the initial recruitment load and all subsequent loads during two epochs: 1) dynamic response to perturbation directly following each load drop and 2) maintenance of steady state between perturbations. Joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) from lower extremities and force platform measurements were assessed. Application of the external loads resulted in a significant forward progression of the anterior-posterior center of pressure (AP COP) that was accompanied by modest changes in joint angles (<3°). Surface EMG increased more in medial gastrocnemius than in the other recorded muscles. At initial recruitment, motor unit firing rate immediately after the load drop was significantly lower than during subsequent load drops or during the steady state at the same load. There was a modest increase in motor unit firing rate immediately after the load drop on subsequent load drops associated with regaining balance. There was no effect of maintaining balance with increased load and forward progression of the AP COP on steady-state motor unit firing rate. The medial gastrocnemius utilized primarily motor unit recruitment to achieve the increased levels of activation necessary to maintain standing in the presence of external loads. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Dimensions and geometry of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles.

    PubMed

    Zurowski, R; Gosek, M; Aleksandrowicz, R

    1976-01-01

    The bio-engineering team presents its suggestion of a method for the measurement of the temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles in order to determine the parameters necessary for exact sciences and indispensable for unified and objective cognitive studies. Ten formalin-fixed human cadavers served for the studies. The preparations were prepared by the modified method of anatomical procedure. Linear and angular measurements of temporomandibular joint and masseter muscles were carried out with the use of the three-dimensional Cartesian system of OXYZ coordinates in relation to frontal, sagittal and horizontal planes. The physiological cross-sections of the masseter, temporal, lateral and medial pterygoid muscles were also determined. The collected data make it possible to develop a mathematical three-dimensioned model of the osseo-articulo-muscular system of the mastication organ.

  14. Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome: Muscles Located at the Site of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ato Ampomah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the location of the MTSS pain (posteromedial border of tibia) and the muscles that originate from that site. Method. The study was conducted in the Department of Anatomy of the School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, and involved the use of 22 cadaveric legs (9 paired and 4 unpaired) from 11 males and 2 females. Findings. The structures that were thus observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia were the soleus, the flexor digitorum longus, and the deep crural fascia. The soleus and flexor digitorum longus muscles were observed to attach directly to the posteromedial border of the tibia. The tibialis posterior muscle had no attachment to this site. Conclusion. The findings of this study suggest that if traction is the cause of MTSS then soleus and the flexor digitorum muscles and not the tibialis posterior muscle are the likely cause of MTSS. PMID:27066291

  15. Changes in contractile properties and action potentials of motor units in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle during maturation.

    PubMed

    Dobrzynska, Z; Celichowski, J

    2016-02-01

    The early phase of development of muscles stops following the disappearance of embryonic and neonatal myosin and the elimination of polyneuronal innervation of muscle fibres with the formation of motor units (MUs), but later the muscle mass still considerably increases. It is unknown whether the three types are visible among newly formed MUs soon after the early postnatal period and whether their proportion is similar to that in adult muscle. Moreover, the processes responsible for MU-force regulation by changes in motoneuronal firing rate as well as properties of motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) during maturation are unknown. Three groups of Wistar rats were investigated - 1 month old, 2 months old and the adult, 9 months old. The basic contractile properties and action potentials of MUs in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle were analysed. The three types of MUs were distinguishable in all age groups, but higher proportion of slow MUs was noticed in young rats (29%, 18% and 11% in 1, 2 and 9 months rats, respectively). The fatigue index for fast fatigable MUs in 1 month old rats was about 2 times higher than in 9 months old rats. The twitch time parameters of fast MUs were shortened during the maturation; for these units, the force-frequency curves in young rats were shifted towards lower frequencies, which suggested that fast motoneurons of young animals generate lower firing rates. Higher twitch-to-tetanus ratios noted for the three MU types in young rats suggested the smaller role of rate coding in force regulation processes, and the higher role of MU recruitment in young rats. No significant differences in MUAP parameters between two groups of young and adult animals were observed. Concluding, the maturation process evokes deeper changes in fast MUs than in slow ones.

  16. Lack of Effect of Ankle Position During the Nordic Curl on Muscle Activity of the Biceps Femoris and Medial Gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; Regan, Amy; Herrington, Lee; Thomas, Chris; McMahon, John; Jones, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Regular performance (~2×/wk) of Nordic curls has been shown to increase hamstring strength and reduce the risk of hamstring strain injury, although no consensus on ankle position has been provided. To compare the effects of performing Nordic curls, with the ankle in a dorsiflexed (DF) or plantar-flexed (PF) position, on muscle activity of the biceps femoris (BF) and medial gastrocnemius (MG). 15 male college athletes (age 22.6 ± 2.1 y, height 1.78 ± 0.06 m, body mass 88.75 ± 8.95 kg). A repeated-measures design was used, with participants performing 2 sets of 3 repetitions of both variations of Nordic curls, while muscle activity was assessed via surface electromyography (EMG) of the BF and MG. Comparisons of muscle activity were made by examining the normalized EMG data as the percentage of their maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Paired-samples t test revealed no significant difference in normalized muscle activity of the BF (124.5% ± 6.2% vs 128.1 ± 5.0%, P > .05, Cohen d = 0.64, power = .996) or MG (82.1% ± 3.9% vs 83.5 ± 4.8%, P > .05, Cohen d = 0.32, power = .947) during the Nordic curls in a PF or DF position, respectively. Ankle position does not influence muscle activity during the Nordic curl; however, performance of Nordic curls with the ankle in a DF position may be preferential, as this replicates the ankle position during terminal leg swing during running, which tends to be the point at which hamstring strains have been reported.

  17. Effect of ageing on the force development in tetanic contractions of motor units in rat medial gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Krutki, Piotr; Celichowski, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ageing on the rate of force generation of motor units, and the mechanical efficiency of contraction produced by a doublet discharge. The study was carried out on isolated motor units of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle of young (5-10 mo) and two groups of old (24-25 and 28-30 mo) Wistar rats. Motor units were classified into the fast fatigable (FF), fast resistant (FR) and slow (S) ones. The force output and rate of force development were determined for non-doublet unfused tetanic contractions evoked by a series of a constant-rate trains of pulses and corresponding doublet contractions starting with an initial brief interpulse interval of 5 ms, and for maximal tetanic contraction. In FF motor units the rate of force development and the force produced by the doublet discharge increased transiently at the age of 24-25 mo, while in S and FR motor units this increase was observed at the age of 28-30 mo. Age-related decrease in the rate of force development of skeletal muscle cannot be attributed to a decline in efficiency of force production by functioning motor units. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recruitment of motor units in the medial gastrocnemius muscle during human quiet standing: is recruitment intermittent? What triggers recruitment?

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D.; Muceli, Silvia; Merletti, Roberto; Farina, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment and the rate of discharge of motor units are determinants of muscle force. Within a motoneuron pool, recruitment and rate coding of individual motor units might be controlled independently, depending on the circumstances. In this study, we tested whether, during human quiet standing, the force of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle is predominantly controlled by recruitment or rate coding. If MG control during standing was mainly due to recruitment, then we further asked what the trigger mechanism is. Is it determined internally, or is it related to body kinematics? While seven healthy subjects stood quietly, intramuscular electromyograms were recorded from the MG muscle with three pairs of wire electrodes. The number of active motor units and their mean discharge rate were compared for different sway velocities and positions. Motor unit discharges occurred more frequently when the body swayed faster and forward (Pearson R = 0.63; P < 0.0001). This higher likelihood of observing motor unit potentials was explained chiefly by the recruitment of additional units. During forward body shifts, the median number of units detected increased from 3 to 11 (P < 0.0001), whereas the discharge rate changed from 8 ± 1.1 (mean ± SD) to 10 ± 0.9 pulses/s (P = 0.001). Strikingly, motor units did not discharge continuously throughout standing. They were recruited within individual, forward sways and intermittently, with a modal rate of two recruitments per second. This modal rate is consistent with previous circumstantial evidence relating the control of standing to an intrinsic, higher level planning process. PMID:21994258

  19. Recruitment of motor units in the medial gastrocnemius muscle during human quiet standing: is recruitment intermittent? What triggers recruitment?

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M M; Loram, Ian D; Muceli, Silvia; Merletti, Roberto; Farina, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment and the rate of discharge of motor units are determinants of muscle force. Within a motoneuron pool, recruitment and rate coding of individual motor units might be controlled independently, depending on the circumstances. In this study, we tested whether, during human quiet standing, the force of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle is predominantly controlled by recruitment or rate coding. If MG control during standing was mainly due to recruitment, then we further asked what the trigger mechanism is. Is it determined internally, or is it related to body kinematics? While seven healthy subjects stood quietly, intramuscular electromyograms were recorded from the MG muscle with three pairs of wire electrodes. The number of active motor units and their mean discharge rate were compared for different sway velocities and positions. Motor unit discharges occurred more frequently when the body swayed faster and forward (Pearson R = 0.63; P < 0.0001). This higher likelihood of observing motor unit potentials was explained chiefly by the recruitment of additional units. During forward body shifts, the median number of units detected increased from 3 to 11 (P < 0.0001), whereas the discharge rate changed from 8 ± 1.1 (mean ± SD) to 10 ± 0.9 pulses/s (P = 0.001). Strikingly, motor units did not discharge continuously throughout standing. They were recruited within individual, forward sways and intermittently, with a modal rate of two recruitments per second. This modal rate is consistent with previous circumstantial evidence relating the control of standing to an intrinsic, higher level planning process.

  20. Effect of angular velocity on soleus and medial gastrocnemius H-reflex during maximal concentric and eccentric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Robbe, Alice; Pousson, Michel; Martin, Alain

    2009-10-01

    At rest, the H-reflex is lower during lengthening than shortening actions. During passive lengthening, both soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) H-reflex amplitudes decrease with increasing angular velocity. This study was designed to investigate whether H-reflex amplitude is affected by angular velocity during concentric and eccentric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Experiments were performed on nine healthy men. At a constant angular velocity of 60 degrees /s and 20 degrees /s, maximal H-reflex and M-wave potentials were evoked at rest (i.e., H(max) and M(max), respectively) and during concentric and eccentric MVC (i.e., H(sup) and M(sup), respectively). Regardless of the muscle, H(max)/M(max) was lower during lengthening than shortening actions and the H(sup)/M(sup) ratio was higher than H(max)/M(max) during lengthening actions. Whereas no action type and angular velocity effects on the MG H(sup)/M(sup) were found, the SOL H(sup)/M(sup) was lower during eccentric than concentric MVC and this depression was increased with higher angular velocity. Our findings indicate that the depression of the H-reflex amplitude during eccentric compared to concentric MVC depends mainly on the amount of inhibition induced by lengthening action. In conclusion, H-reflex should be evoked during both passive and active dynamic trials to evaluate the plasticity of the spinal loop.

  1. Comparison of results of medial rectus muscle recession using augmentation, Faden procedure, and slanted recession in the treatment of high accommodative convergence/accommodation ratio esotropia.

    PubMed

    Gharabaghi, Davoud; Zanjani, Leila Kazemi

    2006-01-01

    According to the literature, accommodative esotropia has an unpredictable course when nonsurgical treatment is considered, especially in cases with a high accommodative convergence/accommodation ratio (AC/A). The aim of this study was to compare the results of augmented recession, slanted recession, and recession with posterior fixation suture of the medial rectus muscles in the treatment of high AC/A esotropia. Twenty-eight children (4 to 14 years old) with high AC/A esotropia with a near-distance disparity greater than 10 PD were included in a prospective, randomized, blinded clinical trial. Nine children underwent recession of both medial rectus muscles and posterior fixation suture (Faden procedure), 9 children underwent augmented recession of the medial rectus muscles, and 10 children underwent slanted recession of both medial rectus muscles. The amount of esodeviation was measured before strabismus surgery and at least 6 months postoperatively. In the augmented recession group, the mean near-distance disparity was reduced from 16.33 +/- 2.17 PD preoperatively to 7.55 +/- 3.87 PD postoperatively (54.21%; P = .056). In the Faden procedure group, it was reduced from 15.22 +/- 4.08 PD to 2.55 +/- 4.03 PD (80.7%; P = .056). In the slanted recession group, it was reduced from 15.50 +/- 4.30 PD to 4.10 +/- 4.80 PD (67.55%; P = .056). The Faden procedure had the best outcome, but slanted recession also was successful. Because of our good results and an easy, non-invasive approach without any additional complications, we recommend slanted recession to treat high AC/A esotropia.

  2. Generalized racemose livedo with cerebrovascular lesions (Sneddon syndrome): an occlusive arteriolopathy due to proliferation and migration of medial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Marsch, W C; Muckelmann, R

    1985-06-01

    We describe two cases of livedo racemosa generalisata with cerebrovascular defects (Sneddon syndrome). The histology is characterized by a proliferation and migration of medial smooth muscle cells in ascending arterioles of the upper subcutis and deep dermis. Migrating smooth muscle cells with a high content of intermediate filaments colonize the sub-endothelial intimal space, with subsequent narrowing of the vessel lumen. Since the discoloration of the skin is provoked by a reactive dilatation of venules, the biopsy should be performed in the adjacent normal-looking skin, taking in the upper subcutis.

  3. Effects of flexor-pronator muscle loading on valgus stability of the elbow with an intact, stretched, and resected medial ulnar collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Udall, John H; Fitzpatrick, Michael J; McGarry, Michelle H; Leba, Thu-Ba; Lee, Thay Q

    2009-01-01

    The medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) is an important passive stabilizer to the valgus stresses that athletes experience during overhead throwing motion. However, the role of the flexor-pronator muscles as active stabilizers to valgus stress is not well defined in the literature. The objectives of this study were to quantify the relative contribution of the individual flexor-pronator muscles to valgus stability of the elbow and how this relationship was affected by ligament status. A custom elbow testing system and Microscribe 3DLX were used for biomechanical testing. Flexor-pronator muscles were loaded to simulate contraction, and the valgus angle of the elbow was measured in eight cadaveric specimens at 30 degrees , 60 degrees , and 90 degrees of elbow flexion with 3 different valgus torques applied to the forearm. Loads based on muscle cross-sectional area were applied to the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), and pronator teres (PT). The effect of each muscle was evaluated by unloading the individual muscle while the other 2 remained loaded, resulting in 5 loading conditions: no muscles loaded, all muscles loaded, unloaded FCU, unloaded FDS, and unloaded PT. Valgus angle was measured for 3 MUCL ligament conditions: intact, stretched, and cut. The effect of muscle loading on valgus angle was similar for each ligament condition. Loading the flexor-pronator muscles significantly decreased valgus angle of the elbow in all testing conditions (P < .01). Unloading the FDS significantly increased valgus angle compared to all muscles loaded in all testing conditions (P < .016). Unloading the FCU and PT significantly increased valgus angle in less than half of the testing conditions. The FDS, PT, and FCU are all active stabilizers of the elbow to valgus stress. The FDS is the biggest contributor amongst the flexor-pronator muscles.

  4. An orthodontic bracket embedded in the medial pterygoid surface: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, Sheryl E; Ikeagwuani, Okechukwu; McLeod, Niall M H

    2016-01-08

    There is a potential risk that orthodontic brackets can become dislodged into the aerodigestive tract. This case illustrates the management of an orthodontic bracket, which became embedded in the deep tissues of the oropharynx. We aim to highlight the potential risk misplaced dental instruments and materials pose, including that they may become embedded in the soft tissues of the throat and suggest that that this possibility should be considered when they cannot be localized.

  5. An orthodontic bracket embedded in the medial pterygoid surface: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, Sheryl E; Ikeagwuani, Okechukwu; McLeod, Niall M H

    2016-03-01

    There is a potential risk that orthodontic brackets can become dislodged into the aerodigestive tract. This case illustrates the management of an orthodontic bracket, which became embedded in the deep tissues of the oropharynx. We aim to highlight the potential risk misplaced dental instruments and materials pose, including that they may become embedded in the soft tissues of the throat and suggest that that this possibility should be considered when they cannot be localized.

  6. Effect of Transducer Orientation on Errors in Ultrasound Image-Based Measurements of Human Medial Gastrocnemius Muscle Fascicle Length and Pennation

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, Simon C.; Herbert, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is often used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles in human muscles in vivo. Theoretically the most accurate measurements are made when the transducer is oriented so that the image plane aligns with muscle fascicles and, for measurements of pennation, when the image plane also intersects the aponeuroses perpendicularly. However this orientation is difficult to achieve and usually there is some degree of misalignment. Here, we used simulated ultrasound images based on three-dimensional models of the human medial gastrocnemius, derived from magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor images, to describe the relationship between transducer orientation and measurement errors. With the transducer oriented perpendicular to the surface of the leg, the error in measurement of fascicle lengths was about 0.4 mm per degree of misalignment of the ultrasound image with the muscle fascicles. If the transducer is then tipped by 20°, the error increases to 1.1 mm per degree of misalignment. For a given degree of misalignment of muscle fascicles with the image plane, the smallest absolute error in fascicle length measurements occurs when the transducer is held perpendicular to the surface of the leg. Misalignment of the transducer with the fascicles may cause fascicle length measurements to be underestimated or overestimated. Contrary to widely held beliefs, it is shown that pennation angles are always overestimated if the image is not perpendicular to the aponeurosis, even when the image is perfectly aligned with the fascicles. An analytical explanation is provided for this finding. PMID:27294280

  7. Effect of Transducer Orientation on Errors in Ultrasound Image-Based Measurements of Human Medial Gastrocnemius Muscle Fascicle Length and Pennation.

    PubMed

    Bolsterlee, Bart; Gandevia, Simon C; Herbert, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is often used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles in human muscles in vivo. Theoretically the most accurate measurements are made when the transducer is oriented so that the image plane aligns with muscle fascicles and, for measurements of pennation, when the image plane also intersects the aponeuroses perpendicularly. However this orientation is difficult to achieve and usually there is some degree of misalignment. Here, we used simulated ultrasound images based on three-dimensional models of the human medial gastrocnemius, derived from magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor images, to describe the relationship between transducer orientation and measurement errors. With the transducer oriented perpendicular to the surface of the leg, the error in measurement of fascicle lengths was about 0.4 mm per degree of misalignment of the ultrasound image with the muscle fascicles. If the transducer is then tipped by 20°, the error increases to 1.1 mm per degree of misalignment. For a given degree of misalignment of muscle fascicles with the image plane, the smallest absolute error in fascicle length measurements occurs when the transducer is held perpendicular to the surface of the leg. Misalignment of the transducer with the fascicles may cause fascicle length measurements to be underestimated or overestimated. Contrary to widely held beliefs, it is shown that pennation angles are always overestimated if the image is not perpendicular to the aponeurosis, even when the image is perfectly aligned with the fascicles. An analytical explanation is provided for this finding.

  8. Should the Ipsilateral Hamstrings Be Used for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Case of Medial Collateral Ligament Insufficiency? Biomechanical Investigation Regarding Dynamic Stabilization of the Medial Compartment by the Hamstring Muscles.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Mirco; Michel, Philipp; Raschke, Michael J; Vogel, Nils; Schulze, Martin; Zoll, Alexander; Fink, Christian; Petersen, Wolf; Domnick, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    Semitendinosus and gracilis muscles are frequently harvested for autologous tendon grafts for cruciate ligament reconstruction. This study investigated the joint-stabilizing effects of these hamstring muscles in cases of insufficiency of the medial collateral ligament (MCL). First, both the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles can actively stabilize the joint against valgus moments in the MCL-deficient knee. Second, the stabilizing influence of these muscles decreases with an increasing knee flexion angle. Controlled laboratory study. The kinematics was examined in 10 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees using a robotic/universal force moment sensor system and an optical tracking system. The knee kinematics under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments were determined in the different flexion angles of the (1) MCL-intact and (2) MCL-deficient knee using the following simulated muscle loads: (1) 0-N (idle) load, (2) 200-N semitendinosus (ST) load, and (3) 280-N (200/80-N) combined semitendinosus/gracilis (STGT) load. Cutting the MCL increased the valgus angle under all tested conditions and angles compared with the MCL-intact knee by 4.3° to 8.1° for the 5-N·m valgus moment and 6.5° to 11.9° for the 10-N·m valgus moment ( P < .01). The applied 200-N simulated ST load reduced the valgus angle significantly at 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30° of flexion under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments ( P < .05). At 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion, these values were close to those for the MCL-intact joint under the respective moments (both P > .05). The combined 280-N simulated STGT load significantly reduced the valgus angle in 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion under 5- and 10-N·m valgus moments ( P < .05) to values near those for the intact joint (5 N·m: 0°, 10°; 10 N·m: 0°, 10°, 20°; P > .05). In 60° and 90° of flexion, ST and STGT loads did not decrease the resulting valgus angle of the MCL-deficient knee without hamstring loads ( P > .05 vs deficient; P = .0001 vs intact). In this

  9. Endoscopic contralateral transmaxillary approach for pterygoid process osteotomy in total maxillectomy: A technical case report.

    PubMed

    Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Yamasaki, Kazuki; Chazono, Hideaki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2018-06-01

    An approach for total maxillectomy with endoscopic transection of the pterygoid process via the contralateral maxillary sinus is described. In total maxillectomy, the resection of the pterygoid process of the sphenoid is a key step for successful resection. However, a conventional craniofacial approach requires extensive incision in the face, elevation of the lateral cheek flap. Even after elevation of the lateral cheek flap, visualization of this region is not good. An endoscopic approach through the contralateral maxillary sinus improved visualization of the pterygoid process, and osteotomy using a diamond-drilling bar was successfully performed. This technique has the potential to widen the indication for total maxillectomy in malignant neoplasms of the maxillary sinus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Fate of the Iliopsoas Muscle in Long-term Follow-up After Open Reduction With a Medial Approach in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip. Part 2: Isokinetic Muscle Strength Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Serdar; Aksahin, Ertugrul; Ersoz, Murat; Bicimoglu, Ali

    2017-09-01

    The impact on long-term weakness of hip flexion of complete iliopsoas tenotomy during open reduction of developmental hip dysplasia with a medial approach has not yet been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate the isokinetic muscle strength (IMS) of hip flexor and extensor muscles in these patients and also to analyze the effect of spontaneous reattachment of the iliopsoas muscle on IMS measurements. The study included 20 patients. Earlier magnetic resonance imaging examination of all the patients revealed spontaneous reattachment of the iliopsoas in 18 (90%) patients. IMS measurements were performed at 60 and 150 degrees/s. The peak torque, total work (TW), average power (AP), work fatigue, and agonist to antagonist muscle ratio of the operated and nonoperated hips were recorded separately for flexors and extensors. The effect of iliopsoas reattachment on IMS was also evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 16.65±2.16 (13 to 20) years. Total work (P=0.013) and average power (P=0.009) of the flexor muscles and work fatigue of the extensor muscles (P=0.030) of the operated hip were significantly decreased when compared with the nonoperated hips at 150 degrees/s. There was no significant difference between the flexor muscles of the operated and nonoperated hips (P<0.05) at 60 degrees/s and extensor muscles (P<0.05) at 150 degrees/s. In addition, patients without reattachment had lower IMS in the operated hips. Flexor muscle strength was decreased in the operated hip against low resistance in long-term follow-up after iliopsoas tenotomy. This may reflect that hip muscle strength was decreased after prolonged activities such as sports. However, in forceful activities flexor muscle strength was retained due to iliopsoas reattachment. On the basis of this study we thought that spontaneous reattachment of the iliopsoas tendon substantially preserves muscle strength. Nonetheless possible efforts should be made to surgically reattach the psoas

  11. Medial gastrocnemius muscle growth during adolescence is mediated by increased fascicle diameter rather than by longitudinal fascicle growth

    PubMed Central

    Weide, Guido; Huijing, Peter A; Maas, Josina C; Becher, Jules G; Harlaar, Jaap; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design, the purpose of this study was to determine how pennate gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle geometry changes as a function of adolescent age. Sixteen healthy adolescent males (aged 10–19 years) participated in this study. GM muscle geometry was measured within the mid-longitudinal plane obtained from a 3D voxel-array composed of transverse ultrasound images. Images were taken at footplate angles corresponding to standardised externally applied footplate moments (between 4 Nm plantar flexion and 6 Nm dorsal flexion). Muscle activity was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG), expressed as a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). To minimise the effects of muscle excitation, EMG inclusion criteria were set at < 10% of MVC. In practice, however, normalised EMG levels were much lower. For adolescent subjects with increasing ages, GM muscle (belly) length increased due to an increase in the length component of the physiological cross-sectional area measured within the mid-longitudinal plane. No difference was found between fascicles at different ages, but the aponeurosis length and pennation angle increased by 0.5 cm year−1 and 0.5 ° per year, respectively. Footplate angles corresponding to externally applied 0 and 4 Nm plantarflexion moments were not associated with different adolescent ages. In contrast, footplate angles corresponding to externally applied 4 and 6 Nm dorsal flexion moments decreased by 10 ° between 10 and 19 years. In conclusion, we found that in adolescents' pennate GM muscles, longitudinal muscle growth is mediated predominantly by increased muscle fascicle diameter. PMID:25879671

  12. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma in vascular smooth muscle cells is upregulated in cystic medial degeneration of annuloaortic ectasia in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sakomura, Yasunari; Nagashima, Hirotaka; Aoka, Yoshikazu; Uto, Kenta; Sakuta, Akiko; Aomi, Shigeyuki; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Nishikawa, Toshio; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2002-09-24

    Cystic medial degeneration (CMD) is a histological abnormality that is common in annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and aortic dissection with Marfan syndrome. Apoptosis and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is one of the features of CMD, but little is known about its pathogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), a transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been reported to show antiproliferative effects on VSMCs as well as anti-inflammatory effects on macrophages. PPARgamma agonist has been recently reported to induce apoptosis of cultured VSMCs. We examined the histopathology of ascending aortas in AAE of Marfan patients (n=21) and control patients (n=6) at surgery. RT-PCR was performed to demonstrate expression of PPARgamma in CMD. Localization of PPARgamma was determined by double immunostaining using antibodies against PPARgamma and cell-specific markers (ie, SMCs, macrophages, and T lymphocytes). PPARgamma expression was upregulated in AAE samples but minimal in control samples by RT-PCR (P=0.07). Immunoreactivity against PPARgamma in numerous nuclei of VSMCs was observed in CMD lesions. Severity of CMD correlated with positive immunoreactivity of PPARgamma in medial VSMCs (P=0.03). No inflammatory cells (ie, macrophages or T lymphocytes) were detected in CMD lesions. PPARgamma expression is upregulated in SMCs of CMD without any inflammatory response. Activated PPARgamma in VSMCs might be involved in the pathogenesis of CMD in Marfan's aortas. Regulation of PPARgamma might lead to clinical implication in protection against progression of AAE.

  13. Pterygoid implants for maxillofacial rehabilitation of a patient with a bilateral maxillectomy defect.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; May, George W; Tharp, Greggory E; Chambers, Mark S

    2013-02-01

    Bilateral maxillectomy is known to have serious esthetic and functional consequences. The retention and support of a maxillary obturator prosthesis in these patients is particularly challenging. Surgical placement of implants is also challenging because of the lack of available bone. Therefore, implant placement into remote sites such as zygoma has been advocated. Very few articles in the literature have discussed the use of pterygoid/pterygomaxillary implants in patients undergoing maxillectomy. This case report describes the maxillofacial rehabilitation of an elderly man who underwent a bilateral subtotal maxillectomy due to basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate. After initial healing, the patient had a pterygoid implant placed on each side of the oral cavity. Zygomatic implants were also attempted, but they failed to osseointegrate. Both pterygoid implants showed successful osseointegration. These 2 implants significantly helped to retain a hollow maxillary obturator prosthesis that aided in improved swallowing, speech, and esthetics. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that describes usage of pterygoid implants for rehabilitation of a patient undergoing bilateral maxillectomy.

  14. Inferring the Diets of Extinct Giant Lemurs from Osteological Correlates of Muscle Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jonathan M G

    2018-02-01

    The jaw adductor muscles of extinct mammals are often reconstructed to elucidate paleoecological relationships and to make broad comparisons among taxa. Muscle lever arms, bite load arms, muscle dimensions, and gape are often also reconstructed to better understand feeding. Several different approaches to these and related goals are discussed here. A protocol for reconstructing muscle dimensions and bite force using biomechanically informative skull measurements and osteological proxies of muscle dimensions is described and applied to a case study of subfossil Malagasy lemurs. The results of this case study show that most subfossil lemurs emphasized the masseter and medial pterygoid muscles over the temporalis. This supports the inference that these extinct lemurs depended heavily on tough food like leaves. Exceptions include signals of hard-object feeding in Archaeolemur that vary between A. majori and A. edwardsi. Reconstructions of soft-tissue and function are important for understanding past ecological relationships. Even those based on well-supported osteological proxies from extant analogues have limitations for making precise inferences. Anat Rec, 301:343-362, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Medial gastrocnemius muscle stiffness cannot explain the increased ankle joint range of motion following passive stretching in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Barbara M; Bar-On, Lynn; Cenni, Francesco; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Bass, Alfie; Holmes, Gill; Desloovere, Kaat; Barton, Gabor J; O'Brien, Thomas D

    2018-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Can the increased range of motion seen acutely after stretching in children with cerebral palsy be explained by changes in the stiffness of the medial gastrocnemius fascicles? What is the main finding and its importance? We show, for the first time, that passive muscle and tendon properties are not changed acutely after a single bout of stretching in children with cerebral palsy and, therefore, do not contribute to the increase in range of motion. This contradicts common belief and what happens in healthy adults. Stretching is often used to increase or maintain the joint range of motion (ROM) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), but the effectiveness of these interventions is limited. Therefore, our aim was to determine the acute changes in muscle-tendon lengthening properties that contribute to increased ROM after a bout of stretching in children with CP. Eleven children with spastic CP [age 12.1 (3 SD) years, 5/6 hemiplegia/diplegia, 7/4 gross motor function classification system level I/II] participated. Each child received three sets of five × 20 s passive, manual static dorsiflexion stretches separated by 30 s rest, with 60 s rest between sets. Before and immediately after stretching, ultrasound was used to measure medial gastrocnemius fascicle lengthening continuously over the full ROM and an individual common ROM pre- to post-stretching. Simultaneously, three-dimensional motion of two marker clusters on the shank and the foot was captured to calculate ankle angle, and ankle joint torque was calculated from manually applied torques and forces on a six degrees-of-freedom load cell. After stretching, the ROM was increased [by 9.9 (12.0) deg, P = 0.005]. Over a ROM common to both pre- and post-measurements, there were no changes in fascicle lengthening or torque. The maximal ankle joint torque tolerated by the participants increased [by 2.9 (2.4) N m, P = 0.003], and at this highest passive torque the

  16. Task-Dependent Intermuscular Motor Unit Synchronization between Medial and Lateral Vastii Muscles during Dynamic and Isometric Squats.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Maurice; Nann, Marius; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Eskofier, Bjoern; Nigg, Benno Maurus

    2015-01-01

    Motor unit activity is coordinated between many synergistic muscle pairs but the functional role of this coordination for the motor output is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term modality of coordinated motor unit activity-the synchronized discharge of individual motor units across muscles within time intervals of 5ms-for the Vastus Medialis (VM) and Lateralis (VL). Furthermore, we studied the task-dependency of intermuscular motor unit synchronization between VM and VL during static and dynamic squatting tasks to provide insight into its functional role. Sixteen healthy male and female participants completed four tasks: Bipedal squats, single-leg squats, an isometric squat, and single-leg balance. Monopolar surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record motor unit activity of VM and VL. For each task, intermuscular motor unit synchronization was determined using a coherence analysis between the raw EMG signals of VM and VL and compared to a reference coherence calculated from two desynchronized EMG signals. The time shift between VM and VL EMG signals was estimated according to the slope of the coherence phase angle spectrum. For all tasks, except for singe-leg balance, coherence between 15-80Hz significantly exceeded the reference. The corresponding time shift between VM and VL was estimated as 4ms. Coherence between 30-60Hz was highest for the bipedal squat, followed by the single-leg squat and the isometric squat. There is substantial short-term motor unit synchronization between VM and VL. Intermuscular motor unit synchronization is enhanced for contractions during dynamic activities, possibly to facilitate a more accurate control of the joint torque, and reduced during single-leg tasks that require balance control and thus, a more independent muscle function. It is proposed that the central nervous system scales the degree of intermuscular motor unit synchronization according to the requirements of the movement task at hand.

  17. Task-Dependent Intermuscular Motor Unit Synchronization between Medial and Lateral Vastii Muscles during Dynamic and Isometric Squats

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Maurice; Nann, Marius; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Eskofier, Bjoern; Nigg, Benno Maurus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Motor unit activity is coordinated between many synergistic muscle pairs but the functional role of this coordination for the motor output is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term modality of coordinated motor unit activity–the synchronized discharge of individual motor units across muscles within time intervals of 5ms–for the Vastus Medialis (VM) and Lateralis (VL). Furthermore, we studied the task-dependency of intermuscular motor unit synchronization between VM and VL during static and dynamic squatting tasks to provide insight into its functional role. Methods Sixteen healthy male and female participants completed four tasks: Bipedal squats, single-leg squats, an isometric squat, and single-leg balance. Monopolar surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record motor unit activity of VM and VL. For each task, intermuscular motor unit synchronization was determined using a coherence analysis between the raw EMG signals of VM and VL and compared to a reference coherence calculated from two desynchronized EMG signals. The time shift between VM and VL EMG signals was estimated according to the slope of the coherence phase angle spectrum. Results For all tasks, except for singe-leg balance, coherence between 15–80Hz significantly exceeded the reference. The corresponding time shift between VM and VL was estimated as 4ms. Coherence between 30–60Hz was highest for the bipedal squat, followed by the single-leg squat and the isometric squat. Conclusion There is substantial short-term motor unit synchronization between VM and VL. Intermuscular motor unit synchronization is enhanced for contractions during dynamic activities, possibly to facilitate a more accurate control of the joint torque, and reduced during single-leg tasks that require balance control and thus, a more independent muscle function. It is proposed that the central nervous system scales the degree of intermuscular motor unit synchronization according to the

  18. Mandibular fracture patterns consistent with posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus, pterygoid plate or both: CT characteristics.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Sukegawa, S; Kanno, T; Fujita, G; Yamamoto, N; Furuki, Y; Michizawa, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus wall, pterygoid plate or both, unrelated to major midface fractures in patients with mandibular fractures, and to characterize associated fractures. A CT study was performed in patients with mandibular fractures to identify posterior maxillary fractures. Patients aged under 16 years, those with mandibular fractures involving only dentoalveolar components and those with concurrent major midfacial fractures were excluded. 13 (6.7%) of 194 patients with mandibular fractures also had posterior maxillary fractures (case group). The injury pattern correlated with the external force directed to the lateral side of the mandible (p < 0.001), alcohol consumption (p = 0.049), the presence of multifocal fractures (p = 0.002) and the fracture regions in the symphysis/parasymphysis (p = 0.001) and the angle/ramus (p = 0.001). No significant difference between the case and non-case groups was seen for age, sex or cause of trauma. Non-displaced fractures in the ipsilateral posterior mandible occurred with significant frequency (p = 0.001) when the posterior maxillary fractures involved only the sinus. Mandibular fractures accompanied by posterior maxillary fractures are not rare. The finding of a unilateral posterior maxillary fracture on CT may aid the efficient radiological examination of the mandible based on possible patterns of associated fractures, as follows: in the ipsilateral posterior region as a direct fracture when the impact is a medially directed force, and in the symphysis/parasymphysis or contralateral condylar neck as an indirect fracture.

  19. Mandibular fracture patterns consistent with posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus, pterygoid plate or both: CT characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, S; Kanno, T; Fujita, G; Yamamoto, N; Furuki, Y; Michizawa, M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus wall, pterygoid plate or both, unrelated to major midface fractures in patients with mandibular fractures, and to characterize associated fractures. Methods: A CT study was performed in patients with mandibular fractures to identify posterior maxillary fractures. Patients aged under 16 years, those with mandibular fractures involving only dentoalveolar components and those with concurrent major midfacial fractures were excluded. Results: 13 (6.7%) of 194 patients with mandibular fractures also had posterior maxillary fractures (case group). The injury pattern correlated with the external force directed to the lateral side of the mandible (p < 0.001), alcohol consumption (p = 0.049), the presence of multifocal fractures (p = 0.002) and the fracture regions in the symphysis/parasymphysis (p = 0.001) and the angle/ramus (p = 0.001). No significant difference between the case and non-case groups was seen for age, sex or cause of trauma. Non-displaced fractures in the ipsilateral posterior mandible occurred with significant frequency (p = 0.001) when the posterior maxillary fractures involved only the sinus. Conclusions: Mandibular fractures accompanied by posterior maxillary fractures are not rare. The finding of a unilateral posterior maxillary fracture on CT may aid the efficient radiological examination of the mandible based on possible patterns of associated fractures, as follows: in the ipsilateral posterior region as a direct fracture when the impact is a medially directed force, and in the symphysis/parasymphysis or contralateral condylar neck as an indirect fracture. PMID:24336313

  20. Relationship between the Ulnar Nerve and the Branches of the Radial Nerve to the Medial Head of the Triceps Brachii Muscle.

    PubMed

    Sh, Cho; Ih, Chung; Uy, Lee

    2018-05-17

    One branch of the radial nerve to the medial head of the triceps brachii muscle (MHN) has been described as accompanying or joining the ulnar nerve. Mostly two MHN branches have been reported, with some reports of one; however, the topographical anatomy is not well documented. We dissected 52 upper limbs from adult cadavers and found one, two, and three MHN branches in 9.6%, 80.8%, and 9.6% of cases, respectively. The MHN accompanying the ulnar nerve was always the superior MHN. The relationship between the ulnar nerve and the MHN was classified into four types according to whether the MHN was enveloped along with the ulnar nerve in the connective tissue sheath and whether it was in contact with the ulnar nerve. It contacted the ulnar nerve in 75.0% of cases and accompanied it over a mean distance of 73.6 mm (range 36-116 mm). In all cases in which the connective tissue sheath enveloped the branch of the MHN and the ulnar nerve, removing the sheath confirmed that the MHN branch originated from the radial nerve. The detailed findings and anatomical measurements of the MHN in this study will help in identifying its branches during surgical procedures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Smooth Muscle Cells Maintains Genome Integrity, Resists Aortic Medial Degeneration, and Is Suppressed in Human Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alanna; Nong, Zengxuan; Yin, Hao; O'Neil, Caroline; Fox, Stephanie; Balint, Brittany; Guo, Linrui; Leo, Oberdan; Chu, Michael W A; Gros, Robert; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2017-06-09

    The thoracic aortic wall can degenerate over time with catastrophic consequences. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can resist and repair artery damage, but their capacities decline with age and stress. Recently, cellular production of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) via nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) has emerged as a mediator of cell vitality. However, a role for Nampt in aortic SMCs in vivo is unknown. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system exists within the aortic media and is required for aortic health. Ascending aortas from patients with dilated aortopathy were immunostained for NAMPT, revealing an inverse relationship between SMC NAMPT content and aortic diameter. To determine whether a Nampt-NAD + control system in SMCs impacts aortic integrity, mice with Nampt -deficient SMCs were generated. SMC- Nampt knockout mice were viable but with mildly dilated aortas that had a 43% reduction in NAD + in the media. Infusion of angiotensin II led to aortic medial hemorrhage and dissection. SMCs were not apoptotic but displayed senescence associated-ß-galactosidase activity and upregulated p16, indicating premature senescence. Furthermore, there was evidence for oxidized DNA lesions, double-strand DNA strand breaks, and pronounced susceptibility to single-strand breakage. This was linked to suppressed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity and was reversible on resupplying NAD + with nicotinamide riboside. Remarkably, we discovered unrepaired DNA strand breaks in SMCs within the human ascending aorta, which were specifically enriched in SMCs with low NAMPT. NAMPT promoter analysis revealed CpG hypermethylation within the dilated human thoracic aorta and in SMCs cultured from these tissues, which inversely correlated with NAMPT expression. The aortic media depends on an intrinsic NAD + fueling system to protect against DNA damage and premature SMC senescence, with relevance to human thoracic aortopathy. © 2017 American Heart

  2. The Fate of Iliopsoas Muscle in the Long-term Follow-up After Open Reduction of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip by Medial Approach. Part 1: MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Serdar; Aksahin, Ertugrul; Duran, Semra; Bicimoglu, Ali

    2017-09-01

    There has been little information about the long-term status of the iliopsoas, which is the main flexor of the hip, after iliopsoas tenotomy in the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). The aim of this study was to assess the status of the iliopsoas muscle and other flexors and extensors of the hip in long-term follow-up with magnetic resonance imaging after complete iliopsoas tenotomy in patients with unilateral DDH treated with open reduction with a medial approach. The study included 20 patients who underwent open reduction with a medial approach for unilateral DDH and had long-term follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of iliopsoas, rectus femoris, tensor fasia lata, sartorius, and gluteus maximus muscles was applied and the muscles of the hip that was operated on were compared with the unoperated hip. In addition, the iliopsoas muscle was examined for reattachment and the effect of reattachment was evaluated. The mean age at the time of operation was 10.53±3.61 months (range, 5 to 18 mo), and mean follow-up was 16.65±2.16 years (range, 13 to 20 y). Spontaneous reattachment of the iliopsoas was observed in 18 patients (90%), either in the lesser trochanter (65%) or the superior part of it (25%). There was no significant difference between the hips that were operated on and those that were not with regard to the mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the tensor fascia lata, rectus femoris, sartorius, and gluteus maximus muscles. The CSA of the tensor fascia lata, rectus femoris, sartorius, and gluteus maximus muscles showed no significant difference (P>0.05); however, CSA of iliopsoas muscle was significantly reduced in the operated hip (P<0.001). Although the iliopsoas tendon was atrophied after complete iliopsoas tenotomy, it was reattached in 90% of the patients spontaneously in long-term follow-up. There was no statistically significant compensatory hypertrophy in any muscles in response to iliopsoas atrophy. Level IV-Therapeutic.

  3. Relationship between function of masticatory muscle in mouse and properties of muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinichi; Hiroki, Emi; Iwanuma, Osamu; Sakiyama, Koji; Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Hirose, Daiki; Shimoo, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Ikari, Yasutoyo; Kikuchi, Ryusuke; Ide, Yoshinobu; Yoshinari, Masao

    2008-05-01

    Mammals exhibit marked morphological differences in the muscles surrounding the jaw bone due to differences in eating habits. Furthermore, the myofiber properties of the muscles differ with function. Since the muscles in the oral region have various functions such as eating, swallowing, and speech, it is believed that the functional role of each muscle differs. Therefore, to clarify the functional role of each masticatory muscle, the myofiber properties of the adult mouse masticatory muscles were investigated at the transcriptional level. Expression of MyHC-2b with a fast contraction rate and strong force was frequently noted in the temporal and masseter muscles. This suggests that the temporal and masseter muscles are closely involved in rapid antero-posterior masticatory movement, which is characteristic in mice. Furthermore, expression of MyHC-1 with a low contraction rate and weak continuous force was frequently detected in the lateral pterygoid muscle. This suggests that, in contrast to other masticatory muscles, mouse lateral pterygoid muscle is not involved in fast masticatory movement, but is involved in functions requiring continuous force such as retention of jaw position. This study revealed that muscles with different roles function comprehensively during complicated masticatory movement.

  4. [The influences upon the passive tensile of the masticatory muscles and ligaments by Herbst appliance under various bite reconstruction--a three dimensional finite element analysis].

    PubMed

    Song, J; Zhao, Z; Hu, L; Jiang, W; Fan, Y; Chen, J

    2001-02-01

    This study aimed to provide some biomechanical references for the clinical use and improvement of Herbst appliance. The three-dimensional model of the 'Temporomandibular joint mandible Herbst appliance system' was set up by SUPER SAP software (version 9.3). On this model, the passive tensile in the masticatory muscles and ligaments were analyzed under various bit reconstruction designed according to specified advanced displacement and vertical bite opening. When Herbst appliance drove the mandible forward, there was not any tensile in the medial, lateral pterygoid and the collateral ligament, while the temporalis, the deep paret of masseter, the stylomandibular ligament, and the sphenomandibular ligament were passively drawn. Under various bite reconstruction, the passive tensile in the medial temporalis, the posterior temporalis, the stylomandibular ligament and the sphenomandibular ligament increased with the amount of the advancement of the mandible; The passive tensile in the posterior temporalis and the deep part of masseter increased with the amount of vertical bite opening of the mandible. The StL, SpL, PT and AT played an important role in functional reconstruction of mandible by Herbst. All five group of bite reconstruction (3-7 mm advancement, 4-2 mm vertical bite opening of the mandible) designed by this study can be selected in clinic according to the patient's capability of adaptation, the extent of malocclusion and the potential and direction of growth.

  5. Investigation of the Expression of Myogenic Transcription Factors, microRNAs and Muscle-Specific E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in the Medial Gastrocnemius and Soleus Muscles following Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, Rebecca; Jonsson, Samuel; Novikova, Liudmila N.; Kingham, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite surgical innovation, the sensory and motor outcome after a peripheral nerve injury remains incomplete. One contributing factor to the poor outcome is prolonged denervation of the target organ, leading to apoptosis of both mature myofibres and satellite cells with subsequent replacement of the muscle tissue with fibrotic scar and adipose tissue. In this study, we investigated the expression of myogenic transcription factors, muscle specific microRNAs and muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases at several time points following denervation in two different muscles, the gastrocnemius (containing predominantly fast type fibres) and soleus (slow type) muscles, since these molecules may influence the degree of atrophy following denervation. Both muscles exhibited significant atrophy (compared with the contra-lateral sides) at 7 days following either a nerve transection or crush injury. In the crush model, the soleus muscle showed significantly increased muscle weights at days 14 and 28 which was not the case for the gastrocnemius muscle which continued to atrophy. There was a significantly more pronounced up-regulation of MyoD expression in the denervated soleus muscle compared with the gastrocnemius muscle. Conversely, myogenin was more markedly elevated in the gastrocnemius versus soleus muscles. The muscles also showed significantly contrasting transcriptional regulation of the microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206. MuRF1 and Atrogin-1 showed the highest levels of expression in the denervated gastrocnemius muscle. This study provides further insights regarding the intracellular regulatory molecules that generate and maintain distinct patterns of gene expression in different fibre types following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26691660

  6. Comparative morphology of the muscles of mastication in the giant panda and the Asiatic black bear.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hideki; Taru, Hajime; Yamamoto, Masako; Arishima, Kazuyoshi; Sasaki, Motoki

    2003-06-01

    The morphological differences in the muscles of mastication between the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) were sought to confirm the adaptational strategy of these muscles in the giant panda. We measured some skull characteristics and weighed the muscles of mastication, and macroscopically observed the muscles of mastication in the two species. The noticeable differences between the two species are classified as follows: (1) The size ratio of the zygomatic width was much larger in the giant panda than in the Asiatic black bear. (2) The weight ratio of the two pterygoid muscles was also much larger in the giant panda than in the Asiatic black bear. (3) The lateral slips of the temporal muscles are thicker and stronger in the Asiatic black bear than in the giant panda. (4) The deep layer of the masseter muscle was rostrocaudally divided, and a complicated running of tendons is observed in the giant panda. (5) The two pterygoid muscles were much larger and well-developed in the giant panda than in the Asiatic black bear. The points (1) and (4) may be related to the generation of the force necessary to chew the bamboo in the giant panda. We thought that the large mass of the masseter and temporal muscles are needed in this species. In the points of (2) and (5), the two pterygoid muscles were obviously different in form and weight ratio between the two species. We suggest that the two pterygoid muscles may act as an additional force generator to dorsoventrally press and crush bamboo stems.

  7. Medial elbow pain

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Raul; Antuña, Samuel A.

    2017-01-01

    Medial elbow pain is uncommon when compared with lateral elbow pain. Medial epicondylitis is an uncommon diagnosis and can be confused with other sources of pain. Overhead throwers and workers lifting heavy objects are at increased risk of medial elbow pain. Differential diagnosis includes ulnar nerve disorders, cervical radiculopathy, injured ulnar collateral ligament, altered distal triceps anatomy or joint disorders. Children with medial elbow pain have to be assessed for ‘Little League elbow’ and fractures of the medial epicondyle following a traumatic event. This paper is primarily focused on the differential diagnosis of medial elbow pain with basic recommendations on treatment strategies. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:362-371. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160006 PMID:28932488

  8. Responses of adventitial CD34+ vascular wall-resident stem/progenitor cells and medial smooth muscle cells to carotid injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Wu, Yan; Zheng, Yong; Ao, Feng; Kang, Kai; Wan, Yu; Song, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Cell culture and carotid injury studies with SD rats were performed to investigate the roles of CD34 + vascular wall-resident stem/progenitor cells (VRS/Pcs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in neointimal formation. In vitro, the media-isolated SM MHC + SMCs occupied 93.92±8.62% of total BrdU + cells, whereas the CD34 + cells, only 2.61±0.82%, indicating that the cell expansion in SMC culture was attributed to SM MHC + SMCs. The adventitia-isolated CD34 + VRS/Pcs responded to PDGF-BB by differentiating into SMC-like cells which expressed SM22α (an early stage SMC marker), but seldom SM MHC (a late stage SMC marker). In carotid injury model, the CD34 + VRS/Pcs differentiated SMC-like cells migrated in very few numbers into only the outer layer of the media, and this was further confirmed by a cell tracking analysis. While the neointimal cells were consistently SM MHC + and CD34 - SMCs during whole course of the post-injury remodeling. Thus it is speculated that the adventitial CD34 + VRS/Pcs, at least in rat model, do not directly participate in neointimal formation, but function to maintain homeostasis of the media during injury-induced vascular wall remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuromuscular Characteristics of Individuals Displaying Excessive Medial Knee Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Padua, Darin A.; Bell, David R.; Clark, Micheal A.

    2012-01-01

    Context Knee-valgus motion is a potential risk factor for certain lower extremity injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury and patellofemoral pain. Identifying neuromuscular characteristics associated with knee-valgus motion, such as hip and lower leg muscle activation, may improve our ability to prevent lower extremity injuries. Objective We hypothesized that hip and lower leg muscle-activation amplitude would differ among individuals displaying knee valgus (medial knee displacement) during a double-legged squat compared with those who did not display knee valgus. We further suggested that the use of a heel lift would alter lower leg muscle activation and frontal-plane knee motion in those demonstrating medial knee displacement. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 37 healthy participants were assigned to the control (n = 19) or medial-knee-displacement (n = 18) group based on their double-legged squat performance. Main Outcome Measure(s) Muscle-activation amplitude for the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, adductor magnus, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior was measured during 2 double-legged squat tasks. The first task consisted of performing a double-legged squat without a heel lift; the second consisted of performing a double-legged squat task with a 2-in (5.08-cm) lift under the heels. Results Muscle-activation amplitude for the hip adductor, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior was greater in those who displayed knee valgus than in those who did not (P < .05). Also, use of heel lifts resulted in decreased activation of the gluteus maximus, hip adductor, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles (P < .05). Use of heel lifts also eliminated medially directed frontal-plane knee motion in those displaying medial knee displacement. Conclusions Medial knee displacement during squatting tasks appears to be associated with increased hip-adductor activation and

  10. Ipsilateral Medial and Lateral Discoid Meniscus with Medial Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Shimozaki, Kengo; Nakase, Junsuke; Ohashi, Yoshinori; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Discoid meniscus is a well-documented knee pathology, and there are many cases of medial or lateral discoid meniscus reported in the literature. However, ipsilateral concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Herein, we report a case of concurrent medial and lateral discoid meniscus. Case Report: A 27-year-old Japanese man complained of pain on medial joint space in his right knee that was diagnosed as a complete medial and lateral discoid meniscus. In magnetic resonance imaging, although the lateral discoid meniscus had no tear, the medial discoid meniscus had a horizontal tear. Arthroscopic examination of his right knee similarly revealed that the medial discoid meniscus had a horizontal tear. In addition, the discoid medial meniscus also had an anomalous insertion to the anterior cruciate ligament, and there was also mild fibrillation of the medial tibial cartilage surface. We performed arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for the torn medial discoid meniscus but not for the asymptomatic lateral discoid meniscus. The latest follow-up at 18 months indicated satisfactory results. Conclusion: We report a rare case of ipsilateral medial and lateral discoid meniscus with medial meniscus tear. The medial discoid meniscus with tear was treated with partial meniscectomy, whereas the lateral discoid meniscus without tear was only followed up. PMID:28164045

  11. Ontogeny of the Alligator Cartilago Transiliens and Its Significance for Sauropsid Jaw Muscle Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Henry P.; Holliday, Casey M.

    2011-01-01

    The cartilago transiliens is a fibrocartilaginous structure within the jaw muscles of crocodylians. The cartilago transiliens slides between the pterygoid buttress and coronoid region of the lower jaw and connects two muscles historically identified as m. pseudotemporalis superficialis and m. intramandibularis. However, the position of cartilago transiliens, and its anatomical similarities to tendon organs suggest the structure may be a sesamoid linking a single muscle. Incompressible sesamoids often form inside tendons that wrap around bone. However, such structures rarely ossify in reptiles and have thus far received scant attention. We tested the hypothesis that the cartilago transiliens is a sesamoid developed within in one muscle by investigating its structure in an ontogenetic series of Alligator mississippiensis using dissection, 3D imaging, and polarizing and standard light microscopy. In all animals studied, the cartilago transiliens receives collagen fibers and tendon insertions from its two main muscular attachments. However, whereas collagen fibers were continuous within the cartilaginous nodule of younger animals, such continuity decreased in older animals, where the fibrocartilaginous core grew to displace the fibrous region. Whereas several neighboring muscles attached to the fibrous capsule in older individuals, only two muscles had significant contributions to the structure in young animals. Our results indicate that the cartilago transiliens is likely a sesamoid formed within a single muscle (i.e., m. pseudotemporalis superficialis) as it wraps around the pterygoid buttress. This tendon organ is ubiquitous among fossil crocodyliforms indicating it is a relatively ancient, conserved structure associated with the development of the large pterygoid flanges in this clade. Finally, these findings indicate that similar tendon organs exist among potentially homologous muscle groups in birds and turtles, thus impacting inferences of jaw muscle homology

  12. Normal flow signal of the pterygoid plexus on 3T MRA in patients without DAVF of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Kakeda, S; Watanabe, R; Ohnari, N; Korogi, Y

    2013-01-01

    Cavernous sinuses and draining dural sinuses or veins are often visualized on 3D TOF MRA images in patients with dural arteriovenous fistulas involving the CS. Flow signals may be seen in the jugular vein and dural sinuses at the skull base on MRA images in healthy participants, however, because of reverse flow. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of flow signals in the pterygoid plexus and CS on 3T MRA images in a cohort of participants without DAVFs. Two radiologists evaluated the flow signals of the PP and CS on 3T MRA images obtained from 406 consecutive participants by using a 5-point scale. In addition, the findings on 3T MRA images were compared with those on digital subtraction angiography images in an additional 171 participants who underwent both examinations. The radiologists identified 110 participants (27.1%; 108 left, 10 right, 8 bilateral) with evidence of flow signals in the PP alone (n = 67) or in both the PP and CS (n = 43). Flow signals were significantly more common in the left PP than in the right PP. In 171 patients who underwent both MRA and DSA, the MRA images showed flow signals in the PP with or without CS in 60 patients; no DAVFs were identified on DSA in any of these patients. Flow signals are frequently seen in the left PP on 3T MRA images in healthy participants. This finding may be the result of flow reversal and should not be considered to indicate occult DAVF.

  13. The medial patellofemoral complex.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Alexander E; Tanaka, Miho J

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of the medial patellofemoral complex, including recent anatomic advances, evaluation of indications for reconstruction with concomitant pathology, and surgical reconstruction techniques. Recent advances in our understanding of MPFC anatomy have found that there are fibers that insert onto the deep quadriceps tendon as well as the patella, thus earning the name "medial patellofemoral complex" to allow for the variability in its anatomy. In MPFC reconstruction, anatomic origin and insertion points and appropriate graft length are critical to prevent overconstraint of the patellofemoral joint. The MPFC is a crucial soft tissue checkrein to lateral patellar translation, and its repair or reconstruction results in good restoration of patellofemoral stability. As our understanding of MPFC anatomy evolves, further studies are needed to apply its relevance in kinematics and surgical applications to its role in maintaining patellar stability.

  14. Recruitment of the Rhesus soleus and medial gastrocnemius before, during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Aragon, J.; Day, M. K.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Electromyograms were recorded from the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles and tendon force from the medial gastrocnemius muscle of 2 juvenile Rhesus monkeys before, during and after Cosmos flight 2229 and of ground control animals. Recording sessions were made while the Rhesus were performing a foot pedal motor task. Preflight testing indicated normal patterns of recruitment between the soleus and medial gastrocnemius, i.e. a higher level of recruitment of the soleus compared to the medial gastrocnemius during the task. Recording began two days into the spaceflight and showed that the media gastrocnemius was recruited preferentially over the soleus. This observation persisted throughout the flight and for the 2 week period of postflight testing. These data indicate a significant change in the relative recruitment of slow and fast extensor muscles under microgravity conditions. The appearance of clonic-like activity in one muscle of each Rhesus during flight further suggests a reorganization in the neuromotor system in a microgravity environment.

  15. Hypodynamic and hypokinetic condition of skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katinas, G. S.; Oganov, V. S.; Potapov, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented in regard to the effect of unilateral brachial amputation on the physiological characteristics of two functionally different muscles, the brachial muscle (flexor of the brachium) and the medial head of the brachial triceps muscle (extensor of the brachium), which in rats represents a separate muscle. Hypokinesia and hypodynamia were studied.

  16. Determining the anatomy of the descending palatine artery and pterygoid plates with computed tomography in Class III patients.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Koichiro; Hashiba, Yukari; Marukawa, Kohei; Nakagawa, Kiyomasa; Okabe, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Etsuhide

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the pterygomaxillary junction region helps prevent blood loss in Le Fort I osteotomy. Here, we determined the location of the descending palatine artery and the structure of the pterygomaxillary region. The study group consisted of 82 Japanese patients with mandibular prognathism and asymmetry, with and without maxillary retrognathism or asymmetry. A total of 164 sides were measured and divided into right versus left, men versus women, and bimaxillary osteotomy (B) versus mandibular osteotomy (S). Lateral and frontal cephalograms and computed tomography (CT) were analysed for all patients. The relationship between the cephalometric measurements and the measurements of the descending palatine artery and pterygoid plate (PP) were assessed. There were no significant correlations between measurements of cephalograms and those of the descending palatine artery and PPs. There were significant differences between right and left in lateral plate length (p=0.0014) and thickness of PP (p=0.0047). There were significant differences between men and women in right width of PP (p=0.0034), right thickness of PP (p=0.0063), left posterior length (p=0.0196), and left thickness of PP (p=0.0279). The B group had a shorter anterior length than the S group (right: p<0.0001, left: p=0.0027). These results suggest that the location of the descending palatine artery and the morphology of the PPs were not significantly associated with any cephalometric measurements. CT examination is necessary to recognize the anatomy of pterygomaxillary region and the exact positions of descending palatine artery before Le Fort I osteotomy.

  17. Epidural abscess treated with a medial supraorbital craniotomy through an incision in the eyebrow. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David S; Shafizadeh, Stephen; Baroody, Fuad M; Yamini, Bakhtiar

    2008-02-01

    The authors describe a medial supraorbital craniotomy performed through a medial eyebrow skin incision to approach an epidural abscess located in the medial anterior fossa of the skull. An 8-year-old boy presented with fevers and facial swelling. Imaging demonstrated pansinusitis and an epidural fluid collection adjacent to the frontal sinus. A medial supraorbital craniotomy was performed to access and drain the epidural abscess. The supraorbital nerve laterally and the supratrochlear nerve medially were preserved by incising the frontalis muscle vertically, parallel to the course of the nerves, and dissecting the subperiosteal plane to mobilize the nerves. This approach may be a useful access corridor for other lesions located near the medial anterior fossa.

  18. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  19. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: Dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ⩾12months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), masseter (MM), buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving⩾69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of muscle hyperactivity of the grimacing muscles by unilateral tight eyelid closure and stapedius muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Masato; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Nagai, Fumio

    2012-10-01

    Muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles, including the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles that cause crow's feet and a glabellar frown line with ageing, cannot be accurately evaluated by surface observation. In 71 subjects, this study investigated the extent to which grimacing muscles are innervated by the bilateral motor cortices, whether the corticofacial projection to the grimacing muscles affects the facially innervated stapedius muscle tone by measuring static compliance of the tympanic membrane, and whether unilateral tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles changes static compliance. Unilateral tight eyelid closure and its subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position revealed that motor neurons of the orbicularis oculi and corrugator supercilii muscles were innervated by the bilateral motor cortices with weak-to-strong contralateral dominance. The orbicularis oculi, corrugator supercilii, and stapedius muscles innervated by the bilateral motor cortices had increased muscle hyperactivity, which lowered the vertical medial eyebrow position and decreased the static compliance of the tympanic membrane more than those innervated by the unilateral motor cortex. Unilateral enhanced tight eyelid closure with contraction of the grimacing muscles in certain subjects ipsilaterally decreased the static compliance with increased contraction of the stapedius muscle, which probably occurs to immobilise the tympanic membrane and protect the inner ear from loud sound. Evaluation of unilateral tight eyelid closure and the subsequent change in the contralateral vertical medial eyebrow position as well as a measurement of the static compliance for the stapedius muscle tone has revealed muscle hyperactivity of grimacing muscles.

  1. Temporary Medial Upper Eyelid Lagophthalmos after External Dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, I O; Meienberg, O; Pimentel de Figueiredo, A R

    2016-04-01

    Background. Report of three cases of medial upper eyelid lagophthalmos as complication of external dacryocystorhinostomy. History and Signs. Shortly after dacryocystorhinostomy (skin incision on the side of the nose), three of ten consecutive patients (28 ± 4 years; mean ± standard deviation), presented with an ipsilateral lagophthalmos of 4 ± 1 mm in voluntary eyelid closure and 6 ± 1 mm in spontaneous blink. The lagophthalmos was due to a selective paresis of the medial part of the orbicularis oculi muscle of the upper eyelid. Patient 1 complained bitterly of dry eye symptoms and of her lagophthalmos. Patient 2 had mild symptoms but became very concerned after peers made her aware of her asymmetric blink. Patient 3 was asymptomatic and did not notice anything particular. Therapy and Outcome. Lagophthalmos resolved spontaneously within three months after surgery, first by improvement of voluntary eyelid closure and then of spontaneous blinking. Conclusions. Temporary lagophthalmos can occur as a complication of external dacryocystorhinostomy, most likely due to damage of the (only recently described) superficial buccal and/or zygomatic branches of the facial nerve that run upward to cross over the medial ligament and innervate the medial part of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Bilateral Vocal Fold Medialization: A Treatment for Abductor Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Karuna; Berke, Gerald S

    2017-11-10

    Abductor spasmodic dysphonia, a difficult-to-treat laryngologic condition, is characterized by spasms causing the vocal folds to remain abducted despite efforts to adduct them during phonation. Traditional treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia-botulinum toxin injection into the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle-can be both technically challenging and uncomfortable. Due to the difficulty of needle placement, it is often unsuccessful. The purpose of this investigation is to present a previously undescribed treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia-bilateral vocal fold medialization. A retrospective case review of all cases of abductor spasmodic dysphonia treated in a tertiary care laryngology practice with bilateral vocal fold medialization over a 10-year period was performed. The Voice Handicap Index and the Voice-Related Quality of Life surveys were utilized to assess patient satisfaction with voice outcome. Six patients with abductor spasmodic dysphonia treated with bilateral vocal fold medialization were identified. Disease severity ranged from mild to severe. All six patients reported statistically significant improvement in nearly all Voice Handicap Index and Voice-Related Quality of Life parameters. They reported fewer voice breaks and greater ease of communication. Results were noted immediately and symptoms continue to be well controlled for many years following medialization. Bilateral vocal fold medialization is a safe and effective treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia. It is performed under local anesthesia and provides phonation improvement in the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Medial vestibulospinal tract lesions impair sacculo-collic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonhye; Lee, Hak-Seung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2010-05-01

    The medial vestibulospinal tract (VST) is known to mediate the vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) in the contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). To determine whether disruption of the medial VST in the medulla impairs formation of VEMP, we measured VEMP in 14 patients with medial medullary infarction (MMI). VEMP was induced by a short tone burst and was recorded in contracting SCM while patients turned their heads forcefully to the contralateral side against resistance. Normative data were obtained from 47 healthy volunteers. Seven patients (50%) had abnormal VEMP in the side of the MMI lesion, absent in two, decreased in four, and delayed in two. One patient showed both decreased and delayed response. Of the seven patients with abnormal VEMP, five had the lesions that extended to the dorsal tegmentum while five of the seven patients with normal VEMP showed restricted anteromedial lesions mainly involving the pyramids. Spontaneous nystagmus (4/7, 57%), gaze-evoked nystagmus (6/7, 86%), and ocular tilt reaction/tilt of the subjective visual vertical (4/7, 57%) were frequently observed in the patients with abnormal VEMP. The abnormal VEMP in patients with infarctions involving the medullary tegmentum supports that VEMP is mediated by the medial VST descending within the medial longitudinal fasciculus.

  4. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location in the subjects with PTSD was the left lateral pterygoid site in 88%, and in subjects of the control group the right lateral pterygoid site in 28.26% of cases. The most painful location in the PTSD group was the left lateral pterygoid site in 72%, and in the control group the left posterior digastric in 4.35% of cases. 58% of the subjects with PTSD had TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p < 0.0001). The most frequent painful location of TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  5. Intermuscular pterygoid-temporal abscess following inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia–A computer tomography based navigated surgical intervention: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Jürgen; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthesia is a common local anesthetic procedure. Although IANB anesthesia is known for its safety, complications can still occur. Today immediately or delayed occurring disorders following IANB anesthesia and their treatment are well-recognized. We present a case of a patient who developed a symptomatic abscess in the pterygoid region as a result of several inferior alveolar nerve injections. Clinical symptoms included diffuse pain, reduced mouth opening and jaw's hypomobility and were persistent under a first step conservative treatment. Since image-based navigated interventions have gained in importance and are used for various procedures a navigated surgical intervention was initiated as a second step therapy. Thus precise, atraumatic surgical intervention was performed by an optical tracking system in a difficult anatomical region. A symptomatic abscess was treated by a computed tomography-based navigated surgical intervention at our department. Advantages and disadvantages of this treatment strategy are evaluated. PMID:24987612

  6. Intermuscular pterygoid-temporal abscess following inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia-A computer tomography based navigated surgical intervention: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Jürgen; Reinbacher, Knut Ernst; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthesia is a common local anesthetic procedure. Although IANB anesthesia is known for its safety, complications can still occur. Today immediately or delayed occurring disorders following IANB anesthesia and their treatment are well-recognized. We present a case of a patient who developed a symptomatic abscess in the pterygoid region as a result of several inferior alveolar nerve injections. Clinical symptoms included diffuse pain, reduced mouth opening and jaw's hypomobility and were persistent under a first step conservative treatment. Since image-based navigated interventions have gained in importance and are used for various procedures a navigated surgical intervention was initiated as a second step therapy. Thus precise, atraumatic surgical intervention was performed by an optical tracking system in a difficult anatomical region. A symptomatic abscess was treated by a computed tomography-based navigated surgical intervention at our department. Advantages and disadvantages of this treatment strategy are evaluated.

  7. Benefit of cup medialization in total hip arthroplasty is associated with femoral anatomy.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Alexandre; Levrero Florencio, Francesc; Rüdiger, Hannes A

    2014-10-01

    Medialization of the cup with a respective increase in femoral offset has been proposed in THA to increase abductor moment arms. Insofar as there are potential disadvantages to cup medialization, it is important to ascertain whether the purported biomechanical benefits of cup medialization are large enough to warrant the downsides; to date, studies regarding this question have disagreed. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of cup medialization with a compensatory increase in femoral offset compared with anatomic reconstruction for patients undergoing THA. We tested the hypothesis that there is a (linear) correlation between preoperative anatomic parameters and muscle moment arm increase caused by cup medialization. Fifteen patients undergoing THA were selected, covering a typical range of preoperative femoral offsets. For each patient, a finite element model was built based on a preoperative CT scan. The model included the pelvis, femur, gluteus minimus, medius, and maximus. Two reconstructions were compared: (1) anatomic position of the acetabular center of rotation, and (2) cup medialization compensated by an increase in the femoral offset. Passive abduction-adduction and flexion-extension were simulated in the range of normal gait. Muscle moment arms were evaluated and correlated to preoperative femoral offset, acetabular offset, height of the greater trochanter (relative to femoral center of rotation), and femoral antetorsion angle. The increase of muscle moment arms caused by cup medialization varied among patients. Muscle moment arms increase by 10% to 85% of the amount of cup medialization for abduction-adduction and from -35% (decrease) to 50% for flexion-extension. The change in moment arm was inversely correlated (R(2) = 0.588, p = 0.001) to femoral antetorsion (anteversion), such that patients with less femoral antetorsion gained more in terms of hip muscle moments. No linear correlation was observed between changes in moment arm and

  8. Medial meniscus posterior horn avulsion.

    PubMed

    Marzo, John M

    2009-05-01

    Avulsion of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can occur from acute trauma or chronic degeneration, leading to meniscus extrusion, articular cartilage loss, osteophyte formation, and medial joint space narrowing. With meniscus extrusion, the meniscus is unable to resist hoop stresses and cannot shield the adjacent articular cartilage from excessive axial load. Over time, this can lead to symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Patients typically report pain, swelling, mechanical symptoms, and general functional loss. Although nonsurgical care may relieve symptoms, it is unlikely to alter either the natural history of meniscal loss or the fate of the medial compartment. Surgical repair of posterior horn meniscal avulsion is done in an attempt to restore the anatomy and biomechanical function of the meniscus, and to slow or prevent degenerative joint disease. Meniscal transplantation is reserved for salvage situations.

  9. Etiologic factors in the development of medial tibial stress syndrome: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tweed, Jo L; Avil, Steven J; Campbell, Jackie A; Barnes, Mike R

    2008-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of exercise-induced leg pain that is common in recreational and competitive athletes. Although various studies have attempted to find the exact pathogenesis of this common condition, it remains unknown. Various theories in literature from 1976 to 2006 were reviewed using key words. Until recently, inflammation of the periosteum due to excessive traction was thought to be the most likely cause of medial tibial stress syndrome. This periostitis has been hypothesized by some authors to be caused by the tearing away of the muscle fibers at the muscle-bone interface, although there are several suggestions as to which, if any, muscle is responsible. Recent studies have supported the view that medial tibial stress syndrome is not an inflammatory process of the periosteum but instead a stress reaction of bone that has become painful.

  10. Medial gastrocnemius myoelectric control of a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2009-02-01

    A previous study from our laboratory showed that when soleus electromyography was used to control the amount of plantar flexion assistance from a robotic ankle exoskeleton, subjects significantly reduced their soleus activity to quickly return to normal gait kinematics. We speculated that subjects were primarily responding to the local mechanical assistance of the exoskeleton rather than directly attempting to reduce exoskeleton mechanical power via decreases in soleus activity. To test this observation we studied ten healthy subjects walking on a treadmill at 1.25 m/s while wearing a robotic exoskeleton proportionally controlled by medial gastrocnemius activation. We hypothesized that subjects would primarily decrease soleus activity due to its synergistic mechanics with the exoskeleton. Subjects decreased medial gastrocnemius recruitment by 12% ( p < 0.05 ) but decreased soleus recruitment by 27% ( p < 0.05). In agreement with our hypothesis, the primary reduction in muscle activity was not for the control muscle (medial gastrocnemius) but for the anatomical synergist to the exoskeleton (soleus). These findings indicate that anatomical morphology needs to be considered carefully when designing software and hardware for robotic exoskeletons.

  11. Different roles of the medial and lateral hamstrings in unloading the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Guelich, David R; Xu, Dali; Koh, Jason L; Nuber, Gordon W; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are closely associated with excessive loading and motion about the off axes of the knee, i.e. tibial rotation and knee varus/valgus. However, it is not clear about the 3-D mechanical actions of the lateral and medial hamstring muscles and their differences in loading the ACL. The purpose of this study was to investigate the change in anterior cruciate ligament strain induced by loading the lateral and medial hamstrings individually. Seven cadaveric knees were investigated using a custom testing apparatus allowing for six degree-of-freedom tibiofemoral motion induced by individual muscle loading. With major muscles crossing the knee loaded moderately, the medial and lateral hamstrings were loaded independently to 200N along their lines of actions at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° of knee flexion. The induced strain of the anterior cruciate ligament was measured using a differential variable reluctance transducer. Tibiofemoral kinematics was monitored using a six degrees-of-freedom knee goniometer. Loading the lateral hamstrings induced significantly more anterior cruciate ligament strain reduction (mean 0.764 [SD 0.63] %) than loading the medial hamstrings (mean 0.007 [0.2] %), (P=0.001 and effect size=0.837) across the knee flexion angles. The lateral and medial hamstrings have significantly different effects on anterior cruciate ligament loadings. More effective rehabilitation and training strategies may be developed to strengthen the lateral and medial hamstrings selectively and differentially to reduce anterior cruciate ligament injury and improve post-injury rehabilitation. The lateral and medial hamstrings can potentially be strengthened selectively and differentially as a more focused rehabilitation approach to reduce ACL injury and improve post-injury rehabilitation. Different ACL reconstruction procedures with some of them involving the medial hamstrings can be compared to each other for their effect on ACL loading. Copyright

  12. Medialized repair for retracted rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Jung, Kyu-Hak; Won, Jun-Sung; Cho, Seung-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of medialized rotator cuff repair and the continuity of repaired tendon in chronic retracted rotator cuff tears. Thirty-five consecutive patients were selected from 153 cases that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for more than medium-sized posterosuperior rotator cuff tears between July 2009 and July 2012 performed with the medialized repair. All cases were available for at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The visual analog scale of pain, muscle strength, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and University of California-Los Angeles score were evaluated. At the final follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved. The visual analog scale score for pain improved from 6 ± 1 preoperatively to 2 ± 1 postoperatively. The range of motion increased from preoperatively to postoperatively: active forward elevation, from 134° ± 49° to 150° ± 16°; active external rotation at the side, from 47° ± 15° to 55° ± 10°; and active internal rotation, from L3 to L1. The shoulder score also improved: Constant score, from 53.5 ± 16.7 to 79 ± 10; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, from 51 ± 15 to 82 ± 8; and University of California-Los Angeles score, from 14 ± 4 to 28 ± 4. The retear cases at the final follow-up were 6 (17%). Medialized repair may be useful in cases in which anatomic bone-to-tendon repair would be difficult because of the excessive tension of the repaired tendon and a torn tendon that does not reach the anatomic insertion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adaptability of the Immature Ocular Motor Control System: Unilateral IGF-1 Medial Rectus Treatment.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Christy L; Fleuriet, Jérome; Walton, Mark M; Mustari, Michael J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-06-01

    Unilateral treatment with sustained release IGF-1 to one medial rectus muscle in infant monkeys was performed to test the hypothesis that strabismus would develop as a result of changes in extraocular muscles during the critical period of development of binocularity. Sustained release IGF-1 pellets were implanted unilaterally on one medial rectus muscle in normal infant monkeys during the first 2 weeks of life. Eye position was monitored using standard photographic methods. After 3 months of treatment, myofiber and neuromuscular size, myosin composition, and innervation density were quantified in all rectus muscles and compared to those in age-matched controls. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatments resulted in strabismus for all treated subjects; 3 of the 4 subjects had a clinically significant strabismus of more than 10°. Both the treated medial rectus and the untreated ipsilateral antagonist lateral rectus muscles had significantly larger myofibers. No adaptation in myofiber size occurred in the contralateral functionally yoked lateral rectus or in myosin composition, neuromuscular junction size, or nerve density. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatment to extraocular muscles during the sensitive period of development of orthotropic eye alignment and binocularity was sufficient to disturb ocular motor development, resulting in strabismus in infant monkeys. This could be due to altering fusion of gaze during the early sensitive period. Serial measurements of eye alignment suggested the IGF-1-treated infants received insufficient coordinated binocular experience, preventing the establishment of normal eye alignment. Our results uniquely suggest that abnormal signaling by the extraocular muscles may be a cause of strabismus.

  14. BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE ANTERIOR, MEDIAL, AND POSTERIOR GENIOGLOSSUS IN THE AGED RAT

    PubMed Central

    Schaser, Allison J.; Wang, Hao; Volz, Lana M.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related tongue weakness may contribute to swallowing deficits in the elderly. One contributing factor may be an alteration in muscle fiber type properties with aging. However, it is not clear how muscle fiber types within the aged tongue may vary from those found in young adults, or how fiber types may vary across the anteroposterior axis of the extrinsic tongue muscles. We examined myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of anterior, medial, and posterior sections of the genioglossus muscle (GG) in 10 old male Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats and compared findings to previously reported data from young adult male rats. Significant differences (p< .01) between young adult and old rats were found in the distribution of MHC isoforms along the anteroposterior axis of the muscle. In the anterior, medial, and posterior regions, there was a significantly smaller proportion of type IIb MHC in the old rat GG muscles, while the proportion of type IIx MHC was significantly greater. In the medial region, the proportion of type I MHC was found to be significantly greater in the old rats. Thus, we found a shift to more slowly contracting muscle fibers in the aged rat tongue. PMID:20809174

  15. The JCR:LA-cp rat: a novel rodent model of cystic medial necrosis.

    PubMed

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Chilian, William M; Bennett, Martin R; Figg, Nichola; Kamarulzaman, Mohd Hamzah

    2017-03-01

    Although there are multiple rodent models of the metabolic syndrome, very few develop vascular complications. In contrast, the JCR:LA-cp rat develops both metabolic syndrome and early atherosclerosis in predisposed areas. However, the pathology of the normal vessel wall has not been described. We examined JCR:LA control (+/+) or cp/cp rats fed normal chow diet for 6 or 18 mo. JCR:LA-cp rats developed multiple features of advanced cystic medial necrosis including "cysts," increased collagen formation and proteoglycan deposition around cysts, apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells, and spotty medial calcification. These appearances began within 6 mo and were extensive by 18 mo. JCR:LA-cp rats had reduced medial cellularity, increased medial thickness, and vessel hypoxia that was most marked in the adventitia. In conclusion, the normal chow-fed JCR:LA-cp rat represents a novel rodent model of cystic medial necrosis, associated with multiple metabolic abnormalities, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and vessel hypoxia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Triggers for cystic medial necrosis (CMN) have been difficult to study due to lack of animal models to recapitulate the pathologies seen in humans. Our study is the first description of CMN in the rat. Thus the JCR:LA-cp rat represents a useful model to investigate the underlying molecular changes leading to the development of CMN. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Bilateral discoid medial menisci: a rare phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Puspak; Bhagwat, Kishan; Panigrahi, Tapas; Gopinathan, Nirmalraj

    2014-01-01

    Discoid medial meniscus is a relatively rare pathology of the knee joint, with bilateral cases even rarer. Herein, we report the case of a 25-year-old man diagnosed with discoid medial meniscus in the right knee with a horizontal tear. Increased cupping of the medial condyle of the tibia, widening of the medial joint space and the presence of discoid meniscus in the right knee prompted investigation of the asymptomatic left knee with magnetic resonance imaging. The contralateral asymptomatic knee also showed evidence of discoid medial meniscus. The symptomatic knee was successfully treated by arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, with excellent functional outcome. PMID:25273941

  17. Succinylcholine activation of human horizontal eye muscles.

    PubMed

    Lennerstrand, Gunnar; Bolzani, Roberto; Tian, Suna; Benassi, Mariagrazia; Fusari, Maurizio; Campos, Emilio; Schiavi, Costantino

    2010-12-01

    Succinylcholine (Sch) can induce contracture in slow, multiply innervated muscle fibres of the extraocular muscles in animals of different species. Slow muscle fibres also exist in human eye muscle but their physiological properties have not been studied. Isometric tension development was recorded in the lateral and medial rectus muscles in 12 patients operated under general anaesthesia. A strain gauge probe was attached with 5-0 silk sutures to the muscle tendon. Recordings were made in 12 eye muscles with the tendon attached to the globe and in four muscles detached from the globe. Muscle activation was produced by i.v. injection of Sch at a dose of 0.2-0.3 mg/kg bodyweight.   A single injection of Sch induced slow contractures lasting for several minutes. In the muscles attached to the globe, mean maximal isometric tension was 12.2 g in the lateral rectus and 12.8 g in the medial rectus. Similar tension was shown in the muscles detached from the globe. The contracture of eye muscles in response to Sch showed characteristics typical of slow muscle fibre activation in amphibian and avian muscle and confirmed the participation of slow fibre systems in ocular motor control. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Acta Ophthalmol.

  18. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle ( myopathic changes ) Tissue death of the muscle (necrosis) Disorders that involve inflammation of the blood vessels and affect muscles ( necrotizing vasculitis ) Traumatic muscle damage ...

  19. Associations of passive muscle stiffness, muscle stretch tolerance, and muscle slack angle with range of motion: individual and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naokazu; Hirata, Kosuke; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Yasuda, Osamu; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2018-05-29

    Joint range of motion (ROM) is an important parameter for athletic performance and muscular injury risk. Nonetheless, a complete description of muscular factors influencing ROM among individuals and between men and women is lacking. We examined whether passive muscle stiffness (evaluated by angle-specific muscle shear modulus), tolerance to muscle stretch (evaluated by muscle shear modulus at end-ROM), and muscle slack angle of the triceps surae are associated with the individual variability and sex difference in dorsiflexion ROM, using ultrasound shear wave elastography. For men, ROM was negatively correlated to passive muscle stiffness of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius in a tensioned state and positively to tolerance to muscle stretch in the medial gastrocnemius. For women, ROM was only positively correlated to tolerance to muscle stretch in all muscles but not correlated to passive muscle stiffness. Muscle slack angle was not correlated to ROM in men and women. Significant sex differences were observed only for dorsiflexion ROM and passive muscle stiffness in a tensioned state. These findings suggest that muscular factors associated with ROM are different between men and women. Furthermore, the sex difference in dorsiflexion ROM might be attributed partly to that in passive muscle stiffness of plantar flexors.

  20. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409.

  1. Mean individual muscle activities and ratios of total muscle activities in a selective muscle strengthening experiment: the effects of lower limb muscle activity based on mediolateral slope angles during a one-leg stance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide basic data for research on selective muscle strengthening by identifying mean muscle activities and calculating muscle ratios for use in developing strengthening methods. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one healthy volunteers were included in this study. Muscle activity was measured during a one-leg stance under 6 conditions of slope angle: 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°. The data used in the analysis were root mean square and % total muscle activity values. [Results] There were significant differences in the root mean square of the gluteus medius, the hamstring, and the medial gastrocnemius muscles. There were significant differences in % total muscle activity of the medial gastrocnemius. [Conclusion] Future studies aimed at developing selective muscle strengthening methods are likely to yield more effective results by using muscle activity ratios based on electromyography data.

  2. The Anatomy of the Medial Patellofemoral Complex.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miho J

    2017-06-01

    The term "medial patellofemoral complex" (MPFC) was proposed to describe the static medial stabilizer of the patella, typically referred to as the medial patellofemoral ligament. In light of our increasing understanding of the attachment of its fibers to the quadriceps tendon in addition to the patella, the term MPFC is used in this article. The purpose of this article is to describe and discuss the anatomy of the MPFC.

  3. Outcome of medial hamstring lengthening in children with spastic paresis: A biomechanical and morphological observational study

    PubMed Central

    Jaspers, Richard T.; Rutz, Erich; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.; Witbreuk, Melinda M.; van Hutten, Kim; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Becher, Jules G.

    2018-01-01

    To improve gait in children with spastic paresis due to cerebral palsy or hereditary spastic paresis, the semitendinosus muscle is frequently lengthened amongst other medial hamstring muscles by orthopaedic surgery. Side effects on gait due to weakening of the hamstring muscles and overcorrections have been reported. How these side effects relate to semitendinosus morphology is unknown. This study assessed the effects of bilateral medial hamstring lengthening as part of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) on (1) knee joint mechanics (2) semitendinosus muscle morphology and (3) gait kinematics. All variables were assessed for the right side only. Six children with spastic paresis selected for surgery to counteract limited knee range of motion were measured before and about a year after surgery. After surgery, in most subjects popliteal angle decreased and knee moment-angle curves were shifted towards a more extended knee joint, semitendinosus muscle belly length was approximately 30% decreased, while at all assessed knee angles tendon length was increased by about 80%. In the majority of children muscle volume of the semitendinosus muscle decreased substantially suggesting a reduction of physiological cross-sectional area. Gait kinematics showed more knee extension during stance (mean change ± standard deviation: 34±13°), but also increased pelvic anterior tilt (mean change ± standard deviation: 23±5°). In most subjects, surgical lengthening of semitendinosus tendon contributed to more extended knee joint angle during static measurements as well as during gait, whereas extensibility of semitendinosus muscle belly was decreased. Post-surgical treatment to maintain muscle belly length and physiological cross-sectional area may improve treatment outcome of medial hamstring lengthening. PMID:29408925

  4. Outcome of medial hamstring lengthening in children with spastic paresis: A biomechanical and morphological observational study.

    PubMed

    Haberfehlner, Helga; Jaspers, Richard T; Rutz, Erich; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Sluijs, Johannes A; Witbreuk, Melinda M; van Hutten, Kim; Romkes, Jacqueline; Freslier, Marie; Brunner, Reinald; Becher, Jules G; Maas, Huub; Buizer, Annemieke I

    2018-01-01

    To improve gait in children with spastic paresis due to cerebral palsy or hereditary spastic paresis, the semitendinosus muscle is frequently lengthened amongst other medial hamstring muscles by orthopaedic surgery. Side effects on gait due to weakening of the hamstring muscles and overcorrections have been reported. How these side effects relate to semitendinosus morphology is unknown. This study assessed the effects of bilateral medial hamstring lengthening as part of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) on (1) knee joint mechanics (2) semitendinosus muscle morphology and (3) gait kinematics. All variables were assessed for the right side only. Six children with spastic paresis selected for surgery to counteract limited knee range of motion were measured before and about a year after surgery. After surgery, in most subjects popliteal angle decreased and knee moment-angle curves were shifted towards a more extended knee joint, semitendinosus muscle belly length was approximately 30% decreased, while at all assessed knee angles tendon length was increased by about 80%. In the majority of children muscle volume of the semitendinosus muscle decreased substantially suggesting a reduction of physiological cross-sectional area. Gait kinematics showed more knee extension during stance (mean change ± standard deviation: 34±13°), but also increased pelvic anterior tilt (mean change ± standard deviation: 23±5°). In most subjects, surgical lengthening of semitendinosus tendon contributed to more extended knee joint angle during static measurements as well as during gait, whereas extensibility of semitendinosus muscle belly was decreased. Post-surgical treatment to maintain muscle belly length and physiological cross-sectional area may improve treatment outcome of medial hamstring lengthening.

  5. Treatment of subtotal medial rectus myectomy complicating functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Trotter, W L; Kaw, P; Meyer, D R; Simon, J W

    2000-08-01

    During the past 2 decades, the introduction of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has dramatically improved the treatment of sinus disorders. However, a variety of orbital complications have been reported, including optic nerve damage, hemorrhage, infection, compromise of the lacrimal drainage apparatus, and strabismus. At least 10 cases have reported damage to the medial rectus muscle. (1-8) Treatment options for such patients have been limited, especially because most are adults at risk for anterior segment ischemia after transposition of vertical rectus muscles. We describe 2 patients whose medial rectus myectomies were repaired by using nonabsorbable "hang-back" sutures in combination with a botulinum toxin (Botox) injection of the antagonist lateral rectus muscle. Good primary position alignment was achieved in both patients, and one patient was able to regain binocular function. We recommend this surgical approach, especially in patients at increased risk for anterior segment ischemia.

  6. Outside-In Deep Medial Collateral Ligament Release During Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel

    2016-08-01

    Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is a very common orthopaedic procedure performed for symptomatic, irreparable meniscus tears. It is usually associated with a very good outcome and minimal complications. In some patients with tight medial compartment, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can be difficult to visualize, and access in this area with instruments may be challenging. To increase the opening of the medial compartment, after valgus-extension stress position of the knee, different techniques of deep medial collateral ligament release have been described. The outside-in pie-crusting technique shown in this technical note has documented effectiveness and good outcomes with minimal or no morbidity.

  7. Medial Patella Subluxation: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mark A.; Bollier, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Medial patella subluxation is a disabling condition typically associated with previous patellofemoral instability surgery. Patients often describe achy pain with painful popping episodes. They often report that the patella shifts laterally, which occurs as the medial subluxed patella dramatically shifts into the trochlear groove during early knee flexion. Physical examination is diagnostic with a positive medial subluxation test. Nonoperative treatment, such as focused physical therapy and patellofemoral stabilizing brace, is often unsuccessful. Primary surgical options include lateral retinacular repair/imbrication or lateral reconstruction. Prevention is key to avoid medial patella subluxation. When considering patellofemoral surgery, important factors include appropriate lateral release indications, consideration of lateral retinacular lengthening vs release, correct MPFL graft placement and tension, and avoiding excessive medialization during tubercle transfer. This review article will analyze patient symptoms, diagnostic exam findings and appropriate treatment options, as well as pearls to avoid this painful clinical entity. PMID:26361441

  8. Somitic origin of the medial border of the mammalian scapula and its homology to the avian scapula blade.

    PubMed

    Valasek, Petr; Theis, Susanne; Krejci, Eliska; Grim, Milos; Maina, Flavio; Shwartz, Yulia; Otto, Anthony; Huang, Ruijin; Patel, Ketan

    2010-04-01

    The scapula is the main skeletal element of the pectoral girdle allowing muscular fixation of the forelimb to the axial skeleton. The vertebrate limb skeleton has traditionally been considered to develop from the lateral plate mesoderm, whereas the musculature originates from the axial somites. However, in birds, the scapular blade has been shown to develop from the somites. We investigated whether a somitic contribution was also present in the mammalian scapula. Using genetic lineage-tracing techniques, we show that the medial border of the mammalian scapula develops from somitic cells. The medial scapula border serves as the attachment site of girdle muscles (serratus anterior, rhomboidei and levator scapulae). We show that the development of these muscles is independent of the mechanism that controls the formation of all other limb muscles. We suggest that these muscles be specifically referred to as medial girdle muscles. Our results establish the avian scapular blade and medial border of the mammalian scapula as homologous structures as they share the same developmental origin.

  9. Somitic origin of the medial border of the mammalian scapula and its homology to the avian scapula blade

    PubMed Central

    Valasek, Petr; Theis, Susanne; Krejci, Eliska; Grim, Milos; Maina, Flavio; Shwartz, Yulia; Otto, Anthony; Huang, Ruijin; Patel, Ketan

    2010-01-01

    The scapula is the main skeletal element of the pectoral girdle allowing muscular fixation of the forelimb to the axial skeleton. The vertebrate limb skeleton has traditionally been considered to develop from the lateral plate mesoderm, whereas the musculature originates from the axial somites. However, in birds, the scapular blade has been shown to develop from the somites. We investigated whether a somitic contribution was also present in the mammalian scapula. Using genetic lineage-tracing techniques, we show that the medial border of the mammalian scapula develops from somitic cells. The medial scapula border serves as the attachment site of girdle muscles (serratus anterior, rhomboidei and levator scapulae). We show that the development of these muscles is independent of the mechanism that controls the formation of all other limb muscles. We suggest that these muscles be specifically referred to as medial girdle muscles. Our results establish the avian scapular blade and medial border of the mammalian scapula as homologous structures as they share the same developmental origin. PMID:20136669

  10. Adaptability of the Immature Ocular Motor Control System: Unilateral IGF-1 Medial Rectus Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Christy L.; Fleuriet, Jérome; Walton, Mark M.; Mustari, Michael J.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Unilateral treatment with sustained release IGF-1 to one medial rectus muscle in infant monkeys was performed to test the hypothesis that strabismus would develop as a result of changes in extraocular muscles during the critical period of development of binocularity. Methods. Sustained release IGF-1 pellets were implanted unilaterally on one medial rectus muscle in normal infant monkeys during the first 2 weeks of life. Eye position was monitored using standard photographic methods. After 3 months of treatment, myofiber and neuromuscular size, myosin composition, and innervation density were quantified in all rectus muscles and compared to those in age-matched controls. Results. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatments resulted in strabismus for all treated subjects; 3 of the 4 subjects had a clinically significant strabismus of more than 10°. Both the treated medial rectus and the untreated ipsilateral antagonist lateral rectus muscles had significantly larger myofibers. No adaptation in myofiber size occurred in the contralateral functionally yoked lateral rectus or in myosin composition, neuromuscular junction size, or nerve density. Conclusions. Sustained unilateral IGF-1 treatment to extraocular muscles during the sensitive period of development of orthotropic eye alignment and binocularity was sufficient to disturb ocular motor development, resulting in strabismus in infant monkeys. This could be due to altering fusion of gaze during the early sensitive period. Serial measurements of eye alignment suggested the IGF-1-treated infants received insufficient coordinated binocular experience, preventing the establishment of normal eye alignment. Our results uniquely suggest that abnormal signaling by the extraocular muscles may be a cause of strabismus. PMID:26030103

  11. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  12. Isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy in a child: a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Jagath C; Wickramasinghe, Chandani; Rodrigo, Ganganath

    2018-02-19

    Temporalis muscle hypertrophy is a rare entity of masticatory muscle hypertrophy. All types of masticatory muscle hypertrophies have been documented of which temporalis muscle hypertrophy is one. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy is most commonly bilateral and usually associated with other types of masticatory muscles hypertrophy such as masseter or pterygoid hypertrophy. However, isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy is extremely rare and only 9 cases have been reported to date in English literature since 1990 with only two patients less than 18 years. There is no exact etiology identified and the diagnosis is made by muscle biopsy combined with imaging study to exclude other possibilities. Age at presentation is ranges from 15 to 65 years with involvement of both sexes. We report the youngest child who is a seven year old girl with right side isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy. In this patient, we discuss the youngest child with isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy and literature review to date. The patient is a seven year old female presenting with painless swelling of the right temporalis muscle. There had no features of inflammation, trauma, neoplasm or history of parafunctions such as bruxism. The child was not complaining significantly headache or visual disturbances as well. She had undergone radiological assessment with ultrasound scan and contrast MRI. The diagnosis was confirmed by muscle biopsy which shows normal muscle architecture. She was managed conservatively with regular follow up. Isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy is extremely rare in children. However this case raises the importance of considering alternative diagnoses despite the condition being rare in the pediatric population.

  13. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy breaking new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjeev; Gopinath, M

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopy has changed the perspective of rhinologist towards the nose. It has revolutionised the surgical management of sinonasal disorders. Sinus surgeries were the first to get the benefit of endoscope. Gradually the domain of endoscopic surgery extended to the management of sino nasal tumours. Traditionally medial maxillectomy was performed through lateral rhinotomy or mid facial degloving approach. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy has been advocated by a number of authors in the management of benign sino-nasal tumours. We present our experience of endoscopic medial maxillectomy in the management of sinonasal pathologies.

  14. Complex Medial Meniscus Tears Are Associated With a Biconcave Medial Tibial Plateau.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Getelman, Mark H; Berry, Kathy L

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether an association exists between a biconcave medial tibial plateau and complex medial meniscus tears. A consecutive series of stable knees undergoing arthroscopy were evaluated retrospectively with the use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiographs, and arthroscopy documented by intraoperative videos. Investigators independently performed blinded reviews of the MRI or videos. Based on the arthroscopy findings, medial tibial plateaus were classified as either biconcave or not biconcave. A transverse coronal plane ridge, separating the front of the tibial plateau from the back near the inner margin of the posterior body of the medial meniscus, was defined as biconcave. The medial plateau slope was calculated with MRI sagittal views. General demographic information, body mass index, and arthroscopically confirmed knee pathology were recorded. A total of 179 consecutive knees were studied from July 2014 through August 2015; 49 (27.2%) biconcave medial tibial plateaus and 130 (72.8%) controls were identified at arthroscopy. Complex medial meniscus tears were found in 103. Patients with a biconcave medial tibial plateau were found to have more complex medial meniscus tears (69.4%) than those without a biconcavity (53.1%) (P = .049) despite having lower body mass index (P = .020). No difference in medial tibial plateau slope was observed for biconcavities involving both cartilage and bone, bone only, or an indeterminate group (P = .47). Biconcave medial tibial plateaus were present in 27.4% of a consecutive series of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy. A biconcave medial tibial plateau was more frequently associated with a complex medial meniscus tear. Level III, case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  15. [Tibial periostitis ("medial tibial stress syndrome")].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Etienne

    2003-06-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is characterised by complaints along the posteromedial tibia. Runners and athletes involved in jumping activities may develop this syndrome. Increased stress to stabilize the foot especially when excessive pronation is present explain the occurrence this lesion.

  16. Anatomy of the Corrugator Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Lee, Jung Hun; Lim, Hee Joong

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this article is to systematically review the anatomy and action of the corrugator muscle. PubMed and Scopus were searched using the terms "corrugator" AND "anatomy." Among the 60 full texts from the 145 relevant abstracts, 34 articles without sufficient content were excluded and 4 articles drawn from the reference lists were added. Among the 30 articles analyzed (721 hemifaces), 28% classified by oblique head and transverse head, and 72% did not. Corrugator originated mostly from the medial supraorbital rim (45%), followed by the medial frontal bone (31%), the medial infraorbital rim (17%), and the upper nasal process (7%). Corrugator extended through the frontalis and orbicularis oculi (41%), only the frontalis (41%), or only the orbicularis oculi (18%). Corrugator ran superolaterally (59%), or laterally (41%). Corrugators inserted mostly to the middle of the eyebrow (57%), or the medial half of the eyebrow (36%), but also to the glabella region (7%). The length of the corrugator ranged 38 to 53 mm. The transverse head (23.38 mm) was longer than the oblique head (19.75 mm). Corrugator was thicker at the medial canthus than at the midpupillary line. Corrugator was innervated by the temporal branch of the facial nerve (66%), the zygomatic branch (17%), or the angular nerve (zygomatic branch and buccal branch, 17%). Supraorbital nerve (60%) or supratrochlear nerve (40%) penetrated the corrugator. The action was depressing, pulling the eyebrow medially (91%), or with medial eyebrow elevation and lateral eyebrow depression (9%). Surgeons must keep this anatomy in mind during surgical procedures.

  17. Modulating Phonation Through Alteration of Vocal Fold Medial Surface Contour

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Ted; Muhlestein, Joseph; Callahan, Sean; Chan, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 1. To test whether alteration of the vocal fold medial surface contour can improve phonation. 2. To demonstrate that implant material properties affect vibration even when implant is deep to the vocal fold lamina propria. Study Design Induced phonation of excised human larynges. Methods Thirteen larynges were harvested within 24 hours post-mortem. Phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and flow (PTF) were measured before and after vocal fold injections using either calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) or hyaluronic acid (HA). Small-volume injections (median 0.0625 mL) were targeted to the infero-medial aspect of the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. Implant locations were assessed histologically. Results The effect of implantation on PTP was material-dependent. CaHA tended to increase PTP, whereas HA tended to decrease PTP (Wilcoxon test P = 0.00013 for onset). In contrast, the effect of implantation on PTF was similar, with both materials tending to decrease PTF (P = 0.16 for onset). Histology confirmed implant presence in the inferior half of the vocal fold vertical thickness. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggested the implants may have altered the vocal fold medial surface contour, potentially resulting in a less convergent or more rectangular glottal geometry as a means to improve phonation. An implant with a closer viscoelastic match to vocal fold cover is desirable for this purpose, as material properties can affect vibration even when the implant is not placed within the lamina propria. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions and implies greater need for surgical precision in implant placement and care in material selection. PMID:22865592

  18. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  19. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: 'SCOPEX', a randomised control trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Hinman, Rana S; Wrigley, Tim V; Roos, Ewa M; Hodges, Paul W; Staples, Margaret; Bennell, Kim L

    2012-11-27

    Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. 62 people aged 30-50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee

  20. Medial versus lateral supraspinatus tendon properties: implications for double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vincent M; Wang, Fan Chia; McNickle, Allison G; Friel, Nicole A; Yanke, Adam B; Chubinskaya, Susan; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2010-12-01

    (56.7% ± 3.6%, P < .05). Superior pullout resistance of medially placed sutures may provide a strain shielding effect for the lateral row after double-row repair. Larger diameter collagen fibrils as well as greater fibril area fraction in the medial supraspinatus tendon may provide greater resistance to suture migration. While clinical factors such as musculotendinous integrity warrant strong consideration for surgical decision making, the present ultrastructural and biomechanical results appear to provide a scientific rationale for double-row rotator cuff repair where sutures are placed more medially at the muscle-tendon junction.

  1. Role of the medial prefrontal cortex in cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yo; Williams, Rhiannan H; Agostinelli, Lindsay; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Saper, Clifford B; Scammell, Thomas E

    2013-06-05

    Narcolepsy is characterized by chronic sleepiness and cataplexy, episodes of profound muscle weakness that are often triggered by strong, positive emotions. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a loss of orexin (also known as hypocretin) signaling, but almost nothing is known about the neural mechanisms through which positive emotions trigger cataplexy. Using orexin knock-out mice as a model of narcolepsy, we found that palatable foods, especially chocolate, markedly increased cataplexy and activated neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Reversible suppression of mPFC activity using an engineered chloride channel substantially reduced cataplexy induced by chocolate but did not affect spontaneous cataplexy. In addition, neurons in the mPFC innervated parts of the amygdala and lateral hypothalamus that contain neurons active during cataplexy and that innervate brainstem regions known to regulate motor tone. These observations indicate that the mPFC is a critical site through which positive emotions trigger cataplexy.

  2. Role of the medial prefrontal cortex in cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Yo; Williams, Rhiannan H.; Agostinelli, Lindsay; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Saper, Clifford B.; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by chronic sleepiness and cataplexy - episodes of profound muscle weakness that are often triggered by strong, positive emotions. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a loss of orexin (also known as hypocretin) signaling, but almost nothing is known about the neural mechanisms through which positive emotions trigger cataplexy. Using orexin knockout mice as a model of narcolepsy, we found that palatable foods, especially chocolate, markedly increased cataplexy and activated neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Reversible suppression of mPFC activity using an engineered chloride channel substantially reduced cataplexy induced by chocolate but did not affect spontaneous cataplexy. In addition, neurons in the mPFC innervated parts of the amygdala and lateral hypothalamus that contain neurons active during cataplexy, and that innervate brainstem regions known to regulate motor tone. These observations indicate that the mPFC is a critical site through which positive emotions trigger cataplexy. PMID:23739971

  3. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  5. Medial Elbow Joint Space Increases With Valgus Stress and Decreases When Cued to Perform A Maximal Grip Contraction.

    PubMed

    Pexa, Brett S; Ryan, Eric D; Myers, Joseph B

    2018-04-01

    Previous research indicates that the amount of valgus torque placed on the elbow joint during overhead throwing is higher than the medial ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) can tolerate. Wrist and finger flexor muscle activity is hypothesized to make up for this difference, and in vitro studies that simulated activity of upper extremity musculature, specifically the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi ulnaris, support this hypothesis. To assess the medial elbow joint space at rest, under valgus stress, and under valgus stress with finger and forearm flexor contraction by use of ultrasonography in vivo. Controlled laboratory study. Participants were 22 healthy males with no history of elbow dislocation or UCL injury (age, 21.25 ± 1.58 years; height, 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight, 79.43 ± 18.50 kg). Medial elbow joint space was measured by use of ultrasonography during 3 separate conditions: at rest (unloaded), under valgus load (loaded), and with a maximal grip contraction under a valgus load (loaded-contracted) in both limbs. Participants lay supine with their arm abducted 90° and elbow flexed 30° with the forearm in full supination. A handgrip dynamometer was placed in the participants' hand to grip against during the contracted condition. Images were reduced in ImageJ to assess medial elbow joint space. A 2-way (condition × limb) repeated-measures analysis of variance and Cohen's d effect sizes were used to assess changes in medial elbow joint space. Post hoc testing was performed with a Bonferroni adjustment to assess changes within limb and condition. The medial elbow joint space was significantly larger in the loaded condition (4.91 ± 1.16 mm) compared with the unloaded condition (4.26 ± 1.23 mm, P < .001, d = 0.712) and the loaded-contracted condition (3.88 ± 0.94 mm, P < .001, d = 1.149). No significant change was found between the unloaded and loaded-contracted conditions ( P = .137). Medial elbow joint space increases under a valgus load and then

  6. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  7. The deep belly of the temporalis muscle: an anatomical, histological and MRI study.

    PubMed

    Geers, C; Nyssen-Behets, C; Cosnard, G; Lengelé, B

    2005-08-01

    In order to achieve a better functional and clinical knowledge of a masticatory muscle called the sphenomandibularis that is suspected to be responsible for headaches by compressing the maxillary nerve, bilateral dissections of the infratemporal fossa were performed on ten human cadavers and completed by histological and radiological studies of the same areas. Both macroscopic and microscopic observations obviously showed that the so-called sphenomandibularis muscle corresponds to the deep portion of the temporalis muscle, since there is no epimysial septum between these two structures, which previously have been described as being completely independent from each other. In spite of the close topographic relationship between the deep belly of the temporalis and the lateral pterygoid muscle, as well as their similar innervation pattern, the sphenomandibularis in fact has to be considered functionally as an original but non-isolated positional fascicle of the temporalis muscle itself. Our observations, correlated with MR images, suggest indeed that the deep belly of the temporalis muscle is of functional importance in the masticatory movements, but is not involved by its neurovascular vicinity in the genesis of specific headaches. Its surgical release, however, should be discussed in the case of a temporal myoplasty.

  8. L-acetylcarnitine enhances functional muscle re-innervation.

    PubMed

    Pettorossi, V E; Brunetti, O; Carobi, C; Della Torre, G; Grassi, S

    1991-01-01

    The efficacy of L-acetylcarnitine and L-carnitine treatment on motor re-innervation was analyzed by evaluating different muscular parameters describing functional muscle recovery after denervation and re-innervation. The results show that L-acetylcarnitine markedly enhances functional muscle re-innervation, which on the contrary is unaffected by L-carnitine. The medial gastrocnemius muscle was denervated by cutting the nerve at the muscle entry point. After 20 days the sectioned nerve was resutured into the medial gastrocnemius muscle, and the extent of re-innervation was monitored 45 days later. L-acetylcarnitine-treated animals show significantly higher twitch and tetanic tensions of re-innervated muscle. Furthermore the results, obtained by analysing the twitch time to peak and tetanic contraction-relaxation times, suggest that L-acetylcarnitine mostly affects the functional re-innervation of slow motor units. The possible mechanisms by which L-acetylcarnitine facilitates such motor and nerve recovery are discussed.

  9. Posterior medial meniscus detachment: a unique type of medial meniscal tear.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Richard A; DeHaan, Alex; Baldwin, James L

    2009-10-01

    Patients with posterior medial meniscal detachment, as determined at knee arthroscopy, were evaluated retrospectively. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years for 8 men and 20 women (30 knees; mean age, 57 years). Most patients had acute onset of pain with a minor specific incident. Seventeen patients were obese, 9 were overweight, and 2 were normal. Eleven of 22 magnetic resonance imaging evaluations detected a tear at the site of the posterior medial meniscus root. Nine of 16 bone scan evaluations showed moderate uptake medially. Arthroscopic treatment included partial medial meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Twelve knees (40%) showed significant progression of arthritis. Of the 7 patients with severe arthritic knees, 5 have subsequently undergone total knee arthroplasty, 1 is considering total knee arthroplasty, and the other has minimal symptoms. Patients should be counseled about the clinical course of posterior medial meniscus detachment and its potential for progressive arthritis in the joint.

  10. Dendrites of medial olivocochlear neurons in mouse.

    PubMed

    Brown, M C; Levine, J L

    2008-06-12

    Stains for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and retrograde labeling with Fluorogold (FG) were used to study olivocochlear neurons and their dendritic patterns in mice. The two methods gave similar results for location and number of somata. The total number of medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB) is about 170 per side. An additional dozen large olivocochlear neurons are located in the dorsal periolivary nucleus (DPO). Dendrites of all of these neurons are long and extend in all directions from the cell bodies, a pattern that contrasts with the sharp frequency tuning of their responses. For VNTB neurons, there were greater numbers of dendrites directed medially than laterally and those directed medially were longer (on average, 25-50% longer). Dendrite extensions were most pronounced for neurons located in the rostral portion of the VNTB. When each dendrite from a single neuron was represented as a vector, and all the vectors summed, the result was also skewed toward the medial direction. DPO neurons, however, had more symmetric dendrites that projected into more dorsal parts of the trapezoid body, suggesting that this small group of olivocochlear neurons has very different physiological properties. Dendrites of both types of neurons were somewhat elongated rostrally, about 20% longer than those directed caudally. These results can be interpreted as extensions of dendrites of olivocochlear neurons toward their synaptic inputs: medially to meet crossing fibers from the cochlear nucleus that are part of the MOC reflex pathway, and rostrally to meet descending inputs from higher centers.

  11. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p < 0.001 and p = 0.018, respectively). Significant correlation was observed between medial meniscal tear and bursitis in the medial compartment (p = 0.038). Presence of medial periarticular bursitis was positively correlated with severity of osteoarthritis but exhibited no correlation with chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  12. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Results Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p < 0.001 and p = 0.018, respectively). Significant correlation was observed between medial meniscal tear and bursitis in the medial compartment (p = 0.038). Presence of medial periarticular bursitis was positively correlated with severity of osteoarthritis but exhibited no correlation with chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. Conclusions We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear. PMID:29333118

  13. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle atrophy may include: Burns Long-term corticosteroid therapy Malnutrition Muscular dystrophy and other diseases of the muscle Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Home Care An exercise program ...

  14. Muscles that do not cross the knee contribute to the knee adduction moment and tibiofemoral compartment loading during gait.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, Prasanna; Lin, Yi-Chung; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate and explain the individual muscle contributions to the medial and lateral knee compartment forces during gait, and to determine whether these quantities could be inferred from their contributions to the external knee adduction moment. Gait data from eight healthy male subjects were used to compute each individual muscle contribution to the external knee adduction moment, the net tibiofemoral joint reaction force, and reaction moment. The individual muscle contributions to the medial and lateral compartment forces were then found using a least-squares approach. While knee-spanning muscles were the primary contributors, non-knee-spanning muscles (e.g., the gluteus medius) also contributed substantially to the medial compartment compressive force. Furthermore, knee-spanning muscles tended to compress both compartments, while most non-knee-spanning muscles tended to compress the medial compartment but unload the lateral compartment. Muscle contributions to the external knee adduction moment, particularly those from knee-spanning muscles, did not accurately reflect their tendencies to compress or unload the medial compartment. This finding may further explain why gait modifications may reduce the knee adduction moment without necessarily decreasing the medial compartment force. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Adjustable sutures: experimental assessment of final muscle position.

    PubMed

    Climenhaga, H W; Pearce, W G

    1984-08-01

    The likelihood of forward "creep" of muscles recessed with the use of adjustable loops of suture in the correction of strabismus was investigated. Twelve orthotropic dogs underwent both regular and loop recessions of the lateral and medial rectus muscles; the data for two of the dogs were excluded because of loss of muscles. Three months later it was found that in the majority of cases the recessed muscles had minimally advanced from the position of surgical placement. Although the type of recession made little difference to the results, the mean forward creep was much greater for the medial rectus muscles (1.55 +/- 0.68 mm [p less than 0.01] and 2.00 +/- 2.44 mm [p = 0.09] for those undergoing regular and loop recessions respectively) than for the lateral rectus muscles (0.35 +/- 0.58 mm and 0.60 +/- 0.62 mm respectively). During the operations the amount of contraction of the medial rectus muscle had been noted to vary. It is likely that in some instances the tension on the suture loops was insufficient to hold them taut, and the muscles therefore adhered to the sclera at variable sites. Hence, adequate intrinsic muscle tone may be important for predictable clinical results of loop recession.

  16. Medial elbow injury in young throwing athletes

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Bonnie; Nyland, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary This report reviews the anatomy, overhead throwing biomechanics, injury mechanism and incidence, physical examination and diagnosis, diagnostic imaging and conservative treatment of medial elbow injuries in young throwing athletes. Based on the information a clinical management decision-making algorithm is presented. PMID:23888291

  17. Affective Aprosodia from a Medial Frontal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Kenneth M.; Leon, Susan A.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Whereas injury to the left hemisphere induces aphasia, injury to the right hemisphere's perisylvian region induces an impairment of emotional speech prosody (affective aprosodia). Left-sided medial frontal lesions are associated with reduced verbal fluency with relatively intact comprehension and repetition…

  18. Anatomy of the pubovisceral muscle origin: Macroscopic and microscopic findings within the injury zone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyong; Betschart, Cornelia; Ramanah, Rajeev; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O L

    2015-11-01

    The levator ani muscle (LA) injury associated with vaginal birth occurs in a characteristic site of injury on the inner surface of the pubic bone to the pubovisceral portion of the levator ani muscle's origin. This study investigated the gross and microscopic anatomy of the pubic origin of the LA in this region. Pubic origin of the levator ani muscle was examined in situ then harvested from nine female cadavers (35-98 years). A combination of targeted feature sampling and sequential sampling was used where each specimen was cut sequentially in approximately 5 mm thick slices apart in the area of known LA injury. Histological sections were stained with Masson's trichrome. The pubovisceral origin is transparent and thin as it attaches tangentially to the pubic periosteum, with its morphology changing from medial to lateral regions. Medially, fibers of the thick muscle belly coalesce toward multiple narrow points of bony attachment for individual fascicles. In the central portion there is an aponeurosis and the distance between muscle and periosteum is wider (∼3 mm) than in the medial region. Laterally, the LA fibers attach to the levator arch where the transition from pubovisceral muscle to the iliococcygeal muscle occurs. The morphology of the levator ani origin varies from the medial to lateral margin. The medial origin is a rather direct attachment of the muscle, while lateral origin is made through the levator arch. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Architectural differences between the hamstring muscles.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Galanis, Nikiforos; Kapetanos, George; Natsis, Konstantinos

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the detailed architectural properties of the human hamstring muscles. The long (BFlh) and short (BFsh) head of biceps femoris, semimembranosus (SM) and semitendinosus (ST) muscles were dissected and removed from their origins in eight cadaveric specimens (age 67.8±4.3 years). Mean fiber length, sarcomere length, physiological cross-section area and pennation angle were measured. These data were then used to calculate a similarity index (δ) between pairs of muscles. The results indicated moderate similarity between BFlh and BFsh (δ=0.54) and between BFlh and SM (δ=0.35). In contrast, similarity was low between SM and ST (δ=0.98) and between BFlh and SM (δ=1.17). The fascicle length/muscle length ratio was higher for the ST (0.58) and BFsh (0.50) compared with the BFlh (0.27) and SM (0.22). There were, however, high inter-correlations between individual muscle architecture values, especially for muscle thickness and fascicle length data sets. Prediction of the whole hamstring architecture was achieved by combining data from all four muscles. These data show different designs of the hamstring muscles, especially between the SM and ST (medial) and BFlh and BFsh (lateral) muscles. Modeling the hamstrings as one muscle group by assuming uniform inter-muscular architecture yields less accurate representation of human hamstring muscle function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Egerton, Thorlene; Wrigley, Tim V; Hodges, Paul W; Hunt, Michael; Roos, Ewa M; Kyriakides, Mary; Metcalf, Ben; Forbes, Andrew; Ageberg, Eva; Hinman, Rana S

    2011-12-05

    Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis), pain, and self-reported physical function measured at baseline and

  1. Comparison of neuromuscular and quadriceps strengthening exercise in the treatment of varus malaligned knees with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis of the knee involving predominantly the medial tibiofemoral compartment is common in older people, giving rise to pain and loss of function. Many people experience progressive worsening of the disease over time, particularly those with varus malalignment and increased medial knee joint load. Therefore, interventions that can reduce excessive medial knee loading may be beneficial in reducing the risk of structural progression. Traditional quadriceps strengthening can improve pain and function in people with knee osteoarthritis but does not appear to reduce medial knee load. A neuromuscular exercise program, emphasising optimal alignment of the trunk and lower limb joints relative to one another, as well as quality of movement performance, while dynamically and functionally strengthening the lower limb muscles, may be able to reduce medial knee load. Such a program may also be superior to traditional quadriceps strengthening with respect to improved pain and physical function because of the functional and dynamic nature. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect of a neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint loading, pain and function in individuals with medial knee joint osteoarthritis. We hypothesise that the neuromuscular program will reduce medial knee load as well as pain and functional limitations to a greater extent than a traditional quadriceps strengthening program. Methods/Design 100 people with medial knee pain, radiographic medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two 12-week exercise programs: quadriceps strengthening or neuromuscular exercise. Each program will involve 14 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist plus four unsupervised sessions per week at home. The primary outcomes are medial knee load during walking (the peak external knee adduction moment from 3D gait analysis), pain, and self-reported physical function

  2. Larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension may trigger posterior root tear of medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun Young; Song, Hyung Keun; Jung, Myung Kuk; Oh, Hyeong Tak; Kim, Joon Ho; Yoon, Ji-Sang; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The major meniscal functions are load bearing, load distribution, and shock absorption by increasing the tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) contact area and dissipating axial loads by conversion into hoop stresses. The increased hoop strain stretches the meniscus in outward direction towards radius, causing extrusion, which is associated with the root tear and resultant degenerative osteoarthritis. Since the larger contact area of medial TFJ may increase the hoop stresses, we hypothesized that the larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension would contribute to the development of medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT). Thus, the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between MMPRT and medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension. A case-control study was conducted to compare medial femoral to tibial condylar dimensions of patients with complete MMPRT (n = 59) with those of demography-matched controls (n = 59) during the period from 2010 to 2013. In each patient, MRIs were reviewed and several parameters were measured including articulation width of medial femoral condyle (MFC) at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°, medial tibial condyle (MTC) width, degree of meniscal extrusion, and medial femoral to tibial condylar width ratio (MFC/MTC) at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. Demographic and radiographic data were assessed. A larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension was associated with MMPRT at 0° and 30° knee angles. Patients with MFC/MTC greater than 0.9 at 0° also showed about 2.5-fold increase in the chance of MMPRT. Those with meniscal extrusion greater than 3 mm also had about 17.1 times greater chance for the presence of MMPRT accordingly. A larger medial femoral to tibial condylar dimension may be considered as one of the regional contributors to the outbreak of MMPRT, and medial femoral to tibial condylar width ratio greater than 0.9 at 0° knee angle may be considered as a significant risk factor for MMPRT. III.

  3. The soleus syndrome. A cause of medial tibial stress (shin splints).

    PubMed

    Michael, R H; Holder, L E

    1985-01-01

    Radionuclide bone scans have demonstrated linear uptake along the posterior medial border of the tibia in patients with shin splints. This area was investigated by anatomical dissection (14 human cadavers), electromyographic (EMG) and muscle stimulation studies (10 patients), and open biopsy (1 patient). Histologically, the increased metabolic activity manifested on the radionuclide scan is due to a periostitis with new bone formation. The soleus muscle and its investing fascia are anatomically and biomechanically implicated in the production of these stress changes, particularly when the heel is in the pronated position. The soleus muscle and fascia form a tough "soleus bridge" over the deep compartment which is thought to be important in patients requiring surgical decompression.

  4. Stimulation of the medial amygdala enhances medial preoptic dopamine release: implications for male rat sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, J M; Hull, E M

    2001-11-02

    Increased dopamine (DA) in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) facilitates male sexual behavior. A major source of innervation to the MPOA is the medial amygdala (MeA). We now report that chemical stimulation of the MeA enhanced levels of extracellular MPOA DA in anesthetized male rats. These results suggest that DA activity in the MPOA can be regulated by input from the MeA to the MPOA.

  5. Natural history of medial clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Salipas, Andrew; Kimmel, Lara A; Edwards, Elton R; Rakhra, Sandeep; Moaveni, Afshin Kamali

    2016-10-01

    Fractures of the medial third of the clavicle comprise less than 3% of all clavicle fractures. The natural history and optimal management of these rare injuries are unknown. The aim of our study is to describe the demographics, management and outcomes of patients with medial clavicle fractures treated at a Level 1 Trauma Centre. A retrospective review was conducted of patients presenting to our institution between January 2008 and March 2013 with a medial third clavicle fracture. Clinical and radiographic data were recorded including mechanism of injury, fracture pattern and displacement, associated injuries, management and complications. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOS-E) scores from the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR). Shoulder outcomes were assessed using two patient reported outcomes scores, the American Shoulder and Elbow Society Score (ASES) and the Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV). Sixty eight medial clavicle fractures in 68 patients were evaluated. The majority of patients were male (n=53), with a median age of 53.5 years (interquartile range (IQR) 37.5-74.5 years). The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident (n=28). The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.4%. The fracture pattern was almost equally distributed between extra articular (n=35) and intra-articular (n=33). Fifty-five fractures (80.9%) had minimal or no displacement. Associated injuries were predominantly thoracic (n=31). All fractures were initially managed non-operatively, with a broad arm sling. Delayed operative fixation was performed for painful atrophic delayed union in two patients (2.9%). Both patients were under 65 years of age and had a severely displaced fracture of the medial clavicle. One intra-operative vascular complication was seen, with no adverse long-term outcome. Follow-up was obtained in 85.0% of the surviving cohort at an average of three years post injury (range 1-6 years). The mean ASES

  6. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric Glial Heterotopia in the Medial Canthus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Amponsah, Emmanuel Kofi; Eo, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ju; Lee, Suk Keun

    2017-11-01

    Glial heterotopias are rare, benign, congenital, midline, and nonteratomatous extracranial glial tissue. They may be confused as encephalocele or dermoid cysts and are mostly present in the nose.An 8-month-old African female child presented with a slow growing paranasal mass. The mass had been present at the left upper medial canthus since birth and had slowly and progressively enlarged. There was no communication between the mass and the cranial cavity during the operational procedure. The mass was immunohistochemically positive for S-100 protein as well as for glial fibrillary acidic protein, but negative for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. This suggested that the mass was composed of benign glial tissues with many astrocytes.The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the first patient with pediatric glial heterotopic tissue in the medial canthus and to report the clinical importance of its immunohistochemical findings.

  8. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Helene; Gour, Anjali; Straehle, Jakob; Boergens, Kevin M.; Brecht, Michael; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2017-09-01

    Research on neuronal connectivity in the cerebral cortex has focused on the existence and strength of synapses between neurons, and their location on the cell bodies and dendrites of postsynaptic neurons. The synaptic architecture of individual presynaptic axonal trees, however, remains largely unknown. Here we used dense reconstructions from three-dimensional electron microscopy in rats to study the synaptic organization of local presynaptic axons in layer 2 of the medial entorhinal cortex, the site of grid-like spatial representations. We observe path-length-dependent axonal synapse sorting, such that axons of excitatory neurons sequentially target inhibitory neurons followed by excitatory neurons. Connectivity analysis revealed a cellular feedforward inhibition circuit involving wide, myelinated inhibitory axons and dendritic synapse clustering. Simulations show that this high-precision circuit can control the propagation of synchronized activity in the medial entorhinal cortex, which is known for temporally precise discharges.

  9. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some are common and normal. Others are signs of a nervous system disorder. Causes Causes may include: Autoimmune disorders , such ... muscle Spinal muscular atrophy Weak muscles (myopathy) Symptoms of a nervous system disorder include: Loss of, or change in, sensation ...

  10. Unicameral Bone Cyst of the Medial Cuneiform.

    PubMed

    Schick, Faith A; Daniel, Joseph N; Miller, Juliane S

    2016-09-02

    A unicameral bone cyst is a relatively uncommon, benign bone tumor found in the metaphysis of long bones, such as the humerus and the femur, in skeletally immature persons. In the foot, these benign, fluid-filled cavities are most commonly found within the os calcis. We present a case report of a 10-year-old female with a unicameral bone cyst of the medial cuneiform.

  11. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  12. Advanced atherosclerosis is associated with increased medial degeneration in sporadic ascending aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Albini, Paul T; Segura, Ana Maria; Liu, Guanghui; Minard, Charles G; Coselli, Joseph S; Milewicz, Dianna M; Shen, Ying H; LeMaire, Scott A

    2014-02-01

    The pathogenesis of non-familial, sporadic ascending aortic aneurysms (SAAA) is poorly understood, and the relationship between ascending aortic atherosclerosis and medial degeneration is unclear. We evaluated the prevalence and severity of aortic atherosclerosis and its association with medial degeneration in SAAA. Atherosclerosis was characterized in ascending aortic tissues collected from 68 SAAA patients (mean age, 62.9 ± 12.0 years) and 15 controls (mean age, 56.6 ± 11.4 years [P = 0.07]) by using a modified American Heart Association classification system. Upon histologic examination, 97% of SAAA patients and 73% of controls showed atherosclerotic changes. Most SAAA samples had intermediate (types 2 and 3, 35%) or advanced atherosclerosis (types ≥ 4; 40%), whereas most control samples showed minimal atherosclerosis (none or type 1, 80%; P < 0.001 after adjusting for age). In a separate analysis, we examined the total incidence and grade distribution of medial degenerative changes among SAAA samples according to atherosclerosis grade. Advanced atherosclerosis was associated with higher grades of smooth muscle cell depletion (P < 0.001), elastic fiber depletion (P = 0.02), elastic fiber fragmentation (P < 0.001), and mucopolysaccharide accumulation (P = 0.04). Aortic diameter was larger in SAAA patients with advanced atherosclerosis than in patients with minimal (P = 0.04) or intermediate atherosclerosis (P = 0.04). Immunostaining showed marked CD3+ T-cell and CD68+ macrophage infiltration, MMP-2 and MMP-9 production, and cryopyrin expression in the medial layer adjacent to atherosclerotic plaque. SAAA tissues exhibited advanced atherosclerosis that was associated with severe medial degeneration and increased aortic diameter. Our findings suggest a role for atherosclerosis in the progression of sporadic ascending aortic aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  14. Isolated Medial Rectus Nuclear Palsy as a Rare Presentation of Midbrain Infarction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed; Lee Kwen, Peterkin

    2015-10-08

    Diplopia is a common subjective complaint that can be the first manifestation of a serious pathology. Here, we report a rare case of midbrain infarction involving the lateral subnucleus of the oculomotor nuclear complex presenting as diplopia, with no other stroke manifestations. An 83-year-old right-handed white man with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and coronary artery disease presented to the emergency department (ED) with diplopia and unsteadiness. Two days prior to admission, the patient woke up with constant horizontal diplopia and unsteadiness, which limited his daily activities and led to a fall at home. He denied any weakness, clumsiness, nausea, vomiting, photophobia, fever, or chills. Ocular exam showed a disconjugate gaze at rest, weakness of the left medial rectus muscle, impaired convergence test, and bilateral 3-mm reactive pupils. The diplopia resolved by closing either eye. The remaining extraocular muscles and other cranial nerves were normal. There was no nystagmus, ptosis, or visual field deficit. Sensation, muscle tone, and strength were normal in all extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a tiny focus of restricted diffusion in the left posterior lateral midbrain. A thorough history and physical examination is essential to diagnose and manage diplopia. Isolated extraocular palsy is usually thought to be caused by orbital lesions or muscular diseases. Here, we report a case of midbrain infarction manifested as isolated medial rectus palsy.

  15. Effects of roller massager on muscle recovery after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Nuno; Reis, Joana F; Vaz, João R; Machado, Rita; Mendes, Bruno; Button, Duane C; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Freitas, Sandro R

    2018-01-01

    Two experiments (n = 10) were conducted to determine the effects of roller massager (RM) on ankle plantar flexor muscle recovery after exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Experiment 1 examined both functional [i.e., ankle plantar flexion maximal isometric contraction and submaximal (30%) sustained force; ankle dorsiflexion maximal range of motion and resistance to stretch; and medial gastrocnemius pain pressure threshold] and morphological [cross-sectional area, thickness, fascicle length, and fascicle angle] variables, before and immediately, 1, 24, 48, and 72 h after an EIMD stimulus. Experiment 2 examined medial gastrocnemius deoxyhaemoglobin concentration kinetics before and 48 h after EIMD. Participants performed both experiments twice: with (RM) and without (no-roller massager; NRM) the application of a RM (6 × 45 s; 20-s rest between sets). RM intervention did not alter the functional impairment after EIMD, as well as the medial gastrocnemius morphology and oxygenation kinetics (P > 0.05). Although, an acute increase of ipsilateral (RM = + 19%, NRM = -5%, P = 0.032) and a strong tendency for contralateral (P = 0.095) medial gastrocnemius pain pressure threshold were observed. The present results suggest that a RM has no effect on plantar flexors performance, morphology, and oxygenation recovery after EIMD, except for muscle pain pressure threshold (i.e., a soreness).

  16. Model identification of stomatognathic muscle system activity during mastication

    PubMed Central

    Kijak, Edward; Margielewicz, Jerzy; Lietz-Kijak, Danuta; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, Katarzyna; Kucharzewski, Marek; Śliwiński, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the numeric projection of the function of the mandible and muscle system during mastication. An experimental study was conducted on a healthy 47 year-old subject. On clinical examination no functional disorders were observed. To evaluate the activity of mastication during muscle functioning, bread cubes and hazelnuts were selected (2 cm2 and 1.2/1.3 cm in diameter, respectively) for condyloid processing. An assessment of the activity of mastication during muscle functioning was determined on the basis of numeric calculations conducted with a novel software programme, Kinematics 3D, designed specifically for this study. The efficacy of the model was verified by ensuring the experimentally recorded trajectories were concordant with those calculated numerically. Experimental measurements of the characteristic points of the mandible trajectory were recorded six times. Using the configuration coordinates that were calculated, the dominant componential harmonics of the amplitude-frequency spectrum were identified. The average value of the dominant frequency during mastication of the bread cubes was ~1.16±0.06 Hz, whereas in the case of the hazelnut, this value was nearly two-fold higher at 1.84±0.07 Hz. The most asymmetrical action during mastication was demonstrated to be carried out by the lateral pterygoid muscles, provided that their functioning was not influenced by food consistency. The consistency of the food products had a decisive impact on the frequency of mastication and the number of cycles necessary to grind the food. Model tests on the function of the masticatory organ serve as effective tools since they provide qualitative and quantitative novel information on the functioning of the human masticatory organ. PMID:28123482

  17. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F; Fregly, Benjamin J; Delp, Scott L; Banks, Scott A; Pandy, Marcus G; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lloyd, David G

    2013-11-15

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

    PubMed Central

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  19. Impaired Varus-Valgus Proprioception and Neuromuscular Stabilization in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The study objectives were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08 ± 0.59° vs. 0.69 ± 0.49°, p < 0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31 ± 0.75% vs. 1.79 ± 0.84% body weight, p < 0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29 ± 0.67% vs. 1.88 ± 0.99%, p = 0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67 ± 2.86 vs. 8.26 ± 5.95 Nm/degree, p < 0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  20. Semimembranosus Release for Medial Soft Tissue Balancing Does Not Weaken Knee Flexion Strength in Patients Undergoing Varus Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Won; Koh, In Jun; Kim, Man Soo; Kim, Ju Yeong; In, Yong

    2016-11-01

    The sequential medial release technique including semimembranosus (semiM) release is effective and safe during varus total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there are concerns about weakening of knee flexion strength after semiM release. We determined whether semiM release to balance the medial soft tissue decreased knee flexion strength after TKA. Fifty-nine consecutive varus knees undergoing TKA were prospectively enrolled. A 3-step sequential release protocol which consisted of release of (1) the deep medial collateral ligament (dMCL), (2) the semiM, and (3) the superficial medial collateral ligament based on medial tightness. Gap balancing was obtained after dMCL release in 31 knees. However, 28 knees required semiM release or more after dMCL release. Isometric muscle strength of the knee was compared 6 months postoperatively between the semiM release and semiM nonrelease groups. Knee stability and clinical outcomes were also compared. No differences in knee flexor or extensor peak torque were observed between the groups 6 months postoperatively (P = .322 and P = .383, respectively). No group difference was observed in medial joint opening angle on valgus stress radiographs (P = .327). No differences in the Knee Society or Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores were detected between the groups (P = .840 and P = .682, respectively). These results demonstrate that semiM release as a sequential step to balance medial soft tissue in varus knees did not affect knee flexion strength after TKA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, H Lee; Hammers, David W

    2018-02-01

    SUMMARYMuscle cells are designed to generate force and movement. There are three types of mammalian muscles-skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and move them relative to each other. Cardiac muscle comprises the heart, which pumps blood through the vasculature. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are known as striated muscles, because the filaments of actin and myosin that power their contraction are organized into repeating arrays, called sarcomeres, that have a striated microscopic appearance. Smooth muscle does not contain sarcomeres but uses the contraction of filaments of actin and myosin to constrict blood vessels and move the contents of hollow organs in the body. Here, we review the principal molecular organization of the three types of muscle and their contractile regulation through signaling mechanisms and discuss their major structural and functional similarities that hint at the possible evolutionary relationships between the cell types. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Persistently active neurons in human medial frontal and medial temporal lobe support working memory

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, J; Sullivan, S; Chung, JM; Ross, IB; Mamelak, AN; Rutishauser, U

    2017-01-01

    Persistent neural activity is a putative mechanism for the maintenance of working memories. Persistent activity relies on the activity of a distributed network of areas, but the differential contribution of each area remains unclear. We recorded single neurons in the human medial frontal cortex and the medial temporal lobe while subjects held up to three items in memory. We found persistently active neurons in both areas. Persistent activity of hippocampal and amygdala neurons was stimulus-specific, formed stable attractors, and was predictive of memory content. Medial frontal cortex persistent activity, on the other hand, was modulated by memory load and task set but was not stimulus-specific. Trial-by-trial variability in persistent activity in both areas was related to memory strength, because it predicted the speed and accuracy by which stimuli were remembered. This work reveals, in humans, direct evidence for a distributed network of persistently active neurons supporting working memory maintenance. PMID:28218914

  3. Acquired simulated brown syndrome following surgical repair of medial orbital wall fracture.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jong-uk; Lim, Hyun Taek

    2005-03-01

    Simulated Brown syndrome is a term applied to a myriad of disorders that cause a Brown syndrome-like motility. We encountered a case of acquired simulated Brown syndrome in a 41-year-old man following surgical repair of fractures of both medial orbital walls. He suffered from diplopia in primary gaze, associated with hypotropia of the affected eye. We performed an ipsilateral recession of the left inferior rectus muscle as a single-stage intraoperative adjustment procedure under topical anesthesia, rather than the direct approach to the superior oblique tendon. Postoperatively, the patient was asymptomatic in all diagnostic gaze positions.

  4. Medial gastrocnemius structure and gait kinetics in spastic cerebral palsy and typically developing children: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Martín Lorenzo, Teresa; Rocon, Eduardo; Martínez Caballero, Ignacio; Lerma Lara, Sergio

    2018-05-01

    To compare medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon structure, gait propulsive forces, and ankle joint gait kinetics between typically developing children and those with spastic cerebral palsy, and to describe significant associations between structure and function in children with spastic cerebral palsy.A sample of typically developing children (n = 9 /16 limbs) and a sample of children with spastic cerebral palsy (n = 29 /43 limbs) were recruited. Ultrasound and 3-dimensional motion capture were used to assess muscle-tendon structure, and propulsive forces and ankle joint kinetics during gait, respectively.Children with spastic cerebral palsy had shorter fascicles and muscles, and longer Achilles tendons than typically developing children. Furthermore, total negative power and peak negative power at the ankle were greater, while total positive power, peak positive power, net power, total vertical ground reaction force, and peak vertical and anterior ground reaction forces were smaller compared to typically developing children. Correlation analyses revealed that smaller resting ankle joint angles and greater maximum dorsiflexion in children with spastic cerebral palsy accounted for a significant decrease in peak negative power. Furthermore, short fascicles, small fascicle to belly ratios, and large tendon to fascicle ratios accounted for a decrease in propulsive force generation.Alterations observed in the medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon structure of children with spastic cerebral palsy may impair propulsive mechanisms during gait. Therefore, conventional treatments should be revised on the basis of muscle-tendon adaptations.

  5. Mouse Plantar Flexor Muscle Size and Strength After Inactivity and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    suspension. Keywords: eccentric contraction , microgravity , exercise . SPACEFLIGHT CAUSES atrophy and strength loss in antigravity skeletal muscles...isometric, concentric, and eccentric contractions pre- served muscle mass in the rat medial gastrocnemius ( 2 ), the use of isometric resistance exercise ...Adams GR , Haddad F , Bodell PW , Tran PD , Baldwin KM . Com- bined isometric, concentric, and eccentric resistance exercise prevents

  6. Muscle fibre recruitment can respond to the mechanics of the muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, James M; Uehli, Katrin; Rozitis, Antra I

    2006-08-22

    This study investigates the motor unit recruitment patterns between and within muscles of the triceps surae during cycling on a stationary ergometer at a range of pedal speeds and resistances. Muscle activity was measured from the soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) using surface electromyography (EMG) and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. Muscle fascicle strain rates were quantified using ultrasonography, and the muscle-tendon unit lengths were calculated from the segmental kinematics. The EMG intensities showed that the body uses the SOL relatively more for the higher-force, lower-velocity contractions than the MG and LG. The EMG spectra showed a shift to higher frequencies at faster muscle fascicle strain rates for MG: these shifts were independent of the level of muscle activity, the locomotor load and the muscle fascicle strain. These results indicated that a selective recruitment of the faster motor units occurred within the MG muscle in response to the increasing muscle fascicle strain rates. This preferential recruitment of the faster fibres for the faster tasks indicates that in some circumstances motor unit recruitment during locomotion can match the contractile properties of the muscle fibres to the mechanical demands of the contraction.

  7. Realization of masticatory movement by 3-dimensional simulation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication.

  8. Persistent medial foot pain in an adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Craig P; Reischl, Stephen F

    2013-03-01

    The patient was a 15-year-old adolescent male who was referred to a physical therapist for a chief complaint of worsening right medial foot pain. Given the worsening nature of the patient's right medial foot pain, palpatory findings, and a prior recommendation for computed tomography from a radiologist, the patient was referred to his physician. Subsequent computed tomography imaging of the right foot revealed a nondisplaced fracture through the dorsal-medial aspect of the navicular.

  9. Isolated medial medullary infarction due to vertebral artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Wakita, M; Matsuoka, H; Hamada, R; Kasuya, J; Osame, M

    2003-12-01

    A 54-year-old man developed left hemiparesis and tactile and deep sensory disturbance following onset of rightside cervical pain. These symptoms resulted from an isolated infarct in the right medial area of the upper medulla oblongata and intracranial vertebral artery (VA) dissection. Atherosclerotic disease of the VA is the most common cause of medial medullary infarction. In past reports of isolated medial medullary infarction, only a few cases involved VA dissection.

  10. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Amit Kanta, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis. PMID:28070434

  11. The medial tibial stress syndrome. A cause of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, S J; Gould, R N; Lee, Y F; Schmidt, D A; Hargens, A R

    1982-01-01

    The medial tibial stress syndrome is a symptom complex seen in athletes who complain of exercise-induced pain along the distal posterior-medial aspect of the tibia. Intramuscular pressures within the posterior compartments of the leg were measured in 12 patients with this disorder. These pressures were not elevated and therefore this syndrome is a not a compartment syndrome. Available information suggests that the medial tibial stress syndrome most likely represents a periostitis at this location of the leg.

  12. Medial and Lateral Discoid Menisci of Both Knees

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Hiroyuki; Arai, Yuji; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Minami, Ginjiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Discoid menisci on both the medial and lateral sides are rare, and there are very few reports on cases involving both sides. We report a case of a 52-year-old female with medial and lateral discoid menisci in both knees. Arthroscopy revealed the lateral menisci of both knees were complete discoid menisci, and partial meniscectomy was performed. The medial menisci were incomplete discoid menisci, but there were no findings of abnormal mobility or injury; therefore, the medial menisci were observed without treatment. At six months postoperatively, her pain and range of motion restrictions disappeared. PMID:27894182

  13. A rare variation of the digastric muscle

    PubMed Central

    KALNIEV, MANOL; KRASTEV, DIMO; KRASTEV, NIKOLAY; VIDINOV, KALIN; VELTCHEV, LUDMIL; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER; MILEVA, MILKA

    2013-01-01

    The digastric muscle is composed by two muscle bellies: an anterior and a posterior, joined by an intermediate tendon. This muscle is situated in the anterior region of the neck. The region between the hyoid bone and the mandible is divided by an anterior belly into two triangles: the submandibular situated laterally and the submental triangle which is located medially. We found that the anatomical variations described in the literature relate mainly to the anterior belly and consist of differences in shape and attachment of the muscle. During routine dissection in February 2013 in the section hall of the Department of Anatomy and Histology in Medical University – Sofia we came across a very interesting variation of the digastric muscle. The digastric muscles that presented anatomical variations were photographed using a Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T1 camera, with a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar lens. We found out bilateral variation of the digastric muscle in one cadaver. The anterior bellies were very thin and insert to the hyoid bone. Two anterior bellies connect each other and thus they formed a loop. The anatomical variations observed of our study related only to the anterior belly, as previously described by other authors. It is very important to consider the occurrence of the above mentioned variations in the digastric muscle when surgical procedures are performed on the anterior region of the neck. PMID:26527971

  14. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... and you need to throw up. The muscles push the food back out of the stomach so it comes up ... body the power it needs to lift and push things. Muscles in your neck and the top part of your back aren't as large, but they are capable ...

  15. Medial surface dynamics of an in vivo canine vocal fold during phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döllinger, Michael; Berry, David A.; Berke, Gerald S.

    2005-05-01

    Quantitative measurement of the medial surface dynamics of the vocal folds is important for understanding how sound is generated within the larynx. Building upon previous excised hemilarynx studies, the present study extended the hemilarynx methodology to the in vivo canine larynx. Through use of an in vivo model, the medial surface dynamics of the vocal fold were examined as a function of active thyroarytenoid muscle contraction. Data were collected using high-speed digital imaging at a sampling frequency of 2000 Hz, and a spatial resolution of 1024×1024 pixels. Chest-like and fry-like vibrations were observed, but could not be distinguished based on the input stimulation current to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The subglottal pressure did distinguish the registers, as did an estimate of the thyroarytenoid muscle activity. Upon quantification of the three-dimensional motion, the method of Empirical Eigenfunctions was used to extract the underlying modes of vibration, and to investigate mechanisms of sustained oscillation. Results were compared with previous findings from excised larynx experiments and theoretical models. .

  16. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Monsch, Andreas U.; Taylor, Kirsten I.

    2012-01-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  17. [Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Lenschow, S; Herbort, M; Fink, C

    2015-12-01

    Stabilization of the patella by medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Recurrent lateral patella instability with chronic weakening of the MPFL. Femoropatellar cartilage defects ICRS grade 3° or higher. Tuberositas Tibiae Trochlear Groove Index (TTTG) >20 mm. Lateral hypercompression of the patella without instability. A 3 cm transverse skin incision at the superomedial edge of the patella in 90° of flexion. Longitudinal incision of the prepatellar bursa and exposure of the quadriceps tendon. Preparation of a flat tendon strip with a length of 8 cm, a width of 10 mm, and a thickness of 3 mm, leaving the attachment at the patella intact. Flipping of the tendon strip and passing of the graft through a tunnel underneath the prepatellar tissue at the medial edge of the patella. Passing of the graft in layer two of the medial joint capsule just below the fascia (layer 1) and the vastus medialis. Fixation of the graft in a bone tunnel, drilled in the femoral insertion site of the native MPFL using a biodegradable interference screw. Patella centralizing brace for 4 weeks with range of motion (ROM) 0/0/90°, 20 kg of partial weight bearing for 3 weeks. Full weight-bearing according to pain starting from week 4 postoperatively. ROM up to 90° of flexion directly postoperatively. Free ROM starting from week 6 postoperatively. Stationary cycling 6 weeks postoperatively. Swimming and running after 10 months. Return to pivoting sports after 4-5 months. A total of 17 patients (7 men and 10 women; average age 21.5 years ±3.9 years, average BMI 22.6 ±3.9) were treated using this technique between March 2011 and November 2012. Only patients with at least one recurrent patella dislocation following conservative treatment were included. Patient satisfaction 12 months postoperatively was very high. Overall, 94.1 % would undergo the procedure again and 94.1 % were very satisfied with the cosmetic result. Significant improvement in Lysholm score 6, 12, and 24

  18. Quadriceps Tendon Autograft Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Steensen, Robert; Gföller, Peter; Lawton, Robert

    2018-06-01

    Critically evaluate the published literature related to quadriceps tendon (QT) medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Hamstring tendon (HT) MPFL reconstruction techniques have been shown to successfully restore patella stability, but complications including patella fracture are reported. Quadriceps tendon (QT) reconstruction techniques with an intact graft pedicle on the patella side have the advantage that patella bone tunnel drilling and fixation are no longer needed, reducing risk of patella fracture. Several QT MPFL reconstruction techniques, including minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches, have been published with promising clinical results and fewer complications than with HT techniques. Parallel laboratory studies have shown macroscopic anatomy and biomechanical properties of QT are more similar to native MPFL than hamstring (HS) HT, suggesting QT may more accurately restore native joint kinematics. Quadriceps tendon MPFL reconstruction, via both open and MIS techniques, have promising clinical results and offer valuable alternatives to HS grafts for primary and revision MPFL reconstruction in both children and adults.

  19. The Anatomy of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thai Q; Ferrel, Jason R; Bentley, Jared C; Steensen, Robert N

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocation is observed in many patients treated nonoperatively following primary dislocation. Injury to the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is reported in the majority of patients following dislocation. There is an increased interest in repair or reconstruction of the MPFL for patients experiencing recurrent instability. The femoral attachment of the MPFL is critical in determining graft behavior following reconstruction. The femoral attachment can be determined by referencing local anatomy, fluoroscopic imaging or on the basis of desired graft-length changes. This article reviews the anatomy of the MPFL, with a focus on its femoral insertion site as it pertains to anatomic, isometric, and anisometric reconstruction. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(4):e583-e588.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Medial tibial stress syndrome: conservative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R Michael; Lavallee, Mark E

    2009-10-07

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), commonly known as "shin splints," is a frequent injury of the lower extremity and one of the most common causes of exertional leg pain in athletes (Willems T, Med Sci Sports Exerc 39(2):330-339, 2007; Korkola M, Amendola A, Phys Sportsmed 29(6):35-50, 2001; Hreljac A, Med Sci Sports Exerc 36(5):845-849, 2004). Although often not serious, it can be quite disabling and progress to more serious complications if not treated properly. Often, the cause of MTSS is multi-factorial and involves training errors and various biomechanical abnormalities. Few advances have been made in the treatment of MTSS over the last few decades. Current treatment options are mostly based on expert opinion and clinical experience. The purpose of this article is to review published literature regarding conservative treatment options for MTSS and provide recommendations for sports medicine clinicians for improved treatment and patient outcomes.

  1. Bilateral medial medullary infarction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pongmoragot, Jitphapa; Parthasarathy, Sujatha; Selchen, Daniel; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2013-08-01

    Bilateral infarction of the medial medulla (MMI) is rare. Limited information is available on clinical characteristics, etiology, and prognosis. High-resolution neuroimaging has a major role in elucidating the underlying stroke mechanism. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze the clinical presentations, stroke mechanisms, and outcomes in patients with bilateral MMI. We performed a systematic review of the literature from 1992-2011 that reported on clinical presentations, stroke mechanism, and/or outcomes in patients with magnetic resonance imaging-proven bilateral MMI. Medline, EMBASE, and Web of Science Scholars Portal were searched without language restriction. Two reviewers independently assessed identified studies to determine eligibility, validity, and quality. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality; a secondary outcome was case fatality at 12 months. We identified 138 articles from Medline, EMBASE, and Scholars Portal including the MeSH terms "brainstem infarction," "medulla," and "bilateral." Twenty-nine articles met our inclusion criteria, including a total of 38 cases with bilateral MMI, and included in our study. These 38 patients had a mean age of 62.2 years and were predominately male (74.2%). The most common clinical presentations were motor weakness in 78.4%, dysarthria in 48.6%, and hypoglossal palsy in 40.5%. The most common vascular pathology was vertebral artery atherosclerosis, in 38.5%. The clinical outcome was poor (mortality, 23.8%; dependency, 61.9%). Bilateral medial medullary infarction is a rare stroke syndrome. Clinical presentations were mostly rostral medullary lesions. Large-artery atherosclerosis and branch disease were the most common stroke mechanisms. The clinical outcome was usually poor. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Double PCL sign does not always indicate a bucket-handle tear of medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zheng, Hua Yong; Huang, Yan; Li, Hai Peng; Wu, Han; Sun, Tian Sheng; Yao, Jian Hua

    2016-09-01

    The discoid medial meniscus is an extremely rare anomaly. Bilateral discoid medial menisci are much more rare but intermittently reported. We report the first case of bilateral discoid medial menisci with positive double PCL sign, which typically indicates a bucket-handle tear of medial meniscus. A literature review was also conducted on bilateral discoid medial menisci.

  3. Fetal Tendinous Connection Between the Tensor Tympani and Tensor Veli Palatini Muscles: A Single Digastric Muscle Acting for Morphogenesis of the Cranial Base.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Hiroshi; Amano, Osamu; Murakami, Gen

    2016-04-01

    Some researchers contend that in adults the tensor tympani muscle (TT) connects with the tensor veli palatini muscle (TVP) by an intermediate tendon, in disagreement with the other researchers. To resolve this controversy, we examined serial sections of 50 human embryos and fetuses at 6-17 weeks of development. At 6 weeks, in the first pharyngeal arch, a mesenchymal connection was found first to divide a single anlage into the TT and TVP. At and after 7 weeks, the TT was connected continuously with the TVP by a definite tendinous tissue mediolaterally crossing the pharyngotympanic tube. At 11 weeks another fascia was visible covering the cranial and lateral sides of the tube. This "gonial fascia" had two thickened borders: the superior one corresponded to a part of the connecting tendon between the TT and TVP; the inferior one was a fibrous band ending at the os goniale near the lateral end of the TVP. In association with the gonial fascia, the fetal TT and TVP seemed to provide a functional complex. The TT-TVP complex might first help elevate the palatal shelves in association with the developing tongue. Next, the tubal passage, maintained by contraction of the muscle complex, seems to facilitate the removal of loose mesenchymal tissues from the tympanic cavity. Third, the muscle complex most likely determined the final morphology of the pterygoid process. Consequently, despite the controversial morphologies in adults, the TT and TVP seemed to make a single digastric muscle acting for the morphogenesis of the cranial base. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Traumatic posterior root tear of the medial meniscus in patients with severe medial instability of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ra, Ho Jong; Ha, Jeong Ku; Jang, Ho Su; Kim, Jin Goo

    2015-10-01

    To examine the incidence and diagnostic rate of traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear associated with severe medial instability and to evaluate the effectiveness of pullout repair. From 2007 to 2011, 51 patients who underwent operation due to multiple ligament injuries including medial collateral ligament rupture were reviewed retrospectively. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective and Lysholm score were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and if indicated, a second-look arthroscopic examination was conducted. Fourteen out of 51 patients were associated with severe medial instability. Seven patients were diagnosed with traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear and underwent arthroscopic pullout repair. Five of them were missed at initial diagnosis using MRI. In seven patients, the mean Lysholm and IKDC subjective scores improved from 74.6 ± 10.3 and 47.6 ± 7.3 to 93.0 ± 3.7 and 91.6 ± 2.6, respectively. All showed complete healing of meniscus root on follow-up MRI and second-look arthroscopy. Medial meniscus posterior root tear may occur in severe medial instability from trauma. It is a common mistake that surgeons may not notice on the diagnosis of those injuries using MRI. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of medial meniscus posterior root tear in this type of injuries. The traumatic medial meniscus posterior root tear could be healed successfully using arthroscopic pullout repair technique. The possibility of the medial meniscus posterior root tear should be considered in severe medial instability and arthroscopic pullout repair can be an effective option for treatment. Case series with no comparison group, Level IV.

  5. Proximal Tibia Medial Biplanar Retrotubercle Open Wedge Osteotomy for Varus Knees with Medial Gonarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Türkmen, İsmail; Esenkaya, İrfan; Ünay, Koray; Türkmensoy, Fatih; Özkut, Afşar Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early results of proximal tibia medial biplanar retrotubercle open wedge osteotomy for varus gonarthrosis and compare the results with the literatüre. Methods: The results of proximal tibia medial biplanar retrotubercle open wedge osteotomy for 23 knees of 22 patients with medial gonarthrosis were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Results: Twenty of the patients were female and two were male. Mean age of the patients was 56.24; mean boy mass index was 31.95 and preoperative HSS (Hospital for Special Surgery) score was 68.7. Mean tibiofemoral axis was 186.39° and mean Insall-Salvatti index value was 1.04 preoperatively. Mean follow up period was 30.19 months. Mean HSS score was 86.48, femorotibial anatomic axis angle was 175° and Insall-Salvati index value 1.06 during the last follow-up. The improvement of the HSS score and the femorotibial anatomic axis angle was statistically significant. However, the change in Insall Salvati index values was statistically insignificant. Nonfatal pulmonary embolus in 1 patient, and deep vein thrombosis that occured one year after the procedure in 1 patient, rhabdomyolysis in 1 patient and loss of correction (relapse) in 1 patient were encountered as complications. Conclusion: Our results show that proximal tibia medial biplanar retrotubercle open wedge osteotomy improves the frontal and sagittal plane deformities without changing the patellar tendon length. Hence, possible patellofemoral problems are prevented and the clinical results are improved.

  6. Measuring anisotropic muscle stiffness properties using elastography.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Geng, G; Qin, E; Sinkus, R; Gandevia, S C; Bilston, L E

    2013-11-01

    Physiological and pathological changes to the anisotropic mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are still largely unknown, with only a few studies quantifying changes in vivo. This study used the noninvasive MR elastography (MRE) technique, in combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to measure shear modulus anisotropy in the human skeletal muscle in the lower leg. Shear modulus measurements parallel and perpendicular to the fibre direction were made in 10 healthy subjects in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles. The results showed significant differences in the medial gastrocnemius (μ‖ = 0.86 ± 0.15 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.66 ± 0.19 kPa, P < 0.001), soleus (μ‖ = 0.83 ± 0.22 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.65 ± 0.13 kPa, P < 0.001) and the tibialis anterior (μ‖ = 0.78 ± 0.24 kPa; μ⊥ = 0.66 ± 0.16 kPa, P = 0.03) muscles, where the shear modulus measured in the direction parallel is greater than that measured in the direction perpendicular to the muscle fibres. No significant differences were measured across muscle groups. This study provides the first direct estimates of the anisotropic shear modulus in the triceps surae muscle group, and shows that the technique may be useful for the probing of mechanical anisotropy changes caused by disease, aging and injury. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Anatomy and histology of the frontalis muscle.

    PubMed

    Costin, Bryan R; Plesec, Thomas P; Sakolsatayadorn, Natta; Rubinstein, Tal J; McBride, Jennifer M; Perry, Julian D

    2015-01-01

    To determine the gross and histologic configurations of the medial and lateral frontalis muscle. After making a midcoronal incision and bluntly dissecting to the orbital rim, the frontalis muscle was marked and measured. A protractor was used to measure the frontalis-orbicularis angle (FOA) and, when present, the angle of central bifurcation (AOB). Three strips of full-thickness forehead soft tissue measuring 0.5 cm × 8 cm were excised 3, 4.5, and 6 cm above the supraorbital notch and analyzed histologically for the presence of skeletal muscle fibers. Data were analyzed using 2-sample t tests, paired t tests, Pearson correlations, and mixed effect models. A p value of ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Sixty-four hemifaces of 32 cadavers (16 males) were dissected. All specimens were Caucasian. The average age was 78.2 years (range, 56-102 years). The average FOA was 88.7° (13.0°), and the average AOB was 90.0° (26.4°). A visible midline bifurcation occurred in 28 of 32 subjects (88%) at an average height of 4.7 cm (range, 2.4-7.2 cm) superior to the supraorbital notch. Continuous skeletal muscle fibers were present within the midline bifurcation histologically in 89%, 75%, and 11% of specimens 3.5, 5.0, and 6.5 cm above the supraorbital notch, respectively. In 46% of individuals, skeletal muscle fibers were continuously present microscopically within the gross bifurcation. While a medial frontalis muscle bifurcation occurs grossly in most senescent Caucasians, muscle fibers exist microscopically within this zone in nearly half of individuals.

  8. Anatomical medial surfaces with efficient resolution of branches singularities.

    PubMed

    Gil, Debora; Vera, Sergio; Borràs, Agnés; Andaluz, Albert; González Ballester, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Medial surfaces are powerful tools for shape description, but their use has been limited due to the sensibility of existing methods to branching artifacts. Medial branching artifacts are associated to perturbations of the object boundary rather than to geometric features. Such instability is a main obstacle for a confident application in shape recognition and description. Medial branches correspond to singularities of the medial surface and, thus, they are problematic for existing morphological and energy-based algorithms. In this paper, we use algebraic geometry concepts in an energy-based approach to compute a medial surface presenting a stable branching topology. We also present an efficient GPU-CPU implementation using standard image processing tools. We show the method computational efficiency and quality on a custom made synthetic database. Finally, we present some results on a medical imaging application for localization of abdominal pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Muscle fiber diameter assessment in cleft lip using image processing.

    PubMed

    Khan, M F J; Little, J; Abelli, L; Mossey, P A; Autelitano, L; Nag, T C; Rubini, M

    2018-04-01

    To pilot investigation of muscle fiber diameter (MFD) on medial and lateral sides of the cleft in 18 infants with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) using image processing. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from the medial and lateral sides of the cleft were analyzed for MFD using an image-processing program (ImageJ). For within-case comparison, a paired Student's t test was performed. For comparisons between classes, an unpaired t test was used. Image processing enabled rapid measurement of MFD with majority of fibers showing diameter between 6 and 11 μm. There was no significant difference in mean MFD between the medial and lateral sides, or between CL and CLP. However, we found a significant difference on the medial side (p = .032) between males and females. The image processing on FFPE tissues resulted in easy quantification of MFD with finding of a smaller MFD on the medial side in males suggesting possible differences in orbicularis oris (OO) muscle between the two sexes in CL that warrants replication using larger number of cases. Moreover, this finding can aid subclinical phenotyping and potentially in the restoration of the anatomy and function of the upper lip. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effectiveness of an exercise programme on dynamic balance in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Al-Khlaifat, Lara; Herrington, Lee C; Tyson, Sarah F; Hammond, Alison; Jones, Richard K

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic balance and quiet standing balance are decreased in knee osteoarthritis (OA), with dynamic balance being more affected. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a group exercise programme of lower extremity muscles integrated with education on dynamic balance using the Star Excursion Balance test (SEBT) in knee OA. Experimental before-and-after pilot study design. Nineteen participants with knee OA attended the exercise sessions once a week for six weeks, in addition to home exercises. Before and after the exercise programme, dynamic balance was assessed using the SEBT in the anterior and medial directions in addition to hip and knee muscle strength, pain, and function. Fourteen participants completed the study. Dynamic balance on the affected side demonstrated significant improvements in the anterior and medial directions (p=0.02 and p=0.01, respectively). The contralateral side demonstrated significant improvements in dynamic balance in the anterior direction (p<0.001). However, balance in the medial direction did not change significantly (p=0.07). Hip and knee muscle strength, pain, and function significantly improved (p<0.05) after the exercise programme. This is the first study to explore the effect of an exercise programme on dynamic balance using the SEBT in knee OA. The exercise programme was effective in improving dynamic balance which is required in different activities of daily living where the patients might experience the risk of falling. This might be attributed to the improvement in muscle strength and pain after the exercise programme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle biopsy examines a tissue sample under a microscope to confirm disease. Sometimes, a blood test to check for a genetic disorder is all that is needed based on someone's symptoms and family history.

  12. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe Happen frequently Don't get better with stretching and drinking enough fluids Last a long time ... able to find some relief from cramps by Stretching or gently massaging the muscle Applying heat when ...

  13. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or tendinitis A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy Some cancers Inflammation, such as myositis Diseases of nerves that affect muscles Infections Certain medicines Sometimes the cause is not ...

  14. A new teaching model for demonstrating the movement of the extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Joe; Refsland, Jason; Iovino, Lee; Holley, Gary; Laws, Tyler; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    The extraocular muscles consist of the superior, inferior, lateral, and medial rectus muscles and the superior and inferior oblique muscles. This study aimed to create a new teaching model for demonstrating the function of the extraocular muscles. A coronal section of the head was prepared and sutures attached to the levator palpebral superioris muscle and six extraocular muscles. Tension was placed on each muscle from a posterior approach and movement of the eye documented from an anterior view. All movements were clearly seen less than that of the inferior rectus muscle. To our knowledge, this is the first cadaveric teaching model for demonstrating the movements of the extraocular muscles. Clin. Anat. 30:733-735, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The alteration of extraocular muscle arc after hang-back recession in animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, S

    1996-01-01

    We did an animal experimental study to investigate the extraocular muscle arc after hang-back recession on horizontal rectus muscles of five dogs. Two tiny sutures using 8-0 nylon were made on the sclera 8-10 mm posterior to the muscle insertion along the upper and lower margins of the right lateral rectus and left medial rectus to compare the altered muscle arc with the original muscle arc. Hang-back recession was performed on the horizontal rectus muscles and three months later we investigated the change in the muscle arc. Four of the 10 muscles operated showed no change, four were displaced upward (mean +/- SD; 1.00 +/- 0.16 mm) and two were displaced downward (1.00 +/- 0.00 mm). The average displacement was 0.60 +/- 0.52 mm. The alteration of muscle arc after hang-back recession thus seems insignificant.

  16. Return to Play After Soleus Muscle Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Pedret, Carles; Rodas, Gil; Balius, Ramon; Capdevila, Lluis; Bossy, Mireia; Vernooij, Robin W.M.; Alomar, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Soleus muscle injuries are common in different sports disciplines. The time required for recovery is often difficult to predict, and reinjury is common. The length of recovery time might be influenced by different variables, such as the involved part of the muscle. Hypothesis Injuries in the central aponeurosis have a worse prognosis than injuries of the lateral or medial aponeurosis as well as myofascial injuries. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A total of 61 high-level or professional athletes from several sports disciplines (soccer, tennis, track and field, basketball, triathlon, and field hockey) were reviewed prospectively to determine the recovery time for soleus muscle injuries. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation was performed on 44 soleus muscle injuries. The association between the different characteristics of the 5 typical muscle sites, including the anterior and posterior myofascial and the lateral, central, and medial aponeurosis disruption, as well as the injury recovery time, were determined. Recovery time was correlated with age, sport, extent of edema, volume, cross-sectional area, and retraction extension or gap. Results Of the 44 patients with muscle injuries who were analyzed, there were 32 (72.7%) strains affecting the myotendinous junction (MT) and 12 (23.7%) strains of the myofascial junction. There were 13 injuries involving the myotendinous medial (MTM), 7 affecting the MT central (MTC), 12 the MT lateral (MTL), 8 the myofascial anterior (MFA), and 4 the myofascial posterior (MFP). The median recovery time (±SD) for all injuries was 29.1 ± 18.8 days. There were no statistically significant differences between the myotendinous and myofascial injuries regarding recovery time. The site with the worst prognosis was the MTC aponeurosis, with a mean recovery time of 44.3 ± 23.0 days. The site with the best prognosis was the MTL, with a mean recovery time of 19.2 ± 13.5 days (P < .05). There

  17. Return to Play After Soleus Muscle Injuries.

    PubMed

    Pedret, Carles; Rodas, Gil; Balius, Ramon; Capdevila, Lluis; Bossy, Mireia; Vernooij, Robin W M; Alomar, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Soleus muscle injuries are common in different sports disciplines. The time required for recovery is often difficult to predict, and reinjury is common. The length of recovery time might be influenced by different variables, such as the involved part of the muscle. Injuries in the central aponeurosis have a worse prognosis than injuries of the lateral or medial aponeurosis as well as myofascial injuries. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 61 high-level or professional athletes from several sports disciplines (soccer, tennis, track and field, basketball, triathlon, and field hockey) were reviewed prospectively to determine the recovery time for soleus muscle injuries. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation was performed on 44 soleus muscle injuries. The association between the different characteristics of the 5 typical muscle sites, including the anterior and posterior myofascial and the lateral, central, and medial aponeurosis disruption, as well as the injury recovery time, were determined. Recovery time was correlated with age, sport, extent of edema, volume, cross-sectional area, and retraction extension or gap. Of the 44 patients with muscle injuries who were analyzed, there were 32 (72.7%) strains affecting the myotendinous junction (MT) and 12 (23.7%) strains of the myofascial junction. There were 13 injuries involving the myotendinous medial (MTM), 7 affecting the MT central (MTC), 12 the MT lateral (MTL), 8 the myofascial anterior (MFA), and 4 the myofascial posterior (MFP). The median recovery time (±SD) for all injuries was 29.1 ± 18.8 days. There were no statistically significant differences between the myotendinous and myofascial injuries regarding recovery time. The site with the worst prognosis was the MTC aponeurosis, with a mean recovery time of 44.3 ± 23.0 days. The site with the best prognosis was the MTL, with a mean recovery time of 19.2 ± 13.5 days (P < .05). There was a statistically significant correlation between

  18. Extraocular muscle proprioception and eye position.

    PubMed

    Pettorossi, V E; Ferraresi, A; Draicchio, F; Errico, P; Santarelli, R; Manni, E

    1995-03-01

    In the lamb, acute unilateral section of the ophthalmic branch induced in the ipsilateral eye occasional oscillations of the resting position and misalignment of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR) with respect to the stimulus. Additional electrolytic lesion of the cells innervating the proprioceptors of the medial rectus muscle, or of the lateral rectus muscle in the contralateral semilunar ganglion, provoked a 4 degrees-7 degrees consensual eye deviation towards and away from the lesioned side, respectively. The optokinetic beating field was similarly deviated. Under these experimental conditions, HVOR showed enhanced gain and marked misalignment in both eyes. Therefore, the selective suppression of muscular proprioceptive input deviated both eyes towards the direction opposite to the muscle whose gangliar proprioceptive representation has been destroyed.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates compartmental muscle mechanisms of human vertical fusional vergence

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vertical fusional vergence (VFV) normally compensates for slight vertical heterophorias. We employed magnetic resonance imaging to clarify extraocular muscle contributions to VFV induced by monocular two-prism diopter (1.15°) base-up prism in 14 normal adults. Fusion during prism viewing requires monocular infraduction. Scans were repeated without prism, and with prism shifted contralaterally. Contractility indicated by morphometric indexes was separately analyzed in medial and lateral vertical rectus and superior oblique (SO) putative compartments, and superior and inferior horizontal rectus extraocular muscle putative compartments, but in the whole inferior oblique (IO). Images confirmed appropriate VFV that was implemented by the inferior rectus (IR) medial compartment contracting ipsilateral and relaxing contralateral to prism. There was no significant contractility in the IR lateral compartment. The superior but not inferior lateral rectus (LR) compartment contracted significantly in the prism viewing eye, but not contralateral to prism. The IO contracted ipsilateral but not contralateral to the prism. In the infraducting eye, the SO medial compartment relaxed significantly, while the lateral compartment was unchanged; contralateral to prism, the SO lateral compartment contracted, while the medial compartment was unchanged. There was no contractility in the superior or medial rectus muscles in either eye. There was no globe retraction. We conclude that the vertical component of VFV is primarily implemented by IR medial compartment contraction. Since appropriate vertical rotation is not directly implemented, or is opposed, by associated differential LR and SO compartmental activity, and IO contraction, these actions probably implement a torsional component of VFV. PMID:25589593

  20. Medial arcuate ligament: a new anatomic landmark facilitates the location of the renal artery in retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Li, Hong Zhao; Zhang, Xu; Song, Yong; Ma, Xin; Dong, Jun; Chen, Wenzheng; Chen, Guang-Fu; Xu, Yong; Lu, Jin Shan; Wang, Bao-Jun; Shi, Tao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a new method for locating the renal artery during retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery. The medial arcuate ligament (MAL) is a tendinous arch in the fascia under the diaphragm that arches across the psoas major muscle and is attached medially to the side of the first or the second lumbar vertebra. The renal artery arises at the level of the intervertebral disc between the L1 and L2 vertebrae. We evaluate the role of the MAL that serves as an anatomic landmark for locating the renal artery during retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery. There is a reproducible consistent anatomic relationship between MAL and the renal artery in 210 cases of retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery. Two main types of the MAL, the "narrow arch" and the "fascial band" types, can be observed. MAL can serve as an accurate and reproducible anatomic landmark for the identification of the renal artery during retroperitoneal laparoscopic renal surgery.

  1. Categorization of biologically relevant chemical signals in the medial amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Chad L.; Meredith, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many species employ chemical signals to convey messages between members of the same species (conspecific), but chemosignals may also provide information to another species (heterospecific). Here, we found that conspecific chemosignals (male, female mouse urine) increased immediate early gene-protein (IEG) expression in both anterior and posterior medial amygdala of male mice, whereas most heterospecific chemosignals (e.g.: hamster vaginal fluid, steer urine) increased expression only in anterior medial amygdala. This categorization of responses in medial amygdala conforms to our previously reported findings in male hamsters. The same characteristic pattern of IEG expression appears in the medial amygdala of each species in response to conspecific stimuli for that species. These results suggest that the amygdala categorizes stimuli according to the biological relevance for the tested species. Thus, a heterospecific predator (cat collar) stimulus, which elicited behavioral avoidance in mice, increased IEG expression in mouse posterior medial amygdala (like conspecific stimuli). Further analysis suggests reproduction related and potentially threatening stimuli produce increased IEG expression in different sub-regions of posterior medial amygdala (dorsal and ventral, respectively). These patterns of IEG expression in medial amygdala may provide glimpses of a tertiary sorting of chemosensory signals beyond the primary-level selectivity of chemosensory neurons and the secondary sorting in main and accessory olfactory bulbs. PMID:19368822

  2. Medial cortex activity, self-reflection and depression

    PubMed Central

    Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Mitchell, Karen J.; Levin, Yael

    2009-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity associated with self-reflection in depressed [current major depressive episode (MDE)] and healthy control participants, focusing on medial cortex areas previously shown to be associated with self-reflection. Both the MDE and healthy control groups showed greater activity in anterior medial cortex (medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus) when cued to think about hopes and aspirations compared with duties and obligations, and greater activity in posterior medial cortex (precuneus, posterior cingulate) when cued to think about duties and obligations (Experiment 1). However, the MDE group showed less activity than controls in the same area of medial frontal cortex when self-referential cues were more ambiguous with respect to valence (Experiment 2), and less deactivation in a non-self-referential condition in both experiments. Furthermore, individual differences in rumination were positively correlated with activity in both anterior and posterior medial cortex during non-self-referential conditions. These results provide converging evidence for a dissociation of anterior and posterior medial cortex depending on the focus of self-relevant thought. They also provide neural evidence consistent with behavioral findings that depression is associated with disruption of positively valenced thoughts in response to ambiguous cues, and difficulty disengaging from self-reflection when it is appropriate to do so. PMID:19620180

  3. Medial cortex activity, self-reflection and depression.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marcia K; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Mitchell, Karen J; Levin, Yael

    2009-12-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity associated with self-reflection in depressed [current major depressive episode (MDE)] and healthy control participants, focusing on medial cortex areas previously shown to be associated with self-reflection. Both the MDE and healthy control groups showed greater activity in anterior medial cortex (medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus) when cued to think about hopes and aspirations compared with duties and obligations, and greater activity in posterior medial cortex (precuneus, posterior cingulate) when cued to think about duties and obligations (Experiment 1). However, the MDE group showed less activity than controls in the same area of medial frontal cortex when self-referential cues were more ambiguous with respect to valence (Experiment 2), and less deactivation in a non-self-referential condition in both experiments. Furthermore, individual differences in rumination were positively correlated with activity in both anterior and posterior medial cortex during non-self-referential conditions. These results provide converging evidence for a dissociation of anterior and posterior medial cortex depending on the focus of self-relevant thought. They also provide neural evidence consistent with behavioral findings that depression is associated with disruption of positively valenced thoughts in response to ambiguous cues, and difficulty disengaging from self-reflection when it is appropriate to do so.

  4. Episodic reinstatement in the medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Staresina, Bernhard P; Henson, Richard N A; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Alink, Arjen

    2012-12-12

    The essence of episodic memory is our ability to reexperience past events in great detail, even in the absence of external stimulus cues. Does the phenomenological reinstatement of past experiences go along with reinstating unique neural representations in the brain? And if so, how is this accomplished by the medial temporal lobe (MTL), a brain region intimately linked to episodic memory? Computational models suggest that such reinstatement (also termed "pattern completion") in cortical regions is mediated by the hippocampus, a key region of the MTL. Although recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated reinstatement of coarse item properties like stimulus category or task context across different brain regions, it has not yet been shown whether reinstatement can be observed at the level of individual, discrete events-arguably the defining feature of episodic memory-nor whether MTL structures like the hippocampus support this "true episodic" reinstatement. Here we show that neural activity patterns for unique word-scene combinations encountered during encoding are reinstated in human parahippocampal cortex (PhC) during retrieval. Critically, this reinstatement occurs when word-scene combinations are successfully recollected (even though the original scene is not visually presented) and does not encompass other stimulus domains (such as word-color associations). Finally, the degree of PhC reinstatement across retrieval events correlated with hippocampal activity, consistent with a role of the hippocampus in coordinating pattern completion in cortical regions.

  5. The Medial Temporal Lobe and Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, H.; Yonelinas, A.R.; Ranganath, C.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to recognize a previously experienced stimulus is supported by two processes: recollection of the stimulus in the context of other information associated with the experience, and a sense of familiarity with the features of the stimulus. Although familiarity and recollection are functionally distinct, there is considerable debate about how these kinds of memory are supported by regions in the medial temporal lobes (MTL). Here, we review evidence for the distinction between recollection and familiarity and then consider the evidence regarding the neural mechanisms of these processes. Evidence from neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological studies of humans, monkeys, and rats indicates that different subregions of the MTL make distinct contributions to recollection and familiarity. The data suggest that the hippocampus is critical for recollection but not familiarity. The parahippocampal cortex also contributes to recollection, possibly via the representation and retrieval of contextual (especially spatial) information, whereas perirhinal cortex contributes to and is necessary for familiarity-based recognition. The findings are consistent with an anatomically guided hypothesis about the functional organization of the MTL and suggest mechanisms by which the anatomical components of the MTL interact to support of the phenomenology of recollection and familiarity. PMID:17417939

  6. Chronic medial instability of the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Savoie, Felix H.; O’Brien, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Damage to the medial collateral ligament of the elbow from an instability episode usually heals with non-operative treatment. In some cases, residual instability may occur, leading to functional impairment.Non-operative management can be successful when bracing, taping and therapy are used to stabilise the elbow.A recent report detailing the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in effectively treating ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries in throwers has shown promise. However, there remain specific groups that should be considered for repair or reconstruction. These may include throwing athletes, wrestlers and some individuals involved in highly active physical activity which demands stability of the elbow.The results of surgical repair and reconstruction allowing a return to sports are quite good, ranging from 84% to 94%. Complications are generally low and mostly centred on ulnar nerve injuries.This report represents a review of the literature concerning valgus instability over the past five years, supplemented by selective older articles where relevant. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:1-6. DOI:10.1302/2058-5241.2.160037. PMID:28607764

  7. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  8. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry.

    PubMed

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders.

  9. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  10. Bilateral medial medullary infarction due to bilateral vertebral artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masafumi; Aiba, Toyotaka; Takahashi, Sho

    2004-03-01

    We describe a 52-year-old woman who experienced transient motor weakness and numbness of the left extremities and presented 2 days later with severe hemiparesis and sensory impairment of the right extremities and right lingual palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral upper medial medullary infarction, primarily in the left ventral portion. The findings of both three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic and conventional angiography suggested dissection of both intracranial vertebral arteries (VAs). Medial medullary infarction is generally caused by atherosclerosis within a VA or anterior spinal artery. This is the first report of bilateral medial medullary infarction due to dissection of both intracranial VAs.

  11. Dysphagia in a patient with bilateral medial medullary infarcts.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Vimal K; Kalita, Jayanti; Misra, Usha K

    2009-09-01

    Bilateral medial medullary infarct is a rare stroke syndrome and only a handful of cases have been described. Dysphagia as a manifestation of medullary infarcts is well recognized but often associated with lateral medullary infarct. Bilateral medial medullary infarcts are commonly associated with severe dysphagia in addition to a number of other signs and symptoms. We describe a patient who had bilateral medial medullary infarct with severe dysphagia in addition to quadriplegia and respiratory difficulty, and analyze infarct topography with respect to dysphagia, risk factors, vascular territories involved, and prognosis in view of previously reported cases.

  12. Medial meniscus anatomy-from basic science to treatment.

    PubMed

    Śmigielski, Robert; Becker, Roland; Zdanowicz, Urszula; Ciszek, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the anatomical attachment of the medial meniscus. Detailed anatomical dissections have been performed and illustrated. Five zones can be distinguished in regard to the meniscus attachments anatomy: zone 1 (of the anterior root), zone 2 (anteromedial zone), zone 3 (the medial zone), zone 4 (the posterior zone) and the zone 5 (of the posterior root). The understanding of the meniscal anatomy is especially crucial for meniscus repair but also for correct fixation of the anterior and posterior horn of the medial meniscus.

  13. Modified tension band wiring of medial malleolar ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, G M; White, D B

    1995-02-01

    Twenty-two displaced medial malleolar ankle fractures that were treated surgically using the modified tension band method of Cleak and Dawson were retrospectively reviewed at an average follow-up of 25 months. The technique involves the use of a screw to anchor a figure-of-eight wire. There were no malreductions and all fractures healed. Problems with the technique included technical errors with hardware placement, medial ankle pain, and asymptomatic wire migration. Despite this, modified tension band wiring remains an acceptable method for fixation of selected displaced medial malleolar fractures. It is especially suited for small fracture fragments and osteoporotic bone.

  14. The Effect of Alpinia zerumbet Essential Oil on Post-Stroke Muscle Spasticity.

    PubMed

    Maia, Maurício Oliva Nascimento; Dantas, Camila Gomes; Xavier Filho, Lauro; Cândido, Edna Aragão Farias; Gomes, Margarete Zanardo

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil of Alpinia zerumbet (EOAz) presents myorelaxant and antispasmodic actions on cardiac and smooth muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of EOAz on the skeletal muscle contraction in post-stroke spasticity. Fifteen adults with unilateral hemiparesis and spasticity resulting from stroke were submitted to surface electromyography readings of the gastrocnemius muscle, before and after 10 daily applications (dermal 0.05 mL per muscle belly) of EOAz. The healthy contralateral muscles without applying the oil were used as controls. The analysis showed that, in both lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the values of all studied variables (root mean square, maximum amplitude and median power frequency) were significantly decreased in pathological legs during muscle contraction (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.05). Moreover, spastic muscles presented different results before and after dermal application of EOAz: The mean values of root mean square and median power frequency were significantly increased in lateral and medial gastrocnemius, and also, the maximum amplitude increased in medial gastrocnemius (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05). The results suggest that EOAz acts in the skeletal spastic muscle contraction by promoting relaxation and improvement of the muscular performance. Thus, the EOAz can be useful for the clinical management of secondary effects in patients with cerebral vascular disease. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  15. Posterior horn medial meniscal root repair with cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament combined injuries.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian F; Johnson, Darren L

    2011-12-01

    Many meniscal root tears remain unrepaired, potentially due to under-recognition and the technical challenge of repairing them. A great effort is made to preserve the native meniscus and restore the circumferential fibers for hoop stress resistance. It has been well demonstrated in the literature that failure to repair this will lead to increased contact pressures in the medial compartment and early degenerative changes in the articular cartilage. Our technique is one that allows the meniscus to resume its important role of knee stability. A thorough understanding of meniscal root anatomy, as well as repair techniques, is important for the cruciate ligament surgeon. Copyright © 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Prediction of medial and lateral contact force of the knee joint during normal and turning gait after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    The computational modeling approach has commonly been used to predict knee joint contact forces, muscle forces, and ligament loads during activities of daily living. Knowledge of these forces has several potential applications, for example, within design of equipment to protect the knee joint from injury and to plan adequate rehabilitation protocols, although clinical applications of computational models are still evolving and one of the limiting factors is model validation. The objective of this study was to extend previous modeling technique and to improve the validity of the model prediction using publicly available data set of the fifth "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict In Vivo Knee Loads." A two-stage modeling approach, which combines conventional inverse dynamic analysis (the first stage) with a multi-body subject-specific lower limb model (the second stage), was used to calculate medial and lateral compartment contact forces. The validation was performed by direct comparison of model predictions and experimental measurement of medial and lateral compartment contact forces during normal and turning gait. The model predictions of both medial and lateral contact forces showed strong correlations with experimental measurements in normal gait (r = 0.75 and 0.71) and in turning gait trials (r = 0.86 and 0.72), even though the current technique over-estimated medial compartment contact forces in swing phase. The correlation coefficient, Sprague and Geers metrics, and root mean squared error indicated that the lateral contact forces were predicted better than medial contact forces in comparison with the experimental measurements during both normal and turning gait trials. © IMechE 2016.

  17. Vascular anatomy of the medial sural artery perforator flap: a new classification system of intra-muscular branching patterns.

    PubMed

    Dusseldorp, Joseph R; Pham, Quy J; Ngo, Quan; Gianoutsos, Mark; Moradi, Pouria

    2014-09-01

    The medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap is a versatile fasciocutaneous flap. The main difficulty encountered when raising the MSAP flap is in obtaining adequate pedicle length during intra-muscular dissection. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of intra-muscular course of the MSAP flap pedicle. 14 cadaveric specimens were dissected and CT angiograms of 84 legs were examined. The intra-muscular branching pattern and depths of the medial sural artery branches were analyzed. The number of perforators, position of the dominant perforator and both intra-muscular and total pedicle length were also recorded and compared to existing anatomical data. Three types of arterial branching pattern were identified within the medial gastrocnemius, demonstrating one (31%), two (59%) or three or more (10%) main branches. A dominant perforator from the medial sural artery was present in 92% of anatomical specimens (13/14). Vertically, the location of the perforator from the popliteal crease was on average 13 cm (±2 cm). Transversely, the perforator originated 2.5 cm (±1 cm) from the posterior midline. Using CT angiography it was possible in 10 consecutive patients to identify a more superficial intra-muscular branch and determine the leg with the optimal branching pattern type for flap harvest. This study is the first to describe the variability of the intra-muscular arterial anatomy of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. Surgeons utilizing the MSAP flap option should be aware of the possible branching pattern types and consequently the differing perforator distribution and depths of intra-muscular branches. Routine use of pre-operative CT angiogram may help determine which leg has the most favorable branching pattern type and intra-muscular course for flap harvest. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of complete distal release of the medial collateral ligament and medial epicondylar osteotomy during ligament balancing in varus knee total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Ang; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kwak, Ji Hoon; Yang, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kwang Hui; Lee, Beom Koo

    2013-12-01

    During ligament balancing for severe medial contracture in varus knee total knee arthroplasty (TKA), complete distal release of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) or a medial epicondylar osteotomy can be necessary if a large amount of correction is needed. This study retrospectively reviewed 9 cases of complete distal release of the MCL and 11 cases of medial epicondylar osteotomy which were used to correct severe medial contracture. The mean follow-up periods were 46.5 months (range, 36 to 78 months) and 39.8 months (range, 32 to 65 months), respectively. There were no significant differences in the clinical results between the two groups. However, the valgus stress radiograph revealed significant differences in medial instability. In complete distal release of the MCL, some stability was obtained by repair and bracing but the medial instability could not be removed completely. Medial epicondylar osteotomy for a varus deformity in TKA could provide constant medial stability and be a useful ligament balancing technique.

  19. Medial compressible forefoot sole elements reduce ankle inversion in lateral SSC jumps.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Jana; Mornieux, Guillaume; Gehring, Dominic; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-06-01

    Sideward movements are associated with high incidences of lateral ankle sprains. Special shoe constructions might be able to reduce these injuries during lateral movements. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether medial compressible forefoot sole elements can reduce ankle inversion in a reactive lateral movement, and to evaluate those elements' influence on neuromuscular and mechanical adjustments in lower extremities. Foot placement and frontal plane ankle joint kinematics and kinetics were analyzed by 3-dimensional motion analysis. Electromyographic data of triceps surae, peroneus longus, and tibialis anterior were collected. This modified shoe reduced ankle inversion in comparison with a shoe with a standard sole construction. No differences in ankle inversion moments were found. With the modified shoe, foot placement occurred more internally rotated, and muscle activity of the lateral shank muscles was reduced. Hence, lateral ankle joint stability during reactive sideward movements can be improved by these compressible elements, and therefore lower lateral shank muscle activity is required. As those elements limit inversion, the strategy to control inversion angles via a high external foot rotation does not need to be used.

  20. Age Related Differences in Diffusion Tensor Indices and Fiber Architecture in the Medial and Lateral Gastrocnemius

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Usha; Csapo, Robert; Malis, Vadim; Xue, Yanjie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate age related changes in diffusion tensor indices and fiber architecture of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (MG and LG) muscles using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Materials and Methods The lower leg of five young and five senior subjects was scanned at 3T and DTI indices extracted using three methods: ROI, histogram and tract based. Tracked fibers were automatically edited to ensure physiologically relevant tracks. Pennation angles were measured with respect to the deep and superficial aponeuroses of both muscles. Results The three methods provided internally consistent measures of the DTI indices (correlation coefficient in the range of 0.90-0.99). The primary, secondary and tertiary eigenvalues in the MG and LG increased significantly in the senior cohort (p<0.05), while the small increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) with age was not significant (MG/LG: p=0.39/0.85; 95% CI:[ −0.059/-0.056, 0.116/0.064]). Fiber lengths of MG fibers originating distally were significantly decreased in seniors (p<0.05) while pennation angles decreased with age in the MG and LG but this was not significant. Conclusion Fiber atrophy and increased fibrosis have opposing effects on the diffusion indices resulting in a complicated dependence with aging. Fiber architectural changes could play a role in determining aging muscle function. PMID:24771672

  1. H-reflex modulation in the human medial and lateral gastrocnemii during standing and walking

    PubMed Central

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Thompson, Aiko K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The soleus H-reflex is dynamically modulated during walking. However, modulation of the gastrocnemii H-reflexes has not been studied systematically. Methods The medial and lateral gastrocnemii (MG and LG) and soleus H-reflexes were measured during standing and walking in humans. Results Maximum H-reflex amplitude was significantly smaller in MG (mean 1.1 mV) or LG (1.1 mV) than in soleus (3.3 mV). Despite these size differences, the reflex amplitudes of the three muscles were positively correlated. The MG and LG H-reflexes were phase- and task-dependently modulated in ways similar to the soleus H-reflex. Discussion Although there are anatomical and physiological differences between the soleus and gastrocnemii muscles, the reflexes of the three muscles are similarly modulated during walking and between standing and walking. The findings support the hypothesis that these reflexes are synergistically modulated during walking to facilitate ongoing movement. PMID:22190317

  2. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    PubMed

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness.

  3. Periorbital epidermoid cyst in the medial canthus of three dogs.

    PubMed

    Davidson, H J; Blanchard, G L

    1991-01-15

    Periorbital epidermoid cyst in the medial canthus was identified ultrasonographically and confirmed histologically in 3 dogs. Surgical resection of the cysts, with reconstruction of the lacrimal canaliculi, was curative in all 3 cases.

  4. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; De Winter, Theodorus C

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise, with pain on palpation of the tibia over a length of at least 5 cm. Histological studies fail to provide evidence that MTSS is caused by periostitis as a result of traction. It is caused by bony resorption that outpaces bone formation of the tibial cortex. Evidence for this overloaded adaptation of the cortex is found in several studies describing MTSS findings on bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis is made based on physical examination, although only one study has been conducted on this subject. Additional imaging such as bone, CT and MRI scans has been well studied but is of limited value. The prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic subjects means that results should be interpreted with caution. Excessive pronation of the foot while standing and female sex were found to be intrinsic risk factors in multiple prospective studies. Other intrinsic risk factors found in single prospective studies are higher body mass index, greater internal and external ranges of hip motion, and calf girth. Previous history of MTSS was shown to be an extrinsic risk factor. The treatment of MTSS has been examined in three randomized controlled studies. In these studies rest is equal to any intervention. The use of neoprene or semi-rigid orthotics may help prevent MTSS, as evidenced by two large prospective studies.

  5. Activation of plantar flexor muscles is constrained by multiple muscle synergies rather than joint torques

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takahito; Kinugasa, Ryuta; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral evidence has suggested that a small number of muscle synergies may be responsible for activating a variety of muscles. Nevertheless, such dimensionality reduction may also be explained using the perspective of alternative hypotheses, such as predictions based on linear combinations of joint torques multiplied by corresponding coefficients. To compare the explanatory capacity of these hypotheses for describing muscle activation, we enrolled 12 male volunteers who performed isometric plantar flexor contractions at 10–100% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexor contraction, the knee extensor muscles were isometrically contracted at 0%, 50%, or 100% of maximum effort. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius (MG), lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and soleus muscles and quantified using the average rectified value (ARV). At lower plantar flexion torque, regression analysis identified a clear linear relationship between the MG and soleus ARVs and between the MG and LG ARVs, suggesting the presence of muscle synergy (r2 > 0.65). The contraction of the knee extensor muscles induced a significant change in the slope of this relationship for both pairs of muscles (MG × soleus, P = 0.002; MG × LG, P = 0.006). Similarly, the slope of the linear relationship between the plantar flexion torque and the ARV of the MG or soleus changed significantly with knee extensor contraction (P = 0.031 and P = 0.041, respectively). These results suggest that muscle synergies characterized by non-mechanical constraints are selectively recruited according to whether contraction of the knee extensor muscles is performed simultaneously, which is relatively consistent with the muscle synergy hypothesis. PMID:29107958

  6. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome with medial tibial stress syndrome in twins.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti; McLean, Christopher

    2011-06-14

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome and medial tibial stress syndrome are uncommon conditions that affect long-distance runners or players involved in team sports that require extensive running. We report 2 cases of bilateral chronic exertional compartment syndrome, with medial tibial stress syndrome in identical twins diagnosed with the use of a Kodiag monitor (B. Braun Medical, Sheffield, United Kingdom) fulfilling the modified diagnostic criteria for chronic exertional compartment syndrome as described by Pedowitz et al, which includes: (1) pre-exercise compartment pressure level >15 mm Hg; (2) 1 minute post-exercise pressure >30 mm Hg; and (3) 5 minutes post-exercise pressure >20 mm Hg in the presence of clinical features. Both patients were treated with bilateral anterior fasciotomies through minimal incision and deep posterior fasciotomies with tibial periosteal stripping performed through longer anteromedial incisions under direct vision followed by intensive physiotherapy resulting in complete symptomatic recovery. The etiology of chronic exertional compartment syndrome is not fully understood, but it is postulated abnormal increases in intramuscular pressure during exercise impair local perfusion, causing ischemic muscle pain. No familial predisposition has been reported to date. However, some authors have found that no significant difference exists in the relative perfusion, in patients, diagnosed with chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Magnetic resonance images of affected compartments have indicated that the pain is not due to ischemia, but rather from a disproportionate oxygen supply versus demand. We believe this is the first report of chronic exertional compartment syndrome with medial tibial stress syndrome in twins, raising the question of whether there is a genetic predisposition to the causation of these conditions. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. GABAergic Projections from the Medial Septum Selectively Inhibit Interneurons in the Medial Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Sulser, Alfredo; Parthier, Daniel; Candela, Antonio; McClure, Christina; Pastoll, Hugh; Garden, Derek; Sürmeli, Gülşen

    2014-01-01

    The medial septum (MS) is required for theta rhythmic oscillations and grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). While GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurons project from the MS to the MEC, their synaptic targets are unknown. To investigate whether MS neurons innervate specific layers and cell types in the MEC, we expressed channelrhodopsin-2 in mouse MS neurons and used patch-clamp recording in brain slices to determine the response to light activation of identified cells in the MEC. Following activation of MS axons, we observed fast monosynaptic GABAergic IPSPs in the majority (>60%) of fast-spiking (FS) and low-threshold-spiking (LTS) interneurons in all layers of the MEC, but in only 1.5% of nonstellate principal cells (NSPCs) and in no stellate cells. We also observed fast glutamatergic responses to MS activation in a minority (<5%) of NSPCs, FS, and LTS interneurons. During stimulation of MS inputs at theta frequency (10 Hz), the amplitude of GABAergic IPSPs was maintained, and spike output from LTS and FS interneurons was entrained at low (25–60 Hz) and high (60–180 Hz) gamma frequencies, respectively. By demonstrating cell type-specific targeting of the GABAergic projection from the MS to the MEC, our results support the idea that the MS controls theta frequency activity in the MEC through coordination of inhibitory circuits. PMID:25505326

  8. Physical Risk Factors for a Medial Elbow Injury in Junior Baseball Players: A Prospective Cohort Study of 353 Players.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Jun; Nakamura, Emi; Suzukawa, Makoto; Akaike, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    The physical risk factors for a medial elbow injury in junior baseball players are unknown. To identify the risk factors for an initial medial elbow injury in junior baseball players. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Junior baseball players (aged 6-12 years) without a history of elbow pain underwent a clinical assessment, ultrasonography, and physical function measurements before the baseball season started. Bilateral passive range of motion (ROM) of elbow extension and flexion, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) of the shoulder, and ER and IR of the hip were measured. IR and ER strength of the shoulder and scapular muscles were measured on both sides. The thoracic kyphosis angle was measured with participants in a relaxed standing position. Before these examinations, every participant completed a questionnaire regarding his or her age, sex, total years of baseball played, position in baseball, number of balls thrown, and episodes of pain during throwing. After the initial test session, each participant was followed up for 12 months to assess for the occurrence of a new injury. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for a medial elbow injury. Seventy-eight players (22.1%) sustained a medial elbow injury. Age ≥9 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.708; 95% CI, 1.224-5.990), pitcher position (OR, 2.620; 95% CI, 1.389-4.941), >100 throws per day (OR, 1.936; 95% CI, 1.072-3.497), thoracic kyphosis angle ≥30° (OR, 2.501; 95% CI, 1.381-4.531), and elbow extension deficit ≥5° (OR, 1.973; 95% CI, 1.022-3.809) were significantly associated with a medial elbow injury. The incidence of an initial medial elbow injury was 22.1%. Age, number of throws per day, thoracic kyphosis angle, and elbow extension deficit are newly discovered risk factors related to physical function. Improvement of the posture and early detection of a silent elbow extension deficit may prevent a medial elbow injury.

  9. The "safe zone" in medial percutaneous calcaneal pin placement.

    PubMed

    Gamie, Zakareya; Donnelly, Leo; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2009-05-01

    Percutaneous pin insertion into the medial calcaneus places a number of structures at risk. Evidence suggests that the greatest risk is to the medial calcaneal nerve (MCN). The medial calcaneal region of 24 cadavers was dissected to determine the major structures at risk. By using four palpable anatomical landmarks, the inferior tip of the medial malleolus (point A), the posterior superior portion of the calcaneal tuberosity (point B), the navicular tuberosity (point C), and the medial process of the calcaneal tuberosity (point D), we attempted to define the safe zone taking into account all possible variables in our dissections including ankle position, side, gender, and possible anatomical variations of the MCN. The commonest arrangement of the MCN was two MCNs that arose independently, one arising before the bifurcation of the tibial nerve and the other arising from the medial plantar nerve. A zone could be defined posterior to 75% of the distance along the lines AB, CD, AD, and CB which would avoid most structures. The posterior branches of the MCN, however, would still be at risk and placing the pin too far posteriorly risks an avulsion fracture. This is the first study to employ four palpable anatomical landmarks to identify a zone to minimize damage to neurovascular structures. It may not be possible, however, to avoid injury of the MCN and consequent sensory loss to the sole of the foot.

  10. Medial orbital wall reconstruction with flexible Ethisorb patches.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, P; Adler, W; Li, L; Schmelzle, R; Klatt, J

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the long-term result after reconstruction of the medial orbital wall with a flexible, biodegradable material (Ethisorb). During a period of almost 8 years, 31 patients with a medial orbital wall fracture were analysed retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were patients with a maximum size fracture of the orbital medial wall measuring 1.5-2 cm(2). Exophthalmos, enophthalmos, bulbus motility, diplopia and skin sensation were investigated over a period of 6 months. In all patients, the medial orbital wall was reconstructed with Ethisorb patches. No significant intraoperative complications were detected. No postoperative infection, abscess or seroma was found in any of the patients receiving an Ethisorb patch. The advantage of the semiflexibility of the Ethisorb patch is that it supplies an anatomically correct fit to the orbital medial wall but does not require fixation by screws or the use of sutures. The low rate of reported bulbus motility disturbance, diplopia, exophthalmos and enophthalmos demonstrates acceptable results after medial orbital wall reconstruction using the Ethisorb patch.

  11. Muscle "Building."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of constructivism in teaching human anatomy. Provides directions for constructing arm-hand and leg-foot models that include extensor and flexor muscles and that are easily and cheaply constructed. Lists resources that provide ideas for using such models depending upon the curriculum implemented in a school or the course that is…

  12. Permanent medialization of the paralyzed vocal fold utilizing botulinum toxin and Gelfoam.

    PubMed

    Rontal, Eugene; Rontal, Michael

    2003-09-01

    The clinical picture of a paralyzed vocal fold often has the same appearance as a subluxated arytenoid, with anterior and medial displacement of the arytenoid and a foreshortened and lax vocal fold. Previous work by the authors has shown that a subluxated arytenoid may be permanently repositioned by reduction and selective injection of the intrinsic laryngeal musculature with botulinum toxin. The injection changes the forces within the larynx, allowing the arytenoid to be brought back to proper position on the cricoid cartilage. This concept has been extended to the paralyzed vocal fold. It has been noted that even a clinically paralyzed vocal fold has voluntary motor units that may still act on the arytenoid through residual action from the interarytenoid and synkinesis. These forces are significant enough to manipulate the arytenoid and, thus, the vocal fold, into its correct, adducted position. In this paper, the arytenoid is mobilized to free any fibrosis. The thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles are then injected to prevent any forward synkinetic pull on the arytenoid. Next, a Gelfoam injection medializes the vocal fold to create glottic closure. This rebalancing sufficiently positions the arytenoid, so that valvular function is permanently restored. In the ten patients studied for over 1 year, there was a 90% success rate as measured by videostroboscopy, phonation time, and V-RQOL analysis. There were no untoward complications. All the materials used are nonpermanent. The procedure does not limit other techniques from being performed at a later time.

  13. Functional dilatation and medial remodeling of the renal artery in response to chronic increased blood flow.

    PubMed

    Roan, Jun-Neng; Yeh, Chin-Yi; Chiu, Wen-Cheng; Lee, Chou-Hwei; Chang, Shih-Wei; Jiangshieh, Ya-Fen; Tsai, Yu-Chuan; Lam, Chen-Fuh

    2011-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) is tightly regulated by several intrinsic pathways in maintaining optimal kidney blood supply. Using a rat model of aortocaval (AC) fistula, we investigated remodeling of the renal artery following prolonged increased blood flow. An AC fistula was created in the infrarenal aorta of anesthetized rats, and changes of blood flow in the renal artery were assessed using an ultrasonic flow probe. Morphological changes and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the remodeled renal artery were analyzed. Blood flow in the renal artery increased immediately after creation of AC fistula, but normal RBF was restored 8 weeks later. The renal artery dilated significantly 8 weeks after operation. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 was upregulated shortly after blood flow increase, and returned to baseline levels after 3 weeks. Histological sections showed luminal dilatation with medial thickening and endothelial cell-to-smooth muscle cell attachments in the remodeled renal artery. Increased RBF was accommodated by functional dilatation and remodeling in the medial layer of the renal artery in order to restore normal blood flow. Our results provide important mechanistic insight into the intrinsic regulation of the renal artery in response to increased RBF. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Medial surface dynamics of the vocal folds in an in vivo canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doellinger, Michael; Berke, Gerald S.; Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Berry, David A.

    2004-05-01

    Quantitative measurement of the medial surface dynamics of the vocal folds is important for understanding how sound is generated in the larynx. However, such data are hard to gather because of the inaccessibility of the vocal folds. Recent studies have applied hemi-larynx methodology to excised human larynges, to visualize these dynamics. The present study extends this methodology to obtain similar quantitative measurements using an in vivo canine hemi-larynx setup, with varying levels of stimulation to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Use of an in vivo model allows us to examine effects of intrinsic muscle contraction on the medial surface of the vocal folds, to provide greater insight into mechanisms of vocal control. Data were collected using digital high-speed imaging with a sampling frequency of up to 4000 Hz, and a spatial resolution of up to 1024×1024 pixels. Three-dimensional motion will be extracted, computed, visualized, and contrasted as a function of the level of stimulation to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Results will also be compared to patterns of vibration in excised larynges. Finally, commonly applied quantitative analyses will be performed to investigate the underlying modes of vibration. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  15. Effects of periodic weight support on medial gastrocnemius fibers of suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Scot C.; Roy, Roland R.; Hauschka, Edward O.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1989-01-01

    The effects of seven-day-long hindlimb suspension (HS) and HS plus daily periodic weight support activity on the size and metabolic properties of individual fibers in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) of rats were examined. Sections of muscle tissue removed after seven day suspension were stained quantitatively for succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, and qualitatively for myosin ATPase. It was found that short intermittent periods of weight support had a beneficial effect in maintaining the size and metabolic properties of both dark and light ATPase fibers in the deep regions (i.e., close to the bone) and of dark ATPase fibers in the superficial regions of the MG. The effect was greater in the deep regions.

  16. Motor cortical representation of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Schrum, A; Wolff, S; van der Horst, C; Kuhtz-Buschbeck, J P

    2011-07-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training involves rhythmical voluntary contractions of the external urethral sphincter and ancillary pelvic floor muscles. The representation of these muscles in the motor cortex has not been located precisely and unambiguously. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine brain activity during slow and fast pelvic floor contractions. Cerebral responses were recorded in 17 healthy male volunteers, 21 to 47 years old, with normal bladder control. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed during metronome paced slow (0.25 Hertz) and fast (0.7 Hertz) contractions of the pelvic floor that mimicked the interruption of voiding. To study the somatotopy of the cortical representations, flexion-extension movements of the right toes were performed as a control task. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during pelvic floor contractions detected activity of the supplementary motor area in the medial wall and of the midcingulate cortex, insula, posterior parietal cortex, putamen, thalamus, cerebellar vermis and upper ventral pons. There were no significant differences in activation between slow and fast contractions. Toe movements involved significantly stronger activity of the paracentral lobule (ie the medial primary motor cortex) than did the pelvic floor contractions. Otherwise the areas active during pelvic floor and leg muscle contractions overlapped considerably. The motor cortical representation of pelvic floor muscles is located mostly in the supplementary motor area. It extends further ventrally and anteriorly than the representation of distal leg muscles. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    PubMed

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  18. Condyle-fossa modifications and muscle interactions during herbst treatment, part 1. New technological methods.

    PubMed

    Voudouris, John C; Woodside, Donald G; Altuna, Gurkan; Kuftinec, Mladen M; Angelopoulos, Gerassimos; Bourque, Paul J

    2003-06-01

    Changes in the condyle, the glenoid fossa, and the muscles of mastication were investigated in subjects undergoing continuous orthopedic advancement of the mandible with a Herbst-block appliance. The total sample consisted of 56 subjects and included 15 nonhuman primates (in the middle mixed, early permanent, and permanent dentitions), 17 human Herbst patients in the early permanent dentition, and 24 human controls from the Burlington Growth Center. The 8 nonhuman primates in the middle mixed dentition were the focus of this study. Mandibular advancement was obtained progressively in 5 animals by adding stops to the telescopic arms of fixed functional Herbst appliances with occlusal coverage; activations of 5.0 mm, 7.0 mm, and 8.0 mm were achieved. Two primates served as controls, and the third was a sham control. Two experimental animals and the 2 controls also wore surgically implanted electromyographic electrodes in the superior and inferior heads of the lateral pterygoid muscles and in the superficial masseter and anterior digastric muscles. Changes in condylar growth direction and amount were assessed with the Björk method from measurements made on serial cephalometric tracings superimposed on metallic implants. Undecalcified sections, treated with intravenous tetracycline vital staining, were viewed with fluorescence microscopy to examine histologic changes in the condyle and the glenoid fossa. New bone formation in the fossa associated with continuous mandibular protrusion was quantified by using computerized histomorphometric analysis of decalcified histological sections and polarized light. The unique combination of permanently implanted electromyographic electrodes, tetracycline vital staining, and histomorphometry represents a significant technological advancement in methods and materials. Together, they demonstrated different muscle-bone interaction results for functional appliances than those reported in previous studies. In Part 1 of this study, we

  19. Reliability and validity of quantifying absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Chino, Kentaro; Akagi, Ryota; Dohi, Michiko; Fukashiro, Senshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Muscle hardness is a mechanical property that represents transverse muscle stiffness. A quantitative method that uses ultrasound elastography for quantifying absolute human muscle hardness has been previously devised; however, its reliability and validity have not been completely verified. This study aimed to verify the reliability and validity of this quantitative method. The Young's moduli of seven tissue-mimicking materials (in vitro; Young's modulus range, 20-80 kPa; increments of 10 kPa) and the human medial gastrocnemius muscle (in vivo) were quantified using ultrasound elastography. On the basis of the strain/Young's modulus ratio of two reference materials, one hard and one soft (Young's moduli of 7 and 30 kPa, respectively), the Young's moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials and medial gastrocnemius muscle were calculated. The intra- and inter-investigator reliability of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations (≤6.9%) and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients (≥0.77) obtained from all measurements. The correlation coefficient between the Young's moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials obtained using a mechanical method and ultrasound elastography was 0.996, which was equivalent to values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The Young's moduli of the medial gastrocnemius muscle obtained using ultrasound elastography were within the range of values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The reliability and validity of the quantitative method for measuring absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography were thus verified.

  20. Ultrasound assessment of hamstring muscle size using posterior thigh muscle thickness.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Thiebaud, Robert S

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have investigated the relationship between ultrasound-measured muscle thickness (MT) and individual muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and muscle volume (MV) in extremity and trunk muscles; however, the hamstring muscle has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between posterior thigh MT by ultrasound and the muscle CSA and MV of the hamstring obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten young women aged 20-31 had MT measured by ultrasound at three sites on the medial anterior (50% of thigh length; TL) and posterior (50% and 70% of TL) aspects of the thigh. On the same day, a series of continuous muscle CSA along the thigh was measured by MRI. In each slice, the anatomical CSA of the hamstring (biceps femoris, semitendinosus and semimembranosus) and quadriceps muscle was analysed, and the CSAs at 50% and 70% of TL and maximal CSA of the hamstring (CSAmax ) were determined. MV was calculated by multiplying CSA by slice thickness. A significant correlation was observed between posterior 50% MT and 50% hamstring CSA (r = 0·848, P = 0·002) and between posterior 70% MT and 70% hamstring CSA (r = 0·679, P = 0·031). Posterior 50% MT (r = 0·732, P = 0·016) and 50% MTxTL (r = 0·873, P = 0·001) were also correlated to hamstring MV. Anterior:posterior 50% thigh MT ratio was correlated to MV ratio of quadriceps and hamstring muscles (r = 0·803, P = 0·005). Our results suggest that posterior thigh MT reflects hamstring muscle CSA and MV. The anterior:posterior MT ratio may serve as a surrogate for MV ratio of quadriceps and hamstring. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comparison of contraction times of a muscle and its motor units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, E.; Smith, L.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The twitch contraction time (CT) for each of 13 soleus (SOL) and 13 medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles was compared with the mean CT from a sample of its motor units (MUs; 356 total) to see if the CT of a whole muscle when tested at its optimal length (Lo) differed systematically from that of its MUs tested at their individual Lo's. The CTs of the whole muscle were significantly longer in the ratio of 1.13. This is consistent with a hypothesis that electrical-field effects result in a more protracted contraction of the individual muscle fiber.

  2. Changes in recruitment of Rhesus soleus and gastrocnemius muscles following a 14 day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Roy, R. R.; De Leon, R. D.; De Guzman, C. P.; Koslovskaia, I.; Sirota, M.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on the recruitment patterns of the soleus, gastrocnemius, and tibialis-anterior muscles was investigated by comparing electromyograms (EMGs) of these muscles of Rhesus monkeys implanted with EMG electrodes, taken before and after a 14-day flight on board Cosmos 2044. It was found that the EMG amplitude values in the soleus muscle decreased after the spaceflight but returned to normal values over the 2-wk recovery period. The medial amplitudes of gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior were not changed by flight. Joint probability density distributions displayed changes after flight in both the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, but not in tibialis anterior.

  3. Medialization thyroplasty versus injection laryngoplasty: a cost minimization analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Samantha; Sun, Hongmei; Sarma, Sisira; Siu, Jennifer; Fung, Kevin; Sowerby, Leigh

    2017-02-20

    Medialization thyroplasty and injection laryngoplasty are widely accepted treatment options for unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Although both procedures result in similar clinical outcomes, little is known about the corresponding medical care costs. Medialization thyroplasty requires expensive operating room resources while injection laryngoplasty utilizes outpatient resources but may require repeated procedures. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to quantify the cost differences in adult patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis undergoing medialization thyroplasty versus injection laryngoplasty. Cost minimization analysis conducted using a decision tree model. A decision tree model was constructed to capture clinical scenarios for medialization thyroplasty and injection laryngoplasty. Probabilities for various events were obtained from a retrospective cohort from the London Health Sciences Centre, Canada. Costs were derived from the published literature and the London Health Science Centre. All costs were reported in 2014 Canadian dollars. Time horizon was 5 years. The study was conducted from an academic hospital perspective in Canada. Various sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess differences in procedure-specific costs and probabilities of key events. Sixty-three patients underwent medialization thyroplasty and 41 underwent injection laryngoplasty. Cost of medialization thyroplasty was C$2499.10 per patient whereas those treated with injection laryngoplasty cost C$943.19. Results showed that cost savings with IL were C$1555.91. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses suggested cost savings ranged from C$596 to C$3626. Treatment with injection laryngoplasty results in cost savings of C$1555.91 per patient. Our extensive sensitivity analyses suggest that switching from medialization thyroplasty to injection laryngoplasty will lead to a minimum cost savings of C$596 per patient. Considering the significant cost savings and similar

  4. The Association Between Rotator Cuff Muscle Fatty Infiltration and Glenoid Morphology in Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kenneth W; Ricchetti, Eric T; Ho, Jason C; Iannotti, Joseph P

    2018-03-07

    Glenoid morphology and rotator cuff muscle quality are important anatomic factors that can impact longevity of the glenoid component following total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). We hypothesized that rotator cuff muscle fatty infiltration is associated with increased pathologic glenoid bone loss in glenohumeral osteoarthritis (OA). We retrospectively reviewed 190 preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans of 175 patients (mean age, 66 years; range, 44 to 90 years) who underwent TSA for the treatment of primary glenohumeral OA. Two-dimensional orthogonal CT images were reformatted in the plane of the scapula from 3-dimensional images. Pathologic joint-line medialization was defined with use of the glenoid vault model. Pathologic glenoid version was measured directly. Glenoid morphology was graded according to a modified Walch classification (subtypes A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, C1, and C2). Rotator cuff muscle fatty infiltration was assessed and assigned a Goutallier score on the sagittal CT slice just medial to the spinoglenoid notch for each muscle. There was a significant difference in the Goutallier score for the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and teres minor muscles between Walch subtypes (p ≤ 0.05). High-grade posterior rotator cuff muscle fatty infiltration was present in 55% (21) of 38 B3 glenoids compared with 8% (3) of 39 A1 glenoids. Increasing joint-line medialization was associated with increasing fatty infiltration of all rotator cuff muscles (p ≤ 0.05). Higher fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus, teres minor, and combined posterior rotator cuff muscles was associated with increasing glenoid retroversion (p ≤ 0.05). After controlling for joint-line medialization and retroversion, B3 glenoids were more likely to have fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles than B2 glenoids were. High-grade rotator cuff muscle fatty infiltration is associated with B3 glenoids, increased pathologic glenoid retroversion, and increased joint

  5. Medial meniscus extrusion correlates with disease duration of the sudden symptomatic medial meniscus posterior root tear.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, T; Kamatsuki, Y; Fujii, M; Kodama, Y; Okazaki, Y; Masuda, S; Ozaki, T

    2017-12-01

    Medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT) leads to abnormal biomechanics of the knee by inducing the medial meniscus extrusion (MME). However, a time-dependent increase of the MME is not fully elucidated in patients suffering from the acute MMPRT. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among disease duration of the MMPRT and severity of the MME. We hypothesized that MME measurement correlates with disease duration after a sudden onset of the minor traumatic MMPRT during the short-term follow-up period. Forty-six patients who had an accurate episode of the posteromedial painful popping were investigated. All the patients were diagnosed having a symptomatic MMPRT with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Absolute MME was measured using MRI scans within 12 months after painful popping events. A correlation coefficient between duration from injury to MRI examination and absolute MME was evaluated. Mean absolute MME was 4.5±1.6mm (range, 1.1-8.8mm) on MRI measurements. A good correlation was observed between MME measurement and duration from injury to MRI examination (R 2 =0.612). The best-fit equation for predicting each value was: MME=0.014×disease duration+3.288mm. This study demonstrated that absolute MME increases progressively within the short duration after the onset of symptomatic MMPRT. Our results suggest that preoperative MME assessment may be important in determining disease duration and treatment strategy of the MMPRT. Retrospective cohort study level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  7. Transoral endoscopic anatomy of the parapharyngeal space: a step-by-step logical approach with surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Dallan, Iacopo; Seccia, Veronica; Muscatello, Luca; Lenzi, Riccardo; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Bignami, Maurizio; Montevecchi, Filippo; Tschabitscher, Manfred; Vicini, Claudio

    2011-04-01

    Surgical approaches to the parapharyngeal spaces are challenging. Little is known about the transoral perspective of the anatomy of the parapharyngeal space. Thus, transoral approaches are seldom performed, and only for small-sized tumors. Six freshly injected cadaver heads were dissected to illustrate the transoral surgical anatomy of the parapharyngeal space. The transoral window dominates the parapharyngeal space from the medial pterygoid muscle laterally to the superior constrictor muscle medially. The stylopharyngeus and styloglossus muscles seem to be critical landmarks in this approach. Posterior to these muscles and laterally to the superior constrictor muscle, the internal carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and lower cranial nerves are identifiable. This anatomic study emphasizes the critical role of the superior constrictor, styloglossus, and stylopharyngeus muscles and highlights the concept of a logical step by step technique that allows the identification of important structures and the creation of safe surgical corridors. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Associations between muscle structure and contractile performance in seniors.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Avleen; Wakeling, James M

    2013-07-01

    Changes in muscle structure due to aging occur in a process known as sarcopenia. These changes can alter muscle mechanics during contraction that may limit mobility in seniors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sarcopenia on muscle fascicle length, pennation and belly thickness in a contracting muscle during isokinetic movements. Fascicles within a pennate muscle shorten at a slower velocity than that of the muscle belly, in a process called belly gearing. Belly gearing may be affected by atrophy and so was also tested in these seniors. The gastrocnemii were tested using ultrasound from 10 young adults (20-40 years) and 9 seniors (70-85 years). The muscle structure was imaged during standing and maximal plantarflexion at four constant velocities on a dynamometer and torque, position and time were recorded during contractions. The muscle belly thickness and pennation in seniors were significantly lower than young adults during standing. Belly thickness, changes in pennation, the belly gearing, ankle torque and power output were all significantly lower in seniors during plantarflexion contractions of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG). The higher pennation observed in young adults is commonly associated with increased fascicle rotations during contraction causing an increased belly gearing. The decreased fascicle rotations in seniors resulted in reduced belly gearing but the size of this effect did not match the loss in strength or power from the muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anatomical study of the opossum (Didelphis albiventris) extraocular muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Matheus, S M; Soares, J C; da Silva, A M; Seullner, G

    1995-01-01

    The anatomy of the extraocular muscles was studied in 10 adult opossums (Didelphis albiventris) of both sexes. Eight extraocular muscles were identified: 4 rectus muscles, 2 oblique muscles, the levator palpebrae superioris and the retractor ocular bulbi. The rectus muscles originate very close one to another between the orbital surfaces of the presphenoid and palatine bones. These muscles diverge on the way to their insertion which occurs at about 2 mm from the limbus. The levator palpebrae superioris originates with the dorsal rectus and is positioned dorsally in relation to it. The retractor ocular bulbi forms a cone which embraces the optic nerve and is located internally in relation to the rectus muscles. The dorsal oblique originates on the presphenoid bone and after a tendinous trajectory through a trochlea on the medial wall of the orbit, inserts into the ocular bulb. The only muscle arising from the anterior orbital floor is the ventral oblique. The main nerve supply for these muscles is the oculomotor, except for the dorsal oblique which is innervated by the trochlear nerve, and the lateral rectus which is innervated by the abducens nerve. The retractor ocular bulbi receives branches from the inferior division of the oculomotor nerve and some branches from the abducens nerve. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7649843

  10. Effects of Aging on Thyroarytenoid Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungah; Kletzien, Heidi; Connor, Nadine P.; Schultz, Edward; Chamberlain, Connie S.; Bless, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/hypotheses Regenerative properties of age-associated changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles following injury are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative properties of the thyroarytenoid muscle (TA) in an aging rat model. The hypothesis was that, following myotoxic injury, old animals would exhibit a decrease in mitotic activities of muscle satellite cells when compared with younger rats, suggesting reduced regenerative potential in the aging rat TA. Study Design Animal group comparison. Method Regeneration responses following injury to the TA were examined in 18 young adult, middle-aged, and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats. TA muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA), satellite cell mitosis (number/fiber), and regeneration index (CSA injured side/CSA non-injured side) were measured and compared across age groups. Results Young animals had a significantly higher regeneration index than the middle-aged and old groups. Within the lateral region of the TA (LTA), the regeneration index was significantly higher in the young animals than in the middle-aged and old animals. The regeneration index of the medial TA (MTA) was significantly higher than the LTA across all age groups. Conclusions The regenerative capacity of the TA muscle is impaired with increasing age. Evidence N/A PMID:22965923

  11. Morphometry of medial gaps of human brain artery branches.

    PubMed

    Canham, Peter B; Finlay, Helen M

    2004-05-01

    The bifurcation regions of the major human cerebral arteries are vulnerable to the formation of saccular aneurysms. A consistent feature of these bifurcations is a discontinuity of the tunica media at the apex of the flow divider. The objective was to measure the 3-dimensional geometry of these medial gaps or "medial defects." Nineteen bifurcations and 2 junctions of human cerebral arteries branches (from 4 male and 2 female subjects) were formalin-fixed at physiological pressure and processed for longitudinal serial sectioning. The apex and adjacent regions were examined and measurements were made from high-magnification photomicrographs, or projection microscope images, of the gap dimensions at multiple levels through the bifurcation. Plots were made of the width of the media as a function of distance from the apex. The media at each edge of the medial gap widened over a short distance, reaching the full width of the media of the contiguous daughter vessel. Medial gap dimensions were compared with the planar angle of the bifurcation, and a strong negative correlation was found, ie, the acute angled branches have the more prominent medial gaps. A discontinuity of the media at the apex was seen in all the bifurcations examined and was also found in the junction regions of brain arteries. We determined that the gap width is continuous with well-defined dimensions throughout its length and average length-to-width ratio of 6.9. The gaps were generally centered on the prominence of the apical ridge.

  12. An in vitro analysis of medial structures and a medial soft tissue reconstruction in a constrained condylar total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Athwal, Kiron K; El Daou, Hadi; Inderhaug, Eivind; Manning, William; Davies, Andrew J; Deehan, David J; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the medial soft tissue contributions to stability following constrained condylar (CC) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and determine whether a medial reconstruction could restore stability to a soft tissue-deficient, CC-TKA knee. Eight cadaveric knees were mounted in a robotic system and tested at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion with ±50 N anterior-posterior force, ±8 Nm varus-valgus, and ±5 Nm internal-external torque. The deep and superficial medial collateral ligaments (dMCL, sMCL) and posteromedial capsule (PMC) were transected and their relative contributions to stabilising the applied loads were quantified. After complete medial soft tissue transection, a reconstruction using a semitendinosus tendon graft was performed, and the effect on kinematic behaviour under equivocal conditions was measured. In the CC-TKA knee, the sMCL was the major medial restraint in anterior drawer, internal-external, and valgus rotation. No significant differences were found between the rotational laxities of the reconstructed knee to the pre-deficient state for the arc of motion examined. The relative contribution of the reconstruction was higher in valgus rotation at 60° than the sMCL; otherwise, the contribution of the reconstruction was similar to that of the sMCL. There is contention whether a CC-TKA can function with medial deficiency or more constraint is required. This work has shown that a CC-TKA may not provide enough stability with an absent sMCL. However, in such cases, combining the CC-TKA with a medial soft tissue reconstruction may be considered as an alternative to a hinged implant.

  13. Medial extrusion of the posterior segment of medial meniscus is a sensitive sign for posterior horn tears.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazufumi; Banno, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Yuta; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate medial extrusion of the posterior segment of the medial meniscus in posterior horn tears. This study enrolled 72 patients without medial meniscal tears (group N), 72 patients with medial meniscal tears without posterior horn tears (group PH-), 44 patients with posterior horn tears of the medial meniscus (group PH+). All meniscal tears were confirmed by arthroscopy. Medial extrusion of the middle segment and the posterior segment was measured on coronal MRIs. Extrusions of both middle and posterior segments in groups PH- and PH+ (middle segment; 2.94±1.51 mm for group PH- and 3.75±1.69 mm for group PH+, posterior segment; 1.85±1.82 mm for group PH- and 4.59±2.74 mm for group PH+) were significantly larger than those in group N (middle segment; 2.04±1.20, posterior segment; 1.21±1.86). Both indicators of extrusion in group PH+ were larger than those in group PH-. In the early OA category, neither middle nor posterior segment in group PH- extruded more than in group N. However, only the posterior segment in group PH+ extruded significantly more than in group N. Multiple lineal regression analyses revealed that posterior segment extrusion was strongly correlated with the posterior horn tears (p<0.001) among groups PH- and PH+. The newly presented indicator for extrusion of the posterior segment of the medial meniscus is associated with posterior horn tears in comparison with the extrusion of the middle segment, especially in the early stages of osteoarthritis. Level II--Diagnostic Study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective Medial Release Technique Using the Pie-Crusting Method for Medial Tightness During Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ha, Chul-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Lee, Choong-Hee; Awe, Soo-Ik; Park, Yong-Geun

    2016-05-01

    The pie-crusting method is popular in releasing lateral tightness during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) but is not well described for medial release. We established a selective medial release technique using the pie-crusting technique and investigated the effectiveness and safety of the technique during primary TKA. We retrospectively reviewed 729 primary TKAs with varus deformity between October 2009 and June 2012. Medial tightness in flexion was released by traditional subperiosteal stripping for the anterior portion of the medial collateral ligament (aMCL). Medial tightness in extension was released by the pie crusting for the tight fibers in the posterior portion of the MCL and/or posteromedial corner structures (pMCL/PMCS). Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Knee Society (KS) scores and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Any complications, including late medial instability that may be related to our surgical technique, were carefully inspected. Among the 729 knees, 170 (23.3%) required subperiosteal stripping for balancing in flexion only, 186 (25.5%) required the pie-crusting for balancing in extension only and 142 (19.5%) required subperiosteal stripping and the pie-crusting for balancing in flexion and extension. The KS knee score was improved from 52.5 to 83.4, KS function score from 58.2 to 91.9, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index from 42.7 to 21.8 (P < .001, all). No specific complications related to our technique were identified. The selective medial release technique appears to be an effective and safe method to obtain a balanced mediolateral gap in primary TKA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison between medial rectus pulley fixation and augmented recession in children with convergence excess and variable-angle infantile esotropia.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Heba M; Abdelhakim, Mohamad A; Awadein, Ahmed; Elhilali, Hala

    2016-10-01

    To compare the outcomes of medial rectus (MR) muscle pulley fixation and augmented recession in children with convergence excess esotropia and variable-angle infantile esotropia. This was a prospective randomized interventional study in which children with convergence excess esotropia or variable-angle infantile esotropia were randomly allocated to either augmented MR muscle recession (augmented group) or MR muscle pulley posterior fixation (pulley group). In convergence excess, the MR recession was based on the average of distance and near angles of deviation with distance correction in the augmented group, and on the distance angle of deviation in the pulley group. In variable-angle infantile esotropia, the MR recession was based on the average of the largest and smallest angles in the augmented group and on the smallest angle in the pulley group. Pre- and postoperative ductions, versions, pattern strabismus, smallest and largest angles of deviation, and angle disparity were analyzed. Surgery was performed on 60 patients: 30 underwent bilateral augmented MR recession, and 30 underwent bilateral MR recession with pulley fixation. The success rate was statistically significantly higher (P = 0.037) in the pulley group (70%) than in the augmented group (40%). The postoperative smallest and largest angles and the angle disparity were statistically significantly lower in the pulley group than the augmented group (P < 0.01). Medial rectus muscle pulley fixation is a useful surgical step for addressing marked variability of the angle in variable angle esotropia and convergence excess esotropia. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pennation angle does not influence the age-related differences in echo intensity of the medial gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Eric D; Rosenberg, Joseph G; Scharville, Michael J; Sobolewski, Eric J; Tweedell, Andrew J; Kleinberg, Craig R

    2015-02-01

    The reflection of an ultrasound (US) wave is strongest when the propagation direction of the wave is perpendicular to muscle fascicles. Thus, it is possible that muscle echo intensity (EI), a gray-scale US measure of muscle quality, may be influenced by the angulation of muscle fascicles. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if age-related differences in muscle EI values are influenced by differences in pennation angle (PA). Medial gastrocnemius EI and PA were examined using panoramic US imaging in 24 young (19.8 ± 1.7 y) and 21 older (69.3 ± 3.3 y) men. The young men had lower EI values (young = 74.1 ± 6.3 a.u., older = 89.1 ± 8.8 a.u.) and a greater PA (young = 20.0 ± 2.9°; older = 17.2 ± 2.5°) compared with the older men (p < 0.01). In addition, there was a negative relationship (r = -0.473, p < 0.01) between PA and EI with both groups combined, but no significant relationship when the young (r = -0.334, p = 0.111) and older (r = -0.147, p = 0.525) men were examined separately. An analysis of covariance revealed that muscle EI values remained different (p < 0.01) between age groups after adjustment for differences in PA. Thus, after statistically adjusting the mean EI values for the differences in PA, there were still significant age-related differences in EI. These findings may provide further support that the age-related changes in muscle EI values reflect changes in tissue composition (i.e., increase in intramuscular fat and/or connective tissue) commonly reported in older adults. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporal characteristics of Punjabi word-medial singletons and geminates.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Qandeel

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have investigated the temporal characteristics of the word-medial singletons and geminates in Indo-Aryan languages. However, little is known about the acoustic cues distinguishing between the word-medial singletons and geminates of Punjabi. The present study examines the temporal characteristics of Punjabi word-medial singleton and geminate stops in a C1V1C2V2 template. The results from five Punjabi speakers showed that, unlike previous studies of Indo-Aryan languages, the durations of C2 and V2 are the most important acoustic correlates of singleton and geminate stops in Punjabi. These findings therefore point towards the cross-linguistic differences in the acoustic correlates of singletons and geminates.

  18. Results of step-cut medial malleolar osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Thordarson, David B; Kaku, Shawn K

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of certain complex ankle pathology, such as a talar body fracture or osteochondral lesion requiring grafting, can necessitate medial malleolar osteotomy for adequate operative exposure. This paper evaluates the step-cut medial malleolar osteotomy for exposure of the ankle joint. Fourteen patients with intra-articular pathology, including talar body fractures or osteochondral lesions necessitating extensive intra-articular exposure had step-cut malleolar osteotomy. The average age of the patients was 37 (range 20-90) years, and the average followup was 8 months. All 14 patients had an uncomplicated intraoperative course, with excellent exposure of the ankle joint. All patients had prompt healing of the osteotomy by 6 weeks after surgery without loss of reduction. None of the patients had pain at the osteotomy site. Step-cut medial malleolar osteotomy is an excellent, reproducible method for extensive exposure of the talar dome.

  19. Changes in articular cartilage following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Martin; Schocke, Michael; Hoser, Christian; Fink, Christian; Mayr, Raul; Rosenberger, Ralf E

    2016-05-01

    To examine degenerative changes in all cartilage surfaces of the knee following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. For this prospective cohort study, 14 patients (five female) with a mean age of 47.9 ± 12.9 years who had undergone isolated arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy were evaluated. Cartilage-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired from the operated knees before the index operations, as well as at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The MRI scans were assessed for the prevalence, severity, and size of cartilage degenerations. The clinical outcome was assessed using the SF-36 physical and mental component score and the International Knee Documentation Committee Knee Evaluation Form and was correlated with radiological findings. There was a significant increase in the severity of cartilage lesions in the medial tibial plateau (P = 0.019), as well as a trend towards an increase in the lateral tibial plateau. The size of the cartilage lesions increased significantly in the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.005) and lateral femoral condyle (P = 0.029), as well as in the patella (P = 0.019). Functional outcome scores improved significantly throughout the follow-up period. There was no correlation between cartilage wear and functional outcome. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is associated with adverse effects on articular cartilage and may lead to an increase in the severity and size of cartilage lesions. Post-operative cartilage wear predominantly affected the medial compartment and also affected the other compartments of the knee. Strategies to reduce subsequent osteoarthritic changes need to involve all compartments of the knee. IV.

  20. Compartmental Innervation of the Superior Oblique Muscle in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Le, Alan; Poukens, Vadims; Ying, Howard; Rootman, Daniel; Goldberg, Robert A; Demer, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Intramuscular innervation of mammalian horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is compartmental. We sought evidence of similar compartmental innervation of the superior oblique (SO) muscle. Three fresh bovine orbits and one human orbit were dissected to trace continuity of SO muscle and tendon fibers to the scleral insertions. Whole orbits were also obtained from four humans (two adults, a 17-month-old child, and a 33-week stillborn fetus), two rhesus monkeys, one rabbit, and one cow. Orbits were formalin fixed, embedded whole in paraffin, serially sectioned in the coronal plane at 10-μm thickness, and stained with Masson trichrome. Extraocular muscle fibers and branches of the trochlear nerve (CN4) were traced in serial sections and reconstructed in three dimensions. In the human, the lateral SO belly is in continuity with tendon fibers inserting more posteriorly on the sclera for infraducting mechanical advantage, while the medial belly is continuous with anteriorly inserting fibers having mechanical advantage for incycloduction. Fibers in the monkey superior SO insert more posteriorly on the sclera to favor infraduction, while the inferior portion inserts more anteriorly to favor incycloduction. In all species, CN4 bifurcates prior to penetrating the SO belly. Each branch innervates a nonoverlapping compartment of EOM fibers, consisting of medial and lateral compartments in humans and monkeys, and superior and inferior compartments in cows and rabbits. The SO muscle of humans and other mammals is compartmentally innervated in a manner that could permit separate CN4 branches to selectively influence vertical versus torsional action.

  1. Surgical anatomy of medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: crucial steps and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Goebel, Lars; Hoffmann, Alexander; Dück, Klaus; Gerich, Torsten; Seil, Romain; Tschernig, Thomas; Pape, Dietrich

    2017-12-01

    To give an overview of the basic knowledge of the functional surgical anatomy of the proximal lower leg and the popliteal region relevant to medial high tibial osteotomy (HTO) as key anatomical structures in spatial relation to the popliteal region and the proximal tibiofibular joint are usually not directly visible and thus escape a direct inspection. The surgical anatomy of the human proximal lower leg and its relevance for HTO are illustrated with a special emphasis on the individual steps of the operation involving creation of the osteotomy planes and plate fixation. The posteriorly located popliteal neurovascular bundle, but also lateral structures such as the peroneal nerve, the head of the fibula and the lateral collateral ligament must be protected from the instruments used for osteotomy. Neither positioning the knee joint in flexion, nor the posterior thin muscle layer of the popliteal muscle offers adequate protection of the popliteal neurovascular bundle when performing the osteotomy. Tactile feedback through a loss-of-resistance when the opposite cortex is perforated is only possible when sawing and drilling is performed in a pounding fashion. Kirschner wires with a proximal thread, therefore, always need to be introduced under fluoroscopic control. Due to anatomy of the tibial head, the tibial slope may increase inadvertently. Enhanced surgical knowledge of anatomical structures that are at a potential risk during the different steps of osteotomy or plate fixation will help to avoid possible injuries. Expert opinion, Level V.

  2. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Procedure Using a Suspensory Femoral Fixation System

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Arai, Yuji; Kan, Hiroyuki; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Terauchi, Ryu; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocation has recently been treated with anatomic medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction using a semitendinosus muscle tendon. Although it is necessary to add tension to fix the tendon graft without loading excess stress on the patellofemoral joint, adjustment of the tension can be difficult. To resolve this problem, we developed an MPFL reconstruction procedure using the ToggleLoc Fixation Device (Biomet, Warsaw, IN), in which the semitendinosus muscle tendon is folded and used as a double-bundle tendon graft and 2 bone tunnels and 1 bone tunnel are made on the patellar and femoral sides, respectively. The patellar side of the tendon graft is fixed with an EndoButton (Smith & Nephew, London, England), and the femoral side is fixed with the ToggleLoc. Stepless adjustment of tension of the tendon graft is possible by reducing the size of the loop of the ToggleLoc hung onto the tendon graft. It may be useful to position the patella in the center of the femoral sulcus by confirming the patellofemoral joint fitting. Stability can be confirmed by loading lateral stress on the patella in the extended knee joint. This procedure is less invasive because opening of the lateral side of the femur is not necessary, and it may be useful for MPFL reconstruction. PMID:24892014

  3. Masticatory muscle architecture in the Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus (Mammalia, Rodentia): new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Saksiri, Soonchan

    2009-10-01

    We present the first descriptive comparison of the skull, mandible and jaw muscles of the recently recovered Laotian rock rat Laonastes aenigmamus. The gross anatomy of five specimens captured in Laos and internal architecture of the jaw musculature were studied using dissections. The following muscles are described: temporal, masseter, pterygoids, digastric, mylohyoid, geniohyoid and transverse mandibular. The description of the masticatory apparatus of L. aenigmamus offers a rare opportunity to assess the order of establishment of the morphological characters during the evolution of Ctenohystrica. Striking convergences have occurred during the evolution of Diatomyidae and L. aenigmamus presents a unique combination of myological features that corresponds to a mixture of sciurognathous and hystricognathous characters. If L. aenigmamus is a sciurognathous rodent, we have to assume that it independently acquired a pars reflexa of the superficial masseter. We show for the first time that the development of this pars reflexa has occurred several times during the evolution of Ctenohystrica and can no longer be considered a synapomorphic feature of 'Hystricognathi'. These results bring new insights into the evolution of hystricognathy and have profound implications for the interpretation of the fossil record of early hystricognath rodents.

  4. The association between reduced knee joint proprioception and medial meniscal abnormalities using MRI in knee osteoarthritis: results from the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    PubMed

    van der Esch, M; Knoop, J; Hunter, D J; Klein, J-P; van der Leeden, M; Knol, D L; Reiding, D; Voorneman, R E; Gerritsen, M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; Dekker, J

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is characterized by pain and activity limitations. In knee OA, proprioceptive accuracy is reduced and might be associated with pain and activity limitations. Although causes of reduced proprioceptive accuracy are divergent, medial meniscal abnormalities, which are highly prevalent in knee OA, have been suggested to play an important role. No study has focussed on the association between proprioceptive accuracy and meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. To explore the association between reduced proprioceptive accuracy and medial meniscal abnormalities in a clinical sample of knee OA subjects. Cross-sectional study in 105 subjects with knee OA. Knee proprioceptive accuracy was assessed by determining the joint motion detection threshold in the knee extension direction. The knee was imaged with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Number of regions with medial meniscal abnormalities and the extent of abnormality in the anterior and posterior horn and body were scored according to the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) method. Multiple regression analyzes were used to examine whether reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA subjects. Mean proprioceptive accuracy was 2.9° ± 1.9°. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected medial meniscal abnormalities were found in the anterior horn (78%), body (80%) and posterior horn (90%). Reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with both the number of regions with meniscal abnormalities (P < 0.01) and the extent of abnormality (P = 0.02). These associations were not confounded by muscle strength, joint laxity, pain, age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and duration of knee complaints. This is the first study showing that reduced proprioceptive accuracy is associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. The study highlights the importance of meniscal abnormalities in understanding reduced proprioceptive accuracy in

  5. Bilateral medial medullary syndrome secondary to Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Anirudda; Chandran, Vijay; Pai, Aparna; Rao, Suryanarayana; Shetty, Ranjan

    2013-08-13

    Medial medullary syndrome (MMS) is a rare type of stroke which results due to occlusion of the anterior spinal artery or vertebral artery or its branches. In this case report we present a patient who developed MMS secondary to Takayasu arteritis (TA). TA is a chronic inflammatory arteritis primarily involving the arch of aorta and its branches, which in our patient resulted in occlusion of subclavian arteries as well as infarction of the medial medulla bilaterally. To our knowledge this is the first time that MMS has been found to occur secondary to TA.

  6. The measurement of medial knee gap width using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Slane, Laura C; Slane, Josh A; Scheys, Lennart

    2017-08-01

    Medial knee instability is a key clinical parameter for assessing ligament injury and arthroplasty success, but current methods for measuring stability are typically either qualitative or involve ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to perform a preliminary analysis of whether ultrasound (US) could be used as an alternate approach for quantifying medial instability by comparing an US method with an approach mimicking the current gold standard fluoroscopy method. US data from the medial knee were collected, while cadaveric lower limbs (n = 8) were loaded in valgus (10 Nm). During post-processing, the US gap width was measured by identifying the medial edges of the femur and tibia and computing the gap width between these points. For comparison, mimicked fluoroscopy (mFluoro) images were created from specimen-specific bone models, developed from segmented CT scans, and from kinematic data collected during testing. Then, gap width was measured in the mFluoro images based on two different published approaches with gap width measured either at the most medial or at the most distal aspect of the femur. Gap width increased significantly with loading (p < 0.001), and there were no significant differences between the US method (unloaded: 8.7 ± 2.4 mm, loaded: 10.7 ± 2.2 mm) and the mFluoro method that measured gap width at the medial femur. In terms of the change in gap width with load, no correlation with the change in abduction angle was observed, with no correlation between the various methods. Inter-rater reliability for the US method was high (0.899-0.952). Ultrasound shows promise as a suitable alternative for quantifying medial instability without radiation exposure. However, the outstanding limitations of existing approaches and lack of true ground-truth data require that further validation work is necessary to better understand the clinical viability of an US approach for measuring medial knee gap width.

  7. Medial Meniscal Extrusion Relates to Cartilage Loss in Specific Femorotibial Subregions- Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bloecker, K.; Wirth, W.; Guermazi, A.; Hunter, DJ; Resch, H.; Hochreiter, J.; Eckstein, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medial meniscal extrusion is known to be related to structural progression of knee OA. However, it is unclear whether medial meniscal extrusion is more strongly associated with cartilage loss in certain medial femorotibial subregions than to others. Methods Segmentation of the medial tibial and femoral cartilage (baseline; 1-year follow-up) and the medial meniscus (baseline) was performed in 60 participants with frequent knee pain (age 61.3±9.2y, BMI 31.3±3.9 kg/m2) and with unilateral medial radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) grade 1–3, using double echo steady state MR-images. Medial meniscal extrusion distance and extrusion area (%) between the external meniscal and tibial margin at baseline, and longitudinal medial cartilage loss in eight anatomical subregions were determined. Results A significant association (Pearson correlation coefficient) was seen between medial meniscus extrusion area in JSN knees and cartilage loss over one year throughout the entire medial femorotibial compartment. The strongest correlation was with cartilage loss in the external medial tibia (r=−0.34 [p<0.01] in JSN, and r=−0.30 [p=0.02] in noJSN knees). Conclusion Medial meniscus extrusion was associated with subsequent medial cartilage loss. The external medial tibial cartilage may be particularly vulnerable to thinning once the meniscus extrudes and its surface is “exposed” to direct, non-physiological, cartilage-cartilage contact. PMID:25988986

  8. Limb muscle quality and quantity in elderly adults with dynapenia but not sarcopenia: An ultrasound imaging study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Jan, Wei Han; Han, Der-Sheng

    2018-03-28

    Dynapenia is prevalent in people with reduced skeletal muscle mass, i.e. sarcopenia, but a certain population develops muscle strength loss despite having normal skeletal muscle volume. To date, studies investigating muscle quality and quantity in groups with dynapenia but not sarcopenia are limited. Echogenicity and thickness of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus femoris, and medial gastrocnemius muscles were measured using high-resolution ultrasonography in 140 community-dwelling elderly adults. Participants with decreased handgrip strength but normal muscular volume were diagnosed as having dynapenia without sarcopenia. A multivariate regression model was used to analyze the association between dynapenia and ultrasound indicators of the sampled muscle expressed as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 140 participants were recruited for the study, 12.6% (n = 18) of whom had dynapenia. The dynapenia group had a higher mean age, higher proportion of women, slower fast gait speed, reduced handgrip strength, and decreased thicknesses of the biceps brachii, rectus femoris, and medial gastrocnemius muscles. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, dynapenia was associated with older age (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.33), higher body mass index (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.64), and decreased thicknesses of the rectus femoris (OR, 0.01; 95% CI, <0.01 to 0.24) and medial gastrocnemius muscles (OR, 0.03; 95% CI, <0.01 to 0.61). Dynapenia without sarcopenia is associated with decreased thicknesses of the rectus femoris and medial gastrocnemius muscles, an association that remains significant after adjustment for demographics, body composition, and physical performance. Ultrasound measurements of lower-limb muscle thickness can be considered an auxiliary criterion for evaluating dynapenia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical anatomy of the styloid muscles and the extracranial glossopharyngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Prades, J M; Gavid, M; Asanau, A; Timoshenko, A P; Richard, C; Martin, C H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between the extracranial glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve and the muscles of the styloid diaphragm. In humans, the IX nerve is a hidden retrostyloid nerve which plays a critical role notably in swallowing and has to be preserved during infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal spaces surgical procedures. In ten adult heads from cadavers (20 sides) fixed in formalin, dissection of the extracranial IX nerve was performed under operating microscope with special attention given to the relationships between this nerve and the styloid muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The three styloid muscles delimit three triangular intermuscular intervals which were each thoroughly explored. Different osseous landmarks were investigated for easy nerve location. The styloid process (SP) is the main superior osseous landmark for the three muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The stylohyoid muscle (SHM) is anteromedially located to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. The styloglossus muscle (SGM) is medial and anterior to the SHM. The stylopharyngeal muscle (SPM) is the most vertical and medial of the three styloid muscles. It courses from the medial surface of the SP in a deep plane hidden between the SHM and the SGM. The extracranial IX nerve turns around the SPM superiorly with a vertical segment posterior to the SPM and inferiorly with a horizontal segment lateral to the SPM. The meeting point of the two segments of the IX nerve is about 10 mm anteriorly located from the transverse process of the atlas. The external carotid artery and some of its branches lie in contact with the lateral side of the IX nerve. Such relationships between the extracranial IX nerve, the styloid muscles and the transverse process of the atlas should be appreciated by clinician who treats patients with stylohyoid complex syndromes and by the surgeon for the parapharyngeal spaces approach.

  10. Higher Medially-directed Joint Reaction Forces are a Characteristic of Dysplastic Hips: A Comparative Study Using Subject-Specific Musculoskeletal Models

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michael D.; MacWilliams, Bruce A.; Foreman, K. Bo; Peters, Christopher L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    Acetabular dysplasia is a known cause of hip osteoarthritis. In addition to abnormal anatomy, changes in kinematics, joint reaction forces (JRFs), and muscle forces could cause tissue damage to the cartilage and labrum, and may contribute to pain and fatigue. The objective of this study was to compare lower extremity joint angles, moments, hip JRFs and muscle forces during gait between patients with symptomatic acetabular dysplasia and healthy controls. Marker trajectories and ground reaction forces were measured in 10 dysplasia patients and 10 typically developing control subjects. A musculoskeletal model was scaled in OpenSim to each subject and subject-specific hip joint centers were determined using reconstructions from CT images. Joint kinematics and moments were calculated using inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics, respectively. Muscle forces and hip JRFs were estimated with static optimization. Inter-group differences were tested for statistical significance (p≤0.05) and large effect sizes (d≥0.8). Results demonstrated that dysplasia patients had higher medially directed JRFs. Joint angles and moments were mostly similar between the groups, but large inter-group effect sizes suggested some restriction in range of motion by patients at the hip and ankle. Higher medially-directed JRFs and inter-group differences in hip muscle forces likely stem from lateralization of the hip joint center in dysplastic patients. Joint force differences, combined with reductions in range of motion at the hip and ankle may also indicate compensatory strategies by patients with dysplasia to maintain joint stability. PMID:28233552

  11. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Inferior oblique muscle paresis as a sign of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Almog, Yehoshua; Ben-David, Merav; Nemet, Arie Y

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis may affect any of the six extra-ocular muscles, masquerading as any type of ocular motor pathology. The frequency of involvement of each muscle is not well established in the medical literature. This study was designed to determine whether a specific muscle or combination of muscles tends to be predominantly affected. This retrospective review included 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis who had extra-ocular muscle involvement with diplopia at presentation. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least one of the following tests: Tensilon test, acetylcholine receptor antibodies, thymoma on chest CT scan, or suggestive electromyography. Frequency of involvement of each muscle in this cohort was inferior oblique 19 (63.3%), lateral rectus nine (30%), superior rectus four (13.3%), inferior rectus six (20%), medial rectus four (13.3%), and superior oblique three (10%). The inferior oblique was involved more often than any other muscle (p<0.01). Eighteen (60%) patients had ptosis, six (20%) of whom had bilateral ptosis. Diagnosing myasthenia gravis can be difficult, because the disease may mimic every pupil-sparing pattern of ocular misalignment. In addition diplopia caused by paresis of the inferior oblique muscle is rarely encountered (other than as a part of oculomotor nerve palsy). Hence, when a patient presents with vertical diplopia resulting from an isolated inferior oblique palsy, myasthenic etiology should be highly suspected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MUSCLE METABOLISM WITH BLOOD FLOW RESTRICTION IN CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Kevin K.; Smith, Sinclair; Rajaei, Sheeva; Leigh, John S.; Natelson, Benjamin H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is associated with reduced blood flow and muscle oxidative metabolism. Patients with CFS according to CDC criteria (n=19) were compared to normal sedentary subjects (n = 11). Muscle blood flow was measured in the femoral artery with Doppler ultrasound after exercise. Muscle metabolism was measured in the medial gastrocnemius muscle using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. CFS and controls were not different in hyperemic blood flow or phosphocreatine recovery rate. Cuff pressures of 50,60,70,80,and 90 mmHg were used to partially restrict blood flow during recovery. All pressures reduced blood flow and oxidative metabolism, with 90 mmHg reducing blood flow by 46% and oxidative metabolism by 30.7% in CFS patients. Hyperemic blood flow during partial cuff occlusion was significantly reduced in CFS patients (P < 0.01), and recovery of oxygen saturation was slower (P < 0.05). No differences were seen in the amount of reduction in metabolism with partially reduced blood flow. In conclusion, CFS patients showed evidence of reduced hyperemic flow and reduced oxygen delivery, but no evidence that this impaired muscle metabolism. Thus, CFS patients might have altered control of blood flow, but this is unlikely to influence muscle metabolism. Further, abnormalities in muscle metabolism do not appear to be responsible for the CFS symptoms. PMID:14578362

  14. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... How can I keep my muscles more healthy? Physical activity Muscles that are not used will get smaller ... heart muscle as well! Get 60 minutes of physical activity every day. Get 60 minutes of physical activity ...

  15. Medial Temporal Lobe Memory in Childhood: Developmental Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  16. Medial malleolar stress fracture secondary to chronic ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Andrew J L; Birks, Christopher L; Blackney, Mark C

    2008-07-01

    Medial malleolar stress fractures are uncommon even in the sporting population. We believe that stress fractures of the medial malleolus may be the end stage of chronic anteromedial ankle impingement in elite running and jumping athletes. We present five cases of elite athletes who presented to our institution with stress fractures of the medial malleolus over a 3-year period (2004 to 2007). In each case preoperative imaging revealed an anteromedial bony spur on the tibia. All fractures were internally fixed and at the same sitting had arthroscopic debridement of the bony spur. All fractures united without further intervention, average time to union was 10.2 (range, 6 to 16) weeks. At most recent review (average, 18 months; range, 8 to 37 months), all patients had resumed sporting activity to their previous level. No patient had suffered a recurrent fracture of the medial malleolus. We believe this region of impingement to be important in the development of the stress fracture and should be addressed at the time of fracture fixation.

  17. Medial Temporal Lobe Structures Contribute to On-Line Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, David

    2009-01-01

    For the last five decades, the medial temporal lobes have been generally understood to facilitate enduring representation of certain kinds of information. In particular, knowledge about the relations among items and concepts appears to rely on that region of the brain. Recent results suggest that those same structures also play a subtle role in…

  18. Transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy in recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Reda H; Abdel Fattah, Ahmed F; Awad, Ayman G

    2014-12-01

    Maxillary sinus inverted papilloma entails medial maxillectomy and is associated with high incidence of recurrence. To study the impact of prior surgery on recurrence rate after transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Eighteen patients with primary and 33 with recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma underwent transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Caldwell-Luc operation was the primary surgery in 12 patients, transnasal endoscopic resection in 20, and midfacial degloving technique in one. The follow-up period ranged between 2 to 19.5 years with an average of 8.8 years. Recurrence was detected in 8/51 maxillary sinus inverted papilloma patients (15.7 %), 1/18 of primary cases (5.5 %), 7/33 of recurrent cases (21.2 %); 3/20 of the transnasal endoscopic resection group (15%) and 4/12 of the Caldwell-Luc group (33.3%). Redo transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy was followed by a single recurrence in the Caldwell-Luc group (25%), and no recurrence in the other groups. Recurrence is more common in recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma than primary lesions. Recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma after Caldwell-Luc operation has higher incidence of recurrence than after transnasal endoscopic resection.

  19. Theta Synchronizes the Activity of Medial Prefrontal Neurons during Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P.; Pare, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony…

  20. Ecological divergence and medial cuneiform morphology in gorillas.

    PubMed

    Tocheri, Matthew W; Solhan, Christyna R; Orr, Caley M; Femiani, John; Frohlich, Bruno; Groves, Colin P; Harcourt-Smith, William E; Richmond, Brian G; Shoelson, Brett; Jungers, William L

    2011-02-01

    Gorillas are more closely related to each other than to any other extant primate and are all terrestrial knuckle-walkers, but taxa differ along a gradient of dietary strategies and the frequency of arboreality in their behavioral repertoire. In this study, we test the hypothesis that medial cuneiform morphology falls on a morphocline in gorillas that tracks function related to hallucial abduction ability and relative frequency of arboreality. This morphocline predicts that western gorillas, being the most arboreal, should display a medial cuneiform anatomy that reflects the greatest hallucial abduction ability, followed by grauer gorillas, and then by mountain gorillas. Using a three-dimensional methodology to measure angles between articular surfaces, relative articular and nonarticular areas, and the curvatures of the hallucial articular surface, the functional predictions are partially confirmed in separating western gorillas from both eastern gorillas. Western gorillas are characterized by a more medially oriented, proportionately larger, and more mediolaterally curved hallucial facet than are eastern gorillas. These characteristics follow the predictions for a more prehensile hallux in western gorillas relative to a more stable, plantigrade hallux in eastern gorillas. The characteristics that distinguish eastern gorilla taxa from one another appear unrelated to hallucial abduction ability or frequency of arboreality. In total, this reexamination of medial cuneiform morphology suggests differentiation between eastern and western gorillas due to a longstanding ecological divergence and more recent and possibly non-adaptive differences between eastern taxa. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Anterior wrist and medial malleolus: the optimal sites for tissue selection in electric death through hand-to-foot circuit pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangtao; Su, Ruibing; Lv, Junyao; Lai, Xiaoping; Li, Xianxian; Wu, Jiayan; Hu, Bo; Xu, Long; Shen, Ruilin; Gu, Jiang; Yu, Xiaojun

    2017-03-01

    Specific morphological changes may be absent in some cases of electrocution shocked by the voltage of 220 V or lower. In this study, we attempted to demonstrate that the anterior wrist and medial malleolus were the optimal sites with promising and significant changes in electric death through the hand-to-foot circuit pathway. We established an electric shock rat model and observed histopathologic changes in the anterior wrist and medial malleolus. The results showed that the current intensities in the left anterior wrist and right medial malleolus were remarkably higher than those in the other sites, and the nuclei long/short (L/S) axis ratios of the arterial endotheliocyte and the skeletal muscle cell in these two areas were significantly higher than those in other parts of the body. These findings suggested that the anterior wrist and/or medial malleolus soft tissues as the narrowest parts of the limbs could be used as promising and useful sites for the assessment of electrical shock death, especially in forensic pathologic evaluation.

  2. Intimal and medial contributions to the hydraulic resistance of the arterial wall at different pressures: a combined computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chooi, K Y; Comerford, A; Sherwin, S J; Weinberg, P D

    2016-06-01

    The hydraulic resistances of the intima and media determine water flux and the advection of macromolecules into and across the arterial wall. Despite several experimental and computational studies, these transport processes and their dependence on transmural pressure remain incompletely understood. Here, we use a combination of experimental and computational methods to ascertain how the hydraulic permeability of the rat abdominal aorta depends on these two layers and how it is affected by structural rearrangement of the media under pressure. Ex vivo experiments determined the conductance of the whole wall, the thickness of the media and the geometry of medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and extracellular matrix (ECM). Numerical methods were used to compute water flux through the media. Intimal values were obtained by subtraction. A mechanism was identified that modulates pressure-induced changes in medial transport properties: compaction of the ECM leading to spatial reorganization of SMCs. This is summarized in an empirical constitutive law for permeability and volumetric strain. It led to the physiologically interesting observation that, as a consequence of the changes in medial microstructure, the relative contributions of the intima and media to the hydraulic resistance of the wall depend on the applied pressure; medial resistance dominated at pressures above approximately 93 mmHg in this vessel. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. Age-dependent increase in oxidative stress in gastrocnemius muscle with unloading

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Parco M.; Pistilli, Emidio E.; Alway, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress increases during unloading in muscle from young adult rats. The present study examined the markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme gene and protein expressions in medial gastrocnemius muscles of aged and young adult (30 and 6 mo of age) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats after 14 days of hindlimb suspension. Medial gastrocnemius muscle weight was decreased by ∼30% in young adult and aged rats following suspension. When muscle weight was normalized to animal body weight, it was reduced by 12% and 22% in young adult and aged rats, respectively, after suspension. Comparisons between young adult and aged control animals demonstrated a 25% and 51% decline in muscle mass when expressed as absolute muscle weight and muscle weight normalized to the animal body weight, respectively. H2O2 content was elevated by 43% while Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein content was reduced by 28% in suspended muscles compared with control muscles exclusively in the aged animals. Suspended muscles had greater content of malondialdehyde (MDA)/4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HAE) (29% and 58% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), nitrotyrosine (76% and 65% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), and catalase activity (69% and 43% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively) relative to control muscles. Changes in oxidative stress markers MDA/4-HAE, H2O2, and MnSOD protein contents in response to hindlimb unloading occurred in an age-dependent manner. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that oxidative stress has a role in mediating disuse-induced and sarcopenia-associated muscle losses. Our data suggest that aging may predispose skeletal muscle to increased levels of oxidative stress both at rest and during unloading. PMID:18801960

  4. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism ismore » the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of (3H)TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation.« less

  5. Complications in posteromedial arthroscopic suture of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Jan, N; Sonnery-Cottet, B; Fayard, J-M; Kajetanek, C; Thaunat, M

    2016-12-01

    All-inside posteromedial suture for lesions of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair provides effective freshening and good healing. The posteromedial portal provides satisfactory healing rates without increasing morbidity or complications rates. Intra- and postoperative complications were collected for a consecutive single-center series of 132 patients undergoing posteromedial hook suture of the medial meniscus in ACL repair. Meniscal healing was assessed as the rate of recurrence of symptomatic medial meniscus lesions (Barret criteria) and on revision surgery, if any, in terms of the aspect and extent of the iterative lesion. The severity of any sensory disorder was assessed by questionnaire. The intraoperative complications rate was 1.5% (2 saphenous vein punctures). At a mean 31months (range, 28-35months), there was no loss to follow-up. Twelve patients (9%) showed symptomatic recurrence of the medial meniscus lesion, requiring 10 repeat surgeries. In 6 cases (4.5%), the iterative lesion involved a smaller, more central part of the meniscus anterior to the sutures, of "postage-stamp" effect, possibly implicating the suture hook and/or non-absorbable sutures. There were no cases of infection or fistula. Postoperative hematoma occurred in 7% of patients. In total, 1.8% reported dysesthesia areas equal to or greater than the size of a credit card (45cm 2 ). Some retears, or "partial failures", may implicate a new lesion caused by the suture hook and possibly prolonged by non-resorbable sutures. Hematoma and sensory disorder rates were comparable to those reported in isolated ACL repair without posteromedial portal. The present results show that posteromedial arthroscopic hook suture in posterior medial meniscus tear provides good healing rates without increased morbidity due to the supplementary portal. IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Immediate reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator flaps after breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Ken; Fujikawa, Masakazu; Tashima, Hiroki; Saito, Takuya; Sotsuka, Yohei; Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in perforator flap surgical techniques have allowed for safe and reliable autologous tissue transfer with minimal donor-site morbidity. Between April 2012 and January 2013, we performed immediate breast reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator (MCFAP) flaps in 15 patients after breast-conserving surgery. The flaps were harvested from patients in the lithotomy position, while a second surgical team simultaneously conducted tumour resection. Of the 15 procedures performed, three flaps were dissected as true perforator flaps, while 12 flaps were dissected as muscle-sparing perforator flaps. The mean flap weight was 138.5 g (range, 77-230 g) and the mean pedicle length was 5.7 cm (range, 3.0-9.0 cm). Recipient vessels for anastomosis were serratus branches in 10 patients, internal mammary vessels in three patients and thoracodorsal vessels in two patients. The mean duration of surgery was 6.74 h (range, 5.65-9.45 h). There were no major complications requiring surgical intervention. Researchers observed partial flap necrosis, which manifested as small firm lesions in two patients, as well as local wound infection and dehiscence in one patient, which resolved spontaneously. There were no instances of donor-site seroma formation or lymphoedema in any of the patients. An objective assessment of postoperative photographs showed that cosmetic results were mostly satisfactory. Donor-site scars along the medial groin crease were inconspicuous and readily concealed by clothing. Given its reliable vascularity and minimal donor-site morbidity, the free MCFAP flap can be a good alternative for partial breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Meniscus delivery: a maneuver for easy arthroscopic access to the posterior horn of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Said, Hatem Galal; Goyal, Saumitra; Fetih, Tarek Nabil

    2016-03-16

    Pathology of posterior horn of medial meniscus is common and often presents a difficult approach during arthroscopy for various reasons. We describe an easy maneuver to facilitate "delivery of the medial meniscus" during arthroscopy.

  8. Effects of microgravity on myogenic factor expressions during postnatal development of rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inobe, Manabu; Inobe, Ikuko; Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Takeda, Shin'Ichi

    2002-01-01

    To clarify the role of gravity in the postnatal development of skeletal muscle, we exposed neonatal rats at 7 days of age to microgravity. After 16 days of spaceflight, tibialis anterior, plantaris, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles were removed from the hindlimb musculature and examined for the expression of MyoD-family transcription factors such as MyoD, myogenin, and MRF4. For this purpose, we established a unique semiquantitative method, based on RT-PCR, using specific primers tagged with infrared fluorescence. The relative expression of MyoD in the tibialis anterior and plantaris muscles and that of myogenin in the plantaris and soleus muscles were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) in the flight animals. In contrast, MRF4 expression was not changed in any muscle. These results suggest that MyoD and myogenin, but not MRF4, are sensitive to gravity-related stimuli in some skeletal muscles during postnatal development.

  9. [Morphohistochemical study of skeletal muscles in rats after experimental flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Il'ina-Kakueva, E I

    1990-01-01

    Morphometric and histochemical methods were used to examine the soleus, gastrocnemius (medial portion), quadriceps femoris (central portion) and biceps brachii muscles of Wistar SPF rats two days after the 13-day flight on Cosmos-1887. It was found that significant atrophy developed only in the soleus muscle. The space flight did not change the percentage content of slow (type I) and fast (type II) fibers in fast twitch muscles. During two days at 1 g the slow soleus muscle developed substantial circulation disorders, which led to interstitial edema and necrotic changes. The gastrocnemius muscle showed small foci containing necrotic myofibers. Two days after recovery no glycogen aggregates were seen in myofibers, which were previously observed in other rats examined 4--8 hours after flight. An initial stage of muscle readaptation to 1 g occurred, when NAD.H2-dehydrogenase activity was decreased.

  10. Anatomic variations found on dissection of depressor septi nasi muscles in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Rezaee, Maryam; Koushki, Ehsan Shams

    2012-01-01

    To define variations of the depressor septi muscle in Iranians; to provide guidance for modification of this muscle during rhinoplasty in patients with an active muscle and short upper lip; and to correlate our findings with our clinical experience to develop the applied algorithms. This study was conducted by dissecting 82 depressor septi nasi muscles in 41 Iranian cadavers. Origin and insertion points of each muscle were studied. Three variations were found in muscle insertion points: periosteal, orbicularis oris, and floating. Forty-four percent of the muscles were inserted into the periosteum of the maxilla (n = 36); 39% of muscles were inserted into the orbicularis oris muscle (n = 32); and 17% were diminutive or floating (n = 14). Periosteal insertion was thicker and stronger than the other variations. In all cadavers, the origin of the muscle was medial crus of alar cartilage and caudal of the nasal septum. This cadaveric dissection showed that the percentage of depressor septi muscle insertions is not similar to that found in other surveys. In this study, periosteal insertion of the depressor septi muscle was the most common variation.

  11. Determining skeletal muscle architecture with Laplacian simulations: a comparison with diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Handsfield, Geoffrey G; Bolsterlee, Bart; Inouye, Joshua M; Herbert, Robert D; Besier, Thor F; Fernandez, Justin W

    2017-12-01

    Determination of skeletal muscle architecture is important for accurately modeling muscle behavior. Current methods for 3D muscle architecture determination can be costly and time-consuming, making them prohibitive for clinical or modeling applications. Computational approaches such as Laplacian flow simulations can estimate muscle fascicle orientation based on muscle shape and aponeurosis location. The accuracy of this approach is unknown, however, since it has not been validated against other standards for muscle architecture determination. In this study, muscle architectures from the Laplacian approach were compared to those determined from diffusion tensor imaging in eight adult medial gastrocnemius muscles. The datasets were subdivided into training and validation sets, and computational fluid dynamics software was used to conduct Laplacian simulations. In training sets, inputs of muscle geometry, aponeurosis location, and geometric flow guides resulted in good agreement between methods. Application of the method to validation sets showed no significant differences in pennation angle (mean difference [Formula: see text] or fascicle length (mean difference 0.9 mm). Laplacian simulation was thus effective at predicting gastrocnemius muscle architectures in healthy volunteers using imaging-derived muscle shape and aponeurosis locations. This method may serve as a tool for determining muscle architecture in silico and as a complement to other approaches.

  12. Clinical study of medial area infarction in the region of posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Oishi, Minoru; Kamei, Satoshi; Shigihara, Shuntaro; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Our objective is to study the neurological characteristics of medial area infarction in the caudal cerebellum. Medial area of the caudal cerebellum is supplied with 2 branches of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). The medial hemispheric branch of the PICA distributes to the medial area of the caudal cerebellar hemisphere. The medial branch of the PICA (mPICA) distributes to the inferior vermis. We studied the neurological characteristics of 18 patients with medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum. The infarction was located in the medial area of the cerebellar hemisphere and vermis (medial ch/vermis) in 11 patients and in the medial area of the cerebellar hemisphere (medial ch) in 7 patients. All the 18 patients showed acute vertigo and disturbance of standing and gait at onset. On admission, the lateropulsion and wide-based gait were present in 13 patients, respectively. Mild ataxia of the extremities was shown in 7 patients. Acute vertigo and unsteadiness were prominent at onset in the 18 patients, although their ataxia of the extremities was mild or none. This result was consistent with the characteristics of medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum. Comparing the neurological symptoms between the medial ch/vermis group and medial ch group, both lateropulsion and wide-based gait were significantly infrequent in medial ch group. This result indicated that the vermis was spared because the mPICA was not involved in the medial ch group. It is necessary to make a careful diagnosis when we encounter patients who present acute vertigo because truncal and gait ataxia are unremarkable on admission in patients with the medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum without vermis involvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Functional electrical stimulation of gluteus medius reduces the medial joint reaction force of the knee during level walking.

    PubMed

    Rane, Lance; Bull, Anthony Michael James

    2016-11-03

    By altering muscular activation patterns, internal forces acting on the human body during dynamic activity may be manipulated. The magnitude of one of these forces, the medial knee joint reaction force (JRF), is associated with disease progression in patients with early osteoarthritis (OA), suggesting utility in its targeted reduction. Increased activation of gluteus medius has been suggested as a means to achieve this. Motion capture equipment and force plate transducers were used to obtain kinematic and kinetic data for 15 healthy subjects during level walking, with and without the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) to gluteus medius. Musculoskeletal modelling was employed to determine the medial knee JRF during stance phase for each trial. A further computer simulation of increased gluteus medius activation was performed using data from normal walking trials by a manipulation of modelling parameters. Relationships between changes in the medial knee JRF, kinematics and ground reaction force were evaluated. In simulations of increased gluteus medius activity, the total impulse of the medial knee JRF was reduced by 4.2 % (p = 0.003) compared to control. With real-world application of FES to the muscle, the magnitude of this reduction increased to 12.5 % (p < 0.001), with significant inter-subject variation. Across subjects, the magnitude of reduction correlated strongly with kinematic (p < 0.001) and kinetic (p < 0.001) correlates of gluteus medius activity. The results support a major role for gluteus medius in the protection of the knee for patients with OA, establishing the muscle's central importance to effective therapeutic regimes. FES may be used to achieve increased activation in order to mitigate distal internal loads, and much of the benefit of this increase can be attributed to resulting changes in kinematic parameters and the ground reaction force. The utility of interventions targeting gluteus medius can be assessed

  14. Smooth Muscle-Mediated Connective Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecham, Robert P.; Whitehouse, Loren A.; Wrenn, David S.; Parks, William C.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.; Crouch, Edmond C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    1987-07-01

    Abnormal accumulation of connective tissue in blood vessels contributes to alterations in vascular physiology associated with disease states such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Elastin synthesis was studied in blood vessels from newborn calves with severe pulmonary hypertension induced by alveolar hypoxia in order to investigate the cellular stimuli that elicit changes in pulmonary arterial connective tissue production. A two- to fourfold increase in elastin production was observed in pulmonary artery tissue and medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive calves. This stimulation of elastin production was accompanied by a corresponding increase in elastin messenger RNA consistent with regulation at the transcriptional level. Conditioned serum harvested from cultures of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells isolated from hypertensive animals contained one or more low molecular weight elastogenic factors that stimulated the production of elastin in both fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and altered the chemotactic responsiveness of fibroblasts to elastin peptides. These results suggest that connective tissue changes in the pulmonary vasculature in response to pulmonary hypertension are orchestrated by the medial smooth muscle cell through the generation of specific differentiation factors that alter both the secretory phenotype and responsive properties of surrounding cells.

  15. Medial Auditory Thalamus Inactivation Prevents Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway that is necessary for delay eyeblink conditioning was investigated using reversible inactivation of the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN) consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate (MGm), suprageniculate (SG), and posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN). Rats were given saline or…

  16. Dynamic Changes in Acetylcholine Output in the Medial Striatum during Place Reversal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragozzino, Michael E.; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The present studies explored the role of the medial striatum in learning when task contingencies change. Experiment 1 examined whether the medial striatum is involved in place reversal learning. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. Injections of the local anesthetic, bupivacaine, into the medial striatum, did…

  17. Bipedicled strap muscle transposition for vocal fold deficit after laser cordectomy in early glottic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Ying; Chuang, Hui-Ching; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chiu, Jeng-Fen

    2005-03-01

    In treating early glottic carcinomas, the outcomes of endoscopic laser cordectomy have been proven to be valuable in local control, survival, and vocal function preservation. In some extended cases, however, laser cordectomy may leave patients with poor vocal function because of vocal fold deficit. This work assesses the vocal outcome of medialization laryngoplasty with bipedicled strap muscle transposition for vocal fold deficit resulting from laser cordectomy in early glottic cancer patients. A prospective clinical series. Thirteen early glottic cancer patients who had vocal fold deficit caused by previous laser cordectomy underwent medialization laryngoplasty with bipedicled strap muscle transposition. The thyroid lamina on the cordectomy side was paramedially separated. The inner perichondrium was circumspectly raised from the overlying thyroid cartilage. After separating the thyrohyoid and cricothyroid membranes, the lamina was retracted laterally. A bipedicled strap muscle flap was then transposed into the area between the lamina and the paraglottic soft tissue. The thyroid cartilages were carefully sutured back in position. All patients received pre- and postoperative voice assessments comprising laryngostroboscopy and vocal function studies. Vocal enhancement was present in 92% (12/13) of patients after medialization laryngoplasty with strap muscle transposition. The glottal closure and maximal phonation time were noticeably improved by surgery. No dyspnea or other significant complications were observed in any patients. The outcomes show that bipedicled strap muscle transposition is a prosthesis-free, safe, and valuable laryngoplastic technique for correcting glottal incompetence caused by endoscopic laser cordectomy in early glottic cancer patients.

  18. Variation Among Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons When Treating Medial Epicondyle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Meghan; Dua, Karan; O'Hara, Nathan N; Brighton, Brian K; Ganley, Theodore J; Hennrikus, William L; Herman, Martin J; Hyman, Joshua E; Lawrence, J Todd; Mehlman, Charles T; Noonan, Kenneth J; Otsuka, Norman Y; Schwend, Richard M; Shrader, M Wade; Smith, Brian G; Sponseller, Paul D; Abzug, Joshua M

    2017-10-18

    Medial epicondyle fractures are a common pediatric and adolescent injury accounting for 11% to 20% of elbow fractures in this population. This purpose of this study was to determine the variability among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons when treating pediatric medial epicondyle fractures. A discrete choice experiment was conducted to determine which patient and injury attributes influence the management of medial epicondyle fractures by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons. A convenience sample of 13 pediatric orthopaedic surgeons reviewed 60 case vignettes of medial epicondyle fractures that included elbow radiographs and patient/injury characteristics. Displacement was incorporated into the study model as a fixed effect. Surgeons were queried if they would treat the injury with immobilization alone or open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Statistical analysis was performed using a mixed effect regression model. In addition, surgeons filled out a demographic questionnaire and a risk assessment to determine if these factors affected clinical decision-making. Elbow dislocation and fracture displacement were the only attributes that significantly influenced surgeons to perform surgery (P<0.05). The presence of an elbow dislocation had the largest impact on surgeons when choosing operative care (β=-0.14; P=0.02). In addition, for every 1 mm increase in displacement, surgeons tended to favor ORIF by a factor of 0.09 (P<0.01). Sex, mechanism of injury, and sport participation did not influence decision-making. In total, 54% of the surgeons demonstrated a preference for ORIF for the included scenarios. On the basis of the personality Likert scale, participants were neither high-risk takers nor extremely risk adverse with an average-risk score of 2.24. Participant demographics did not influence decision-making. There is substantial variation among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons when treating medial epicondyle fractures. The decision to operate is significantly based on

  19. Altered fibre types in gastrocnemius muscle of high wheel-running selected mice with mini-muscle phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Joanisse, Denis R; Mokas, Sophie; Bilodeau, Geneviève M; Garland, Theodore

    2008-03-01

    Selective breeding of mice for high voluntary wheel running has favoured characteristics that facilitate sustained, aerobically supported activity, including a "mini-muscle" phenotype with markedly reduced hind limb muscle mass, increased mass-specific activities of oxidative enzymes, decreased % myosin heavy chain IIb, and, in the medial gastrocnemius, reduced twitch speed, reduced mass-specific isotonic power, and increased fatigue resistance. To evaluate whether selection has altered fibre type expression in mice with either "mini" or normal muscle phenotypes, we examined fibre types of red and white gastrocnemius. In both the medial and lateral gastrocnemius, the mini-phenotype increased activities of oxidative enzymes and decreased activities of glycolytic enzymes. In red muscle samples, the mini-phenotype markedly changed fibre types, with the % type I and type IIA fibres and the surface area of type IIA fibres increasing; in addition, mice from selected lines in general had an increased % type IIA fibres and larger type I fibres as compared with mice from control lines. White muscle samples from mini-mice showed dramatic structural alterations, with an atypical distribution of extremely small, unidentifiable fibres surrounded by larger, more oxidative fibres than normally present in white muscle. The increased proportion of oxidative fibres and these atypical small fibres together may explain the reduced mass and increased mitochondrial enzyme activities in mini-muscles. These and previous results demonstrate that extension of selective breeding beyond the time when the response of the selected trait (i.e. distance run) has levelled off can still modify the mechanistic underpinnings of this behaviour.

  20. Muscular activity of lower limb muscles associated with working on inclined surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Lun; Kincl, Laurel; Lowe, Brian; Succop, Paul; Bhattacharya, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of visual cues, muscular fatigue, task performance and experience of working on inclined surfaces on activity of postural muscles in the lower limbs associated with maintaining balance on three inclined surfaces—0°, 14° and 26°. Normalized electromyographic (NEMG) data were collected on 44 professional roofers bilaterally from the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialii anterior, and gastrocnemii medial muscle groups. The 50th and 95th percentile normalized EMG amplitudes were used as EMG variables. Results showed that inclination angle and task performance caused a significant increase in the NEMG amplitudes of all postural muscles. Visual cues were significantly associated with a decrease in the 95th percentile EMG amplitude for the right gastrocnemius medial and tibialis anterior. Fatigue was related to a significant decrease in the NEMG amplitude for the rectus femoris. Experience of working on inclined surfaces did not have a significant effect on the NEMG amplitude. PMID:25331562

  1. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity.

  2. Orthogonal muscle fibres have different instructive roles in planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Scimone, M Lucila; Cote, Lauren E; Reddien, Peter W

    2017-11-30

    The ability to regenerate missing body parts exists throughout the animal kingdom. Positional information is crucial for regeneration, but how it is harboured and used by differentiated tissues is poorly understood. In planarians, positional information has been identified from study of phenotypes caused by RNA interference in which the wrong tissues are regenerated. For example, inhibition of the Wnt signalling pathway leads to regeneration of heads in place of tails. Characterization of these phenotypes has led to the identification of position control genes (PCGs)-genes that are expressed in a constitutive and regional manner and are associated with patterning. Most PCGs are expressed within planarian muscle; however, how muscle is specified and how different muscle subsets affect regeneration is unknown. Here we show that different muscle fibres have distinct regulatory roles during regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. myoD is required for formation of a specific muscle cell subset: the longitudinal fibres, oriented along the anterior-posterior axis. Loss of longitudinal fibres led to complete regeneration failure because of defects in regeneration initiation. A different transcription factor-encoding gene, nkx1-1, is required for the formation of circular fibres, oriented along the medial-lateral axis. Loss of circular fibres led to a bifurcated anterior-posterior axis with fused heads forming in single anterior blastemas. Whereas muscle is often viewed as a strictly contractile tissue, these findings reveal that different muscle types have distinct and specific regulatory roles in wound signalling and patterning to enable regeneration.

  3. Extracranial-intracranial bypass in medial sphenoid ridge meningioma associated with severe stenosis of the intracranial segments of the internal carotid artery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yabo; Wang, Zhong; Han, Qingdong

    2018-06-01

    Tumor resection and extracranial-intracranial bypass concerning medial sphenoid ridge meningioma associated with severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA) of intracranial segments has been rarely presented. Effective treatment as to the complex lesions may be complicated. Tumor resection and cerebrovascular protection should be both taken into consideration. We presented one case of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma associated with severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery of intracranial segments. The patient suffered hyperthyroidism, mirror-image dextrocardia and congenital heart disease atrial septal defect simultaneously. Before the neurosurgical treatment , the colleagues of department of cardiac surgery, anesthesiology and respiratory medicine agreed on our plan of resecting the tumor following the comprehensive evaluation of basal clinical conditions in the patient. For reducing the bleeding intraoperatively, the interventional branch performed digital subtraction angiography(DSA) and found collateral anastomosis between the supplying vessels of left middle meningeal arteries and anterior choroid arteries. No preoperative interventional embolization was determined considering the risk of cerebral ischemia. The following subtotal resection of medial sphenoid ridge meningioma and left extracranial-intracranial bypass were carried out. Additionally, ipsilateral decompressive craniectomy was done. Post-operative imaging Computed tomography (CT), Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and Transcranial Doppler (TCD) indicated subtotal resection of tumor and bypass patency. The patient was discharged with the right limbs of muscle strength of grade IV. The muscle strength of the patient returned to grade V after 6 months of follow-up. Comprehensive treatment of tumor resection and extracranial-intracranial bypass concerning medial sphenoid ridge meningioma associated with severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery of intracranial segments is

  4. Changes in oxygen consumption of human muscle and tendon following repeat muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the oxygen consumption (VO(2)) of muscle and tendon following repeat muscle contractions. During endurance tests (50 repetitions at 70% of the maximum voluntary contraction with 5-s contractions and 5-s rest) and the recovery period (0-10 min), we measured the blood volume and oxygen saturation (StO(2)) of the medial gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon using near infrared spectroscopy and red laser light. Nine male subjects performed the endurance tests three times on separate days (tests-1, 2, and 3). Before and after (test-1: immediately after, test-2: at the 5-min recovery point, test-3: at the 10-min recovery point) the endurance tests, the rate of StO(2) during 8-min period of arterial occlusion was measured to estimate the VO(2) of muscle and tendon. In test-3, after the end of exercise, the THb and StO(2) of the Achilles tendon increased gradually, and these values were higher than the pre-exercise levels until the end of the recovery period. The VO(2) of tendon as well as muscle increased significantly after the repeat muscle contractions. Furthermore, the VO(2) of tendon returned to the pre-exercise level at the 10-min point of recovery, although that of muscle was significantly higher compared to the pre-exercise level until the end of the recovery period. These results indicate that the difference between oxygen supply and consumption within tendon was greater after compared to before exercise.

  5. Experimental muscle pain produces central modulation of proprioceptive signals arising from jaw muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Capra, N F; Ro, J Y

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline, a well-established experimental model for muscle pain, on central processing of proprioceptive input from jaw muscle spindle afferents. Fifty-seven cells were recorded from the medial edge of the subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) and the adjacent parvicellular reticular formation from 11 adult cats. These cells were characterized as central units receiving jaw muscle spindle input based on their responses to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, muscle palpation and jaw stretch. Forty-five cells, which were successfully tested with 5% hypertonic saline, were categorized as either dynamic-static (DS) (n=25) or static (S) (n=20) neurons based on their responses to different speeds and amplitudes of jaw movement. Seventy-six percent of the cells tested with an ipsilateral injection of hypertonic saline showed a significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during opening and/or holding phases. The most remarkable saline-induced change was a significant reduction of MFR during the hold phase in S units (100%, 18/18 modulated). Sixty-nine percent of the DS units (11/16 modulated) also showed significant changes in MFRs limited to the hold phase. However, in the DS neurons, the MFRs increased in seven units and decreased in four units. Finally, five DS neurons showed significant changes of MFRs during both opening and holding phases. Injections of isotonic saline into the ipsilateral masseter muscle had little effect, but hypertonic saline injections made into the contralateral masseter muscle produced similar results to ipsilateral injections with hypertonic saline. These results unequivocally demonstrate that intramuscular injection with an algesic substance, sufficient to produce muscle pain, produces significant changes in the proprioceptive properties of the jaw movement-related neurons. Potential mechanisms involved in saline-induced changes in the

  6. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy for odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tsugihama; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Asaka, Daiya; Okushi, Tetsushi; Haruna, Shin-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic maxillary cysts and tumours originate from the tooth root and have traditionally been treated through an intraoral approach. Here, we report the efficacy and utility of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for the treatment of odontogenic maxillary cysts and a tumour. We undertook EMMM under general anaesthesia in six patients: four had radicular cysts, one had a dentigerous cyst, and one had a keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The cysts and tumours were completely excised and the inferior turbinate and nasolacrimal duct were preserved in all patients. There were no peri- or postoperative complications, and no incidences of recurrence. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy appears to be an effective and safe technique for treating odontogenic cysts and tumours.

  7. Multiple running speed signals in medial entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hinman, James R.; Brandon, Mark P.; Climer, Jason R.; Chapman, G. William; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) can be modeled using oscillatory interference or attractor dynamic mechanisms that perform path integration, a computation requiring information about running direction and speed. The two classes of computational models often use either an oscillatory frequency or a firing rate that increases as a function of running speed. Yet it is currently not known whether these are two manifestations of the same speed signal or dissociable signals with potentially different anatomical substrates. We examined coding of running speed in MEC and identified these two speed signals to be independent of each other within individual neurons. The medial septum (MS) is strongly linked to locomotor behavior and removal of MS input resulted in strengthening of the firing rate speed signal, while decreasing the strength of the oscillatory speed signal. Thus two speed signals are present in MEC that are differentially affected by disrupted MS input. PMID:27427460

  8. Downregulation of the posterior medial frontal cortex prevents social conformity.

    PubMed

    Klucharev, Vasily; Munneke, Moniek A M; Smidts, Ale; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-08-17

    We often change our behavior to conform to real or imagined group pressure. Social influence on our behavior has been extensively studied in social psychology, but its neural mechanisms have remained largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the transient downregulation of the posterior medial frontal cortex by theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces conformity, as indicated by reduced conformal adjustments in line with group opinion. Both the extent and probability of conformal behavioral adjustments decreased significantly relative to a sham and a control stimulation over another brain area. The posterior part of the medial frontal cortex has previously been implicated in behavioral and attitudinal adjustments. Here, we provide the first interventional evidence of its critical role in social influence on human behavior.

  9. Repair of the posterior root of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher; Reddy, Sudheer; Ma, C Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Tears of the posterior root of the medial meniscus are becoming increasingly recognized. Early identification and treatment of these tears help halt the progression of cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis of the knee. Repair of these tears is essential for recreating the hoop stress of the medial meniscus. In this note, we describe a successful arthroscopic technique to repair this lesion. A posteromedial portal is established by which two 2-0 PDS sutures are placed through the meniscus root and pulled down through a trans-tibial tunnel and fixed using an EndoButton distally along the anterolateral cortex of the tibia. This has been performed successfully in five patients with no complications.

  10. Modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy for zygomatic implant salvage.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joseph S; Tajudeen, Bobby A; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an epidemiologically important disease process due, in part, to the increasingly commonplace use of dental restorative procedures such as zygomatic implantation. Traditional management of this clinical entity typically entails extraction of the infected hardware via an open or endoscopic approach. We describe a novel management strategy of odontogenic CRS following bilateral zygomatic implantation for oral rehabilitation that we surgically salvaged via a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy. We describe the presentation and management of a case of metachronous development of bilateral CRS subsequent to zygomatic implantation. The patient's postoperative course was characterized by marked endoscopic, radiologic, and symptomatic improvement as measured by the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test. We describe a novel treatment strategy for the management of odontogenic sinusitis resulting from erroneous zygomatic implant placement. Modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy in this clinical context facilitates mucosal normalization of the affected sinus, while permitting preservation of oral function through salvage of the displaced implant.

  11. Taiwanese life scientists less "medialized" than their Western colleagues.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yin-Yueh; Peters, Hans Peter

    2015-01-01

    The article presents results from surveys of life scientists in Taiwan (n=270) and in Germany (n=326). Fewer Taiwanese than German researchers have frequent contact with the media and they rate their experiences with journalists less positively. Furthermore, they are less prepared to adapt to journalistic expectations and to a greater extent than German researchers they expect journalists to consider scientific criteria in their reporting. These findings are interpreted in Weingart's "medialization of science" framework as indicators of lower medialization of science in Taiwan than in Germany. However, Taiwanese scientists are more willing than German scientists to accept journalistic simplification at the expense of accuracy. This is explained as an adaptation to the media system and to the perceived scientific literacy of the media audience. We hypothesize that cultural differences regarding the relative priority of relational vs. rational communication goals may also contribute to more tolerance of journalistic simplification in Taiwan. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. REHABILITATION FOLLOWING MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION FOR PATELLAR INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Prohaska, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common problem seen by physical therapists, athletic trainers and orthopedic surgeons. Although following an acute dislocation, conservative rehabilitation is usually the first line of defense; refractory cases exist that may require surgical intervention. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and its role as the primary stabilizer to lateral patellar displacement. Medial patellofemoral ligament disruption is now considered to be the essential lesion following acute patellar dislocation due to significantly high numbers of ruptures following this injury. Evidence is now mounting that demonstrates the benefits of early reconstruction with a variety of techniques. Recently rehabilitation has become more robust and progressive due to our better understanding of soft tissue reconstruction and repair techniques. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the etiology of patellar instability, the anatomy and biomechanics and examination of patellofemoral instability, and to describe surgical intervention and rehabilitation following MPFL rupture. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:28593102

  13. Occlusal force, electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles and mandibular flexure of subjects with different facial types

    PubMed Central

    CUSTODIO, William; GOMES, Simone Guimarães Farias; FAOT, Fernanda; GARCIA, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues; DEL BEL CURY, Altair Antoninha

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether vertical facial patterns influence maximal occlusal force (MOF), masticatory muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity, and medial mandibular flexure (MMF). Material and Methods Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups by Ricketts's analysis: brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolychofacial. Maximum occlusal force in the molar region was bilaterally measured with a force transducer. The electromyographic activities of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles were recorded during maximal voluntary clenching. Medial mandibular flexure was calculated by subtracting the intermolar distance of maximum opening or protrusion from the distance in the rest position. The data were analyzed using ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test. The significance level was set at 5%. Results Data on maximum occlusal force showed that shorter faces had higher occlusal forces (P<0.0001). Brachyfacial subjects presented higher levels of masseter electromyographic activity and medial mandibular flexure, followed by the mesofacial and dolychofacial groups. Additionally, dolychofacial subjects showed significantly lower electromyographic temporalis activities (P<0.05). Conclusion Within the limitations of the study, it may be concluded that maximum occlusal force, masticatory muscle activity and medial mandibular flexure were influenced by the vertical facial pattern. PMID:21655772

  14. Arrangement of the orbicularis oris muscle in different types of cleft lips.

    PubMed

    Wijayaweera, C J; Amaratunga, N A; Angunawela, P

    2000-05-01

    A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the labial region, especially the arrangement of the muscle fibers, is essential for the success of primary repair of the cleft lip. Pared lateral and medial edges from 20 unilateral incomplete cleft lips and 25 unilateral complete cleft lips were obtained during primary surgery. Three specimens of normal lips were taken from unclaimed infant cadavers as the controls. They were prepared for routine histological studies and were examined to study the direction of muscle fibers. Intrinsic and extrinsic bundles were identified in both lateral and medial sides of specimens of both cleft types. The intrinsic bundle was not displaced but was interrupted by the cleft. The extrinsic bundle in the lateral side of both cleft types ran upward along the lateral cleft margin, whereas in the medial side it ran horizontally to terminate close to the medial cleft margin. The extrinsic bundle is the retractor, which is associated with facial expression, whereas the intrinsic bundle is the constrictor of the mouth. Because there are two functional components in the orbicularis oris muscle, identifying and repairing them separately will enable each of them to accomplish their distinctive functions.

  15. Medial unicondylar knee arthroplasty combined to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Alberto; Legnani, Claudio; Terzaghi, Clara; Iori, Stefano; Borgo, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcomes of patients who underwent combined medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The hypothesis was that this procedure would lead to a high success rate in patients affected by isolated medial unicompartmental osteoarthritis and concomitant ACL deficiency. Fourteen patients with primary ACL lesion and concomitant medial compartment symptomatic osteoarthritis treated from 2006 to 2010 were followed up for an average time of 26.7 months (SD 4.2). Assessment included KOOS score, Oxford Knee score, American Knee Society scores, WOMAC index of osteoarthritis, Tegner activity level and objective examination including instrumented laxity test with KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiological assessment was done with standard simple radiographs in order to get information about any presence of loosening of the components. KOOS score, OKS, WOMAC index and the AKSS improved significantly after surgery (p < 0.001). Regarding AKSS, improvement was noted both in the objective score and in the functional one (p < 0.001). There was no clinical evidence of instability in any of the knees as evaluated with clinical laxity testing. No pathologic radiolucent lines were observed around the components. In one patient signs of osteoarthritis in the lateral compartment were observed 28 months after surgery. UKA combined with ACL reconstruction is a valid therapeutic option for the treatment of combined medial unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis and ACL deficiency in young and active patients and confirms subjective and objective clinical improvement 2 years after surgery. The use of a fixed-bearing prosthesis represents a reliable feature as it allows to overcome problems of improper ligament tensioning during the implantation of the components. IV.

  16. Unicameral Bone Cyst of the Medial Cuneiform: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schick, Faith A; Daniel, Joseph N; Miller, Juliane S

    2016-02-17

    A unicameral bone cyst is a relatively uncommon, benign bone tumor found in the metaphysis of long bones, such as the humerus and the femur, in skeletally immature persons. In the foot, these benign, fluid-filled cavities are most commonly found within the os calcis. We present a case report of a 10-year-old female with a unicameral bone cyst of the medial cuneiform.

  17. Why Do Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasties Fail Today?

    PubMed

    van der List, Jelle P; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Pearle, Andrew D

    2016-05-01

    Failure rates are higher in medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) than total knee arthroplasty. To improve these failure rates, it is important to understand why medial UKA fail. Because individual studies lack power to show failure modes, a systematic review was performed to assess medial UKA failure modes. Furthermore, we compared cohort studies with registry-based studies, early with midterm and late failures and fixed-bearing with mobile-bearing implants. Databases of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane and annual registries were searched for medial UKA failures. Studies were included when they reported >25 failures or when they reported early (<5 years), midterm (5-10 years), or late failures (>10 years). Thirty-seven cohort studies (4 level II studies and 33 level III studies) and 2 registry-based studies were included. A total of 3967 overall failures, 388 time-dependent failures, and 1305 implant design failures were identified. Aseptic loosening (36%) and osteoarthritis (OA) progression (20%) were the most common failure modes. Aseptic loosening (26%) was most common early failure mode, whereas OA progression was more commonly seen in midterm and late failures (38% and 40%, respectively). Polyethylene wear (12%) and instability (12%) were more common in fixed-bearing implants, whereas pain (14%) and bearing dislocation (11%) were more common in mobile-bearing implants. This level III systematic review identified aseptic loosening and OA progression as the major failure modes. Aseptic loosening was the main failure mode in early years and mobile-bearing implants, whereas OA progression caused most failures in late years and fixed-bearing implants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The operative outcomes of displaced medial-end clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Verinder S; Hermans, Deborah; Duckworth, David G

    2015-11-01

    Nonoperative treatment of displaced medial clavicle fractures often leads to poor functional outcomes and painful nonunions. This study investigates the functional outcomes of patients undergoing operative fixation of these fractures. We investigated 27 patients undergoing operative fixation of a medial clavicle fracture; 24 had an acute, displaced fracture and 3 had fixation for nonunions. Preoperative radiographs or computed tomography scans were obtained, and data collected included age, sex, mechanism of injury, and fixation method. Follow-up included physical examination and radiographs for assessment of union; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores at 12 months; and the recording of complications. The median age was 37 years (interquartile range, 17-47 years). There were 26 male patients and one female patient included, with 7 physeal injuries and 20 adult injuries. The most common mechanism of fracture was vehicular accident (n = 15). Three patients had operations for nonunions and 2 for a periprosthetic fracture medial to an existing plate. The fracture was fixed with plate and screws in 19 cases and with transosseous sutures in 8 cases. The median Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score at 12 months was 0.4 (interquartile range, 0-5.0), with a union rate of 100% at 12 months. All patients had full shoulder range of motion at final follow-up and were able to return to preinjury occupational activities. There were no significant complications. Operative fixation of displaced medial clavicle fractures results in anatomic reconstruction and excellent functional outcomes, even in the setting of fixation performed for symptomatic nonunion. Early intervention can minimize the risk of painful nonunion. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging analyses indicate heterogeneous strains along human medial gastrocnemius fascicles caused by submaximal plantar-flexion activity.

    PubMed

    Karakuzu, Agah; Pamuk, Uluç; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Acar, Burak; Yucesoy, Can A

    2017-05-24

    Sarcomere length changes are central to force production and excursion of skeletal muscle. Previous modeling indicates non-uniformity of that if mechanical interaction of muscle with its surrounding muscular and connective tissues is taken into account. Hence, quantifying length changes along the fascicles of activated human muscle in vivo is crucial, but this is lacking due to technical complexities. Combining magnetic resonance imaging deformation analyses and diffusion tensor imaging tractography, the aim was to test the hypothesis that submaximal plantar flexion activity at 15% MVC causes heterogeneous length changes along the fascicles of human medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. A general fascicle strain distribution pattern shown for all subjects indicates that proximal track segments are shortened, whereas distal ones are lengthened (e.g., by 13% and 29%, respectively). Mean fiber direction strains of different tracts also shows heterogeneity (for up to 57.5% of the fascicles). Inter-subject variability of amplitude and distribution of fascicle strains is notable. These findings confirm the hypothesis and are solid indicators for the functionally dependent mechanics of human muscle, in vivo. Heterogeneity of fascicle strains can be explained by epimuscular myofascial force transmission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study, which quantified local deformations along human skeletal muscle fascicles caused by sustained submaximal activation. The present approach and indicated fascicle strain heterogeneity has numerous implications for muscle function in health and disease to estimate the muscle's contribution to the joint moment and excursion and to evaluate mechanisms of muscle injury and several treatment techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block compared with medial transverse abdominis plane block in inguinal hernia repair: A prospective, randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nidhi; Sen, Indu Mohini; Mandal, Banashree; Batra, Ankita

    2018-03-29

    Analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transverse abdominis plane block, administered a little more medially, just close to the origin of the transverse abdominis muscle has not yet been investigated in patients undergoing unilateral inguinal hernia repair. We hypothesised that medial transverse abdominis plane block would provide comparable postoperative analgesia to ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block in inguinal hernia repair patients. This prospective, randomised trial was conducted in 50 ASA I and II male patients≥18 years of age. Patients were randomised into two groups to receive either pre-incisional ipsilateral ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block or medial transverse abdominis plane block, with 0.3ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. Our primary objective was postoperative 24-hour analgesic consumption and secondary outcomes included pain scores, time to first request for rescue analgesic and side effects, if any, in the postoperative period. There was no significant difference in the total postoperative analgesic consumption [group I: 66.04mg; group II: 68.33mg (P value 0.908)]. Time to first request for rescue analgesic was delayed, though statistically non-significant (P value 0.326), following medial transverse abdominis plane block, with excellent pain relief seen in 58.3% patients as opposed to 45.8% patients in ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block group. Medial transverse abdominis plane block being a novel, simple and easily performed procedure can serve as an useful alternative to ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block for providing postoperative pain relief in inguinal hernia repair patients. Copyright © 2018 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The flavonoid quercetin induces apoptosis and inhibits JNK activation in intimal vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; Bishop-Bailley, David; Lodi, Federica

    Quercetin, the most abundant dietary flavonol, exerts vasodilator, anti-hypertensive, and anti-atherogenic effects and reduces the vascular remodelling associated with elevated blood pressure. Here, we have compared the effects of quercetin in intimal- and medial-type rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in culture. After 48 h, quercetin reduced the viability of a polyclonal intimal-type cell line derived from neonatal aorta but not of a medial-type cell line derived from adult aorta. These differential effects were similar in both proliferating and quiescent VSMC. Quercetin also preferentially reduced the viability of intimal-type over medial-type VSMC in primary cultures derived from balloon-injured carotid arteries.more » The effects of quercetin on cell viability were mainly dependent upon induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and were unrelated to PPAR{gamma}, pro-oxidant effects or nitric oxide. The expression of MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK) and ERK phosphorylation were not different between intimal- and medial-type VSMC. p38 phosphorylation was negligible in both cell types. Medial-type showed a weak JNK phosphorylation while this was markedly increased in intimal-type cells. Quercetin reduced JNK phosphorylation but had no consistent effect on ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, quercetin preferentially produced apoptosis in intimal-type compared to medial-type VSMC. This might play a role in the anti-atherogenic and anti-hypertensive effects of quercetin.« less

  2. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  3. Medial malleolar fractures: a biomechanical study of fixation techniques.

    PubMed

    Fowler, T Ty; Pugh, Kevin J; Litsky, Alan S; Taylor, Benjamin C; French, Bruce G

    2011-08-08

    Fracture fixation of the medial malleolus in rotationally unstable ankle fractures typically results in healing with current fixation methods. However, when failure occurs, pullout of the screws from tension, compression, and rotational forces is predictable. We sought to biomechanically test a relatively new technique of bicortical screw fixation for medial malleoli fractures. Also, the AO group recommends tension-band fixation of small avulsion type fractures of the medial malleolus that are unacceptable for screw fixation. A well-documented complication of this technique is prominent symptomatic implants and secondary surgery for implant removal. Replacing stainless steel 18-gauge wire with FiberWire suture could theoretically decrease symptomatic implants. Therefore, a second goal was to biomechanically compare these 2 tension-band constructs. Using a tibial Sawbones model, 2 bicortical screws were compared with 2 unicortical cancellous screws on a servohydraulic test frame in offset axial, transverse, and tension loading. Second, tension-band fixation using stainless steel wire was compared with FiberWire under tensile loads. Bicortical screw fixation was statistically the stiffest construct under tension loading conditions compared to unicortical screw fixation and tension-band techniques with FiberWire or stainless steel wire. In fact, unicortical screw fixation had only 10% of the stiffness as demonstrated in the bicortical technique. In a direct comparison, tension-band fixation using stainless steel wire was statistically stiffer than the FiberWire construct. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Dopamine in the medial amygdala network mediates human bonding.

    PubMed

    Atzil, Shir; Touroutoglou, Alexandra; Rudy, Tali; Salcedo, Stephanie; Feldman, Ruth; Hooker, Jacob M; Dickerson, Bradford C; Catana, Ciprian; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2017-02-28

    Research in humans and nonhuman animals indicates that social affiliation, and particularly maternal bonding, depends on reward circuitry. Although numerous mechanistic studies in rodents demonstrated that maternal bonding depends on striatal dopamine transmission, the neurochemistry supporting maternal behavior in humans has not been described so far. In this study, we tested the role of central dopamine in human bonding. We applied a combined functional MRI-PET scanner to simultaneously probe mothers' dopamine responses to their infants and the connectivity between the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), the amygdala, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which form an intrinsic network (referred to as the "medial amygdala network") that supports social functioning. We also measured the mothers' behavioral synchrony with their infants and plasma oxytocin. The results of this study suggest that synchronous maternal behavior is associated with increased dopamine responses to the mother's infant and stronger intrinsic connectivity within the medial amygdala network. Moreover, stronger network connectivity is associated with increased dopamine responses within the network and decreased plasma oxytocin. Together, these data indicate that dopamine is involved in human bonding. Compared with other mammals, humans have an unusually complex social life. The complexity of human bonding cannot be fully captured in nonhuman animal models, particularly in pathological bonding, such as that in autistic spectrum disorder or postpartum depression. Thus, investigations of the neurochemistry of social bonding in humans, for which this study provides initial evidence, are warranted.

  5. Analysis of 3D strain in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kolaczek, S; Hewison, C; Caterine, S; Ragbar, M X; Getgood, A; Gordon, K D

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a method to evaluate three-dimensional strain in meniscal tissue using medical imaging. Strain is calculated by tracking small teflon markers implanted within the meniscal tissue using computed tomography imaging. The results are presented for strains in the middle and posterior third of the medial menisci of 10 human cadaveric knees, under simulated physiologically relevant loading. In the middle position, an average compressive strain of 3.4% was found in the medial-lateral direction, and average tensile strains of 1.4% and 3.5% were found in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions respectively at 5° of knee flexion with an applied load of 1× body weight. In the posterior position, under the same conditions, average compressive strains of 2.2% and 6.3% were found in the medial-lateral and superior-inferior directions respectively, and an average tensile strain of 3.8% was found in the anterior-posterior direction. No statistically significant difference between strain in the middle or posterior of the meniscus or between the global strains is uncovered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dopamine in the medial amygdala network mediates human bonding

    PubMed Central

    Touroutoglou, Alexandra; Rudy, Tali; Salcedo, Stephanie; Feldman, Ruth; Hooker, Jacob M.; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Catana, Ciprian; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2017-01-01

    Research in humans and nonhuman animals indicates that social affiliation, and particularly maternal bonding, depends on reward circuitry. Although numerous mechanistic studies in rodents demonstrated that maternal bonding depends on striatal dopamine transmission, the neurochemistry supporting maternal behavior in humans has not been described so far. In this study, we tested the role of central dopamine in human bonding. We applied a combined functional MRI-PET scanner to simultaneously probe mothers’ dopamine responses to their infants and the connectivity between the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), the amygdala, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which form an intrinsic network (referred to as the “medial amygdala network”) that supports social functioning. We also measured the mothers’ behavioral synchrony with their infants and plasma oxytocin. The results of this study suggest that synchronous maternal behavior is associated with increased dopamine responses to the mother’s infant and stronger intrinsic connectivity within the medial amygdala network. Moreover, stronger network connectivity is associated with increased dopamine responses within the network and decreased plasma oxytocin. Together, these data indicate that dopamine is involved in human bonding. Compared with other mammals, humans have an unusually complex social life. The complexity of human bonding cannot be fully captured in nonhuman animal models, particularly in pathological bonding, such as that in autistic spectrum disorder or postpartum depression. Thus, investigations of the neurochemistry of social bonding in humans, for which this study provides initial evidence, are warranted. PMID:28193868

  7. Incarcerated medial epicondyle fracture following pediatric elbow dislocation: 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Seth D; Flanagin, Brody A; Bohl, Daniel D; DeLuca, Peter A; Smith, Brian G

    2014-09-01

    To describe outcomes after surgical management of pediatric elbow dislocation with incarceration of the medial epicondyle. We conducted a retrospective case review of 11 consecutive children and adolescents with an incarcerated medial epicondyle fracture after elbow dislocation. All patients underwent open reduction internal fixation using a similar technique. We characterized outcomes at final follow-up. Average follow-up was 14 months (range, 4-56 mo). All patients had clinical and radiographic signs of healing at final follow-up. There was no radiographic evidence of loss of reduction at intervals or at final follow-up. There were no cases of residual deformity or valgus instability. Average final arc of elbow motion was 4° to 140°. All patients had forearm rotation from 90° supination to 90° pronation. Average Mayo elbow score was 99.5. Four of 11 patients had ulnar nerve symptoms postoperatively and 1 required a second operation for ulnar nerve symptoms. In addition, 1 required a second operation for flexion contracture release with excision of heterotopic ossification. Three patients had ulnar nerve symptoms at final follow-up. Two of these had mild paresthesia only and 1 had both mild paresthesia and weakness. Our results suggest that open reduction internal fixation of incarcerated medial epicondyle fractures after elbow dislocation leads to satisfactory motion and function; however, the injury carries a high risk for complications, particularly ulnar neuropathy. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Volition and conflict in human medial frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nachev, Parashkev; Rees, Geraint; Parton, Andrew; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud

    2009-01-01

    Summary Controversy surrounds the role of human medial frontal cortex in controlling actions[1-5]. Although damage to this area leads to severe difficulties in spontaneously initiating actions[6], the precise mechanisms underlying such ‘volitional’ deficits remain to be established. Previous studies have implicated the medial frontal cortex in conflict monitoring[7-10] and the control of voluntary action[11, 12], suggesting that these key processes are functionally related or share neural substrates. Here we combine a novel behavioural paradigm with functional imaging of the oculomotor system to reveal for the first time a functional subdivision of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) into anatomically distinct areas responding exclusively to volition or to conflict. We also demonstrate that activity in the supplementary eye field (SEF) distinguishes between success and failure in changing voluntary action plans during conflict, suggesting a role for the SEF in implementing the resolution of conflicting actions. We propose a functional architecture of human medial frontal cortex that incorporates the generation of action plans and the resolution of conflict. PMID:15668167

  9. A combinatorial optogenetic approach to medial habenula function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Eric E.; Hsu, Yun-Wei; Wang, Si; Morton, Glenn; Zeng, Hongkui

    2013-03-01

    The habenula is a brain region found in all vertebrate species. It consists of medial and lateral subnuclei which make complex descending connections to the brainstem. Although the medial habenula (MHb) and its projection, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR), have been recognized for decades, their function remains obscure. The small size of the MHb in rodents, and the cellular and molecular complexity of this region, have made it difficult to study the function of this region with high specificity. Here we describe a Cre-mediated genetic system for expressing the microbial opsin channelrhodopsin (ChR2) specifically in the dorsal (dMHb) and ventral (vMHb) medial habenula. Genetically targeted expression of ChR2 allows MHb neurons to be selectively activated with light in acute brain slices with electrophysiological readouts, and in vivo by means of custom-built fiber optic cannulas. These tools will allow highly specific studies of MHb circuitry and the role of the MHb in behaviors related to addiction and mood regulation.

  10. Aging, self-referencing, and medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Gutchess, Angela H; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Schacter, Daniel L

    2007-01-01

    The lateral prefrontal cortex undergoes both structural and functional changes with healthy aging. In contrast, there is little structural change in the medial prefrontal cortex, but relatively little is known about the functional changes to this region with age. Using an event-related fMRI design, we investigated the response of medial prefrontal cortex during self-referencing in order to compare age groups on a task that young and elderly perform similarly and that is known to actively engage the region in young adults. Nineteen young (M age = 23) and seventeen elderly (M age = 72) judged whether adjectives described themselves, another person, or were presented in upper case. We assessed the overlap in activations between young and elderly for the self-reference effect (self vs. other person), and found that both groups engage medial prefrontal cortex and mid-cingulate during self-referencing. The only cerebral differences between the groups in self versus other personality assessment were found in somatosensory and motor-related areas. In contrast, age-related modulations were found in the cerebral network recruited for emotional valence processing. Elderly (but not young) showed increased activity in the dorsal prefrontal cortex for positive relative to negative items, which could reflect an increase in controlled processing of positive information for elderly adults.

  11. Medial maxillectomy in recalcitrant sinusitis: when, why and how?

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Iordanis; Constantinidis, Jannis

    2014-02-01

    We reviewed all journal articles relevant to endoscopic medial maxillectomy in patients with recalcitrant chronic maxillary sinusitis in order to present all indications, the underlying pathophysiology and the developed surgical techniques. Despite the high success rate of middle meatal antrostomy, cases with persistent maxillary sinus disease exist and often need a more extended endoscopic procedure for the better control of the disease. Such surgical option uses gravity for better sinus drainage and offers better saline irrigation, local application of medications and follow-up inspection. An endoscopic medial maxillectomy and its modified forms offer a wider surgical field and access to all 'difficult' areas of the maxillary sinus. Patients with previous limited endoscopic sinus surgery or extended open surgery, cystic fibrosis, extensive mucoceles, allergic fungal sinusitis, odontogenic infections, foreign bodies and so on may suffer from recurrent disease requiring an endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Depending on the disease, various modifications of the procedure can be performed preserving the anterior buttress, nasolacrimal duct and inferior turbinate if possible.

  12. Case report: comprehensive management of medial tibial stress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krenner, Bernard John

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Activity or exercise-induced leg pain is a common complication among competitive and “weekend warrior” athletes. Shin splints is a term that has been used to describe all lower leg pain as a result of activity. There are many different causes of “shin splints,” one of which is medial tibial stress syndrome, and the treating clinician must be aware of potentially serious causes of activity related leg pain. Restoring proper biomechanics to the entire kinetic chain and rehabilitation of the injured area should be the primary aim of treatment to optimize shock absorption. The role inflammation plays in medial tibial stress syndrome is controversial, but in this case, seemed to be a causative factor as symptomatology was dramatically decreased with the addition of proteolytic enzymes. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be quite difficult to treat and keeping athletes away from activities that will slow healing or aggravate the condition can be challenging. “Active” rest is the best way in which to allow proper healing while allowing the athlete to maintain their fitness. PMID:19674573

  13. Volition and conflict in human medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Rees, Geraint; Parton, Andrew; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud

    2005-01-26

    Controversy surrounds the role of human medial frontal cortex in controlling actions. Although damage to this area leads to severe difficulties in spontaneously initiating actions, the precise mechanisms underlying such "volitional" deficits remain to be established. Previous studies have implicated the medial frontal cortex in conflict monitoring and the control of voluntary action, suggesting that these key processes are functionally related or share neural substrates. Here, we combine a novel behavioral paradigm with functional imaging of the oculomotor system to reveal, for the first time, a functional subdivision of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) into anatomically distinct areas that respond exclusively to either volition or conflict. We also demonstrate that activity in the supplementary eye field (SEF) distinguishes between success and failure in changing voluntary action plans during conflict, suggesting a role for the SEF in implementing the resolution of conflicting actions. We propose a functional architecture of human medial frontal cortex that incorporates the generation of action plans and the resolution of conflict.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging in evaluation of human skeletal muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Zaraiskaya, Tatiana; Kumbhare, Dinesh; Noseworthy, Michael D

    2006-08-01

    To explore the capability and reliability of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) in the evaluation of human skeletal muscle injury. DTI of four patients with gastrocnemius and soleus muscles injuries was compared to eight healthy controls. Imaging was performed using a GE 3.0T short-bore scanner. A diffusion-weighted 2D spin echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence optimized for skeletal muscle was used. From a series of axially acquired diffusion tensor images the diffusion tensor eigenparameters (eigenvalues and eigenvectors), fractional anisotropy (FA), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated and compared for injured and healthy calf muscles. Two dimensional (2D) projection maps of the principal eigenvectors were plotted to visualize the healthy and pathologic muscle fiber architectures. Clear differences in FA and ADC were observed in injured skeletal muscle, compared to healthy controls. Mean control FA was 0.23 +/- 0.02 for medial and lateral gastrocnemius (mg and lg) muscles, and 0.20 +/- 0.02 for soleus (sol) muscles. In all patients FA values were reduced compared to controls, to as low as 0.08 +/- 0.02. The ADC in controls ranged from 1.41 to 1.31 x 10(-9) m(2)/second, while in patients this was consistently higher. The 2D projection maps revealed muscle fiber disorder in injured calves, while in healthy controls the 2D projection maps show a well organized (ordered) fiber structure. DTI is a suitable method to assess human calf muscle injury.

  15. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  16. Age-related differences in diffusion tensor indices and fiber architecture in the medial and lateral gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Usha; Csapo, Robert; Malis, Vadim; Xue, Yanjie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2015-04-01

    To investigate age related changes in diffusion tensor indices and fiber architecture of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (MG and LG) muscles using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The lower leg of five young and five senior subjects was scanned at 3 Tesla and DTI indices extracted using three methods: region of interest, histogram, and tract based. Tracked fibers were automatically edited to ensure physiologically relevant tracks. Pennation angles were measured with respect to the deep and superficial aponeuroses of both muscles. The three methods provided internally consistent measures of the DTI indices (correlation coefficient in the range of 0.90-0.99). The primary, secondary, and tertiary eigenvalues in the MG and LG increased significantly in the senior cohort (P < 0.05), while the small increase in fractional anisotropy with age was not significant (MG/LG: P = 0.39/0.85; 95% confidence interval: [-0.059/-0.056, 0.116/0.064]). Fiber lengths of MG fibers originating distally were significantly decreased in seniors (P < 0.05) while pennation angles decreased with age in the MG and LG but this was not significant. Fiber atrophy and increased fibrosis have opposing effects on the diffusion indices resulting in a complicated dependence with aging. Fiber architectural changes could play a role in determining aging muscle function. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Medial Sural Artery Perforator Flap: The First Choice for Soft-Tissue Reconstruction About the Knee.

    PubMed

    Ling, Barbara M; Wettstein, Reto; Staub, Daniel; Schaefer, Dirk J; Kalbermatten, Daniel F

    2018-02-07

    The gastrocnemius muscle flap may be considered the first choice in many cases of soft-tissue reconstruction about the knee. Limited arc of rotation and reach of the flap as well as unsightly muscle bulk are major disadvantages and were the impetus to look for a local alternative. The aim of this study is to present a consecutive series of patients with a reconstruction about the knee involving the medial sural artery perforator flap (MSAPF). A consecutive series of 17 cases of defect reconstructions about the knee using the MSAPF is described, with an emphasis on early postoperative complications. No major flap-related complications occurred except 1 case of tip necrosis that healed uneventfully after excision and secondary suture. Two patients with direct donor-site closure had a minor complication that required no revision, and 2 had partial skin-graft loss. In summary, use of this pedicled perforator flap represents a reliable technique for soft-tissue reconstruction about the knee with an acceptable complication rate and optimal contour reconstruction without the need for a skin graft and secondary debulking procedures. The range of motion associated with the MSAPF in comparison to the range associated with the gastrocnemius muscle flap is increased so that more proximal and lateral defects can be covered. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  18. Function of transected or avulsed rectus muscles following recovery using an anterior orbitotomy approach.

    PubMed

    Pineles, Stacy L; Laursen, Jessica; Goldberg, Robert A; Demer, Joseph L; Velez, Federico G

    2012-08-01

    To assess the function of muscles retrieved from a retrobulbar location using an anterior orbitotomy approach and to identify the prognostic factors favoring a good outcome. The records of all patients undergoing anterior orbitotomy for the retrieval of a transected or avulsed muscle in a retrobulbar location were reviewed. Ocular motility, before and after retrieval (with ductions scaled from -4 to +4), was evaluated. Record review identified 11 patients who had suffered trauma to 12 muscles (5 inferior, 6 medial, and 1 lateral rectus muscle). Ductions improved from -4 ± 0.4 preoperatively to -2.7 ± 0.9 postoperatively (P = 0.002); mean primary position deviation improved from 34(Δ) ± 14(Δ)-15(Δ) ± 9(Δ) (P < 0.001), and mean deviation in the field of action improved from 47(Δ) ± 20(Δ)-20(Δ) ± 22(Δ) (P = 0.02). Ductions improved by at least two units in three patients, all of whom had medial rectus trauma. Single binocular vision in primary gaze was achieved in 6 patients. Patients with medial rectus muscle injury and patients injured by sinus surgery had the lowest likelihood of recovering single binocular vision. Our results are similar to historical series in which muscles were not retrieved and transpositions performed; however, muscle retrieval avoids risks associated with transposition surgeries such as anterior segment ischemia. Muscle recovery via the anterior orbitotomy approach may be reasonable to consider in those cases with a reasonable possibility of having active force generation postoperatively. Copyright © 2012 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The different role of each head of the triceps brachii muscle in elbow extension.

    PubMed

    Kholinne, Erica; Zulkarnain, Rizki Fajar; Sun, Yu Cheng; Lim, SungJoon; Chun, Jae-Myeung; Jeon, In-Ho

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional role of each head of the triceps brachii muscle, depending on the angle of shoulder elevation, and to compare each muscle force and activity by using a virtual biomechanical simulator and surface electromyography. Ten healthy participants (8 males and 2 females) were included in this study. The mean age was 29.2 years (23-45). Each participant performed elbow extension tasks in five different degrees (0, 45, 90, 135, and 180°) of shoulder elevation with three repetitions. Kinematics data and surface electromyography signal of each head of the triceps brachii were recorded. Recorded kinematics data were then applied to an inverse kinematics musculoskeletal modeling software function (OpenSim) to analyze the triceps brachii's muscle force. Correlation between muscle force, muscle activity, elbow extension, and shoulder elevation angle were compared and analyzed for each head of triceps brachii. At 0° shoulder elevation, the long head of the triceps brachii generates a significantly higher muscle force and muscle activation than the lateral and medial heads (p < 0.05). While at 90°, 135° and 180° shoulder elevation, the medial head of the triceps brachii showed a significantly higher muscle force than the long and the lateral heads (p < 0.05). Each head of the triceps brachii has a different pattern of force and activity during different shoulder elevations. The long head contributes to elbow extension more at shoulder elevation and the medial head takes over at 90° and above of shoulder elevation. This study provides further understanding of triceps brachii's for clinicians and health trainers who need to investigate the functional role of the triceps brachii in detail. Copyright © 2018. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Anatomical analysis of medial branches of dorsal rami of cervical nerves for radiofrequency thermocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Tae Dong; Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Hye Yeon; Kim, Myung Hwa; Lee, Youn-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Cervical medial branch blocks are used to treat patients with chronic neck pain. The aim of this study was to clarify the anatomical aspects of the cervical medial branches to improve the accuracy and safety of radiofrequency denervation. Twenty cervical specimens were harvested from 20 adult cadavers. The anatomical parameters of the C4-C7 cervical medial branches were measured. The 3-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction images of the bone were also analyzed. Based on cadaveric analysis, most of the cervical dorsal rami gave off 1 medial branch; however, the cervical dorsal rami gave off 2 medial branches in 27%, 15%, 2%, and 0% at the vertebral level C4, C5, C6, and C7, respectively. The diameters of the medial branches varied from 1.0 to 1.2 mm, and the average distance from the notch of inferior articular process to the medial branches was about 2 mm. Most of the bifurcation sites were located at the medial side of the posterior tubercle of the transverse process. On the analysis of 3-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction images, cervical medial branches (C4 to C6) passed through the upper 49% to 53% of a line between the tips of 2 consecutive superior articular processes (anterior line). Also, cervical medial branches passed through the upper 28% to 35% of a line between the midpoints of 2 consecutive facet joints (midline). The present anatomical study may help improve accuracy and safety during radiofrequency denervation of the cervical medial branches.

  1. Episodic snapping of the medial head of the triceps due to weightlifting.

    PubMed

    Spinner, R J; Wenger, D E; Barry, C J; Goldner, R D

    1999-01-01

    We describe two patients who had episodic elbow snapping and ulnar nerve dysesthesias only after weightlifting. These symptoms would disappear soon afterward. The episodic nature of their complaints and findings led to misdiagnosis. We documented by repeated clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging that the presence of these symptoms correlated directly with the finding of intermittent, activity-related snapping of the medial triceps. In both patients, the symptoms disappeared when the medial portion of the triceps migrated medially but did not dislocate over the medial epicondyle with elbow flexion. Thus, a minor change in the configuration of the medial portion of the triceps (fluid accumulation) in the same individual at different times can cause intermittent dislocation of the medial triceps. Previous papers dealing with patients with snapping of the medial triceps describe symptoms exacerbated by athletic activities, but the constant finding of snapping on sequential examinations.

  2. Medial joint space widening of the ankle in displaced Tillaux and Triplane fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Gourineni, Prasad; Gupta, Asheesh

    2011-10-01

    Tillaux and Triplane fractures occur in children predominantly from external rotation mechanism. We hypothesized that in displaced fractures, the talus would shift laterally along with the distal fibula and the distal tibial epiphyseal fragment increasing the medial joint space. Consecutive cases evaluated retrospectively. Level I and Level II centers. Twenty-two skeletally immature patients with 14 displaced Triplane fractures and eight displaced Tillaux fractures were evaluated for medial joint space widening. Measurement of fracture displacement and medial joint space widening before and after intervention. Thirteen Triplane and six Tillaux fractures (86%) showed medial space widening of 1 to 9 mm and equal to the amount of fracture displacement. Reduction of the fracture reduced the medial space to normal. There were no known complications. Medial space widening of the ankle may be a sign of ankle fracture displacement. Anatomic reduction of the fracture reduces the medial space and may improve the results in Tillaux and Triplane fractures.

  3. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kent; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kimura, Junpei; Han, Sung-Yong; Endo, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids.

  4. Difference in muscle activation patterns during high-speed versus standard-speed yoga: A randomized sequence crossover study.

    PubMed

    Potiaumpai, Melanie; Martins, Maria Carolina Massoni; Wong, Claudia; Desai, Trusha; Rodriguez, Roberto; Mooney, Kiersten; Signorile, Joseph F

    2017-02-01

    To compare the difference in muscle activation between high-speed yoga and standard-speed yoga and to compare muscle activation of the transitions between poses and the held phases of a yoga pose. Randomized sequence crossover trial SETTING: A laboratory of neuromuscular research and active aging Interventions: Eight minutes of continuous Sun Salutation B was performed, at a high speed versus a standard-speed, separately. Electromyography was used to quantify normalized muscle activation patterns of eight upper and lower body muscles (pectoralis major, medial deltoids, lateral head of the triceps, middle fibers of the trapezius, vastus medialis, medial gastrocnemius, thoracic extensor spinae, and external obliques) during the high-speed and standard-speed yoga protocols. Difference in normalized muscle activation between high-speed yoga and standard-speed yoga. Normalized muscle activity signals were significantly higher in all eight muscles during the transition phases of poses compared to the held phases (p<0.01). There was no significant interaction between speed×phase; however, greater normalized muscle activity was seen for highspeed yoga across the entire session. Our results show that transitions from one held phase of a pose to another produces higher normalized muscle activity than the held phases of the poses and that overall activity is greater during highspeed yoga than standard-speed yoga. Therefore, the transition speed and associated number of poses should be considered when targeting specific improvements in performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Kent; SUZUKI, Satoshi; KOYABU, Daisuke; KIMURA, Junpei; HAN, Sung-Yong; ENDO, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids. PMID:25715875

  6. Relationship of medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion and ankle joint power and work performance during gait in typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Martín Lorenzo, Teresa; Albi Rodríguez, Gustavo; Rocon, Eduardo; Martínez Caballero, Ignacio; Lerma Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Muscle fascicles lengthen in response to chronic passive stretch through in-series sarcomere addition in order to maintain an optimum sarcomere length. In turn, the muscles’ force generating capacity, maximum excursion, and contraction velocity is enhanced. Thus, longer fascicles suggest a greater capacity to develop joint power and work. However, static fascicle length measurements may not be taking sarcomere length differences into account. Thus, we considered relative fascicle excursions through passive ankle dorsiflexion may better correlate with the capacity to generate joint power and work than fascicle length. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine if medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursions correlate with ankle joint power and work generation during gait in typically developing children. A sample of typically developing children (n = 10) were recruited for this study and data analysis was carried out on 20 legs. Medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion from resting joint angle to maximum dorsiflexion was estimated from trigonometric relations of medial gastrocnemius pennation angle and thickness obtained from B-mode real-time ultrasonography. Furthermore, a three-dimensional motion capture system was used to obtain ankle joint work and power during the stance phase of gait. Significant correlations were found between relative fascicle excursion and peak power absorption (–) r(14) = −0.61, P = .012 accounting for 31% variability, positive work r(18) = 0.56, P = .021 accounting for 31% variability, and late stance positive work r(15) = 0.51, P = .037 accounting for 26% variability. The large unexplained variance may be attributed to mechanics of neighboring structures (e.g., soleus or Achilles tendon mechanics) and proximal joint kinetics which may also contribute to ankle joint power and work performance, and were not taken into account. Further studies are encouraged to provide

  7. The benefit of therapeutic medial branch blocks after cervical operations.

    PubMed

    Klessinger, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Persistent neck pain is a common problem after surgery of the cervical spine. No therapy recommendation exists for these patients. The objective of this study was to determine if a therapeutic medial branch block is a rational treatment for patients with postoperative neck pain after cervical spine operations. Retrospective practice audit. Review of charts of all patients who underwent cervical spine operations for degenerative reasons during a time period of 3 years. Patients with persistent postsurgical pain were treated with therapeutic medial branch blocks (local anesthetic and steroid). A positive treatment response was defined if at least 80% reduction of pain could be achieved or if the patient was sufficiently satisfied with the relief. All patients with a minimum follow up time of 6 months were included. Of the 312 operations performed, 128 were artificial disc operations, 125 were stand alone cages, and 59 were fusions with cage and plate. Persistent neck pain occurred in 33.3% of the patients. There was no difference between the patients with neck pain and the whole group of patients. More than half of the patients with neck pain--52.9%--were treated successfully with therapeutic medial branch blocks. Since no further treatment was necessary, the initial treatment was considered successful. Nearly a third--32.2%--of the patients were initially treated successfully, but their pain recurred and further diagnostics and treatments were necessary. In this group of patients, significantly more with double level operations were found (P = 0.003). Patients not responding to the medial branch block were 14.9%. This audit is retrospective and observational, and therefore does not represent a high level of evidence. However, to our knowledge, since this information has not been previously reported and no recommendation for the treatment of post-operative zygapophysial joint pain exists, it appears to be the best available research upon which to recommend treatment

  8. The effect of caloric restriction on the forelimb skeletal muscle fibers of the hypertrophic myostatin null mice.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Matsakas, Antonios; Wenisch, Sabine; Arnhold, Stefan; Patel, Ketan

    2017-06-01

    Skeletal muscle mass loss has a broad impact on body performance and physical activity. Muscle wasting occurs due to genetic mutation as in muscular dystrophy, age-related muscle loss (sarcopenia) as well as in chronic wasting disorders as in cancer cachexia. Food restriction reduces muscle mass underpinned by increased muscle protein break down. However the influence of dietary restriction on the morphometry and phenotype of forelimb muscles in a genetically modified myostatin null mice are not fully characterized. The effect of a five week dietary limitation on five anatomically and structurally different forelimb muscles was examined. C57/BL6 wild type (Mstn +/+ ) and myostatin null (Mstn -/- ) mice were either given a standard rodent normal daily diet ad libitum (ND) or 60% food restriction (FR) for a 5 week period. M. triceps brachii Caput laterale (T.lateral), M. triceps brachii Caput longum (T.long), M. triceps brachii Caput mediale (T.medial), M. extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and M. flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) were dissected, weighted and processed for immunohistochemistry. Muscle mass, fibers cross sectional areas (CSA) and myosin heavy chain types IIB, IIX, IIA and type I were analyzed. We provide evidence that caloric restriction results in muscle specific weight reduction with the fast myofibers being more prone to atrophy. We show that slow fibers are less liable to dietary restriction induced muscle atrophy. The effect of dietary restriction was more pronounced in Mstn -/- muscles to implicate the oxidative fibers compared to Mstn +/+ . Furthermore, peripherally located myofibers are more susceptible to dietary induced reduction compared to deep fibers. We additionally report that dietary restriction alters the glycolytic phenotype of the Mstn -/- into the oxidative form in a muscle dependent manner. In summary our study shows that calorie restriction alters muscle fiber profile of forelimb muscles of Myostatin null mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Gmb

  9. Perturbation-enhanced neuromuscular training alters muscle activity in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hurd, Wendy J; Chmielewski, Terese L; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Female athletes involved in jumping and cutting sports injure their anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) 4-6 times more frequently than their male counterparts in comparable sports. Neuromuscular factors, including quadriceps dominance, has been incriminated as contributing to the higher rates of injury in women. Currently, the most effective form of intervention developed to reduce female ACL injury rates has been neuromuscular training. The purpose of this study was to (1) identify gender based muscle activity patterns during disturbed walking that may contribute to ACL injury, and (2) determine if a novel training program could positively influence patterns among healthy female athletes utilizing a disturbed gait paradigm. Twenty healthy athletes (female=10, male=10) were tested. All subjects participated in five trials during which a platform translated horizontally in a lateral direction at heel contact before and after completing ten sessions of a perturbation training program. Electromyographic (EMG) data from the vastus lateralis, medial and lateral hamstrings, and medial gastrocnemius were collected. Trials were analyzed for the muscle onset, termination of activity, peak amplitude, time to peak amplitude, and integrated EMG activity. Muscle cocontraction, the simultaneous activation of antagonistic muscles (lateral hamstrings-vastus lateralis, and medial gastrocnemius-vastus lateralis), was calculated as indicators of active knee stiffness in preparation for heel strike, during weight acceptance and midstance. Prior to training, women had significantly higher peak quadriceps activity and higher integrated quadriceps activity during midstance than men. Both medial and lateral hamstring integrals during midstance increased from pre to posttraining. Onset times to peak activities for hamstrings and quadriceps were similar before training except for medial hamstring time to peak which occurred after heel strike in most women. Time to peak medial hamstring

  10. The effects of a multisensory dynamic balance training on the thickness of lower limb muscles in ultrasonography in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung-Min; Kim, Won-Hyo; Yun, Chang-Kyo

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of multisensory dynamic balance training on muscles thickness such as rectus femoris, anterior tibialis, medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy by using ultrasonography. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen children diagnosed with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy were divided randomly into the balance training group and control group. The experimental group only received a multisensory dynamic balance training, while the control group performed general physiotherapy focused balance and muscle strengthening exercise based Neurodevelopmental treatment. Both groups had a therapy session for 30 minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. The ultrasonographic muscle thickness were obtained in order to compare and analyze muscle thickness before and after in each group. [Result] The experimental group had significant increases in muscle thickness in the rectus femoris, tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. The control group had significant increases in muscle thickness in the tibialis anterior. The test results of the rectus femoris, medial gastrocnemius and lateral gastrocnemius muscle thickness values between the groups showed significant differences. [Conclusion] In conclusion, a multisensory dynamic balance training can be recommended as a treatment method for patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

  11. The effect of cadence on the muscle-tendon mechanics of the gastrocnemius muscle during walking.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S F; Cresswell, A G; Farris, D J; Lichtwark, G A

    2017-03-01

    Humans naturally select a cadence that minimizes metabolic cost at a constant walking velocity. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cadence on the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle and tendon interaction, and examine how this might influence lower limb energetics. We hypothesized that cadences higher than preferred would increase MG fascicle shortening velocity because of the reduced stride time. Furthermore, we hypothesized that cadences lower than preferred would require greater MG fascicle shortening to achieve increased muscle work requirements. We measured lower limb kinematics and kinetics, surface electromyography of the triceps surae and MG fascicle length, via ultrasonography, during walking at a constant velocity at the participants' preferred cadence and offsets of ±10%, ±20%, and ±30%. There was a significant increase in MG fascicle shortening with decreased cadence. However, there was no increase in the MG fascicle shortening velocity at cadences higher than preferred. Cumulative MG muscle activation per minute was significantly increased at higher cadences. We conclude that low cadence walking requires more MG shortening work, while MG muscle and tendon function changes little for each stride at higher cadences, driving up cumulative activation costs due to the increase in steps per minute. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Medial prefrontal cortex acetylcholine injection-induced hypotension: the role of hindlimb vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crippa, G. E.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Correa, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    The injection of acetylcholine (ACh) into the cingulate region of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) causes a marked fall in arterial blood pressure which is not accompanied by changes in heart rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic basis for this stimulus-induced hypotension in Sprague-Dawley rats. The study was designed to determine whether a change in the vascular resistance of hindlimb, renal or mesenteric vascular beds contributes to the fall in arterial pressure in response to ACh injection into the cingulate cortex. Miniature pulsed-Doppler flow probes were used to measure changes in regional blood flow and vascular resistance. The results indicated that the hypotensive response was largely due to a consistent and marked vasodilation in the hindlimb vascular bed. On this basis, an additional experiment was then undertaken to determine the mechanisms that contribute to hindlimb vasodilation. The effect of interrupting the autonomic innervation of one leg on the hindlimb vasodilator response was tested. Unilateral transection of the lumbar sympathetic chain attenuated the cingulate ACh-induced vasodilation in the ipsilateral, but not in the contralateral hindlimb. These results suggest that the hypotensive response to cingulate cortex-ACh injection is caused by skeletal muscle vasodilation mediated by a sympathetic chain-related vasodilator system.

  13. Changes to medial gastrocnemius architecture after surgical intervention in spastic diplegia.

    PubMed

    Shortland, Adam P; Fry, Nicola R; Eve, Linda C; Gough, Martin

    2004-10-01

    We assessed the architecture of the medial gastrocnemius in nine children (five males, four females; age range 6 to 15 years; mean 10 years 10 months, SD 3 years 6 months) with spastic diplegia by ultrasound imaging before and after a gastrocnemius recession. The children were ambulant (seven independent, one with a posterior walker, one using crutches) before and after surgical intervention. We compared values for fascicle lengths and deep fascicular-aponeurosis angles with those from a group of normally developing children (five males, five females; age range 6 to 11 years; mean 8 years 4 months, SD 1 year 4 months). Despite a variable interval between assessments (from 56 to 610 days), fascicles were shorter (p=0.00226) and the deep fascicular-aponeurosis angle increased (p=0.0152) after intervention. Fascicle lengths of patients were similar to those in the group of normally developing children before surgery. After surgery, fascicles in the group of children with spastic diplegia were shorter than in their normally developing peers (p=0.00109). The gastrocnemius recession procedure alters muscle architecture, though the degree of fascicular shortening varied, with four of the participants in our study losing less than 10% of their original fascicular length at maximum dorsiflexion. Increases in ankle-joint power in walking, observed after surgical intervention in children with spastic diplegia, may be due to a more normal ankle position rather than to improvements in the active mechanical performance of the gastrocnemius.

  14. Postero-medial approach for complex tibial plateau injuries with a postero-medial or postero-lateral shear fragment.

    PubMed

    Berber, Reshid; Lewis, Charlotte P; Copas, David; Forward, Daren P; Moran, Christopher G

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a modified postero-medial surgical approach to the knee in treating a series of patients with complex tibial plateau injuries with associated postero-medial and postero-lateral shear fractures. Posterior coronal shear fractures are underappreciated and their clinical relevance has recently been characterised. Less-invasive surgery and indirect reduction techniques are inadequate for treating these coronal plane fractures. Our approach includes an inverted 'L'-shaped incision situated within the posterior flexor knee crease, followed by the retraction or incision of the medial head of the gastrocnemius tendon, while protecting the neurovascular structures. This provides a more extensile exposure, as far as the postero-lateral corner, than previously described. Our case series included eight females and eight males. The average age was 53 years. The majority of these injuries were sustained through high-energy trauma. All patients' fractures were classified as Schatzker grade 4, or above, with a postero-medial split depression. Eight patients had associated postero-lateral corner fractures. Two were open, two had vascular compromise and one had neurological injury. The average time to surgery was 6.4 days (range 0-12), operative time 142 min (range 76-300) and length of stay 17 days (range 7-46). A total of 11 patients were treated using the postero-medial approach alone and in five the treatment was combined with an antero-lateral approach. Two patients suffered a reduced range of movement requiring manipulation and physiotherapy, and three patients had a 5-degree fixed flexion deformity. Two patients developed superficial wound infections treated with antibiotics alone. Anatomical reduction and fracture union was achieved in 15 patients. These are complex fractures to treat, and our modified posterior approach allows direct reduction and optimal positioning of plates to act as buttress devices. It can be extended across the

  15. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  16. The course of the buccal nerve: relationships with the temporalis muscle during the prenatal period

    PubMed Central

    MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. R.; RODRÍGUEZ-VÁZQUEZ, J. F.; CUADRA, C.; MÉRIDA-VELASCO, J. A.; JIMÉNEZ-COLLADO, J.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the course of the buccal nerve and its relationships with the temporalis muscle during the prenatal period. Serial sections of 90 human fetal specimens ranging from 9 to 17 wk development were studied by light microscopy. Each fetal specimen was studied on both right and left sides, making a total of 180 cases for study. A 3-D reconstruction of the region analysed in one of the specimens was made. In 89 cases the buccal nerve was located medial to the temporalis muscle; in 73 cases it penetrated the muscle; in 15 cases it lay in a canal formed by the muscle fibres and was covered by fascia, and finally, in 3 cases it was a branch of the inferior alveolar nerve. The study has revealed that in a large number of cases the buccal nerve maintains an intimate association with the temporalis muscle. PMID:11327204

  17. Arthroscopic pullout repair of posterior root tear of the medial meniscus: the anterior approach using medial collateral ligament pie-crusting release.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Sik; Moon, Hong-Kyo; Koh, Yong-Gon; Kim, Yong-Chan; Sim, Dong-Sik; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kwon, Se-Kwang

    2011-08-01

    Posterior root tears of the medial meniscus are frequently encountered and should be repaired if possible to prevent osteoarthritis of the medial compartment. Various surgical techniques have been proposed to repair posterior root tears. The anterior arthroscopic approach can cause an iatrogenic chondral injury due to the narrow medial joint space. The posterior approaches might be technically unfamiliar to many surgeons because they require the establishment of a posteromedial or trans-septal portal. This paper describes the medial collateral ligament pie-crusting release technique for arthroscopic double transosseous pullout repair of posterior root tears of the medial meniscus through the anterior approach to provide the good visualization of the footprint and sufficient working space.

  18. Interaction of chronic reatine depletion and muscle unloading effects on postural and locomotor muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Haddad, Fadia; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, creatine depletion was induced separately and in combination with non-weight-bearing activity to determine if the response to lowering this metabolite would counter the MHC transitions expected from non-weight-bearing. Creatine depletion was induced by feeding rats a diet supplemented with the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA). Animals were fed a diet containing the creatine analogue for 68 days. Hindlimb non-weight-bearing in BS and NS animals was accomplished by tail suspension for the final 30 days of this period. Beta-GPA feeding lowered the creatine content of muscles sampled by 65%. Creatine depletion resulted in a 16% increase in citrate synthase activity in the soleus (SOL) and a 24% increase in the plantaris (PLN). In two postural muscles, the SOL and vastus intermedius (VI), tail suspension resulted in large decreases in the type I MHC expression and increases in type IIx and IIb MHCs. In two locomotor muscles, the PLN and medial gastrocnemius, type I MHC declined and type IIb increased with suspension. Creatine depletion did not prevent the suspension-induced decline in type I MHC in any of these muscles. The increase in type IIb MHC was either prevented or reduced by creatine depletion before and during suspension in the SOL, VI, and PLN. Creatine depletion alone resulted in small increases in type I and IIa MHCs in the two locomotor muscles, but it had no effect on the MHC profile of the postural muscles studied. These results indicate that the mechanical signal generated by the hindlimb non-weight-bearing state dominated over the metabolic stimulus of creatine depletion with respect to the primary adaptation involving a reduction in type I MHC.

  19. Effects of foot orthoses with medial arch support and lateral wedge on knee adduction moment in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dessery, Yoann; Belzile, Étienne; Turmel, Sylvie; Corbeil, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    There is contradictory evidence regarding whether the addition of medial arch supports to laterally wedged insoles reduces knee adduction moment, improves comfort, and reduces knee pain during the late stance phase of gait. To verify if such effects occur in participants with medial knee osteoarthritis. Randomized single-blinded study. Gait analysis was performed on 18 patients affected by medial knee osteoarthritis. Pain and comfort scores, frontal plane kinematics and kinetics of ankle, knee, and hip were compared in four conditions: without foot orthosis, with foot orthoses, with medial arch support, and with foot orthoses with medial arch support and lateral wedge insoles with 6° and 10° inclination. Lower-extremity gait kinetics were characterized by a significant decrease, greater than 6%, in second peak knee adduction moment in laterally wedged insole conditions compared to the other conditions ( p < 0.001; effect size = 0.6). No significant difference in knee adduction moment was observed between laterally wedged insole conditions. In contrast, a significant increase of 7% in knee adduction moment during the loading response was observed in the customized foot orthoses without lateral inclination condition ( p < 0.001; effect size = 0.3). No difference was found in comfort or pain ratings between conditions. Our study suggests that customized foot orthoses with a medial arch support may only be suitable for the management of medial knee osteoarthritis when a lateral wedge is included. Clinical relevance Our data suggest that customized foot orthoses with medial arch support and a lateral wedge reduce knee loading in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We also found evidence that medial arch support may increase knee loading, which could potentially be detrimental in KOA patients.

  20. A Systematic Review of Clinical Functional Outcomes After Medial Stabilized Versus Non-Medial Stabilized Total Knee Joint Replacement.

    PubMed

    Young, Tony; Dowsey, Michelle M; Pandy, Marcus; Choong, Peter F

    2018-01-01

    Medial stabilized total knee joint replacement (TKJR) construct is designed to closely replicate the kinematics of the knee. Little is known regarding comparison of clinical functional outcomes of patients utilising validated patient reported outcome measures (PROM) after medial stabilized TKJR and other construct designs. To perform a systematic review of the available literature related to the assessment of clinical functional outcomes following a TKJR employing a medial stabilized construct design. The review was performed with a Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) algorithm. The literature search was performed using variouscombinations of keywords. The statistical analysis was completed using Review Manager (RevMan), Version 5.3. In the nineteen unique studies identified, there were 2,448 medial stabilized TKJRs implanted in 2,195 participants, there were 1,777 TKJRs with non-medial stabilized design constructs implanted in 1,734 subjects. The final mean Knee Society Score (KSS) value in the medial stabilized group was 89.92 compared to 90.76 in the non-medial stabilized group, with the final KSS mean value difference between the two groups was statistically significant and favored the non-medial stabilized group (SMD 0.21; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.41; p = 004). The mean difference in the final WOMAC values between the two groups was also statistically significant and favored the medial stabilized group (SMD: -0.27; 95% CI: -0.47 to -0.07; p = 0.009). Moderate to high values ( I 2 ) of heterogeneity were observed during the statistical comparison of these functional outcomes. Based on the small number of studies with appropriate statistical analysis, we are unable to reach a clear conclusion in the clinical performance of medial stabilized knee replacement construct. Level II.

  1. Investigating the role of smooth muscle cells in large elastic arteries: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Murtada, Sae-Il; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2014-10-07

    Physiological loading in large elastic arteries is considered to be mainly carried by the passive components of the media but it is not known how much the contraction of the smooth muscle cells is actually involved in the load carrying. Smooth muscle contraction is considered to occur in a relatively slow time domain but the contraction is able to produce significant tension. In the present work the role of smooth muscle contraction in large elastic arteries is investigated by analyzing how changes in the intracellular calcium, and thereby the active tone of smooth muscle cells, influence the deformation and stress behavior; different intracellular calcium functions and medial wall thicknesses with cycling internal pressure are studied. In particular, a recently proposed mechanochemical model (Murtada et al., 2012. J. Theor. Biol. 297, 176-186), which links intracellular calcium with mechanical contraction and an anisotropic model representing the elastin/collagen composite, was implemented into a 3D finite element framework. Details of the implementation procedure are described and a verification of the model implementation is provided by means of the isometric contraction/relaxation analysis of a medial strip at optimal muscle length. In addition, numerically obtained pressure-radius relationships of arterial rings modeled with one and two layers are analyzed with different geometries and at different calcium levels; a comparison with the Laplace equation is provided. Finally, a two-layer arterial ring is loaded with a realistic pressure wave and with various intracellular calcium functions (different amplitudes and mean values) and medial wall thicknesses; residual stresses are considered. The finite element results show that changes in the calcium amplitudes hardly have an influence on the current inner ring radius and the circumferential stress. However, an increase in the mean intracellular calcium value and the medial wall thickness leads to a clear

  2. FDG-PET detects nonuniform muscle activity in the lower body during human gait.

    PubMed

    Kindred, John H; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B; Benson, John-Michael; Rudroff, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    Nonuniform muscle activity has been partially explained by anatomically defined neuromuscular compartments. The purpose of this study was to investigate the uniformity of skeletal muscle activity during walking. Eight participants walked at a self-selected speed, and muscle activity was quantified using [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging. Seventeen muscles were divided into 10 equal length sections, and within muscle activity was compared. Nonuniform activity was detected in 12 of 17 muscles (ƒ > 4.074; P < 0.046), which included both uni- and multi-articular muscles. Greater proximal activity was detected in 6 muscles (P < 0.049), and greater distal versus medial activity was found in the iliopsoas (P < 0.042). Nonuniform muscle activity is likely related to recruitment of motor units located within separate neuromuscular compartments. These findings indicate that neuromuscular compartments are recruited selectively to allow for efficient energy transfer, and these patterns may be task-dependent. Muscle Nerve 54: 959-966, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Consideration of Muscle Depth for Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Three-Dimensional Approach.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    Knowledge of variable anatomy is key for excellent outcomes from the administration of botulinum toxin for aesthetic purposes. One must understand the location and function of each facial muscle to predict the patient's desired outcome. One concept often overlooked by injectors is the understanding of the target muscle's depth. In addition, a firm understanding of where each facial muscle originates and attaches can be essential to correctly identifying and injecting the correct muscle with botulinum toxin. Facial muscles often overlap each other and cross various planes. For example, an injector may be unaware that the corrugator supercilii muscle lies in different depths medially and laterally. Novice injectors may miss the variability of this muscle and inject the lower frontalis muscle by mistake. This may lead to a heavy brow look, or it could drop the area between the brows, creating an appearance of anger. This article explores a three-dimensional anatomical approach to achieve excellent outcomes, rather than the two-dimensional approach traditionally discussed. Many of the injection techniques defined in this article are considered off-label by the Food and Drug Administration at the time of this publication but are commonly discussed in peer-reviewed literature and consensus opinion reports. Twelve facial muscles often injected for positive aesthetic outcomes will be outlined as well as seven facial muscles to generally avoid.

  4. Diffusive sensitivity to muscle architecture: a magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging study of the human calf.

    PubMed

    Galbán, Craig J; Maderwald, Stefan; Uffmann, Kai; de Greiff, Armin; Ladd, Mark E

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the diffusive properties of adjacent muscles at rest, and to determine the relationship between diffusive and architectural properties, which are task-specific to muscles. The principle, second, and third eigenvalues, trace of the diffusion tensor, and two anisotropic parameters, ellipsoid eccentricity (e) and fractional anisotropy (FA), of various muscles in the human calf were calculated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Linear correlations of the calculated parameters to the muscle physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), which is proportional to maximum muscle force, were performed to ascertain any linear relation between muscle architecture and diffusivity. Images of the left calf were acquired from six healthy male volunteers. Seven muscles were investigated in this study. These comprised the soleus, lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, posterior tibialis, anterior tibialis, extensor digitorum longus, and peroneus longus. All data were presented as the mean and standard error of the mean (SEM). In general, differences in diffusive parameter values occurred primarily between functionally different muscles. A strong correlation was also found between PCSA and the third eigenvalue, e, and FA. A mathematical derivation revealed a linear relationship between PCSA and the third eigenvalue as a result of their dependence on the average radius of all fibers within a single muscle. These findings demonstrated the ability of DTI to differentiate between functionally different muscles in the same region of the body on the basis of their diffusive properties.

  5. Medial rectus Faden operations with or without recession for partially accommodative esotropia associated with a high accommodative convergence to accommodation ratio.

    PubMed

    Akar, Serpil; Gokyigit, Birsen; Sayin, Nihat; Demirok, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the results of Faden operations on the medial rectus (MR) muscles with or without recession for the treatment of partially accommodative esotropia associated with a high accommodative convergence to accommodation (AC : A) ratio and to determine whether there was a decrease in the effects of posterior fixation over time. In this retrospective study, 108 of 473 patients who underwent surgery for partially accommodative esotropia with a high AC : A ratio received Faden operations on both MR muscles, and 365 received symmetric MR muscle recessions combined with a Faden operation. For the Faden operation, a satisfactory outcome of 76.9% at 1 month postoperation, decreased to 71.3% by the final follow-up visit (mean 4.8 years). A moderate positive correlation was observed between the increase in the postoperative near deviation and postoperative time. For the Faden operations combined with MR recession, a satisfactory outcome of 78.9% at 1 month post-operation, decreased to 78.4% by the final follow-up visit. A Faden operation of the MR muscles with or without recession is an effective surgical option for treating partially accommodative esotropia associated with a high AC : A ratio. For Faden operations of the MR muscles without recession, the effects of the posterior fixation decline over time.

  6. Medial orbital wall landmarks in three different North American populations.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Milap P; Perry, Julian D

    2015-04-01

    We sought to measure the medial orbital wall foramina distances in two previously unstudied populations, to describe a new bony medial wall feature, and to validate the accuracy of a new coordinate measurement device within the orbit. Dried, well-preserved, complete human skulls without orbital defects were studied. Age, gender, birthplace, ethnicity, and laterality of the orbit were recorded for each skull. Supranumerary ethmoidal foramina were recorded, and the fronto-ethmoidal groove depth was measured. The distances between the anterior lacrimal crest (ALC) - anterior ethmoidal foramen (AEF), AEF - posterior ethmoidal foramen (PEF), and PEF - optic canal (OC) were measured first by surgical ruler and wire and then by the Microscribe coordinate measurement device. One hundred and forty-six orbits were studied. Fifty-seven orbits were of European or Caucasian descent, 68 orbits of African American descent, 2 orbits of West African descent, 11 orbits of Eskimo descent, and 8 orbits of unknown origin. No significant differences existed between the manual and Microscribe measurements for the ALC-AEF, AEF-PEF, and PEF-OF distances (p < 0.0001). A significant frontoethmoidal groove was observed in 27/146 (19%) orbits, in 6/57 (11%) Caucasian orbits, in 17/70 (24%) African American orbits, and in 4/11 (36%) Eskimo orbits. Supranumerary ethmoidal foramina were found in 50/146 orbits (34.2%) and in 17/27 (63%) orbits with a significant frontoethmoidal grooves. No significant differences in medial wall foramina distances exist between African American and Caucasian orbits; however, a frontoethmoidal groove occurs more commonly in African American orbits. This groove often occurs in the presence of supernumerary ethmoidal foramina. The Microscribe coordinate measurement system represents a valid tool to measure distances within the orbit.

  7. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  8. Posterior root tear of the medial and lateral meniscus.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wolf; Forkel, Philipp; Feucht, Matthias J; Zantop, Thore; Imhoff, Andreas B; Brucker, Peter U

    2014-02-01

    An avulsion of the tibial insertion of the meniscus or a radial tear close to the meniscal insertion is defined as a root tear. In clinical practice, the incidence of these lesions is often underestimated. However, several biomechanical studies have shown that the effect of a root tear is comparable to a total meniscectomy. Clinical studies documented progredient arthritic changes following root tears, thereby supporting basic science studies. The clinical diagnosis is limited by unspecific symptoms. In addition to the diagnostic arthroscopy, MRI is considered to be the gold standard of diagnosis of a meniscal root tear. Three different direct MRI signs for the diagnosis of a meniscus root tear have been described: Radial linear defect in the axial plane, vertical linear defect (truncation sign) in the coronal plane, and the so-called ghost meniscus sign in the sagittal plane. Meniscal extrusion is also considered to be an indirect sign of a root tear, but is less common in lateral root tears. During arthroscopy, the function of the meniscus root must be assessed by probing. However, visualization of the meniscal insertions is challenging. Refixation of the meniscal root can be performed using a transtibial pull-out suture, suture anchors, or side-to-side repair. Several short-term studies reported good clinical results after medial or lateral root repair. Nevertheless, MRI and second-look arthroscopy revealed high rates of incomplete or absent healing, especially for medial root tears. To date, most studies are case series with short-term follow-up and level IV evidence. Outerbridge grade 3 or 4 chondral lesions and varus malalignment of >5° were found to predict an inferior clinical outcome after medial meniscus root repair. Further research is needed to evaluate long-term results and to define evident criteria for meniscal root repair.

  9. Reliability and Validity of Quantifying Absolute Muscle Hardness Using Ultrasound Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Chino, Kentaro; Akagi, Ryota; Dohi, Michiko; Fukashiro, Senshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Muscle hardness is a mechanical property that represents transverse muscle stiffness. A quantitative method that uses ultrasound elastography for quantifying absolute human muscle hardness has been previously devised; however, its reliability and validity have not been completely verified. This study aimed to verify the reliability and validity of this quantitative method. The Young’s moduli of seven tissue-mimicking materials (in vitro; Young’s modulus range, 20–80 kPa; increments of 10 kPa) and the human medial gastrocnemius muscle (in vivo) were quantified using ultrasound elastography. On the basis of the strain/Young’s modulus ratio of two reference materials, one hard and one soft (Young’s moduli of 7 and 30 kPa, respectively), the Young’s moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials and medial gastrocnemius muscle were calculated. The intra- and inter-investigator reliability of the method was confirmed on the basis of acceptably low coefficient of variations (≤6.9%) and substantially high intraclass correlation coefficients (≥0.77) obtained from all measurements. The correlation coefficient between the Young’s moduli of the tissue-mimicking materials obtained using a mechanical method and ultrasound elastography was 0.996, which was equivalent to values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The Young’s moduli of the medial gastrocnemius muscle obtained using ultrasound elastography were within the range of values previously obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. The reliability and validity of the quantitative method for measuring absolute muscle hardness using ultrasound elastography were thus verified. PMID:23029231

  10. Bilateral Medial Medullary Infarction with Nondominant Vertebral Artery Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Gui-lian; Du, Ju-mei; Ma, Zhu-lin

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral medial medullary infarction (MMI) is a rare stroke subtype. Here, we report a case with bilateral MMI caused by nondominant vertebral artery occlusion confirmed by brain digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging basi-parallel-anatomical-scanning. We highlight that anterior spinal arteries could originate from a unilateral vertebral artery (VA). Radiologists and neurologists should pay attention to the nondominant VA as bilateral MMI may be induced by occlusion of nondominant VA that supplies the bilateral anteromedial territories of the medulla. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Discoid Medial Meniscus Tear, with a Literature Review of Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Song, In Soo; Kim, Jun Bum; Lee, Jong Keun; Park, Byeong-Seop

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports our experience of treating four cases of symptomatic discoid medial meniscus, three of which were bilateral. We performed partial meniscectomy with a four-portal technique using a knife leaving a 6 mm peripheral margin after confirmation of magnetic resonance imaging findings. Clinical results were assessed at the end of 2-year follow-up using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and a visual analogue scale. We obtained satisfactory clinical results without recurrence of the symptoms in all cases. PMID:28854771

  12. A General Role for Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Event Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-11

    anterior cingulate cortex modulates attentional response: combined fMRI and ERP evidence. J. Cogn . Neurosci . 18, 766–780. doi: 10.1162/jocn.2006.18.5.766...losses in the anterior cingulate cortex. Cogn . Affect. Behav. Neurosci . 7, 327–336. doi: 10.3758/cabn.7.4.327 Shima, K., and Tanji, J. (1998). Role of...COMPUTATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 11 July 2014 doi: 10.3389/fncom.2014.00069 A general role for medial prefrontal

  13. Biomechanical consequences of a nonanatomic posterior medial meniscal root repair.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Christopher M; Foad, Abdullah; Smith, Sean D; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Dornan, Grant J; Engebretsen, Lars; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    Posterior medial meniscal root tears have been reported to extrude with the meniscus becoming adhered posteromedially along the posterior capsule. While anatomic repair has been reported to restore tibiofemoral contact mechanics, it is unknown whether nonanatomic positioning of a meniscal root repair to a posteromedial location would restore the loading profile of the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to compare the tibiofemoral contact mechanics of a nonanatomic posterior medial meniscal tear with that of the intact knee or anatomic repair. It was hypothesized that a nonanatomic root repair would not restore the tibiofemoral contact pressures and areas to that of the intact or anatomic repair state. Controlled laboratory study. Tibiofemoral contact mechanics were recorded in 6 male human cadaveric knee specimens (average age, 45.8 years) using pressure sensors. Each knee underwent 5 testing conditions for the posterior medial meniscal root: (1) intact knee; (2) root tear; (3) anatomic transtibial pull-out repair; (4) nonanatomic transtibial pull-out repair, placed 5 mm posteromedially along the edge of the articular cartilage; and (5) root tear concomitant with an ACL tear. Knees were loaded with a 1000-N axial compressive force at 4 flexion angles (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°), and contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure were calculated. Contact area was significantly lower after nonanatomic repair than for the intact knee at all flexion angles (mean = 44% reduction) and significantly higher for anatomic versus nonanatomic repair at all flexion angles (mean = 27% increase). At 0° and 90°, and when averaged across flexion angles, the nonanatomic repair significantly increased mean contact pressures in comparison to the intact knee or anatomic repair. When averaged across flexion angles, the peak contact pressures after nonanatomic repair were significantly higher than the intact knee but not the anatomic repair. In contrast, when

  14. Bilateral Endoscopic Medial Maxillectomy for Bilateral Inverted Papilloma

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Inverted papilloma (IP) is a benign tumor of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses that is unilateral in most cases. Bilateral IP, involving both sides of the nasal cavity and sinuses, is extremely rare. This paper describes a large IP that filled in both sides of the nasal cavity and sinuses, mimicking association with malignancy. The tumor was successfully treated by bilateral endoscopic medial maxillectomy (EMM). The patient is without evidence of the disease 24 months after surgery. If preoperative diagnosis does not confirm the association with malignancy in IP, endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) should be selected, and ESS, including EMM, is a good first choice of the treatment for IP. PMID:22953103

  15. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  16. Does Medial Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With the Bone-Plug Technique Restore the Anatomic Location of the Native Medial Meniscus?

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Ki; Bin, Seong-Il; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Chang-Rack

    2015-12-01

    Previous work has shown the importance of restoring the normal structure of the native meniscus with meniscal allograft transplantation. The purpose of this study was to compare the anatomic positions of the anterior horn and posterior horn between the preoperative medial meniscus and the postoperative meniscal allograft after medial meniscal allograft transplantation with the bone-plug technique. The hypothesis was that the bone-plug technique could restore the preoperative structure of the native medial meniscus. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between December 1999 and December 2013, a total of 59 patients (49 male, 10 female) underwent medial meniscal allograft transplantation by use of the bone-plug technique. The anatomic positions of both horns in the native medial meniscus and in the meniscal allograft were measured via MRI. The percentage reference method was used to measure the locations of both horns. On coronal MRI, the mean absolute distance of the posterior horn from the lateral border of the tibial plateau changed from 45.2 ± 3.3 to 48.1 ± 4.2 mm (P < .05), and the percentage distance of the posterior horn changed from 59.6% to 63.0% (P < .05). On sagittal MRI, the mean absolute distance of the posterior horn from the anterior reference point changed from 40.3 ± 3.0 to 42.0 ± 3.5 mm (P < .05), and the mean percentage distance of the posterior horn changed from 76.5% to 79.4% (P <.05). On coronal MRI, the mean absolute distance of the anterior horn from the lateral border of the tibial plateau changed from 41.3 ± 4.2 to 48.5 ± 5.6 mm (P < .05), and the mean percentage distance of the anterior horn changed from 54.5% to 63.8% (P < .05). On sagittal MRI, the mean absolute distance of the anterior horn from the anterior reference point changed from 5.5 ± 1.0 to 9.9 ± 2.9 mm (P < .05), and the mean percentage distance of the anterior horn changed from 10.6% to 19.0% (P < .05). Despite attempts to place the meniscal allograft in the same

  17. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  18. Metabolic heterogeneity in human calf muscle during maximal exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenborne, K.; McCully, K.; Kakihira, H.

    1991-07-01

    Human skeletal muscle is composed of various muscle fiber types. The authors hypothesized that differences in metabolism between fiber types could be detected noninvasively with {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy during maximal exercise. This assumes that during maximal exercise all fiber types are recruited and all vary in the amount of acidosis. The calf muscles of seven subjects were studied. Two different coils were applied: an 11-cm-diameter surface coil and a five-segment meander coil. The meander coil was used to localize the {sup 31}P signal to either the medial or the lateral gastrocnemius. Maximal exercise, consisting of rapid plantarmore » flexions, resulted in an 83.7% {plus minus} 7.8% decrease of the phosphocreatine pool and an 8-fold increase of the inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) pool. At rest the P{sub i} pool was observed as a single resonance (pH 7.0). Toward the end of the first minute of exercise, three subjects showed three distinct P{sub i} peaks. During the second minute of exercise the pH values stabilized. The same pattern was seen when the signal was collected from the medial or lateral gastrocnemius. In four subjects only two distinct P{sub i} peaks were observed. The P{sub i} peaks had differing relative areas in different subjects, but they were reproducible in each individual. This method allowed is to study the appearance and disappearance of the different P{sub i} peaks, together with the changes in pH. Because multiple P{sub i} peaks were seen in single muscles they most likely identify different muscle fiber types.« less

  19. Monitoring respiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Nava, S

    1998-12-01

    The respiratory system consists of two main parts, the lung and the ventilatory pump. The latter consists of the bony structure of the thorax, the central respiratory controllers, the inspiratory and expiratory muscles, and the nerves innervating these muscles. Respiratory muscle fatigue occurs when respiratory muscle endurance is exceeded. Muscle fatigue is defined as a condition in which there is a reduction in the capacity for developing force and/or velocity of a muscle, resulting from muscle activity, and which is reversible by rest. The respiratory muscles are somewhat difficult to assess and the techniques employed are still relatively primitive. The most important methods of respiratory muscles function assessment are: 1) the vital capacity manoeuvre, which depends on maximum inspiratory and expiratory effort by the muscles and may be a useful indicator of respiratory muscle function; 2) radiological screening has been proposed for the detection of diaphragm paralysis. This may be helpful if the paralysis is unilateral, but bilateral paralysis is difficult to detect; and 3) respiratory muscles strength may be assessed with either voluntary or nonvoluntary manoeuvres. The function of the inspiratory muscles is assessed with 3 voluntary dependent manoeuvres. They are the so called Müller manoeuvre (or maximal inspiratory pressure), the sniff test and the combined test. All these three manoeuvres generate a pressure that is a reflection of complex interactions between several muscle groups since the efforts produce different mechanisms of activity of inspiratory and expiratory muscles. Two techniques are presently employed to assess diaphragm function, not being dependent on the patient's motivation: electrical phrenic nerve stimulation and cervical magnetic stimulation. Since it is less painful, magnetic cervical stimulation overcomes some of the difficulties encountered during electrical stimulation. With these two techniques recordings of diaphragmatic

  20. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Ravneet S; Lott, Donovan; Mathur, Sunita; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Bendixen, Roxanna; Forbes, Sean C; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities. Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed. Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus) was significantly greater than control group (p<0.05). Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84) and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80). Dorsiflexor (DF) and plantarflexor (PF) specific torque was significantly different between the groups. Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Ravneet S.; Lott, Donovan; Mathur, Sunita; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Bendixen, Roxanna; Forbes, Sean C.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Walter, Glenn A.; Vandenborne, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities. Methods Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed. Results Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus) was significantly greater than control group (p<0.05). Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84) and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80). Dorsiflexor (DF) and plantarflexor (PF) specific torque was significantly different between the groups. Discussion Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD. PMID:26103164

  2. Dissociable roles of medial and lateral PFC in rule learning.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bihua; Li, Wei; Li, Fuhong; Li, Hong

    2016-11-01

    Although the neural basis of rule learning is of great interest to cognitive neuroscientists, the pattern of transient brain activation during rule discovery remains to be investigated. In this study, we measured event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during distinct phases of rule learning. Twenty-one healthy human volunteers were presented with a series of cards, each containing a clock-like display of 12 circles numbered sequentially. Participants were instructed that a fictitious animal would move from one circle to another either in a regular pattern (according to a rule hidden in consecutive trials) or randomly. Participants were then asked to judge whether a given step followed a rule. While the rule-search phase evoked more activation in the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), the rule-following phase caused stronger activation in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). Importantly, the intermediate phase, the rule-discovery phase evoked more activations in MPFC and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) than rule search, and more activations in LPFC than rule following. Therefore, we can conclude that the medial and lateral PFC have dissociable contributions in rule learning.

  3. Ultrasonography of the medial iliac lymph nodes in the dog.

    PubMed

    Llabrés-Díaz, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Sixty-one medial iliac lymph nodes of 38 different dogs (eight with adenocarcinoma of the apocrine glands of the anal sac, 13 with multicentric lymphoma, six with multicentric lymphoma but in clinical remission, and 11 control dogs) were evaluated to assess the ability of ultrasound to identify and interrogate these lymph nodes across the different groups and to differentiate these groups using different sonographic parameters. Ultrasound proved to be useful to assess canine medial iliac lymph nodes. An increase in size or number of detected lymph nodes or finding rounder or heterogeneous lymph nodes could differentiate lymph nodes of dogs of the control group from lymph nodes of dogs with lymphoma or an adenocarcinoma of the apocrine glands of the anal sac. Subcategories of malignancy could not be differentiated. More studies need to be performed, both with patients with reactive lymph nodes and also focusing on other canine superficial lymph nodes, before generalizing the results of this study to other areas or diseases.

  4. Working memory for conjunctions relies on the medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ingrid R; Page, Katie; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Chatterjee, Anjan; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2006-04-26

    A prominent theory of hippocampal function proposes that the hippocampus is importantly involved in relating or binding together separate pieces of information to form an episodic representation. This hypothesis has only been applied to studies of long-term memory because the paradigmatic view of the hippocampus is that it is not critical for short-term forms of memory. However, relational processing is important in many working memory tasks, especially tasks using visual stimuli. Here, we test the hypothesis that the medial temporal lobes are important for relational memory even over short delays. The task required patients with medial temporal lobe amnesia and controls to remember three objects, locations, or object-location conjunctions over 1 or 8 s delays. The results show that working memory for objects and locations was at normal levels, but that memory for conjunctions was severely impaired at 8 s delays. Additional analyses suggest that the hippocampus per se is critical for accurate conjunction working memory. We propose that the hippocampus is critically involved in memory for conjunctions at both short and long delays.

  5. Working Memory for Conjunctions Relies on the Medial Temporal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Page, Katie; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Chatterjee, Anjan; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    A prominent theory of hippocampal function proposes that the hippocampus is importantly involved in relating or binding together separate pieces of information to form an episodic representation. This hypothesis has only been applied to studies of long-term memory because the paradigmatic view of the hippocampus is that it is not critical for short-term forms of memory. However, relational processing is important in many working memory tasks, especially tasks using visual stimuli. Here, we test the hypothesis that the medial temporal lobes are important for relational memory even over short delays. The task required patients with medial temporal lobe amnesia and controls to remember three objects, locations, or object-location conjunctions over 1 or 8 s delays. The results show that working memory for objects and locations was at normal levels, but that memory for conjunctions was severely impaired at 8 s delays. Additional analyses suggest that the hippocampus per se is critical for accurate conjunction working memory. We propose that the hippocampus is critically involved in memory for conjunctions at both short and long delays. PMID:16641239

  6. Function of the medial meniscus in force transmission and stability.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter S; Arno, Sally; Bell, Christopher; Salvadore, Gaia; Borukhov, Ilya; Oh, Cheongeun

    2015-06-01

    We studied the combined role of the medial meniscus in distributing load and providing stability. Ten normal knees were loaded in combinations of compressive and shear loading as the knee was flexed over a full range. A digital camera tracked the motion, from which femoral-tibial contacts were determined by computer modelling. Load transmission was determined from the Tekscan for the anterior horn, central body, posterior horn, and the uncovered cartilage in the centre of the meniscus. For the three types of loading; compression only, compression and anterior shear, compression and posterior shear; between 40% and 80% of the total load was transmitted through the meniscus. The overall average was 58%, the remaining 42% being transmitted through the uncovered cartilage. The anterior horn was loaded only up to 30 degrees flexion, but played a role in controlling anterior femoral displacement. The central body was loaded 10-20% which would provide some restraint to medial femoral subluxation. Overall the posterior horn carried the highest percentage of the shear load, especially after 30 degrees flexion when a posterior shear force was applied, where the meniscus was estimated to carry 50% of the shear force. This study added new insights into meniscal function during weight bearing conditions, particularly its role in early flexion, and in transmitting shear forces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tear: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the medial meniscus root, for example by a complete radial tear, destroys the ability of the knee to withstand hoop strain, resulting in contact pressure increases and kinematic alterations. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed to repair the medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT), many of which have shown complete healing of the repaired MMPRT. However, efforts to standardize or optimize the treatment for MMPRT are much needed. When planning a surgical intervention for an MMPRT, strict surgical indications regarding the effect of pullout strength on the refixed root, bony degenerative changes, mechanical alignment, and the Kellgren-Lawrence grade should be considered. Although there are several treatment options and controversies, the current trend is to repair the MMPRT using various techniques including suture anchors and pullout sutures if the patient meets the indications. However, there are still debates on the restoration of hoop tension and prevention of arthritis after repair and further biomechanical and clinical studies should be conducted in the future. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literature regarding various diagnosis and treatment strategies of MMPRT, especially focusing on conflict issues including whether repair techniques can restore the main function of normal meniscus and which is the best suture technique to repair the MMPRT. The authors attempted to provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques. PMID:25229041

  8. Medial meniscus posterior root tear: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku; Kim, Jin Goo

    2014-09-01

    Damage to the medial meniscus root, for example by a complete radial tear, destroys the ability of the knee to withstand hoop strain, resulting in contact pressure increases and kinematic alterations. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed to repair the medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT), many of which have shown complete healing of the repaired MMPRT. However, efforts to standardize or optimize the treatment for MMPRT are much needed. When planning a surgical intervention for an MMPRT, strict surgical indications regarding the effect of pullout strength on the refixed root, bony degenerative changes, mechanical alignment, and the Kellgren-Lawrence grade should be considered. Although there are several treatment options and controversies, the current trend is to repair the MMPRT using various techniques including suture anchors and pullout sutures if the patient meets the indications. However, there are still debates on the restoration of hoop tension and prevention of arthritis after repair and further biomechanical and clinical studies should be conducted in the future. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literature regarding various diagnosis and treatment strategies of MMPRT, especially focusing on conflict issues including whether repair techniques can restore the main function of normal meniscus and which is the best suture technique to repair the MMPRT. The authors attempted to provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques.

  9. Modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy for zygomatic implant salvage

    PubMed Central

    Tajudeen, Bobby A.; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Odontogenic chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an epidemiologically important disease process due, in part, to the increasingly commonplace use of dental restorative procedures such as zygomatic implantation. Traditional management of this clinical entity typically entails extraction of the infected hardware via an open or endoscopic approach. We describe a novel management strategy of odontogenic CRS following bilateral zygomatic implantation for oral rehabilitation that we surgically salvaged via a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Methods: We describe the presentation and management of a case of metachronous development of bilateral CRS subsequent to zygomatic implantation. Results: The patient's postoperative course was characterized by marked endoscopic, radiologic, and symptomatic improvement as measured by the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test. Conclusion: We describe a novel treatment strategy for the management of odontogenic sinusitis resulting from erroneous zygomatic implant placement. Modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy in this clinical context facilitates mucosal normalization of the affected sinus, while permitting preservation of oral function through salvage of the displaced implant. PMID:28107147

  10. Medial-lateral organization of the orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rich, Erin L; Wallis, Jonathan D

    2014-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that specific cognitive functions localize to different subregions of OFC, but the nature of these functional distinctions remains unclear. One prominent theory, derived from human neuroimaging, proposes that different stimulus valences are processed in separate orbital regions, with medial and lateral OFC processing positive and negative stimuli, respectively. Thus far, neurophysiology data have not supported this theory. We attempted to reconcile these accounts by recording neural activity from the full medial-lateral extent of the orbital surface in monkeys receiving rewards and punishments via gain or loss of secondary reinforcement. We found no convincing evidence for valence selectivity in any orbital region. Instead, we report differences between neurons in central OFC and those on the inferior-lateral orbital convexity, in that they encoded different sources of value information provided by the behavioral task. Neurons in inferior convexity encoded the value of external stimuli, whereas those in OFC encoded value information derived from the structure of the behavioral task. We interpret these results in light of recent theories of OFC function and propose that these distinctions, not valence selectivity, may shed light on a fundamental organizing principle for value processing in orbital cortex.

  11. Medial capsular interpositional arthroplasty for severe hallux rigidus.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Michael Patrick; Gerhardt, Nels; Thordarson, David B

    2009-06-01

    Multiple surgical options have been described for severe hallux rigidus. One option is capsular interpositional arthroplasty. We report our initial results with a technique using the thicker medial capsule as our interpositional material instead of the dorsal capsule and extensor hallucis brevis (EHB). Twenty-two patients with grade IV hallux rigidus underwent minimal proximal phalanx resection (modified Keller) with preservation of the flexor hallucis brevis (FHB) insertion and medial capsular interpositional arthroplasty. Postoperative AOFAS hallux MTP-IP scores (mean 77.8), and SF-36 scores (mean 68.7 on physical function, 79.5 role limitations) demonstrated clinical improvement compared to historical controls. Alignment and stability were well maintained (mean preoperative HV angle of 11.8 degrees, mean postoperative HV angle of 13.0 degrees). Dorsiflexion/plantarflexion arc of motion showed sustained improvement (mean 38.4 degrees preoperative, mean 62.3 degrees postoperative). These results are comparable to other forms of interpositional arthroplasty and arthrodesis for end stage arthritis of the hallux MTPJ.

  12. Cognition and medial frontal cortex in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Nachev, Parashkev

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent work on the role of medial frontal cortex in cognition and its involvement in neurological disorders is critically reviewed. Recent findings The highly influential notion of conflict monitoring by the anterior cingulate has been called into question by monkey single-cell neurophysiology and lesion studies in monkeys and humans. An alternative role for this region in adapting behaviour in response to changing demands over time is gaining support. By contrast, the more dorsally placed pre-supplementary motor area and supplementary eye field have been implicated in direct executive control in situations of response conflict. Although more rostral medial areas have been linked to complex cognitive operations involving references to the self, conceptual obstacles make the evidence difficult to interpret. The role of orbitofrontal cortex in guiding action based on value has been reinforced. Summary This area continues to generate both interest and controversy. A few striking discrepancies between data from functional imaging and interventional techniques illustrate the hazards of drawing strong conclusions from merely correlative evidence. More broadly, a case can be made for tempering the empirical enthusiasm here with a little more theoretical restraint. PMID:17102698

  13. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed tomore » differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.« less

  14. Physiological cross-sectional area of human leg muscles based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukunaga, T.; Roy, R. R.; Shellock, F. G.; Hodgson, J. A.; Day, M. K.; Lee, P. L.; Kwong-Fu, H.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to determine the physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of the major muscles or muscle groups of the lower leg. For 12 healthy subjects, the boundaries of each muscle or muscle group were digitized from images taken at 1-cm intervals along the length of the leg. Muscle volumes were calculated from the summation of each anatomical CSA (ACSA) and the distance between each section. Muscle length was determined as the distance between the most proximal and distal images in which the muscle was visible. The PCSA of each muscle was calculated as muscle volume times the cosine of the angle of fiber pinnation divided by fiber length, where published fiber length:muscle length ratios were used to estimate fiber lengths. The mean volumes of the major plantarflexors were 489, 245, and 140 cm3 for the soleus and medial (MG) and lateral (LG) heads of the gastrocnemius. The mean PCSA of the soleus was 230 cm2, about three and eight times larger than the MG (68 cm2) and LG (28 cm2), respectively. These PCSA values were eight (soleus), four (MG), and three (LG) times larger than their respective maximum ACSA. The major dorsiflexor, the tibialis anterior (TA), had a muscle volume of 143 cm2, a PCSA of 19 cm2, and an ACSA of 9 cm2. With the exception of the soleus, the mean fiber length of all subjects was closely related to muscle volume across muscles. The soleus fibers were unusually short relative to the muscle volume, thus potentiating its force potential.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Pseudoaneurysm of the medial superior genicular artery after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee Byoung; Song, Si Young; Kwon, Duck Joo; Shin, Jun; Paik, Sang Hoon

    2009-09-01

    We describe a case of 43-year-old man who had a pseudoaneurysm of the medial superior genicular artery after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy with standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals. Pseudoaneurysm of the medial superior genicular artery has been reported at the previous superomedial portal site after arthroscopy. Described herein is a unique case that involved the medial superior genicular artery at the previous anteromedial portal site after arthroscopy. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated with transcatheter embolization.

  16. Pseudoaneurysm of the Medial Superior Genicular Artery after Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kee Byoung; Kwon, Duck Joo; Shin, Jun; Paik, Sang Hoon

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of 43-year-old man who had a pseudoaneurysm of the medial superior genicular artery after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy with standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals. Pseudoaneurysm of the medial superior genicular artery has been reported at the previous superomedial portal site after arthroscopy. Described herein is a unique case that involved the medial superior genicular artery at the previous anteromedial portal site after arthroscopy. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated with transcatheter embolization. PMID:19885054

  17. Pullout failure strength of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus with root ligament tear.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mo; Joo, Yong-Bum

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the reparability of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus with root ligament tear by measuring the actual pullout failure strength of a simple vertical suture of an arthroscopic subtotal meniscectomized posterior horn of the medial meniscus. From November 2009 to May 2010, nine posterior horns of the medial meniscus specimens were collected from arthroscopic subtotal meniscectomy performed as a treatment for root ligament rupture of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Simple vertical sutures were performed on the specimens, and pullout failure load was tested with a biaxial servohydraulic testing machine (Model 8874; Instron Corp., Norwood, MA, USA). The degree of degeneration, extrusion, and medial displacement of the medial meniscus were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Kellgren-Lawrence classification was used in standing plain radiography, and mechanical alignment was measured using orthoroentgenography. Tear morphology was classified into ligament proper type or meniscoligamentous junctional type according to the site of the torn root ligament of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during arthroscopy. The mean pullout failure strength of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus was 71.6 ± 23.2 N (range, 41.4-107.7 N). The degree of degeneration of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on MRI showed statistically significant correlation with pullout failure strength and Kellgren-Lawrence classification. Pullout failure strength showed correlation with mechanical alignment and Kellgren-Lawrence classification (P < 0.05). The measurement of pullout failure strength of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus with root ligament tear showed a degree of repairability. The degree of degeneration of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on MRI showed a significant correlation with the pullout failure strength. The pullout failure strength was also not only correlated with the degree of degeneration of the

  18. Location of the motoneurons of the mylohyoid muscle in the rat. A fluorescence and Nissl study.

    PubMed

    Badran, Darwish H; Al-Hadidi, Maher T; Ramadan, Hassan N; Abu-Ghaida, Jamal H

    2005-01-01

    To locate the neuronal motor cells of the mylohyoid muscle and discuss their topographical organization. The present study was conducted at the Department of Anatomy and Histology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between 2002 and 2003. The mylohyoid muscle in 15 albino rats was injected with 15 mliter of a retrogradely transported fluorescent material DAPI-Pr. After a survival period of 48 hours, animals were sacrificed, fixed in situ and brains harvested. The caudorostral transverse sections of the hindbrains were examined under the fluorescence microscope to detect the fluorescing cells, which were immediately photographed. Sections containing the labeled cells were charted, stained with 1% thionine and photographs obtained through light and fluorescence microscopes at different magnifications. The place and shape of all labeled cells were singled out by asset of their charted referring photographs of hindbrain sections, which display the entire motor trigeminal nucleus. The results showed that the fluorescent cell increase was found to occupy the rostromedial part of the ipsilateral motor trigeminal nucleus. The nucleus was large at its caudal third; the labeled cells are mainly those of the medial "subgroup". These cells are rationally distinct and lie alongside the internal loop of the facial nerve. At the middle third, most of the medial "subgroup" was found labeled. At its middle, the nucleus found was well developed, attained an appreciable size and its medial "subgroup" was somewhat distinct. Whereas, at the rostral third, the nucleus was larger, the medial group was more distinct and all cells were labeled. The medial cellular mass of the nucleus showed reduced labeled cells at the rostral end. This study demonstrates that the rostromedial part of the motor trigeminal nucleus represents the absolute territorial domain of the mylohyoid muscle motoneurons.

  19. Higher medially-directed joint reaction forces are a characteristic of dysplastic hips: A comparative study using subject-specific musculoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael D; MacWilliams, Bruce A; Bo Foreman, K; Peters, Christopher L; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Anderson, Andrew E

    2017-03-21

    Acetabular dysplasia is a known cause of hip osteoarthritis. In addition to abnormal anatomy, changes in kinematics, joint reaction forces (JRFs), and muscle forces could cause tissue damage to the cartilage and labrum, and may contribute to pain and fatigue. The objective of this study was to compare lower extremity joint angles, moments, hip JRFs and muscle forces during gait between patients with symptomatic acetabular dysplasia and healthy controls. Marker trajectories and ground reaction forces were measured in 10 dysplasia patients and 10 typically developing control subjects. A musculoskeletal model was scaled in OpenSim to each subject and subject-specific hip joint centers were determined using reconstructions from CT images. Joint kinematics and moments were calculated using inverse kinematics and inverse dynamics, respectively. Muscle forces and hip JRFs were estimated with static optimization. Inter-group differences were tested for statistical significance (p≤0.05) and large effect sizes (d≥0.8). Results demonstrated that dysplasia patients had higher medially directed JRFs. Joint angles and moments were mostly similar between the groups, but large inter-group effect sizes suggested some restriction in range of motion by patients at the hip and ankle. Higher medially-directed JRFs and inter-group differences in hip muscle forces likely stem from lateralization of the hip joint center in dysplastic patients. Joint force differences, combined with reductions in range of motion at the hip and ankle may also indicate compensatory strategies by patients with dysplasia to maintain joint stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Medial tibial pain. A prospective study of its cause among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Giladi, M; Stein, M; Kashtan, H; Margulies, J; Chisin, R; Steinberg, R; Swissa, A; Aharonson, Z

    1986-12-01

    In a prospective study of 295 infantry recruits during 14 weeks of basic training, 41% had medial tibial pain. Routine scintigraphic evaluation in cases of medial tibial bone pain showed that 63% had abnormalities. A stress fracture was found in 46%. Only two patients had periostitis. None had ischemic medial compartment syndrome. Physical examination could not differentiate between cases with medial tibial bone pain secondary to stress fractures and those with scintigraphically normal tibias. When both pain and swelling were localized in the middle one-third of the tibia, the lesion most likely proved to be a stress fracture.

  1. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  2. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Lucy H; Norton, Joanna L; Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J; Hammond, Chrissy L

    2015-09-18

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Interosseous nerve transfers for tibialis anterior muscle paralysis (foot drop): a human cadaver-based feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A; Hansen, Uel; Terreros, Daniel A; Rossum, Alfred; West, Priscilla

    2009-03-01

    This study explored the anatomical feasibility of using an interosseous nerve transfer (routed between the tibia and fibula) to restore motor function to the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, following injury to the common peroneal nerve (resulting in a foot drop). The specific nerve branches evaluated as possible donor nerves included the nerves to the medial gastrocnemius, the lateral gastrocnemius, and the soleus muscles. All nerve transfers were accomplished using a direct interosseous route and a direct repair (one medial gastrocnemius transfer did require interpositional grafting). The distance from the repair site to the TA muscle was shortest for the transfer using the nerve branch to the soleus. Histologically, the nerve branch to the soleus was most similar to the branch to the TA for both axonal count and cross-sectional area. A two-incision surgical approach using a fibular window (mobilizing a fibular segment after double osteotomy) and interosseous routing of the transfer is proposed.

  4. Bupivacaine injection remodels extraocular muscles and corrects comitant strabismus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joel M; Scott, Alan B; Danh, Kenneth K; Strasser, Dirk; Sane, Mona

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and anatomic changes resulting from bupivacaine injection into extraocular muscles to treat comitant horizontal strabismus. Prospective, observational clinical series. Thirty-one comitant horizontal strabismus patients. Nineteen patients with esotropia received bupivacaine injections in the lateral rectus muscle, and 12 patients with exotropia received bupivacaine injections in the medial rectus. Sixteen of these, with large strabismus angles, also received botulinum type A toxin injections in the antagonist muscle at the same treatment session. A second treatment was given to 13 patients who had residual strabismus after the first treatment. Clinical alignment measures and muscle volume, maximum cross-sectional area, and shape derived from magnetic resonance imaging, with follow-up examinations for up to 3 years. At an average of 15.3 months after the final treatment, original misalignment was reduced by 10.5 prism diopters (Δ; 6.0°) with residual deviations of 10Δ or less in 53% of patients. A single treatment with bupivacaine alone reduced misalignment at 11.3 months by 4.7Δ (2.7°) with residual deviations of 10Δ or less in 50% of patients. Alignment corrections were remarkably stable over follow-ups for as long as 3 years. Six months after bupivacaine injection, muscle volume had increased by 6.6%, and maximum cross-sectional area had increased by 8.5%, gradually relaxing toward pretreatment values thereafter. Computer modeling with Orbit 1.8 (Eidactics, San Francisco, CA) suggested that changes in agonist and antagonist muscle lengths were responsible for the enduring changes in eye alignment. Bupivacaine injection alone or together with botulinum toxin injection in the antagonist muscle improves eye alignment in comitant horizontal strabismus by inducing changes in rectus muscle structure and length. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  6. Effects of plyometric and isometric training on muscle and tendon stiffness in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of plyometric and isometric training on tendon properties during ramp and ballistic contractions and muscle stiffness under passive and active conditions. Eleven subjects completed 12 weeks (3 days/week) of a unilateral training program for the plantar flexors. They performed plyometric training on one side (PLY) and isometric training on the other side (ISO). Active muscle stiffness in the medial gastrocnemius muscle was calculated according to changes in estimated muscle force and fascicle length during fast stretching after submaximal isometric contractions. Passive muscle stiffness was also calculated from estimated passive muscle force and fascicle length during slow passive stretching. Stiffness and hysteresis of tendon structures were measured using ultrasonography during ramp and ballistic contractions. Passive muscle stiffness and tendon hysteresis did not change for PLY or ISO Active muscle stiffness significantly increased for PLY, but not for ISO Tendon stiffness during ramp and ballistic contractions increased significantly for ISO, but not for PLY In addition, tendon elongation values at force production levels beyond 100 N during ballistic contractions increased for PLY These results suggest that plyometric training (but not isometric training) enhances the extensibility of tendon structures during ballistic contractions and active muscle stiffness during fast stretching, and these changes may be related to improved performances during stretch-shortening cycle exercises. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  7. Muscle contributions to knee extension in the early stance phase in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ogaya, Shinya; Kubota, Ryo; Chujo, Yuta; Hirooka, Eiko; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Hase, Kimitaka

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze individual muscle contributions to knee angular acceleration using a musculoskeletal simulation analysis and evaluate knee extension mechanics in the early stance phase in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The subjects comprised 15 patients with medial knee OA and 14 healthy elderly individuals. All participants underwent gait performance test using 8 infrared cameras and two force plates to measure the kinetic and kinematic data. The simulation was driven by 92 Hill-type muscle-tendon units of the lower extremities and a trunk with 23° of freedom. We analyzed each muscle contribution to knee angular acceleration in the 5%-15% and 15%-25% periods of the stance phase (% SP) using an induced acceleration analysis. We compared accelerations by individual muscles between the two groups using an analysis of covariance for controlling gait speed. Patients with knee OA had a significantly lesser knee extension acceleration by the vasti muscles and higher knee acceleration by hip adductors than those in controls in 5-15% SP. In addition, knee OA resulted in significantly lesser knee extension acceleration by the vasti muscles in 15-25% SP. These results indicate that patients with knee OA have decreased dependency on the vasti muscles to control knee movements during early stance phase. Hip adductor muscles, which mainly control mediolateral motion, partly compensate for the weak knee extension by the vasti muscles in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of aging on the isometric torque sharing patterns among the plantar flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Liliam F; Verneque, Debora; Menegaldo, Luciano L

    2017-01-01

    Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) reduction of the triceps surae (TS) muscles during aging suggests a proportional loss of torque among its components: soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii. However, direct measurements of muscle forces in vivo are not feasible. The purpose of this paper was to compare, between older and young women, isometric ankle joint torque sharing patterns among TS muscles and tibialis anterior (TA). An EMG-driven model was used for estimating individual muscle torque contributions to the total plantar flexor torque, during sustained contractions of 10% and 40% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Relative individual muscle contributions to the total plantar flexion torque were similar between older and young women groups, for both intensities, increasing from LG, MG to SOL. Muscle strength (muscle torque/body mass) was significantly greater for all TS components in 40% MVC contractions. Increased TA activation was observed in 10% of MVC for older people. Despite the reduced maximum isometric torque and muscle strength, the results suggest small variations of ankle muscle synergies during the aging process.

  9. Peak medial (but not lateral) hamstring activity is significantly lower during stance phase of running. An EMG investigation using a reduced gravity treadmill.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Clint; Einarson, Einar; Thomson, Athol; Whiteley, Rodney

    2017-09-01

    The hamstrings are seen to work during late swing phase (presumably to decelerate the extending shank) then during stance phase (presumably stabilizing the knee and contributing to horizontal force production during propulsion) of running. A better understanding of this hamstring activation during running may contribute to injury prevention and performance enhancement (targeting the specific role via specific contraction mode). Twenty active adult males underwent surface EMG recordings of their medial and lateral hamstrings while running on a reduced gravity treadmill. Participants underwent 36 different conditions for combinations of 50%-100% altering bodyweight (10% increments) & 6-16km/h (2km/h increments, i.e.: 36 conditions) for a minimum of 6 strides of each leg (maximum 32). EMG was normalized to the peak value seen for each individual during any stride in any trial to describe relative activation levels during gait. Increasing running speed effected greater increases in EMG for all muscles than did altering bodyweight. Peak EMG for the lateral hamstrings during running trials was similar for both swing and stance phase whereas the medial hamstrings showed an approximate 20% reduction during stance compared to swing phase. It is suggested that the lateral hamstrings work equally hard during swing and stance phase however the medial hamstrings are loaded slightly less every stance phase. Likely this helps explain the higher incidence of lateral hamstring injury. Hamstring injury prevention and rehabilitation programs incorporating running should consider running speed as more potent stimulus for increasing hamstring muscle activation than impact loading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship of medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion and ankle joint power and work performance during gait in typically developing children: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Martín Lorenzo, Teresa; Albi Rodríguez, Gustavo; Rocon, Eduardo; Martínez Caballero, Ignacio; Lerma Lara, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    Muscle fascicles lengthen in response to chronic passive stretch through in-series sarcomere addition in order to maintain an optimum sarcomere length. In turn, the muscles' force generating capacity, maximum excursion, and contraction velocity is enhanced. Thus, longer fascicles suggest a greater capacity to develop joint power and work. However, static fascicle length measurements may not be taking sarcomere length differences into account. Thus, we considered relative fascicle excursions through passive ankle dorsiflexion may better correlate with the capacity to generate joint power and work than fascicle length. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine if medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursions correlate with ankle joint power and work generation during gait in typically developing children. A sample of typically developing children (n = 10) were recruited for this study and data analysis was carried out on 20 legs. Medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion from resting joint angle to maximum dorsiflexion was estimated from trigonometric relations of medial gastrocnemius pennation angle and thickness obtained from B-mode real-time ultrasonography. Furthermore, a three-dimensional motion capture system was used to obtain ankle joint work and power during the stance phase of gait. Significant correlations were found between relative fascicle excursion and peak power absorption (-) r(14) = -0.61, P = .012 accounting for 31% variability, positive work r(18) = 0.56, P = .021 accounting for 31% variability, and late stance positive work r(15) = 0.51, P = .037 accounting for 26% variability. The large unexplained variance may be attributed to mechanics of neighboring structures (e.g., soleus or Achilles tendon mechanics) and proximal joint kinetics which may also contribute to ankle joint power and work performance, and were not taken into account. Further studies are encouraged to provide greater insight

  11. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients' ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29-71 years) and 30 years (range: 14-62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is common in

  12. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients’ ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29–71 years) and 30 years (range: 14–62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is

  13. [Dynamic retraction microneurosurgery for the treatment of medial tentorial meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Du, W; Zhong, D; Lü, D; Li, J; Huang, H Y; Yang, J; Wu, Y T; Xia, H J; Tang, W Y; Sun, X C

    2018-05-08

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and clinical significance of dynamic retraction microneurosurgery for the treatment of medial tentorial meningiomas. Methods: From January 2011 to December 2016, a cohort of 28 patients with medial tentorial meningiomas were treated by microneurosurgery at the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. Patients who treated intraoperatively with dynamic retraction surgery from January 2014 to December 2016 were assigned into dynamic retraction group, and those with fixed retractors intraoperatively from January 2011 to December 2013 were assigned into retractor group. The surgical approaches tailored in our patients were based on predominant direction of tumor extension. The extent of tumor resection was scored according to the Simpson's classification scale. Comparisons of tumor size, operation time, hospitalization time, retraction-related injury, tumor Simpson resection grade and Karnofsky Performance Scale(KPS) score six months after surgery were also made between two groups. Results: A total of 12 patients(retractor group) were treated with the use of self-retaining brain retractors intraoperatively and dynamic retraction surgical procedure was performed intraoperatively in 16 patients(dynamic retraction group). The difference between two groups with regard to sex, age, tumor size, operation time and tumor Simpson resection grade was not statistically significant(all P >0.05). The mean duration of hospital time was shorter in the dynamic retraction group than that in the retractor group(18.3 d±1.8 d vs 20.2 d±1.3 d, P =0.004). The dynamic retraction group had lower incidence of retraction-related injury compared with the retractor group(1/16 vs 6/12), P =0.022]. The dynamic retraction group had better neurological recovery rate with KPS >80 evaluated six months after surgery compared with the retractor group(14/16 vs 5/12, P =0.017). Conclusions: Dynamic retraction microneurosurgery for the treatment

  14. A comparison of hamstring muscle activity during different screening tests for non-contact ACL injury.

    PubMed

    Husted, Rasmus S; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars L; Myklebust, Grethe; Kallemose, Thomas; Lauridsen, Hanne B; Hölmich, Per; Aagaard, Per; Zebis, Mette K

    2016-06-01

    Reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscles during a sports-specific sidecutting movement has been found to be a potential risk factor for non-contact ACL injury. However, whether a reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscle is a general neuromuscular phenomenon and thereby observable independently of the type of clinical screening tests used is not known. This cross sectional study investigated the rank correlation of knee joint neuromuscular activity between three different ACL injury risk screening tests. Sixty-two adolescent female elite football and handball players (16.7±1.3years) participated in the study. Using surface electromyography (EMG) assessment, the neuromuscular activity of medial hamstring muscle (semitendinosus, ST), lateral hamstring muscle (biceps femoris, BF) and quadriceps muscle (vastus lateralis, VL) were monitored during three standardized screening tests - i.e. one-legged horizontal hop (OLH), drop vertical jump (DJ) and sidecutting (SC). Neuromuscular pre-activity was measured in the time interval 10ms prior to initial contact on a force plate. For neuromuscular hamstring muscle pre-activity, correlation analysis (Spearman correlation coefficient) showed low-to-moderate correlations between SC and 1) DJ (rs=0.34-0.36, P<0.05) and 2) OLH (rs=0.40-0.41, P<0.05), respectively. In conclusion, the present data suggest that hamstring pre-activity share some common variance during the examined tests. However, a lack of strong correlation suggests that we cannot generalize one risk factor during one test to another test. The present data demonstrate that one-legged horizontal hop and drop vertical jump testing that are commonly used in the clinical setting does not resemble the specific neuromuscular activity patterns known to exist during sidecutting, a well known high risk movement for non-contact ACL injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth hormone, IGF-I, and exercise effects on non-weight-bearing fast muscles of hypophysectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, E. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Evans, J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) with or without exercise (ladder climbing) in countering the effects of unweighting on fast muscles of hypophysectomized rats during 10 days of hindlimb suspension were determined. Compared with untreated suspended rats, muscle weights were 16-29% larger in GH-treated and 5-15% larger in IGF-I-treated suspended rats. Exercise alone had no effect on muscle weights. Compared with ambulatory control, the medial gastrocnemius weight in suspended, exercised rats was larger after GH treatment and maintained with IGF-I treatment. The combination of GH or IGF-I plus exercise in suspended rats resulted in an increase in size of each predominant fiber type, i.e., types I, I + IIa and IIa + IIx, in the medial gastrocnemius compared with untreated suspended rats. Normal ambulation or exercise during suspension increased the proportion of fibers expressing embryonic myosin heavy chain in hypophysectomized rats. The phenotype of the medial gastrocnemius was minimally affected by GH, IGF-I, and/or exercise. These results show that there is an IGF-I, as well as a GH, and exercise interactive effect in maintaining medial gastrocnemius fiber size in suspended hypophysectomized rats.

  16. Isolation of a matrix that binds medial Golgi enzymes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Rat liver Golgi stacks were extracted with Triton X-100 at neutral pH. After centrifugation the low speed pellet contained two medial-Golgi enzymes, N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I and mannosidase II, but no enzymes or markers from other parts of the Golgi apparatus. Both were present in the same structures which appeared, by electron microscopy, to be small remnants of cisternal membranes. The enzymes could be removed by treatment with low salt, leaving behind a salt pellet, which we term the matrix. Removal of salt caused specific re-binding of both enzymes to the matrix, with an apparent dissociation constant of 3 nM for mannosidase II. Re-binding was abolished by pretreatment of intact Golgi stacks with proteinase K, suggesting that the matrix was present between the cisternae. PMID:8106542

  17. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo E; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical indication or inappropriate surgical technique/patient selection; (2) a technical error; and (3) an incorrect assessment of the concomitant risk factors for instability. An understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the MPFL and cautiousness with the imaging techniques while favoring clinical over radiological findings and the use of common sense to determine the adequate surgical technique for each particular case, are critical to minimizing MPFL surgery failure. Additionally, our approach to dealing with failure after primary MPFL reconstruction is also presented. PMID:28251062

  18. Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Repair Using a Transtibial Technique.

    PubMed

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Mohan, Rohith; Stuart, Michael J; Krych, Aaron J

    2017-06-01

    The meniscal roots are critical in maintaining the normal shock absorbing function of the meniscus. If a meniscal root tear is left untreated, meniscal extrusion can occur rendering the meniscus nonfunctional resulting in degenerative arthritis. Two main repair techniques are described: (1) suture anchors (direct fixation) and (2) sutures pulled through a tibial tunnel (indirect fixation). Meniscal root repair using a suture anchor technique is technically challenging requiring a posterior portal and a curved suture passing device that can be difficult to manipulate within the knee. We present a technique for posterior medial meniscus root repair using 3 sutures (1 leader, 2 cinch), standard arthroscopy portals, and transtibial fixation. Overall, this technique simplifies a challenging procedure and allows for familiarity and efficiency.

  19. Medial prefrontal cortex as an action-outcome predictor.

    PubMed

    Alexander, William H; Brown, Joshua W

    2011-09-18

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and especially anterior cingulate cortex is central to higher cognitive function and many clinical disorders, yet its basic function remains in dispute. Various competing theories of mPFC have treated effects of errors, conflict, error likelihood, volatility and reward, using findings from neuroimaging and neurophysiology in humans and monkeys. No single theory has been able to reconcile and account for the variety of findings. Here we show that a simple model based on standard learning rules can simulate and unify an unprecedented range of known effects in mPFC. The model reinterprets many known effects and suggests a new view of mPFC, as a region concerned with learning and predicting the likely outcomes of actions, whether good or bad. Cognitive control at the neural level is then seen as a result of evaluating the probable and actual outcomes of one's actions. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex as an action-outcome predictor

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, William H.; Brown, Joshua W.

    2011-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and especially anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is central to higher cognitive function and numerous clinical disorders, yet its basic function remains in dispute. Various competing theories of mPFC have treated effects of errors, conflict, error likelihood, volatility, and reward, based on findings from neuroimaging and neurophysiology in humans and monkeys. To date, no single theory has been able to reconcile and account for the variety of findings. Here we show that a simple model based on standard learning rules can simulate and unify an unprecedented range of known effects in mPFC. The model reinterprets many known effects and suggests a new view of mPFC, as a region concerned with learning and predicting the likely outcomes of actions, whether good or bad. Cognitive control at the neural level is then seen as a result of evaluating the probable and actual outcomes of one's actions. PMID:21926982

  1. Snapping knee caused by the thickening of the medial hamstrings.

    PubMed

    de la Hera Cremades, B; Escribano Rueda, L; Lara Rubio, A

    We report a case of symptomatic subluxation of the semitendinosus and gracilis over the medial condyle of the tibia caused by the thickening of its tendons. Snapping was reproduced on active extension. Clinical examination and, above all, dynamic ultrasound were the key for the diagnosis because other imaging tests were normal. Due to failure of conservative treatment with physiotherapy and infiltrations, surgery was undertaken, involving desinsertion and excision of distal 8cm segment of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. At the present time (6 months postoperatively), the patient is symptom-free and has returned to the previous normal life activities. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Emotional processing in anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Etkin, Amit; Egner, Tobias; Kalisch, Raffael

    2010-01-01

    Negative emotional stimuli activate a broad network, including the medial prefrontal (mPFC) and anterior cingulate (ACC) cortices. An early influential view dichotomized these regions into dorsal-caudal “cognitive” and ventral-rostral “affective” subdivisions. In this review, we examine a wealth of recent research on negative emotions in animals and humans, using the example of fear/anxiety, and conclude that, contrary to the traditional dichotomy, both subdivisions make key contributions to emotional processing. Specifically, dorsal-caudal regions of the ACC/mPFC are involved in appraisal and expression of negative emotion, while ventral-rostral portions of the ACC/mPFC have a regulatory role with respect to limbic regions involved in generating emotional responses. Moreover, this new framework is broadly consistent with emerging data on other negative and positive emotions. PMID:21167765

  3. Effects of an acute bout of dynamic stretching on biomechanical properties of the gastrocnemius muscle determined by shear wave elastography

    PubMed Central

    Noorkoiv, Marika; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Gokalp, Hulya; Marzilger, Robert; Mohagheghi, Amir A.

    2018-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of dynamic stretching (DS) exercise on passive ankle range of motion (RoM), resting localized muscle stiffness, as measured by shear wave speed (SWS) of medial gastrocnemius muscle, fascicle strain, and thickness. Methods/Results Twenty-three participants performed a DS protocol. Before and after stretching, SWS was measured in the belly of the resting medial gastrocnemius muscle (MGM) using shear wave elastography. DS produced small improvements in maximum dorsiflexion (+1.5° ±1.5; mean difference ±90% confidence limits) and maximum plantarflexion (+2.3° ±1.8), a small decrease in fascicle strain (-2.6% ±4.4) and a small increase in SWS at neutral resting angle (+11.4% ±1.5). There was also a small increase in muscle thickness (+4.1mm ±2.0). Conclusions Through the use of elastography, this is the first study to suggest that DS increases muscle stiffness, decreases fascicle strain and increases muscle thickness as a result of improved RoM. These results can be beneficial to coaches, exercise and clinical scientists when choosing DS as a muscle conditioning or rehabilitation intervention. PMID:29723229

  4. Anatomy of the Platysma Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lim, Jae Hyun

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the anatomy the platysma systematically.The term "platysma AND anatomy" was used to search PubMed and Scopus, producing 394 and 214 papers, respectively. After excluding 95 duplicate titles, 513 abstracts and 98 full papers were reviewed. Among these 98 papers, 83 were excluded and 5 were added. Ultimately, 20 papers were analyzed.The most common aging-related change of the platysma was shortening (70.7%), followed by thinning (25.2%). The platysma most commonly originated from the upper portion of thorax anterior to clavicle (67.7%), followed by the subcutaneous tissue of the subclavicular and acromial regions (22.6%) and pectoralis (9.7%). The platysma ascended upward and medially (68.5%) or ascended from the clavicle to the face (31.5%). The platysma most commonly inserted on the cheek skin (57.5%), followed by the cutaneous muscles around the mouth (18.6%), the mandibulocutaneous ligament or zygoma (18.6%), and the parotid fascia or periosteum of the mandible (5.3%). The platysma was most commonly innervated by the cervical branch of the facial nerve (38.2%) or the cervical branch and mandibular branch of the facial nerve (60.5%), followed by the cervical plexus (0.6%), the cervical motor nucleus (0.6%), and the glossopharyngeal nerve (0.1%). The most common action of the platysma was drawing the lips inferiorly (83.3%) or posteriorly (12.9%). Four papers classified the platysma into subtypes; however, these classification strategies used arbitrary standards.Further studies will be necessary to establish the thickness of the platysma and to characterize age-related changes of the platysma.

  5. Perfusion network shift during seizures in medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Karen M; Tabesh, Ali; Sainju, Rup K; DeSantis, Stacia M; Naselaris, Thomas; Joseph, Jane E; Ahlman, Mark A; Spicer, Kenneth M; Glazier, Steve S; Edwards, Jonathan C; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is associated with limbic atrophy involving the hippocampus, peri-hippocampal and extra-temporal structures. While MTLE is related to static structural limbic compromise, it is unknown whether the limbic system undergoes dynamic regional perfusion network alterations during seizures. In this study, we aimed to investigate state specific (i.e. ictal versus interictal) perfusional limbic networks in patients with MTLE. We studied clinical information and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images obtained with intravenous infusion of the radioactive tracer Technetium- Tc 99 m Hexamethylpropyleneamine Oxime (Tc-99 m HMPAO) during ictal and interictal state confirmed by video-electroencephalography (VEEG) in 20 patients with unilateral MTLE (12 left and 8 right MTLE). Pair-wise voxel-based analyses were used to define global changes in tracer between states. Regional tracer uptake was calculated and state specific adjacency matrices were constructed based on regional correlation of uptake across subjects. Graph theoretical measures were applied to investigate global and regional state specific network reconfigurations. A significant increase in tracer uptake was observed during the ictal state in the medial temporal region, cerebellum, thalamus, insula and putamen. From network analyses, we observed a relative decreased correlation between the epileptogenic temporal region and remaining cortex during the interictal state, followed by a surge of cross-correlated perfusion in epileptogenic temporal-limbic structures during a seizure, corresponding to local network integration. These results suggest that MTLE is associated with a state specific perfusion and possibly functional organization consisting of a surge of limbic cross-correlated tracer uptake during a seizure, with a relative disconnection of the epileptogenic temporal lobe in the interictal period. This pattern of state specific shift in metabolic networks in

  6. Reversed Procrastination by Focal Disruption of Medial Frontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ashwani; Diehl, Beate; Scott, Catherine; McEvoy, Andrew W; Nachev, Parashkev

    2016-11-07

    An enduring puzzle in the neuroscience of voluntary action is the origin of the remarkably wide dispersion of the reaction time distribution, an interval far greater than is explained by synaptic or signal transductive noise [1, 2]. That we are able to change our planned actions-a key criterion of volition [3]-so close to the time of their onset implies decision-making must reach deep into the execution of action itself [4-6]. It has been influentially suggested the reaction time distribution therefore reflects deliberate neural procrastination [7], giving alternative response tendencies sufficient time for fair competition in pursuing a decision threshold that determines which one is behaviorally manifest: a race model, where action selection and execution are closely interrelated [8-11]. Although the medial frontal cortex exhibits a sensitivity to reaction time on functional imaging that is consistent with such a mechanism [12-14], direct evidence from disruptive studies has hitherto been lacking. If movement-generating and movement-delaying neural substrates are closely co-localized here, a large-scale lesion will inevitably mask any acceleration, for the movement itself could be disrupted. Circumventing this problem, here we observed focal intracranial electrical disruption of the medial frontal wall in the context of the pre-surgical evaluation of two patients with epilepsy temporarily reversing such hypothesized procrastination. Effector-specific behavioral acceleration, time-locked to the period of electrical disruption, occurred exclusively at a specific locus at the ventral border of the pre-supplementary motor area. A cardinal prediction of race models of voluntary action is thereby substantiated in the human brain. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Sacral medial telangiectatic vascular nevus: a study of 43 children.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, A; Neri, I; Orlandi, C; Marini, R

    1996-01-01

    Medial telangiectatic vascular nevi are capillary vascular malformations frequently observed at birth occurring mostly on the face or on the nape as a single lesion or as multiple macules affecting more than one site simultaneously. In 1990, Metzker and Shamir reported a medial telangiectatic vascular nevus (MTVN) in the sacral region along the midline and called this particular variety of MTVN 'butterfly-shaped mark'. Our study was performed to investigate the morphology and localization of an MTVN in the sacral region (sMTVN) in a group of Caucasian children. We observed 43 children with sMTVN, ranging in age from 1 month to 12 years (mean 8 years), for a period of 6 years. sMTVN was found as a red-violet macular lesion of rhomboid or triangular shape in 16 patients and as a group of little red-violet macules in 10 patients. In 16 patients moreover the whole back was involved with many small red-violet spots on and around the spinal column, and in 1 patient with classic sMTVN satellite macules were also present over both buttocks. Four patients suffered from epilepsy with mental deficiency. In 6 patients, the family history showed sMTVN in one or more members of the family. No case presented an association with spina bifida. In our study, sMTVN shows a morphological polymorphism while Metzker and Shamir reported the same clinical aspect in all 25 of their patients. In accordance with these authors, we noted that sMTVN persist into childhood and adult life in the same way as occipital MTVN.

  8. Modified transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy through prelacrimal duct approach.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motohiko; Nakamura, Yoshihisa; Yokota, Makoto; Ozaki, Shinya; Murakami, Shingo

    2017-10-01

    We previously reported a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy (modified transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy through prelacrimal duct approach [MTEMMPDA]) to resect inverted papilloma (IP), for which the inferior turbinate (IT) and nasolacrimal duct (ND) can be preserved. MTEMMPDA is a safe and effective method to obtain wide, straight access to the maxillary sinus (MS). However, there are few reported cases of patients who underwent MTEMMPDA, and even fewer of patients who underwent partial osteotomy of the apertura piriformis and the anterior wall of the MS. In this study, we analyzed the outcomes of 51 patients who underwent MTEMMPDA. Retrospective review. All patients who underwent MTEMMPDA at our hospital between January 2004 and December 2015 were included in this study. Fifty-one patients with sinonasal IP in the MS underwent MTEMMPDA. Recurrence was seen in the MS of one patient (follow-up of 2-138 months). The IT remained unchanged in all 51 patients without atrophy. We have not observed epiphora, eye discharge, dry nose, or persistent crusting after this surgery. Although seven patients had numbness around the upper lip after surgery, this had disappeared by 1 year after surgery. Additional partial osteotomy of the apertura piriformis and the anterior wall of the MS were done in eight patients. Deformation of the external nose was not seen. This approach appears to be a safe and effective method to resect IP in the MS, even if there is additional partial osteotomy of the apertura piriformis and the anterior wall of the MS. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2205-2209, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Effect of Medialization Thyroplasty on Glottic Airway Anatomy: Cadaver Model.

    PubMed

    Shinghal, Tulika; Anderson, Jennifer; Chung, Janet; Hong, Aaron; Bharatha, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the change in airway dimensions after medialization thyroplasty (MT) using a cadaveric model. Helical computerized tomography (CT) was performed before and after placement of a silastic block in human larynges to investigate the effect on airway anatomy at the level of the glottis. Tissue density (TD) of the medialized vocal fold (VF) was documented to understand the effect on tissue displacement. This is a cadaveric study. Thirteen human cadaveric larynges underwent fine-cut CT scan before and after MT was performed using carved blocks in two sizes (small block and large block [LB]). Clientstream software was used to measure laryngeal dimensions: intraglottic volume (IGV), cross-sectional area (CSA), posterior-glottic diameter (PGD), VF density (in Hounsfield units [HUs]), and anterior-posterior diameter (APD). Eight sequential axial sections 0.625 mm cuts) at the level of the true VFs were analyzed. There was a significant decrease between the three conditions for IGV (P < 0.0001) and CSA (P < 0.0001). TD of the VF was increased after MT as indicated by HU increase (P = 0.0003). APD was not significantly changed. PGD was significantly different between the no block to LB placement (P = 0.0012). MT significantly changes the IGV and CSA at the level of the glottis. Density in the true VF was significantly increased. These findings have important implications for understanding volumetric effects of MT. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral idiopathic calf muscle hypertrophy: an exceptional cause of unsightly leg curvature.

    PubMed

    Herlin, C; Chaput, B; Rivier, F; Doucet, J C; Bigorre, M; Captier, G

    2015-04-01

    The authors present the management of a young female patient who presented with longstanding bilateral calf muscle hypertrophy, with no known cause. Taking into account the patient's wishes and the fact that the hypertrophy was mainly located in the posteromedial compartment, we chose to carry out a subtotal bilateral resection of medial gastrocnemius muscles. This procedure was performed with an harmonic scalpel, permitting a excellent cosmetic result while avoiding complications or functional impairment. After a reviewing of the commonly used techniques, the authors discuss the chosen surgical approach taking into account its clinical particularity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of the extraocular muscle proprioceptors on the orientation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Pettorossi, V E; Errico, P; Ferraresi, A; Manni, E

    1996-03-01

    In the intact brain lamb, unilateral electrolytic lesion of the medial dorso-lateral portion of the semilunar ganglion containing the first order neurons of the eye muscle proprioception induced modifications of the horizontal and vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex (HVOR and VVOR) which consisted in marked alterations of the trajectories of the quick phases, while the slow phases were scarcely affected. Similar results were observed after section of the branches described by Winckler in the retrobulbar region along the extraocular muscle proprioceptive information travels. These findings extend those of previous investigations carried out in decorticate animals.

  12. Plakins in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Justin G; Bernstein, Marija A; Boudreau-Larivière, Céline

    2010-03-01

    Striated muscle cells contain numerous architectural proteins that contribute to the function of muscle as generators of mechanical force. Among these proteins are crosslinkers belonging to the plakin family, namely plectin, microtubule-actin crosslinking factor (ACF7/MACF1), bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (Bpag1/dystonin), and desmoplakin. These plakin family members, in particular plectin and Bpag1/dystonin, exist as several isoforms. The domain organization of these plakin variants dictates their subcellular location and the proteins with which they interact. Several studies suggest that plakins exert unique functions within various compartments of the muscle cell including the sarcolemma, the sarcomere, both neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions in skeletal muscle, and the intercalated discs in cardiac muscle. Plakins may also regulate the cellular placement and function of specific organelles, notably the nucleus, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Here we review and summarize our current knowledge of the function of plakins in striated muscle cells.

  13. Muscle development and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of skeletal muscle from the epithelial somites involves a series of events triggered by temporally and spatially discrete signals resulting in the generation of muscle fibers which vary in their contractile and metabolic nature. The fiber type composition of muscles varies between individuals and it has now been found that there are differences in fiber type proportions between lean and obese animals and humans. Amongst the possible causes of obesity, it has been suggested that inappropriate prenatal environments may ‘program’ the fetus and may lead to increased risks for disease in adult life. The characteristics of muscle are both heritable and plastic, giving the tissue some ability to adapt to signals and stimuli both pre and postnatally. Given that muscle is a site of fatty acid oxidation and carbohydrate metabolism and that its development can be changed by prenatal events, it is interesting to examine the possible relationship between muscle development and the risk of obesity. PMID:19279728

  14. Differences in end-point force trajectories elicited by electrical stimulation of individual human calf muscles

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, S B; Segal, R L; Abelew, T A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the end-point force trajectories of the fibularis longus (FIB), lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. Most information about individual muscle function has come from studies which use models based on electromyographic (EMG) recordings. In this study (N=20 subjects) we used electrical stimulation (20Hz) to elicit activity in individual muscles, recorded the end-point forces at the foot and verified the selectivity of stimulation by using magnetic resonance imaging. Unexpectedly, no significant differences were found between LG and MG force directions. Stimulation of LG and MG resulted in downward and medial or lateral forces depending on the subject. We found FIB end-point forces to be significantly different than those of LG and MG. In all subjects, stimulation of FIB resulted in downward and lateral forces. Based on our results, we suggest that there are multiple factors determining when and whether LG or MG will produce a medial or lateral force and FIB consistently plays a significant role in eversion/abduction and plantarflexion. We suggest that the inter-subject variability we found is not simply an artifact of experimental or technical error but is functionally relevant and should be addressed in future studies and models. PMID:20095454

  15. Shockwave treatment for medial tibial stress syndrome: A randomized double blind sham-controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Newman, Phil; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger

    2017-03-01

    Up to 35% of runners develop medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) which often results in lengthy disruption to training and sometimes affects daily activities. There is currently no high quality evidence to support any particular intervention for MTSS. This study aims to investigate the effect of shockwave therapy for MTSS. A randomized, sham-controlled, pilot trial in a university-based health clinic including 28 active adults with MTSS. Intervention included standard dose shockwave therapy for the experimental group versus sham dose for the control group, delivered during Week 1-3, 5 and 9. Main outcome measures were pain measured during bone and muscle pressure as well as during running using a numerical rating scale (0-10) and running was measured as pain-limited distance (m), at Week 1 (baseline) and Week 10 (post-intervention). Self-perception of change was measured using the Global Rating of Change Scale (-7 to +7) at Week 10 (post-intervention). Pain (palpation) was reduced in the experimental group by 1.1 out of 10.0 (95% CI -2.3 to 0.0) less than the control group. There were no other statistically significant differences between the groups. Standard dose shockwave therapy is not more effective than sham dose at improving pain or running distance in MTSS. However, the sham dose may have had a clinical effect. Further investigation including a no intervention control is warranted to evaluate the effect of shockwave therapy in the management of MTSS. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered medial temporal activation related to local glutamate levels in subjects with prodromal signs of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Valli, Isabel; Stone, James; Mechelli, Andrea; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Lythgoe, David; O'Gorman, Ruth; Seal, Marc; McGuire, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Both medial temporal cortical dysfunction and perturbed glutamatergic neurotransmission are regarded as fundamental pathophysiological features of psychosis. However, although animal models of psychosis suggest that these two abnormalities are interrelated, their relationship in humans has yet to be investigated. We used a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the relationship between medial temporal activation during an episodic memory task and local glutamate levels in 22 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 14 healthy volunteers. We observed a significant between-group difference in the coupling of