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Sample records for median cleft face

  1. [Median cleft of the upper lip. Apropos of 3 cases. The Association for the Study of Facial Clefts].

    PubMed

    Vanrenterghem, L; Joly, B; Podvin, A; Poupart; Bayart, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors report three cases of Median Cleft of the upper lip, a clinical entity really deserving the term of "hare lip", a very ancient denomination who dates back to the Tang Dynasty and unfairly used to describe the usual lateral clefts of the lip. The denominations of "true" and "false" median cleft lips recovering respectively such different embryopathic realities as clefts of the median element with varying degrees of vertical separation and as agenesis of the fronto-nasal process accompanied with cerebral anomalies are no more used now. Median clefts of the upper lip can be included in the "neurocristopathies" by less or more precocious dysneurulation of the fronto-nasal process creating anomalies from various single midline defects of the upper lip of our three cases, to associated midline defects like in the Median Cleft face syndrome (fronto-nasal dysplasia) described by De Myer and Sedano to holoprosencephaly (arhinencephaly), which are rarely associated.

  2. Frontonasal dysplasia (Median cleft face syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Seema; Sharma, Vipin; Bothra, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of a rare case of frontonasal dysplasia (FND) in a full-term girl with birth weight of 2.750 kg. The baby had the classical features of FND. There were no other associated anomalies. There was no history of consanguinity and no family history of similar conditions. So inheritance of this case could be considered sporadic. Maxillofacial surgery should be considered for all patients for whom improvement is possible. However, in developing countries where there are considerable limitations in provision of social services, with economic and educational constraints, correction of such major defects remains a challenging task. PMID:22346197

  3. Quantitative analysis of orofacial development and median clefts in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Allyson E; Dickinson, Amanda J

    2014-05-01

    Xenopus has become a useful tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying orofacial development. However, few quantitative analyses exist to describe the anatomy of this region. In this study we combine traditional facial measurements with geometric morphometrics to describe anatomical changes in the orofacial region during normal and abnormal development. Facial measurements and principal component (PC) analysis indicate that during early tadpole development the face expands primarily in the midface region accounting for the development of the upper jaw and primary palate. The mouth opening correspondingly becomes flatter and wider as it incorporates the jaw elements. A canonical variate analysis of orofacial and mouth opening shape emphasized that changes in the orofacial shape occur gradually. Orofacial anatomy was quantified after altered levels of retinoic acid using all-trans retinoic acid or an inhibitor of retinoic acid receptors or by injecting antisense oligos targeting RALDH2. Such perturbations resulted in major decreases in the width of the midface and the mouth opening illustrated in facial measurements and a PC analysis. The mouth opening shape also had a gap in the primary palate resulting in a median cleft in the mouth opening that was only illustrated quantitatively in the morphometric analysis. Finally, canonical and discriminant function analysis statistically distinguished the orofacial and mouth opening shape changes among the different modes used to alter retinoic acid signaling levels. By combining quantitative analyses with molecular studies of orofacial development we will be better equipped to understand the complex morphogenetic processes involved in palate development and clefting.

  4. Face facts: Genes, environment, and clefts

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate provides an ideal, albeit complex, model for the study of human developmental anomalies. Clefting disorders show a mix of well-defined syndromic causes (many with single-gene or environmental etiologies) coupled with their more common presentation in the nonsyndromic form. This summary presents some insight into the genetic causes of, etiology of and animal models for cleft lip and/or palate. 79 refs.

  5. Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome associated with unique cleft palate: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Holla, Goda; Ramakrishna, Yeluri; Holla, Anup; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2014-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome is a rare dental anomaly that affects 1:50,000 live births. SMMCI syndrome is characterized by the presence of a single central incisor located on the maxillary midline in both primary and permanent dentitions. It may occur as an isolated finding or in association with developmental defects and systemic involvement. Congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI syndrome can include short stature, mild forms of deviation in craniofacial morphology, mild to severe intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, and cleft lip and/or palate. This report describes a clinical case of a 7-year-old girl with SMMCI syndrome--in addition to bilateral residual cleft and associated nasal regurgitation--that was treated with a removable maxillary obturator.

  6. Median cleft of the upper lip: A new classification to guide treatment decisions.

    PubMed

    de Boutray, Marie; Beziat, Jean-Luc; Yachouh, Jacques; Bigorre, Michèle; Gleizal, Arnaud; Captier, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    Median cleft of the upper lip (MCL) is a specific and rare entity on the spectrum of facial clefts. MCL have different clinical expressions and can be either isolated or part of multiple malformations. Confusion still exists regarding the explanation and classification of MCL; some cases have been reported in the literature, but no studies carried out a complete review of the literature. This study reviewed cases of MCL in 2 French units and conducted a systematic review of the literature, in order to derive a new classification. Fourteen patients with MCL in the 2 units and 195 cases in the literature were reviewed. They involved complete (42%), incomplete (49%), and minor forms (9%). Epidemiological and clinical data were collected, from which a classification was derived, based on the type of cleft and its belonging to other syndrome(s). Three main groups were distinguished, namely, isolated MCL, MCL within craniofacial malformations, and MCL with extrafacial malformations. Each group and subgroup was associated with a prognosis and led to specific management. This study reviewed all of the various forms of MCL and their associated anomalies, in order to have a global view of MCL and to derive a useful classification scheme to guide management of care. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Changing face of cleft care: specialized centers in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2012-01-01

    The organization and management of specialized cleft lip and palate centers in developing countries are challenging because of the lack of financial resources devoted to the national health care system. The treatment of cleft lip and palate is of low priority for health care and budgets; however, gradual progress is possible. As an example of how care might be improved in the developing world, we suggest guidelines to strengthen the local cleft lip and palate centers in Brazil based on the ideal geographic distribution of cleft centers around the country, to achieve the following objectives: first, avoid patient's migration; second, facilitate patient's adherence; third, focus on a global and continuous multidisciplinary treatment; and fourth, avoid indiscriminate opening of nonprepared cleft lip and palate centers in our country. This ideal scenario would put the cleft lip and palate health attention on the right path in Brazil.

  8. The effect of cleft lip on adults' responses to faces: cross-species findings.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Christine E; Young, Katherine S; Parsons, Emma; Dean, Annika; Murray, Lynne; Goodacre, Tim; Dalton, Louise; Stein, Alan; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2011-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common of the congenital conditions affecting the face and cranial bones and is associated with a raised risk of difficulties in infant-caregiver interaction; the reasons for such difficulties are not fully understood. Here, we report two experiments designed to explore how adults respond to infant faces with and without cleft lip, using behavioural measures of attractiveness appraisal ('liking') and willingness to work to view or remove the images ('wanting'). We found that infants with cleft lip were rated as less attractive and were viewed for shorter durations than healthy infants, an effect that was particularly apparent where the cleft lip was severe. Women rated the infant faces as more attractive than men did, but there were no differences in men and women's viewing times of these faces. In a second experiment, we found that the presence of a cleft lip in domestic animals affected adults' 'liking' and 'wanting' responses in a comparable way to that seen for human infants. Adults' responses were also remarkably similar for images of infants and animals with cleft lip, although no gender difference in attractiveness ratings or viewing times emerged for animals. We suggest that the presence of a cleft lip can substantially change the way in which adults respond to human and animal faces. Furthermore, women may respond in different ways to men when asked to appraise infant attractiveness, despite the fact that men and women 'want' to view images of infants for similar durations.

  9. The Effect of Cleft Lip on Adults' Responses to Faces: Cross-Species Findings

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Emma; Dean, Annika; Murray, Lynne; Goodacre, Tim; Dalton, Louise; Stein, Alan; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2011-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common of the congenital conditions affecting the face and cranial bones and is associated with a raised risk of difficulties in infant-caregiver interaction; the reasons for such difficulties are not fully understood. Here, we report two experiments designed to explore how adults respond to infant faces with and without cleft lip, using behavioural measures of attractiveness appraisal (‘liking’) and willingness to work to view or remove the images (‘wanting’). We found that infants with cleft lip were rated as less attractive and were viewed for shorter durations than healthy infants, an effect that was particularly apparent where the cleft lip was severe. Women rated the infant faces as more attractive than men did, but there were no differences in men and women's viewing times of these faces. In a second experiment, we found that the presence of a cleft lip in domestic animals affected adults' ‘liking’ and ‘wanting’ responses in a comparable way to that seen for human infants. Adults' responses were also remarkably similar for images of infants and animals with cleft lip, although no gender difference in attractiveness ratings or viewing times emerged for animals. We suggest that the presence of a cleft lip can substantially change the way in which adults respond to human and animal faces. Furthermore, women may respond in different ways to men when asked to appraise infant attractiveness, despite the fact that men and women ‘want’ to view images of infants for similar durations. PMID:22016785

  10. Simple solution for difficult face mask ventilation in children with orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Veerabathula, Prardhana; Patil, Manajeet; Upputuri, Omkar; Durga, Padmaja

    2014-10-01

    Significant air leak from the facial cleft predisposes to difficult mask ventilation. The reported techniques of use of sterile gauze, larger face mask and laryngeal mask airway after intravenous induction have limited application in uncooperative children. We describe the use of dental impression material molded to the facial contour to cover the facial defect and aid ventilation with an appropriate size face mask in a child with a bilateral Tessier 3 anomaly. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A case of false median cleft of upper lip with IV-A holoprosencephaly that underwent cheiloplasty at 2.5 years of age.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J; Arai, N; Kiyosaki, I; Uzawa, N; Ishii, J; Yoshimasu, H; Amagasa, T

    2000-11-01

    Holoprosencephaly results from the incomplete development of midline structures within the cerebrum and encompasses a series of abnormalities of mid-facial development. Here, we report a case of male holoprosencephaly associated with false median cleft of upper lip. This patient belonged clinically to the DeMyer's group IV holoprosencephaly, semilobar type. An infant with this type of holoprosencephaly has been thought to die generally within 1 to 2 years after birth and to rarely benefit from an operation. In this case, the patient had cheiloplasty at the age of 2.5 years at the request of his parents and he lives currently, being 3 years and 2 months old.

  12. Testing the face shape hypothesis in twins discordant for nonsyndromic orofacial clefting.

    PubMed

    Roosenboom, Jasmien; Indencleef, Karlijne; Hens, Greet; Peeters, Hilde; Christensen, Kaare; Marazita, Mary L; Claes, Peter; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Weinberg, Seth M

    2017-09-08

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs) are complex traits characterized by multifactorial inheritance and wide phenotypic variability. Numerous studies have shown subtle differences in the faces of unaffected relatives from cleft families compared to controls, the implication being that such outward differences are an incomplete expression reflecting an underlying genetic predisposition. Twins discordant for OFCs provide a unique opportunity to further test this idea, as the unaffected co-twin shares on average 50% (for dizygotic twins) and 100% (for monozygotic twins) of the genetic risk factors as the affected twin. We used 3D surface imaging and spatially-dense morphometry to compare facial shape in a sample of 44 unaffected co-twins and age- and sex-matched unaffected controls (n = 241). Unaffected co-twins showed statistically significant differences in the midface, lateral upper face, and forehead regions, compared to controls. Furthermore, co-twins were characterized by a distinct pattern of midfacial retrusion, broader upper faces, and greater protrusion of the mandible and brow ridges. This same general facial pattern was shown in both unaffected monozygotic and dizygotic co-twin subsets. These results provide additional support that altered facial shape is a phenotypic marker for OFC susceptibility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Nonsyndromic Mandibular Symphysis Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Guttikonda, Leela Krishna; Nadella, Koteswara Rao; Uppaluru, Vijayalakshmi; Kodali, Rama Mohan; Nallamothu, Ranganadh

    2014-01-01

    Median cleft of lower lip and mandible is a rare congenital anomaly described as cleft number 30 of Tessier's classification. In minor forms only lower lip cleft is seen. We report the case of a patient with median cleft of lower lip, severe ankyloglossia, cleft of mandibular symphysis, and residual cleft involving on right soft palate and associated with other facial clefts. These deformities were corrected in multiple stage procedure, consisting of release of the tongue from floor of the mouth and lower alveolus and fixation of the mandibular cleft done with right iliac bone graft using stainless steel miniplate. PMID:24711928

  14. Tessier 30 facial cleft

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Nirmal C.; Kalita, Kabita; Gogoi, Manoj; Deuri, Pradip K.

    2012-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible and complete duplication of the tongue is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but complete duplication of the tongue as part of the Tessier 30 cleft is not yet reported. PMID:22529554

  15. Face shape of unaffected parents with cleft affected offspring: combining three-dimensional surface imaging and geometric morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, SM; Naidoo, SD; Bardi, KM; Brandon, CA; Neiswanger, K; Resick, JM; Martin, RA; Marazita, ML

    2009-01-01

    Objective Various lines of evidence suggest that face shape may be a predisposing factor for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P). In the present study, 3D surface imaging and statistical shape analysis were used to evaluate face shape differences between the unaffected (non-cleft) parents of individuals with CL/P and unrelated controls. Methods Sixteen facial landmarks were collected from 3D captures of 80 unaffected parents and 80 matched controls. Prior to analysis, each unaffected parent was assigned to a subgroup on the basis of prior family history (positive or negative). A geometric morphometric approach was utilized to scale and superimpose the landmark coordinate data (Procrustes analysis), test for omnibus group differences in face shape, and uncover specific modes of shape variation capable of discriminating unaffected parents from controls. Results Significant disparity in face shape was observed between unaffected parents and controls (p < 0.01). Notably, these changes were specific to parents with a positive family history of CL/P. Shape changes associated with CL/P predisposition included marked flattening of the facial profile (midface retrusion), reduced upper facial height, increased lower facial height and excess interorbital width. Additionally, a sex-specific pattern of parent-control difference was evident in the transverse dimensions of the nasolabial complex. Conclusions The faces of unaffected parents from multiplex cleft families display meaningful shape differences compared with the general population. Quantitative assessment of the facial phenotype in cleft families may enhance efforts to discover the root causes of CL/P. PMID:19840279

  16. The effectiveness of mentoring speech and language pathology students when they face patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, María del Carmen; Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Sarre, Pilar; Morales, Santiago; Sterling, Mariana

    2015-10-01

    Mentoring programs can boost Speech & Language (SL) pathologists' satisfaction about their clinical skills, increasing their professional competence. A quality induction program provides a bridge for an efficient and comfortable transition between theoretical knowledge and clinical practice in front of clients. This transition can be especially difficult when the SL pathologist confronts patients with cleft palate. To study whether a mentoring program can improve SL Pathology students' performance for treating patients with cleft palate. 18 SL Pathology students coursing the third year of a SL Pathology graduate program volunteered for participating in the study. The students were divided in two groups. All SL students from both groups were equally supervised. The students were followed for two semesters during their participation in the SL Pathology intervention for patients with cleft palate. The only difference between the students from each group was that one group (active group) was mentored by an experienced SLP who had previously received specific training to become a mentor. All SL students were assessed at the onset and at the end of the study. The assessment was performed through an analysis according to a previously validated scale (Learning Continuum of Speech & Language pathologists). A Wilcoxon test demonstrated a significant improvement (P<0.05) in the levels of The Learning Continuum of Speech & Language Pathologists at the end of the follow-up period in both groups of students. When the levels of performance at the end were compared between groups, a Mann Whitney test demonstrated a significant difference (P<0.05). The students included in the active group who were receiving additional mentoring besides the usual clinical supervision, showed a greater improvement as compared with the students from the control group. Learning how to conduct an adequate and effective intervention in cleft palate patients from an integral stand point is not easy for

  17. Prenatal screening for fetal face and clefting in a prospective study on low-risk population: can 3- and 4-dimensional ultrasound enhance visualization and detection rate?

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Centini, Giovanni; Rosignoli, Lucia

    2005-10-01

    A study of 1856 second trimester low-risk pregnancies was conducted over a period of 12 months to evaluate the detection rate of cleft lip and palate by 3- and 4-dimensional (3D, 4D) ultrasonography. To image the fetal face and profile, a protocol regarding the use of external or internal hand stimulation or a repeated scan was followed, and the time taken to perform 3D scan was compared to that of a conventional 2D ultrasound. One case of unilateral right cleft lip and a cleft lip plus cleft palate were both identified, giving a prevalence of 1.1 per 1000 live births and a prenatal detection rate of 100%. The average imaging time for fetal face/profile view was significantly less with 3D when compared to 2D (5.33 vs 6.2 seconds, P < .001) and diagnosis at first scan without external or internal hand stimulation was feasible in 78% by 2D versus 87% by 3D technique (P < .0001). Cleft lip and palate were isolated prenatal findings and newborn karyotyping showed normal chromosomal maps in both cases. With the use of this standardized protocol, we were able to image the fetal face and profile view in all cases. We underline the critical role of sonographic expertise in screening for these anomalies and the great enhancement in imaging soft tissues and bone lesions by using 3D ultrasound. We advocate that screening for cleft lip and palate be included in future standard ultrasound examination in the second trimester of pregnancy.

  18. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  19. Management of Midline Facial Clefts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sobhan; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Khatri, Isha

    2015-12-01

    Median or midline facial clefts are rare anomalies of developmental origin, etiology of whose occurrence is still unknown precisely. The most basic presentation of midline facial clefts is in the form of a Median cleft lip which is defined as any congenital vertical cleft through the centre of the upper lip. First described by Bechard in 1823, it is the most common amongst all atypical clefts reported. The incidence is about 1:10,00,000 births. This may occur as a sporadic event or as a part of an inherited sequence of anomalies. It arises embryologically from incomplete fusion of the medial nasal prominences. The authors present a series of eight cases with varying degrees of midline facial clefts. This review article aims to give a broad idea on the various classifications used for further understanding of midline facial clefts and a brief idea about the various surgical management techniques used in the repair of these facial clefts.

  20. Maxillary Protraction With Intermaxillary Elastics to Miniplates Versus Bone-Anchored Face-Mask Therapy in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients.

    PubMed

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Kazemian, Mozhgan; Eslami, Neda; Pouya, Iman Saeedi

    2016-07-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients usually have deficient maxilla due to postsurgical scars. The aim this study was to compare the effectiveness of miniplates-anchored face-mask therapy versus intermaxillary elastics to miniplates for maxillary traction in cleft lip and palate patients. This clinical trial included 11 prepubertal patients with cleft lip and palate. Initially, a w-arch expander was cemented and activated 3 mm per month to overcorrect the crossbite. Then, the patients were divided into 2 groups: mini-plate-anchored face-mask (n = 5): 2 miniplates were placed in the maxilla and the patients were instructed to wear a face-mask for 12 to 14 hours/per day. Intermaxillary elastics to miniplates (n = 6): 2 miniplates were inserted in the maxilla; 1 on each side and 2 miniplates were placed in the anterior mandible on both sides. Intermaxillary elastics with a force of 250 g per side were attached to the hooks. Cephalometric parameters before treatment (T1) and after achieving positive overjet (T2) were compared between the 2 groups. Fisher exact, paired, and independent t tests were used for statistical comparison. At T1 or T2 there was not a significant difference between the 2 groups in the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue variables. According to results of our preliminary study, intermaxillary elastics to miniplates might have a promising effect as an alternative for face mask therapy in maxillary protraction of cleft lip and palate patients.

  1. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... side. There are three primary types of clefts: • Cleft lip/palate refers to the condition when both the palate ... one in 1,000 babies are born with cleft lip/palate. About 50 percent of all clefts More common ...

  2. Craniofacial clefting and sutural dystopia.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Edwards, T J; David, D J

    1991-07-01

    Sutural anomalies in conjunction with craniofacial clefting are unusual. A case of median frontal clefting is presented in which there was an absence of a normal metopic suture and replacement by paramedian frontal sutures. The association of an underlying brain anomaly, with attendant surgical difficulties, is noted, as are the radiological techniques of preoperative diagnosis.

  3. Submucous Clefts

    MedlinePlus

    ... is done in a hospital under general anesthesia. Pre- and post-surgical evaluation by members of a ... prosthodontist) associated with a cleft palate team. Again, pre- and post-treatment evaluation by the cleft palate ...

  4. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... and advocacy priorities National Network of Perinatal Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? ... how the body develops or how the body works. Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth ...

  5. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cleft palate. A cleft lip is a separation of the two sides of the lip. The separation often includes the bones of the upper jaw ... 5 Comments Miracle Flights Puts Care in the Air 11/20/15 , No Comments Connections to be ...

  6. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... If teasing or self-esteem issues arise at school, this can help your child feel safe in talking with you about it. After a baby is born with a cleft, parents are understandably concerned about the possibility of having another child with the same condition. While many cases of cleft lip and ...

  7. The role of folate metabolism in orofacial development and clefting.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Stacey E; Kennedy, Allyson E; Wyatt, Brent H; Moore, Alexander D; Pridgen, Deborah E; Cherry, Amanda M; Mavila, Catherine B; Dickinson, Amanda J G

    2015-09-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with numerous diseases and birth defects including orofacial defects. However, whether folate has a role in the face during early orofacial development has been unclear. The present study reveals that pharmacological and antisense oligonucleotide mediated inhibition of DHFR, an integral enzyme in the folate pathway, results in specific changes in the size and shape of the midface and embryonic mouth. Such defects are accompanied by a severe reduction in the muscle and cartilage jaw elements without significant change in neural crest pattern or global levels of methylation. We propose that the orofacial defects associated with DHFR deficient function are the result of decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death via DNA damage. In particular, localized apoptosis may also be depleting the cells of the face that express crucial genes for the differentiation of the jaw structures. Folate supplementation is widely known to reduce human risk for orofacial clefts. In the present study, we show that activating folate metabolism can reduce median oral clefts in the primary palate by increasing cell survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that a minor decrease in DHFR function exacerbates median facial clefts caused by RAR inhibition. This work suggests that folate deficiencies could be a major contributing factor to multifactorial orofacial defects.

  8. The role of folate metabolism in orofacial development and clefting

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Stacey E.; Kennedy, Allyson E.; Wyatt, Brent H.; Moore, Alexander D.; Pridgen, Deborah E.; Cherry, Amanda M.; Mavila, Catherine B.; Dickinson, Amanda J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with numerous diseases and birth defects including orofacial defects. However, whether folate has a role in the face during early orofacial development has been unclear. The present study reveals that pharmacological and antisense oligonucleotide mediated inhibition of DHFR, an integral enzyme in the folate pathway, results in specific changes in the size and shape of the midface and embryonic mouth. Such defects are accompanied by a severe reduction in the muscle and cartilage jaw elements without significant change in neural crest pattern or global levels of methylation. We propose that the orofacial defects associated with DHFR deficient function are the result of decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death via DNA damage. In particular, localized apoptosis may also be depleting the cells of the face that express crucial genes for the differentiation of the jaw structures. Folate supplementation is widely known to reduce human risk for orofacial clefts. In the present study, we show that activating folate metabolism can reduce median oral clefts in the primary palate by increasing cell survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that a minor decrease in DHFR function exacerbates median facial clefts caused by RAR inhibition. This work suggests that folate deficiencies could be a major contributing factor to multifactorial orofacial defects. PMID:26144049

  9. Tessier 30 Facial Cleft with Duplication of Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Jayanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and the neck with complete duplication of the tongue repaired at neonatal period is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but cleft of the neck with complete duplication of the tongue as a part of the Tessier 30 cleft is very rare. We could not find such report in the available English literature. PMID:28082778

  10. Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts.

    PubMed

    Strychowsky, Julie E; Rahbar, Reza

    2016-06-01

    Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts are rare congenital anomalies of the aerodigestive tract. Patients may present with airway and/or swallowing impairments. An approach to evaluation and management is presented. Important pearls for conservative and surgical management are discussed. Open versus endoscopic surgical techniques are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    PubMed

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru.

  12. Cleft palate - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cleft palate ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cleft palate : Cleft Palate Foundation -- www.cleftline.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1210.asp ...

  13. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  14. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... all the way to the back of your mouth. What's a Cleft Lip or Cleft Palate? The word cleft means a gap or split between two things. A cleft lip is a split in the upper lip. This can happen on one or ... a split in the roof of the mouth. This leaves a hole between the nose and ...

  15. Prevalence of orofacial clefts in Korean live births.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung Won; Hwang, Sun Mi; Lee, You Sun; Kim, Min-A; Seo, Kyung

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of orofacial clefts and identify the characteristics of other birth defects associated with orofacial clefts in Korea. This study used data from the Congenital Anomaly Survey conducted by the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs. The survey was conducted on birth defects documented during 2005 to 2006 in 2,348 medical institutes in Korea. This study was performed using data from medical insurance claims of the National Health Insurance Corporation. The prevalence of orofacial clefts was defined as the number of cases per 10,000 live births. Among the 883,184 live births, 25,335 infants had birth defects, which included 980 infants with orofacial clefts. The prevalence of total orofacial clefts in the total live births was 11.09 per 10,000, accounting for 3.9% of all birth defects. The most common orofacial cleft was cleft palate only (n=492), followed by cleft lip only (n=245) and cleft lip with cleft palate (n=243), with prevalence rates of 5.57, 2.77, 2.75 per 10,000 live births, respectively. While malformations of the circulatory system; digestive system; eyes, ears, face, and neck; and musculoskeletal system were most frequently encountered among infants with a cleft lip with or without a cleft palate, anomalies of most organ systems were notably observed among infants with cleft palate only. The prevalence of orofacial clefts in Korea was similar or slightly lower than that of other countries. This study informs present status of orofacial clefts and gives baseline data to lay the foundation stone for Korea's registry system of orofacial clefts.

  16. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. OBJECTIVES: To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. METHODS: A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. RESULTS: On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. CONCLUSIONS: The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory

  17. The Epidemiology of Cleft Lip and Palate in Canada, 1998 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jennifer L K; Oddone-Paolucci, Elizabeth; Harrop, Robertston A

    2015-07-01

    To examine the birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention for clefts in Canada (1998 to 2007). Also to highlight the difficulties associated with studying the epidemiology of clefts using the current data collection mechanisms. Epidemiologic data acquired from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Population-based study in Canada 1998 to 2007. All live births with an International Classification of Diseases (9th or 10th revision) diagnostic code for cleft palate or for cleft lip with or without cleft palate or with a surgical intervention code for repair of cleft lip or cleft palate. Birth prevalence, gender distribution, and pattern of surgical intervention. There were 3,015,325 live births in Canada (1998 to 2007). The mean birth prevalence was 0.82 per 1000 live births for cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 0.58 per 1000 live births for cleft palate. The birth prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was significantly higher in boys, with a stable boy to girl ratio of 1.75:1. Cleft palate was significantly greater in girls; however, the boy to girl ratio decreased from 0.97:1 in 1998 to 0.59:1 in 2007. The median age of repair in Canada from 1998 to 2007 was 4.7 months for cleft lip and 11.6 months for cleft palate. Thirty percent of patients underwent cleft palate repair after age 1. The birth prevalence of cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate is stable in Canada. An increasing birth prevalence of cleft palate in girls is suggested. The timing of surgical intervention is consistent with current standards. The challenges associated with collecting these data in Canada are discussed.

  18. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001051.htm Cleft lip and palate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that affect the upper lip ...

  19. Cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Crockett, David J; Goudy, Steven L

    2014-11-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is the most common congenital malformation of the head and neck. Orofacial clefting could significantly affect the quality of life of the child and requires multiple steps of care to obtain an optimal outcome. Each patient should be evaluated for congenital anomalies, developmental delay, neurologic disorders, and psychosocial concerns. A multidisciplinary team is necessary to ensure that every aspect of the child's care is appropriately treated and coordination between providers is achieved. This article discusses the assessment and treatment recommendations for children born with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cleft palate repair and variations

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon

    2009-01-01

    Cleft palate affects almost every function of the face except vision. Today a child born with cleft palate with or without cleft lip should not be considered as unfortunate, because surgical repair of cleft palate has reached a highly satisfactory level. However for an average cleft surgeon palatoplasty remains an enigma. The surgery differs from centre to centre and surgeon to surgeon. However there is general agreement that palatoplasty (soft palate at least) should be performed between 6-12 months of age. Basically there are three groups of palatoplasty techniques. One is for hard palate repair, second for soft palate repair and the third based on the surgical schedule. Hard palate repair techniques are Veau-Wardill-Kilner V-Y, von Langenbeck, two-flap, Aleveolar extension palatoplasty, vomer flap, raw area free palatoplasty etc. The soft palate techniques are intravelar veloplasty, double opposing Z-plasty, radical muscle dissection, primary pharyngeal flap etc. And the protocol based techniques are Schweckendiek's, Malek's, whole in one, modified schedule with palatoplasty before lip repair etc. One should also know the effect of each technique on maxillofacial growth and speech. The ideal technique of palatoplasty is the one which gives perfect speech without affecting the maxillofacial growth and hearing. The techniques are still evolving because we are yet to design an ideal one. It is always good to know all the techniques and variations so that one can choose whichever gives the best result in one's hands. A large number of techniques are available in literature, and also every surgeon incorporates his own modification to make it a variation. However there are some basic techniques, which are described in details which are used in various centres. Some of the important variations are also described. PMID:19884664

  1. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    PubMed

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  2. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  3. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  4. Issues involved in the phenotypic classification of orofacial clefts ascertained through a state birth defects registry for the North Carolina Cleft Outcomes Study.

    PubMed

    Aylsworth, Arthur S; Allori, Alexander C; Pimenta, Luiz A; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Harmsen, Katherine G; Watkins, Stephanie E; Ramsey, Barry L; Strauss, Ronald P; Meyer, Robert E

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies involving birth defects are extremely sensitive to phenotype accuracy and precision. We devised a case review and classification protocol for a project to study school achievement in children with idiopathic, nonsyndromic orofacial clefts to improve the reliability of phenotypic classification from the statewide birth defects registry. Surveillance-program abstraction data and medical records at the birth or treating hospitals were used when available. Exclusion criteria included: median cleft lip; Tessier cleft; premaxillary agenesis; presence of a recognizable syndrome, phenotype, association, or sequence (other than Robin sequence); clefts with other malformations not considered to be normal or common variants in the newborn; and cases with documented or suspected genetic or teratogenic causes. Of 712 children identified with orofacial clefts, 153 were excluded, leaving 559 nonsyndromic orofacial cleft cases of unknown cause in the final study. These cases were grouped into the following clinically meaningful types: cleft lip with or without cleft alveolus; cleft lip and cleft palate; and cleft palate only. This review and classification process resulted in the elimination of 21.5% of the original cohort of identified cases, with most exclusions being due to suspected syndromic associations. Verbatim descriptions of the clinical findings are critical for accurate classification of diagnoses. This review process improved the precision of orofacial cleft phenotype classification for our study. Precision would have been further improved if all of the cases had verbatim descriptions of diagnoses and all medical records could have been reviewed by the classification team. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Current concepts in the embryology and genetics of cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L; Mooney, Mark P

    2004-04-01

    Many mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal craniofacial embryogenesis are well understood. The genetic factors that provoke abnormal development and result in orofacial clefts are not clear, but much progress has occurred in our understanding. Genes or chromosomal rearrangements on many chromosomes can lead to syndromes that include orofacial clefts. This diversity in the mechanisms that can lead to syndromic clefts highlights the fact that the processes leading to the development of the oral cavity and face are complex and sensitive to disturbances at multiple timepoints or within multiple genetic domains. As for nonsyndromic clefting, large-scale family studies are consistent with one or a few loci exerting major effects on phenotypic expression, although no single gene has been identified as a "necessary" locus for development of nonsyndromic clefts. Rather, the emerging consensus is that the genetic etiology of nonsyndromic clefting is complex, with several loci showing significant results in at least some studies. Some of these loci may be genes for susceptibility to environmental factors, some may be modifying loci, and some may be "necessary" loci. Mutations in genes that are now known to control early development are logical candidate genes for future studies of nonsyndromic orofacial clefting. Continued genetic analyses and developmental studies are crucial for eventual understanding of the complex etiology of these common congenital anomalies.

  6. Cleft lip-cleft palate in Zimbabwe: estimating the distribution of the surgical burden of disease using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T; Shaye, David; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Mehdezadeh, Omid; Mahomva, Leonard; Chidzonga, Midion

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and unmet need for cleft lip-cleft palate reconstructive surgery by using incidence. Our hypotheses were that the age of presentation to screening clinics will decrease between 2006 and 2012, and the geospatial distribution of cases will expand to a more rural catchment area. Longitudinal cross-sectional/geospatial distribution study. An online, secure database was created from intake forms for children with cleft lip-cleft palate (N=604) in Zimbabwe (2006-2012). Univariate analysis was completed. A linear regression model was fitted to test the time trend of a child's age at the time of presentation. Unique patient addresses (n=411) were matched. Maps presenting cleft diagnosis and presentation year were created with geographic information systems (GIS) software. The median age of presentation was greater for isolated cleft palate (4.2 years, n=106) than isolated cleft lip (1.5 years, n=251) and cleft lip-cleft palate (2.0 years, n=175). Cleft lip cases were mostly left sided with equal gender distribution. The overall age of presentation remained stable (P=.83). The age of children with isolated cleft palate decreased by 0.8 years per surgical trip (P=.01), suggesting the prevalence of unrepaired cleft palate is decreasing due to local and visiting surgeons. The catchment area extended to a less populous area, but clustered around Harare and Bulawayo. This study gives Zimbabwe-specific evidence that supports reports of the persistent burden of disease requiring attention. The GIS software provided data for the primary needs assessment, which will direct communication to healthcare providers and prospective patients outside of the current catchment area. 3 © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Distal median nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy that affects the movement of or sensation in ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Peripheral Nerve Disorders Read more Latest Health News Read more Health ...

  8. Congenital sternal cleft.

    PubMed

    Biswas, G; Khandelwal, N K; Venkatramu, N K; Chari, P S

    2001-04-01

    A cleft of the sternum is a rare congenital anomaly. We present a case of a sternal cleft in a 7-year-old boy. A split iliac bone graft covered with the sternocostal portion of a pectoralis major flap was used to reconstruct the defect. Copyright 2001 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  9. Median artery revisited

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-NIEDENFÜHR, M.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; VÁZQUEZ, T.; NEARN, L.; LOGAN, B.; PARKIN, I.

    1999-01-01

    This study confirms that the median artery may persist in adult life in 2 different patterns, palmar and antebrachial, based on their vascular territory. The palmar type, which represents the embryonic pattern, is large, long and reaches the palm. The antebrachial type, which represents a partial regression of the embryonic artery is slender, short, and terminates before reaching the wrist. These 2 arterial patterns appear with a different incidence. The palmar pattern was studied in the whole sample (120 cadavers) and had an incidence of 20%, being more frequent in females than in males (1.3∶1), occurring unilaterally more often than bilaterally (4∶1) and slightly more frequently on the right than on the left (1.1∶1). The antebrachial pattern was studied in only 79 cadavers and had an incidence of 76%, being more frequent in females than in males (1.6∶1); it was commoner unilaterally than bilaterally (1.5∶1) and was again slightly more prevalent on the right than on the left (1.2∶1). The origin of the median artery was variable in both patterns. The palmar type most frequently arose from the caudal angle between the ulnar artery and its common interosseous trunk (59%). The antebrachial pattern most frequently originated from the anterior interosseous artery (55%). Other origins, for both patterns, were from the ulnar artery or from the common interosseous trunk. The median artery in the antebrachial pattern terminated in the upper third (74%) or in the distal third of the forearm (26%). However, the palmar pattern ended as the 1st, 2nd or 1st and 2nd common digital arteries (65%) or joined the superficial palmar arch (35%). The median artery passed either anterior (67%) or posterior (25%) to the anterior interosseous nerve. It pierced the median nerve in the upper third of the forearm in 41% of cases with the palmar pattern and in none of the antebrachial cases. In 1 case the artery pierced both the anterior interosseous and median nerves. PMID

  10. Branchial cleft cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... Branchial cleft cysts form during development of the embryo . They occur when tissues in the neck area ( ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 19. Read More Cyst Fetal development Review Date 11/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  11. Cleft Palate Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sequence, Crouzon Syndrome, and Treacher Collins Syndrome. Cleftline™ Bears Our Cleftline™ bears bring comfort to children with cleft lip and ... anxiety they experience from having facial differences. Each bear is custom-made with stitches across its upper ...

  12. Cleft lip repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100010.htm Cleft lip repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  13. Isolated Mitral Cleft in Trisomy 21: An Initially 'Silent' Lesion.

    PubMed

    Thankavel, Poonam P; Ramaciotti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cardiac anomalies are common in trisomy 21, and transthoracic echocardiogram within the first month of life is recommended. While a cleft mitral valve associated with atrioventricular septal defect has been well defined in this population, the prevalence of isolated mitral valve cleft has not been previously reported. The aim of our study was to define the occurrence of isolated mitral cleft in the first echocardiogram of patients with trisomy 21. This retrospective chart review examined echocardiographic data on all Trisomy 21 patients <1 year of age obtained during January 1, 2010, to May 1, 2014, at our institution. Images were reviewed by one of the authors with no knowledge of the official diagnosis. In addition to evaluation for isolated mitral valve cleft, data obtained included presence of additional congenital heart defects and need for surgical intervention. A total of 184 patients (median age 5 days) were identified. Isolated mitral cleft was identified in 12 patients (6.5 %). Four were diagnosed retrospectively (33 %). Only one had mitral regurgitation on initial echocardiogram. Seven required surgery for closure of ventricular septal defects. Isolated mitral cleft is present in an important number of neonates with Trisomy 21. Mitral regurgitation is often absent in the neonatal period and should not be used as a reliable indicator of absence of valve abnormality. Careful attention should be directed toward the mitral valve during the first echocardiogram to exclude an isolated cleft, which can lead to progressive mitral regurgitation.

  14. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  15. Prevalence, pattern and perceptions of cleft lip and cleft palate among children born in two hospitals in Kisoro District, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is one of the most common congenital anomalies that affect the oro-facial region. The aim of the study was to determine the period prevalence, pattern and perceptions of cleft lip and cleft palate in children born between 2005 and 2010 in two hospitals in Kisoro District, Uganda. Methods The study involved a retrospective review of medical records of mothers who delivered live babies between January 2005 and December 2010 in Kisoro Hospital and St. Francis Hospital, Mutolere in Kisoro District. Key informant interviews of mothers (n = 20) of the children with cleft lip and/or clip palate and selected medical staff (n = 24) of the two hospitals were carried out. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Over the 6 year period, 25,985 mothers delivered live babies in Kisoro Hospital (n = 13,199) and St. Francis Hospital, Mutolere (n = 12,786) with 20 babies having oro-facial clefts. The overall period prevalence of the clefts was 0.77/1,000 live births. Sixty percent (n = 12) of children had combined cleft lip and palate and the same proportion had clefts on the left side of the face. More boys were affected than girls: 13 versus 7. About 45% of mothers were hurt on realizing that they had delivered a child with an oro-facial cleft. Forty percent of mothers indicated that a child with oro-facial cleft was regarded as an outcast. About 91.7% (n = 22) of the medical staff reported that these children were not accepted in their communities. Surgical intervention and psychosocial support were the management modalities advocated for by most respondents. Conclusion/recommendations The period prevalence of combined cleft lip and palate in two hospitals in Kisoro District was comparable to some findings elsewhere. Cleft lip and cleft palate are a medical and psychosocial problem in Kisoro District that calls for sensitization and counseling of the families and communities of the affected children

  16. Definition of critical periods for Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced holoprosencephaly, cleft lip, and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Galen W; Melberg, Cal G; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Parins, Kia F; Kietzman, Henry W; Everson, Joshua L; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Lipinski, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO). Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD) 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in "non-syndromic" orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug.

  17. Cleft lip and palate: series of unusual clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Paranaíba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Miranda, Roseli Teixeira de; Martelli, Daniella Reis Barbosa; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Almeida, Hudson de; Orsi Júnior, Julian Miranda; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2010-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face, corresponding to approximately 65% of all malformations of the craniofacial region. to describe unusual clinical cases of non-syndromic CL/P (CL/PNS), diagnosed in a reference service in Minas Gerais, Brazil, and correlate these alterations with possible risk factors. we carried out a retrospective study, between the years of 1992 and the 1st half of 2009, from medical records. Among the 778 cases of CL/PNS diagnosed in the period of 17 years, 5 (0.64%) were unusual CL/PNS, and all patients were male. It was found that among the 5 patients, 2 had incomplete right cleft lip with incomplete cleft palate, 2 were affected by left incomplete cleft lip and incomplete cleft palate, and 1 had a cleft lip and palate associated with complete right cleft palate. Risk factors such as consanguinity, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption, medication usage during pregnancy, history of abortion and/or stillbirths and maternal diseases were not associated with unusual CL/PNS. This study described 5 unusual cases of CL/PNS in a Brazilian population; no associations with the risk factors analyzed were seen. It also confirmed the unusualness of the prevalence of such alterations.

  18. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Bonegrafting the Cleft Maxilla skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Information for Parents & Individuals Bonegrafting the Cleft Maxilla To download the PDF version of this factsheet, ...

  19. Osteoplasty of the alveolar cleft defect.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Dariusz; Wójcicki, Piotr; Koźlik, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Cleft of lip, alveolar process and palate is the most common congenital defect affecting the face. It occurs at the time of early embryogenesis as a result of disturbed differentiation of the primordial cell layer and is associated with genetic and environmental factors. The most severe type of the defect is complete cleft of the lip, alveolar process and palate, unilateral or bilateral, which is accompanied by impaired breathing, sucking, swallowing, chewing, hearing and speaking. The treatment consists in the surgical reconnection (reconstruction) of the cleft anatomical structures and their formation to gain proper appearance, occlusal conditions and speech. The part of the surgical treatment is reconstruction of alveolar bone by means of autogenic spongy bone grafting (osteoplasty). The surgery performed at the stage of mixed dentition following an orthodontic treatment is a recognized standard management modality. Its effects provide stabilization of the dental arches fixed in the orthodontic treatment, possibility of growth of permanent teeth adjoining the cleft as well as separation of the nasal and oral cavities. The grafted bone becomes a platform for the collapsed base of the ala nasi and facilitates restoration of teeth loss. In the graft healing process the volume of the regenerated bone tissue is lower than the graft volume. Methods to augment the healed bone volume are being searched for, as this factor decides substantially on successful outcome of the surgery.

  20. The Young Child with Cleft Lip and Palate: Intervention Needs in the First Three Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Rebecca; Reinhartsen, Debra

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the multiple medical, dental, therapeutic, psychosocial, and early intervention needs faced by children with cleft lip and cleft plate during the first three years of life. The physiological development of children with these disabilities is described and the need for interdisciplinary team involvement is emphasized. (Author/CR)

  1. The Young Child with Cleft Lip and Palate: Intervention Needs in the First Three Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Rebecca; Reinhartsen, Debra

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the multiple medical, dental, therapeutic, psychosocial, and early intervention needs faced by children with cleft lip and cleft plate during the first three years of life. The physiological development of children with these disabilities is described and the need for interdisciplinary team involvement is emphasized. (Author/CR)

  2. Branchial Cleft Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity. PMID:27904209

  3. Intermediate and Definitive Cleft Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gary, Celeste; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2016-11-01

    Intermediate and definitive cleft rhinoplasties are a challenging part of definitive cleft care. The anatomy of the cleft nose is severely affected by the structural deficits associated with congenital orofacial clefting. A comprehensive understanding of the related anatomy is crucial for understanding how to improve the appearance and function in patients with secondary cleft nasal deformities. Timing of intermediate and definitive rhinoplasty should be carefully considered. A thorough understanding of advanced rhinoplasty techniques is an important part of providing adequate care for patients with these deformities.

  4. The cleft seal for bottle-feeding--A report on case studies.

    PubMed

    Dawjee, S M; Du Plessis, F

    2006-08-01

    Clefting of the lip and palate is the most frequent craniofacial malformation that occurs in newborn babies. The greatest immediate challenge facing a neonate with a cleft is to take nourishment. In developing countries and particularly in rural areas, palatal obturators and other aids that can assist in feeding are not easily available or accessible. The aim of this study was to develop, evaluate and report on the cleft seal, a simple and inexpensive device that is used with a feeding bottle to promote nourishment of a neonate with a cleft palate. The cleft seal is made of either silicone or thermoform plastic and consists of a spoon-like projection attached to a circular washer. The latter fits snugly between the teat base and collar of the feeding bottle, while the spoon-like projection forms a canopy over the teat and separates the nasal cavity from the mouth during feeding. Closure of the cleft emulates the natural feeding process and favours normal orofacial development. Results from this study indicate that there is an increase in nutritional intake over a shorter feeding time when using the cleft seal. Parents also report an absence of nasal regurgitation. The greatest advantage of the cleft seal lies in its negligible cost and ease of use, which can enable distribution and application in remote neonatal centres, where nursing and parental care givers are often at a loss as to what to do when faced with a newborn with a cleft palate.

  5. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Palate? What Do Doctors Do? en español Labio leporino y paladar hendido When Karly talks to her friends, most of them don't know it took years of hard work for her to develop her speech skills. Karly was born with a condition called cleft lip and palate. As a child, she had several ...

  6. Anomalous median nerve associated with persistent median artery.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Chikwe, J; Evans, S E

    1994-01-01

    A right human forearm showed persistence of the median artery in combination with anomalies of the median nerve and of the palmar circulation. The median nerve formed a ring enclosing the median artery, gave off its 3rd palmar digital branch in the forearm, and had a high palmar cutaneous nerve origin and a double thenar supply. The superficial palmar arch was incomplete. The median artery extended into the hand, providing the 2nd common palmar digital artery and the artery to the radial side of the index finger. It anastomosed with the radial artery in the 1st web space. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7961153

  7. Closing the cleft over a throbbing heart: neonatal sternal cleft

    PubMed Central

    J, Ashok Raja; G, Mathevan; K, Mathiarasan; P, Ramasubramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Sternal cleft is a rare anomaly comprising 0.5% of chest wall malformations. We present a case of a neonate with a ‘V’-shaped upper partial sternal cleft at birth. A hyperpigmented cutaneous nevi was present over the cleft. Primary approximation and closure of the defect was performed at 1 week of life. We discuss the presentation and management, and review the literature. PMID:25100810

  8. Genetics of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects and can occur as isolated, nonsyndromic events or as part of Mendelian syndromes. There is substantial phenotypic diversity in individuals with these birth defects and their family members: from subclinical phenotypes to associated syndromic features that is mirrored by the many genes that contribute to the etiology of these disorders. Identification of these genes and loci has been the result of decades of research using multiple genetic approaches. Significant progress has been made recently due to advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies, primarily through the use of whole exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies. Future progress will hinge on identifying functional variants, investigation of pathway and other interactions, and inclusion of phenotypic and ethnic diversity in studies. PMID:24124047

  9. Genetics of cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Marazita, Mary L

    2013-11-01

    Orofacial clefts are common birth defects and can occur as isolated, nonsyndromic events or as part of Mendelian syndromes. There is substantial phenotypic diversity in individuals with these birth defects and their family members: from subclinical phenotypes to associated syndromic features that is mirrored by the many genes that contribute to the etiology of these disorders. Identification of these genes and loci has been the result of decades of research using multiple genetic approaches. Significant progress has been made recently due to advances in sequencing and genotyping technologies, primarily through the use of whole exome sequencing and genome-wide association studies. Future progress will hinge on identifying functional variants, investigation of pathway and other interactions, and inclusion of phenotypic and ethnic diversity in studies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cleft Nasal Deformity and Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoav; Buchanan, Edward P.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Stal, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The cleft nasal deformity is a complex challenge in plastic surgery involving the skin, cartilage, mucosa, and skeletal platform. Ever since Blair and Brown first described the intricacies of the cleft pathology in 1931, the appropriate approach has been extensively debated in the literature with respect to timing, technique, and extent of surgical intervention. In this article, the authors review the literature and summarize the various modalities for achieving a successful rhinoplasty in the patient with a cleft nasal deformity. PMID:24179452

  11. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-03-23

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not.

  12. The impact of cleft lip and palate repair on maxillofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bing; Losee, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction is central to current team-approached cleft treatment. Cleft surgeons are always concerned about the impact of their surgical maneuver on the growth of the maxilla. Hypoplastic maxilla, concaved mid-face and deformed dental arch have constantly been reported after cleft treatments. It is very hard to completely circumvent these postoperative complications by current surgical protocols. In this paper, we discussed the factors that inhibit the maxillofacial growth on cleft patients. These factors included pre-surgical intervention, the timing of cleft palate and alveolae repair, surgical design and treatment protocol. Also, we made a review about the influence on the maxillary growth in un-operated cleft patients. On the basis of previous researches, we can conclude that most of scholars express identity of views in these aspects: early palatoplasty lead to maxilla growth inhibition in all dimensions; secondary alveolar bone graft had no influence on maxilla sagittal growth; cleft lip repair inhibited maxilla sagittal length in patients with cleft lip and palate; Veau's pushback palatoplasty and Langenbeck's palatoplasty with relaxing incisions were most detrimental to growth; Furlow palatoplasty showed little detrimental effect on maxilla growth; timing of hard palate closure, instead of the sequence of hard or soft palate repair, determined the postoperative growth. Still, scholars hold controversial viewpoints in some issues, for example, un-operated clefts have normal growth potential or not, pre-surgical intervention and pharyngoplasty inhibited maxillofacial growth or not. PMID:25394591

  13. Bilateral cleft lip.

    PubMed

    Mulliken, John B

    2004-04-01

    The surgeon's objectives are normal nasolabial appearance and normal speech. The principles for synchronous repair of bilateral cleft lip have been established, and the techniques continue to evolve. Primary repair impairs maxillary growth, but little can be done at this time except to practice gentle craftsmanship and to minimize tension on the lower labial closure. The cutaneous lip should never be reopened for revision, and the number of secondary procedures involving the nasal cartilages should be kept to a minimum. Many adolescents with repaired bilateral cleft lip need maxillary advancement to improve projection of the nasal tip, to protrude the upper lip, and to attain normal sagittal skeletal harmony. With expected improvements in the technology of distraction osteogenesis, maxillary advancement may someday become as acceptable as orthodontic treatment.

  14. Congenital midline cervical cleft.

    PubMed

    Agag, Richard; Sacks, Justin; Silver, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare disorder of the ventral neck that is clinically evident at birth and must be differentiated from the more common thyroglossal duct cyst. The case of CMCC presented here was associated with chromosomes 13/14 de novo Robertsonian translocations as well as midline deformities including a sacral tuft and a minor tongue-tie. The case is presented as well as discussion of histopathology, embryology, and surgical treatment.

  15. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  16. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created.

  17. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  18. Syndromes and anomalies associated with cleft

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, R.

    2009-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are one of the commonest birth defects, and may be associated with other congenital anomalies. The majority of these orofacial clefts are nonsyndromic. A significant percentage of these clefts both syndromic and non-syndromic may have associated anomalies. Apart from reviewing other studies, this article also analyses a study of associated anomalies from a tertiary cleft centre in India. PMID:19884681

  19. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  20. Association between maternal smoking, gender, and cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Daniella Reis Barbosa; Coletta, Ricardo D; Oliveira, Eduardo A; Swerts, Mário Sérgio Oliveira; Rodrigues, Laíse A Mendes; Oliveira, Maria Christina; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) represent the most common congenital anomalies of the face. To assess the relationship between maternal smoking, gender and CL/P. This is an epidemiological cross-sectional study. We interviewed 1519 mothers divided into two groups: mothers of children with CL/P (n=843) and mothers of children without CL/P (n=676). All mothers were classified as smoker or non-smoker subjects during the first trimester of pregnancy. To determine an association among maternal smoking, gender, and CL/P, odds ratios were calculated and the adjustment was made by a logistic regression model. An association between maternal smoking and the presence of cleft was observed. There was also a strong association between male gender and the presence of cleft (OR=3.51; 95% CI 2.83-4.37). By binary logistic regression analysis, it was demonstrated that both variables were independently associated with clefts. In a multivariate analysis, male gender and maternal smoking had a 2.5- and a 1.5-time greater chance of having a cleft, respectively. Our findings are consistent with a positive association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and CL/P in male gender. The results support the importance of smoking prevention and introduction of cessation programs among women with childbearing potential. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  2. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  3. Cleft palate in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Joan M; Rosen, Heather; Desai, Urmen; Mulliken, John B; Meara, John G; Rogers, Gary F

    2009-09-01

    The frequency of associated cleft palate is known to be high in some fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Apert syndrome. However, there is little information on the frequency of palatal clefts in the FGFR2-mediated disorder, that is, Pfeiffer syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of palatal clefts in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome. The records of patients with Pfeiffer syndrome managed in our craniofacial unit were reviewed. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome were included. Diagnostic criteria were as follows: characteristic mutations in FGFR1 or FGFR2 or, in the absence of genetic testing, clinical findings consistent with Pfeiffer syndrome as determined by a clinical geneticist or our most experienced surgeon (J.B.M.). Only 2 clefts were noted in 25 patients (8%), including 1 with a submucous cleft and 1 with an overt palatal cleft. Many patients (87%) were described as having a high-arched and narrow palate, and 1 had a low, broad palate. Nine patients were noted to have choanal atresia or stenosis. Clefting of the palate does occur in Pfeiffer syndrome but at a low frequency.

  4. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18–22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated. PMID:16722608

  5. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-04-09

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th-38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18-22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated.

  6. Swallowing function after laryngeal cleft repair: more than just fixing the cleft.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Alexander J; de Alarcon, Alessandro; Tabangin, Meredith E; Miller, Claire K; Cotton, Robin T; Rutter, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and describe the swallowing function in children after laryngeal cleft repair. Ten-year (2002-2012) retrospective chart review. Academic tertiary care pediatric otolaryngology practice. Records of 60 children who had surgical repair of laryngeal cleft (ages 2 weeks-14 years) and postoperative functional endoscopic evaluation of swallowing or videofluoroscopic swallow studies were examined retrospectively. Twenty-nine children had one postoperative swallow evaluation, 19 children had two, 4 children had three, 5 children had four, and 3 children had five. Median time to the first evaluation was 10.8 weeks (interquartile range [IQR]: 36.5, 231). On the final swallow evaluation, 34 (57%) children demonstrated normal swallowing parameters, 12 (20%) children showed penetration, and 14 (23%) children showed aspiration. Forty-three (72%) children were able to take everything by mouth normally or with minor behavioral modifications, 11 (18%) children required thickened fluids, and six (10%) children were kept nil per os (NPO). Mean improvement on the penetration-aspiration (pen-asp) scale was 2.13. On multivariable analysis, neurodevelopmental issues and gastronomy tube use were associated with the need for NPO status. Despite a high rate of surgical success, a substantial minority of children have persistent swallowing dysfunction after laryngeal cleft repair. Swallowing dysfunction after repair is multifactorial and arises from concomitant neurologic, anatomic, or other comorbidities that contribute to oropharyngeal and pharyngeal dysphagia. Based on our results, we recommend a testing schedule for postoperative swallowing evaluations after cleft repair. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Presurgical management of unilateral cleft lip and palate in a neonate: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Avhad, Rajendra; Sar, Ranjukta; Tembhurne, Jyoti

    2014-09-01

    A cleft lip and palate consists of fissures of the upper lip and/or palate, and is the most commonly seen orofacial anomaly that involves the middle third of the face. Early treatment of patients with a cleft lip and palate is important because of esthetic, functional, and psychological concerns. Nasoalveolar molding provides excellent results when started immediately after birth. This clinical report describes the presurgical management of an infant with a complete unilateral cleft of the soft palate, hard palate, alveolar ridge, and lip. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  9. Asian oral-facial cleft birth prevalence.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Margaret E; Ratay, Jessica S; Marazita, Mary L

    2006-09-01

    To determine the clefting birth prevalence among Asian populations, specifically Chinese and Japanese, using raw counts from nonoverlapping published studies of Asian populations, and to investigate whether Asian clefting rates have been interpreted accurately as being up to twice the Caucasian rate. A literature review of articles giving raw counts of clefting in Asian populations, primarily Japanese and Chinese. Where possible, clefts were identified by the patients' ethnicity, country of origin, cleft type, syndromic status, and birth status. Prevalence rates of cleft lip with or without cleft palate per 1000 live births are reported. Syndromic plus nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: Chinese, 1.30; Japanese, 1.34; Other Asian, 1.47; and total, 1.33. Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: Chinese, 1.20; Japanese, 1.18; Other Asian, 1.22; and total, 1.19. Overall, Chinese and Japanese live birth prevalence rates for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate, based on the published reports of birth prevalence, are significantly lower than the oft-quoted rate of 2 per 1000 for Asians. The apparent reason for the discrepancy is that many published prevalence rates included all pregnancies (live births plus pregnancy losses) and do not distinguish between syndromic and nonsyndromic clefts or between cleft palate alone and cleft lip with or without cleft palate. These results demonstrate that it is extremely important for current population-based studies of clefts to include careful delineation of population groups, syndromes, cleft type, and birth status.

  10. [Cleft lip and palate--problematic cleft speech].

    PubMed

    Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M A

    1999-01-01

    The early restoration of facial and palatal morphology in patients with cleft of lip and/or palate provides the anatomical base for good speech outcome. The author gives the up todate overview of the main problems concerning cleft speech, such as velopalatal insufficiency and typical articulation errors. The article describes the modern methods for the evaluation of VPI and current trends in treatment modalities for VPI.

  11. Non-Local Euclidean Medians.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Singer, Amit

    2012-11-01

    In this letter, we note that the denoising performance of Non-Local Means (NLM) can be improved at large noise levels by replacing the mean by the Euclidean median. We call this new denoising algorithm the Non-Local Euclidean Medians (NLEM). At the heart of NLEM is the observation that the median is more robust to outliers than the mean. In particular, we provide a simple geometric insight that explains why NLEM performs better than NLM in the vicinity of edges, particularly at large noise levels. NLEM can be efficiently implemented using iteratively reweighted least squares, and its computational complexity is comparable to that of NLM. We provide some preliminary results to study the proposed algorithm and to compare it with NLM.

  12. Lasers for median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Gilling, A P

    2001-08-01

    Laser treatment encompases a variety of techniques using different laser wavelengths, application systems, and surgical techniques to achieve contrasting tissue effects such as incision, resection, vaporization, or coagulation. Many studies have proven the clinical efficacy of the various laser techniques for the treatment of benign prostatiuc hyperplasia, including randomized studies versus transurethral prostatectomy (TURP). Recently, long-term follow-up of up to 5 years has demonstrated the durability of the results, although in some of the studies, retreatment rates were higher than after TURP. Median lobes were never seen as a contraindication for treatment in the laser based procedures. Technically, laser treatment techniques such as side-firing transurethral coagulation, contact- and free-beam laser vaporization, interstitial laser coagulation, and the holmium laser-based resection and enucleation are fully suitable for treatment of median lobes. Surprisingly, no studies focussing specifically on laser treatment of median lobes have been published.

  13. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    MedlinePlus

    ... graft; 2) prosthetic replacement (dental bridge); or 3) dental metallic bone implants. The best option for an individual patient is best decided by the dental specialists on the cleft palate team. (See Replacing ...

  14. Cleft care in international adoption.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Jesse A; Brown, Benjamin J; Mason, Patrick; Basci, Deniz; Hindenburg, Lora; Dufresne, Craig R; Baker, Stephen B

    2014-12-01

    Standards of cleft care abroad differ from those in the United States, particularly in less developed countries, where international adoption rates are high. Children adopted from these countries present to plastic surgeons in the United States at various ages and states of repair. The operative and perioperative needs of these children are poorly understood. This study attempts to characterize the preadoption history, the postadoption course, and surgical outcomes of children adopted with cleft deformities. The authors performed a retrospective review of all adopted cleft lip-cleft palate patients presenting to an academic craniofacial referral center and compared outcomes among adopted children who were repaired abroad, adopted children who underwent repair performed by the two senior authors (C.R.D. and S.B.B.), and children born in the United States who underwent repair performed by one of the senior authors (S.B.B.) : Between May of 1993 and August of 2010, 83 adopted children with cleft deformities were evaluated in the authors' craniofacial center. Average age at adoption was 30.5 months (range, 5.0 to 95.0 months). Comparing outcomes among adopted children repaired abroad, adopted children repaired by the senior authors, and children born in the United States who underwent repair in the United States, the authors found no statistically significant differences in lip revision rates, fistula rates, or velopharyngeal insufficiency. Adopted cleft patients constitute a complex and variable population with high rates of revision and delayed presentation. Internationally adopted children with orofacial clefts fared no better or worse after undergoing primary cleft repair abroad or in the United States.

  15. Schwannoma of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Julien; Landes, Geneviève; Tardif, Michèle

    2013-02-01

    A schwannoma is a benign tumour of Schwann cells that presents as a palpable and painless mass on the volar aspect of the hand and wrist. A 44-year-old, right-handed woman, presented for a volar swelling of her right hand. On examination she had a non-pulsatile mass with no fluctuation at the radiopalmar aspect of the right hand, and a soft mass on the volar aspect of the right palm. There was no pain on palpation. An excisional biopsy specimen showed an encapsulated and extrafascicular tumour that originated in the median nerve fascicules. Histological examination showed a median nerve schwannoma measuring 4.0 x 1.5 x 1.2 cm. Differential diagnosis of hand tumours is divided into three categories: tumours of the soft tissue, bone, and skin. Schwannomas of the median nerve make up 0.1%-0.3% of all hand tumours. Symptoms are caused by an entrapment syndrome resulting from the growing tumour. Pain is the most common complaint of schwannomas distal to the wrist. Imaging studies include computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is difficult to differentiate schwanommas from neurofibromas solely on the basis of an MRI. Neurofibroma grows intraneurally and infiltrates the nerve; it has the potential to require resection of all or part of the nerve, leaving a consequent functional deficit. Tumours of the hand are diagnostically challenging and median nerve shwannomas are rare.

  16. Esthetic evaluation of the facial profile in rehabilitated adults with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Ferrari Júnior, Flávio Mauro; Ayub, Priscila Vaz; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Pereira Lauris, José Roberto; Garib, Daniela Gamba

    2015-01-01

    To assess the facial esthetics of patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate, and to compare the judgment of raters related and unrelated to cleft care. The sample comprised 23 adult patients (7 women and 16 men) with a mean age of 26.1 years, rehabilitated at a single center. Standardized photographs of the right and left facial profile were taken of each patient and subjectively evaluated by 25 examiners: 5 orthodontists and 5 plastic surgeons with expertise in oral cleft rehabilitation, 5 orthodontists and 5 plastic surgeons without expertise in oral cleft rehabilitation, and 5 laypersons. The facial profiles were classified into 3 categories: esthetically unpleasant, esthetically acceptable, and esthetically pleasant. Intraexaminer and interexaminer agreements were evaluated with the Spearman correlation coefficient and Kendall coefficient of concordance. The differences between rater categories were analyzed using the Student-Newman-Keuls test (with P < .05 indicating a statistically significant difference). Most of the sample was classified as esthetically acceptable. Orthodontists and plastic surgeons related to oral cleft rehabilitation gave the best scores to the facial profiles, followed by layperson examiners and by orthodontists and plastic surgeons unrelated to oral cleft rehabilitation. The middle third of the face, the nose, and the upper lip were frequently pointed out as contributors to the esthetic impairment. The facial profile of rehabilitated adult patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate was considered esthetically acceptable because of morphologic limitations in the structures affected by the cleft. Laypersons and professionals unrelated to oral cleft rehabilitation seem to be more critical regarding facial esthetics than professionals involved with cleft rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  18. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  19. Maternal smoking and oral clefts

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Rolv T.; Wilcox, Allen J; Taylor, Jack; Gjessing, Håkon K.; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Aabyholm, Frank; Vindenes, Halvard

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence for an effect of cigarette smoking on risk of oral clefts. There are also hypothetical pathways for a biological effect involving toxic chemicals in cigarette smoke. Methods We performed a combined case-control and family-triad study of babies born in Norway with oral clefts in the period 1996 to 2001, with 88% participation among cases (n=573) and 76% participation among controls (n=763). Mothers completed a questionnaire three months after birth of the baby. DNA was collected from parents and children, and assayed for genes related to detoxification of compounds of cigarette smoke (NAT1, NAT2, CYP1A1, GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1). Results For isolated cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) there was a dose-response effect of smoking in the first trimester. The odds ratio rose from 1.6 (95% CI: 1.0 - 2.5) for passive smoking to 1.9 (95% CI: 0.9 - 4.0) for mothers who smoked more than 10 cigarettes per day. There was little evidence of an association with cleft palate. Genetic analyses used both case-control and family-triad data. In case-triads we found an association between a NAT2 haplotype and isolated cleft lip (RR of 1.6 in single dose and 2.5 in double dose), but with little evidence of interaction with smoking. Other genes did not show associations, and previously described interactions with smoking were not confirmed. Conclusion First-trimester smoking was clearly associated with risk of cleft lip. This effect was not modified by variants of genes related to detoxification of compounds of cigarette smoke. PMID:18449058

  20. Using frogs faces to dissect the mechanisms underlying human orofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Amanda J G

    2016-03-01

    In this review I discuss how Xenopus laevis is an effective model to dissect the mechanisms underlying orofacial defects. This species has been particularly useful in studying the understudied structures of the developing face including the embryonic mouth and primary palate. The embryonic mouth is the first opening between the foregut and the environment and is critical for adult mouth development. The final step in embryonic mouth formation is the perforation of a thin layer of tissue covering the digestive tube called the buccopharyngeal membrane. When this tissue does not perforate in humans it can pose serious health risks for the fetus and child. The primary palate forms just dorsal to the embryonic mouth and in non-amniotes it functions as the roof of the adult mouth. Defects in the primary palate result in a median oral cleft that appears similar across the vertebrates. In humans, these median clefts are often severe and surgically difficult to repair. Xenopus has several qualities that make it advantageous for craniofacial research. The free living embryo has an easily accessible face and we have also developed several new tools to analyze the development of the region. Further, Xenopus is readily amenable to chemical screens allowing us to uncover novel gene-environment interactions during orofacial development, as well as to define underlying mechanisms governing such interactions. In conclusion, we are utilizing Xenopus in new and innovative ways to contribute to craniofacial research.

  1. Using Frogs Faces to Dissect the Mechanisms Underlying Human Orofacial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Amanda J.G.

    2016-01-01

    In this review I discuss how Xenopus laevis is an effective model to dissect the mechanisms underlying orofacial defects. This species has been particularly useful in studying the understudied structures of the developing face including the embryonic mouth and primary palate. The embryonic mouth is the first opening between the foregut and the environment and is critical for adult mouth development. The final step in embryonic mouth formation is the perforation of a thin layer of tissue covering the digestive tube called the buccopharyngeal membrane. When this tissue does not perforate in humans it can pose serious health risks for the fetus and child. The primary palate forms just dorsal to the embryonic mouth and in non-amniotes it functions as the roof of the adult mouth. Defects in the primary palate result in a median oral cleft that appears similar across the vertebrates. In humans, these median clefts are often severe and surgically difficult to repair. Xenopus has several qualities that make it advantageous for craniofacial research. The free living embryo has an easily accessible face and we have also developed several new tools to analyze the development of the region. Further, Xenopus is readily amenable to chemical screens allowing us to uncover novel gene-environment interactions during orofacial development, as well as to define underlying mechanisms governing such interactions. In conclusion, we are utilizing Xenopus in new and innovative ways to contribute to craniofacial research. PMID:26778163

  2. Understanding Cleft and Craniofacial Team Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area skip to submenu Who We Are What We Do Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area States: A States: ...

  3. Understanding Cleft and Craniofacial Team Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area Team Disclaimer States: ...

  4. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Justin, Grant A; Brietzke, Scott E

    2017-01-01

      This study examined malpractice claims related to cleft lip and cleft palate surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and reviewed financial outcomes.   The WestlawNext legal database was analyzed for all malpractice lawsuits and settlements related to the surgical repair of cleft lip and palate.   Inclusion criteria included patients undergoing surgical repair of a primary cleft lip or palate or revision for complications of previous surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes.   A total of 36 cases were identified, with 12 unique cases from 1981 to 2006 meeting the inclusion criteria. Six cases (50%) were decided by a jury and six by settlement. Five cases involved complications related to the specific surgery, and the other seven were associated with any surgery and perioperative care of children and adults. Cleft palate repair (50%) was the most frequently litigated surgery. Postoperative negligent supervision was the most common allegation (42%) and resulted in a payout in each case (mean = $3,126,032). Death (42%) and brain injury (25%) were the most frequent injuries reported. Financial awards were made in nine cases (after adjusting for inflation, mean = $2,470,552, range = $0 to $7,704,585). The awards were significantly larger for brain injury than other outcomes ($4,675,395 versus $1,368,131 after adjusting for inflation, P = .0101).   Malpractice litigation regarding cleft lip and palate surgery is uncommon. However, significant financial awards involving perioperative brain injury have been reported.

  5. Quantitative 3D soft tissue analysis of symmetry prior to and after unilateral cleft lip repair compared with non-cleft persons (performed in Cambodia).

    PubMed

    Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja; Chaitidis, Despina; Berg-Boerner, Isabelle; Krol, Zdzislav; Kovacs, Laszlo; Schwenzer, Nina F; Zimmerer, Stephan; Holberg, Christof; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical application of three-dimensional (3D) imaging and morphological analysis with subsequent individual therapy planning and postoperative 3D symmetry control in comparison with data from non-cleft persons. This was a prospective study using a 3D surface-imaging and evaluation system in cleft patients and non-cleft persons. The pre- and postoperative 3D facial profiles were recorded from the patients using a 3D laser scanner. The preoperative 3D image was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively for an individual therapy planning. On the basis of ratios and scores, based on empirical regions of interest, the technique of cleft repair was designed individually. The postoperative result was evaluated regarding symmetry. The surgically created soft tissue shift was defined quantitatively and visualized with vectors. The postoperative symmetry was compared with 3D data from a group of non-cleft persons of the same ethnical group. Eleven patients (mean age 13.8 years, median 13, minimum 2, maximum 41 years) with either a unilateral isolated cleft lip, a cleft lip and alveolus or a complete unilateral cleft lip, alveolus and palate and 25 non-cleft persons (8 children between 4 and 12 years, 17 adults (9 men, 8 women) between 18 and 50 years). All these persons investigated were Asians of Khmer origin. The analysis permitted quantitative 3D evaluation. The 3D anthropometric data of the non-cleft Khmer persons were collected and named the gold standard of symmetry in this ethnical group. All postoperative 3D images reached symmetrical values within the range of the normal cohort. Soft tissue shifts from pre- to postoperative sites could be visualized. A new method for registration was described enabling follow-up registration in patients when growing older. This 3D soft tissue analysis can be a useful tool in quantitative analysis and objective follow-up control in cleft patients. It offers deeper insight into the complex

  6. Beware the solitary maxillary median central incisor.

    PubMed

    DiBiase, Andrew T; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2008-03-01

    The incidence of a solitary maxillary median central incisor (SMMCI) tooth in the general population is low, in either the primary or secondary dentition. The most common cause of a missing maxillary central incisor is trauma, or more rarely hypodontia. However, SMMCI is also a recognized genetic anomaly and affected individuals can be carriers for a potentially more serious condition affecting midline development of the brain and face, holoprosencephaly (HPE). The presence of an SMMCI of unknown aetiology is therefore considered a risk factor for HPE, even in the absence of any other clinical signs. The orthodontist may be responsible for diagnosing cases of SMMCI with no obvious cause, and in these subjects due consideration should be given to referral for the appropriate genetic testing and counselling.

  7. Nasolabial symmetry and esthetics in cleft lip and palate: analysis of 3D facial images.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Dries J; Maal, Thomas J; Kuijpers, Mette A; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Fudalej, Piotr S

    2015-11-01

    To determine the relationship between nasolabial symmetry and esthetics in subjects with orofacial clefts. Eighty-four subjects (mean age 10 years, standard deviation 1.5) with various types of nonsyndromic clefts were included: 11 had unilateral cleft lip (UCL); 30 had unilateral cleft lip and alveolus (UCLA); and 43 had unilateral cleft lip, alveolus, and palate (UCLAP). A 3D stereophotogrammetric image of the face was taken for each subject. Symmetry and esthetics were evaluated on cropped 3D facial images. The degree of asymmetry of the nasolabial area was calculated based on all 3D data points using a surface registration algorithm. Esthetic ratings of various elements of nasal morphology were performed by eight lay raters on a 100 mm visual analog scale. Statistical analysis included ANOVA tests and regression models. Nasolabial asymmetry increased with growing severity of the cleft (p = 0.029). Overall, nasolabial appearance was affected by nasolabial asymmetry; subjects with more nasolabial asymmetry were judged as having a less esthetically pleasing nasolabial area (p < 0.001). However, the relationship between nasolabial symmetry and esthetics was relatively weak in subjects with UCLAP, in whom only vermilion border esthetics was associated with asymmetry. Nasolabial symmetry assessed with 3D facial imaging can be used as an objective measure of treatment outcome in subjects with less severe cleft deformity. In subjects with more severe cleft types, other factors may play a decisive role. Assessment of nasolabial symmetry is a useful measure of treatment success in less severe cleft types.

  8. Solitary median maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Bolan, Michele; Derech, Carla D'Agostini; Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Pereira, Eliana Ternes; Almeida, Izabel Cristina Santos

    2009-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCIS) is a rare abnormality characterized by the presence of a central incisor positioned at the maxillary mid-axis. This morphologic defect also can be associated with other diseases. The purpose of this paper was to present a case report of a 4-year-old twin child with SMMCIS. The patient showed a symmetrical primary maxillary central incisor located at the midline, with an absence of labial frenulum, an indistinct philtrum, and an incisive papilla. Radiographic examination confirmed the presence of only a maxillary central incisor in both dentitions. The patient was referred for a genetic and otolaryngological assessment, however, no other abnormality than the ones reported were detected.

  9. How to Feed Cleft Patient?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saima Yunus

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleft lip and palate patients have all rights like other normal individuals, to enjoy the benefits of nourishment. Knowledge has to be there about the different feeding positions like straddle, dancer hand position along with the use of specially designed bottles and nipples. Parent's should be trained about the correct positions of feeding, in extreme of the cases in which parents are not able to follow these instructions, feeding obturators can be given. How to cite this article: Jindal MK, Khan SY. How to Feed Cleft Patient? Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):100-103. PMID:25206201

  10. Oral cleft prevention program (OCPP)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects with significant medical, psychosocial, and economic ramifications. Oral clefts have a complex etiology with genetic and environmental risk factors. There are suggestive results for decreased risks of cleft occurrence and recurrence with folic acid supplements taken at preconception and during pregnancy with a stronger evidence for higher than lower doses in preventing recurrence. Yet previous studies have suffered from considerable design limitations particularly non-randomization into treatment. There is also well-documented effectiveness for folic acid in preventing neural tube defect occurrence at 0.4 mg and recurrence with 4 mg. Given the substantial burden of clefting on the individual and the family and the supportive data for the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation as well as its low cost, a randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of high versus low dose folic acid for prevention of cleft recurrence is warranted. Methods/design This study will assess the effect of 4 mg and 0.4 mg doses of folic acid, taken on a daily basis during preconception and up to 3 months of pregnancy by women who are at risk of having a child with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NSCL/P), on the recurrence of NSCL/P. The total sample will include about 6,000 women (that either have NSCL/P or that have at least one child with NSCL/P) randomly assigned to the 4 mg and the 0.4 mg folic acid study groups. The study will also compare the recurrence rates of NSCL/P in the total sample of subjects, as well as the two study groups (4mg, 0.4 mg) to that of a historical control group. The study has been approved by IRBs (ethics committees) of all involved sites. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Discussion The costs related to oral clefts are high, including long term psychological and socio-economic effects. This study provides an opportunity for

  11. TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting.

    PubMed

    Midro, A; Hubert, E; Preferansow, J; Iwaszkiewicz-Pawłowska, A

    1993-01-01

    A case of TAR syndrome with bilateral cleft lip and palate is presented. Bilateral symmetric focomelia, normal thumbs among five fingers of hands, synostosis of IVth and Vth metacarpal bones and some defects of lower limbs with associated thrombocytopenia were noted. Dysmorphic facial features included hypertelorism, epicanthus, blue sclerae, broad nasal root, micrognathia, low-set ears, sparse blond hair. To our knowledge this patient represents an unusual association of TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting. A common background of TAR and Roberts/SC syndrome is suggested.

  12. Prevalence of cleft lip and/or palate in children from Lodz between years 1981-2010.

    PubMed

    Antoszewski, Bogusław; Fijałkowska, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital malformations constitute a serious problem of both medical and social nature. Cleft lip and/or palate represent the most common congenital anomaly of the face that is why it is essential to know the real frequency of the described phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to determine the frequency of cleft lip and/or palate and the types of malformations that occurred in Lodz city between the years 1981-2010. Our clinic has been carrying on the studies concerning the incidence of cleft lip and/or palate since 1981. The Polish Registry of Congenital Malformations has been operating in Poland since 1 April 1997. The team has managed to obtain data, from the Registry, concerning the total number of all live born infants and the number of children with cleft lip and/or palate, who were born in Lodz, between 1998 and 2010. In years 1981-2010, 319 children, in 210 952 live born infants, were born with cleft lip and/or palate in Lodz. The isolated cleft palate was observed more frequently in girls and the unilateral cleft of lip and palate in boys. In all three decades palate clefts are more common whereas bilateral lip, alveolus and palate clefts are more infrequent. A small tendency to decrease in actual cleft lip and/or palate frequency among children, in the period of 30 years, is observed in Lodz. Over the years it has still been observed that the isolated cleft palate is the most common type of defect. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  13. Esthetic, Functional, and Everyday Life Assessment of Individuals with Cleft Lip and/or Palate

    PubMed Central

    Papamanou, Despina A.; Karamolegkou, Marina; Dorotheou, Domna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the level of satisfaction of individuals with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) and their parents concerning the esthetic and functional treatment outcomes, the impact of the cleft on everyday life, and potential associations with treatment outcome satisfaction. Subjects and Methods. The sample consisted of 33 patients (7 CP, 20 unilateral CLP, and 6 bilateral CLP; median age: 17.1, range: 9.0–33.1 years) and 30 parents, who responded to a questionnaire in an interview-guided session. All participants received their orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics in the University of Athens. Results. Patients and their parents were quite satisfied with esthetics and function. Patients with UCLP primarily were concerned about nose esthetics (BCLP about lip esthetics and CP about speech). Increased satisfaction was associated with decreased influence of the cleft in everyday life (0.35 < rho < 0.64, P < 0.05). Parents reported significant influence of the cleft on family life, while patients did not. Conclusions. Despite the limited sample size of subgroups, the main concerns of patients with different cleft types and the importance of satisfying lip, nose, and speech outcomes for an undisturbed everyday life were quite evident. Thus, the need for targeted treatment strategies is highlighted for individuals with cleft lip and/or palate. PMID:26064918

  14. Whole-blood 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine as a risk factor for orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Budner, Margareta; Surowiec, Zbigniew; Fudalej, Piotr; Hozyasz, Kamil K

    2013-05-01

    In mice, biotin deficiency is one of the most potent clefting factors. Increased 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5OH) is regarded as a biomarker of biotin deficiency. This retrospective study was undertaken to determine whether increased C5OH in newborns is associated with orofacial clefts. Seventy newborns with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 140 control newborns without congenital anomalies were investigated. Whole-blood C5OH concentrations were measured using tandem mass spectrometry. The median (interquartile range, IQR) concentrations of C5OH in patients with clefts and controls were 0.16 (0.13-0.22)μmoll(-1) and 0.17 (0.13-0.20)μmoll(-1), respectively (p=0.90). The receiver operating characteristic analysis did not find out cut-off values for C5OH discriminating between cases and controls. There appears to be no association between biotin deficiency, as indexed by an increase of C5OH, and orofacial clefts in the investigated group of patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare craniofacial anomaly: Tessier no. 2 cleft.

    PubMed

    Ozek, C; Gundogan, H; Bilkay, U; Cankayali, R; Guner, U; Gurler, T; Songur, E

    2001-07-01

    Four cases of facial cleft that fit the anatomic description of the rare Tessier no. 2 cleft, with two patients having the no. 12 cleft extending to the cranium as no. 2 clefts, are presented. In all patients, clinical expressions of the anomaly were different. Thus, diverse surgical procedures were used in all cases. These cases and review of the literature help to define the soft-tissue and bony course of these clefts, and also emphasize the role of three-dimensional computed tomography scan imaging to show the bony cleft route. The diagnosis and treatment plan of the no. 2 cleft as well as its cranial counterpart are discussed in this report.

  16. Social interaction patterns of children and adolescents with and without oral clefts during a videotaped analogue social encounter.

    PubMed

    Slifer, Keith J; Amari, Adrianna; Diver, Tanya; Hilley, Lisa; Beck, Melissa; Kane, Alana; McDonnell, Sharon

    2004-03-01

    To examine the social interaction patterns of children with and without oral clefts. Participants were videotaped while interacting with a peer confederate. Oral cleft and control groups were compared on social behavior and several self- and parent-report measures. Thirty-four 8- to 15-year-olds with oral clefts, matched for sex, age, and socioeconomic status with 34 noncleft controls. Data were obtained on social behaviors coded from videotapes and on child and parent ratings of social acceptance/competence and facial appearance. Statistically significant differences were found between groups: children with clefts made fewer choices and more often failed to respond to peer questions; children with clefts and their parents reported greater dissatisfaction with the child's facial appearance; and parents of children with clefts rated them as less socially competent. Significant within-group associations were also found. Parent perception of child social competence and child self-perception of social acceptance were positively correlated for both groups. Children with clefts who felt more socially accepted more often looked a peer in the face. Controls who felt more socially accepted chose an activity less often during the social encounter. Differing patterns of overt social behavior as well as parent and self-perception can be measured between children with and without oral clefts. Such results may be helpful in developing interventions to enhance social skills and parent/child adjustment.

  17. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Nasal Symmetry Following Primary Correction of Unilateral Cleft Lip Nasal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Linden, Olivia E; Taylor, Helena O; Vasudavan, Sivabalan; Byrne, Margaret E; Deutsch, Curtis K; Mulliken, John B; Sullivan, Stephen R

    2016-07-21

      To evaluate nasal symmetry using three-dimensional photogrammetry following primary tip rhinoplasty with or without an internal splint in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip/palate.   We captured three-dimensional images of patients with unilateral complete cleft lip/palate who underwent nasolabial repair by rotation-advancement of the lip and primary tip rhinoplasty, either with or without an internal resorbable splint, and normal control subjects. We assessed nasal symmetry by identifying the plane of maximum symmetry and the root-mean-square deviation between native and reflected surfaces.   We imaged 38 controls and 38 subjects with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip/palate (20 with, 18 without an internal splint).   Nasal asymmetry root-mean-square deviation clustered between 0.19 and 0.50 mm (median = 0.24 ± 0.08 mm) for controls; whereas, those with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip/palate ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 mm (median = 0.75 ± 0.40 mm). Although root-mean-square deviation ranges overlapped, patients with repaired unilateral complete cleft lip/palate had significantly greater asymmetry than controls (P < .001). We found no difference in asymmetry between patients with or without an internal splint (P = .5).   Three-dimensional photogrammetry was used to successfully compare symmetry among different patient and control groups. Although "normal" nasal symmetry was attained in some patients following cleft lip/nasal repair, most had persistent asymmetry compared with normal controls. Placement of a resorbable internal splint did not improve symmetry in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip/palate.

  18. Laterality of Oral Clefts and Academic Achievement.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Emily R; Collett, Brent R; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul; Ansley, Timothy; Wehby, George L

    2017-02-01

    Children with isolated oral clefts have lower academic performance when compared with unaffected peers, yet few studies have examined specific attributes of clefts that may modify this risk. Oral clefts have nonrandom laterality, with left-sided clefts being more common than right-sided clefts, a pattern that may be genetically or environmentally influenced. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between cleft laterality and academic achievement in a population-based sample of children with and without isolated oral clefts. The study included 292 children with isolated unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate identified by using the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders matched with 908 unaffected classmates. This group provided 1953 child-grade observations for cases and 6829 for classmates. Academic achievement was evaluated by using high-quality standardized test data on multiple academic domains as well as use of special education. We found that children with right-sided clefts had similar achievement scores and usage of special education services compared with their unaffected classmates. Children with left-sided clefts had lower reading scores than children with right-sided clefts by nearly 7 percentiles (P < .05). They also had lower scores on all evaluated domains by 4 to 6 percentiles and greater use of special education services by 6 percentage points than their classmates. Children with left-sided clefts had poorer academic performance than their classmates or children with right-sided clefts, who showed similar academic achievement compared with their unaffected classmates. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Tympanogram findings in patients with cleft palates aged six months to seven years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanti, A.; Widiarni, D.; Alviandi, W.; Tamin, S.; Mansyur, M.

    2017-08-01

    Cleft palate is one of the most common congenital craniofacial deformities. Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a middle ear disease having a prevalence of almost 90% in patients with cleft palates. Tympanometry is a fast, safe, non-invasive, and easy tool for diagnosing middle ear disease qualitatively and quantitatively. Studies have been conducted using tympanometry to detect middle ear conditions in patients with cleft palates, but no research has studied tympanogram findings in patients with cleft palates in Indonesia. The aim of this study is to determine the tympanogram findings in Indonesian children aged six months to seven years with cleft palates. This is a cross-sectional study of 30 patients (17 males and 13 females) with Veau classification of palatal clefts aged six months to seven years (median 26.5 months) who underwent tympanometry examinations using a 226 Hztympanometer. Tympanograms were classified using the Jerger/Liden classification. Examinations of 58 ears found that type B tympanograms occurred most frequently (70.7%). The quantitative values of tympanometry analyzed included SAA (0.1-0.2 cm3), TPP value (-197.2-(-146.8 daPa)), Vec value (0.5-0.6 cm3), and gradient value (0.03-0.07 cm3). Using the Fisher test, a significant relationship was found between age and type of tympanogram (p = 0.0039) with the risk of type B and C tympanograms in infants (6-60 months) as high as 4.8 times that of children without cleft palates. The type B tympanogram was most frequently seen in patients with cleft palates aged six months to seven years old with the quantitative values of tympanometry lower than the normal values. Therefore, there was a significant difference in the type of tympanogram seen with age.

  20. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  1. Etiopathogenesis of orofacial clefting revisited

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Sudeendra; Krishnapillai, Rekha; Jose, Maji; Prabhu, Vishnudas

    2012-01-01

    The cleft anomaly may be more ancient than the man himself. It is one of the most common developmental malformations reported in the literature. There are number of intriguing theories regarding its etiopathogenesis, each of which has some evidence in its favor. This review highlights all the genetic and environmental etiologic factors and focuses on its pathogenesis. PMID:22923895

  2. Morphologic variability of nonsyndromic operated patients affected by cleft lip and palate: a geometric morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Cortés Araya, Juan; Díaz Muñoz, Alejandro; Manríquez Soto, Germán

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we compared patterns of morphologic variations of the craniofacial skeleton between patients affected by clefts who were operated on and unaffected subjects, aiming to discuss possible morpho-functional consequences of treatment in craniofacial development. The lateral cephalograms of 76 subjects, comprising patients with operated unilateral cleft lip and palate (OpC) and a group matched for sex and age without cleft, were used. Thirteen landmarks were used as variables in geometric morphometric tests quantifying and describing overall shape variation, differences between group means, allometry, and upper-lower face covariation. The OpC group showed broader shape variations including noncleft group characteristics, but mainly a retrognathic maxilla, a vertically elongated face, a more open mandibular angle, and a more closed basicranial angle. Group means differed mainly in the maxillomandibular relationships. Allometry differed between groups, with the smallest OpC patients showing the most altered morphology. Upper and lower face covariation was stronger in the OpC group, showing mainly vertical changes in the anterior face. Operated patients affected by clefts achieve a broad range of morphologies; the most altered were found in those with skeletal Class III and small size. Furthermore, their strongest upper and lower face shape covariation suggests that a harmonic dental occlusion could be a key factor in achieving "normal" craniofacial morphology. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun Kumar; Nandini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM) too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it's management both at the time of cleft lip repair and also secondarily

  4. Cleft of the secondary palate without cleft lip diagnosed with three-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in a fetus with Fryns' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benacerraf, B R; Sadow, P M; Barnewolt, C E; Estroff, J A; Benson, C

    2006-05-01

    We present a case of Fryns' syndrome diagnosed prenatally using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A cleft of the soft palate was diagnosed using 3D thick-slice ultrasonography. Other sonographic findings included a right diaphragmatic hernia, enlarged echogenic kidneys and severe polyhydramnios. The detection of the cleft palate was instrumental in suggesting the diagnosis of Fryns' syndrome in a fetus which also had a diaphragmatic hernia. These findings were also demonstrated with prenatal MRI. The technique of imaging the soft palate en face using a thick-slice technique is presented.

  5. Evaluation of unilateral cleft lip and palate using anthropometry measurements post-alveolar bone grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simorangkir, H. J.; Hak, M. S.; Tofani, I.

    2017-08-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) requires multiple steps and coordination of multidisciplinary sciences to produce optimal results. Alveolar bone-grafting (ABG) is an important procedure in the treatment of such patients because it influences the eruption of teeth and stabilizes the maxilla. To evaluate the effect and suitability of alveolar bone grafting procedure at Cleft Center Harapan Kita Maternal and Child Hospital on nasal deformity from anthropometry with photogrammetry and aesthetic proportional in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate with UCLP. Patients with UCLP were evaluated post-ABG using anthropometry and photogrammetry to investigate the results anteriorly, laterally, and basally. Anthropometric measurements taken photogrammetrically used 14 points and 11 distance items. Evaluations were made of upper lip length, upper lip projection, and nostril sill elevation for both the cleft and non-cleft sides of patients’ faces. A t-test showed that the values for upper lip length and projection were significantly increased, and a correction test using a Fisher exam gave a value of 1. The ABG treatment protocol for patients with UCLP at the Cleft Lip and Palate Unit at Harapan Kita Maternal and Child Hospital is suitable to be performed; it aesthetically satisfies patients and their families.

  6. Modification of perioral stiffness in patients with repaired cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Steven M; Trotman, Carroll-Ann; Chu, Shin-Ying; Lee, Jaehoon

    2012-09-01

    To measure and compare the perioral stiffness among three groups of pediatric subjects: a group of patients with a repaired cleft lip (and palate) who had a secondary lip revision surgery (revision), another group of patients with repaired cleft lip (and palate) who did not have secondary surgery (nonrevision), and a group of noncleft "normal" patients (noncleft). A parallel, three-group, nonrandomized clinical trial. A total of 16 patients with repaired cleft lip/palate who did not have lip revision, 13 patients with repaired cleft lip/palate who had lip revision surgery and were tested at 18 to 24 months postsurgery, and 27 noncleft patients. Nonparticipatory perioral stiffness was sampled using a recently developed face-referenced measurement technology known as OroSTIFF. Perioral stiffness, derived as a quotient from resultant force and interangle lip span, was modeled with multilevel regression techniques. Real-time calculation of the perioral stiffness function demonstrated a significant quadratic relation between imposed interangle stretch and resultant force for each of the three groups. This nonlinear stiffness growth function was significantly elevated in the nonrevision patients compared with the noncleft controls and is likely due to the presence of scar tissue in the upper lip; it was significantly lower among patients with cleft lip/palate who completed lip revision surgery. This study demonstrates the efficacy of applying an objective measurement to map differences in perioral tissue biomechanics among patients born with orofacial clefts.

  7. Surgical repair of a congenital sternal cleft in a cat.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ilona; Bavegems, Valerie C A; Vandekerckhove, Peter M F P; Melis, Sanne M; Cornillie, Pieter; de Rooster, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    To describe the clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of an incomplete cleft of the 5th-8th sternebra and a cranioventral abdominal wall hernia in a 2 month old Ragdoll kitten and to evaluate the short- and long-term outcome. Clinical report. Ragdoll cat (n = 1), 2 months old. Sternal cleft was confirmed by thoracic radiographs. Computed tomography (CT) was used to plan an optimal surgical approach. A ventral median incision was made, starting at the 3rd sternebra and extended into the abdomen. Ostectomy of the proximal part of the 5th left sternebra was performed. Lateral periosteal flaps were created, unfolded, and absorbable monofilament sutures preplaced to facilitate closure and the repair was reinforced by 2 peristernal sutures. A bone graft was applied, and the free margin of the omentum was sutured to the cranial aspect of the wound. No major complications occurred. At 3 weeks, CT scan confirmed approximation of the hemisternebrae and at 10 months, complete fusion of the hemisternebrae had not occurred, but a strong connection of the sternal bars was present. Sternal cleft is a rare congenital abnormality that can be corrected surgically with favorable outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. Hematological parameters in patients of cleft lip and cleft palate with special reference to eosinophil counts.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Shipra; Negi, Gita; Chandra, Harish; Chandra, Smita; Gaur, Dushyant Singh; Rajan, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Birth abnormalities like cleft lip and cleft palate account for about 1.4 per 1000 live births in India. These are seen to be associated with a high incidence of eosinophilia which delays the surgical management of these patients. The aim of this paper is to study the hematological parameters in patients of cleft lip and cleft palate. A total of 223 cases of cleft lip and cleft palate were taken up for the study. Hematological parameters including hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, absolute eosinophil count, and red cell indices were studied. Anemia was found in 182/223 (81.63%) cases which was most commonly of microcytic hypochromic type. Eosinophilia was seen in 46/223 (20.60%) cases. Many cleft lip and cleft palate patients show high eosinophil counts. Absolute eosinophil count was found to be a better parameter for assessment of eosinophils.

  9. Endoscope-assisted versus conventional second branchial cleft cyst resection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-si; Sun, Wei; Wu, Pei-na; Zhang, Si-yi; Xu, Mi-mi; Luo, Xiao-ning; Zhan, Jian-dong; Huang, Xiaoming

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of endoscope-assisted second branchial cleft cyst resection via retroauricular approach by comparing it with conventional cervical incision for removal of second branchial cleft cyst. From January 2009 to December 2010, 25 patients were randomly assigned to the endoscope-assisted surgery group (13 patients) or the conventional surgery group (12 patients). The clinical characteristics of patients, operation time, operative bleeding volume, postoperative complications, and subjective satisfaction with incision scar checked by visual analog scale were compared between the groups, retrospectively. All 13 second branchial cleft cyst resections were successfully performed endoscopically, and the wounds healed uneventfully. Endoscope-assisted surgery lasted 54.6 ± 6.3 min, and conventional surgery lasted 49.6 ± 6.9 min (P = 0.069). Degree of bleeding volume did not differ between the groups (P = 0.624). Mean patient satisfaction score was 9.2 ± 0.6 in the endoscope-assisted surgery group and 6.2 ± 0.8 in the controls (P < 0.001). All 13 patients in the endoscope-assisted surgery group were satisfied with their cosmetic results. One case showed temporary numbness around the earlobe that recovered within 1 month after surgery. No marginal nerve palsy occurred. No complications such as bleeding, salivary fistula, or paresis of the marginal mandibular branch occurred. All 25 patients were disease free with follow-up of 6-24 months (median 16 months). Endoscope-assisted second branchial cleft cyst resection via retroauricular approach is a feasible technique. This procedure may serve as an alternative approach that allows an invisible incision and better cosmetic results.

  10. A model humanitarian cleft mission: 312 cleft surgeries in 7 days.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Ghulam Qadir; Gill, Nauman Ahmad; Ishaq, Irfan; Ganatra, Muhammad Ashraf; Mahmood, Farrakh; Kashif, Muhammad; Alam, Iftikhar; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Lo, Lun-Jou; Laub, Donald Rudolph

    2015-03-01

    There are many countries in the world where patients with cleft lip and palate cannot get access to specialized cleft care units. Cleft missions play an important role in providing surgical care to the areas of the world with limited resources. This article presents a model of cleft missions that can be adopted in many countries where expertise is available but resources are limited. Through proper utilization of local human resource, this type of mission can be a cost-effective and robust way of treating patients with cleft in countries with approximately 52% of the world's population. We present a case series of patients of one of our cleft missions carried out in Khairpur, Pakistan, in March 2014 over a period of 7 days. Specific details concerning the organization of mission, gathering of patients, preparation for surgery, and carrying out surgical procedures in a safe and swift manner are presented. A total of 312 patients were operated on in 7 days. There were 145 patients with cleft lip and 167 patients with cleft palate. There were 187 male and 125 female patients with mean age of 7 years. Contemporary operative techniques were utilized to repair different types of cleft lip and palate. Of 167 patients, only 16 developed fistula. A locoregional cleft team can be more effective to care for the patients with cleft in countries where surgical and other expertise can be utilized by proper organization of cleft missions on a national level.

  11. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  12. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  13. Prevalence of Orofacial Clefts in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Butali, A; Adeyemo, W.L; Mossey, P.A; Olasoji, H.O; Onah, I.I; Adebola, A; Efunkoya; Akintububo, A; James, O; Adeosun, O.O; Ogunlewe, M.O; Ladeinde, A.L; Mofikoya, B.O; Adeyemi, M.O; Ekhaguere, O.A; Emeka, C; A MBChB, Awoyale T.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFC) are the most common malformations of the head and neck. In Africa, OFC is under-ascertained with little or no surveillance system in most parts for clefts and other birth defects. A Nigerian craniofacial anomalies study “NigeriaCRAN” was established in 2006 to support cleft research specifically for epidemiological studies, treatment outcomes and; studies into etiology and prevention. We pooled data from seven of the largest Smile Train treatment centers in the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. Data from September 2006 to June 2011 were analyzed and clefts compared between sides and gender using the Fisher’s exact test. A total of 2197 cases were identified during the study period with an estimated prevalence rate of 0.5/1000. Of the total number of OFC, 53.3% are males and 47%.7 are females. There was a significant difference (p=0.0001) between unilateral left clefts and unilateral right clefts and; significant difference (p=0.0001) between bilateral clefts and either clefts on the left or right side. A significant gender difference (p=0.03) with more females than males was also observed for CP. A total of 103 (4.7 %) associated anomalies were identified, nine syndromic cleft cases and 10.4 % of the total number of clefts individuals have an affected relative. The significant difference between unilateral clefts and gender differences in the proportion of cleft palate only are consistent with the literature. The present study emphasizes the need for birth defects registries in developing countries in order to estimate the exact prevalence of birth defects including OFC. PMID:23557093

  14. Geometric median for missing rainfall data imputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Siti Nur Zahrah Amin; Deni, Sayang Mohd; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Missing data is a common problem faced by researchers in environmental studies. Environmental data, particularly, rainfall data are highly vulnerable to be missed, which is due to several reasons, such as malfunction instrument, incorrect measurements, and relocation of stations. Rainfall data are also affected by the presence of outliers due to the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall measurements. These problems may harm the quality of rainfall data and subsequently, produce inaccuracy in the results of analysis. Thus, this study is aimed to propose an imputation method that is robust towards the presence of outliers for treating the missing rainfall data. Geometric median was applied to estimate the missing values based on the available rainfall data from neighbouring stations. The method was compared with several conventional methods, such as normal ratio and inverse distance weighting methods, in order to evaluate its performance. Thirteen rainfall stations in Peninsular Malaysia were selected for the application of the imputation methods. The results indicated that the proposed method provided the most accurate estimation values compared to both conventional methods based on the least mean absolute error. The normal ratio was found to be the worst method in estimating the missing rainfall values.

  15. [Cleft lip and palate in Campeche Mayas].

    PubMed

    Weiss, K M; Georges, E; Levy, B; Aguirre, A; Portilla, R J; Gaitán, C L; Leyva, E; Rodríguez, T

    1988-07-01

    It has been suggested that among American Indians, as in some genetically-related Asiatic ethnic groups, incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate is higher than among people of Caucasian extraction. Such hypothesis, plus growing demand for services observed at a center for the surgery of cleft lip and cleft palate in Campeche state, led the authors to undertake research among the Maya residents of that region. However, neither careful review of case histories nor field research performed in several Indian communities could confirm the hypothesis of a higher incidence among this ethnic community.

  16. Improving Informed Consent for Cleft Palate Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Cleft Palate; Jaw Abnormalities; Maxillofacial Abnormalities; Mouth Abnormalities; Congenital Abnormalities; Jaw Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Craniofacial Abnormalities; Musculoskeletal Abnormalities; Stomatognathic Diseases; Stomatognathic System Abnormalities

  17. Cleft Lip and Palate Repair: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Gian Luca; Freda, Nicola; Giacomina, Alessandro; Montemagni, Marina; Sisti, Andrea

    2017-09-12

    Cleft lip and palate is the most frequent congenital craniofacial deformity. In this article, the authors describe their experience with cleft lip and palate repair. Data regarding patients presenting with primary diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate, between 2009 and 2015, were reviewed. Details including demographics, type of cleft, presence of known risk factors, surgical details, and follow-up visits were collected. Documented complications were reported. Caregivers' satisfaction was assessed with a survey. The survey used to assess satisfaction with cleft-related features was based on the cleft evaluation profile (CEP). In addition, 4 assessors used visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the aesthetic satisfaction. Seven hundred fifty-two patients with primary diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate underwent surgical correction at "S. Chiara" Hospital, 432 (57.45%) male and 320 (42.55%) female. The most common cleft types in our study were incomplete cleft palate (152 patients) and left unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (152 patients). Associated syndromes were found in 46 patients (6.12%). Cleft lip was repaired using a modified Tennison-Randall technique when the defect was unilateral, whereas a modified Mulliken technique was used for bilateral cleft lip. Cleft palate was repaired using the Bardach technique or Von Langenbeck technique at 5 to 6 months of age. Cleft lip and palate was repaired in several surgical steps. In total, complications were reported in 81 of 752 patients (14.16%). Average fathers' satisfaction score assessed using CEP was 4.5 (lip), 4.8 (nose), 4.7 (teeth), 4.8 (bite), 4.2 (breathing), 4.6 (profile). Average mothers' satisfaction score assessed using CEP was 4.3 (lip), 4.6 (nose), 4.4 (teeth), 4.5 (bite), 4.1 (breathing), 4.4 (profile). Average level of aesthetic satisfaction, assessed using VAS, was 8.7 (fathers), 8.1 (mothers), 7.9 (lay person), and 8.0 (senior cleft surgeon). The multidisciplinary management of children with

  18. Surgical correction of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Rahul; Huppa, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Surgical cleft repair aims to restore function of the oro-nasal sphincter and oro-nasal soft tissues and re-establish the complex relationship between perioral and perinasal muscle rings without compromising subsequent mid-facial growth and development. Here we review the surgical anatomy of this region, optimal timing for surgical repair and current thinking on the use of surgical adjuncts. In addition, an overview of current surgical techniques available for the repair of cleft lip, cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency is presented. Finally, we briefly discuss nasal revision surgery and the use of osteotomy, including distraction osteogenesis in the cleft patient.

  19. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Results: Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Conclusion: Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively. PMID:25954706

  20. Periodontal Status Among Patients With Cleft Lip (CL), Cleft Palate (CP) and Cleft Lip, Alveolus and Palate (CLAP) In Chennai, India. A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, N; John, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Long term health of the stomatognathic system as well as esthetic aspects is the therapeutic goals in patients with oro facial clefts. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip, alveolus and palate (CLAP) reporting to a hospital in Chennai, India. The study group consisted of 80 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into three groups. Group 1: patients with cleft lip (CL), Group 2: subjects with cleft palate (CP) and Group 3: subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate (CLAP). Community Periodontal Index for Treatment needs CPITN Index was recorded. Among the 80 study subjects, 51 (63.8%) were males and 29 (36.2%) were females. Among the 26 study subjects with cleft lip, 10 (38.5%) had healthy periodontium, 4 (15.4%) had bleeding on probing and 12 (46.1%) had calculus. Mean number of sextants coded for healthy and bleeding was maximum among the subjects with cleft palate. Mean number of sextants coded for calculus was maximum among the subjects with cleft lip alveolus and palate. Prevalence of periodontal disease is high among patients with cleft lip, alveolus and palate (35%) than in Cleft lip (32.5%) and Cleft Palate (32.5%). Gingivitis and Calculus is predominantly high in patients with Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip respectively.

  1. Maiden morsel - feeding in cleft lip and palate infants

    PubMed Central

    Devi, E. Sree; Sai Sankar, A. J.; Manoj Kumar, M. G.; Sujatha, B.

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are the most common craniofacial anomalies that have an incidence of 0.28 to 3.74 per 1000 live births globally. Due to the great advancements in the field of medical science, these anomalies can today be corrected. However, it cannot be ignored that the parents of these patients may face psychological stress due to the cleft defects in the baby. Also, these conditions may cause financial difficulties to the parents and cause anxiety to the mother about the proper feeding of their infant. Feeding problems can range from excessive air intake to failure to thrive. As the management of such cases is lengthy and includes a multi-disciplinary team approach, it is the role of the Pediatrician/Pedodontist to educate the mother about the proper feeding techniques. In this article, we have reviewed and highlighted the various traditional and advanced devices and techniques which help in the successful management of these individuals. PMID:24478964

  2. Median raphe cyst: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Piyush; Das, Anupam; Savant, Sushil S; Barkat, Rizwana

    2017-02-15

    Median raphe cysts are rare congenital lesions ofthe male genitalia that occur as a result of alteredembryologic development. We report two such casesof median raphe cysts in the pediatric age group. Inaddition, we review the literature.

  3. Perceptions of team members working in cleft services in the United kingdom: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia K; Leary, Sam D; Ness, Andy R; Sandy, Jonathan R; Persson, Martin; Kilpatrick, Nicky; Waylen, Andrea E

    2015-01-01

    Cleft care provision in the United Kingdom has been centralized over the past 15 years to improve outcomes for children born with cleft lip and palate. However, to date, there have been no investigations to examine how well these multidisciplinary teams are performing. In this pilot study, a cross-sectional questionnaire surveyed members of all health care specialties working to provide cleft care in 11 services across the United Kingdom. Team members were asked to complete the Team Work Assessment (TWA) to investigate perceptions of team working in cleft services. The TWA comprises 55 items measuring seven constructs: team foundation, function, performance and skills, team climate and atmosphere, team leadership, and team identity; individual constructs were also aggregated to provide an overall TWA score. Items were measured using five-point Likert-type scales and were converted into percentage agreement for analysis. Responses were received from members of every cleft team. Ninety-nine of 138 cleft team questionnaires (71.7%) were returned and analyzed. The median (interquartile range) percentage of maximum possible score across teams was 75.5% (70.8, 88.2) for the sum of all items. Team performance and team identity were viewed most positively, with 82.0% (75.0, 88.2) and 88.4% (82.2, 91.4), respectively. Team foundation and leadership were viewed least positively with 79.0% (72.6, 84.6) and 76.6% (70.6, 85.4), respectively. Cleft team members perceive that their teams work well, but there are variations in response according to construct.

  4. The impact of speech material on speech judgement in children with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Svensson, Henry; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    The chosen method of speech assessment, including type of speech material, may affect speech judgement in children with cleft palate. To assess the effect of different speech materials on speech judgement in 5-year-old children born with or without cleft palate, as well as the reliability of materials by means of intra- and inter-transcriber agreement of consonant transcriptions. Altogether 40 children were studied, 20 born with cleft palate, 20 without. The children were audio recorded at 5 years of age. Speech materials used were: single-word naming, sentence repetition (both developed for cleft palate speech assessment), retelling of a narrative and conversational speech. The samples were phonetically transcribed and inter- and intra-transcriber agreement was calculated. Percentage correct consonants (PCC), percentage correct places (PCP), percentage correct manners (PCM), and percentage active cleft speech characteristics (CSC) were assessed. In addition, an analysis of phonological simplification processes (PSP) was performed. The PCC and CSC results were significantly more accurate in word naming than in all other speech materials in the children with cleft palate, who also achieved more accurate PCP results in word naming than in sentence repetition and conversational speech. Regarding PCM and PSP, performance was significantly more accurate in word naming than in conversational speech. Children without cleft palate did better, irrespective of the speech material. The medians of intra- and inter-transcriber agreement were good in both groups and all speech materials. The closest agreement in the cleft palate group was seen in word naming and the weakest in the retelling task. The results indicate that word naming is the most reliable speech material when the purpose is to assess the best speech performance of a child with cleft palate. If the purpose is to assess connected speech, sentence repetition is a reliable and also valid speech material, with good

  5. Complete trisomy 9 with unusual phenotypic associations: Dandy-Walker malformation, cleft lip and cleft palate, cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Lituania, Mario; Chitayat, David; Bonasoni, Maria Paola; Keating, Sarah; Thompson, Megan; Shannon, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 9 is a rare chromosomal abnormality usually associated with first-trimester miscarriage; few fetuses survive until the second trimester. We report two new cases of complete trisomy 9 that both present unusual phenotypic associations, and we analyze the genetic pathway involved in this chromosomal abnormality. The first fetus investigated showed Dandy-Walker malformation, cleft lip, and cleft palate) at the second trimester scan. Cardiovascular abnormalities were characterized by a right-sided, U-shaped aortic arch associated with a ventricular septal defect (VSD). Symmetrical intrauterine growth restriction and multicystic dysplastic kidney disease were associated findings. The second fetus showed a dysmorphic face, bilateral cleft lip, hypoplastic corpus callosum, and a Dandy-Walker malformation. Postmortem examination revealed cardiovascular abnormalities such as persistent left superior vena cava draining into the coronary sinus, membranous ventricular septal defect, overriding aorta, pulmonary valve with two cusps and three sinuses, and the origin of the left subclavian artery distal to the junction of ductus arteriosus and aortic arch. Complete trisomy 9 may result in a wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities, and the presented case series contributes further details on the phenotype of this rare aneuploidy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Risk of Oral Clefts in twins

    PubMed Central

    Grosen, Dorthe; Bille, Camilla; Petersen, Inge; Skytthe, Axel; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob; Pedersen, Jacob Krabbe; Murray, Jeffrey Clark; Christensen, Kaare

    2011-01-01

    Background Small studies have indicated that twinning increases the risk of oral cleft. Methods We used data from a Danish national population-based cohort study to investigate whether twinning was associated with isolated oral cleft, and to estimate the twin probandwise concordance rate and heritability. Twins (207 affected/130,710) and singletons (7766 affected/4,798,526) born from 1936 through 2004 in Denmark were ascertained by linkage among the Danish Facial Cleft Database, the Danish Twin Registry and the Civil Registration System. We computed oral cleft prevalence and prevalence proportion ratio for twins versus singletons, stratified for three sub-phenotypes. Probandwise concordance rates and heritability for twins were estimated for two phenotypes—cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP). Results The prevalence of oral cleft was 15.8 per 10,000 twins and 16.6 per 10,000 singletons (prevalence proportion ratio = 0.95; 95% confidence interval = 0.83 – 1.1). This prevalence was similar for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. The probandwise concordance rate was higher for CL/P for monozygotic twins than for dizygotic twins (50 % vs. 8%, respectively). A similar contrast was present for CP. Recurrence risk for both types of clefts was greater in dizygotic twins than in non-twin siblings. Heritability estimates were above 90% for both CL/P and CP. Conclusion No excess risk of oral cleft could be demonstrated for twins compared with singletons. The concordance rates and heritability estimates for both types of clefts show a strong genetic component. PMID:21423016

  7. Consensus genetic maps as median orders from inconsistent sources.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Benjamin N; Schnable, Patrick S; Aluru, Srinivas

    2008-01-01

    A genetic map is an ordering of genetic markers calculated from a population of known lineage. While traditionally a map has been generated from a single population for each species, recently researchers have created maps from multiple populations. In the face of these new data, we address the need to find a consensus map--a map that combines the information from multiple partial and possibly inconsistent input maps. We model each input map as a partial order and formulate the consensus problem as finding a median partial order. Finding the median of multiple total orders (preferences or rankings)is a well studied problem in social choice. We choose to find the median using the weighted symmetric difference distance, a more general version of both the symmetric difference distance and the Kemeny distance. Finding a median order using this distance is NP-hard. We show that for our chosen weight assignment, a median order satisfies the positive responsiveness, extended Condorcet,and unanimity criteria. Our solution involves finding the maximum acyclic subgraph of a weighted directed graph. We present a method that dynamically switches between an exact branch and bound algorithm and a heuristic algorithm, and show that for real data from closely related organisms, an exact median can often be found. We present experimental results using seven populations of the crop plant Zea mays.

  8. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date.

  9. Diagnosis and management of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft.

    PubMed

    Malandrini, Alex; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Martone, Gianluca; Tosi, Gian Marco; Caporossi, Aldo

    2008-07-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with hyphema, iridocyclitis, iridophacodonesis, and maculopathy after a contusive trauma. Ultrasound biomicroscopy identified a 90-degree cyclodialysis cleft with severe damage of the zonular fibers. Echographic B-scan examination revealed intravitreal hemorrhage and a 360-degree choroidal detachment. One month later, phacoemulsification was performed and a single-piece poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens was inserted into the ciliary sulcus, with the haptic rotated toward the cyclodialysis cleft area. Postoperatively, the visual acuity improved and the intraocular pressure returned to normal. Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed closure of the cleft by reattachment of the ciliary body to the scleral spur. Optical coherence tomography revealed complete resolution of the macular and choroidal folds. Ultrasound biomicroscopy is a useful method for appropriate management of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft. In cases of small cyclodialysis clefts, with the surgical method we describe, the lens haptics apply directional force toward the sclera, fostering adherence of the ciliary body fibers.

  10. International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Vincent K L; Lee, Seng-Teik T; Lambrecht, Thomas J; Barnett, John; Gorney, Mark; Hardjowasito, Widanto; Lemperle, Gottfried; McComb, Harold; Natsume, Nagato; Stranc, Mirek; Wilson, Libby

    2002-01-01

    The International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions was set up to provide a report to be presented at the Eighth International Congress of Cleft Palate and Associated Craniofacial Anomalies on September 12, 1997, in Singapore. The aim of the report was to provide data from a wide range of different international teams performing volunteer cleft missions and, thereafter, based on the collected data, to identify common goals and aims of such missions. Thirteen different groups actively participating in volunteer cleft missions worldwide were selected from the International Confederation of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's list of teams actively participating in volunteer cleft missions. Because of the time frame within which the committee had to work, three groups that did not respond by the stipulated deadline were omitted from the committee. The represented members and their respective institutions have undertaken more than 50 volunteer cleft missions to underdeveloped nations worldwide within the last 3 years. They have visited over 20 different countries, treating more than 3,500 patients worldwide. Based on the data collected and by consensus, the committee outlined recommendations for future volunteer cleft missions based on 1) mission objectives, 2) organization, 3) personal health and liability, 4) funding, 5) trainees in volunteer cleft missions, and 6) public relations. The task force believed that all volunteer cleft missions should have well-defined objectives, preferably with long-term plans. The task force also decided that it was impossible to achieve a successful mission without good organization and close coordination. All efforts should be made, and care taken, to ensure that there is minimal morbidity and no mortality. Finally, as ambassadors of goodwill and humanitarian aid, the participants must make every effort to understand and respect local customs and protocol. The main aims are to provide top-quality surgical service, train local

  11. Nasal gel and olfactory cleft.

    PubMed

    Herranz González-Botas, Jesús; Padín Seara, Anselmo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether a nasal gel, administrated using a radial-hole inhaler, reaches the olfactory cleft and if a different administration method influences distribution. Sixteen healthy volunteers underwent a nasal endoscopy at 1 and 7minutes after the administration of a intranasal gel, with a different method in each fossa. No dye deposition was identified at the olfactory cleft, middle turbinate or middle meatus. In all cases the gel was identified at the nasal vestibule. On the right side, the second most frequent dye identification area was the inferior turbinate, with a rate of 87% at the first minute and 75% at 7 minutes. It was followed by the septum (75 and 62%) and the inferior meatus (6.2 and 12.5%). On the left side, the second most frequent stained area was the septum (18.7 and 13.5%), followed by the inferior meatus (6.5 and 65%). No inferior turbinate staining was found in the left side. There was a significant difference in the deposition rate at the septum (P<.01) and inferior turbinate (P<.001), when both administration methods were compared. No nasal gel, administrated using a radial-hole inhaler, was found at the olfactory cleft, middle turbinate or middle meatus. Gel distribution was located at the anterior and inferior portion of the nose, independent of the administration method used. Significantly different gel distribution rates were found at the septum and inferior turbinate when the 2 administration methods were compared. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Starting a Family: The Experience of Parents With Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    PubMed

    Stock, Nicola Marie; Rumsey, Nichola

    2015-07-01

    One of the key challenges facing young adults with cleft lip and/or palate is making decisions about starting a family, because there is an increased likelihood of their own child being diagnosed with cleft lip and/or palate. Should this occur, a second key challenge is how to deal with their child's diagnosis and subsequent treatment. To explore the views, experiences and possible support needs of this unique group of parents in order to inform the services provided by nonspecialist Health Professionals, cleft teams, and genetic counselors. Individual telephone interviews eliciting qualitative data. Qualitative thematic analysis identified five themes. Accessing accurate information and appropriate support around heritability presented a significant challenge. Parents described feelings of responsibility and distress at their child's diagnosis, as well as a number of factors that had helped or hindered their adjustment. Parents also described ways in which their own experiences had impacted their parenting style and how becoming a parent had changed the way they felt about their own cleft. Young adults' understanding of what it means to grow up with cleft lip and/or palate may impact their decision to start a family and their experiences of having children. Possible methods of supporting prospective parents through this potentially difficult stage will be discussed.

  13. Is cleft severity related to maxillary growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate?

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Ting; Liao, Yu-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To study the relationship of cleft severity and maxillary growth in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. A systematic literature review. A literature survey from the PubMed database from January 1966 to December 2008 used the Medical Subject Headings terms facial growth, unilateral cleft lip palate, cephalometry, and cleft severity or cleft width. The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal from 1964 to November 2008 was hand searched. Studies published as full-length articles reporting quantitative data on the relationship of cleft severity and written in English were selected. Two reviewers selected and extracted the data independently and also assessed the quality of the studies. Four studies met the selection criteria and were included in the review. All were retrospective and longitudinal. Quality analysis revealed medium to low level of the included studies. Heterogeneity of the studies prevented major conclusions about the relationship of a severe cleft and unfavorable maxillary forward growth. The review has highlighted the importance of further research. Further well-designed controlled studies and long-term studies are needed, and researchers have to consider combined assessment of cleft size and palate size. Further studies should also focus on the cleft severity at birth and at the time of palate repair.

  14. Primary treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate in children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yukari; Susami, Takafumi; Kochi, Shoko; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Takagi, Ritsuo; Tachimura, Takashi; Nakano, Yoko; Shibui, Takeo; Michi, Ken-ichi; Nishio, Juntaro; Hata, Yuiro

    2012-05-01

    To investigate current trends in primary treatment for children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate in Japan. Nationwide, retrospective study under the direction of the Academic Survey Committee of the Japanese Cleft Palate Association based on analysis of data obtained via a booklet-style questionnaire completed by institutions providing primary treatment for cleft lip and/or palate patients. PARTICIPANTS, PATIENTS: Patients were 4349 children undergoing primary repair for cleft lip and/or palate at 107 participating institutions between 1996 and 2000. Cleft type, laterality; use of infant palatal plate; and timing and technique of primary repair for cleft lip and/or palate were evaluated by cleft surgeons at 107 participating institutions. Of a total of 2874 patients with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only, infant palatal plates were used with 1087 (37.8%) and were not used with 1787 (62.2%). Primary unilateral lip repair was performed at the age of 2 to 6 months in more than 90% of patients. Bilateral cleft lip was treated by one-stage repair in 285 patients (44.5%) and by two-stage repair in 258 (40.2%). Primary one-stage palatal repair was performed in 2212 (76.9%) and two-stage palatal repair in 262 (9.1%) cleft palate patients. Information on treatment of the remaining 400 (14%) patients was unavailable. This investigation clarified current trends in primary treatment for cleft lip and/or palate in Japan. The results suggest the need for an increase in regional core hospitals and greater variation in treatment options.

  15. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, p<0.0001), bilateral complete CLP (p=0.0002) and bilateral incomplete CLP (p< 0.0001) were more affected by tooth agenesis than individuals with other cleft types. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most affected teeth (p<0.0001). The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P.

  16. Unusual facial cleft in Fryns syndrome: defect of stomodeum?

    PubMed

    Girisha, K M; Bhat, P; Adiga, P K; Pai, A H; Rai, L

    2010-01-01

    Unusual facial cleft in Fryns syndrome: defect of stomodeum?: We report on a fetus with Fryns syndrome. The facial cleft was unusual. There was bilateral cleft lip with cleft palate. The intermaxillary segment was connected through the base of a mound in the midline to the lower lip. We believe this is an atypical facial cleft in Fryns syndrome and likely represents a defective stomodeum.

  17. Demographics of orofacial clefts in Canada from 2002 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Pavri, Sabrina; Forrest, Christopher R

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Orofacial clefts such as cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate are the most frequent congenital anomalies of the head and neck. The purpose of this study was to determine the current demographics for orofacial clefts in Canada. Methods : A request for data from all Canadian provinces (excluding Quebec due to incompatibilities with provincial coding systems) for the fiscal years 2002-2003 to 2007-2008 was submitted to the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Variables evaluated included gender, cleft type, gestational age, birth weight, income quintile, and institution health region. Results : Over the period studied, the prevalence of orofacial clefts ranged from 11.0 to 15.3 per 10,000 live births (1 in 654 to 1 in 909 live births). The distribution of cleft types for live births with orofacial clefts was 17% for cleft lip, 41% for cleft palate, and 42% for cleft lip and palate, of which cleft lip and cleft lip and palate were male dominant (62% and 66% male, respectively) and cleft palate was female dominant (56% female). Saskatchewan and Manitoba had significantly higher cleft birthrates (P < .05) compared with the other provinces. Birth weight and gestational age (but not income quintile) were significantly (P < .0001) lower for newborns with orofacial clefting compared with those with no cleft. Conclusions : Canada has one of the highest orofacial cleft birthrates in the world (prevalence of 12.7 per 10,000 live births, approximately 1 in 790 live births). This study presents an updated demographic of orofacial clefts in Canadian newborns and may be useful in predicting the burden of anticipated health care.

  18. The Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study: expanding the cleft phenotype. Background and justification.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth M; Neiswanger, Katherine; Martin, Rick A; Mooney, Mark P; Kane, Alex A; Wenger, Sharon L; Losee, Joseph; Deleyiannis, Frederick; Ma, Lian; De Salamanca, Javier E; Czeizel, Andrew E; Marazita, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study was begun in 1993 with the primary goal of identifying genes involved in nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in a variety of populations worldwide. Based on the results from a number of pilot studies and preliminary genetic analyses, a new research focus was added to the Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study in 1999: to elucidate the role that associated phenotypic features play in the familial transmission patterns of orofacial clefts in order to expand the definition of the nonsyndromic cleft phenotype. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of phenotypic features associated with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. These features include fluctuating and directional asymmetry, non-right-handedness, dermatoglyphic patterns, craniofacial morphology, orbicularis oris muscle defects, dental anomalies, structural brain and vertebral anomalies, minor physical anomalies, and velopharyngeal incompetence.

  19. Adaptive marginal median filter for colour images.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Samuel; Gregori, Valentín; Sapena, Almanzor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new filter for impulse noise reduction in colour images which is aimed at improving the noise reduction capability of the classical vector median filter. The filter is inspired by the application of a vector marginal median filtering process over a selected group of pixels in each filtering window. This selection, which is based on the vector median, along with the application of the marginal median operation constitutes an adaptive process that leads to a more robust filter design. Also, the proposed method is able to process colour images without introducing colour artifacts. Experimental results show that the images filtered with the proposed method contain less noisy pixels than those obtained through the vector median filter.

  20. Mesencephalic clefts with associated eye movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Lagreze, W D; Warner, J E; Zamani, A A; Gouras, G K; Koralnik, I J; Bienfang, D C

    1996-04-01

    To describe two patients with mesencephalic midline clefts and associated eye movement disorders. Case reports. The first patient developed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia, reduced convergence, right ptosis, right fourth-nerve palsy, and right elevator palsy several years after meningitis with hydrocephalus. The second patient had bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia with exotropia, reduced convergence, bilateral ptosis, limited upward gaze, and right hypertropia since childhood. In both patients, magnetic resonance imaging showed a midline cleft extending from the cerebral aqueduct into the midbrain. It is likely that the clefts affected the oculomotor nuclei and medial longitudinal fasciculi, accounting for the eye movement disorders.

  1. Postoperative Speech Outcomes and Complications in Submucous Cleft Palate Patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Seo; Bae, Yong Chan; Nam, Su Bong; Kang, Kyung Dong; Sung, Ji Yoon

    2016-05-01

    The postoperative speech outcomes of submucous cleft palate (SMCP) surgery are known to be poorer than those of other types of cleft palate. We attempted to objectively characterize the postoperative complications and speech outcomes of the surgical treatment of SMCP through a comparison with the outcomes of incomplete cleft palate (ICP). This study included 53 SMCP patients and 285 ICP patients who underwent surgical repair from 1998 to 2015. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 3.9±1.9 years for the SMCP patients and 1.3±0.9 years for the ICP patients. A retrospective analysis was performed of the complications, the frequency of subsequent surgical correction for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), and speech outcomes. In both the SMCP and ICP patients, no cases of respiratory difficulty, bleeding, or wound disruption were noted. Delayed wound healing and fistula occurred in 18.9% and 5.7% of the SMCP patients and in 14% and 3.2% of the ICP patients, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference in either delayed wound healing or fistula occurrence was observed between the two groups. The rate of surgical correction for VPD in the SMCP group was higher than in the ICP group. In the subset of 26 SMCP patients and 62 ICP patients who underwent speech evaluation, the median speech score value was 58.8 in the SMCP group and 66 in the ICP group, which was a statistically significant difference. SMCP and ICP were found to have similar complication rates, but SMCP had significantly worse speech outcomes.

  2. Initial cleft severity and maxillary growth in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Ting; Liao, Yu-Fang; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting

    2011-08-01

    Initial cleft severity in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) varies. This is reflected in the sizes of the cleft and the palate. The purpose of this retrospective study was to establish whether there is a relationship between cleft severity at birth and growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 29 infants with nonsyndromic complete UCLP were used to measure the sizes of the cleft and the palate. The later growth of the maxilla was determined by using cephalometric radiographs taken at age 9. Statistical analyses were performed with multiple linear regression. The results showed a relationship between cleft area and maxillary protrusion (SNA, P <0.05). Also, there was a relationship between palate area and maxillary width (P <0.05). These data suggest that in patients with complete UCLP there is a significant relationship between initial cleft severity and maxillary growth. Patients with a small cleft area have a more protruded maxilla than do those with a large cleft area. Patients with a large palate area have a wider maxilla than those with a small palate area. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of cleft lip and cleft palate in rural north-central guatemala.

    PubMed

    Matute, Jorge; Lydick, Elaine A; Torres, Olga R; Owen, Karen K; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2015-05-01

    To estimate the number of new cases of cleft lip and cleft palate in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, in 2012. Cross-sectional survey of midwives from communities identified through a two-stage cluster-sampling process. Midwives were asked how many babies they had delivered in the past year and how many of those newborns had various types of birth defects, as illustrated in pictures. Indigenous Mayan communities in rural north-central Guatemala. Midwives (n = 129) who had delivered babies in the previous year. Reports of babies born with cleft lip and cleft palate. A 1-year prevalence rate of 18.9 per 10,000 for cleft lip and 4.7 per 10,000 for cleft palate was estimated for Alta Verapaz. None of the cases of cleft lip also had cleft palate. The indigenous communities in north-central Guatemala might have a relatively high cleft lip prevalence rate compared with the global average.

  4. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  5. Preoperative Cleft Lip Measurements and Maxillary Growth in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Tompson, Bryan D; Fisher, David M

    2016-11-01

    Maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate is highly variable. The authors' aim was to investigate associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and maxillary growth determined cephalometrically in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with cUCLP. Preoperative cleft lip measurements were made at the time of primary cheiloplasty and available for each patient. Maxillary growth was evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and alveolar bone grafting (8.5 ± 0.7 years). The presence of associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and cephalometric measures of maxillary growth was determined using regression analyses. In the 58 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 90% and in transverse width in 81% of patients. There was an inverse correlation between cleft lateral lip height and transverse width with a β coefficient of -0.382 (P = .003). Patients with a more deficient cleft lateral lip height displayed a shorter maxillary length (β coefficient = 0.336; P = .010), a less protruded maxilla (β coefficient = .334; P = .008), and a shorter anterior maxillary height (β coefficient = 0.306; P = .020) than those with a less deficient cleft lateral lip height. Patients with cUCLP present with varying degrees of lateral lip hypoplasia. Preoperative measures of lateral lip deficiency are related to later observed deficiencies of maxillary length, protrusion, and height.

  6. Quantification of negative aesthetic ratings in primary unrepaired unilateral cleft lip infants by modified paired comparison method.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Takeshi; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Akira; Suga, Ken-Ichiro; Nakano, Yoko; Hitoshi, Ohhata; Takagiwa, Mutsumi

    2014-01-01

    To quantify negative aesthetic ratings in primary unrepaired cleft lip infants by further refining our previously reported paired comparison method. The Thurstone paired comparison method was used to quantify negative aesthetic ratings of plaster facial models selected and ordered according to a table of paired random numbers. A total of 30 facial models of unrepaired incomplete unilateral cleft lip infants were used in this study. Raters comprised 20 oral surgeons and anesthesiologists. Quantification of aesthetic ratings for the 30 face models of unrepaired incomplete unilateral cleft lip infants was obtained. The ratings ranged from 0 to 5.08. Quantification of the aesthetic ratings for the 30 face models will be used as objective variables in a multivariate analysis in the third stage of this ongoing study.

  7. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with non syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Material and Methods Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Results Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, p<0.0001), bilateral complete CLP (p=0.0002) and bilateral incomplete CLP (p< 0.0001) were more affected by tooth agenesis than individuals with other cleft types. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most affected teeth (p<0.0001). Conclusions The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P. Key words:Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate, dental anomaly, tooth agenesis, microdontia. PMID:26615505

  8. Patterns of orofacial clefting in the facial morphology of bats: a possible naturally occurring model of cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Orr, David J A; Teeling, Emma C; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Finarelli, John A

    2016-11-01

    A normal feature of the facial anatomy of many species of bat is the presence of bony discontinuities or clefts, which bear a remarkable similarity to orofacial clefts that occur in humans as a congenital pathology. These clefts occur in two forms: a midline cleft between the two premaxillae (analogous to the rare midline craniofacial clefts in humans) and bilateral paramedian clefts between the premaxilla and the maxillae (analogous to the typical cleft lip and palate in humans). Here, we describe the distribution of orofacial clefting across major bat clades, exploring the relationship of the different patterns of clefting to feeding mode, development of the vomeronasal organ, development of the nasolacrimal duct and mode of emission of the echolocation call in different bat groups. We also present the results of detailed radiographic and soft tissue dissections of representative examples of the two types of cleft. The midline cleft has arisen independently multiple times in bat phylogeny, whereas the paramedian cleft has arisen once and is a synapomorphy uniting the Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae. In all cases examined, the bony cleft is filled in by a robust fibrous membrane, continuous with the periosteum of the margins of the cleft. In the paramedian clefts, this membrane splits to enclose the premaxilla but forms a loose fold laterally between the premaxilla and maxilla, allowing the premaxilla and nose-leaf to pivot dorsoventrally in the sagittal plane under the action of facial muscles attached to the nasal cartilages. It is possible that this is a specific adaptation for echolocation and/or aerial insectivory. Given the shared embryological location of orofacial clefts in bats and humans, it is likely that aspects of the developmental control networks that produce cleft lip and palate in humans may also be implicated in the formation of these clefts as a normal feature in some bats. A better understanding of craniofacial development in bats with and

  9. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lip and palate Cleft lip and palate repair Review Date 5/9/2016 Updated by: David A. ... and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  10. Cleft Lip and Palate (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more if they are having hearing problems. Dental Problems Children with a cleft lip and palate ... improve speech and breathing, overbites/underbites, and appearance. Dental and Orthodontic Treatment Maintaining healthy teeth and preventing ...

  11. Postoperative wound management after cleft lip surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztián; Mommaerts, Maurice Y

    2011-09-01

    Our aim was to describe the postoperative management and wound care protocol after primary cleft lip closure, as it has been used in the Bruges Cleft and Craniofacial Center at the supraregional teaching hospital AZ St. Jan, Bruges, between June 1, 1991, and July 1, 2009. The postoperative management and wound care included the use of a Logan bow, long-acting local anesthetic, elbow restraints, antibiotic therapy, crust removal with normal saline solution, and a special local wound ointment that was prepared at our center. During the last 19 years, 199 unilateral and 103 bilateral cleft lip patients have been repaired. 2.6% showed postoperative infection and/or dehiscence. One percent required readmission for reoperation. In 1.6%, inflammatory reaction was treated with oral antibiotics. The specific wound dressing ointment, as it is prepared in our department, could meet the requirements of primary wound management after cleft lip closure.

  12. Cleft Lip – A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Shkoukani, Mahdi A.; Chen, Michael; Vong, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts comprise a range of congenital deformities and are the most common head and neck congenital malformation. Clefting has significant psychological and socio- economic effects on patient quality of life and require a multidisciplinary team approach for management. The complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in the incidence and cause of clefting. In this review, the embryology, classification, epidemiology, and etiology of cleft lip are discussed. The primary goals of surgical repair are to restore normal function, speech development, and facial esthetics. Different techniques are employed based on surgeon expertise and the unique patient presentations. Pre-surgical orthopedics are frequently employed prior to definitive repair to improve outcomes. Long term follow up and quality of life studies are discussed. PMID:24400297

  13. NEURAL FIBROLIPOMA OF THE MEDIAN NERVE.

    PubMed

    Fares, Jawad; Natout, Nizar; Fares, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of neural fibrolipoma (lipofibromatous hamartoma) of the median nerve of the hand. An 18-year-old male complaining of progressive and chronic macrodactyly of his thumb of the left hand, with neurological complains, was admitted to the hospital. Magnetic resonance (MR) evaluation revealed fibro-fatty infiltration of the median nerve at the level of the carpal tunnel, and the terminal branches of the median nerve in the thumb and index. The pathological examination of excised tissue confirmed the diagnosis of neural fibrolipoma of the terminal branch of the median nerve in his thumb. Imaging is recommended; MR studies on morphological abnormalities must be done in similar cases.

  14. Dental Decay Phenotype in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting.

    PubMed

    Howe, B J; Cooper, M E; Wehby, G L; Resick, J M; Nidey, N L; Valencia-Ramirez, L C; Lopez-Palacio, A M; Rivera, D; Vieira, A R; Weinberg, S M; Marazita, M L; Moreno Uribe, L M

    2017-09-01

    Although children with oral clefts have a higher risk for dental anomalies when compared with the general population, prior studies have shown conflicting results regarding their dental decay risk. Also, few studies have assessed dental decay risk in unaffected relatives of children with clefts. Thus, the question of increased risk of dental decay in individuals with oral clefts or their unaffected relatives is still open for empirical investigation. This study characterizes dental decay in the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts and their relatives, as compared with controls, and it addresses whether families with oral clefts have a significantly increased risk for dental decay versus the general population. A total of 3,326 subjects were included: 639 case probands, 1,549 unaffected relatives, and 1,138 controls. Decay was identified from in-person dental examinations or intraoral photographs. Case-control differences were tested with regression analysis. No significant differences were shown in percentage decayed and filled teeth and decayed teeth in the primary dentition (dft, dt) and permanent dentition (DFT, DT) in cases versus controls. In the cleft region, no significant differences were seen in primary or permanent decay (dt, DT) when compared with controls. No difference was found with regard to cleft type and percentage dft, dt, DFT, and DT in case probands. Nonsignificant differences were found in unaffected siblings and parents versus controls (primary and permanent dentitions). Collectively, these findings indicate that individuals with nonsyndromic oral clefts and their families do not have a higher dental decay risk as compared with the general population. These results suggest that either genetic or environmental factors underlying a higher susceptibility for dental anomalies do not increase caries risk or that the seemingly higher risk for dental decay associated with increased dental anomalies in case

  15. Heuristics for the inversion median problem

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of genome rearrangements has become a mainstay of phylogenetics and comparative genomics. Fundamental in such a study is the median problem: given three genomes find a fourth that minimizes the sum of the evolutionary distances between itself and the given three. Many exact algorithms and heuristics have been developed for the inversion median problem, of which the best known is MGR. Results We present a unifying framework for median heuristics, which enables us to clarify existing strategies and to place them in a partial ordering. Analysis of this framework leads to a new insight: the best strategies continue to refer to the input data rather than reducing the problem to smaller instances. Using this insight, we develop a new heuristic for inversion medians that uses input data to the end of its computation and leverages our previous work with DCJ medians. Finally, we present the results of extensive experimentation showing that our new heuristic outperforms all others in accuracy and, especially, in running time: the heuristic typically returns solutions within 1% of optimal and runs in seconds to minutes even on genomes with 25'000 genes--in contrast, MGR can take days on instances of 200 genes and cannot be used beyond 1'000 genes. Conclusion Finding good rearrangement medians, in particular inversion medians, had long been regarded as the computational bottleneck in whole-genome studies. Our new heuristic for inversion medians, ASM, which dominates all others in our framework, puts that issue to rest by providing near-optimal solutions within seconds to minutes on even the largest genomes. PMID:20122203

  16. Prevalence of dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Rullo, R; Festa, V M; Rullo, R; Addabbo, F; Chiodini, P; Vitale, M; Perillo, L

    2015-09-01

    To examine the prevalence of different types of dental anomalies in children with nonsyndromic cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip-palate, and bilateral cleft lip-palate. A sample of 90 patients (aged 4-20 years) affected by isolated cleft lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate was examined. Cleft patients were classified into one of three groups according to cleft type: (1) Unilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, (2) Bilateral Cleft Lip-Palate, and (3) Cleft Lip. Intraoral exams, panoramic radiographs and dental casts, were used to analyse the prevalence of the various dental anomalies included in this study. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with cleft lip, unilateral cleft lip and palate and bilateral cleft lip and palate. The congenital absence of the cleft-side lateral incisor was observed in 40% of the sample, and a total of 30% patients showed supernumerary teeth at the incisors region. Second premolar agenesis was found in 4.4% of patients, whereas in 18.9% of the sample there was an ectopic dental eruption. Lateral or central incisors rotation was noted in 31.1% of the sample, while shape anomaly, lateral incisor microdontia, and enamel hypoplasia were detected respectively in 25.6%, 5.6% and 18.9% of cleft patients. High prevalence of different dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate has been confirmed. This study, in particular, shows the presence of ectopic and rotated teeth in the cleft area.

  17. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  18. New insights in collagen turnover in orofacial cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Carinci, Francesco; Moscheni, Claudia; Torri, Carlo; Pezzetti, Furio; Scapoli, Luca; Martinelli, Marcella; Gioia, Magda; Stabellini, Giordano

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to characterize the fibroblast phenotype of patients by analyzing gene and protein expression of cleft lip and/or cleft palate fibroblasts in relation to collagen turnover and extracellular matrix remodeling. Human palatal fibroblasts were obtained from three healthy subjects without cleft lip and/or cleft palate and from three subjects with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Collagen turnover-related gene and protein expression were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western and dot blots, and sodium dodecyl sulfate zymography. Cleft lip and/or cleft palate fibroblasts, compared with controls, displayed a down-regulation of collagens type I and III messenger RNA (p < .0001 and p < .001, respectively) but an opposite tendency to increase protein levels. Cleft lip and/or cleft palate cells had higher lysyl hydroxylase-2b messenger RNA levels expressed in relation to collagen type I messenger RNA, down-regulated matrix metalloproteinase-1, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine messenger RNA (p < .0001 and p < .01, respectively). Pro-matrix metalloproteinase-1 tended to decrease, and pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 were down-regulated (p < .01, p < .05, respectively), as was Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine protein expression (p < .05). Our results suggest that the cleft lip and/or cleft palate fibroblast phenotype is characterized by a tendency toward interstitial collagen deposition due to posttranslational modifications, such as decreased collagen degradation by matrix metalloproteinases and increased collagen cross-links. These findings may contribute to the knowledge of the cleft lip and/or cleft palate fibroblast phenotype and may be useful to the surgeon when considering the potential wound contraction and subsequent undesired scarring in cleft lip and/or cleft palate ocurring after the surgical closure of a cleft palate.

  19. Early secondary alveoloplasty in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Arangio, Paolo; Marianetti, Tito M; Tedaldi, Massimiliano; Ramieri, Valerio; Cascone, Piero

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this study were to present a personal surgical technique throughout the review of international literature concerning surgical techniques, objectives, and outcomes in early secondary alveoloplasty and to describe our personal surgical techniques in alveolar bone defect repair in cleft lip and palate.Throughout a literature analysis, it is now settled that early secondary alveoloplasty could reestablish the continuity of alveolar bone and prevent upper dental arch collapse after presurgical orthopedic upper maxilla expansion; it also might give a good bone support for teeth facing the cleft and allow the eruption of permanent elements with the bone graft and rebalance the symmetry of dental arch, improve facial aesthetic, guarantee an adequate amount of bone tissue for a further prosthetic reconstruction with implant, and finally close the eventual oronasal fistula.The surgical technique we are presenting permitted a total number of 35 early secondary alveoloplasty on which a long-term follow-up is still taking place.We can assess that early secondary alveoloplasty must be performed before permanent canine eruption. Iliac crest is the suggested donor site for bone grafting; orthopedic and orthodontic treatments must be performed in association with surgery, and if there is the dental element agenesia, an implantation treatment must be considered.

  20. A mutation in mouse Pak1ip1 causes orofacial clefting while human PAK1IP1 maps to 6p24 translocation breaking points associated with orofacial clefting.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adam P; Mansilla, M Adela; Choe, Youngshik; Helminski, Simon; Sturm, Richard; Maute, Roy L; May, Scott R; Hozyasz, Kamil K; Wójcicki, Piotr; Mostowska, Adrianna; Davidson, Beth; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Pleasure, Samuel J; Murray, Jeffrey C; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are among the most common birth defects and result in an improper formation of the mouth or the roof of the mouth. Monosomy of the distal aspect of human chromosome 6p has been recognized as causative in congenital malformations affecting the brain and cranial skeleton including orofacial clefts. Among the genes located in this region is PAK1IP1, which encodes a nucleolar factor involved in ribosomal stress response. Here, we report the identification of a novel mouse line that carries a point mutation in the Pak1ip1 gene. Homozygous mutants show severe developmental defects of the brain and craniofacial skeleton, including a median orofacial cleft. We recovered this line of mice in a forward genetic screen and named the allele manta-ray (mray). Our findings prompted us to examine human cases of orofacial clefting for mutations in the PAK1IP1 gene or association with the locus. No deleterious variants in the PAK1IP1 gene coding region were recognized, however, we identified a borderline association effect for SNP rs494723 suggesting a possible role for the PAK1IP1 gene in human orofacial clefting.

  1. A Mutation in Mouse Pak1ip1 Causes Orofacial Clefting while Human PAK1IP1 Maps to 6p24 Translocation Breaking Points Associated with Orofacial Clefting

    PubMed Central

    Helminski, Simon; Sturm, Richard; Maute, Roy L.; May, Scott R.; Hozyasz, Kamil K.; Wójcicki, Piotr; Mostowska, Adrianna; Davidson, Beth; Adamopoulos, Iannis E.; Pleasure, Samuel J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are among the most common birth defects and result in an improper formation of the mouth or the roof of the mouth. Monosomy of the distal aspect of human chromosome 6p has been recognized as causative in congenital malformations affecting the brain and cranial skeleton including orofacial clefts. Among the genes located in this region is PAK1IP1, which encodes a nucleolar factor involved in ribosomal stress response. Here, we report the identification of a novel mouse line that carries a point mutation in the Pak1ip1 gene. Homozygous mutants show severe developmental defects of the brain and craniofacial skeleton, including a median orofacial cleft. We recovered this line of mice in a forward genetic screen and named the allele manta-ray (mray). Our findings prompted us to examine human cases of orofacial clefting for mutations in the PAK1IP1 gene or association with the locus. No deleterious variants in the PAK1IP1 gene coding region were recognized, however, we identified a borderline association effect for SNP rs494723 suggesting a possible role for the PAK1IP1 gene in human orofacial clefting. PMID:23935987

  2. Weight, Length, and Body Mass Index Growth of Children Under 2 Years of Age With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Gabriela Serrano; Marques, Ilza Lazarini; de Barros, Suely Prietto; Arena, Eliane Petean; de Souza, Luiz

    2016-05-01

    To study the growth of length-for-age (L/A), weight-for-age (W/A), and body mass index (BMI) of children with cleft lip and palate receiving a normal diet; to establish specific growth curves for children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip (CLP/ICP) who had not undergone palatoplasty and for children with isolated cleft lip (ICL); and to assess if CLP/ICP growth differed from ICL growth and if CLP/ICP and ICL growth differed from growth for typical children. Prospective and cross-sectional study. Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil. Weight and length of 381 children with cleft lip and palate and who were younger than 2 years were recorded and used to calculate W/A, L/A, and BMI growth curves. The 2006 World Health Organization growth charts were used as a reference for typical children. All children received a normal diet for age. Children with CLP/ICP had median W/A and BMI growth curves below growth curves for typical children but showed spontaneous recovery starting at approximately 5 months of age, even with nonoperated cleft palate. Children with ICL had growth similar to that of typical children. Children with CLP/ICP, who initially had W/A and BMI values less than those of the ICL group, had W/A and BMI equal to or higher than the ICL group after 9 months of age. Children with CLP/ICP had impaired W/A and BMI growth with spontaneous recovery starting early in childhood. This study established specific W/A, BMI, and L/A growth curves for children with cleft lip and palate.

  3. Switching non-local vector median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method that removes random-valued impulse noise superimposed on a natural color image. In impulse noise removal, it is essential to employ a switching-type filtering method, as used in the well-known switching median filter, to preserve the detail of an original image with good quality. In color image filtering, it is generally preferable to deal with the red (R), green (G), and blue (B) components of each pixel of a color image as elements of a vectorized signal, as in the well-known vector median filter, rather than as component-wise signals to prevent a color shift after filtering. By taking these fundamentals into consideration, we propose a switching-type vector median filter with non-local processing that mainly consists of a noise detector and a noise removal filter. Concretely, we propose a noise detector that proactively detects noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the isolation tendencies of pixels of interest not in an input image but in difference images between RGB components. Furthermore, as the noise removal filter, we propose an extended version of the non-local median filter, we proposed previously for grayscale image processing, named the non-local vector median filter, which is designed for color image processing. The proposed method realizes a superior balance between the preservation of detail and impulse noise removal by proactive noise detection and non-local switching vector median filtering, respectively. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural color images.

  4. Ocular Manifestations of Oblique Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Ortube, Maria Carolina; Dipple, Katrina; Setoguchi, Yoshio; Kawamoto, Henry K.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the Tessier classification, craniofacial clefts are numbered from 0 to 14 and extend along constant axes through the eyebrows, eyelids, maxilla, nostrils, and the lips. We studied a patient with bilateral cleft 10 associated with ocular abnormalities. Method Clinical report with orbital and cranial computed tomography. Results After pregnancy complicated by oligohydramnios, digoxin, and lisinopril exposure, a boy was born with facial and ocular dysmorphism. Examination at age 26 months showed bilateral epibulbar dermoids, covering half the corneal surface, and unilateral morning glory anomaly of the optic nerve. Ductions of the right eye were normal, but the left eye had severely impaired ductions in all directions, left hypotropia, and esotropia. Under anesthesia, the left eye could not be rotated freely in any direction. Bilateral Tessier cleft number 10 was implicated by the presence of colobomata of the middle third of the upper eyelids and eyebrows. As the cleft continued into the hairline, there was marked anterior scalp alopecia. Computed x-ray tomography showed a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst and calcification of the reflected tendon of the superior oblique muscle, trochlea, and underlying sclera, with downward and lateral globe displacement. Discussion Tessier 10 clefts are very rare and usually associated with encephalocele. Bilateral 10 clefts have not been reported previously. In this case, there was coexisting unilateral morning glory anomaly and arachnoid cyst of the left middle cranial fossa but no encephalocele. Conclusions Bilateral Tessier facial cleft 10 may be associated with alopecia, morning glory anomaly, epibulbar dermoids, arachnoid cyst, and restrictive strabismus. PMID:20856062

  5. Median palmar digital neuropathy in a cheerleader.

    PubMed

    Shields, R W; Jacobs, I B

    1986-11-01

    Median palmar digital neuropathy developed in a 16-year-old girl as a result of chronic trauma to the palm during cheerleading activities. The clinical findings on examination, which included paresthesias in the distribution of a palmar digital nerve and exacerbation of symptoms with compression of the palm, were consistent with this diagnosis. Nerve conduction studies documented a lesion of the median palmar digital nerve. Avoidance of cheerleading activities resulted in nearly total resolution of the symptoms. Awareness of this entity and the value of nerve conduction studies in establishing the diagnosis may avoid confusion and facilitate correct diagnosis and management.

  6. Late reconstruction of median nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jia-Wei Kevin; Mirarchi, Adam J

    2012-10-01

    The median nerve provides sensory innervation to the radial aspect of the hand, including the palm, thumb, index, long, and half of the ring fingers. It provides motor innervation to most of the volar forearm musculature and, importantly, to m ost of thenar musculature. The main goal of median nerve reconstructive procedures is to restore thumb opposition. There are a variety of transfers that can achieve this goal but tendon transfers must recreate thumb opposition, which involves 3 basics movements: thumb abduction, flexion, and pronation. Many tendon transfers exist and the choice of tendon transfer should be tailored to the patient's needs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Primary Care Pediatrician and the Care of Children With Cleft Lip and/or Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Charlotte W; Jacob, Lisa S; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2017-05-01

    Orofacial clefts, specifically cleft lip and/or cleft palate (CL/P), are among the most common congenital anomalies. CL/P vary in their location and severity and comprise 3 overarching groups: cleft lip (CL), cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP), and cleft palate alone (CP). CL/P may be associated with one of many syndromes that could further complicate a child's needs. Care of patients with CL/P spans prenatal diagnosis into adulthood. The appropriate timing and order of specific cleft-related care are important factors for optimizing outcomes; however, care should be individualized to meet the specific needs of each patient and family. Children with CL/P should receive their specialty cleft-related care from a multidisciplinary cleft or craniofacial team with sufficient patient and surgical volume to promote successful outcomes. The primary care pediatrician at the child's medical home has an essential role in making a timely diagnosis and referral; providing ongoing health care maintenance, anticipatory guidance, and acute care; and functioning as an advocate for the patient and a liaison between the family and the craniofacial/cleft team. This document provides background on CL/P and multidisciplinary team care, information about typical timing and order of cleft-related care, and recommendations for cleft/craniofacial teams and primary care pediatricians in the care of children with CL/P. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  9. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  10. Alar web in cleft lip nose deformity: study in adult unilateral clefts.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Chandra, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    The correction of alar webbing in unilateral cleft lip nose deformity is challenging because of progressive distortions in the alar web region during the period of growth. Alar webbing is a persistent universal deformity in both the primary and secondary cleft lip noses. The purpose of this article is to study the alar web deformity in adult patients with unilateral cleft lip noses. Twenty-five patients aged 13 years and older presenting with unilateral cleft nasal deformity were included. Preoperative and postoperative measurements of the nose, along with detailed intraoperative recording of the deformed anatomy, were done. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was also done in selected cases. Transcolumellar open rhinoplasty was performed in all the cases, and nasal septal straightening with centralization was done. Cleft alar base augmentation was done using bone graft to restore symmetry of the nasal tripod. Both the cleft and noncleft alar cartilages were extensively mobilized from the skin and mucosal sides. The overgrown and caudally slumped cleft-side alar cartilage was resected caudally and was then resuspended in a symmetrical position with the noncleft alar cartilage. A midline-strut septal cartilage extension graft was used to restore the tip aesthetics. The skin overlying the alar web was in-rolled after semilunar cartilage resection, and skin excision was also done to restore symmetry with the opposite vestibule. The remaining secondary cleft nasal and lip deformities were corrected depending upon the specific presenting pathologic abnormality. The cleft alar cartilage was found to be caudally displaced in all the cases. The caudal border of the lateral crus was prolapsing in the cavity of the vestibule on the superomedial aspect and was tenting the skin in the area of the weak triangle, producing the characteristic alar web deformity. In the study group, the maximum width of the cleft alar cartilage at the level of the lateral crus was increased by

  11. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  12. Breastfeeding After Early Repair of Cleft Lip in Newborns With Cleft Lip or Cleft Lip and Palate in a Baby-Friendly Designated Hospital.

    PubMed

    Burianova, Iva; Kulihova, Katarina; Vitkova, Veronika; Janota, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Goals of treatment of orofacial cleft are to improve feeding, speech, hearing, and facial appearance. Early surgery brings faster healing, better cosmetic effect, and fewer complications. Breastfeeding rates after early surgery are unknown. Early repair of the cleft lip may influence breastfeeding rates. Research aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding after early repair of the cleft lip in a Baby-Friendly designated hospital. The rate of breastfeeding in newborns with cleft lip was compared to cleft lip and palate. This was a retrospective cohort study. The study group included infants with cleft lip and cleft lip and palate operated on in the first 2 weeks of life. Newborns and their mothers were supported by a team promoting breastfeeding. One hundred four infants (70 boys and 34 girls) were included. Isolated cleft lip was present in 56 (53.8%) infants, and cleft lip and palate in 48 (46.2%). Forty-four (78.6%) of the infants with a cleft lip were breastfed, 3 (5.4%) received human milk via bottle or syringe, and 9 (16.0%) were formula fed. Three (6.2%) of the infants with a cleft lip and palate were breastfed, 31 (64.6%) received human milk via bottle or Haberman feeder, and 14 (29.2%) were formula fed. The rate of breastfeeding in patients following early surgery of the cleft lip was high and comparable to the general population. The rate of breastfeeding in babies with cleft lip and palate after early repair of the cleft lip remained low.

  13. Prevalence at birth of cleft lip with or without cleft palate: data from the International Perinatal Database of Typical Oral Clefts (IPDTOC).

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    As part of a collaborative project on the epidemiology of craniofacial anomalies, funded by the National Institutes for Dental and Craniofacial Research and channeled through the Human Genetics Programme of the World Health Organization, the International Perinatal Database of Typical Orofacial Clefts (IPDTOC) was established in 2003. IPDTOC is collecting case-by-case information on cleft lip with or without cleft palate and on cleft palate alone from birth defects registries contributing to at least one of three collaborative organizations: European Surveillance Systems of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) in Europe, National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) in the United States, and International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR) worldwide. Analysis of the collected information is performed centrally at the ICBDSR Centre in Rome, Italy, to maximize the comparability of results. The present paper, the first of a series, reports data on the prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate from 54 registries in 30 countries over at least 1 complete year during the period 2000 to 2005. Thus, the denominator comprises more than 7.5 million births. A total of 7704 cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (7141 livebirths, 237 stillbirths, 301 terminations of pregnancy, and 25 with pregnancy outcome unknown) were available. The overall prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was 9.92 per 10,000. The prevalence of cleft lip was 3.28 per 10,000, and that of cleft lip and palate was 6.64 per 10,000. There were 5918 cases (76.8%) that were isolated, 1224 (15.9%) had malformations in other systems, and 562 (7.3%) occurred as part of recognized syndromes. Cases with greater dysmorphological severity of cleft lip with or without cleft palate were more likely to include malformations of other systems.

  14. Iterative dip-steering median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Shoudong; Zhu, Weihong; Shi, Taikun

    2017-09-01

    Seismic data are always contaminated with high noise components, which present processing challenges especially for signal preservation and its true amplitude response. This paper deals with an extension of the conventional median filter, which is widely used in random noise attenuation. It is known that the standard median filter works well with laterally aligned coherent events but cannot handle steep events, especially events with conflicting dips. In this paper, an iterative dip-steering median filter is proposed for the attenuation of random noise in the presence of multiple dips. The filter first identifies the dominant dips inside an optimized processing window by a Fourier-radial transform in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The optimum size of the processing window depends on the intensity of random noise that needs to be attenuated and the amount of signal to be preserved. It then applies median filter along the dominant dip and retains the signals. Iterations are adopted to process the residual signals along the remaining dominant dips in a descending sequence, until all signals have been retained. The method is tested by both synthetic and field data gathers and also compared with the commonly used f-k least squares de-noising and f-x deconvolution.

  15. Feeding interventions for growth and development in infants with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Bessell, Alyson; Hooper, Lee; Shaw, William C; Reilly, Sheena; Reid, Julie; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-16

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth defects, affecting about one baby of every 700 born. Feeding these babies is an immediate concern and there is evidence of delay in growth of children with a cleft as compared to those without clefting. In an effort to combat reduced weight for height, a variety of advice and devices are recommended to aid feeding of babies with clefts. This review aims to assess the effects of these feeding interventions in babies with cleft lip and/or palate on growth, development and parental satisfaction. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 27 October 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 27 October 2010), PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 27 October 2010) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 27 October 2010). Attempts were made to identify both unpublished and ongoing studies. There was no restriction with regard to language of publication. Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of feeding interventions for babies born with cleft lip, cleft palate or cleft lip and palate up to the age of 6 months (from term). Studies were assessed for relevance independently and in duplicate. All studies meeting the inclusion criteria were data extracted and assessed for validity independently by each member of the review team. Authors were contacted for clarification or missing information whenever possible. Five RCTs with a total of 292 babies, were included in the review. Comparisons made within the RCTs were squeezable versus rigid feeding bottles (two studies), breastfeeding versus spoon-feeding (one study) and maxillary plate versus no plate (two studies). No statistically significant differences were shown for any of the primary outcomes when comparing bottle types, although squeezable bottles were less likely to require

  16. Perioperative complications in infant cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Homann, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Reich, Alexander; Joos, Ulrich; Werkmeister, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleft surgery in infants includes special risks due to the kind of the malformation. These risks can be attributed in part to the age and the weight of the patient. Whereas a lot of studies investigated the long-term facial outcome of cleft surgery depending on the age at operation, less is known about the complications arising during a cleft surgery in early infancy. Methods We investigated the incidence and severity of perioperative complications in 174 infants undergoing primary cleft surgery. The severity and the complications were recorded during the intraoperative and the early postoperative period according to the classification by Cohen. Results Our study revealed that minor complications occurred in 50 patients. Severe complications were observed during 13 operations. There was no fatal complication in the perioperative period. The risk of complications was found to be directly correlated to the body weight at the time of the surgery. Most of the problems appeared intraoperatively, but they were also followed by complications immediately after the extubation. Conclusion In conclusion, cleft surgery in infancy is accompanied by frequent and sometimes severe perioperative complications that may be attributed to this special surgical field. PMID:17280602

  17. Cleft lip and palate results from Hedgehog signaling antagonism in the mouse: Phenotypic characterization and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Robert J; Song, Chihwa; Sulik, Kathleen K; Everson, Joshua L; Gipp, Jerry J; Yan, Dong; Bushman, Wade; Rowland, Ian J

    2010-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway provides inductive signals critical for developmental patterning of the brain and face. In humans and in animal models interference with this pathway yields birth defects, among the most well-studied of which fall within the holoprosencephaly (HPE) spectrum. Timed-pregnant C57Bl/6J mice were treated with the natural Hh signaling antagonist cyclopamine by subcutaneous infusion from gestational day (GD) 8.25 to 9.5, or with a potent cyclopamine analog, AZ75, administered by oral gavage at GD 8.5. Subsequent embryonic morphogenesis and fetal central nervous system (CNS) phenotype were respectively investigated by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In utero Hh signaling antagonist exposure induced a spectrum of craniofacial and brain malformations. Cyclopamine exposure caused lateral cleft lip and palate (CLP) defects attributable to embryonic deficiency of midline and lower medial nasal prominence tissue. The CLP phenotype was accompanied by olfactory bulb hypoplasia and anterior pituitary aplasia, but otherwise grossly normal brain morphology. AZ75 exposure caused alobar and semilobar HPE with associated median facial deficiencies. An intermediate phenotype of median CLP was produced infrequently by both drug administration regimens. The results of this study suggest that interference with Hh signaling should be considered in the CLP differential and highlight the occurrence of CNS defects that are expected to be present in a cohort of patients having CLP. This work also illustrates the utility of fetal MRI-based analyses and establishes a novel mouse model for teratogen-induced CLP. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Impact of 22q deletion syndrome on speech outcomes following primary surgery for submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Bezuhly, Michael; Fischbach, Simone; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David M

    2012-03-01

    Patients with 22q deletion syndrome are at increased risk of submucous cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency. The authors' aim is to evaluate speech outcomes following primary Furlow palatoplasty or pharyngeal flap for correction of velopharyngeal insufficiency in submucous cleft palate patients with and without 22q deletion syndrome. Records of submucous cleft palate patients who underwent primary surgery between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed. Data included 22q deletion syndrome diagnosis, age at surgery, procedure, preoperative nasopharyngoscopy and nasometry, speech outcomes, complications, and secondary surgery rates. Seventy-eight submucous cleft palate patients were identified. Twenty-three patients had 22q deletion syndrome. Fewer 22q deletion syndrome patients obtained normal resonance on perceptual assessment compared with nonsyndromic patients (74 percent versus 88 percent). A similar difference existed based on postoperative nasometric scores. Among 22q deletion syndrome patients, similar success rates were achieved with Furlow palatoplasty and pharyngeal flap. No difference in the proportion improved postoperatively was noted between 22q deletion syndrome and nonsyndromic groups. One complication was experienced per group. More revision operations were indicated in the 22q deletion syndrome group (17 percent) compared with the nonsyndromic group (4 percent). Median times to normal resonance for 22q deletion syndrome and nonsyndromic patients were 150 weeks and 34 weeks, respectively. Adjusting for multiple variables, 22q deletion syndrome patients were 3.6 times less likely to develop normal resonance. Careful selection of Furlow palatoplasty or pharyngeal flap for primary repair of submucous cleft palate is highly effective in 22q deletion syndrome patients and yields results approaching those of nonsyndromic patients. Therapeutic, III.

  19. Risk of Oral Clefts (Cleft Lip and/or Palate) in Infants Born to Mothers Taking Topamax (Topiramate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of oral clefts. Q8. Does FDA have post marketing adverse event reports of oral clefts with topiramate? ... based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, BUT the potential ...

  20. Sagittal maxillary growth pattern in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with unrepaired cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Qi; Wu, Jun; Chen, Rong-Jing

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the sagittal maxillary growth pattern during the mixed and permanent dentition in unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients with unrepaired cleft palate. A total of 30 nonsyndromic UCLP patients with unrepaired cleft palate were included, 15 of whom were in mixed dentition and 15 in permanent dentition.Cephalograms were analyzed and compared in the patients with UCLP who have operatively undergone repair with both the lip and palate as well as normal subjects. The UCLP patients with unrepaired cleft palate in mixed dentition showed decreased anterior-posterior length of the maxilla. The UCLP patients with unrepaired cleft palate in permanent dentition demonstrated an almost normal maxillary growth. The operated-on patients both in mixed and permanent dentitions showed maxillary retrusion as well as decreased maxillary length. There appears that there may be the potential normal maxillary growth in UCLP patients, and early surgical repair of the cleft palate may affect sagittal maxillary growth pattern in patients with cleft.

  1. Occlusal Classification in Relation to Original Cleft Width in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Andrew H; Patel, Kamlesh B; Maschhoff, Clayton W; Huebener, Donald V; Skolnick, Gary B; Naidoo, Sybill D; Woo, Albert S

    2015-09-01

    To determine a correlation between the width of the cleft palate measured at the time of lip adhesion, definitive lip repair, and palatoplasty and the subsequent occlusal classification of patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Retrospective, observational study. Referral, urban, children's hospital Participants : Dental models and records of 270 patients were analyzed. None. Angle occlusion classification. The mean age at which occlusal classification was determined was 11 ± 0.3 years. Of the children studies, 84 were diagnosed with Class I or II occlusion, 67 were diagnosed with Class III occlusion, and 119 were lost to follow up or transferred care. Mean cleft widths were significantly larger in subjects with Class III occlusion for all measures at time of lip adhesion and definitive lip repair (P < .02). At time of palatoplasty, cleft widths were significantly greater at the alveolus (P = .025) but not at the midportion of the hard palate (P = .35) or posterior hard palate (P = .10). Cleft widths from the lip through to the posterior hard palate are generally greater in children who are diagnosed with Class III occlusion later in life. Notably, the alveolar cleft width is significantly greater at each time point for patients who went on to develop Class III occlusion. There were no significant differences in cleft widths between patients diagnosed later with Class I and Class II occlusions.

  2. Spectrographic measures of the speech of young children with cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Casal, C; Domínguez, C; Fernández, A; Sarget, R; Martínez-Celdrán, E; Sentís-Vilalta, J; Gay-Escoda, C

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive children with repaired cleft lip and/or palate [isolated cleft lip (CL) 6, isolated cleft palate (CP) 7, unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) 7, and bilateral cleft lip and palate 2] with a mean age of 27 months underwent spectrographic measures of tape-recorded speech (DSP Sona-Graph digital unit). Controls were 22 age- and sex-matched noncleft children. Data analyzed included (1) the Spanish vocalic variables [a, i, u, e, o]: first formant, second formant, duration, and context; (2) obstruent variables [p, t, k]: burst, voice onset time, and duration, and (3) nasal variables [m]: first formant, second formant, and duration. Statistically significant differences were observed between the CL group and the control group in the first formant of [e] and in the increase of the frequency of the [t] burst. Comparison between UCLP and controls showed differences in the second formant of [a], in the first formant of [o], and in the second formant of [o]. These results suggest a small but significant influence of either the cleft lip or its repair on lip rounding for [o] and [u]. In addition, tongue position differences were most likely responsible for the differences seen with [a] and [e]. Spectrographic differences in the current patients did not contribute to meaningful differences in speech sound development. Individualized care (orthodontics, surgery, speech therapy) in children with cleft lip and/or palate attended at specialized craniofacial units contributes to normalization of speech development.

  3. Algorithms for the treatment of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Stal, S; Klebuc, M; Taylor, T D; Spira, M; Edwards, M

    1998-10-01

    Developing standardized outcomes and algorithms of treatment is a constantly evolving task. This article examines four variables in this process: cleft type, operative technique, surgical experience, and timing. Input from international cleft lip and palate programs regarding techniques and treatment modalities provide a dynamic tool for assessment and the development of guidelines in the treatment of the cleft lip and palate patient.

  4. Frontonasal and fibrous dysplasia in a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Albright, Steven B; Hollier, Larry H; Buchanan, Edward P

    2013-07-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia is a rare entity. It has characteristic physical deformities: hypertelorism, broad nasal root, median facial cleft of the upper lip or palate, clefting of the nasal alae, poorly formed nasal tip, cranium bifidum occultum, and a widow's peak hairline. Fibrous dysplasia is a benign bone tumor in which normal bone is replaced by fibrous, poorly formed osseus tissues. We present a patient with frontonasal dysplasia who desired correction of her hypertelorism. Incidentally, fibrous dysplasia was found in her left orbit complicating surgical correction. In addition, the patient has velopharyngeal insufficiency and a class III malocclusion. The interplay of all these craniofacial defects makes the sequencing and timing of surgery important in this unique patient.

  5. Transverse and vertical asymmetry of bilateral craniofacial structures in repaired unilateral and bilateral complete cleft lip and palate cases.

    PubMed

    Lal, N; Utreja, A; Tewari, A; Chari, P S

    1991-03-01

    Fifty repaired complete cleft lip and palate cases (38 UCLP and 12 BCLP) in the age range of 6 to 14 years were evaluated for transverse and vertical asymmetry using postero-anterior cephalograms. A total of nine bilateral landmarks, representing upper face, mid face and lower face were used. Results showed that asymmetry was not confined to any single plane of reference but manifested in both dimensions--transverse and vertical. The UCLP group had greater asymmetry of mid face than the BCLP group. Asymmetry was found to be extending to distant areas besides the contiguous structures.

  6. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in ... zoster (shingles) or herpes simplex (cold sores) infection Injury to the face Migraine Myofascial pain syndrome Sinusitis or sinus infection ( ...

  7. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  8. Collagen nerve wrap for median nerve scarring.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Ballas, Efstathios G; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2015-02-01

    Nerve wrapping materials have been manufactured to inhibit nerve tissue adhesions and diminish inflammatory and immunologic reactions in nerve surgery. Collagen nerve wrap is a biodegradable type I collagen material that acts as an interface between the nerve and the surrounding tissues. Its main advantage is that it stays in place during the period of tissue healing and is then gradually absorbed once tissue healing is completed. This article presents a surgical technique that used a collagen nerve wrap for the management of median nerve tissue adhesions in 2 patients with advanced carpal tunnel syndrome due to median nerve scarring and adhesions. At last follow-up, both patients had complete resolution with no recurrence of their symptoms. Complications related to the biodegradable material were not observed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Median Citation Index vs Journal Impact Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2015-03-01

    The Journal Impact Factor is an arithmetic mean: It is the average number of citations, in a year, to a journal's articles that were published the previous two years. But for the vast majority of scholarly journals, the distribution of these citations is skewed (non-symmetric). We argue that a more representative member of the skewed distribution of citations is its median, not the mean. We thus introduce the Median Citation Index (MCI) and compare it to the journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a potentially more suitable choice of the ``center'' of the distribution, or its typical value. Unlike the JIF, the MCI is far less sensitive to outlier (very highly cited) papers or to gaming, and does not lend itself to the hype of calculating it to three decimal digits.

  10. A semblance-guided median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.C. ); Toksoz, M.N. ); Purdy, G.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A slowness selective median filter based on information from a local set of traces is described and implemented. The filter is constructed in two steps, the first being an estimation of a preferred slowness and the second, the selection of a median or trimmed mean value to replace the original data point. A symmetric window of traces defining the filter aperture is selected about each trace to be filtered and the filter applied repeatedly to each time point. The preferred slowness is determined by scanning a range of linear moveouts within the user-specified slowness passband. Semblance is computed for each trial slowness and the preferred slowness selected from the peak semblance value. Data points collected along this preferred slowness are then sorted from lowest to highest and in the case of a pure median filter, the middle point(s) selected to replace the original data point. This approach may be sued as a velocity filter to estimate coherent signal within a specified slowness passband and reject coherent energy outside this range. For applications of this type, other velocity estimators may be used in place of the authors semblance measure to provide improved velocity estimation and better filter performance. The filter aperture may also be extended to provide increased velocity estimation, but will result in additional lateral smearing of signal. The authors show that, in addition to a velocity filter, their approach may be used to improve signal-to-noise ratios in noisy data. The median filter tends to suppress the amplitude of random background noise and semblance weighting may be used to reduce the amplitude of background noise further while enhancing coherent signal.

  11. Unusual median nerve schwannoma: a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Andrea; Tudose, Irina; Terzea, Dana; Răducu, Laura; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are common soft tissue neoplasms and their characterization is often challenging. Although the surgical pathology defines some typical entities, some degree of controversy regarding the classification of these tumors still exists. Newer imagistic and histopathological techniques are crucial for their accurate diagnosis and grading. We present an unusual case of median nerve schwannoma in a young patient, discussing the clinical, surgical and pathological elements, including immunohistochemistry.

  12. Mentalis muscle responses to median nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kwong-Kum; Chen, Jen-Tse; Lai, Kuan-Lin; Kao, Chuen-Der; Lin, Chia-Yi; Liu, Chih-Yang; Lin, Yung-Yang; Shan, Din-E; Wu, Zin-An

    2006-08-31

    Electrical stimulation may produce excitation or inhibition of the motor neurons, as represented the blink reflex and masseter silent period in response to trigeminal nerve stimulation. Clinically, a light touch on the palm may evoke a mentalis muscle response (MMR), i.e. a palmomental reflex. In this study, we attempted to characterize the MMR to median nerve stimulation. Electrical stimulation was applied at the median nerve with recordings at the mentalis muscles. An inhibition study was done with continuous stimuli during muscle contraction (I1 and I2 of MMRaverage). Excitation was done with a single shot during muscle relaxation (MMRsingle) or by continuous stimuli during muscle contraction (E1 and E2 of MMRaverage). The characteristic differences between MMRaverage and MMRsingle were as follows: earlier onset latencies of MMRaverage (MMRaverage < 45 ms; MMRsingle > 60 ms), and a lower amplitude of MMRaverage (MMRaverage < 50 microV; MMRsingle > 150 microV). The receptive field of MMRsingle was widespread over the body surface and that of MMRaverage was limited to the trigeminal, median and index digital nerves. Series of stimuli usually significantly decreased the amplitude of MMRsingle, as a phenomenon of habituation. On the other hand, it was difficult to evoke the earlier response (i.e. MMRaverage) without continuous stimuli and an average technique. MMRaverage had the components of both excitation (E) and inhibition (I); for example, E1-I1-E2-I2 or I1-E2-I2. E2 was the most consistent component. In patients with dorsal column dysfunction, median nerve stimulation could successfully elicit MMRsingle, but not MMRaverage. Contrarily, in patients with pain sensory loss, it was more difficult to reproduce MMRsingle than MMRaverage. It seemed that MMRaverage and MMRsingle did not have equivalents across the different modalities of stimulation.

  13. Shoulder posture and median nerve sliding

    PubMed Central

    Julius, Andrea; Lees, Rebecca; Dilley, Andrew; Lynn, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Background Patients with upper limb pain often have a slumped sitting position and poor shoulder posture. Pain could be due to poor posture causing mechanical changes (stretch; local pressure) that in turn affect the function of major limb nerves (e.g. median nerve). This study examines (1) whether the individual components of slumped sitting (forward head position, trunk flexion and shoulder protraction) cause median nerve stretch and (2) whether shoulder protraction restricts normal nerve movements. Methods Longitudinal nerve movement was measured using frame-by-frame cross-correlation analysis from high frequency ultrasound images during individual components of slumped sitting. The effects of protraction on nerve movement through the shoulder region were investigated by examining nerve movement in the arm in response to contralateral neck side flexion. Results Neither moving the head forward or trunk flexion caused significant movement of the median nerve. In contrast, 4.3 mm of movement, adding 0.7% strain, occurred in the forearm during shoulder protraction. A delay in movement at the start of protraction and straightening of the nerve trunk provided evidence of unloading with the shoulder flexed and elbow extended and the scapulothoracic joint in neutral. There was a 60% reduction in nerve movement in the arm during contralateral neck side flexion when the shoulder was protracted compared to scapulothoracic neutral. Conclusion Slumped sitting is unlikely to increase nerve strain sufficient to cause changes to nerve function. However, shoulder protraction may place the median nerve at risk of injury, since nerve movement is reduced through the shoulder region when the shoulder is protracted and other joints are moved. Both altered nerve dynamics in response to moving other joints and local changes to blood supply may adversely affect nerve function and increase the risk of developing upper quadrant pain. PMID:15282032

  14. Three-dimensional nasal changes following maxillary advancement in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A; McCance, A M; James, D R; Moss, J P

    1996-06-01

    Three-dimensional laser surface scanning of the face was performed before and after Le Fort I maxillary advancement in 24 patients with replaced clefts of the lip and palate. The surgery resulted in advancement of the upper lip and para-alar tissues and an increase in the relative prominence of the nose within the face. These changes were produced at the expense of an increase in nasal width and a reduction in nasal tip protrusion. The changes in nasal morphology showed significant variation among patients.

  15. Median arcuate ligament syndrome in athletes.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jeffrey N; Haskins, Ivy N; Brody, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) is a common entity in young athletes. Most occurrences are due to a "cramp" or "stitch," but an uncommon, and often overlooked, etiology of ETAP is median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS). The initial presentation of MALS typically includes postprandial nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, but in athletes, the initial presentation may be ETAP. We present a case series of three athletes who presented with exercise-related transient abdominal pain and were ultimately diagnosed and treated for MALS. Unlike other patients with median arcuate ligament syndrome, these athletes presented with exercise-induced pain, rather than the common postprandial symptoms. These symptoms persisted despite conservative measures. Work-up of patients with suspected MALS include a computed tomography or magnetic resonance angiography showing compression of the celiac artery with post-stenotic dilation, or a celiac artery ultrasound demonstrating increased velocities (>200 cm/s(2)) with deep exhalation. All patients underwent a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release. Postoperatively, there were no complications, and all were discharged home on postoperative day #2. All patients have subsequently returned to athletics with resolution of their symptoms. ETAP is common in athletes and often resolves with preventative or conservative strategies. When ETAP persists despite these methods, alternative causes, including MALS, should be considered. A combination of a thorough history and physical exam, as well as radiographic data, is essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and treatment strategy.

  16. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  17. Cleft palate only: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    TETTAMANTI, L.; AVANTAGGIATO, A.; NARDONE, M.; SILVESTRE-RANGIL, J.; TAGLIABUE, A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Cleft palate only (CPO) is one of the most common congenital malformations worldwide. The etiopathogenesis of CPO is not completely understood. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of drugs during pregnancy, advanced paternal age, have been demonstrated to be a risk of CPO, but conflicting results have also been published. Insufficient intake of folic acid during the pregnancy has been suggested to increase the risk for CPO. The demonstrated risk for siblings and the higher risk for monozygotic twins suggest a genetic etiopathogenesis for CPO. In some cases of CPO a prevalent mode of inheritance has been reported, but oligogenic models with reduced penetrance, and the risk related to environmental factors have also been proved. One of the first manifestations associated with CPO is difficulty with feeding. Aerophagia is a problem in these infants with CPO and requires more frequent burping and slower feeding. The inability to generate intraoral breath pressure due to nasal air emission in CPO children frequently manifests as articulation difficulties, particularly consonant weakness, and unintelligible speech. Hearing disorders are prevalent among individuals with CPO, as a result of chronic otitis media with effusion due to eustachian tube dysfunction. A multidisciplinary team is essential to manage the many aspects of CPO. In treating CPO, the reconstructive surgeon works in cooperation with otolaryngologists, dentists and orthodontists, speech pathologists, audiologists, geneticists, psychiatrists, maxillofacial surgeons, social workers, and prosthodontists. CPO can be considered a genetically complex disease, but new knowledge and new therapeutic approaches have greatly improved the quality of life of these children. Prenatal diagnosis is an important step in the treatment of this disease. PMID:28757935

  18. Cleft palate only: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Tettamanti, L; Avantaggiato, A; Nardone, M; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Tagliabue, A

    2017-01-01

    Cleft palate only (CPO) is one of the most common congenital malformations worldwide. The etiopathogenesis of CPO is not completely understood. Environmental factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, intake of drugs during pregnancy, advanced paternal age, have been demonstrated to be a risk of CPO, but conflicting results have also been published. Insufficient intake of folic acid during the pregnancy has been suggested to increase the risk for CPO. The demonstrated risk for siblings and the higher risk for monozygotic twins suggest a genetic etiopathogenesis for CPO. In some cases of CPO a prevalent mode of inheritance has been reported, but oligogenic models with reduced penetrance, and the risk related to environmental factors have also been proved. One of the first manifestations associated with CPO is difficulty with feeding. Aerophagia is a problem in these infants with CPO and requires more frequent burping and slower feeding. The inability to generate intraoral breath pressure due to nasal air emission in CPO children frequently manifests as articulation difficulties, particularly consonant weakness, and unintelligible speech. Hearing disorders are prevalent among individuals with CPO, as a result of chronic otitis media with effusion due to eustachian tube dysfunction. A multidisciplinary team is essential to manage the many aspects of CPO. In treating CPO, the reconstructive surgeon works in cooperation with otolaryngologists, dentists and orthodontists, speech pathologists, audiologists, geneticists, psychiatrists, maxillofacial surgeons, social workers, and prosthodontists. CPO can be considered a genetically complex disease, but new knowledge and new therapeutic approaches have greatly improved the quality of life of these children. Prenatal diagnosis is an important step in the treatment of this disease.

  19. Muencke syndrome with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter J; Snell, Broughton; Moore, Mark H

    2013-07-01

    Muencke syndrome results from mutations in the FGFR3 gene, and although it is well recognized that the clinical presentation is variable, the important key finding includes coronal synostosis. We present a family where a mother with proven FGFR3 Pro250Arg mutation gave birth to identical twins both of whom had craniosynostosis but had coexisting bilateral cleft lip and palate. We believe that this is the first description of clefting occurring in conjunction with Muencke syndrome and so further extends the range of phenotypic variation that can occur in this syndrome.

  20. Speech evaluation for patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Ann W

    2014-04-01

    Children with cleft palate are at risk for speech problems, particularly those caused by velopharyngeal insufficiency. There may be an additional risk of speech problems caused by malocclusion. This article describes the speech evaluation for children with cleft palate and how the results of the evaluation are used to make treatment decisions. Instrumental procedures that provide objective data regarding the function of the velopharyngeal valve, and the 2 most common methods of velopharyngeal imaging, are also described. Because many readers are not familiar with phonetic symbols for speech phonemes, Standard English letters are used for clarity.

  1. Nutritional standard for children with orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Rowicka, Grażyna; Weker, Halina

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of children with orofacial clefts is a multi-stage process, usually extending over many years and requiring intervention of numerous specialists. Most of the problems in such children before the tissue reconstruction surgery are related to feeding and airway protection during swallowing. Feeding of children with orofacial clefts is the more difficult the more severe the defect is. Such children are at an increased risk of body weight deficit and malnutrition. The aim of the study is to present the nutritional standard for children with orofacial clefts. Feeding principles for children with orofacial clefts: If the clinical state of the child and the emotional state of the mother allow, children with orofacial clefts should be breastfed or bottle-fed with breast milk. If feeding with breast milk is not possible, children should receive appropriate formulas for infants. Their diet can usually be expanded at the same time as in healthy infants and should comply with the nutritional model or standard for children aged 6-12 months. Various feeding techniques are used in children with orofacial clefts, depending not only on the type of the defect, but also the experience of the institution taking care of the child. Such children may require a diet with higher calories due to their increased energy expenditure related to eating. In the case of body weight deficit and/or malnutrition resulting from inadequate diet, a change of the feeding technique should be considered, and, subsequently, a diet modification. The modification may mean an extra formula feeding (in children fed with breast milk) or earlier introduction of supplementary foods. Sometimes a different feeding method than oral feeding must be used, e.g. through a naso-gastric tube or, in extreme cases, a feeding stoma. It is of utmost importance that infants with the said defects gain the optimal body weight before the planned operation, since malnutrition may be a significant reason for delaying the

  2. Older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and palate: a qualitative study exploring aging and appearance.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Claire; Harcourt, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Objective : To explore older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P), focusing on aging and appearance. Design : An exploratory-descriptive qualitative study. Participants : Individual semi-structured interviews (five via telephone, one face-to-face) conducted with six adults between the ages of 57 and 82 years. Results : Interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which resulted in five themes: cleft across the life span, keeping up appearances, being one of a kind, resilience and protection, and cleft in an ever-changing society. A CL/P had an ongoing impact on participants' lives, although its relevance shifted over time and some aspects of life (e.g., romantic relationships, decisions about having children of their own) were particularly affected. Participants seemed at ease living with CL/P as an older adult and considered it an important aspect of their identity, yet they still described feeling isolated at times and had little contact with other people with a cleft. They felt that health care could be more considerate to the needs of older people with a cleft, particularly around dentistry and information provision. Participants thought societal attitudes toward visible differences had changed over the years, but not necessarily for the better. A paradox was evident between reports of being noticed by others because of their cleft and simultaneously feeling invisible or ignored because of their age. Conclusions : These findings have implications for provision of care for older adults with a CL/P and for younger people with a CL/P who will be the older generation of the future.

  3. Barriers to Care for Children with Orofacial Clefts in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, Cynthia H.; Strassle, Paula; Mendez, Dara D.; Lee, Kyung A.; Krohmer, Anne; Meyer, Robert E.; Strauss, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the barriers faced by families of children with birth defects in obtaining healthcare. We examined reported perceived barriers to care and satisfaction with care among mothers of children with orofacial clefts. Methods In 2006, a validated barriers to care mail/phone survey was administered in North Carolina to all resident mothers of children with orofacial clefts born between 2001 and 2004. Potential participants were identified using the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program, an active, state-wide, population-based birth defects registry. Five barriers to care subscales were examined: pragmatics, skills, marginalization, expectations, and knowledge/beliefs. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Results were stratified by cleft type and presence of other birth defects. Results Of 475 eligible participants, 51.6% (n = 245) responded. The six most commonly reported perceived barriers to care were all part of the pragmatics subscale: having to take time off work (45.3%); long waits in the waiting rooms (37.6%); taking care of household responsibilities (29.7%); meeting other family members' needs (29.5%); waiting too many days for appointments (27.0%); and cost (25.0%). Most respondents (72.3%, 175/242) felt “very satisfied” with their child's cleft care. Conclusion Although most participants reported being satisfied with their child's care, many perceived barriers to care were identified. Due to the limited understanding and paucity of research on barriers to care for children with birth defects, including orofacial clefts, additional research on barriers to care and factors associated with them are needed. PMID:25200965

  4. Barriers to care for children with orofacial clefts in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cassell, Cynthia H; Strassle, Paula; Mendez, Dara D; Lee, Kyung A; Krohmer, Anne; Meyer, Robert E; Strauss, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about the barriers faced by families of children with birth defects in obtaining healthcare. We examined reported perceived barriers to care and satisfaction with care among mothers of children with orofacial clefts. In 2006, a validated barriers to care mail/phone survey was administered in North Carolina to all resident mothers of children with orofacial clefts born between 2001 and 2004. Potential participants were identified using the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program, an active, state-wide, population-based birth defects registry. Five barriers to care subscales were examined: pragmatics, skills, marginalization, expectations, and knowledge/beliefs. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Results were stratified by cleft type and presence of other birth defects. Of 475 eligible participants, 51.6% (n = 245) responded. The six most commonly reported perceived barriers to care were all part of the pragmatics subscale: having to take time off work (45.3%); long waits in the waiting rooms (37.6%); taking care of household responsibilities (29.7%); meeting other family members' needs (29.5%); waiting too many days for appointments (27.0%); and cost (25.0%). Most respondents (72.3%, 175/242) felt "very satisfied" with their child's cleft care. Although most participants reported being satisfied with their child's care, many perceived barriers to care were identified. Due to the limited understanding and paucity of research on barriers to care for children with birth defects, including orofacial clefts, additional research on barriers to care and factors associated with them are needed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Multivariate Analysis of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Facial Skeletal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) occurs when the maxillary and nasal facial prominences fail to fuse correctly during development, resulting in a palatal cleft and clefted soft and hard tissues of the dentoalveolus. The UCLP deformity may compromise an individual's ability to eat, chew, and speak. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 7-17-year-old individuals born with UCLP (n = 24) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 24) were assessed. Coordinate values of three-dimensional anatomical landmarks (n = 32) were recorded from each CBCT image. Data were evaluated using principal coordinates analysis (PCOORD) and Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA). Approximately 40% of morphometric variation is captured by PCOORD axes 1-3, and the negative and positive ends of each axis are associated with specific patterns of morphological differences. Approximately 36% of facial skeletal measures significantly differ by confidence interval testing (α = 0.10) between samples. Although significant form differences occur across the facial skeleton, strong patterns of morphological differences were localized to the lateral and superioinferior aspects of the nasal aperture, particularly on the clefted side of the face. The UCLP deformity strongly influences facial skeletal morphology of the midface and oronasal facial regions, and to a lesser extent the upper and lower facial skeletons. The pattern of strong morphological differences in the oronasal region combined with differences across the facial complex suggests that craniofacial bones are integrated and covary, despite influences from the congenital cleft.

  6. High-resolution median nerve sonographic measurements: correlations with median nerve conduction studies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Christina; Caldera, Franklin; Welty, Leah; Lai, Jean; Lento, Paul; Feldman, Eric; Sered, Heather; Sayeed, Yusef; Plastaras, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    To study relationships between median wrist and forearm sonographic measurements and median nerve conduction studies. The study population consisted of a prospective convenience sample of healthy adults. Interventions included high-resolution median nerve sonography and median motor and sensory nerve conduction studies. Main outcome measures included median motor nerve compound muscle action potential amplitude, distal latency, and conduction velocity; sensory nerve action potential amplitude and distal latency; and sonographic median nerve cross-sectional area. Median motor nerve and sensory nerve conduction studies of the index finger were performed using standard published techniques. A second examiner blinded to nerve conduction study results used a high-frequency linear array transducer to measure the cross-sectional area of the median nerve at the distal volar wrist crease (carpal tunnel inlet) and forearm (4 cm proximally), measured in the transverse plane on static sonograms. The outer margin of the median nerve was traced at the junction of the hypoechoic fascicles and adjacent outer connective tissue layer. Fifty median nerves were evaluated in 25 participants. The compound muscle action potential amplitude with wrist stimulation was positively related to the cross-sectional area, with the area increasing by 0.195 mm(2) for every millivolt increase in amplitude in the dominant hand (95% confidence interval, 0.020, 0.370 mm(2); P < .05) and 0.247 mm(2) in the nondominant hand (95% confidence interval, 0.035, 0.459 mm(2); P < .05). There was no significant linear association between the wrist median cross-sectional area and median motor and sensory distal latencies. Conduction velocity through the forearm was not significantly linearly associated with the forearm area or forearm-to-wrist area ratio (tapering ratio). The wrist area was inversely related to the sensory nerve action potential amplitude. Although associations were found between median nerve

  7. Occipital meningoencephalocele with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate and Limb Abnormalities- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Arthi; T, Sadeesh; Swer, Mary Hydrina; Rao, Sudha

    2014-12-01

    A 21-week-old still born female fetus with occipital encepholocele, cleft lip and cleft palate was received from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry and was studied in detail. It was born to Primigravida, of a second degree consanguineous marriage, with unremarkable family history. The biometric measurements were noted which corresponded to the age of the fetus. Further the fetus was embalmed and dissected. On examination an encephalocele of 2.7×1.5 cm was seen in the occipital region with a midline defect in the occipital bone and herniated brain tissue. Other anomalies observed were right unilateral cleft lip, right cleft palate, and bilateral syndactyly of the lower limbs and associated Congenital Talipus Equino Varus of the right foot. Other internal organs were developed appropriate for the age of the fetus.

  8. Occipital meningoencephalocele with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate and Limb Abnormalities- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    T, Sadeesh; Swer, Mary Hydrina; Rao, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    A 21-week-old still born female fetus with occipital encepholocele, cleft lip and cleft palate was received from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry and was studied in detail. It was born to Primigravida, of a second degree consanguineous marriage, with unremarkable family history. The biometric measurements were noted which corresponded to the age of the fetus. Further the fetus was embalmed and dissected. On examination an encephalocele of 2.7×1.5 cm was seen in the occipital region with a midline defect in the occipital bone and herniated brain tissue. Other anomalies observed were right unilateral cleft lip, right cleft palate, and bilateral syndactyly of the lower limbs and associated Congenital Talipus Equino Varus of the right foot. Other internal organs were developed appropriate for the age of the fetus. PMID:25653933

  9. Tobacco smoking and oral clefts: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Little, Julian; Cardy, Amanda; Munger, Ronald G.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between maternal smoking and non-syndromic orofacial clefts in infants. METHODS: A meta-analysis of the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy was carried out using data from 24 case-control and cohort studies. FINDINGS: Consistent, moderate and statistically significant associations were found between maternal smoking and cleft lip, with or without cleft palate (relative risk 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.25-1.44) and between maternal smoking and cleft palate (relative risk 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.35). There was evidence of a modest dose-response effect for cleft lip with or without cleft palate. CONCLUSION: The evidence of an association between maternal tobacco smoking and orofacial clefts is strong enough to justify its use in anti-smoking campaigns. PMID:15112010

  10. [Atrioventricular septal defect in an adult patient: There are 'clefts' and clefts].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nuno; Almeida, Jorge; Amorim, Mário Jorge

    2016-03-01

    In this report, we present the case of an adult male with severe mitral regurgitation due to an atrioventricular septal defect. Anatomical assessment by two- and three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography was essential for detailed morphological characterization and surgical planning. The different features of a 'cleft' in an atrioventricular septal defect compared to an anterior leaflet cleft in an otherwise normal mitral valve are here discussed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Community Mobilization and Awareness Creation for Orofacial Cleft Services: A Survey of Nigerian Cleft Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The opportunity to provide free surgical care for orofacial clefts has opened a new vista and is enhanced by well-informed communities who are aware of the free surgical services available to them. It is the responsibility of cleft care providers to adequately inform these communities via a combination of community mobilization and awareness creation. Methods. This was a nationwide, cross-sectional descriptive study of all orofacial cleft service providers in Nigeria using a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Results. A total of 4648 clefts have been repaired, 50.8% by the ten government-owned and 49.2% by the five nongovernment-owned organizations included in the study. The nongovernment-owned institutions seemed to be more aggressive about community mobilization and awareness creation than government-owned ones, and this was reflected in their patient turnout. Most of the organizations studied would prefer a separate, independent body to handle their awareness campaign. Conclusion. Community mobilization requires skill and dedication and may require formal training or dedicated budgets by government-owned and nongovernment-owned institutions alike. Organizations involved in cleft care provision must take community mobilization and awareness seriously if the largely unmet needs of orofacial cleft patients in Nigeria are to be tackled. PMID:27350971

  12. Cleft lip and palate care in Romania.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vanessa

    2011-11-01

    Vanessa Martin travelled with a surgical team to Romania over a period of 12 years to support nurses and improve practice in the treatment of cleft lip and palate. She recounts her experiences and the changes that took place during that time.

  13. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  14. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  15. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  16. [The mandible in labio-maxillary clefts].

    PubMed

    Cadenat, H; Barthélémy, R; Izac, F; Clouet, M; Fabert, G

    1977-01-01

    The writers have studied mandibular anomalies in a series of 20 surgically treated clefts. Anomalies of shape occur in one case out of two and are in the form of a mandible which is too long. Anomalies of position most often show a mandible in front of the maxillary and to the rear in comparison to the base of the skull.

  17. Dental sequellae of alveolar clefts: utility of endosseous implants. Part I: therapeutic protocols.

    PubMed

    Samama, Yves; Tulasne, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this publication is to offer teams specializing in the primary and secondary treatment of labio-alveolar-palatal clefts a prosthetic evaluation for more rational management of the dental sequellae of clefts for patients who, when they reach adulthood, often wish to improve their facial esthetics, in which the dental element plays a significant part. The reorganization and restoration of the upper anterior teeth, and their esthetic integration with respect to the face and lips, would then be less of a problem for plastic surgeons or orthodontists. In this respect, the installation in this sector of implants, following ambitious bone surgery involving the sacrifice, in bilateral forms, of the teeth of the medial process is a protocol that could usefully be taken into account.

  18. Dental sequellae of alveolar clefts: utility of endosseous implants. Part II: clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Samama, Yves; Tulasne, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    This second part follows on from part 1 published in the previous issue of this journal. The aim of this publication is to offer teams specializing in the primary and secondary treatment of labio-alveolar-palatal clefts a prosthetic evaluation for more rational management of the dental sequellae of clefts for patients who, when they reach adulthood, often wish to improve their facial esthetics, in which the dental element plays an important part. The reorganization and restoration of the maxillary anterior teeth and their esthetic integration with respect to the face and lips would then be less of a problem for plastic surgeons and orthodontists. In this regard, the installation in this sector of implants, following ambitious bone surgery involving the sacrifice of the teeth of the medial nasal process in bilateral forms, is a protocol that could usefully be taken into account.

  19. Robust non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filter with superior performance on detail-preserving removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on natural gray-scale images. The non-local means filter is in the limelight as a way of Gaussian noise removal with superior performance on detail preservation. By referring the fundamental concept of the non-local means, we had proposed a non-local median filter as a specialized way for random-valued impulse noise removal so far. In the non-local processing, the output of a filter is calculated from pixels in blocks which are similar to the block centered at a pixel of interest. As a result, aggressive noise removal is conducted without destroying the detailed structures in an original image. However, the performance of non-local processing decreases enormously in the case of high noise occurrence probability. A cause of this problem is that the superimposed noise disturbs accurate calculation of the similarity between the blocks. To cope with this problem, we propose an improved non-local median filter which is robust to the high level of corruption by introducing a new similarity measure considering possibility of being the original signal. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural gray-scale images.

  20. Robust non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel image filter with superior performance on detail-preserving removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on natural gray-scale images. The non-local means filter is in the limelight as a way of Gaussian noise removal with superior performance on detail preservation. By referring the fundamental concept of the non-local means, we had proposed a non-local median filter as a specialized way for random-valued impulse noise removal so far. In the non-local processing, the output of a filter is calculated from pixels in blocks which are similar to the block centered at a pixel of interest. As a result, aggressive noise removal is conducted without destroying the detailed structures in an original image. However, the performance of non-local processing decreases enormously in the case of high noise occurrence probability. A cause of this problem is that the superimposed noise disturbs accurate calculation of the similarity between the blocks. To cope with this problem, we propose an improved non-local median filter which is robust to the high level of corruption by introducing a new similarity measure considering possibility of being the original signal. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural gray-scale images.

  1. A descriptive epidemiology study of cleft lip and palate in Northern Finland.

    PubMed

    Lithovius, Riitta H; Ylikontiola, Leena P; Harila, Virpi; Sándor, George K

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate in a population uniquely from Northern Finland. The records of a total of 214 cleft patients treated between 1998-2011 at the Oulu Cleft Lip and Palate Center at the University of Oulu were assessed on a retrospective basis. Data regarding cleft type, sex and side of cleft was collected and analyzed. Family history of clefting was investigated. Cleft palate (68.7%) was most frequently found, followed by cleft lip and palate (18.7%) and cleft lip with or without alveolus (12.6%). Cleft palate occurred more frequently in females (63.3%) and cleft lip and palate was more frequently found in males (62.5%). The left side was more frequently affected in both male and female patients. Left-sided clefts were observed in 82% of patients compared to right-sided clefts in 18%. A family history of clefting was detected in 20.1% of patients. The incidence of clefts in Northern Finland is higher than the corresponding incidence in other European countries. Cleft palate was the most frequent cleft type and it was more frequent in females. In males, cleft lip and palate was more frequent. The left side was more frequently affected in both genders. One fifth of the patients had a family history of clefts.

  2. Alveolar graft in the cleft lip and palate patient: Review of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Tobella-Camps, María L.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Alveolar bone grafting is a vital part of the rehabilitation of cleft patients. The factors that have been most frequently associated with the success of the graft are the age at grafting and the pre-grafting orthodontic treatment. Objectives: 1) Describe the cases of alveolar bone grafts performed at the Maxilofacial Unit of Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona (HSJD); and 2) Analyze the success/failure of alveolar grafts and related variables. Material and Methods: Descriptive retrospective study using a sample of 104 patients who underwent a secondary alveolar graft at the Craniofacial Unit of HSJD between 1998 and 2012. The graft was done by the same surgeon in all patients using bone from the iliac crest. Results: 70% of the patients underwent the procedure before the age of 15 (median 14.45 years); 70% of the graft patients underwent pre-graft maxillary expansion. A total of 100 cases were recorded as successful (median age of 14.58 years, 68 underwent pre-graft expansion) and only 4 were recorded as failures (median age of 17.62 years, 3 underwent pre-graft expansion). We did not find statistically significant differences in age at the time of grafting or pre-surgical expansion when comparing the success and failure groups. We found the success rate of the graft to be 96.2%. Conclusions: The number of failures was too small to establish a statistically significant conclusion in our sample regarding the age at grafting and pre-grafting expansion. The use of alveolar bone grafting from the iliac crest has a very high success rate with a very low incidence of complications. Existing controversies regarding secondary bone grafting and the wide range of success rates found in the literature suggest that it is necessary to establish a specific treatment protocol that ensures the success of this procedure. Key words:Alveolar graft, cleft lip and palate, alveolar cleft, alveolar defect. PMID:24880440

  3. The trochlear cleft: initial experience in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wissman, Robert D; England, Eric; Mehta, Kaushal; d'Heurle, Albert; Langenderfer, Eric; Mangine, Robert; Kenter, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The trochlear cleft is a recently described vertically oriented, low-signal cartilage lesion centered in the trough of the trochlear cartilage. The purpose of our study was to determine the incidence of clefts in an at-risk group of athletes and correlate these findings with clinical and physical examination results. Sixteen female collegiate volleyball players consented to bilateral knee evaluations, which consisted of history, physical examination, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed each MR study by consensus. The trochlear cartilage was considered to be either normal, at risk of developing a cleft, or meeting the previously described criteria for clefts. The Fisher exact test was used for categorical variables, and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for nonparametric continuous variable. A total of 16 athletes (32 knees; 16 women; age range, 18-22 years; mean, 19.9 years) were enrolled in the study. Four knees (13%) in 3 athletes were diagnosed with a trochlear cleft; 6 knees (19%) in 4 athletes had clefts or were at risk of developing clefts. Among those players with unilateral cartilage lesions, 67% had contralateral abnormalities (P = 0.0783). Functional outcomes and physical examination findings were within normal limits for all athletes, with no difference noted between those with and without clefts. Elite athletes have a much higher incidence of trochlear clefts than the general population and are at risk of bilateral disease. Clefts are likely to be an incidental finding at MR imaging for unrelated symptoms.

  4. Censored Median Regression and Profile Empirical Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2007-01-01

    We implement profile empirical likelihood based inference for censored median regression models. Inference for any specified sub-vector is carried out by profiling out the nuisance parameters from the “plug-in” empirical likelihood ratio function proposed by Qin and Tsao. To obtain the critical value of the profile empirical likelihood ratio statistic, we first investigate its asymptotic distribution. The limiting distribution is a sum of weighted chi square distributions. Unlike for the full empirical likelihood, however, the derived asymptotic distribution has intractable covariance structure. Therefore, we employ the bootstrap to obtain the critical value, and compare the resulting confidence intervals with the ones obtained through Basawa and Koul’s minimum dispersion statistic. Furthermore, we obtain confidence intervals for the age and treatment effects in a lung cancer data set. PMID:19112527

  5. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  6. Robust Mediation Analysis Based on Median Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis has many applications in psychology and the social sciences. The most prevalent methods typically assume that the error distribution is normal and homoscedastic. However, this assumption may rarely be met in practice, which can affect the validity of the mediation analysis. To address this problem, we propose robust mediation analysis based on median regression. Our approach is robust to various departures from the assumption of homoscedasticity and normality, including heavy-tailed, skewed, contaminated, and heteroscedastic distributions. Simulation studies show that under these circumstances, the proposed method is more efficient and powerful than standard mediation analysis. We further extend the proposed robust method to multilevel mediation analysis, and demonstrate through simulation studies that the new approach outperforms the standard multilevel mediation analysis. We illustrate the proposed method using data from a program designed to increase reemployment and enhance mental health of job seekers. PMID:24079925

  7. Parent-Controlled Analgesia in Children Undergoing Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Ho; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Sung Jin; Bai, Sun Jun; Lee, Su Hyun; Park, Beyoung Yun

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to find an optimal basal infusion dose of fentanyl for parent-controlled analgesia (PrCA) in children undergoing cleft palate repair and the degree of parents' satisfaction with PrCA. Thirty consecutive children between 6 months and 2 yr of age were enrolled. At the end of surgery, a PrCA device with a basal infusion rate of 2 mL/hr and bolus of 0.5 mL with lockout time of 15 min was applied. Parents were educated in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices, the Wong Baker face pain scoring system, and monitoring of adverse effects of fentanyl. Fentanyl was infused 0.3 µg/kg/hr at first, and we obtained a predetermined fentanyl regimen by the response of the previous patient to a larger or smaller dose of fentanyl (0.1 µg/kg/hr as the step size), using an up-and-down method. ED50 and ED95 by probit analysis were 0.63 µg/kg/hr (95% confidence limits, 0.55-0.73 µg/kg/hr) and 0.83 µg/kg/hr (95% confidence limits, 0.73-1.47 µg/kg/hr), respectively. Eighty seven percent of the parents were satisfied with participating in the PrCA modality. PrCA using fentanyl with a basal infusion rate of 0.63 µg/kg/hr can be applied effectively for postoperative pain management in children undergoing cleft palate repair with a high level of parents' satisfaction. PMID:18303211

  8. Surgery Navigation in Treating Congenital Midfacial Dysplasia of Patients With Facial Cleft.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Bai, Shanshan; Yu, Zheyuan; Xu, Liang; Yuan, Jie; Xu, Haisong; Wei, Min

    2017-09-01

    To explore a new accurate way for the treatment of congenital midfacial dysplasia in facial cleft patients. Between November 2015 and November 2016, 8 patients with nasal deformity and midfacial dysplasia (Tessier Nos. 3-11 cleft) were collected (median age, years; range = 15-20 years). Expanded frontal flap for nasal reconstruction and image-guided navigation-assisted surgery for modified nasal-maxillary-hard palatine osteotomy to advance the peri-pyriform bone structure were performed in all the patients. After 6 to 12 months of follow-up, the authors analyzed the differences between preoperative planning and postoperative results through computed tomography data. Patients were satisfied with surgery, and computed tomography data showed that there was little difference between preoperative planning and postoperative results with the navigation-assisted surgery. Using expanded frontal flap with navigation-assisted surgery for peri-pyriform advancement, the authors could treat congenital nasal deformity and midfacial dysplasia effectively, accurately, and safely in craniofacial cleft patients.

  9. Descriptive epidemiology of cleft lip and cleft palate in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jane C; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Bower, Carol; Turner, Robin M; Roberts, Christine L; Nassar, Natasha

    2013-02-01

    The reported birth prevalence of orofacial clefts (OFCs) varies considerably. This study describes the epidemiology of OFCs in an Australian population. We studied infants diagnosed with cleft lip, with or without cleft palate (CL±P), and cleft palate only (CPO) since 1980 and reported to the population based Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies. We calculated prevalence rates by sex, Aboriginal status, geographic location, and socio-economic status. Associations between clefts and folate availability, pregnancy characteristics, pregnancy outcomes, other congenital anomalies, and age at diagnosis were also investigated. From 1980 to 2009, 917 infants with CL±P (12.05 per 10,000) and from 1980 to 2004, 621 infants with CPO (10.12 per 10,000) were registered. Prevalence rates for CL±P and CPO were 1.9 and 1.3 times higher, respectively, for Aboriginal Australians. Additional anomalies were reported for 31% of infants with CL±P and for 61% with CPO; chromosomal anomalies and other specific diagnoses accounted for 46% and 66%, respectively, of those with CL±P and CPO with additional anomalies. Almost all (99.7%) children with CL±P were diagnosed before 1 year of age, but 12% of CPO diagnoses were made after 1 year of age; 94% of these diagnoses were of submucous clefts and bifid uvula. These data provide a picture of the prevalence of OFCs in WA since 1980, and provide a useful reference for OFC data in Australia and internationally. The quality and completeness of the WARDA data are high, reflected in high prevalence rates, and proportions of clefts occurring with other anomalies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cleft extension and risks of other birth defects in children with isolated cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Chetpakdeechit, Woranuch; Mohlin, Bengt; Persson, Christina; Hagberg, Catharina

    2010-03-01

    To study the risks of having other birth defects in children born with an isolated cleft palate (iCP) when the length of the cleft was taken into account. The hypothesis was that a newborn with an extensive cleft lesion may have an increased risk of other birth defects compared to a child with a less extensive cleft of the palate. All Caucasian children with iCP born between 1975 and 2005 in the southwestern region of Sweden were included. Data were collected from standardized medical records and the length of the cleft was checked on the pre-surgical dental cast for each child. A total of 343 children were born with an iCP. The incidence was 0.64/1000 live births. Thirty-four percent of children with either a total or partial iCP had other birth defects. The risk was 1.7 times higher for a total compared to a partial iCP. The two most common birth defects were congenital heart disease and intellectual disability. Ear problems related to infections were registered in 43% of cases. Fifteen percent of the children had the Pierre Robin sequence, which was analyzed as a separate variable and not included as a birth defect. The length of the iCP was found to influence the risk of having another birth defect as the total palatal clefts were more often combined with other birth defects compared to partial clefts. Careful medical check-ups are important for newborns with iCP since they have increased risks of other birth defects.

  11. Facial shape and asymmetry in 5-year-old children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and/or palate: an exploratory study using laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Jelena; Lewis, Bethan M; Donaghy, Claire E; Zhurov, Alexei I; Knox, Jeremy; Hunter, Lindsay; Richmond, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility of facial laser scanning in pre-school children and to demonstrate landmark-independent three-dimensional (3D) analyses for assessment of facial deformity in 5-year-old children with repaired non-syndromic unilateral cleft lip and/or cleft palate (UCL/P). Faces of twelve 5-year-old children with UCL/P (recruited from university hospitals in Cardiff and Swansea, UK) and 35 age-matched healthy children (recruited from a primary school in Cardiff) were laser scanned. Cleft deformity was assessed by comparing individual faces against the age and gender-matched average face of healthy children. Facial asymmetry was quantified by comparing original faces with their mirror images. All facial scans had good quality. In a group of six children with isolated cleft palate coincidence with the average norm ranged from 18.8 to 26.4 per cent. There was no statistically significant difference in facial asymmetry when compared with healthy children (P > 0.05). In a group of six children with UCL with or without cleft palate coincidence with the average norm ranged from 14.8 to 29.8 per cent. Forehead, midface and mandibular deficiencies were a consistent finding, ranging from 4 to 10mm. The amount of 3D facial asymmetry was higher in this group (P < 0.05). Facial laser scanning can be a suitable method for 3D assessment of facial morphology in pre-school children, provided children are well prepared. Landmark-independent methods of 3D analyses can contribute to understanding and quantification of facial soft tissue cleft deformity and be useful in clinical practice. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Face Lift.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dinah; Small, Kevin H; Barton, Fritz E

    2015-11-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the essential anatomy of the aging face and its relationship to face-lift surgery. 2. Understand the common operative approaches to the aging face and a historical perspective. 3. Understand and describe the common complications following face lifting and treatment options. Surgical rejuvenation of the aging face remains one of the most commonly performed plastic surgery procedures. This article reviews the anatomy of the face and its impact on surgical correction. In addition, this review discusses the evolution of various face-lift techniques and the current surgical approach to the aging face. Finally, this article discusses potential postoperative complications after rhytidectomy and management solutions.

  13. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning.

  14. Measuring Symmetry in Children With Cleft Lip. Part 2: Quantification of Nasolabial Symmetry Before and After Cleft Lip Repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Liang, Shu; Shapiro, Linda; Tse, Raymond

    2016-11-01

      The first part of this study validated an automated computer-based method of identifying the three-dimensional midfacial plane in children with unrepaired cleft lip. The purpose of this second part is to develop computer-based methods to quantify symmetry and to determine the correlation of these measures to clinical expectations.   A total of 35 infants with unrepaired unilateral cleft lip and 14 infant controls.   Six computer-based methods of quantifying symmetry were developed and applied to the three-dimensional images of infants with unilateral cleft lip before and after cleft lip repair and to those of controls.   Symmetry scores for cleft type, changes with surgery, and individual subjects ranked according to cleft severity were assessed.   Significant differences in symmetry scores were found between cleft types and found before and after surgery. Symmetry scores for infants with unilateral cleft lip approached those of controls after surgery, and there was a strong correlation with ranked cleft severity.   Our computer-based three-dimensional analysis of nasolabial symmetry correlated with clinical expectations. Automated processing made measurement convenient. Use of these measures may help to objectively measure cleft severity and treatment outcome.

  15. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning. PMID:26923345

  16. Game Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jill

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "Game Face: Life Lessons Across the Curriculum", a teaching kit that challenges assumptions and builds confidence. Game Face, which is derived from a book and art exhibition, "Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like?", uses layered and powerful images of women and girls participating in sports to teach…

  17. Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Tolarová, Marie M; Poulton, Donald; Aubert, Maryse M; Oh, HeeSoo; Ellerhorst, Thomas; Mosby, Terezie; Tolar, Miroslav; Boyd, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    There is no doubt modern genetics have greatly influenced our professional and personal lives during the last decade. Uncovering genetic causes of many medical and dental pathologies is helping to narrow the diagnosis and select a treatment plan that would provide the best outcome. Importantly, having an understanding of multifactorial etiology helps direct our attention toward prevention. We now understand much better our own health problems. In some cases, we can modify our lifestyle and diet in order to prevent "environmental factors" from triggering the mutated genes inherited from our parents. Good examples are diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. If we realize we might have inherited genes for cardiovascular problems from several ancestors who had heart attacks, we already know that these genes will make us only "susceptible" for disease. Those who exercise, watch one's weight, diet, and carefully monitor one's lifestyle will very likely--though possessing "susceptibility genes"--stay healthier and, maybe, will never experience any cardiovascular problems. In principle, the same applies for craniofacial anomalies, especially for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate. One needs to understand genetic and environmental causes of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in order to prevent them. With all this in mind, the Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program have been established at the Department of Orthodontics, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. A partnership with Rotaplast International, Inc., has made it possible for the faculty, orthodontic residents, and students to participate in 27 multidisciplinary cleft medical missions in underdeveloped and developing countries by donating professional and educational services, and, last but not least, by collecting valuable data and specimens to further research. A significant number of research studies, including 15 master of science theses, have been accomplished in

  18. FOXE1 association with both isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and isolated cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Lina M.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Busch, Tamara D.; Machida, Junichiro; Johnson, Marla K.; Brauer, David; Krahn, Katherine; Daack-Hirsch, Sandy; L'Heureux, Jamie; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Rivera, Dora; López, Ana Maria; Moreno, Manuel A.; Hing, Anne; Lammer, Edward J.; Jones, Marilyn; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Jugessur, Astanand; Wilcox, Allen J.; Chines, Peter; Pugh, Elizabeth; Doheny, Kim; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22–q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we undertook an iterative and complementary fine mapping strategy using family-based CL/P samples from Colombia, USA and the Philippines. Candidate genes within 9q22–q33 were sequenced, revealing 32 new variants. Concurrently, 397 SNPs spanning the 9q22–q33 2-LOD-unit interval were tested for association. Significant SNP and haplotype association signals (P = 1.45E − 08) narrowed the interval to a 200 kb region containing: FOXE1, C9ORF156 and HEMGN. Association results were replicated in CL/P families of European descent and when all populations were combined the two most associated SNPs, rs3758249 (P = 5.01E − 13) and rs4460498 (P = 6.51E − 12), were located inside a 70 kb high linkage disequilibrium block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5′ and 3′ of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated, indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically distinct. Foxe1 expression was found in the epithelium undergoing fusion between the medial nasal and maxillary processes. Mutation screens of FOXE1 identified two family-specific missense mutations at highly conserved amino acids. These data indicate that FOXE1 is a major gene for CL/P and provides new insights for improved counseling and genetic interaction studies. PMID:19779022

  19. Case series: variations in the embryology of congenital midline cervical clefts.

    PubMed

    Mendis, D; Moss, A L H

    2007-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical clefts (CMCC) is a clinical diagnosis and represents a spectrum of rare developmental anomalies. Fewer than 100 cases have been reported overall, the first being described by Bailey in 1924 (1). It is not a true cleft because it does not include a gap between adjacent skin flaps. It is thought to represent a failure of midline fusion of the branchial arches although this is controversial. It is a clinical diagnosis and presents at birth with a ventral midline defect of the skin of the neck. This consists of a skin tag (nipple-like projection), an atrophic mucosal surface and a caudal sinus. It may be associated with a subcutaneous fibrous cord, which can cause a vertical midline tethering restricting cervical extension. Associated defects may be a median cleft of the mandible, tongue and lower lip. There may be an associated delay in mandibular development and hypoplasia or absence of neck structures such as the hyoid bone. Associated thyroglossal and bronchogenic cysts may occur as well as defects in other parts of the body such as a sternal cleft (2). CMCC has been previously reported in the literature as being of a branchial origin, however a review of the histology of previous cases suggests a combined branchial and bronchogenic component (2-6). We report on two cases that presented with the clinical picture of a classical CMCC. Our first case appears to have a bronchogenic origin with possible branchial components and the second case appears to be solely branchial in origin. There is much debate as to the embryology of this clinical entity; we shall endeavour to address the main theories.

  20. [Clinical characteristics in children with cleft palate associated with middle ear cholesteatoma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chen, M; Hao, J S; Liu, W; Zhang, J

    2017-05-07

    Objective: To summarize the characteristics of children diagnosed as cleft palate associated with middle ear cholesteatoma. Methods: There were five middle ear cholesteatoma cases who had previously received cleft palate repairment surgery. All of the patients were followed up for 17 to 47 months. Median follow-up time was 31 months. Results: There were three males and two females with three to eleven years old , and the average of age was seven years and ten months. The time of cleft palate repairment surgery was from six months to four years, and the average age was one year and nine months. No history of grommet insertion. Three cases were unilateral choleateatoma (right ear in two cases and left ear in one case, of which two cases of contralateral ear with secretory otitis media) and two cases were bilateral choleateatoma. Five cases(seven ears) received surgeries. Radical mastoidectomy + canal wall down tympanoplasty were performed in three ears, in which we found stapes disappeared. Radical mastoidectomy + canal wall up tympanoplasty were performed in four ears, in which we found intact foot plate, with recurrence occurred in one case nine months after the first surgery. No recurrence occurred after the second canal wall down tympanoplasty. The postoperative average hearing thresholds of air conduction were improved in different degrees. Conclusions: There may be a relationship between cleft palate associated with middle ear cholesteatoma and no grommet insertion history. The incidence of bilateral cases is relatively high, and otitis media with effusion may occur because of poor Eustachian tube function in the unilateral cases. Choice of surgical methods should be decided basing on combination of decreasing the recrudescence and improving the hearing.

  1. [Prevalence of oral clefts from 1975 to 1994, Brazil].

    PubMed

    de Castro Monteiro Loffredo, L; Freitas, J A; Grigolli, A A

    2001-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of oral clefts in Brazil categorized by etiology and geographical region. Case reports of oral cleft in newborns in the period 1975 - 1994 were included in the study. Data was collected using the morbidity certificates of the Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais (Craniofacial Abnormalities Rehabilitation Hospital), Ministry of Health data (Datasus), and Fundação Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (Brazilian Census Bureau). There were 16,853 new cases of oral clefts, with a total prevalence of 0.19 per 1,000 births, and there was an increased prevalence every five years. The highest prevalence were observed in the Midwest, southeast, and south regions. As for the studied categories, cleft lip (or the cleft of lip and palate) was seen in 74% of the cases and isolated cleft palate was seen in 26% of them.

  2. Assessment of differentially expressed plasma microRNAs in nonsyndromic cleft palate and nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Gao, Yanli; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Bei; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as a new class of regulatory molecules that influence many biological functions. However, the expression profile of plasma microRNAs in nonsyndromic cleft palate (NSCP) or nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate (NSCLP) remains poorly investigated. In this study, we used Agilent human miRNA microarray chips to monitor miRNA levels in three NSCP plasma samples (mixed as the CP group), three NSCLP plasma samples (mixed as the CLP group) and three normal plasma samples (mixed as the Control group). Six selected plasma miRNAs were validated in samples from an additional 16 CP, 33 CLP and 8 healthy children using qRT-PCR. Using Venn diagrams, distinct and overlapping dysregulated miRNAs were identified. Their respective target genes were further assessed using gene ontology and pathway analysis. The results show that distinct or overlapping biological processes and signalling pathways were involved in CP and CLP. Our study showed that the common key gene targets reflected functional relationships to the Notch, Wnt, phosphatidylinositol and Hedgehog signalling pathways. Further studies should examine the mechanism of the potential target genes, which may provide new avenues for future clinical prevention and therapy. PMID:27863433

  3. Cleft cluster: a strategy for concurrent correction of multiple secondary clefting deformities.

    PubMed

    Denny, A D; Kinney, T

    1995-03-01

    We have developed a strategy for concurrent correction of multiple secondary clefting deformities based on the model proposed by Henderson and Jackson [1] which combines several cleft-related procedures. We have expanded this concept significantly to include as many as eleven procedures. The selected procedures are dictated individually by patients' needs. The constellation of corrective cleft-related surgeries has been given the name "cleft cluster" in the interest of simplicity. We are reporting on our experience with 85 consecutive patients using this approach. All patients in this series received bone grafting of the alveolar cleft as the primary procedure, plus multiple additional procedures as necessary. None of the patients reported received primary lip or palate surgery by the authors. The average number of procedures performed was 7.2. The average hospitalization was 4.1 days. The patients have been followed from 1 to 7 yrs. The fistula recurrence rate was 8%. Average patient age was 16.8 yrs with a range of 8 to 54 yrs. This approach eliminates multiple hospitalizations and outpatient procedures, allows flexibility to individualize patient care, provides consistent results, and is cost-effective.

  4. Monofilament absorbable sutures in median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Işik, O; Ipek, G; Mansuroğlu, D; Berki, T; Tuzcu, M; Yakut, C

    1999-08-01

    The most common material used for closure of median sternotomy incision is steel suture in open heart surgery. Some complications and disadvantages have been investigated recently. These complications are the breaking down of steel suture, erosion of sternum tabulae especially in osteoporotic patients, erosion of the dermis especially in patients with thin subdermic layer and cause of infection. Another disadventage of steel suture material is cosmetic problems or discomfort. For these reasons some suture materials such as silk, polyfilament polyester, monofilament material, polypropylene have been used recently. Silk and polyester have a risk of high infection, and polypropylene causes granulation tissue according to the number of knots. These facts encouraged the usage of an absorbable suture material. The available polyfilament absorbable sutures in the market a few years ago had a short absorption time, causing sternal infection and dehiscence. Polydiaxone, a monofilament suture material introduced recently has a considerably longer absorption time. 153 sternal closures were performed with monofilament absorbable suture material in a period of seven months at the Koşuyolu Heart and Research Hospital. The mean age of the patients was 32.55, ranging from 8/12 to 71 years. The mean body weight is 48.37, ranging between 7 kg and 75 kg. Only two patients had sternal dehiscence. We conclude that monofilament absorbable suture is a safe alternative for all kinds of steel suture material for closure of sternotomy.

  5. Median filtering algorithms for multichannel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, A.; Chilingarian, A.

    2011-05-01

    Particle detectors of worldwide networks are continuously measuring various secondary particle fluxes incident on Earth surface. At the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC), the data of 12 cosmic ray particle detectors with a total of ˜280 measuring channels (count rates of electrons, muons and neutrons channels) are sent each minute via wireless bridges to a MySQL database. These time series are used for the different tasks of off-line physical analysis and for online forewarning services. Usually long time series contain several types of errors (gaps due to failures of high or low voltage power supply, spurious spikes due to radio interferences, abrupt changes of mean values of several channels or/and slowly trends in mean values due to aging of electronics components, etc.). To avoid erroneous physical inference and false alarms of alerting systems we introduce offline and online filters to "purify" multiple time-series. In the presented paper we classify possible mistakes in time series and introduce median filtering algorithms for online and off-line "purification" of multiple time-series.

  6. Ear Infection in Isolated Cleft Lip: Etiological Implications.

    PubMed

    Ruegg, Teresa A; Cooper, Margaret E; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Ford, Matthew D; Wehby, George L; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Czeizel, Andrew E; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2017-03-01

      Chronic ear infections are a common occurrence in children with orofacial clefts involving the secondary palate. Less is known about the middle ear status of individuals with isolated clefts of the lip, although several studies have reported elevated rates of ear infection in this group. The purpose of this retrospective study was to test the hypothesis that chronic ear infections occur more frequently in isolated cleft lip cases (n = 94) compared with controls (n = 183).   A questionnaire was used to obtain information on history of chronic ear infection. The association between ear infection status (present/absent) and cleft lip status (cleft lip case/control) was tested using both chi-square and logistic regression.   The reported occurrence of chronic ear infection was significantly greater in cleft lip cases (31%) compared with unaffected controls (11%). After adjusting for age and sex, having a cleft lip increased the odds of being positive for ear infection by a factor greater than 3 (odds ratio = 3.698; 95% confidence interval = 1.91 to 7.14). Within cleft lip cases, there was no difference in the occurrence of ear infection by defect laterality or by the type of clefting present in the family history. Although velopharyngeal insufficiency was present in 18.4% of our cleft lip sample, there was no statistical association between ear infection and abnormal speech patterns. These results may have potential implications both for the clinical management of isolated cleft lip cases and for understanding the etiology of orofacial clefting.

  7. Spectrum of Dental Phenotypes in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting

    PubMed Central

    Howe, B.J.; Cooper, M.E.; Vieira, A.R.; Weinberg, S.M.; Resick, J.M.; Nidey, N.L.; Wehby, G.L.; Marazita, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with oral clefts show a wide range of dental anomalies, adding complexity to understanding the phenotypic spectrum of orofacial clefting. The evidence is mixed, however, on whether the prevalence of dental anomalies is elevated in unaffected relatives and is mostly based on small samples. In the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts, their relatives, and controls, this study characterizes the spectrum of cleft-related dental anomalies and evaluates whether families with clefting have a significantly higher risk for such anomalies compared with the general population. A total of 3,811 individuals were included: 660 cases with clefts, 1,922 unaffected relatives, and 1,229 controls. Dental anomalies were identified from in-person dental exams or intraoral photographs, and case-control differences were tested using χ2 statistics. Cases had higher rates of dental anomalies in the maxillary arch than did controls for primary (21% vs. 4%, P = 3 × 10−8) and permanent dentitions (51% vs. 8%, P = 4 × 10−62) but not in the mandible. Dental anomalies were more prevalent in cleft lip with cleft palate than other cleft types. More anomalies were seen in the ipsilateral side of the cleft. Agenesis and tooth displacements were the most common dental anomalies found in case probands for primary and permanent dentitions. Compared with controls, unaffected siblings (10% vs. 2%, P = 0.003) and parents (13% vs. 7%, P = 0.001) showed a trend for increased anomalies of the maxillary permanent dentition. Yet, these differences were nonsignificant after multiple-testing correction, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in some families carrying susceptibility to both overt clefts and dental anomalies. Collectively, the findings suggest that most affected families do not have higher genetic risk for dental anomalies than the general population and that the higher prevalence of anomalies in cases is primarily a physical consequence of the cleft

  8. VIEW OF CRESCENTSHAPED ISLAND/MEDIAN WITH LARGE MONKEYPOD TREE AT SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CRESCENT-SHAPED ISLAND/MEDIAN WITH LARGE MONKEYPOD TREE AT SOUTHEAST “CORNER” OF BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Management of congenital midline cervical cleft.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Colin W; Benson, Alex D; Verchere, Cynthia G; Ludemann, Jeffrey P; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2012-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare developmental defect of the anterior neck normally characterized by an atrophic mucosal plaque with a cranial nipple-like skin tag, a short caudal sinus, and may be attached to a subcutaneous fibrous cord of variable length. Clinically, patients present at an early age with, white females being the most commonly affected population. In addition to aesthetic concerns, CMCC can prevent full extension of the neck, result in micrognathia and torticollis, predispose patients to infection, and can coexist with other clefting defects or cysts. Fewer than 50 cases have been published in the English-language literature. Herein, we report a case of CMCC that also presented with a mild contracture of the right sternohyoid muscle. The embryopathogenesis, histopathology, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare condition are also discussed.

  10. Sociological aspects of cleft palate adults: IV. Social integration.

    PubMed

    Peter, J P; Chinsky, R R; Fisher, M J

    1975-07-01

    The patterns of social integration of adults with primary and secondary groups were evaluated for 196 adult cleft subjects, their 190 siblings and 209 random controls. Results indicated that cleft adults tended to rely on the extended family for mutual aid and social activities. They also participated less frequently in voluntary associations and relied on a few one-to-one friendships. Social activities tended to be that of informal visiting patterns. While it would be inaccurate to characterize the cleft adult family as grossly different from other American families, they are a definable population experiencing some degree of limitation associated with having a cleft.

  11. Surgical Repair of a Superior Sternal Cleft in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Tobias; Kellner, Maximilian; Boemers, Thomas Michael; Mack-Detlefsen, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Sternal cleft is a rare congenital malformation with little more than 100 cases published worldwide. Incomplete sternal clefting in a female newborn is the most frequent form seen. First-line treatment is the surgical defect closure in the neonatal period. Presurgical examination has to focus on common associated malformations, in particular cardiac defects. The surgical repair of sternal cleft itself shows satisfying functional and cosmetic results with low complication rates. We present the case of a 4-month-old male infant with a superior sternal cleft. PMID:26788449

  12. Corticosteroid use during pregnancy and risk of orofacial clefts

    PubMed Central

    Hviid, Anders; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    Background The association between the risk of orofacial clefts in infants and the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy is unclear from the available evidence. We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all live births in Denmark over a 12-year period. Methods We collected data on all live births in Denmark from Jan. 1, 1996, to Sept. 30, 2008. We included live births for which information was available from nationwide health registries on the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy, the diagnosis of an orofacial cleft and possible confounders. Results There were 832 636 live births during the study period. Exposure to corticosteroids during the first trimester occurred in 51 973 of the pregnancies. A total of 1232 isolated orofacial clefts (i.e., cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and cleft palate) were diagnosed within the first year of life, including 84 instances in which the infant had been exposed to corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy. We did not identify any statistically significant increased risk of orofacial clefts associated with the use of corticosteroids: cleft lip with or without cleft palate, prevalence odds ratio (OR) 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–1.38]; cleft palate alone, prevalence OR 1.23 (95% CI 0.83–1.82). Odds ratios for risk of orofacial clefts by method of delivery (i.e., oral, inhalant, nasal spray, or dermatologic and other topicals) were consistent with the overall results of the study and did not display significant heterogeneity, although the OR for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with the use of dermatologic corticosteroids was 1.45 (95% CI 1.03–2.05). Interpretation Our results add to the safety information on a class of drugs commonly used during pregnancy. Our study did not show an increased risk of orofacial clefts with the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy. Indepth investigation of the pattern of association between orofacial clefts and the use of dermatologic

  13. The evolution of human genetic studies of cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs)--primarily cleft lip and cleft palate--are among the most common birth defects in all populations worldwide, and have notable population, ethnicity, and gender differences in birth prevalence. Interest in these birth defects goes back centuries, as does formal scientific interest; scientists often used OFCs as examples or evidence during paradigm shifts in human genetics, and have also used virtually every new method of human genetic analysis to deepen our understanding of OFC. This review traces the evolution of human genetic investigations of OFC, highlights the specific insights gained about OFC through the years, and culminates in a review of recent key OFC genetic findings resulting from the powerful tools of the genomics era. Notably, OFC represents a major success for genome-wide approaches, and the field is poised for further breakthroughs in the near future.

  14. The Evolution of Human Genetic Studies of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs)—primarily cleft lip and cleft palate—are among the most common birth defects in all populations worldwide, and have notable population, ethnicity, and gender differences in birth prevalence. Interest in these birth defects goes back centuries, as does formal scientific interest; scientists often used OFCs as examples or evidence during paradigm shifts in human genetics, and have also used virtually every new method of human genetic analysis to deepen our understanding of OFC. This review traces the evolution of human genetic investigations of OFC, highlights the specific insights gained about OFC through the years, and culminates in a review of recent key OFC genetic findings resulting from the powerful tools of the genomics era. Notably, OFC represents a major success for genome-wide approaches, and the field is poised for further breakthroughs in the near future. PMID:22703175

  15. Timing of palate repair affecting growth in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xue; Zheng, Qian; Lu, Dawei; Huang, Ning; Li, Jingtao; Li, Sheng; Wang, Yan; Shi, Bing

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the facial morphology characteristics of patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCCLPs) who had undergone cleft palate repair at different times. This study included 46 nonsyndromic UCCLPs and 38 age and sex matched non-cleft patients. 35 cephalometric measurements were used to evaluate the facial morphology. Student's t-test, one-way ANOVA and rank sum tests were used for comparison. Significant difference was defined at 95% level. The data showed that UCCLPs who had palatoplasty between 7 and 12 years had greater PMP-A, PMP-ANS, Ba-ANS, Ba-A, Ba-N-ANS than those operated on before 4 years of age, and UCCLPs who had palatoplasty at 4-12 years had smaller Y-axis angle than those operated on before 4 years of age. The maxillary sagittal length increased gradually as von Langenbeck repair was delayed. UCCLPs who underwent palate repair using von Langenbeck technique at 4-12 years had a more protrusive maxilla and less clockwise rotated mandible than those repaired before 4 years. UCCLPs operated using the von Langenbeck technique at 4-12 years had better head-face morphology than those operated on before 4 years. There was no difference in facial morphology among UCCLPs with palate repair at 4-12 years. Copyright © 2012 European Assocation for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional facial analysis of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Siti Adibah; Aidil Koay, Noor Airin

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the facial features of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and compared them with a normal control group using a three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry camera. This cross-sectional study examined 3D measurements of the facial surfaces of 20 Chinese children with repaired UCLP and 40 unaffected Chinese children aged 7 to 12 years old, which were captured using the VECTRA 3D five-pod photosystem and analyzed using Mirror software. Twenty-five variables and two ratios were compared between both groups using independent t-test. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was determined using ten randomly selected images and analyzed using intra-class correlation coefficient test (ICC). The level of significance was set at p < 0.0018. Intra- and inter-observers’ reliability was considered fair to excellent with an ICC value ranging from 0.54 to 0.99. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.0018) were found mainly in the nasolabial region. The cleft group exhibited wider alar base root width, flattened nose and broader nostril floor width on the cleft side. They tended to have shorter upper lip length and thinner upper vermillion thickness. Faces of Chinese children with repaired UCLP displayed meaningful differences when compared to the normal group especially in the nasolabial regions.

  17. Three-dimensional facial analysis of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Siti Adibah; Aidil Koay, Noor Airin

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the facial features of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and compared them with a normal control group using a three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry camera. This cross-sectional study examined 3D measurements of the facial surfaces of 20 Chinese children with repaired UCLP and 40 unaffected Chinese children aged 7 to 12 years old, which were captured using the VECTRA 3D five-pod photosystem and analyzed using Mirror software. Twenty-five variables and two ratios were compared between both groups using independent t-test. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was determined using ten randomly selected images and analyzed using intra-class correlation coefficient test (ICC). The level of significance was set at p < 0.0018. Intra- and inter-observers’ reliability was considered fair to excellent with an ICC value ranging from 0.54 to 0.99. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.0018) were found mainly in the nasolabial region. The cleft group exhibited wider alar base root width, flattened nose and broader nostril floor width on the cleft side. They tended to have shorter upper lip length and thinner upper vermillion thickness. Faces of Chinese children with repaired UCLP displayed meaningful differences when compared to the normal group especially in the nasolabial regions. PMID:27507713

  18. Maurer's clefts, the enigma of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mundwiler-Pachlatko, Esther; Beck, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, completely remodels the infected human erythrocyte to acquire nutrients and to evade the immune system. For this process, the parasite exports more than 10% of all its proteins into the host cell cytosol, including the major virulence factor PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte surface protein 1). This unusual protein trafficking system involves long-known parasite-derived membranous structures in the host cell cytosol, called Maurer’s clefts. However, the genesis, role, and function of Maurer’s clefts remain elusive. Similarly unclear is how proteins are sorted and how they are transported to and from these structures. Recent years have seen a large increase of knowledge but, as yet, no functional model has been established. In this perspective we review the most important findings and conclude with potential possibilities to shed light into the enigma of Maurer’s clefts. Understanding the mechanism and function of these structures, as well as their involvement in protein export in P. falciparum, might lead to innovative control strategies and might give us a handle with which to help to eliminate this deadly parasite. PMID:24284172

  19. Rib cage mechanics after median sternotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Locke, T J; Griffiths, T L; Mould, H; Gibson, G J

    1990-01-01

    A substantial reduction in lung volumes occurs after sternotomy, but the mechanism or mechanisms are unclear. Measurements were made of lung volumes and of chest wall motion with four pairs of magnetometers (two pairs for anteroposterior rib cage, one for lateral rib cage, and one for anteroposterior abdominal dimensions) in 16 men before and one week and three months after coronary artery grafting. Reductions in all lung volumes occurred after sternotomy and were greater in the supine than in the sitting position. Supine vital capacity was reduced one week after surgery, with almost complete recovery at three months. One week after sternotomy there was a significant reduction in tidal volume from a mean (95% confidence limits) value of 0.88 (0.76-1.00) litre to 0.61 (0.52-0.70) l, and in supine rib cage displacement from 3.87 (1.96-5.78) mm to 0.44 (-0.61-1.49) mm in the lateral plane. Respiratory frequency increased from 16 (13-19) to 21 (19-24)/min. Coordination of the rib cage was assessed by measuring the difference in timing of onset of chest wall motion and airflow in four planes. At one week nine of 14 patients showed uncoordination between airflow and rib cage motion in one or more dimensions, and this was still present in three patients at three months. No loss of the temporal relation between airflow and abdominal wall motion was detected. The results suggest that reduced and uncoordinated rib cage expansion contributes to the restrictive ventilatory defect that follows median sternotomy. PMID:2392792

  20. Effects of lip repair on maxillofacial morphology in patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qinghua; Chen, Zhengxi; Yang, Yang; Chen, Zhenqi

    2014-11-01

    Objective : To evaluate the effects of lip repair on maxillofacial development of patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Design : Retrospective. Patients : A total of 75 patients were recruited, including 38 surgical patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and 37 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate who had lip but not palate repair. As controls, 38 patients with no cleft were selected. All subjects were divided according to two growth stages: before the pubertal peak (GS1) and after the pubertal peak (GS2). Interventions : Lateral cephalograms of all subjects were obtained. Main Outcome Measures : Cephalograms were analyzed and compared in the study and control groups. Results : The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate in both GS1 and GS2 demonstrated an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth with retroclined maxillary incisors. The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate showed a shorter length of maxilla, a more clockwise-rotated mandible, and retroclined maxillary incisors. Conclusions : There was an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth but retroclined maxillary incisors in patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate who had received lip repair only, indicating that lip repair may not have a negative impact on the maxillofacial development and influences only the inclination of the maxillary incisors. The shorter anterior-posterior maxillary length and larger gonial angle in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate compared with those in patients with unilateral cleft lip and alveolus suggest that these variations in maxillary and mandibular growth may be a consequence of the cleft itself.

  1. The FGF and FGFR Gene Family and Risk of Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Tianxiao; Wu, Tao; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B; Ruczinski, Ingo; Schwender, Holger; Liang, Kung Yee; Murray, Tanda; Fallin, M Daniele; Redett, Richard J; Raymond, Gerald V; Jin, Sheng-Chih; Chou, Yah-Huei Wu; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel S; Cheah, Felicia S H; Jee, Sun Ha; Jabs, Ethylin W; Scott, Alan F; Beaty, Terri H

    2013-01-01

    Background : Isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate is a common human congenital malformation with a complex and heterogeneous etiology. Genes coding for fibroblast growth factors and their receptors (FGF/FGFR genes) are excellent candidate genes. Methods : We tested single-nucleotide polymorphic markers in 10 FGF/FGFR genes (including FGFBP1, FGF2, FGF10, FGF18, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGF19, FGF4, FGF3, and FGF9) for genotypic effects, interactions with one another, and with common maternal environmental exposures in 221 Asian and 76 Maryland case-parent trios ascertained through a child with isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Results : Both FGFR1 and FGF19 yielded evidence of linkage and association in the transmission disequilibrium test, confirming previous evidence. Haplotypes of three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FGFR1 were nominally significant among Asian trios. Estimated odds ratios for individual single-nucleotide polymorphic markers and haplotypes of multiple markers in FGF19 ranged from 1.31 to 1.87. We also found suggestive evidence of maternal genotypic effects for markers in FGF2 and FGF10 among Asian trios. Tests for gene-environment (G × E) interaction between markers in FGFR2 and maternal smoking or multivitamin supplementation yielded significant evidence of G × E interaction separately. Tests of gene-gene (G × G) interaction using Cordell's method yielded significant evidence between single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FGF9 and FGF18, which was confirmed in an independent sample of trios from an international consortium. Conclusion : Our results suggest several genes in the FGF/FGFR family may influence risk for isolated, nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate through distinct biological mechanisms.

  2. Appreciation of cleft lip and palate treatment outcome by professionals and laypeople.

    PubMed

    Papamanou, Despina A; Gkantidis, Nikolaos; Topouzelis, Nikolaos; Christou, Panagiotis

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the aesthetic evaluation of head photographs of treated individuals with clefts by laypeople and professionals and to investigate how certain cephalometric variables could be related to their rating. A set of five standardized head photos (frontal, both laterals, three-quater right and left) of 12 Caucasian patients with treated unilateral cleft lip and palate were presented to 12 adult laypeople, 12 orthodontists, and 12 maxillofacial surgeons. For each set of photos the judges had to answer four questions on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The answers were analysed for intra- and inter-panel level of agreement and correlations of assessments with certain cephalometric parameters were determined. There was a high level of agreement for all assessments of each panel of raters. However, laypeople were less satisfied with lip and nose aesthetics compared to professionals. The three groups were similarly satisfied with the aesthetics of the jaws and the face. The anterior position of the maxilla (SNA) influenced positively professionals' ratings of facial aesthetics. Orthodontists were negatively influenced when the vertical dimension of the face or the distance of the lower lip to E-plane were relatively increased. The latter was the only cephalometric parameter correlated with lower aesthetic scores obtained from laypeople. Professionals report greater satisfaction from the treatment outcome and evaluate cleft consequences with less severity than laypeople. According to cephalometric findings, the relative positions of the lips seem to dominate facial aesthetics' appreciation by laypeople, while specialists appear to focus on different features of the face.

  3. Moustache reconstruction in patients with cleft lip: (final aesthetic touches in clefts-part ii).

    PubMed

    Duskova, Marketa; Sosna, Bohuslav; Sukop, Andrej

    2006-09-01

    Men with clefts often have limited or even missing moustache growth in scar areas or in the upper lip prolabium. However the histological testing showed the absence or at least the inactive form of androgenic receptor in hair follicle of cleft site, transplantation of autologous grafts harvested from hair was successful in all six cases either into scars or the prolabium. A more natural effect was achieved by using micrografts. The positive reaction of patients proved there is a need for detailed treatment in highly outgoing individuals.

  4. Orbicularis oris muscle defects as an expanded phenotypic feature in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Weinberg, Seth M; Rogers, Carolyn R; Brandon, Carla A; Cooper, Margaret E; Bardi, Kathleen M; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Resick, Judith M; Bowen, A'Delbert; Mooney, Mark P; de Salamanca, Javier Enríquez; González, Beatriz; Maher, Brion S; Martin, Rick A; Marazita, Mary L

    2007-06-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip+/-cleft palate is a complex disease with a wide phenotypic spectrum; occult defects of the superior orbicularis oris muscle may represent the mildest subclinical form of the lip portion of the phenotype. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography to compare the frequency of discontinuities in the OO muscle in 525 unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip+/-cleft palate versus 257 unaffected controls. OO muscle discontinuities were observed in 54 (10.3%) of the non-cleft relatives, compared to 15 (5.8%) of the controls-a statistically significant increase (P=0.04). Male relatives had a significantly higher rate of discontinuities than male controls (12.0% vs. 3.2%; P=0.01); female relatives also had a higher rate of discontinuities than female controls, but the increase was not statistically significant (8.9% vs. 7.4%; P=0.56). These data confirm the hypothesis that subepithelial OO muscle defects are a mild manifestation of the cleft lip phenotype. Identification of subepithelial OO muscle defects may be important in a clinical setting, as a means of providing more accurate recurrence risk estimates to relatives in cleft families. Furthermore, the expansion of the cleft lip+/-cleft palate phenotypic spectrum should improve the power of genetic studies. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Orthodontically guided bone transport in the treatment of alveolar cleft: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Rodríguez, Estefanía; Gómez, Elena; Otero, Marta; Berraquero, Rosario; Wucherpfennig, Begona; Hernández-Godoy, Juan; Guiñales, Jorge; Vincent, Germán; Burgueño, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Conventional treatments are sometimes not possible in certain alveolar cleft cases due to the severity of the gap which separates the fragments. Various management strategies have been proposed, including sequential surgical interventions or delaying treatment until adulthood to then carry out maxillary osteotomies. A further alternative approach has also been proposed, involving the application of bone transport techniques to mobilise the osseous fragments and thereby reduce the gap between lateral fragments and the premaxilla. We introduce the case of a 10-year-old patient who presented with a bilateral alveolar cleft and a severe gap. Stable occlusion between the premaxilla and the mandible was achieved following orthodontic treatment, making it inadvisable to perform a retrusive osteotomy of the premaxilla in order to close the alveolar clefts. Faced with this situation, it was decided we would employ a bone transport technique under orthodontic guidance using a dental splint. This would enable an osseous disc to be displaced towards the medial area and reduce the interfragmentary distance. During a second surgical intervention, closure of the soft tissues was performed and the gap was filled in using autogenous bone. The use of bone transport techniques in selected cases allows closure of the osseous defect, whilst also preserving soft tissues and reducing the amount of bone autograft required. In our case, we were able to respect the position of the premaxilla and, at the same time, generate new tissues at both an alveolar bone and soft tissue level with results which have remained stable over the course of time. Alveolar cleft, bone transport, graft.

  6. Orthodontically guided bone transport in the treatment of alveolar cleft: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Elena; Otero, Marta; Berraquero, Rosario; Wucherpfennig, Begona; Hernández-Godoy, Juan; Guiñales, Jorge; Vincent, Germán; Burgueño, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conventional treatments are sometimes not possible in certain alveolar cleft cases due to the severity of the gap which separates the fragments. Various management strategies have been proposed, including sequential surgical interventions or delaying treatment until adulthood to then carry out maxillary osteotomies. A further alternative approach has also been proposed, involving the application of bone transport techniques to mobilise the osseous fragments and thereby reduce the gap between lateral fragments and the premaxilla. Case Report We introduce the case of a 10-year-old patient who presented with a bilateral alveolar cleft and a severe gap. Stable occlusion between the premaxilla and the mandible was achieved following orthodontic treatment, making it inadvisable to perform a retrusive osteotomy of the premaxilla in order to close the alveolar clefts. Faced with this situation, it was decided we would employ a bone transport technique under orthodontic guidance using a dental splint. This would enable an osseous disc to be displaced towards the medial area and reduce the interfragmentary distance. During a second surgical intervention, closure of the soft tissues was performed and the gap was filled in using autogenous bone. Conclusions The use of bone transport techniques in selected cases allows closure of the osseous defect, whilst also preserving soft tissues and reducing the amount of bone autograft required. In our case, we were able to respect the position of the premaxilla and, at the same time, generate new tissues at both an alveolar bone and soft tissue level with results which have remained stable over the course of time. Key words:Alveolar cleft, bone transport, graft. PMID:26855699

  7. Fordyce Happiness Program and Happiness in Mothers of Children with a Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosavi Asl, Fatemeh-Sadat; Abbasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Facial deformities and aesthetic and functional anomalies in children may be a cause of real distress in families. Problems faced by parents in coping with a child’s anomaly can be upsetting and lead parents to exhibit over-severe behavior. The present study was conducted in order to study the effect of happiness program on the happiness of the mothers of children with a cleft lip and palate. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 64 mothers of children with a cleft lip and palate enrolled by convenience random sampling were assigned to an intervention or control group based on a simple random sampling. Then, a program of happiness training was implemented consisting of 10 sessions of 2 hours each. A demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire were completed prior to and 2 months after the last session of intervention. The data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics, consisting of a paired t-test, independent t-test and Chi-square test using SPSS version 20. Results: The independent t-test indicated a significant difference in mean happiness score after training between the intervention and control groups (P<0.05). Moreover, the paired t-test indicated a significant difference in mean happiness score between before and after training in the intervention group, although the difference was not statistically significant for the control group (P>0.05). Conclusion: In light of the efficacy of happiness training on the promotion of happiness in the mothers of children with a cleft lip and palate, this model is recommended as a healthcare intervention to decrease stress in mothers following the birth of an infant with a cleft lip and palate. PMID:28008390

  8. Minimally Painful Local Anesthetic Injection for Cleft Lip/Nasal Repair in Grown Patients

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher; Wong, Alison L.; Chokotho, Tilinde

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a recent interest in injecting large body and face areas with local anesthetic in a minimally painful manner. The method includes adherence to minimal pain injection details as well feedback from the patient who counts the number of times he feels pain during the injection process. This article describes the successes and limitations of this technique as applied to primary cleft lip/nasal repair in grown patients. Methods: Thirty-two primary cleft lip patients were injected with local anesthesia by 3 surgeons and then underwent surgical correction of their deformity. At the beginning of the injection of the local anesthetic, patients were instructed to clearly inform the injector each and every time they felt pain during the entire injection process. Results: The average patient felt pain only 1.6 times during the injection process. This included the first sting of the first 27-gauge needle poke. The only pain that 51% of the patients felt was that first poke of the first needle; 24% of the patients only felt pain twice during the whole injection process. The worst pain score occurred in a patient who felt pain 6 times during the injection process. Ninety-one percent of the patients felt no pain at all after the injection of the local anesthetic and did not require a top-up. Conclusion: It is possible to successfully and reliably inject local anesthesia in a minimally painful manner for cleft lip and nasal repair in the fully grown cleft patient. PMID:25289364

  9. Natal and neonatal teeth among cleft lip and palate infants

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Manjushree; Kadam, Dinesh; Bhandary, Sanath; Hukkeri, Rajesh Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Natal/neonatal teeth are reported to be more common among clefts and congenital anomalies. Data exclusively among clefts is sparse. The aim was to evaluate prevalence of natal teeth among cleft lip and palate neonates and review the causes, presentation, associated anomalies, complications and management. Materials and Methods: Out of 641operated patients, records of 151 infants with cleft lip and palate with less than three months of age presented to the department of plastic and reconstructive surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Out of which 107 were unilateral complete lip and palate (ULCP), 15 bilateral cleft lip and isolated cleft palate constituted 29. Results: Three patients among the studied records showed neonatal teeth. Two had paired central mandibular incisor teeth along with associated other anomalies and one had a single maxillary neonatal tooth. All were present in unilateral cleft lip and none of the bilateral or isolated cleft palate infants showed neonatal teeth. The overall incidence of neonatal teeth was 1.98% and 2.8% in unilateral Cleft lip. Conclusion: Our study supports the incidence of 2% natal teeth among UCLP. Involvement of mandibular central incisors in contrast to the notion that maxillary alveolus is more commonly affected suggest that it is not only the anatomical disturbance but also all those possible common multifactorial etiological factors contributing to the congenital anomalies as such. Natal/neonatal teeth are rather under-diagnosed and reported than a rare phenomenon and the prevalence is higher in certain population. Riga-Fede disease unlikely to be seen in clefts with neonatal teeth due to anatomical factors. The extraction of non mobile tooth if necessary can be done during the primary surgery for the cleft lip. PMID:24163556

  10. Natal and neonatal teeth among cleft lip and palate infants.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Manjushree; Kadam, Dinesh; Bhandary, Sanath; Hukkeri, Rajesh Y

    2013-01-01

    Natal/neonatal teeth are reported to be more common among clefts and congenital anomalies. Data exclusively among clefts is sparse. The aim was to evaluate prevalence of natal teeth among cleft lip and palate neonates and review the causes, presentation, associated anomalies, complications and management. Out of 641operated patients, records of 151 infants with cleft lip and palate with less than three months of age presented to the department of plastic and reconstructive surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed. Out of which 107 were unilateral complete lip and palate (ULCP), 15 bilateral cleft lip and isolated cleft palate constituted 29. Three patients among the studied records showed neonatal teeth. Two had paired central mandibular incisor teeth along with associated other anomalies and one had a single maxillary neonatal tooth. All were present in unilateral cleft lip and none of the bilateral or isolated cleft palate infants showed neonatal teeth. The overall incidence of neonatal teeth was 1.98% and 2.8% in unilateral Cleft lip. Our study supports the incidence of 2% natal teeth among UCLP. Involvement of mandibular central incisors in contrast to the notion that maxillary alveolus is more commonly affected suggest that it is not only the anatomical disturbance but also all those possible common multifactorial etiological factors contributing to the congenital anomalies as such. Natal/neonatal teeth are rather under-diagnosed and reported than a rare phenomenon and the prevalence is higher in certain population. Riga-Fede disease unlikely to be seen in clefts with neonatal teeth due to anatomical factors. The extraction of non mobile tooth if necessary can be done during the primary surgery for the cleft lip.

  11. Distinct DNA methylation profiles in subtypes of orofacial cleft.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Gemma C; Ho, Karen; Davies, Amy; Stergiakouli, Evie; Humphries, Kerry; McArdle, Wendy; Sandy, Jonathan; Davey Smith, George; Lewis, Sarah J; Relton, Caroline L

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic data could help identify risk factors for orofacial clefts, either by revealing a causal role for epigenetic mechanisms in causing clefts or by capturing information about causal genetic or environmental factors. Given the evidence that different subtypes of orofacial cleft have distinct aetiologies, we explored whether children with different cleft subtypes showed distinct epigenetic profiles. In whole-blood samples from 150 children from the Cleft Collective cohort study, we measured DNA methylation at over 450,000 sites on the genome. We then carried out epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) to test the association between methylation at each site and cleft subtype (cleft lip only (CLO) n = 50; cleft palate only (CPO) n = 50; cleft lip and palate (CLP) n = 50). We also compared methylation in the blood to methylation in the lip or palate tissue using genome-wide data from the same 150 children and conducted an EWAS of CLO compared to CLP in lip tissue. We found four genomic regions in blood differentially methylated in CLO compared to CLP, 17 in CPO compared to CLP and 294 in CPO compared to CLO. Several regions mapped to genes that have previously been implicated in the development of orofacial clefts (for example, TBX1, COL11A2, HOXA2, PDGFRA), and over 250 associations were novel. Methylation in blood correlated with that in lip/palate at some regions. There were 14 regions differentially methylated in the lip tissue from children with CLO and CLP, with one region (near KIAA0415) showing up in both the blood and lip EWAS. Our finding of distinct methylation profiles in different orofacial cleft (OFC) subtypes represents a promising first step in exploring the potential role of epigenetic modifications in the aetiology of OFCs and/or as clinically useful biomarkers of OFC subtypes.

  12. A Descriptive Epidemiology Study of Oral Cleft in Sergipe, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luiza, Andrea; Noronha de Góis, Diego; Santos, Jadson Alípio Santana de Sousa; Brito de Oliveira, Rosany Larissa; Ferreira da Silva, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The nonsyndromic orofacial cleft is the fourth most common birth defect, but in Brazil, data about the cleft epidemiology are not accurate. Objective This study aimed to describe the epidemiologic characteristics of oral cleft cases at Specialized Society Attending Cleft Patient in Sergipe State. Methods Data were obtained from patients' medical records in relation to the following characteristics: age; gender; race; origin; cleft type; additional malformations and/or complications; prenatal accomplishment; treatment applied. For diagnosis analysis, it was noted if mothers had received prenatal care and if they had ultrasonography performed and if the cleft was viewed in it. Results We observed a prevalence of male gender (54%). Age between 0 and 4 years old was most prevalent (53%), and pheoderma race was observed in 47%. Transincisive foramen cleft was found in 52.3% of the individuals. The prevalence of pre- and transincisive foramen cleft was higher in men (66.3 and 55.7%), women accounted for 65.0% of postincisive foramen, and atypical facial cleft (0.3%) occurred in one case. Associated malformations and complications were present in 12% of patients. Prenatal care was reported by 48% of the mothers. Conclusion In this study male gender was the most affected, and 0 to 4 years was the most frequent age group. Transincisive foramen cleft type was most frequently encountered. Prenatal care was reported by most mothers. So, this study found that early treatment is a reality in SEAFESE (Service Specializing in Cleft Care of Sergipe), and consequently the chances of successful integration of the child to society will be better. PMID:25992043

  13. Gonioscopically Guided Nonpenetrating Cyclodialysis Cleft Repair: A Novel Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ian AS; Shah, Brinda; Goyal, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim We present a novel surgical technique for repair of persistent and symptomatic cyclodialysis clefts refractory to conservative or minimally invasive treatment. Background Numerous surgical techniques have been described to close cyclodialysis clefts. The current standard approach involves intraocular repair of cyclodialysis clefts underneath a full-thickness scleral flap. Technique Our technique employs intraoperative use of a direct gonioscope to guide a nonpenetrating surgical repair. Subsequently, a significantly less invasive, nonpenetrating technique utilizing a partial-thickness scleral flap can be performed that reduces potential risks associated with intraocular surgery. The direct gonioscope is also used for confirmation of adequate surgical closure of the cyclodialysis cleft prior to completion of surgery. This technique has been successfully carried out to repair traumatic chronic cyclodialysis clefts associated with hypotony in two patients. There were no significant adverse events as a result of using this technique. Conclusion The novel technique described increases the likelihood of successful and permanent repair of cyclodialysis clefts with resolution of symptoms associated with hypotony, through direct intraoperative visualization of the cleft. Clinical significance Gonioscopically guided nonpenetrating cyclodialysis cleft repair offers significant benefits over previously described techniques. Advantages of our technique include gonioscopic cleft visualization, enabling accurate localization of the area requiring repair, and subsequent confirmation of adequate closure of the cleft. Using a partial-thickness scleral flap is also less invasive and reduces risks associated with treatment of this potentially challenging complication of ocular trauma. How to cite this article Rodrigues IAS, Shah B, Goyal S, Lim S. Gonioscopically Guided Nonpenetrating Cyclodialysis Cleft Repair: A Novel Surgical Technique. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2017

  14. Not All Clefts Are Created Equal: Patterns of Hospital-Based Care Use among Children with Cleft Lip and Palate within 4 Years of Initial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ligh, Cassandra A; Fox, Justin P; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason W; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    This study compares hospital-based care and associated charges among children with cleft lip, cleft palate, or both, and identifies subgroups generating the greatest cumulative hospital charges. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and palate who underwent initial surgery from 2006 to 2008 in four U.S. states. Primary outcome was hospital-based care-emergency, outpatient, inpatient-within 4 years of surgery. Regression models compared outcomes and classification tree analysis identified patients at risk for being in the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. The authors identified 4571 children with cleft lip (18.2 percent), cleft palate (39.2 percent), or cleft lip and palate (42.6 percent). Medical comorbidity was frequent across all groups, with feeding difficulty (cleft lip, 2.4 percent; cleft palate, 13.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 6.0 percent; p < 0.001) and developmental delay (cleft lip, 1.8 percent; cleft palate, 9.4 percent; cleft lip and palate, 3.6 percent; p < 0.001) being most common. Within 30 days of surgery, those with cleft palate were most likely to return to the hospital (p < 0.001). Hospital-based care per 100 children within 4 years was lowest among the cleft lip group, yet comparable among those with cleft palate and cleft lip and palate (p < 0.001). Cumulative 4-year charges, however, were highest among the cleft palate cohort (cleft lip, $56,966; cleft palate, $106,090; cleft lip and palate, $91,263; p < 0.001). Comorbidity, diagnosis (cleft lip versus cleft palate with or without cleft lip), and age at initial surgery were the most important factors associated with the highest quartile of cumulative hospital charges. Cleft lip and palate children experience a high rate of hospital-based care early in life, with degree of medical comorbidity being a significant burden. Understanding this relationship and associated needs may help deliver more efficient, patient

  15. Face Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of face painting as a technique for making the endangered species issue tangible for children while addressing the complexity of the issue. Children are "given" an animal of their own and are educated about the animal while having their faces painted to resemble the animal. (LZ)

  16. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hang Suk; Choi, Hyun Gon; Kim, Soon Heum; Park, Hyung Jun; Shin, Dong Hyeok; Jo, Dong In; Kim, Cheol Keun

    2012-01-01

    Background The bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essential treatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture and size of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the success rate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, some studies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of the cleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet. We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessment according to the cleft type. Methods The study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according to the cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysis software. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimation and intraoperative measurement was analyzed. Results The difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3 cm3 (P=0.084). There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleft palate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05). Conclusions Assessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysis software can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volume of cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract an additional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate. PMID:23094242

  17. Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in oral cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, M M; Rocha, C M G; Katina, T; Caldas, M; Codorniz, A; Medeiros, C

    2003-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of congenital heart diseases (CHDs) in cleft patients, the type of cleft and the presence of a syndrome were coded in 220 patients. A Doppler echocardiogram with color-flow mapping (DE) was obtained in all patients. Mean age was 112.0 +/- 101.2 months (range, 1-576 months), and 56.8% (125) were males. Cleft lip and palate occurred in 144 patients (65.5%), cleft lip in 40 (18.2%), and cleft palate in 36 (16.4%). Cleft palates were more frequent among females. Twenty-four CHDs were diagnosed in 21 of 220 patients (9.5%): 7 mitral valve prolapses, 6 atrial septal defects, 4 patent ductus arteriosus, 3 ventricular septal defects, 2 cases of tetralogy of Fallot, 1 pulmonary stenosis, and 1 bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of CHD did not correlate with the type of cleft. Syndromes occurred in 28 patients (12.7%), and this association was higher among patients with a cleft palate.

  18. Primary Closure of A Sternal Cleft in A Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Ramdial, Shaal; Pillay, Desigan; Madaree, Anil

    2016-01-01

    A three day old neonate was referred to our department with a problem of a sternal cleft. Sternal clefts are often associated with a myriad of other abnormalities ranging from mild to severe. We present our experience with such a problem, and review the current literature concerning it. PMID:27853697

  19. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  20. Cleft palate in a male water buffalo calf.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Y; Ranjbar, R; Ghadiri, A R; Afsahr, F Saberi; Nejad, S Goorani; Mahabady, M Khaksary; Afrough, M; Karampoor, R; Tavakoli, A

    2007-12-15

    Congenital palatal defects are common in animals but there is only one report of water buffalo has been recorded in Iran. One died male water buffalo calf was examined after hysterotomy operation. At necropsy findings, brachygnathia, palate cleft and small lungs were diagnosed. It is the second report of water buffalo cleft palate in Iran.

  1. A practical prenatal ultrasound classification system for common oral clefts.

    PubMed

    Maarse, Wiesje; Boonacker, Chantal W B; Breugem, Corstiaan C; Kon, Moshe; Manten, Gwendolyn T R; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to introduce and validate a new oral cleft classification system based on prenatal ultrasound for use by professionals in daily practice. During a 3-year period (2011-2014), all cases of prenatal oral cleft diagnosed by ultrasound were retrospectively reviewed. A new prenatal ultrasound classification system was introduced. For the purpose of validation, prenatal ultrasound images of oral cleft types were described according to the new classification system and were compared with postnatal findings by reviewing medical records. A total of 103 fetuses with oral cleft were identified by ultrasound. The mean gestation time at detection was 20.4 weeks (95% confidence intervals: 20.0-20.7). The association between oral cleft and other anomalies varied by cleft type; types 2b/3b and 4 were most frequently associated with other anomalies. The measure of agreement between the prenatal and postnatal findings showed a Kappa value of 0.63 (95% confidence intervals: 0.52-0.75), demonstrating the accuracy of this new classification system. A new prenatal oral cleft classification system is presented. This system appears to be accurate, and it shows the variation in the risk of associated anomalies for each cleft type. We expect that ultrasonographers will be able to use the new classification in daily practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A Glance at Methods for Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolinejad, Sima; Ebrahimzadeh Bidskan, Alireza; Ashraf, Hami; Hamidi Alamdari, Daryoush

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cleft palate is the second most common birth defect and is considered as a challenge for pediatric plastic surgeons. There is still a general lack of a standard protocol and patients often require multiple surgical interventions during their lifetime along with disappointing results. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed search was undertaken using search terms including 'cleft palate repair', 'palatal cleft closure', 'cleft palate + stem cells', 'cleft palate + plasma rich platelet', 'cleft palate + scaffold', 'palatal tissue engineering', and 'bone tissue engineering'. The found articles were included if they defined a therapeutic strategy and/or assessed a new technique. Results: We reported a summary of the key-points concerning cleft palate development, the genes involving this defect, current therapeutic strategies, recently novel aspects, and future advances in treatments for easy and fast understanding of the concepts, rather than a systematic review. In addition, the results were integrated with our recent experience. Conclusions: Tissue engineering may open a new window in cleft palate reconstruction. Stem cells and growth factors play key roles in this field. PMID:25593724

  3. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  4. Smile Train: The ascendancy of cleft care in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Subodh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Though India has an estimated population of one million untreated cleft patients, facilities for its treatment have been limited and are not evenly distributed across the country. Furthermore, a paucity of committed cleft surgeons in fewer hospitals to provide quality surgical treatment to these patients, poverty, illiteracy, superstitions and poor connectivity in some remote regions severely limit the chances of an average cleft lip patient born in India from receiving rational and effective comprehensive treatment for his/her malady. The Smile Train Project with its singular focus on cleft patients started its philanthropic activities in India in the year 2000. It made hospitals and included clefts surgeon equal partners in this programme and helped them treat as many cleft patients as they possibly could. The Project encouraged improvement of the training and infrastructure in various centres across the length and breadth of the region. The Project received an unprecedented success in terms of growth of number of centres, cleft surgeons and quantum of cleft patients reporting for treatment. The G S Memorial Hospital is one such partner hospital. It started innovative outreach programmes and took a holistic view of the needs of these patients and their families. With the support of the Smile Train, it has not only succeeded in providing treatment to more than 14,500 patients in 5 years, but has also devised innovative outreach programmes and seamlessly incorporated salient changes in the hospital system to suit the needs of the target population. PMID:19884676

  5. Early Speech Production of Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, Theresa; Broen, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    The study comparing word-initial target phonemes and phoneme production of five toddlers with cleft palate and five normal toddlers found that the cleft palate children tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels and fewer words with word-initial stops, fricatives, and affricates than normal children. (Author/DB)

  6. Single-Word Intelligibility in Speakers with Repaired Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara; Chau, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Many speakers with repaired cleft palate have reduced intelligibility, but there are limitations with current procedures for assessing intelligibility. The aim of this study was to construct a single-word intelligibility test for speakers with cleft palate. The test used a multiple-choice identification format, and was based on phonetic contrasts…

  7. #Cleft: The Use of Social Media Amongst Parents of Infants with Clefts.

    PubMed

    Khouri, Joseph S; McCheyne, Melisande J; Morrison, Clinton S

    2017-01-13

      Many societies and organizations are using social media to reach their target audience. The extent to which parents of patients with craniofacial anomalies use social media has yet to be determined. The goal of this study is to characterize and describe the use of social media by the parents of children with cleft lip and palate as it pertains to the care of their child.   Parents or guardian of all patients presenting for initial consultation regarding a child's congenital cleft anomaly were contacted by phone or mail to complete a survey regarding their use of social media vis-à-vis their child's cleft anomaly. Participants were asked to answer a 19-question survey.   Thirty-two families were contacted and 25 surveys were completed. Ninety-two percent of respondents used social media to learn about their child's diagnosis. Facebook (76%) and blogs (24%) were the most commonly accessed social media outlets, followed by Instagram (8%). Education about the diagnosis and treatment of cleft pathology (87%) was the most common reason for accessing social media, followed by companionship and support (56%), and advice about perioperative care (52%). Almost half (43%) of parents used social media to obtain information on their caregiver and treatment team, and 26% of parents used information gained on social media to guide their decision on where to seek care.   Social media is a readily available resource, one that will certainly shape the experiences of our patients and families for years to come.

  8. The caries prevalence of oral clefts in eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wen-Lin; Zhang, Dai-Zun; Xu, Yao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available concerning the prevalence of caries among patients with oral clefts in Eastern China. Consecutive patients aged 6-18 with oral clefts were recruited. Patients were stratified into 2 groups according to their ages, namely Group I with aged 6-12 and Group II with aged 13-18. For each age group, the children were further divided into three subgroups according to the types of oral clefts they had: cleft lip/cleft lip and alveolus (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and palate (CLP). Dental caries were examined by using the decayed, missing, and filled index for primary teeth (dmft) and Decay, Missing and Filled index for Permanent teeth (DMFT) according to criteria of the World Health Organization. 268 eligible patients with oral clefts were included in the study. The mean DMFT for Group I was 1.77 (SD2.58) while that for Group II was 6.96 (SD4.35). The mean DMFT was statistically significant different between the age group I and age group II (t=12.21, P<0.05). In Group I, the dmft scores was 4.68 (SD3.67) for CL group, while that for the CP group was 7.36 (SD3.93), and that for the CLP group was 5.72 (SD 3.87). The mean dmft was no statistically significant different among cleft types (F=3.13, P>0.05). Also in Group I, the mean DMFT was 1.56 (SD2.18) for CL group, while that for the CP group was 1.24 (SD 1.81) and that for the CLP group was 2.08 (SD2.96). There were no statistically significant different in mean DMFT among different cleft types (F=1.09, P>0.05). In Group II, the mean DMFT was 6.06 (SD3.97) for CL group while that for the CP group was 7.71 (SD 4.94) and that for the CLP group was 7.05 (SD4.32). No significant difference was shown in the mean DMFT among different cleft groups (CL, CP, and CLP) (F=0.55, P>0.05). During assess the prevalence of dental caries among Eastern Chinese with oral clefts; the study confirmed that the prevalence of caries was increased with increasing age for oral clefts patients. It was

  9. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:23213503

  10. Removal of second branchial cleft cysts using a retroauricular approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Fang, Si-Lian

    2009-05-01

    Second branchial cleft cysts (also called cervical lymphoepithelial cysts) usually present in adulthood, and cosmesis of surgical access is an important issue. This study was performed to assess the feasibility and outcome of a retroauricular approach for removing second branchial cleft cysts. Eight patients underwent removal of second branchial cleft cysts using a retroauricular approach. All 8 second branchial cleft cysts were removed successfully, and the wounds healed uneventfully. None of the patients suffered from weakness of the great auricular nerve. Marginal nerve palsy did not occur postsurgery. Average follow-up period was 14.5 months (range, 6-20 months) with no tumor recurrence. The incision scars were invisible. Second branchial cleft cyst resection using a retroauricular approach is a feasible method that provides an acceptable cosmetic outcome.

  11. The gingival Stillman's clefts: histopathology and cellular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Maria Antonietta; Cerroni, Loredana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Orlandi, Augusto; Pilloni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Stillman's cleft is a mucogingival triangular-shaped defect on the buccal surface of a root with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to examine the Stillman's cleft obtained from excision during root coverage surgical procedures at an histopathological level. Harvesting of cleft was obtained from two periodontally healthy patients with a scalpel and a bevel incision and then placed in a test tube with buffered solution to be processed for light microscopy. Microscopic analysis has shown that Stillman's cleft presented a lichenoid hand-like inflammatory infiltration, while in the periodontal patient an inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia was identified. Stillman's cleft remains to be investigated as for the possible causes of such lesion of the gingival margin, although an inflammatory response seems to be evident and active from a strictly histopathological standpoint.

  12. The gingival Stillman’s clefts: histopathology and cellular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cassini, Maria Antonietta; Cerroni, Loredana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Orlandi, Augusto; Pilloni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study Stillman’s cleft is a mucogingival triangular-shaped defect on the buccal surface of a root with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to examine the Stillman’s cleft obtained from excision during root coverage surgical procedures at an histopathological level. Materials and method Harvesting of cleft was obtained from two periodontally healthy patients with a scalpel and a bevel incision and then placed in a test tube with buffered solution to be processed for light microscopy. Results Microscopic analysis has shown that Stillman’s cleft presented a lichenoid hand-like inflammatory infiltration, while in the periodontal patient an inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia was identified. Conclusion Stillman’s cleft remains to be investigated as for the possible causes of such lesion of the gingival margin, although an inflammatory response seems to be evident and active from a strictly histopathological standpoint. PMID:26941897

  13. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  14. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP) - Part 3: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; CARVALHO, Roberta Martinelli; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira das; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassutaka Faria; SOARES, Simone; MAZZOTTINI, Reinaldo; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face. PMID:23329251

  15. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-USP (HRAC-USP)--part 3: oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Freitas, José Alberto de Souza; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Carvalho, Roberta Martinelli; Oliveira, Thais Marchini; Lauris, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga de; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira das; Yaedú, Renato Yassutaka Faria; Soares, Simone; Mazzottini, Reinaldo; Pinto, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face.

  16. Ten-Year Cleft Surgery in Nepal: Achievements and Lessons Learned for Better Cleft Care Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Hans-Dieter; Koch, Heribert; Koller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate surgery abroad is devoid of global consensus regarding standards of therapy, follow-up, and outcome. Cleft surgery in Nepal during a 10-year sustained program provided the opportunity to inform on the need for such standards. Methods: Medical records were evaluated from the cleft clinic at Sushma Koirala Memorial Hospital, Sankhu, Kathmandu, Nepal, from 1997 to 2007. Four groups were identified for analysis: total cohort, total surgical cohort (TSC), primary program patients (PPP; patients had not been operated on before), and nonprimary program patients (non-PPP; patients operated on elsewhere before). Patient demographics, diagnostic, primary and secondary surgery (corrective surgery), and follow-up were evaluated. Results: One thousand forty-five patients were eligible for surgery. Three hundred twenty-three of 1,045 patients (30.9%) did not seek treatment, although scheduled for surgery. One thousand two hundred one procedures were performed in 722 patients [TSC; 845 PPP (70.4%); 356 non-PPP (29.64%)]. Corrective procedures were performed in 257 of 1,201 [3.5% (30 of 845 procedures in 509 patients) PPP vs 63.7% (227 of 356 procedures in 213 patients) non-PPP]. One hundred six lips were completely reoperated on (1 PPP vs 105 non-PPP), and 42 palates underwent a total revision (5 PPP vs 37 non-PPP). The surgical outcome of the TSC group in terms of complication rate was similar to the one in developed countries. Conclusions: The high rate of corrective surgery reveals the need for global regulatory mechanisms and the need for nongovernmental organizations to introduce strategies for delivering sustained cleft care until achieving full rehabilitation. The World Health Organization should establish standards for cleft care delivered in less developed countries. PMID:27579235

  17. Face lift.

    PubMed

    Warren, Richard J; Aston, Sherrell J; Mendelson, Bryan C

    2011-12-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify and describe the anatomy of and changes to the aging face, including changes in bone mass and structure and changes to the skin, tissue, and muscles. 2. Assess each individual's unique anatomy before embarking on face-lift surgery and incorporate various surgical techniques, including fat grafting and other corrective procedures in addition to shifting existing fat to a higher position on the face, into discussions with patients. 3. Identify risk factors and potential complications in prospective patients. 4. Describe the benefits and risks of various techniques. The ability to surgically rejuvenate the aging face has progressed in parallel with plastic surgeons' understanding of facial anatomy. In turn, a more clear explanation now exists for the visible changes seen in the aging face. This article and its associated video content review the current understanding of facial anatomy as it relates to facial aging. The standard face-lift techniques are explained and their various features, both good and bad, are reviewed. The objective is for surgeons to make a better aesthetic diagnosis before embarking on face-lift surgery, and to have the ability to use the appropriate technique depending on the clinical situation.

  18. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Zuhaib, Mohammed; Bonanthaya, Krishnamurthy; Parmar, Renu; Shetty, Pritham N; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1) To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (2) To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM). (3) To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Prospective study. A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, significant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle closure in unilateral clefts.

  19. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p < 0.0001); children who had isolated cleft lip with or without alveolus and isolated cleft palate were not statistically different from unaffected children. Patients with unilateral cleft lip with cleft palate were found to be more severely affected than bilateral cases. Nasal obstruction was observed in early childhood, although severity worsened in adolescence. This population-based study reports a high prevalence of nasal obstructive symptoms in children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate based on type and severity of the cleft. The authors encourage cleft teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  20. The Effects of Secondary Cleft Procedures on Alar Base Position and Nostril Morphology in Patients with Unilateral Clefts.

    PubMed

    Power, Stephanie M; Matic, Damir B

    2017-07-01

    To compare effects of secondary cleft procedures on alar base position and nostril morphology. Retrospective review. Multidisciplinary cleft clinic at tertiary center. Seventy consecutive patients with unilateral clefts were grouped according to secondary procedure. Alveolar bone graft versus total lip takedown with anatomic muscle repair versus single-stage total lip with cleft septorhinoplasty (nose-lip) versus rhinoplasty alone. Anthropometric measurements were recorded from pre- and postoperative photographs. Ratios of cleft to noncleft side were compared within and across groups pre- and postoperatively using parametric and nonparametric tests. Within the bone graft group, no differences were seen postoperatively in alar base position in long-term follow-up. The total lip group demonstrated greater symmetry at the alar base (P < .001), increased vertical lip dimension (P < .001), and decreased nostril height (P = .004) postoperatively. Within the nose-lip group, increased vertical dimension and alar base support (P < .001) were also seen postoperatively. Across groups, the single-stage nose-lip group demonstrated greatest alar base symmetry on worm's-eye view (P < .04). Alar base asymmetry in patients with unilateral clefts may be related to soft tissue deficiency and was not affected by alveolar bone grafting. Total lip takedown with anatomic muscle reapproximation was associated with increased alar base symmetry and vertical lip dimension on cleft to noncleft side. Greatest symmetry at the alar base was seen following single-stage nose-lip reconstruction, which may be an effective technique for correcting the secondary cleft lip nasal deformity.

  1. Imputation of orofacial clefting data identifies novel risk loci and sheds light on the genetic background of cleft lip ± cleft palate and cleft palate only

    PubMed Central

    Böhmer, Anne C.; Bowes, John; Nikolić, Miloš; Ishorst, Nina; Wyatt, Niki; Hammond, Nigel L.; Gölz, Lina; Thieme, Frederic; Barth, Sandra; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Spielmann, Malte; Aldhorae, Khalid; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Dixon, Michael J.; Knapp, Michael; Mangold, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (nsCL/P) is among the most common human birth defects with multifactorial etiology. Here, we present results from a genome-wide imputation study of nsCL/P in which, after adding replication cohort data, four novel risk loci for nsCL/P are identified (at chromosomal regions 2p21, 14q22, 15q24 and 19p13). On a systematic level, we show that the association signals within this high-density dataset are enriched in functionally-relevant genomic regions that are active in both human neural crest cells (hNCC) and mouse embryonic craniofacial tissue. This enrichment is also detectable in hNCC regions primed for later activity. Using GCTA analyses, we suggest that 30% of the estimated variance in risk for nsCL/P in the European population can be attributed to common variants, with 25.5% contributed to by the 24 risk loci known to date. For each of these, we identify credible SNPs using a Bayesian refinement approach, with two loci harbouring only one probable causal variant. Finally, we demonstrate that there is no polygenic component of nsCL/P detectable that is shared with nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO). Our data suggest that, while common variants are strongly contributing to risk for nsCL/P, they do not seem to be involved in nsCPO which might be more often caused by rare deleterious variants. Our study generates novel insights into both nsCL/P and nsCPO etiology and provides a systematic framework for research into craniofacial development and malformation. PMID:28087736

  2. Syntax and Discourse in Near-Native French: Clefts and Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study examines aspects of the syntax-discourse interface in near-native French. Two cleft structures--"c'est" clefts and "avoir" clefts--are examined in experimental and spontaneous conversational data from 10 adult Anglophone learners of French and ten native speakers of French. "C'est" clefts mark focus, and…

  3. Cleft palate: players, pathways, and pursuits

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jeffrey C.; Schutte, Brian C.

    2004-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is a common human birth defect, and its causes are being dissected through studies of human populations and through the use of animal models. Mouse models in particular have made a substantial contribution to our understanding of the gene pathways involved in palate development and the nature of signaling molecules that act in a tissue-specific manner at critical stages of embryogenesis. Related work has provided further support for investigating the role of common environmental triggers as causal covariates. PMID:15199400

  4. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  5. Nasal airway and septal variation in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Friel, Michael T; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Flores, Roberto L; Tholpady, Sunil; Kula, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) affects the dentoalveolar and nasolabial facial regions. Internal and external nasal dysmorphology may persist in individuals born with CLP despite surgical interventions. 7-18 year old individuals born with unilateral and bilateral CLP (n = 50) were retrospectively assessed using cone beam computed tomography. Anterior, middle, and posterior nasal airway volumes were measured on each facial side. Septal deviation was measured at the anterior and posterior nasal spine, and the midpoint between these two locations. Data were evaluated using principal components analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and post-hoc ANOVA tests. PCA results show partial separation in high dimensional space along PC1 (48.5% variance) based on age groups and partial separation along PC2 (29.8% variance) based on CLP type and septal deviation patterns. MANOVA results indicate that age (P = 0.007) and CLP type (P ≤ 0.001) significantly affect nasal airway volume and septal deviation. ANOVA results indicate that anterior nasal volume is significantly affected by age (P ≤ 0.001), whereas septal deviation patterns are significantly affected by CLP type (P ≤ 0.001). Age and CLP type affect nasal airway volume and septal deviation patterns. Nasal airway volumes tend to be reduced on the clefted sides of the face relative to non-clefted sides of the face. Nasal airway volumes tend to strongly increase with age, whereas septal deviation values tend to increase only slightly with age. These results suggest that functional nasal breathing may be impaired in individuals born with the unilateral and bilateral CLP deformity.

  6. A Case of Complex Facial Clefts Treated with Staged-tissue Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Shigemura, Yuka; Nuri, Takashi; Iwanaga, Hiroyuki; Seno, Takaya

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Craniofacial clefts involve all soft tissue and skeletal elements throughout the cleft. Usefulness of tissue expansion in craniofacial clefts is reported. Surgery for a complex type of facial clefts is more difficult and more extensive than for a simple one. We experienced a primary case of complex facial clefts (Tessier No. 2 and 12 on the right and 3, 11, and 5 on the left). Soft-tissue closure of all clefts could be completed by using 4 tissue expanders and 7 operations. Because multiple tissue deficiencies and abnormalities exist in craniofacial clefts, especially complex type, a planned, staged, sequential approach by tissue expansion is necessary to produce ideal results. PMID:25587498

  7. Recognizing Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Hadyn D.

    1975-01-01

    The proposition that the mechanisms underlying facial recognition are different from those involved in recognizing other classes of pictorial material was assessed following a general review of the literature concerned with recognizing faces. (Author/RK)

  8. The Heterogeneous P-Median Problem for Categorization Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Simon J.; Aloise, Daniel; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    The p-median offers an alternative to centroid-based clustering algorithms for identifying unobserved categories. However, existing p-median formulations typically require data aggregation into a single proximity matrix, resulting in masked respondent heterogeneity. A proposed three-way formulation of the p-median problem explicitly considers…

  9. The Heterogeneous P-Median Problem for Categorization Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Simon J.; Aloise, Daniel; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    The p-median offers an alternative to centroid-based clustering algorithms for identifying unobserved categories. However, existing p-median formulations typically require data aggregation into a single proximity matrix, resulting in masked respondent heterogeneity. A proposed three-way formulation of the p-median problem explicitly considers…

  10. Quantitative Anthropometric Measures of Facial Appearance of Healthy Hispanic/Latino White Children: Establishing Reference Data for Care of Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juhun; Ku, Brian; Combs, Patrick D.; Da Silveira, Adriana. C.; Markey, Mia K.

    2017-06-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P) is one of the most common congenital facial deformities worldwide. To minimize negative social consequences of CL ± P, reconstructive surgery is conducted to modify the face to a more normal appearance. Each race/ethnic group requires its own facial norm data, yet there are no existing facial norm data for Hispanic/Latino White children. The objective of this paper is to identify measures of facial appearance relevant for planning reconstructive surgery for CL ± P of Hispanic/Latino White children. Quantitative analysis was conducted on 3D facial images of 82 (41 girls, 41 boys) healthy Hispanic/Latino White children whose ages ranged from 7 to 12 years. Twenty-eight facial anthropometric features related to CL ± P (mainly in the nasal and mouth area) were measured from 3D facial images. In addition, facial aesthetic ratings were obtained from 16 non-clinical observers for the same 3D facial images using a 7-point Likert scale. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted to find features that were correlated with the panel ratings of observers. Boys with a longer face and nose, or thicker upper and lower lips are considered more attractive than others while girls with a less curved middle face contour are considered more attractive than others. Associated facial landmarks for these features are primary focus areas for reconstructive surgery for CL ± P. This study identified anthropometric measures of facial features of Hispanic/Latino White children that are pertinent to CL ± P and which correlate with the panel attractiveness ratings.

  11. Facial clefts and associated limb anomalies: description of three cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Obdeijn, M C; Offringa, P J; Bos, R R M; Verhagen, A A E; Niessen, F B; Roche, N A

    2010-11-01

    Facial clefts are rare congenital malformations. In the literature these are sometimes reported in combination with limb malformations, especially ring constrictions. This article describes three children with facial clefts and limb ring constrictions with various expressions. The first case has a lateral cleft with associated limb malformations. This combination has, to our knowledge, not yet been reported. The literature about facial clefting and the amniotic band syndrome and the possible etiology of clefting and constrictions in these cases are discussed.

  12. Modeling CMB lensing cross correlations with CLEFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Chirag; White, Martin; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2017-08-01

    A new generation of surveys will soon map large fractions of sky to ever greater depths and their science goals can be enhanced by exploiting cross correlations between them. In this paper we study cross correlations between the lensing of the CMB and biased tracers of large-scale structure at high z. We motivate the need for more sophisticated bias models for modeling increasingly biased tracers at these redshifts and propose the use of perturbation theories, specifically Convolution Lagrangian Effective Field Theory (CLEFT). Since such signals reside at large scales and redshifts, they can be well described by perturbative approaches. We compare our model with the current approach of using scale independent bias coupled with fitting functions for non-linear matter power spectra, showing that the latter will not be sufficient for upcoming surveys. We illustrate our ideas by estimating σ8 from the auto- and cross-spectra of mock surveys, finding that CLEFT returns accurate and unbiased results at high z. We discuss uncertainties due to the redshift distribution of the tracers, and several avenues for future development.

  13. Cleft contribution to ring current formation

    SciTech Connect

    Delcourt, D.C. ); Sauvaud, J.A. ); Moore, T.E. )

    1990-12-01

    The storm time transport of ionospheric plasma from the cleft fountain to the plasma sheet and ring current is investigated by means of three-dimensional trajectory codes. Using observations to define the source location and flow rate. The authors trace test particles during a taillike to dipolelike reconfiguration of the geomagnetic field. Emphasis is placed on the behavior of heavy ions of low charge state (O{sup +}). As a result of their long periods of gyration, these ions are highly sensitive to rapid field variations and possible display transient nonadiabatic motions. It is demonstrated that O{sup +} which have originated in the high-latitude ionosphere but which find themselves in the vicinity of the equator at substorm onset can experience considerable erergization (from several keV up to several hundred keV) and pitch angle increase leading to trapping, as an effect of the induced electric field. These effects accompany a rapid earthward transport from midtail ({approximately}10-15 R{sub E}) to geosynchronous altitudes. The average particle energy and density involved suggest a substantial contribution of the cleft O{sup +} fountain to the ring current during substorms.

  14. Risk factors involved in orofacial cleft predisposition – review

    PubMed Central

    Nelke, Kamil; Pawlas, Krystyna; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Clefts that occur in children are a special topic. Avoiding risk factors, and also an early diagnosis of cleft possibility can result in minimizing or avoiding them. If on the other hand when clefts occur they require a long-term, multistage specialized treatment. Etiology of clefts seems to be related to many factors. Factors such as genetic, environmental, geographic and even race factors are important. Identification of risk factors can lead to prevention and prophylactic behaviors in order to minimize its occurrence. Exposure to environmental factors at home and work that lead to cleft predisposition should not be disregarded. It seems that before planning a family it would be wise to consult with doctors of different specializations, especially in high-risk families with cleft history in order to analyze previous lifestyle. Clefts are very common in hereditary facial malformations and are causing a lot of other irregularities in the head and neck region. In this paper after a brief papers review authors present socio-geographic, environmental and also work place related factors that are influencing pregnant women condition and should be taken under serious consideration. PMID:28352691

  15. Correction of alveolar cleft with calcium-based bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Spiros A; Contodimos, George B; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2011-05-01

    The criterion standard of alveolar cleft repair is iliac crest bone graft before secondary canine eruption. Tooth eruption has never been shown to occur in synthetic bone substitute, and there is no ideal autologous bone graft for primary repair. This prospective study evaluated alveolar cleft grafting with a calcium substitute before primary canine eruption. Ten consecutive patients with complete cleft lip, palate, and unilateral alveolar cleft with reasonably aligned arches were grafted beginning in January 2003 to March 2007. Mean age at surgery was 10.4 months. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. Radiologic evaluation of alveolar ridge was performed at the age of 4.All 10 patients were operated on by the same surgeon using the same technique, that is, conservative elevation of nasal, oral, and anterior alveolar mucosal flaps around the cleft, closure of nasal and oral flaps, placement of 1 to 3 mL of calcium substitute paste or crystals in the pocket, and closure of the anterior alveolar mucosa. All 10 patients healed without complication. Clinical evaluation revealed a well-healed arch with primary canine growth in the area of the previous cleft. Adequate normal bone formation and often a descending secondary canine were radiologically confirmed. Calcium substitutes offer significant advantages over other biomaterials as well as autologous bone grafts particularly in the primary alveolar cleft reconstruction. Our study has shown for the first time that teeth can erupt through this material, which turns into a normal functioning bone in the alveolar ridge.

  16. Hypertelorism and Orofacial Clefting Revisited: An Anthropometric Investigation.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth M; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Wehby, George L; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Moreno, Lina M; Christensen, Kaare; Marazita, Mary L

    2016-08-09

      Since the 1960s, multiple studies have reported a tendency toward hypertelorism in individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (OFCs). However, the association between specific cleft types and increased interorbital distance has been inconsistent. Using three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging, we tested whether different forms of clefting showed evidence of increased interorbital distance.   Intercanthal and outercanthal distances and intercanthal indices were calculated from 3D facial surface images of 287 individuals with repaired OFCs. Raw measurements were converted to sex and age-normalized Z-scores. Mean Z-scores for individuals with cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP), and cleft palate (CP) were compared with reference normative values (controls) and one another directly using t tests and analysis of variance.   The CLP group showed a significant increase in intercanthal width (P = .001) and intercanthal index (P < .001) compared with reference norms. The CP group showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in outercanthal width. The CL group showed no difference from reference norms. The proportion of clinically hyperteloric individuals was generally low but highest in the CLP group (7.4%). Cleft severity had little effect on interorbital spacing.   Individuals with CLP exhibited on average a tendency toward mild hypertelorism, driven primarily by an increase in intercanthal distance. This tendency was not seen in CL or CP.

  17. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro.

  18. Unfavourable results in the repair of the cleft lip

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Puthucode V.; Adenwalla, Hirji Sorab

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Unfavorable results in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip repair are often easy to spot but not always easy to prevent as to treat. We have tried to deal with the more common problems and explain possible causes and the best possible management options from our experience. Unilateral cleft lip repair: Unfavorable results immediately after repair involve Dehiscence and Scaring. Delayed blemishes include vermillion notching, a short lip, deficiency in the height of the lateral vermillion on the cleft side, white roll malalignment, oro-vestibular fistula, the cleft lip nose deformity, a narrow nostril and a “high-riding” nostril. We analyze the causes of these blemishes and outline our views regarding the treatment of these. Bilateral cleft lip: Immediate problems again include dehiscence as also loss of prolabium or premaxilla. Delayed unfavorable results are central vermillion deficiency, a lip that is too tight, bilateral cleft lip nose deformity, problems with the premaxilla and maxillary growth disturbances. Here again we discuss the causation of these problems and our preferred methods of treatment. Conclusion: We have detailed the significant unfavorable results after unilateral and bilateral cleft lip surgery. The methods of treatment advocated have been layer from our own experience. PMID:24501453

  19. Hospital care of children with a cleft in England

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, Kate J; Copley, Lynn P; Deacon, Scott A; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyse hospital admissions in the first 2 years of life among children with cleft lip and/or palate in England. Design Analysis of national administrative data of hospital admissions. Setting National Health Service hospitals. Patients Patients born alive between 1997 and 2008 who underwent surgical cleft repair. Outcome measures Number of admissions, including the birth episode, and days spent in hospital were examined. Children were analysed according to cleft type and whether or not they had additional congenital anomalies. Results 10 892 children were included. In their first 2 years, children without additional anomalies (n=8482) had on average 3.2 admissions and 13.2 days in hospital, which varied from 2.6 admissions and 9.2 days with cleft lip to 4.7 admissions and 19.7 days with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP). Children with additional anomalies (n=2410) had on average 6.7 admissions and 51.4 days in hospital, which varied from 6.4 admissions and 48.5 days with cleft palate to 8.8 admissions and 67.5 days with BCLP. The mean number and duration of cleft-related admissions was similar in children without (1.6 admissions and 6.4 days) and in those with additional anomalies (1.5 admissions and 8.5 days). 35.2% of children without additional anomalies had at least one emergency admission, whereas the corresponding figure was 67.3% with additional anomalies. Conclusions The burden of hospital care in the first 2 years of life varied according to cleft type and presence of additional anomalies. However, cleft-specific hospital care did not differ between children with and without additional anomalies. PMID:23968774

  20. Incidence of facial clefts in Cambridge, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Bister, Dirk; Set, Patricia; Cash, Charlotte; Coleman, Nicholas; Fanshawe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of facial clefting in Cambridge, UK, using multiple resources of ascertainment and to relate the findings to antenatal ultrasound screening (AUS) detection rates. AUS records from an obstetric ultrasound department, post-natal records from the regional craniofacial unit, and autopsy reports of foetuses over 16 weeks' gestational age from a regional pathology department from 1993 to 1997 were retrospectively reviewed. Cross-referencing between the three data sets identified all cases of facial clefts. Of 23,577 live and stillbirths, 30 had facial clefts. AUS detected 17 of these. Sixteen of the 30 had isolated facial clefts. Others had associated anomalies, chromosomal defects, or syndromes. Percentages and confidence intervals were calculated from the above data. Twenty-one resulted in live births, seven terminations, and two foetal deaths. Overall, detection rate by AUS was 65 percent [67 percent isolated cleft lip, 93 per cent cleft lip and palate (CLP), and 22 percent isolated cleft palate], with no false positives. The incidence of facial clefts was 0.127 percent (95 percent confidence interval 0.089-0.182 percent); the incidence for isolated CLP was lower than previously reported: 0.067 percent (0.042-0.110 percent). With one exception, all terminations were in foetuses with multiple anomalies. The figures presented will enable joint CLP clinics to give parents information of termination rates. The study allows pre-pregnancy counselling of families previously affected by clefting about the reliability of AUS detection rates.

  1. The lack of isolated palatal clefts in Czech Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Peterka, M; Peterková, R; Likovský, Z

    2006-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are usually divided into three basic types: isolated cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (CP). The incidence of specific cleft types in a population and their relative numbers show specific differences between ethnic groups and races. However, there are no available data about the incidence and relative numbers of orofacial cleft types (CL, CLP, CP) in the gypsy ethnic group. The aim of this study was to compare relative numbers of specific types of orofacial clefts between the Czech gypsy and non-gypsy populations. We conducted a retrospective epidemiological study using a set of all living patients with orofacial clefts born in the Czech Republic from 1964 until 2002. The cleft patients were subdivided into three groups: 5304 non-gypsy children, both parents of whom were non-gypsies (NN), 98 gypsy children, both parents of whom were gypsies (GG) and 18 children with one parent non-gypsy and one parent gypsy (NG). The relative number of isolated CP was 37.1% in NN children. However, the relative number of CP was significantly reduced to 5.1% (P < 0.01) in the GG group. Conversely, the relative number of CLP was higher (P < 0.01) in the GG group (62.2%) in comparison to the NN group (39.2%). The tendency to decrease in the relative number of CP and increase in the relative number of CLP was also apparent in the NG group, but not so well expressed. We hypothesize that the decrease in CP and increase in CLP and CL in gypsies might be caused by their genetic predis-position to CL. Since the CP originates later than CL during embryonic development, some CP arise in embryos with already existing CL giving rise to CLP. Consequently, the missing isolated CP might be hidden in the group of CLP patients postnatally.

  2. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S.; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P < 0.05. Results: The study showed different categories of clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely. PMID:27195223

  3. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-04-01

    The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P < 0.05. The study showed different categories of clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely.

  4. Type of Oral Cleft and Mothers’ Perceptions of Care, Health Status, and Outcomes for Preadolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Peter C.; Tyler, Margaret C.; Romitti, Paul A.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Canady, John W.; Karnell, Michael P.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the outcomes of care for children by type of oral cleft. Design Data were collected through structured telephone interviews during 2003 in Iowa with mothers of 2- to 12-year-old children with oral clefts. Interviews with mothers of children with clubfoot and statewide data on Iowa children were used for comparison. Participants Participants included mothers of children in Iowa born between 1990 and 2000 with nonsyndromic oral clefts. Children were identified by the statewide Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders. Main Outcome Measures Rating of cleft care, severity of condition, health status, esthetic outcome, speech, and school performance were evaluated by type of oral cleft. Results Children with cleft lip and palate were most likely to have their clefts rated as very severe. Children with palatal involvement were reported to have a lower health status and were almost twice as likely to be identified as having a special health care need compared with either children with cleft lip or children statewide. Children with cleft lip had more esthetic concerns; children with palatal involvement had the most speech concerns. Conclusions Although mothers generally believed their children had received high-quality care, ratings of the children’s current health status and outcomes of care varied significantly by type of cleft (cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate). Differences observed in this population-based study support the proposition that cleft type should be considered when examining outcomes of care for children with oral clefts. PMID:17105335

  5. Endoscopic excision of branchial cleft cyst in the neck using mammary areolae and axilla approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jia; Fan, Ziyi; Gong, Yu; Yuan, Qiaoying; Zhong, Ling; Fan, Linjun

    2012-10-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are prone to recurrence and secondary infections, and hence, surgical resection is necessary. These masses are traditionally removed through an overlying incision; however, the resulting scar can be considered aesthetically displeasing. We accomplished a case of endoscopic resection of branchial cleft cyst in the right side of the neck of an 18-year-old female patient. Incisions were made in the bilateral mammary areolae and right axilla of the patient. We completely resected the mass using an ultrasonic scalpel and electrocoagulation hook within 45 minutes. All of the procedures were finished on the deep face of platysma muscle, which was not severed. There was no significant bleeding during the operation and the postoperative recovery was smooth, without recurrence for 6 months. The endoscopic resection of the neck mass through bilateral areolae and axillary incisions is simple, safe, and feasible, because there were covert incisions and fewer complications.

  6. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  7. Otologic Concerns for Cleft Lip and Palate Patient.

    PubMed

    Berryhill, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Understanding eustachian tube physiology and anticipating probable eustachian tube dysfunction is an important component of cleft palate management. This article provides a brief summary of the otologic physiology and issues that may be of concern to cleft palate management. It is of critical importance not only to provide primary closure of the cleft palate, but also to recognize that along with speech, hearing has a critical component to the educational and social success of all individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Presurgical nasal moulding in a neonate with cleft lip

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Anshula; Shah, Dixit; Macwan, Chirag S

    2014-01-01

    The concept of presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNM) was developed to improve the aesthetic result of surgically corrected cleft lip. This paper presents the method of fabrication of PNM appliance and the case of a 30-day-old neonate with unilateral cleft lip in whom nasal moulding was performed. Treatment was initiated at 30 days and continued for 60 days after which the surgical correction of cleft lip was performed. Significant improvement in aesthetics and symmetry of the nose was achieved at the end of the treatment. PMID:24928928

  9. Prosthetic management of soft palate cleft--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dosumu, O O; Ogunrinde, T J; Ogundipe, O T

    2006-09-01

    The treatment of cleft in the soft palate can be achieved essentially by surgical reconstruction or prosthetic obturation. The goals of prosthetic intervention are to prevent food and liquid leakage into the nose and to improve speech intelligibility by ensuring functional velopharyngeal port closure. In this report, the prosthetic management of a 5-year-old child with soft palatal cleft is presented. The impression of the cleft was taken with tissue conditioner, Visco -gel, TM (De Trey, Amalgamated Dental London) and the pharyngeal obturator (speech bulb) was made in clear acrylic resin. Patient tolerated the appliance well and was referred to speech therapist for speech articulation.

  10. Evolution of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Infants with Cleft Palate and Micrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.; Taylor, Jesse A.; Vossough, Arastoo; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Thomas, Allison; Bradford, Ruth; Lioy, Janet; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Assadsangabi, Reza; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with craniofacial anomalies are a heterogeneous group at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the prevalence and structural predictors of OSA in this population are unknown. We hypothesized that infants with micrognathia would have more significant OSA than those with isolated cleft palate ± cleft lip (ICP), and those with ICP would have more significant OSA than controls. We postulated that OSA severity would correlate with reduced mandibular size, neurodevelopmental scores, and growth. Methods: Prospective cohort study. 15 infants with ICP, 19 with micrognathia, and 9 controls were recruited for polysomnograms, neurodevelopmental testing, cephalometrics (ICP and micrognathia groups) at baseline and a follow-up at 6 mo. Results: Baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) [median (range)] of the micrognathia group [20.1 events/h (0.8, 54.7)] was greater than ICP [3.2 (0.3, 30.7)] or controls [3.1 (0.5, 23.3)] (p = 0.001). Polysomnographic findings were similar between ICP and controls. Controls had a greater AHI than previously reported in the literature. Cephalometric measures of both midface hypoplasia and micrognathia correlated with OSA severity. Neurodevelopment was similar among groups. OSA improved with growth in participants with ICP and postoperatively in infants with micrognathia. Conclusions: Micrognathia, but not ICP, was associated with more significant OSA compared to controls. Both midface and mandibular hypoplasia contribute to OSA in these populations. OSA improved after surgical correction in most infants with micrognathia, and improved without intervention before palate repair in infants with ICP. Citation: Cielo CM, Taylor JA, Vossough A, Radcliffe J, Thomas A, Bradford R, Lioy J, Tapia IE, Assadsangabi R, Shults J, Marcus CL. Evolution of obstructive sleep apnea in infants with cleft palate and micrognathia. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):979–987. PMID:27092700

  11. Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: New BCL3 information

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, C.; Hecht, J.T.; Gasser, D.

    1996-09-01

    We did not previously provide LOD scores for linkage assuming heterogeneity, as suggested by Ott for the linkage analysis of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and BCL3, ApoC2, and D19S178 in the paper by Stein et al. The results from analysis using the HOMOG program, allowing for heterogeneity under the reduced penetrance model, gave a maximum LOD score of 1.85 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.03 for D19S178, and 1.72 for multipoint analysis in the interval. For the affecteds-only model, the values are 1.96 for ApoC2, 0.41 for BCL3, 0.01 for D19S178, and 1.44 for the multipoint analysis. 8 refs.

  12. Candidate Gene/Loci Studies in Cleft Lip/Palate and Dental Anomalies Finds Novel Susceptibility Genes for Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; McHenry, Toby G.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    We revisited 42 families with two or more cleft affected siblings that participated in previous studies and collected complete dental information. Genotypes from 1489 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers located in 150 candidate genes/loci were reanalyzed. Two sets of association analyses were carried out. First we ran the analysis solely on the cleft status. Second we assigned affection to any cleft or dental anomaly (tooth agenesis, supernumerary teeth, and microdontia), and repeated the analysis. Significant over-transmission was seen for a SNP in ANKS6 (rs4742741, 9q22.33; p=0.0004) when a dental anomaly phenotype was included in the analysis. Significant over-transmission was also seen for a SNP in ERBB2 (rs1810132, 17q21.1; p=0.0006). In the clefts only data, the most significant result was also for ERBB2 (p=0.0006). Other markers with suggestive p-values included IRF6 and 6q21-q23 loci. In contrast to the above results, suggestive over-transmission of markers in GART, DPF3, and NRXN3 were seen only when the dental anomaly phenotype was included in the analysis. These findings support the hypothesis that some loci may contribute to both clefts and congenital dental anomalies. Thus, including dental anomalies information in the genetics analysis of cleft lip and palate will provide new opportunities to map susceptibility loci for clefts. PMID:18978678

  13. Candidate pathway based analysis for cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Xiao; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this research was to identify potential biological pathways associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and to explore the potential biological mechanisms underlying these associated pathways on risk of NSCL/P. This project was based on the dataset of a previously published genome-wide association (GWA) study on NSCL/P (Beaty et al. 2010). Case-parent trios used here originated from an international consortium (The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium, GENEVA) formed in 2007. A total of 5,742 individuals from 1,908 CL/P case-parents trios (1,591 complete trios and 317 incomplete trios where one parent was missing) were collected and genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad array. Candidate pathways were selected using a list of 356 genes that may be related to oral clefts. In total, 42 candidate pathways, which included 1,564 genes and 40,208 SNPs were tested. Using a pathway-based analysis approach proposed by Wang et al (2007), we conducted a permutation-based test to assess the statistical significance of the nominal p-values of 42 candidate pathways. The analysis revealed several pathways yielding nominally significant p-values. However, controlling for the family wise error rate, none of these pathways could retain statistical significance. Nominal p-values of these pathways were concentrated at the lower tail of the distribution, with more than expected low p-values. A permutation based test for examining this type of distribution pattern yielded an overall p-value of 0.029. Thus, while this pathway-based analysis did not yield a clear significant result for any particular pathway, we conclude that one or more of the genes and pathways considered here likely do play a role in oral clefting.

  14. Temporal characteristics of nasalization in speakers with and without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunghee; Kuehn, David P

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of the study were to compare the temporal characteristics of nasalization between speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and normal adult speakers and to investigate the relationship between acoustic temporal measures and perceived nasality. Fifteen speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and 15 speakers without cleft palate aged 13 to 45 years participated in this study. Two listeners judged the degree of nasality in speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Two distinct acoustic energies derived from the mouth and nose were recorded simultaneously while speakers were producing the speech tasks /pimip/, /pamap/, and /pumup/. Absolute and proportional measures related to nasalization duration were obtained. Speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip exhibited more extensive acoustic nasalization in the time domain than did speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip showed larger nasalization-duration ratios in the high vowel contexts than in the low vowel context. Speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip did not exhibit distinct differences in nasalization-duration ratios among the vowel contexts. The acoustic measurements reflecting temporal patterns of oral-nasal acoustic impedance were related to the perception of hypernasality. These results suggest that the speakers with cleft palate with or without cleft lip showed longer duration of acoustic nasalization than speakers without cleft palate with or without cleft lip. Temporal characteristics of acoustic nasalization grew longer as the degree of perceived hypernasality increased. The positive correlation between temporal measures of acoustic nasalization and degree of perceived nasality suggests that temporal measures of nasalization would provide supplementary diagnostic information in relation to the degree of hypernasality.

  15. Relapse after orthodontic correction of maxillary median diastema: a follow-up evaluation of consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Shashua, D; Artun, J

    1999-06-01

    An evaluation of 96 treated orthodontic patients with maxillary median diastema ranging from 0.50 mm to 5.62 mm (mean 1.22, SD 0.85) was performed 4.0 to 9.0 years after completion of active treatment. Pre- and posttreatment data were gathered from available records. Follow-up data were gathered from records and interviews of 37 patients, and from phone interviews of 59 patients. The incidence of diastema relapse was 49% when scored as either presence of a measurable space at follow-up, a history of orthodontic or prosthetic retreatment to close a reopened space, or continued use of a retainer to control relapse tendency. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pretreatment diastema size and presence of a family member with a similar condition were the only significant risk factors for relapse (p<0.05), while pretreatment spacing in the maxillary anterior dentition approached significance (p = 0.10). No association was found between relapse and presence of an abnormal frenum or an osseous intermaxillary cleft, although patients with an abnormal frenum had a wider pretreatment diastema than those with a normal frenum (p<0.05). Fremitus of the maxillary incisors was the only parameter at follow-up associated with space reopening (p<0.01).

  16. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Mexico: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Castro, Emmanuel; Acosta-Alfaro, Luis F; Guadron-Llanos, Alma M; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Murillo-Llanes, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate, the most common developmental deformity, is seen worldwide and the etiology involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the maternal risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate. Materials and Methods: We conducted a case control study at the Women’s Hospital in Culiacan, Mexico. Medical records were analyzed, including patients who delivered babies with and without cleft lip and cleft palate from January 2010 to December 2015. Multiple variables were analyzed, including gestational age, weight at birth, the use of folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy, smoking, alcohol abuse, the use of recreational drugs, history of sexually transmitted infections, marital status, socioeconomic status, education, and nutritional status. Results: We found that the maternal risk factors with the strongest association for the development of cleft lip and cleft palate were the following: patients who were not taking folic acid during pregnancy [OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.32-8.09], P=0.00; patients who were not taking vitamin supplementation during pregnancy [OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.19-7.27], P=0.02; smoking during pregnancy [OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.23-3.41], P=0.01; and alcohol abuse during pregnancy [OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.17-3.08], P=0.03. Conclusions: The main risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate in a Mexican population at the Women’s hospital in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico were smoking, alcohol abuse, and patients not taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy. PMID:28819616

  17. Maternal Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Mexico: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Angulo-Castro, Emmanuel; Acosta-Alfaro, Luis F; Guadron-Llanos, Alma M; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Fernando; Osuna-Ramírez, Ignacio; Murillo-Llanes, Joel

    2017-07-01

    Cleft lip and palate, the most common developmental deformity, is seen worldwide and the etiology involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the maternal risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate. We conducted a case control study at the Women's Hospital in Culiacan, Mexico. Medical records were analyzed, including patients who delivered babies with and without cleft lip and cleft palate from January 2010 to December 2015. Multiple variables were analyzed, including gestational age, weight at birth, the use of folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy, smoking, alcohol abuse, the use of recreational drugs, history of sexually transmitted infections, marital status, socioeconomic status, education, and nutritional status. We found that the maternal risk factors with the strongest association for the development of cleft lip and cleft palate were the following: patients who were not taking folic acid during pregnancy [OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.32-8.09], P=0.00; patients who were not taking vitamin supplementation during pregnancy [OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.19-7.27], P=0.02; smoking during pregnancy [OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.23-3.41], P=0.01; and alcohol abuse during pregnancy [OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.17-3.08], P=0.03. The main risk factors associated with the development of cleft lip and cleft palate in a Mexican population at the Women's hospital in Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico were smoking, alcohol abuse, and patients not taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy.

  18. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P.

  19. Candidate gene/loci studies in cleft lip/palate and dental anomalies finds novel susceptibility genes for clefts.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; McHenry, Toby G; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L

    2008-09-01

    We revisited 42 families with two or more cleft-affected siblings who participated in previous studies. Complete dental information was collected to test the hypothesis that dental anomalies are part of the cleft phenotype spectrum, and can provide new opportunities for identification of cleft susceptibility genes. Genotypes from 1489 single nucleotide polymorphism markers located in 150 candidate genes/loci were reanalyzed. Two sets of association analyses were carried out. First, we ran the analysis solely on the cleft status. Second, we assigned affection to any cleft or dental anomaly (tooth agenesis, supernumerary teeth, and microdontia) and repeated the analysis. Significant over-transmission was seen for a single nucleotide polymorphism in ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 6 (rs4742741, 9q22.33; P = 0.0004) when a dental anomaly phenotype was included in the analysis. Significant over-transmission was also seen for a single nucleotide polymorphism in ERBB2 (rs1810132, 17q21.1; P = 0.0006). In the clefts only data, the most significant result was also for ERBB2 (P = 0.0006). Other markers with suggestive P values included interferon regulatory factor 6 and 6q21-q23 loci. In contrast to the above results, suggestive over-transmission of markers in GART, DPF3, and neurexin 3 were seen only when the dental anomaly phenotype was included in the analysis. These findings support the hypothesis that some loci may contribute to both clefts and congenital dental anomalies. Thus, including dental anomalies information in the genetics analysis of cleft lip and palate will provide new opportunities to map susceptibility loci for clefts.

  20. Bilateral asymmetry in Chinese families with cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Cooper, Margaret E; Liu, You-E; Hu, Dan-Ning; Melnick, Michael; Weinberg, Seth M; Marazita, Mary L

    2005-03-01

    To determine if Chinese individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) display more bilateral asymmetry than do their unaffected relatives. A case-control study of 313 individuals with CL/P from Shanghai, China, with 201 unaffected relatives as controls. Size-adjusted asymmetry scores were defined by data on middle-finger length, palm length, palpebral fissure width, and ear length. Case-control comparisons used a multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The ear-length measure showed a significant increase in fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in individuals with CL/P compared with their unaffected relatives, which was most pronounced in the female cleft lip and palate subgroup (p = .04). No other measures showed any increase in FA. Evidence was found for increased FA, as measured by overall ear length, in Chinese individuals with nonsyndromic CL/P, compared with their unaffected family members. The use of bilateral measurements other than dermatoglyphics may prove to be a valuable means of assessing overall developmental stability in individuals with developmental malformations and in their families.

  1. Treatment of 4-5 year old patients with cleft lip and cleft palate in Tawanchai center.

    PubMed

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of Cleft Lip/Palate condition in Thailand reaches a rate of 2.49% of child births, with estimates of 800 new cases per year in the Northeastern region. The healthcare process emphasizes interdisciplinary teamwork at each stage of the planning of treatment and services with the primary goal of achieving patient satisfaction and ability to live normally in society. The first 5 years are particularly important, with a focus on quality of care and ability to adapt to the environment before entering school. To study the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate in Tawanchai center in the 4-5 year age range. A retrospective study of the clinical records was led, concerning the 123 cleft lip and cleft palate patients aged 4-5 years under treatment in Tawanchai center, Srinagarind Hospital. Data was collected during three months from October to December 2011, using the admission records of the interdisciplinary team. Percentages and mean values were calculated from these data. 120 of the 123 patients were operated, giving a ratio of 97.56%. 108 cases were under government universal health coverage regime, corresponding to 87.80% of cases. 74 cases (60.16%) presented both cleft lip and palate condition, and an average of 5-night stay in hospital per person. Medical services by the interdisciplinary team were provided as follows: (1) of 30 patients with cleft lip aged 3-4 months, 30 (100%) received pre and post-surgery care counseling, 29 (96.67%) received surgery; (2) of 19 patients with cleft palate aged 10-18 months, 17 (89.47%) received treatment information, pre and postsurgery counseling and were operated according to the protocols; (3) of 74 patients with cleft lip and palate, 53 (71.62%) received counseling for pre and post-surgery care for lip repair at the age of 3-4 months, 52 (70.27%) were operated following the protocols, while at the age of 10-18 months 63 patients (85.14%) received treatment information, pre and postsurgery care counseling

  2. About Face

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In these videos, Veterans, family members, and clinicians share their experiences with PTSD and PTSD treatment. Choose a topic below to hear what they have to say. What is PTSD? → How ...

  3. Face Prints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadash, Dre Ann

    1984-01-01

    Eighth graders made prints of their own faces, using photographic papers and chemicals. Describes the supplies needed and the printing process involved. Because junior high school students are so concerned with self, this was a very meaningful activity for them. (CS)

  4. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  5. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  6. Clinical characteristics of horses and foals diagnosed with cleft palate in a referral population: 28 cases (1988-2011).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sarah D; Norman, Tracy E; Arnold, Carolyn E; Coleman, Michelle C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this case series was to characterize the population, case presentations, and outcomes of 28 equids diagnosed with cleft palate over a 25-year period. The incidence of cleft palate was 0.04%. The median age at presentation was 2 mo (range: 1 d to 3 y). Fifty percent of the animals were < 2 mo old, 21% were ≥ 2 mo but < 1 y old, and 29% were 1 y of age or older. Males and females were nearly equally represented. Short-term outcomes included euthanasia in 50%, surgical repair in 11%, supportive care in 4%, and no treatment in 32% of cases; 46% of the animals survived to discharge. Defects involving both the hard and soft palate and/or aspiration pneumonia generally had less favorable outcomes. Though cleft palate is rare in horses, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses of all ages with nasal discharge, a cough, a history of recurrent respiratory infections, poor growth, or chronic submandibular lymphadenopathy. Endoscopic evaluation of the pharynx may aid in earlier diagnosis and prognostication for owners.

  7. Clinical characteristics of horses and foals diagnosed with cleft palate in a referral population: 28 cases (1988–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sarah D.; Norman, Tracy E.; Arnold, Carolyn E.; Coleman, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case series was to characterize the population, case presentations, and outcomes of 28 equids diagnosed with cleft palate over a 25-year period. The incidence of cleft palate was 0.04%. The median age at presentation was 2 mo (range: 1 d to 3 y). Fifty percent of the animals were < 2 mo old, 21% were ≥ 2 mo but < 1 y old, and 29% were 1 y of age or older. Males and females were nearly equally represented. Short-term outcomes included euthanasia in 50%, surgical repair in 11%, supportive care in 4%, and no treatment in 32% of cases; 46% of the animals survived to discharge. Defects involving both the hard and soft palate and/or aspiration pneumonia generally had less favorable outcomes. Though cleft palate is rare in horses, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses of all ages with nasal discharge, a cough, a history of recurrent respiratory infections, poor growth, or chronic submandibular lymphadenopathy. Endoscopic evaluation of the pharynx may aid in earlier diagnosis and prognostication for owners. PMID:26130841

  8. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  9. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  10. Characteristics of the Thermal Ion Bulk Parameters in the Cleft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk parameters for the thermal ions (0.3 to 25 eV) have been derived using data from the Scanning Thermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS) on the Sounding of the Cleft Ion Fountain Energization Region (SCIFER) experiment. The SCIFER rocket was launched into the ionospheric cleft region at 1000 MLT with a maximum altitude of 1450 km. The heated cleft plasma was observed to be H(+) dominated, in sharp contrast with observations of the same region near solar maximum. Regions of particular interest include the sharp, heated equatorward wall of the cleft and highly structured patches of transversely-accelerated ions (TAI). Densities, temperatures and velocities are used to characterize and distinguish these regions and to compare to predicted bulk parameters from candidate heating mechanisms.

  11. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  12. Cleft and Case: Two Sources of Interference for FL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Edwin A.

    1975-01-01

    Examines errors made by English speakers learning German and, in attempting to find sources for them, contrasts certain phenomena of German and English grammar. The phenomena in question are cleft sentences and the treatment of case. (TL)

  13. Secondary repair of alveolar clefts using human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Hossein; Khojasteh, Arash; Soleimani, Masoud; Tehranchi, Azita; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Keshel, Saeed Hidari; Atashi, Reza

    2009-08-01

    Recently tissue engineering has become available as a regenerative treatment for bone defects; however, little has been reported on the application of tissue engineering for regeneration of cleft defect tissues. Mesenchymal-derived stem cells were applied to different kinds of bone substitute and compared in different animal models, but their usage in human critical defects remained unclear. In this study we report 2 patients with unilateral alveolar cleft, treated with the composite scaffold of demineralized bone mineral and calcium sulphate (Osteoset) loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Computed tomograms showed 34.5% regenerated bone, extending from the cleft walls and bridging the cleft after 4 months in one case and in the other there was 25.6% presentation of bone integrity. The available data revealed the conventional bone substitute was not a suitable scaffold for the MSC-induced bone regeneration.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL MODELS FOR THE STUDY OF ORAL CLEFTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicology and teratology studies routinely utilize animal models to determine the potential for chemical and physical agents to produce reproductive and developmental toxicity, including birth defects such as cleft palate. The standardized teratology screen typically tests co...

  15. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  16. EXPERIMENTAL MODELS FOR THE STUDY OF ORAL CLEFTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicology and teratology studies routinely utilize animal models to determine the potential for chemical and physical agents to produce reproductive and developmental toxicity, including birth defects such as cleft palate. The standardized teratology screen typically tests co...

  17. Repair of bilateral cleft lip and its variants

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, John B.

    2009-01-01

    The surgeon who lifts a scalpel to repair a bilateral cleft lip and nasal deformity is accountable for: 1) precise craftsmanship based on three-dimensional features and four-dimensional changes; 2) periodic assessment throughout the child's growth; and 3) technical modifications during primary closure based on knowledge gained from long-term follow-up evaluation. These children should not have to endure the stares prompted by nasolabial stigmata that result from outdated concepts and technical misadventures. The principles for repair of bilateral complete cleft lip have evolved to such a level that the child's appearance should be equivalent to, or surpass, that of a unilateral complete cleft lip. These same principles also apply to the repair of the variants of bilateral cleft lip, although strategies and execution differ slightly. PMID:19884685

  18. Ankyloglossia with cleft lip: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Jangid, Kritika; Alexander, Aurelian Jovita; Jayakumar, Nadathur Doraiswamy; Varghese, Sheeja; Ramani, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This article presents a rare case of ankyloglossia associated with cleft lip treated with diode laser in a 12-year-old Indian boy who had undergone surgical correction of associated cleft lip soon after birth. Correction of ankyloglossia at a young age would lead to enhanced phonetics, improved oral hygiene, and overall personality development.

  19. Ankyloglossia with cleft lip: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jangid, Kritika; Alexander, Aurelian Jovita; Jayakumar, Nadathur Doraiswamy; Varghese, Sheeja; Ramani, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This article presents a rare case of ankyloglossia associated with cleft lip treated with diode laser in a 12-year-old Indian boy who had undergone surgical correction of associated cleft lip soon after birth. Correction of ankyloglossia at a young age would lead to enhanced phonetics, improved oral hygiene, and overall personality development. PMID:26941523

  20. Papillary Carcinoma in Median Aberrant Thyroid (Ectopic) - Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K, Shashidhar; Deshmane, Vijaya Laxmi; Kumar, Veerendra; Arjunan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Median ectopic thyroid may be encountered anywhere from the foramen caecum to the diaphragm. Non lingual median aberrant thyroid (incomplete descent) usually found in the infrahyoid region and malignant transformation in this ectopic thyroid tissue is very rare. We report an extremely rare case of papillary carcinoma in non lingual median aberrant thyroid in a 25-year-old female. The differentiation between a carcinoma arising in the median ectopic thyroid tissue and a metastatic papillary carcinoma from an occult primary in the main thyroid gland is also discussed. PMID:25121039

  1. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (p<0.01). Usually, cleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  2. Orthognathic surgery in the cleft lip and palate patient.

    PubMed

    Herber, S C; Lehman, J A

    1993-10-01

    Orthognathic surgery for the cleft lip and palate patient should be designed to achieve good facial aesthetics and a stable, functional occlusion. Maxillary and mandibular osteotomies, which benefit cleft lip and palate patients with associated dentofacial deformities, should be modified to meet the needs of the individual patient. Soft-tissue correction of the upper lip and nose adds to the overall aesthetic result, but should be performed as a separate procedure.

  3. Nasalance measures in German-speaking cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Swennen, Gwen R J; Grimaldi, Hannes; Upheber, Juliane; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Dempf, Rupert

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate nasalance measures in German-speaking patients with different types of repaired cleft lip and palate and to find out if significant nasalance gender differences exist in the different cleft groups. A total of 125 German-speaking cleft patients (74 male and 51 female) were included in this study: 18 patients with isolated unilateral cleft lip (UCL; mean age: 13.00 +/- 2.03 years), 66 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP; mean age: 14.80 +/- 3.45 years), 25 patients with isolated cleft palate (CP; mean age: 14.60 +/- 3.48 years), and 16 patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP; mean age: 14.30 +/- 3.61 years). Nasalance data were collected and computed using the NasalView hardware/software system (Fa. Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA). Speech stimuli according to a modified Heidelberg Rhinophonia Assessment Form (sustained vowels "a," "e," "i," "o," and "u"; oral and nasal sentences; and three oral-nasal reading passages) were used to obtain nasalance scores. Nasalance distance and ratio were also calculated for the oral and nasal sentences and for one of the oral-nasal reading passages. Unpaired t tests showed no significant gender nasalance differences in each cleft group. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences in mean nasalance distance and ratio. For the nasal sentence, a significant difference (P = 0.032) in mean nasalance scores was found between the UCL and UCLP groups.

  4. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  5. [Nasal sequels of unilateral clefts: analysis and management].

    PubMed

    Talmant, J-C; Talmant, J-Ch; Lumineau, J-P

    2007-09-01

    Usually, the nasal sequels of unilateral cleft patient are just considered as an esthetic problem to be addressed after the growth spurt of adolescence. This very narrow vision has led the cleft lip and palate treatment to a deadend. Actually, nasal sequels are the worst in terms of consequence on facial growth. 75% of complete unilateral cleft children are more oral than nasal breathers. Today, we know about the bad consequences of oral breathing on facial growth. It is not surprising to observe a high rate of small maxilla with cleft maxilla scars. In the fetus, the unilateral cleft nose deformities are well explained by the rupture of the facial envelope and the ventilatory dynamics of the amniotic fluid. Every step of the primary treatment threatens the nasal air way patency, whether when repairing lip and nose, suturing the hard palate that is the floor of the nose, or closing the alveolar cleft which controls the width of the piriform aperture. The functional and esthetic nasal sequels reflect the initial deformity, but are also the surgeon's skill and protocol choice. Before undertaking treatment, we must analyze the deformity at every level. Usually, the best option is to reopen the cleft completely to perform a combined revision of the lip, nose, and alveolar cleft after an adequate anterior maxillary expansion. If nasal breathing is necessary for an adequate facial growth, 25 years of experience showed us that it was very difficult to erase the cortical imprint of an early oral breathing pattern. So it is essential to establish a normal nasal breathing mode at the initial surgery. When the initial surgery is efficient and/or the secondary repair is successful, the final esthetic rhinoplasty, when indicated, is just performed for the sake of harmonization, with a classic internal approach and a few refinements.

  6. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins.

  7. Fetal Cleft Lip/Palate Surgery: End of a Dream?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih; Inangil, Gökhan; Kara, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Recognition that a fetus can scarlessly heal in intrauterine life led to various animal studies in the mid 1980s exploring the possibility of fetal cleft lip/palate surgery. The idea of scarless cleft repair seemed like a possible dream after the promising results from the early animal studies. In this review, we analyze the progress made in the 30 years since our first experience with animal models.

  8. Outcomes in facial aesthetics in cleft lip and palate surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V P; Bella, H; Cadier, M M; Pigott, R W; Goodacre, T E E; Richard, B M

    2012-09-01

    While there are internationally validated outcome measures for speech and facial growth in cleft lip and palate patients, there is no such internationally accepted system for assessing outcomes in facial aesthetics. A systematic critical review of the scientific literature from the last 30 years using PUBMED, Medline and Google Scholar was conducted in-line with the PRISMA statement recommendations. This encompassed the most relevant manuscripts on aesthetic outcomes in cleft surgery in the English language. Fifty-three articles were reviewed. Four main means of determining outcome measures were found: direct clinical assessment, clinical photograph evaluation, clinical videographic assessment and three-dimensional evaluation. Cropped photographs were more representative than full face. Most techniques were based on a 5-point scale, evolving from the Asher-McDade system. Multiple panel-based assessments compared scores from lay or professional raters, the results of which were not statistically significant. Various reports based on cohorts were poorly matched for gender, age, clinical condition and ethnicity, making their results difficult to reproduce. The large number of outcome measure rating systems identified, suggests a lack of consensus and confidence as to a reliable, validated and reproducible scoring system for facial aesthetics in cleft patients. Many template and lay panel scoring systems are described, yet never fully validated. Advanced 3D imaging technologies may produce validated outcome measures in the future, but presently there remains a need to develop a robust method of facial aesthetic evaluation based on standardised patient photographs. We make recommendations for the development of such a system. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The sublime bridge: anatomy and implications in median nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Marshall, Tyler; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2010-07-01

    The sublime bridge is a potential site of entrapment of the median nerve in the forearm. To the authors' knowledge, this structure and its relationship to the median nerve have not been studied. The aim of the present study was to quantitate this structure and elucidate its relationship to the median nerve. Sixty adult cadaveric forearms underwent dissection of the sublime bridge. Relationships of this structure were observed, and measurements of its anatomy were made. The relationship of the median nerve to the sublime bridge was observed with range of motion about the forearm. The sublime bridge was found to be tendinous in the majority (45 [75%]) of specimens and muscular in the remaining forearms (15 [25%]). The maximal mean width of the sublime bridge was 7 cm proximally, and the minimal mean width was 3 cm distally. The mean distance from the medial epicondyle to the apex of the sublime bridge was found to be 8.1 cm. The relation of the median nerve to the bridge was always intimate. On 2 sides (1 left and 1 right) from different male specimens, the median nerve was attached to the deep aspect of the sublime bridge by a strong connective tissue band, thus forming a tunnel on the deep aspect of this structure. With range of motion of the forearm, increased compression of the median nerve by the overlying sublime bridge was seen with extension but no other movement. Based on the authors' study, pronator syndrome is an incorrect term applied to compression of the median nerve at the sublime bridge. This potential site of median nerve compression is distinct and has characteristics that can clinically differentiate it from compression of the median nerve between the heads of the pronator teres. The authors hope that these data will be of use to the surgeon in the evaluation and treatment of patients with proximal median nerve entrapment.

  10. MSX1 and orofacial clefting with and without tooth agenesis.

    PubMed

    Modesto, A; Moreno, L M; Krahn, K; King, S; Lidral, A C

    2006-06-01

    MSX1 has been considered a strong candidate for orofacial clefting, based on mouse expression studies and knockout models, as well as association and linkage studies in humans. MSX1 mutations are also causal for hereditary tooth agenesis. We tested the hypothesis that individuals with orofacial clefting with or without tooth agenesis have MSX1 coding mutations by screening 33 individuals with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and 19 individuals with both orofacial clefting and tooth agenesis. Although no MSX1 coding mutations were identified, the known 101C > G variant occurred more often in subjects with both CL/P and tooth agenesis (p = 0.0008), while the *6C-T variant was found more often in CL/P subjects (p = 0.001). Coding mutations in MSX1 are not the cause of orofacial clefting with or without tooth agenesis in this study population. However, the significant association of MSX1 with both phenotypes implies that MSX1 regulatory elements may be mutated.

  11. X- linked markers in DMD associated with oral clefts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Poorav J.; Beaty, Terri H.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.; Munger, Ronald G.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Wu, Tao; Murray, Tanda; Rose, Margaret; Redett, Richard J.; Jin, Shin C.; Lie, Rolv T.; Wu-Chou, Yah-Huei; Wang, Hong; Ye, Xiaoqian; Yeow, Vincent; Chong, Samuel; Jee, Sun Ha; Shi, Bing; Scott, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    As part of an international consortium, case-parent trios were collected for a genome wide association study of isolated, non-syndromic oral clefts, including cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP) and cleft lip and palate (CLP). Non-syndromic oral clefts have a complex and heterogeneous etiology. Risk is influenced by genes, environmental factors, and differs markedly by gender. Family based association tests (FBAT) were used on 14,486 SNPs spanning the X chromosome, stratified by type of cleft and racial group. Significant results even after multiple comparisons correction were obtained for the Duchene’s muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, the largest single gene in the human genome, among CL/P trios (both CL and CLP combined). When stratified into groups of European and Asian ancestry, stronger signals were obtained for Asians. Although conventional sliding window haplotype analysis showed no increase in significance, analysis selected combinations of the 25 most significant SNPs in DMD identified four SNPs together that attained genome-wide significance among Asian CL/P trios, raising the possibility of interaction between distant SNPs within DMD. PMID:23489894

  12. Anterior pillarplasty: a modification in cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Çelebiler, Özhan; Ersoy, Burak; Numanoğlu, Ayhan

    2011-07-01

    After the primary repair of cleft palate, surgeons are frequently confronted with a short soft palate and a wide velopharyngeal space, both of which are known to diminish the quality of speech. We introduce a new modification of the primary repair of cleft palate that lengthens the soft palate and helps to reduce the volume of the velopharyngeal space. Ten patients younger than 12 months with nonsyndromic cleft palate were operated on with this technique. The incision at the cleft margin extended behind the uvula as a modification to the classic design of mucoperiosteal flaps. The sagittally divided mucosal layers of each anterior tonsillar pillar are sutured at the midline 1 cm posterior to the new uvula. The rate of postoperative fistula formation and other complications were evaluated postoperatively. One patient had a uvular and partly pillar detachment at the postoperative period. All other clefts healed without complication. The primary repair of the cleft palate with the anterior pillarplasty technique is a safe and easy-to-perform procedure. This modification can effectively reduce the transverse diameter of the velopharyngeal space and increase the anteroposterior length of the palate.

  13. Endoscope-assisted second branchial cleft cyst resection via an incision along skin line on lateral neck.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junming; Chen, Weixiong; Zhang, Jianli; He, Fayao; Zhu, Zhaofeng; Tang, Sucheng; Wang, Yuejian

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study is to report the feasibility of endoscope-assisted second branchial cleft cyst resection via a small incision along the skin line on the lateral neck. In total, 41 patients from the Department of Otolaryngology, Foshan Hospital of Yat-sen University were randomly assigned to conventional (20 patients) or endoscope-assisted (21 patients) second branchial cleft cyst resection. The patient clinical characteristics, operation time, operative bleeding volume, postoperative complications, and subjective satisfaction with the incision scar (measured using a visual analog scale) were compared between the groups. All 41 s branchial cleft cyst resections were successfully performed, and the wounds healed uneventfully. The bleeding volume (6.3 ± 2.5 ml) and incision length (2.7 ± 0.3 cm) differed between the groups (P < 0.00). The mean patient satisfaction score was 8.0 ± 0.8 in the endoscope-assisted surgery group and 6.4 ± 0.9 in the control group (P < 0.00). All of the patients in the endoscope-assisted surgery group were satisfied with their cosmetic results. No marginal nerve palsy occurred. No complications such as bleeding, salivary fistula, or paresis of the marginal mandibular branch occurred. All of the patients were disease free through a follow-up period of 6-24 months (median: 14 months). Endoscope-assisted second branchial cleft cyst resection via a small incision along the dermatoglyph on the lateral neck is a feasible technique. This procedure may serve as an alternative approach, allowing a minimally invasive incision and better cosmetic results.

  14. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate: identification of sporadic cases with a high level of genetic predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, F C; Sofaer, J A

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that asymmetry for certain bilaterally represented features may be an indicator of genetic predisposition to cleft lip with or without cleft palate and may therefore be of value in the individual assessment of recurrence risk, particularly for sporadic cases. An asymmetry score has been devised that may be of use in identifying those with a high level of genetic predisposition. Stepwise logistic regression selected nine variables that together correctly classified 85% of familial cleft patients and unrelated non-cleft controls. Applying the same regression equation to sporadic cases, 26% fell into the range occupied by the majority of familial patients, suggesting that these had a high level of genetic predisposition. PMID:3572999

  15. Citation Characteristics of Research Articles under the Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal

    2015-08-01

    Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University, has cooperated with the Medical Association of Thailand in publishing the special five issues of JMT (Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand) during the years 2010-2014 in order to promote research activities and working network of related fields in cleft lip-cleft palate and craniofacial deformities. This study aimed to examine the features of 106 research articles in terms of authors and disciplines, and analyze the citations considering sources, country and years after publication. The scope of study also included citations in the form of journal, which was presented as journal ranking compared with impact factors and Bradford's Law on journal citation. The results of study will be useful in developing multidisciplinary research activities of the center and especially assist in the acquisition of academic journals for essential sources of reference.

  16. Ultrasonographic median nerve changes after a wheelchair sporting event.

    PubMed

    Impink, Bradley G; Boninger, Michael L; Walker, Heather; Collinger, Jennifer L; Niyonkuru, Christian

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the acute median nerve response to intense wheelchair propulsion by using ultrasonography and to examine the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) signs and symptoms and the acute median nerve response. Case series. Research room at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games. Manual wheelchair users (N=28) competing in wheelchair basketball. Ultrasound images collected before and after a wheelchair basketball game. Median nerve cross-sectional area, flattening ratio, and swelling ratio and changes in these after activity. Comparison of median nerve characteristics and patient characteristics between participants with and without positive physical examination findings and with and without symptoms of CTS. Significant changes in median nerve ultrasound characteristics were noted after activity. The group as a whole showed a significant decrease in cross-sectional area at the radius of 4.05% (P=.023). Participants with positive physical examinations showed significantly different (P=.029) and opposite changes in swelling ratio compared with the normal group. Subjects with CTS symptoms had a significantly (P=.022) greater duration of wheelchair use (17.1 y) compared with the asymptomatic participants (9 y). Manual wheelchair propulsion induces acute changes in median nerve characteristics that can be visualized by using ultrasound. Studying the acute median nerve response may be useful for optimizing various interventions, such as wheelchair set up or propulsion training, to decrease both acute and chronic median nerve damage and the likelihood of developing CTS.

  17. Estimation of Median Streamflows at Perennial Stream Sites in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, Richard A.; Wong, Michael F.; Matsuoka, Iwao

    1992-01-01

    The most accurate estimates of median streamflows at perennial stream sites in Hawaii are those made at streamflow-gaging stations. Two alternative methods for estimating median streamflows at ungaged sites are described in this report. Multiple-regression equations were developed for estimating median streamflows at ungaged, unregulated, perennial stream sites. The equations relate combinations of drainage area, mean altitude of the main stream channel, and mean annual precipitation to median streamflow. Streamflow data from 56 long-term continuous-record gaging stations were used in the analysis. Median-streamflow data for all 56 sites were adjusted using record-extension techniques to reflect base period (1912 through 1986) conditions. Hawaii was subdivided into two geographic groups and multiple-regression equations were developed for each. The standard error of predication for the equation developed for the first group, the islands of Oahu, Molokai, and Hawaii, is 41 percent. The standard error of predication for the equation developed for the second group, the islands of Kauai and Maui, is 54 percent. A method for estimating median-streamflow, based on discharge measurements and data from nearby streamflow-gaging stations, was also developed for 27 regulated, perennial windward Oahu sites. Standard errors of prediction for 23 of the sites range from 5 to 34 percent. Median-streamflow estimates for the four remaining sites were considered poor and no measures of accuracy are provided. Discharge measurements can be used to make estimates of median streamflows at ungaged, regulated sites where the regression equations developed in this report are not applicable. Discharge measurements can also be used to make estimates of median streamflows at ungaged, unregulated sites. Estimates of median streamflows based on discharge measurements have greater standard errors than estimates based on continuous streamflow records and in general have smaller standard errors

  18. Congenital missing permanent teeth in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and unilateral cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Na-Young

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the differences in the congenital missing teeth pattern in terms of tooth type (permanent maxillary lateral incisor [MLI] and maxillary second premolar [MSP]) and sidedness (cleft vs noncleft) between boys and girls in Korean unilateral cleft lip and alveolus (UCLA) and unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients. This study used the charts, models, radiographs, and intraoral photographs of 90 UCLA patients and 204 UCLP patients (ages 6 to 13 years). Binomial test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test, maximum likelihood analysis of variance, and the odds ratio were performed. According to the relationship between the congenital missing teeth pattern and the cleft type, the UCLP patients had 2.98 times more missing MLIs and 1.80 times more missing MSPs than did the UCLA patients. The MLI was congenitally missing more in boys than in girls, but the MSP showed the opposite tendency. Boys had a higher frequency of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs on the cleft side than did girls. However, on the noncleft side and both sides, girls had a higher frequency of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs than did boys. Results showed a gender-dominant pattern of congenital missing MLIs and MSPs. These results suggest that gender and cleft type might affect the congenital missing teeth pattern in terms of tooth type and sidedness.

  19. Enhancing accessibility of patients with cleft lip/palate to healthcare services via a cleft birth registration system.

    PubMed

    Volrathongchai, Kanittha; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2014-10-01

    Cleft lip/palate is a critical health problem in Thailand; with an incidence rate of 2.49/1,000 live births. To insure the best outcomes, surgery should be performed near the age of three months. However; during the years 1993-2007, only 39.7% of children with a cleft lip/palate underwent an operation by the age of 3-4 months and only 58.18% by the age of 9-12 months. The purpose of the study is to determine if a cleft birth registry might facilitate timely and proper treatment for children with a cleft lip/palate. A pilot cleft birth registry, developed by the Tawanchai Cleft Center, was made available to hospitals in Khon Kaen, Roi-et, Kalasin, and Mahasarakam provinces, Thailand. Ninety-eight personnel involved in the care of children with a cleft lip/palate were recruited from the participating hospitals to evaluate the system. Assigned to one offour focus groups, participants were asked to evaluate the pilot system in terms of satisfaction and benefit. Following the focus groups, those participants that were traditionally responsible for registration were asked to use the cleft birth registry to register any newborns with a cleft lip/palate that were encountered in the course of their duties. Records were examined to determine how many newborns were properly registered and for those registered, whether proper care was received in a timely manner With 78 focus group participants responding to the satisfaction survey, results indicated mostly high levels of satisfaction with 26 (33%) participants rating satisfaction as very good, 49 (63%) as good and 3 (4%) as fair No participant rated satisfaction below fair. Furthermore, a majority stated that the cleft birth registy would benefit patients and contribute to timely treatment. During two years of active use, one hundred and thirty-seven newborns with a cleft lip/palate were registered into this cleft birth registry. Subsequent examination showed that eighty-eight percent ofregistered cases received proper

  20. Median and ulnar antidromic sensory studies to the fourth digit.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Andrew; Lohman, James; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The literature documents multiple reports of neurological injury resulting from both the implantation and the removal of orthopedic devices. These injuries can be easily and objectively evaluated with nerve conduction studies. This study was undertaken to derive a normative database for median and ulnar sensory conduction studies to the fourth digit. Testing was done utilizing a 14-cm antidromic technique on 192 asymptomatic subjects with no risk factors for neuropathy. The subjects were studied bilaterally. Onset latency, peak latency, onset-to-peak amplitude, peak-to-peak amplitude, rise time, and duration were recorded. Increasing age and body mass index were associated with decreasing amplitudes and area. No other demographic factors correlated with differences in waveform measurements. Mean onset latency was 2.7 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 2.6 +/- 0.2 for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak latency was 3.4 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 3.3 +/- 0.3 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean onset-to-peak amplitude was 21 +/- 12 muV for the median nerve and 23 +/- 12muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak-to-peak amplitude was 34 +/- 20 muV for the median nerve and 36 +/- 23 muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean area was 25 +/- 17 nVs for the median nerve and 28 +/- 19 nVs for the ulnar nerve. Mean rise time was 0.7 +/- 0.1 ms for the median nerve and 0.7 +/- 0.2 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean duration was 1.9 +/- 0.4 ms for the median nerve and 1.9 +/- 0.5 ms for the ulnar nerve. The mean difference in onset and peak latency between the median and ulnar nerves (median minus ulnar) was 0.1 +/- 0.2 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of median greater than ulnar onset and peak latency was 0.5 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of ulnar greater than median onset latency was 0.2 ms (0.3 ms for peak latency). The upper limit of normal drop in median peak-to-peak amplitude from one side to the other was 56%. For the ulnar nerve this value was 73%.

  1. Description of total population hospital admissions for cleft lip and/or palate in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Jonathan Y J; Kilpatrick, Nicky; Jacoby, Peter; Slack-Smith, Linda M

    2015-12-07

    Orofacial clefts are a group of frequently observed congenital malformations often requiring multiple hospital admissions over the lifespan of affected individuals. The aim of this study was to describe the total-population hospital admissions with principal diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate in Australia over a 10 year period. Data for admissions to hospitals were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Hospital Morbidity Database (July 2000 to June 2010). The outcome variable was a hospital separation with the principal diagnosis of cleft palate, cleft lip or cleft lip and palate (ICD-10-AM diagnosis codes Q35-Q37 respectively). Trends in rates of admission and length of stay by age, gender and cleft type were investigated. A total of 11, 618 admissions were identified; cleft palate (4,454; 0.22 per 10,000 people per year), cleft lip (2,251; 0.11) and cleft lip and palate (4,913; 0.25). Admission age ranged from birth to 79 years with males more frequently admitted. Most admissions occurred prior to adolescence in cleft palate and cleft lip and through to late teens in cleft lip and palate, declining for all groups after 25 years. This study identified population level trends in hospital separations for orofacial cleft diagnosis in Australia.

  2. Speech Correction for Children with Cleft Lip and Palate by Networking of Community-Based Care.

    PubMed

    Hanchanlert, Yotsak; Pramakhatay, Worawat; Pradubwong, Suteera; Prathanee, Benjamas

    2015-08-01

    Prevalence of cleft lip and palate (CLP) is high in Northeast Thailand. Most children with CLP face many problems, particularly compensatory articulation disorders (CAD) beyond surgery while speech services and the number of speech and language pathologists (SLPs) are limited. To determine the effectiveness of networking of Khon Kaen University (KKU) Community-Based Speech Therapy Model: Kosumphisai Hospital, Kosumphisai District and Maha Sarakham Hospital, Mueang District, Maha Sarakham Province for reduction of the number of articulations errors for children with CLP. Eleven children with CLP were recruited in 3 1-year projects of KKU Community-Based Speech Therapy Model. Articulation tests were formally assessed by qualified language pathologists (SLPs) for baseline and post treatment outcomes. Teachings on services for speech assistants (SAs) were conducted by SLPs. Assigned speech correction (SC) was performed by SAs at home and at local hospitals. Caregivers also gave SC at home 3-4 days a week. Networking of Community-Based Speech Therapy Model signficantly reduced the number of articulation errors for children with CLP in both word and sentence levels (mean difference = 6.91, 95% confidence interval = 4.15-9.67; mean difference = 5.36, 95% confidence interval = 2.99-7.73, respectively). Networking by Kosumphisai and Maha Sarakham of KKU Community-Based Speech Therapy Model was a valid and efficient method for providing speech services for children with cleft palate and could be extended to any area in Thailand and other developing countries, where have similar contexts.

  3. Differences in excitability between median and superficial radial sensory axons.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Yumi; Kanai, Kazuaki; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Isose, Sagiri; Nasu, Saiko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Ohmori, Shigeki; Noto, Yu-ichi; Kugio, Yumiko; Shimizu, Toshio; Matsubara, Shiro; Lin, Cindy S Y; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in excitability properties of human median and superficial radial sensory axons (e.g., axons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin in the hand). Previous studies have shown that excitability properties differ between motor and sensory axons, and even among sensory axons between median and sural sensory axons. In 21 healthy subjects, threshold tracking was used to examine excitability indices such as strength-duration time constant, threshold electrotonus, supernormality, and threshold change at the 0.2 ms inter-stimulus interval in latent addition. In addition, threshold changes induced by ischemia for 10 min were compared between median and superficial radial sensory axons. Compared with radial sensory axons, median axons showed shorter strength-duration time constant, greater threshold changes in threshold electrotonus (fanning-out), greater supernormality, and smaller threshold changes in latent addition. Threshold changes in both during and after ischemia were greater for median axons. These findings suggest that membrane potential in human median sensory axons is more negative than in superficial radial axons, possibly due to greater activity of electrogenic Na(+)/K(+) pump. These results may reflect adaptation to impulses load carried by median axons that would be far greater with a higher frequency. Biophysical properties are not identical in different human sensory axons, and therefore their responses to disease may differ. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Approach of the unilateral cleft lip with Meara's cheiloplasty technique].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Díaz, C; Albert Cazalla, A; Parri Ferrandis, F J; Correa Jorquera, J; Rubio-Palau, J

    2017-04-20

    Isolated cleft lip is the mildest form of the cleft lip and palate spectrum; however those patients are often treated with the same surgical techniques that are used for the more severe cases (advancement-rotation flaps, quadrangular flaps). Meara's cheiloplasty technique may be a less aggressive option for lip repair in isolated cleft lip or whenever the gap between labial segments is not wide. All children that had their cleft lip repaired following Meara's cheiloplasty between May 2014 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Duration of the surgical procedure, time to hospital discharge and complications were noted. Aesthetic results were evaluated in terms of lip height and symmetry, nose shape and symmetry, and scar appearance. Thirteen patients underwent Meara's cheiloplasty during this period. The average age was 6.11 months (5 to 12 months). A primary rhinoplasty was done at the same time in case of nasal asymmetry. Duration of the lip repair averaged 85 minutes. Oral feeding was started 4 hours after the procedure; bottle-feeding was withheld for 2 weeks postoperatively, as our protocol recommends after other lip repair techniques. In all 13 cases the result was a symmetrical, adequately high upper lip and a well-balanced nose, except for one case of lip scar retraction that was solved with triamcinolone infiltration. There were no other intra or postoperative complications. Meara's cheiloplasty corrects small or moderate gap cleft lip (usually cleft lip without cleft alveolus). Benefits over other teccniques are a shorter procedure and less geometric, undulate flaps that produce a harmonic lip.

  5. Upper Triangular Flap in Unilateral Cleft Lip Repair.

    PubMed

    Aranmolate, Segun; Aranmolate, Sheg O; Zeri, Richard S; Gbeneol, Tom; Ajani, Abduwahab O

    2016-05-01

    In this article, the authors describe their use of the upper triangular flap method to repair unilateral cleft lips in 250 patients with cosmetically appealing and predictable results. This method produces a straight philtral column scar that is parallel to the noncleft side and hides the surgical scars on the medial aspect of the nostril and in the lip-columellar crease. The first step is to assign the reference points along the vermilion border and the nostril sills. It is important to identify the nostril sill on the cleft nose, which could be particularly attenuated in wide clefts. Next, the upper triangular flap is designed on the upper part of the cleft side, having made allowance for the sillo-columellar distance. The dissections are performed along the drawn line joining functional points. The repair begins from the floor of the nostril, where the "neo-sill" is sutured directly opposite to the noncleft sill. The sillo-columellar distance (s-c) must be reestablished and the small triangular flap is not dissected into 3 layers to avoid devitalizing the skin. The muscle layers are identified, approximated, and held on stay sutures, which are tied in sequence. In this work, the authors identify the apparent lip length and the real lip length. It must be noted that the correction for shortening of the cleft philtral column is done on the real lip length by all other methods used for unilateral cleft lip repair, including our upper triangular flap method. On the basis of its simplicity and their postoperative results, the authors believe this approach offers further insight into cleft lip repair.

  6. Academic Achievement of Children and Adolescents With Oral Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Brent; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul A.; Ansley, Timothy N.; Speltz, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies of academic achievement of children with oral clefts have mostly relied on small, clinic-based samples prone to ascertainment bias. In the first study in the United States to use a population-based sample with direct assessment, we evaluated the academic achievement of children with oral clefts relative to their classmates. METHODS: Children born with isolated oral clefts in Iowa from 1983 to 2003 were identified from the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders and matched to unaffected classmates by gender, school/school district, and month and year of birth. Academic achievement was assessed by using standardized tests of academic progress developed by the Iowa Testing Programs. Iowa Testing Programs data were linked to birth certificates for all children. Regression models controlled for household demographic and socioeconomic factors. The analytical sample included 588 children with clefts contributing 3735 child-grade observations and 1874 classmates contributing 13 159 child-grade observations. RESULTS: Children with oral clefts had lower scores than their classmates across all domains and school levels, with a 5-percentile difference in the overall composite score. Children with clefts were approximately one-half grade level behind their classmates and had higher rates of academic underachievement and use of special education services by 8 percentage points. Group differences were slightly lower but remained large and significant after adjusting for many background characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Children with oral clefts underperformed across all academic areas and grade levels compared with their classmates. The results support a model of early testing and intervention among affected children to identify and reduce academic deficits. PMID:24753523

  7. Preliminary Analysis of the 3-Dimensional Morphology of the Upper Lip Configuration at the Completion of Facial Expressions in Healthy Japanese Young Adults and Patients With Cleft Lip.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kouzou; Nozoe, Etsuro; Okawachi, Takako; Ishihata, Kiyohide; Nishinara, Kazuhide; Nakamura, Norifumi

    2016-09-01

    To develop criteria for the analysis of upper lip configuration of patients with cleft lip while they produce various facial expressions by comparing the 3-dimensional (3D) facial morphology of healthy Japanese adults and patients with cleft lip. Twenty healthy adult Japanese volunteers (10 men, 10 women, controls) without any observed facial abnormalities and 8 patients (4 men, 4 women) with unilateral cleft lip and palate who had undergone secondary lip and nose repair were recruited for this study. Facial expressions (resting, smiling, and blowing out a candle) were recorded with 2 Artec MHT 3D scanners, and images were superimposed by aligning the T-zone of the faces. The positions of 14 specific points were set on each face, and the positional changes of specific points and symmetry of the upper lip cross-section were analyzed. Furthermore, the configuration observed in healthy controls was compared with that in patients with cleft lip before and after surgery. The mean absolute values for T-zone overlap ranged from 0.04 to 0.15 mm. Positional changes of specific points in the controls showed that the nose and lip moved backward and laterally upward when smiling and the lips moved forward and downward medially when blowing out a candle; these movements were bilaterally symmetrical in men and women. In patients with cleft lip, the positional changes of the specific points were minor compared with those of the controls while smiling and blowing out a candle. The left-versus-right symmetry of the upper lip cross-section exceeded 1.0 mm in patients with cleft lip, which was markedly higher than that in the controls (0.17 to 0.91 mm). These left-versus-right differences during facial expressions were decreased after surgery. By comparing healthy individuals with patients with cleft lip, this study has laid the basis for determining control values for facial expressions. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by

  8. Early bone grafting in complete cleft lip and palate cases following maxillofacial orthopedics. II. The soft tissue development from seven to thirteen years of age.

    PubMed

    Larson, O; Nordin, K E; Nylén, B; Eklund, G

    1983-01-01

    The subsequent effect of preoperative maxillofacial orthopedics and early bone grafting on the development of the soft tissue profile of the face was studied with roentgencephalometric analysis on cleft patients between 7 and 13 years of age. They were divided into two unilateral and one bilateral complete-cleft group, all having been bone grafted early with the "four-flap" technique. The two unilateral groups were one group of 39 children operated on between 1960 and 1965 without preoperative orthopedics and one group of 46 children operated on between 1965 and 1972 after preoperative orthopedics ("T-traction"). The bilateral group comprised 19 children operated on between 1960 and 1972 after premaxillary retropositioning pressure, combined when necessary, with outward rotation of the lateral maxillary segments. Comparisons of facial growth were made with U.S. non-grafted clefts and with nonclefts. The effect of the preoperative orthopedic management facilitated the subsequent surgical procedure by a narrowing of the cleft and replacement of the deviated maxillary and nasal structures. The results were within limits of the non-grafted cases, with the exception of the soft tissue overlying the subnasal region. The reduced prominence of that region was explained by the primary surgical procedure, which made the lip adherent to the alveolar crest. In comparison with nonclefts, all parameters indicated a reduced growth capacity.

  9. 1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST SHOWING REVOLUTIONARY WAR MONUMENT 56/1 - Greene Street Historic District, Greene Street, Gordon Highway to Augusta Canal Bridge, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  10. 12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, Copy of photograph ca. 1940. Collection Connecticut Department of Transportation. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  11. Median Nerve Palsies due to Injections: A Review.

    PubMed

    Andrea, Andrea; Gonzales, Jocelyn R; Iwanaga, Joe; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-05-29

    Injection nerve palsy (INP) in the median nerve is an iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury that can be inflicted by a faulty intramuscular injection in the median nerve area. The literature reports a 2% incidence of INP among all peripheral nerve injuries. The incidence of INP in developed countries has decreased significantly during the past decade, but the injury appears to remain prevalent in developing countries. A deep understanding of the anatomy of the peripheral nerves, and a precise intramuscular injection technique, have been shown to be vital for preventing INP in the median nerve. Debates continue regarding what, if any, intervention is necessary for injection palsies; and if it is needed, when it should be carried out. In this article, we will review the literature related to median injection nerve palsy and recommended methods of prevention.

  12. The Hypothalamic Median Eminence and its Role in Reproductive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Weiling; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    The median eminence at the base of the hypothalamus serves as an interface between the neural and peripheral endocrine systems. It is the site where hypothalamic releasing hormones are released into the portal capillary bed to be transported to the anterior pituitary, which provides further signals to target endocrine systems. Of specific relevance to reproduction, a group of about 1000 neurons in mammals release the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide from neuroterminals in the median eminence. During the life cycle, there are dramatic changes in reproductive demands, and we focus this review on how GnRH terminals in the median eminence change during reproductive senescence. We discuss morphological and functional properties of the median eminence, and how relationships among GnRH terminals and their microenvironment of nerve terminals, glial cells, and the portal capillary vasculature determine the ability of GnRH peptide to be secreted and to reach its target in the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:20738281

  13. 2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO EAST ROCKS ROAD BRIDGE, CA. 1940. COLLECTION CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. - Merritt Parkway, East Rocks Road Bridge, Spanning Merritt Parkway, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  14. Exclusion of linkage between cleft lip with or without cleft palate and markers on chromosomes 4 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.H.; Malcolm, S.; Winter, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without associate cleft palate (CLP) is a common craniofacial defect, occurring in {approximately}1/1,000 live births. While the defect generally occurs sporadically, multiplex families have been reported. Segregation analyses have demonstrated that, in some families, CLP is inherited as an autosomal dominant/codominant disorder with low penetrance. Several clefting loci have been proposed on multiple chromosomes, including 6p24, 4q, and 19q13.1. Association studies and linkage studies suggested a locus that mapped to 6p24. We were unable to confirm this in a linkage study of 12 multigenerational families. A subsequent linkage study by Carinci et al., however, found evidence for linkage to this region in 14 of 21 clefting families. Additionally, Davies et al. studied the chromosomes of three individuals with cleft lip and palate, all of whom had a rearrangement involving 6p24. Their investigation supported a locus at 6p24. Carinci et al. reported that the most likely position for a clefting locus was at D6S89, which is centromeric to EDN1. This is in contrast to the findings of Davies et al., who suggested a placement telomeric to EDN1. F13A, which had been implicated in the initial association studies, is telomeric to EDN1. Thus, the region between F13A and D6S89 encompasses the regions proposed by both Davies et al. and Carinci et al. A second clefting locus, at 4q, was proposed by Beiraghi et al., who studied a single multigenerational family by linkage analysis. Their data suggested a locus near D4S175 and D4S192. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Dependence of the latitude of the cleft on the interplanetary magnetic field and substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamide, Y.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1976-01-01

    The latitudinal motion of the cleft (the polar cusp) associated with the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and substorm activity is examined. The cleft location is identified on the basis of the location of midday auroras and of electron precipitation by the OGO 4 and ISIS 1 satellites. It is found that the IMF and substorm activity control independently the latitude of the cleft and that they can shift the cleft location by 3 or 4 deg under average conditions.

  16. Orofacial clefts at Bugando Medical Centre: associated factors and postsurgical complications.

    PubMed

    Buyu, Yunus; Manyama, Mange; Chandika, Alphonce; Gilyoma, Japhet

    2012-11-01

    To determine factors associated with orofacial clefts and postsurgical complications of cleft lip and palate repair surgeries in northwestern Tanzania. This was a cohort study involving patients with orofacial clefts. Associated factors (family history of orofacial clefts, maternal use of alcohol and cigarette smoking during pregnancy) were obtained through interviews with accompanying parents. Antenatal cards were used to obtain maternal age at birth and birth weight. Ninety-four patients with different orofacial clefts were seen. Among them, 46.8% (44/94), 13.8% (13/94), and 39.4% (37/94) had cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate, respectively. About 15% of orofacial cleft cases had a positive family history of orofacial clefts. Among these, 7.4% had an affected relative on the maternal side, 4.3% had an affected relative on the paternal side, and 3.2% had an affected sibling. This difference was statistically significant (chi-square  =  27.7, p < .001). Orofacial cleft was significantly associated with order of birth (chi-square  =  21.0, p < .001). Postoperative complications observed included palatal fistula and philtrum dehiscence. Family history of orofacial clefts and order of birth were significantly associated with orofacial clefts in northwestern Tanzania. These factors have been associated with risk of orofacial clefts elsewhere and suggest a hereditary role in the etiology of orofacial cleft. Palatal fistula and philtrum dehiscence were postsurgical complications observed in orofacial clefts patients who had primary surgery past the recommended age. These complications could have resulted from delayed surgery and absence of presurgical procedures.

  17. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  18. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  19. Injection augmentation of type I laryngeal clefts.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Harshdeep Singh; El-Hakim, Hamdy

    2012-05-01

    To describe a series of children diagnosed with type I congenital laryngeal clefts (LC-I) and treated, due to various presentations, with endoscopic injection augmentation (IA). Case series with chart review. Tertiary care academic children's hospital in Edmonton, Canada. All pediatric patients diagnosed with LC-I and treated with IA in a single tertiary care practice. The children were identified from a prospectively collected database. Only those who were treated with IA and had a minimum follow-up of 3 months were included. The authors collected demographics, diagnoses, surgical procedures, number of IA procedures, clinical outcomes, and complications. Over a period of 8 years, 43 patients were diagnosed with LC-I. Eighteen had undergone IA over the past 4 years. Mean age at IA was 37.11 ± 32.68 months with a male-to-female ratio of 1.25:1. The indications were swallowing dysfunction (13), atypical croup (2), chronic cough (1), cyanotic spells (1), and asthma (1). Seven patients required repeated injections (mean, 2.57 injections). A total of 13 patients responded with resolution of symptoms in question. A single postoperative complication was recorded. IA is a brief, simple management option that succeeds in a number of children with LC-I. It is minimally morbid and supplements other conservative approaches to treat the condition.

  20. Aerodynamic studies of cleft-palate speech.

    PubMed

    Dickson, S; Barron, S; McGlone, R E

    1978-05-01

    The aerodynamic oral-nasal factors related to the speech of two groups of cleft-palate children were evaluated. One group presented hypernasality and the other group presented normal nasal resonance. The aerodynamic parameters evaluated were oral pressure, nasal flow, and flow-pressure ratio (nasal flow/oral pressure). Oral temperature readings were also obtained. These parameters were evaluated under three conditions (1) blowing, (2) vocalizing the vowel /i/, and (3) reading eight sentences representing two different rhythm patterns, two types of consonant loadings, and two conditions of syllable stress. The findings revealed significant differences between the hypernasal and normal resonance groups in flow-pressure ratio, oral pressure, and nasal flow while subjects were reading sentences. However, only a small proportion of the variability in these aerodynamic measurements could be accounted for based on the classification of hypernasality or normal nasal resonance. Oral-nasal aerodynamic studies done during speaking activity are more useful clinically than blowing activity or saying vowel sounds. No aerodynamic differences were noted between the two groups for the different rhythm and stress patterns and phonemic loadings within the sentences used.

  1. [Repair of palatal fistulae in cleft patients].

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Traoré, H; Gilliot, B; Taupin, A; Ory, L; Guillou Jamard, M-R; Labbé, D; Compère, J-F

    2011-06-01

    Treatment of oronasal fistulae in cleft patients remains a surgical challenge because of its high failure rate. The authors report the results of an aggressive surgical technique using the total elevation of palatal mucoperiosteum, even for small fistulae. This approach was used on twelve consecutive patients, from five to 33 years of age, presenting with a Pittsburgh classification type IV palatal fistulae. The surgical procedure was total elevation of the hard palate mucoperiosteum starting from the dental sulcus combined with sealed double layer sutures. Clinical and photographical control was made at least 6 months after to detect a possible relapse. The success rate was 100%. No relapsing fistula was observed with follow-up ranging from 6 to 36 months. This technique allows wide exposure and safe closure of the nasal layer. It is simple and leaves no raw bone surface exposed and no additional scar. The authors think it can be used in all type IV fistulae less than 1cm wide. Several other surgical techniques have been described to close palatal fistulae: local turnover flaps, pedicled flaps from adjacent oral tissue, tongue flaps, tissue expansion, and even free flaps. Obturator prostheses have also been used. The technique we report, even if more aggressive, seems to be more reliable with fewer relapse and sequelae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Has the median nerve involvement in rheumatoid arthritis been overemphasised?

    PubMed

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Singh, Rajesh

    2016-08-30

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a well and widely recognised cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In the rheumatoid wrist, synovial expansion, joint erosions and ligamentous laxity result in compression of the median nerve due to increased intracarpal pressure. We evaluated the published studies to determine the prevalence of CTS and the characteristics of the median nerve in RA and its association with clinical parameters such as disease activity, disease duration and seropositivity. A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria. Pooled data from 8 studies with random selection of RA patients revealed that 86 out of 1561 (5.5%) subjects had CTS. Subclinical CTS, on the other hand, had a pooled prevalence of 14.0% (30/215). The cross sectional area of the median nerve of the RA patients without CTS were similar to the healthy controls. The vast majority of the studies (8/13) disclosed no significant relationship between the median nerve findings and the clinical or laboratory parameters in RA. The link between RA and the median nerve abnormalities has been overemphasised throughout the literature. The prevalence of CTS in RA is similar to the general population without any correlation between the median nerve characteristics and the clinical parameters of RA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  3. Has the median nerve involvement in rheumatoid arthritis been overemphasized?

    PubMed

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Singh, Rajesh

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a well and widely recognized cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In the rheumatoid wrist, synovial expansion, joint erosions and ligamentous laxity result in compression of the median nerve due to increased intracarpal pressure. We evaluated the published studies to determine the prevalence of CTS and the characteristics of the median nerve in RA and its association with clinical parameters such as disease activity, disease duration and seropositivity. A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria. Pooled data from 8 studies with random selection of RA patients revealed that 86 out of 1561 (5.5%) subjects had CTS. Subclinical CTS, on the other hand, had a pooled prevalence of 14.0% (30/215). The cross sectional area of the median nerve of the RA patients without CTS were similar to the healthy controls. The vast majority of the studies (8/13) disclosed no significant relationship between the median nerve findings and the clinical or laboratory parameters in RA. The link between RA and the median nerve abnormalities has been overemphasized throughout the literature. The prevalence of CTS in RA is similar to the general population without any correlation between the median nerve characteristics and the clinical parameters of RA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Centre-based statistics of cleft lip with/without alveolus and palate as well as cleft palate only patients in Aden, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Ahlam Hibatulla Ali; Abdo, Muhgat Ahmed Ali; Krentz, Helga; Lenz, Jan-Hendrik; Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to report the types and patterns of cleft lip with/without cleft alveolus and palate as well as cleft palate only as seen in Aden, Yemen. Retrospective, centre-based study conducted at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Aden University, Yemen. Statistical evaluation of the data from all cleft patients who were registered at or referred to this centre during the years 2005-2011. A total of 1110 cleft patients were seen during the period studied (2005-2011). Amongst these there were 183 (16.48%) with a cleft lip and 144 (12.98) with a cleft of lip and alveolus, 228 (20.54%) had a cleft palate, and 555 (50%) had a combination of cleft lip, alveolus, and palate. The clefts were found more often in males than in females (56.5% boys versus 43.5% girls). This difference was statistically significant (p ≤ 0.001). Statistically significant sex differences were also noted when evaluating the various cleft types. Isolated cleft palates were found most often in females. Among the cleft palate cases there were 102 (9.2%) with a cleft soft palate only. The ages of the patients were between one day and 40 years. Two hundred and one children (18%) had a positive family history of clefts. Among the risk factors considered in this study, consanguineous marriages among cousins were found most frequently (in 48% of the cases). In contrast to this, only 10% of the mothers had reported to have been taking medication directly prior to or during the first trimester of their pregnancy. On average the mothers were neither very young nor very old. The prevalence rate of orofacial cleft types among this Yemeni sample was similar to prevalence rates previously reported in white Caucasians. The present study did neither find many cases with medication before, nor during, pregnancy; there were few young or very old mothers; and the incidence of positive family histories was similar to those found in other studies on clefts. However, consanguineous marriages were

  5. Whole blood propionylcarnitine in newborns with orofacial cleft.

    PubMed

    Hozyasz, Kamil K; Oltarzewski, Mariusz; Lugowska, Iwona; Szymanski, Marta; Surowiec, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are thought to be determined by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Experiments on animals demonstrated that vitamin B12 supplemented diets antagonize selected teratogens during palatogenesis. Increased propionylcarnitine in neonates is regarded as a marker of maternal vitamin B12 deficiency. The retrospective study was undertaken to determine whether increased propionylcarnitine in newborns is associated with orofacial clefts. Fifty-two newborns with isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and 107 control newborns without congenital anomalies were investigated. Whole blood propionylcarnitine concentrations were measured using tandem mass spectrometry. The mean concentrations of propionylcarnitine in newborns with clefts and controls were 2.82±1.06µmolL(-1) and 2.68±0.94µmolL(-1), respectively. T-test for equality of means did not confirm any significant differences between both groups (P=0.381). Deficiency of vitamin B12 with metabolic disturbances seems not to be a risk factor for CLP in the investigated group of patients. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Cleft lift procedure for pilonidal disease: technique and perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Favuzza, J; Brand, M; Francescatti, A; Orkin, B

    2015-08-01

    Pilonidal disease is a common condition affecting young patients. It is often disruptive to their lifestyle due to recurrent abscesses or chronic wound drainage. The most common surgical treatment, "cystectomy," removes useful tissue unnecessarily and does not address the etiology of the condition. Herein, we describe the etiology of pilonidal disease and our technique for definitive management of pilonidal disease using the cleft lift procedure. In this paper, we present our method of performing the cleft lift procedure for pilonidal disease including perioperative management and surgical technique. We have used the cleft lift procedure in nearly 200 patients with pilonidal disease, in both primary and salvage procedures settings. It has been equally successful in both settings with a high rate of success. It results in a closed wound with relatively minimal discomfort and straightforward wound care. We have described our current approach to recurrent and complex pilonidal disease using the cleft lift procedure. Once learned, the cleft lift procedure is a straightforward and highly successful solution to a chronic and challenging condition.

  7. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  8. Are cleft palate fistulae a cause of dental decay?

    PubMed

    Richards, Helen; van Bommel, Annelotte; Clark, Victoria; Richard, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    To investigate a possible correlation between fistula and dental decay in children at 5 years of age from a single-surgeon series of cleft palate repairs. Retrospective review of data over a 9-year period between 2003 and 2011 of cleft palate repairs performed by the senior author at Birmingham Children's Hospital, U.K. Data collected on age, sex, age at repair, presence of fistula, and number of decayed, missing, or filled primary teeth (i.e., decayed, missing, and filled teeth score) at age 5 years. The overall fistula rate for this patient population was 24.1%. Fistulae were more common in the more severe forms of cleft type, as was frequency of dental decay. Comparison of fistula versus nonfistula groups showed a higher rate of dental decay (40%) in the fistula group, compared with only 20% in the nonfistula group (P = .036). A positive association was established between dental decay and the presence of a fistula. Although not proven as causative, possible reasons for this include nasal mucus retaining sugary food in the mouth and an overall prolonged food-clearance time. The known association between severity of cleft and an increased likelihood of a fistula and severity of cleft and increased dental decay were again demonstrated but were not found to be the exclusive explanation for the new finding of an association between fistulae and higher dental decay rates.

  9. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Shanghai, China: Evidence for an autosomal major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Marazita, M.L. ); Hu, Dan-Ning; Liu, You-E. ); Spence, A. ); Melnick, M. )

    1992-09-01

    Orientals are at higher risk for cleft lip with our without cleft palate (CL[+-] P) than Caucasians or blacks. The authors collected demographic and family data to study factors contributing to the etiology of CL[+-]P in Shanghai. The birth incidence of nonsyndromic CL[+-]P (SHanghai 1980-87) was 1.11/1,000, with a male/female ratio of 1.42. Almost 2,000 nonsyndromic CL[+-]P probands were ascertained from individuals operated on during the years 1956-83 at surgical hospitals in Shanghai. Detailed family histories and medical examinations were obtained for the probands and all available family members. Genetic analysis of the probands' families were performed under the mixed model with major locus (ML) and multifactorial (MFT) components. The hypothesis of no familial transmission and of MFT alone could be rejected. Of the ML models, the autosomal recessive was significantly most likely and was assumed for testing three complex hypothesis: (1) ML and sporadics; (2) ML and MFT; (3) ML, MFT, and sporadics. None of the complex models were more likely than the ML alone model. In conclusion, the best-fitting, most parsimonious model for CL[+-]P in Shanghai was that of an autosomal recessive major locus. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Cleft size at the time of palate repair in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate as an indicator of maxillary growth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-F; Prasad, N K K; Chiu, Y-T; Yun, C; Chen, P K-T

    2010-10-01

    Cleft size at the time of palate repair might affect the difficulty of surgical repair and, thus, indirectly postoperative maxillary growth. This retrospective study aimed to determine whether a correlation existed between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 39 infants with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, taken at the time of palate repair, were used to measure cleft size. Cleft size was defined as the percentage of the total palatal area. The later growth of the maxilla was determined using lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs taken at 9 years of age. The Pearson correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. The results showed negative correlations between cleft size and the maxillary length (PMP-ANS, PMP-A) and the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA). These data suggest that in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate there is a significant correlation between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the maxillary length and protrusion. Patients with a large cleft at the time of palate repair have a shorter and more retrusive maxilla than those with a small cleft by the age of 9 years. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Facial aesthetics and perceived need for further treatment among adults with repaired cleft as assessed by cleft team professionals and laypersons.

    PubMed

    Foo, Peter; Sampson, Wayne; Roberts, Rachel; Jamieson, Lisa; David, David

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the ratings of professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft regarding the facial aesthetics of adult patients previously treated for orofacial clefting. The necessity for further treatment, as perceived by the respective groups, is also compared. The design of the study was a cross-sectional study. Professionals (two plastic surgeons, one dentist, one orthodontist, and one psychologist) and laypeople (one male and one female adult without a cleft and one male and one female adult with a cleft) were recruited to rate photographs of 80 non-syndromic cleft patients treated by the Australian Craniofacial Unit from 1975 to 2009. Facial aesthetics were measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). High values indicated good aesthetics. Necessity for further treatment was also measured by a VAS (0-100 mm). High values indicated high perceived need for further treatment. The professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perception of need for further treatment than the raters with and without a cleft. The laypeople with a cleft rated facial aesthetics significantly higher and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than laypeople without a cleft. The non-surgical professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than the surgical professionals. Differences exist in the facial aesthetics ratings and perceived need for further surgery between professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft. This should be considered when managing cleft treatment expectations.

  12. Initial size of cleft does not correlate with size and function of nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Erika; Andlin-Sobocki, Anna; Mani, Maria; Holmström, Mats

    2011-06-01

    The noses of patients with clefts are often functionally inadequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between size of the maxillary cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This is a long-term follow up study including 53 patients with UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 and treated at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Lip repair was performed at 3-4 months of age followed by either a one-stage or a two-stage palatal closure. The size of the cleft was measured on infant maxillary dental casts. Nasal minimum cross-sectional area (cm(2)) and volume (cm(3)) (acoustic rhinometry), air flow resistance (Pa s/cm(3)) (rhinomanometry), peak inspiratory flow (l/min) (peak nasal inspiratory flow) and number of identified odours (Scandinavian odor-identification test) were assessed in adulthood. The size of the maxillary cleft varied considerably at infancy. The size of the nasal airway and its function on the cleft side in adulthood were reduced compared with the non-cleft side, but no correlations were found between size of the initial cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood. In adults born with UCLP, therefore, size of the maxillary cleft in infancy does not seem to affect size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood.

  13. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  14. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  15. Nasolabial fold discontinuity during speech as a possible extended cleft phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Karen L; Neiswanger, Katherine; Cohn, Ellen; Desensi, Rebecca; Brandon, Carla; Bardi, Kathleen; Marazita, Mary L

    2013-03-01

    Objective : This exploratory research sought to extend the cleft phenotype by identifying movement-related soft tissue appearance changes in the midfacial region in individuals with cleft lip/palate or those with genetic susceptibility to cleft lip/palate (unaffected relatives). The cleft phenotype (clinically identified orofacial cleft or subclinical orbicularis oris defect) was hypothesized to be associated with movement related appearance changes in the midfacial region, e.g., with furrowing and dimpling during speech. Design : Changes in the appearance of skin in the midfacial region, including a newly identified phenotypic feature, nasolabial fold (NLF) discontinuity, were described and compared across groups. Participants : Individuals with cleft lip (n  =  42), unaffected relatives of persons with a cleft (n  =  57) and healthy controls (n  =  41) were compared. Results : Frequencies of NLF discontinuity differed across cleft, relative, and control groups. NLF discontinuities were observed more frequently in individuals with a cleft phenotype (overt cleft or previously identified orbicularis oris muscle defect) than in those with no underlying muscular defect (Fisher exact test, P  =  .014). Conclusion : Results suggest that the appearance of facial soft tissue during movement of the midface is moderated at least in part by underlying cleft risk factors, indicating certain facial movements as candidate physical markers for extension of the cleft phenotype.

  16. Children with Diagnoses of Cleft Lip and/or Palate: What School Psychologists Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalewicz, Eva Aleksandra; Ausikaitis, Ashley Etzel; Kapp-Simon, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a review of the literature on orofacial clefting in children. The authors review the etiology, prevalence, and variations of clefting as well as issues related to neuropsychological, social, academic, emotional, and behavioral functioning of children with clefts. Finally, the authors discuss the implications for school…

  17. Public health policy and medical missions in the Philippines: the case of oral--facial clefting.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the critical role of medical missions as alternative or proxy health delivery agencies in developing countries like the Philippines. Why and how they exist, what they can and cannot do, how they interact with the for-profit and public health sectors, and what challenges they face in the context of underdevelopment are analyzed by using a proposed structural- behavioral framework. We find that these missions can offer short-term benefits to specialized public health problems, such as oral-facial clefting, but depend on public and private partnerships and resources for long-term solutions. The article thus suggests that health care provision in developing countries should also be treated as a managerial issue. The challenge is for Third World governments to promote effective trisector collaborations, improve accessibility and adequacy of services, and support socially redistributive health policies.

  18. Longitudinal study of growth of children with unilateral cleft-lip palate from birth to two years of age

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ilza L.; Nackashi, John A.; Borgo, Hilton C.; Martinelli, Ângela P. M. C.; Pegoraro-Krook, Maria I.; Williams, William N.; Dutka, Jeniffer C. R.; Seagle, Michael B.; Souza, Telma V.; Garla, Luis A.; Neto, José S. M.; Silva, Marcos L. N.; Graciano, Maria I. G.; Moorhead, Jacquelyn; A Piazentin-Penna, Sílvia H.; Feniman, Mariza R.; Zimmermann, Maria C.; Bento-Gonçalves, Cristina G. A.; Pimentel, Maria C. M.; Boggs, Steve; Jorge, José C.; Antonelli, Patrick J.; Shuster, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the growth of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) from birth to 2 years of age and to construct specific UCLP growth curves. Design Physical growth was a secondary outcome measure of a NIH sponsored longitudinal, prospective clinical trial involving the University of Florida (USA) and the University of São Paulo (Brazil). Patients 627 children with UCLP, nonsyndromic, both genders. Methods Length, weight, and head circumference were prospectively measured for a group of children enrolled in a clinical trial. Median growth curves for the 3 parameters (length, weight, head circumference) were performed and compared to the median for the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS, 2000) curves. The median values for length, weight, and head circumference at birth, 6, 12, 18 and 24 month of age were plotted against NCHS median values, and statistically compared at birth and 24 months. Setting Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais, Universidade de São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil (HRAC-USP). Results At birth, children of both genders with UCLP presented with smaller body dimensions in relation to NCHS median values, but the results suggest a “catch up growth” for length, weight, and head circumference for girls and for weight (to some degree) and head circumference for boys. Conclusions Weight was the most compromised parameter for both genders followed by length and then head circumference. There was no evidence of short statue. This study established growth curves for children with UCLP. PMID:19860503

  19. Developmental anomalies of the lower face and the hyoid cartilage due to partial elimination of the posterior mesencephalic and anterior rhombencephalic neural crest in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Been, W; Lieuw Kie Song, S H; van Limborgh, J

    1984-12-01

    In an effort to verify the supposition that a normal development of the lower face and the hyoid apparatus is dependent on the availability of a sufficient number of cells derived from the posterior mesencephalic and anterior rhombencephalic parts of the neural crest, in a total of 52 six-somite stage chick embryos (about 26 hours of incubation) these parts of the neural crest were partially eliminated by tangential micro-laser irradiation. Among the 17 irradiated embryos sacrificed after 24 hours, several ones showed an underdevelopment of the mesenchyme in the ventral part of the first branchial arch; in 2 of these cases, additionally the second branchial arch was underdeveloped. At the age of 7-8 days, 4 out of 15 surviving embryos showed an underdevelopment of the lower beak and a reduction in size of Meckel's cartilage; in 3 of these cases, in addition, a median cleft in the lower beak and/or reduction or absence of the hyoid cartilage were observed. From these observations the conclusion is drawn that for a normal development and growth of the mandibular part of the face and the hyoid cartilage sufficient numbers of posterior mesencephalic and anterior rhombencephalic neural crest cells are indispensable, indeed.

  20. Famous face recognition, face matching, and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Lander, Karen; Poyarekar, Siddhi

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously established that extraverts who are skilled at interpersonal interaction perform significantly better than introverts on a face-specific recognition memory task. In our experiment we further investigate the relationship between extraversion and face recognition, focusing on famous face recognition and face matching. Results indicate that more extraverted individuals perform significantly better on an upright famous face recognition task and show significantly larger face inversion effects. However, our results did not find an effect of extraversion on face matching or inverted famous face recognition.

  1. [Association between non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate and environmental factors in Ningxia].

    PubMed

    Lili, Yu; Jian, Ma; Junpeng, Gao; Kun, Zhai; Jinfang, Zhu; Yongqing, Huang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the association between non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) and environmental factors in Ningxia population. This case-control study involved 453 NSCL/P patients and 452 normal newborns from Ningxia. A questionnaire focusing on various factors, including family history, pregnancy reaction, drug use during pregnancy, and infections, was used and responses were analyzed through Chi-square test and Logistic regression analysis with SPSS 16.0. The constituent ratio of different types of NSCL/P was cleft lip∶cleft lip and palate∶cleft palate equal to 1︰2.02︰1.51. Logistic regression analysis revealed that abnormal pregnancy, infection, abortion, drugs, drinking, smoking, and living near factories likely increased the risk of NSCL/P (P<0.05). Single fetus, pregnancy-related nausea, vomiting, parents' moderate tastes, and eating soy foods and fruits decreased the risk of NSCL/P (P<0.05). The incidence of NSCL/P should be reduced to enhance the conditions of women during pregnancy by maintaining a balanced diet and avoiding infections, abortion, drugs, and negative habits. 
.

  2. Treatment outcome after neonatal cleft lip repair in 5-year-old children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Košková, Olga; Vokurková, Jitka; Vokurka, Jan; Bryšova, Alena; Šenovský, Pavel; Čefelínová, Julie; Lukášová, Darina; Dorociaková, Petra; Abelovský, Juraj

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess speech outcomes and dental arch relationship of 5-year-old Czech patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) who have undergone neonatal cleft lip repair and one-stage palatal closure. Twenty-three patients with UCLP, born between 2009 and 2010, were included in the study. Three universal speech parameters (hypernasality, articulation and speech intelligibility) have been devised for speech recordings evaluation. Outcomes of dental arch relationship were evaluated by applying the GOSLON Yardstick and subsequently compared with the GOSLON outcome of other cleft centers. Moderate hypernasality was present in most cases, the mean value for articulation and speech intelligibility was 2.07 and 1.93, respectively. The Kappa values for inter-examiner agreement for all the three speech outcomes ranged from 0.786 to 0.808. Sixty-three percent of patients were scored GOSLON 1 and 2, 26% GOSLON 3, and 10% GOSLON 4. GOSLON mean score was 2.35. Interrater agreement was very good, represented by kappa value of 0.867. The treatment protocol, involving neonatal cleft lip repair and one-stage palatal repair performed up to the first year of UCLP patient's life, has shown good speech outcomes and produced very good treatment results in regard to maxillary growth, comparable with other cleft centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing

    PubMed Central

    Pittig, Andre; Schupp, Harald T.; Alpers, Georg W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The human face conveys emotional and social information, but it is not well understood how these two aspects influence face perception. In order to model a group situation, two faces displaying happy, neutral or angry expressions were presented. Importantly, faces were either facing the observer, or they were presented in profile view directed towards, or looking away from each other. In Experiment 1 (n = 64), face pairs were rated regarding perceived relevance, wish-to-interact, and displayed interactivity, as well as valence and arousal. All variables revealed main effects of facial expression (emotional > neutral), face orientation (facing observer > towards > away) and interactions showed that evaluation of emotional faces strongly varies with their orientation. Experiment 2 (n = 33) examined the temporal dynamics of perceptual-attentional processing of these face constellations with event-related potentials. Processing of emotional and neutral faces differed significantly in N170 amplitudes, early posterior negativity (EPN), and sustained positive potentials. Importantly, selective emotional face processing varied as a function of face orientation, indicating early emotion-specific (N170, EPN) and late threat-specific effects (LPP, sustained positivity). Taken together, perceived personal relevance to the observer—conveyed by facial expression and face direction—amplifies emotional face processing within triadic group situations. PMID:28158672

  4. Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing.

    PubMed

    Bublatzky, Florian; Pittig, Andre; Schupp, Harald T; Alpers, Georg W

    2017-05-01

    The human face conveys emotional and social information, but it is not well understood how these two aspects influence face perception. In order to model a group situation, two faces displaying happy, neutral or angry expressions were presented. Importantly, faces were either facing the observer, or they were presented in profile view directed towards, or looking away from each other. In Experiment 1 (n = 64), face pairs were rated regarding perceived relevance, wish-to-interact, and displayed interactivity, as well as valence and arousal. All variables revealed main effects of facial expression (emotional > neutral), face orientation (facing observer > towards > away) and interactions showed that evaluation of emotional faces strongly varies with their orientation. Experiment 2 (n = 33) examined the temporal dynamics of perceptual-attentional processing of these face constellations with event-related potentials. Processing of emotional and neutral faces differed significantly in N170 amplitudes, early posterior negativity (EPN), and sustained positive potentials. Importantly, selective emotional face processing varied as a function of face orientation, indicating early emotion-specific (N170, EPN) and late threat-specific effects (LPP, sustained positivity). Taken together, perceived personal relevance to the observer-conveyed by facial expression and face direction-amplifies emotional face processing within triadic group situations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. The cleft ion fountain - A two-dimensional kinetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Lockwood, M.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of ionospheric ions from a source in the polar cleft ionosphere through the polar magnetosphere is investigated using a two-dimensional, kinetic, trajectory-based code. The transport model includes the effects of gravitation, longitudinal magnetic gradient force, convection electric fields, and parallel electric fields. Individual ion trajectories as well as distribution functions and resulting bulk parameters of density, parallel average energy, and parallel flux for a presumed cleft ionosphere source distribution are presented for various conditions to illustrate parametrically the dependences on source energies, convection electric field strengths, ion masses, and parallel electric field strengths. The essential features of the model are consistent with the concept of a cleft-based ion fountain supplying ionospheric ions to the polar magnetosphere, and the resulting plasma distributions and parameters are in general agreement with recent low-energy ion measurements from the DE 1 satellite.

  6. Use of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate in cleft lip repair.

    PubMed

    Magee, William P; Ajkay, Nicolas; Githae, Bernard; Rosenblum, Richard S

    2003-01-01

    Octyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) is a synthetic tissue adhesive recently approved for skin closure. This study was designed to assess its effectiveness for use in clefts lip repairs. Sixty-four patients with unilateral, bilateral, or midline cleft lip defects were repaired. The ages at repair ranged from 4 days to 19 months, with an average of 46.5 days. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 3 years. No complications were found. Several advantages were observed: shorter operative time, formation of a protective barrier, simplified incision care, no need for suture removal, and improved scar outcome. This study supports octyl-2-cyanoacrylate as an alternative to skin sutures in primary cleft lip repair.

  7. Ethics in Numbers: Auditing Cleft Treatment in Mexico and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Alexander, Samuel

    2017-09-01

    Plastic surgeons around the globe are implementing projects that mix audit with medical research to ensure and improve the level of care offered to patients with cleft lip and palate. Drawing on recent literature on "audit culture" and the global growth of "performance indicators" as a form of governance, I demonstrate the conjugation of ethics and the production of numerical indicators in cleft treatment. By standardizing documentation, cleft treatment audit programs facilitate evidence-based medicine and a form of reflexive self-governance. However, the abstraction that accompanies standardization is amplified as corollary data practices travel. In emerging as the answer to improving treatment, these projects lock out the politico-economic factors that mediate medical care in resource poor settings. This danger is compounded by the tendency of numerical governance to replace political conversation with technocratic expertise. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  8. Postpalatoplasty Eustachian tube function in young children with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Alper, Cuneyt M; Losee, Joseph E; Mandel, Ellen M; Seroky, James T; Swarts, J Douglas; Doyle, William J

    2012-07-01

    To characterize Eustachian tube function using the forced response test in young children with cleft palate with or without cleft lip after palatoplasty with tympanostomy tubes inserted prepalatoplasty and compare these results with those of a 1986 study that evaluated a similar population using identical methods. Outpatient research clinic. A total of 34 children with cleft palate were tested at an average age of 18.6 ± 4.0 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREs: Passive and active measures for the forced response test. Of the sample, 13 ears could not be tested, and tests on 24 ears were incomplete. The forced response test showed that the passive Eustachian tube function parameters were similar to those of normal adults and children. The percentage of ears that showed tubal dilation with swallowing was 60%. The active resistance and dilatory efficiency were similar to those of a normal adult population. A 1986 study of Eustachian tube function in postpalatoplasty subjects with cleft palate (37 ears) aged 15 to 26 months documented Eustachian tube dilation with swallowing in 84% of the ears. In the present study, which focused on a similar population, the frequency of tubal dilation was 60%. Nonetheless, both frequencies are significantly greater than the dilation frequency of 27% reported for 56 ears of subjects with cleft palate tested between 3 months and 18 years with tympanostomy tubes inserted for persistent otitis media with effusion. This suggests that dilation during the forced response test may be a prognostic marker for those children with cleft palate who will resolve their ear disease at an early age.

  9. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  10. Alveolar bone grafting with simultaneous cleft lip rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Eun; Han, Jihyeon; Baek, Rong-Min; Kim, Baek-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    Optimal timing for cleft lip rhinoplasty is controversial. Definitive rhinoplasty is deferred until facial skeletal growth is completed. Intermediate rhinoplasty is performed after stabilization of the grafted alveolar bone, because the grafted bone tends to be absorbed over several months postoperatively, distorting the nasal profile. Here, we report our experience with simultaneous rhinoplasty during alveolar bone grafting for indicated patients, describe our surgical technique that ensures long-term bone graft survival, and report graft take rates and nasal profile changes. This retrospective chart review included a total of 54 patients; 44 underwent alveolar bone grafting only, and 10 underwent simultaneous cleft lip rhinoplasty. All surgeries were conducted with a judicious mucosal incision for tensionless wound closure. Bone graft take was evaluated with dental radiographs by the Bergland classification. Further, nasal aesthetic outcome was evaluated with medical photographs, based on nostril height and width and alar base width. In total, 96.3% of clefts showed graft success with Type I (66.7%) or Type II (27.8%) classifications; only 3.7% of clefts showed unfavorable results classified as Type III, and no clefts showed Type IV failure. The nasal shape was flatter with a decreased nostril height and increased nostril width after alveolar bone grafting, while nostril height was increased and nostril width was decreased in patients who underwent simultaneous rhinoplasty. With surgical techniques ensuring alveolar bone graft survival, simultaneous cleft lip rhinoplasty can result in nasal aesthetic improvement for patients with severe nasal deformities, decreasing the number of operations. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implicit face prototype learning from geometric information.

    PubMed

    Or, Charles C-F; Wilson, Hugh R

    2013-04-19

    There is evidence that humans implicitly learn an average or prototype of previously studied faces, as the unseen face prototype is falsely recognized as having been learned (Solso & McCarthy, 1981). Here we investigated the extent and nature of face prototype formation where observers' memory was tested after they studied synthetic faces defined purely in geometric terms in a multidimensional face space. We found a strong prototype effect: The basic results showed that the unseen prototype averaged from the studied faces was falsely identified as learned at a rate of 86.3%, whereas individual studied faces were identified correctly 66.3% of the time and the distractors were incorrectly identified as having been learned only 32.4% of the time. This prototype learning lasted at least 1 week. Face prototype learning occurred even when the studied faces were further from the unseen prototype than the median variation in the population. Prototype memory formation was evident in addition to memory formation of studied face exemplars as demonstrated in our models. Additional studies showed that the prototype effect can be generalized across viewpoints, and head shape and internal features separately contribute to prototype formation. Thus, implicit face prototype extraction in a multidimensional space is a very general aspect of geometric face learning.

  12. Adaptive weighted median filter utilizing impulsive noise detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Jun; Meguro, Mitsuhiko; Hamada, Nozomu

    1999-10-01

    The removal of noise in image is one of the current important issues. It is also useful as a preprocessing for edge detection, motion estimation and so on. In this paper, an adaptive weighted median filter utilizing impulsive noise detection is proposed for the removal of impulsive noise in digital images. The aim of our proposed method is to eliminate impulsive noise effectively preserving original fine detail in images. This aim is same for another median-type nonlinear filters try to realized. In our method, we use weighted median filter whose weights should be determined by balancing between the signal preserving ability and noise reduction performance. The trade off between these two inconsistent properties is realized using the noise detection mechanism and optimized adaptation process. In the previous work, threshold value between the signal and the output of the median filter have to be decided for the noise detection. Adaptive algorithm for optimizing WM filters uses the teacher image for training process. In our method, following two new approaches are introduced in the filtering. (1) The noise detection process uses the discriminant method to the histogram distribution of the derivation from median filter output. (2) Filter weights which have been learned by uncorrupted pixels and their neighborhood without the original image are used for the restoration filtering for noise corrupted pixels. The validity of the proposed method is shown through some experimental results.

  13. Median nerve superficial to the transverse carpal ligament.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Gaskin, Alexis D; Allen, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in up to 12% of cases after carpal tunnel release. Recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome is defined as recurrence of classic symptoms confirmed by electrodiagnostic studies after a symptom-free interval of a minimum of 6 months, as opposed to persistent carpal tunnel syndrome, where a symptom-free interval never occurs after carpal tunnel release, which is attributed to incomplete release of the transverse carpal ligament. The most common causes of recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome requiring reoperation are incomplete release of the transverse carpal ligament and scarring of the median nerve to the surrounding structures. Surgical exploration, release of the reconstituted transverse carpal ligament, and freeing of the median nerve from constricting scar will usually result in symptom relief. The authors describe an unusual presentation of recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome with healing of the transverse carpal ligament dorsal to the median nerve, trapping the median nerve in the subcutaneous tissue. Hand surgeons must be aware of this anomalous location when performing revision carpal tunnel release. The surgeon must locate the median nerve proximally in normal tissue before proceeding distally to avoid iatrogenic injury during revision carpal tunnel release. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  15. Urinary symptoms after robotic prostatectomy in men with median lobes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Satyan K; Fleet, Trisha; Skipper, Betty

    2013-01-01

    We report on the natural history of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and urinary continence in patients with median lobe enlargement (MLE) after robotic radical prostatectomy (RP). Patients treated with RP from October 2008 to March 2012 completed American Urological Association symptom index (AUAI) and continence assessments at the preoperative visit and each postoperative visit. Two cohorts were established based on the presence or absence of a median lobe intraoperatively. A total of 698 validated questionnaires were completed by 175 patients with a median of 4 AUAI scores per patient. The 36 patients (21%) with MLE required a longer time to achieve urinary continence (P = .05, log-rank test), although ultimately, no difference was seen in long-term continence probability between the two cohorts (P = .63). On multivariate analysis, the presence of a median lobe reduced the odds of early continence recovery (P = .02). By use of a generalized estimating equation, the cohort-average AUAI scores after RP are presented. Patients with MLE had faster improvement in LUTS after surgery, whereas those without MLE had temporary worsening in LUTS before improvement. Patients with MLE have a different natural history of LUTS and continence after RP as compared with patients without this finding. Therefore, radiographic or cystoscopic evaluation for the presence of a median lobe before RP may improve patient counseling about urinary outcomes.

  16. [Cloverleaf skull and bilateral facial clefts].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Manassero-Morales, Gioconda

    2015-01-01

    Cloverleaf skull syndrome, or Kleeblattschädel syndrome, is a rare malformation in which the skull has a cloverleaf appearance. It is caused by the premature closure of several sutures, being evident before birth. To present our experience in a case of cloverleaf skull syndrome, and update the information from the literature. A female infant of 5 months of age, diagnosed at birth with cleft lip and palate and hydrocephaly. A peritoneal ventricle valve was implanted at 30 days of life, and an ocular enucleation was performed due to an infectious process. The patient was followed-up in Genetics, where it confirmed a macrocephaly and craniosynostosis type cloverleaf skull. The 46XX cytogenetic study and echocardiography were normal. The brain CT scan showed multiple anomalies associated with hydrocephaly and non-specific malformations. Cloverleaf skull may be present in isolated form or associated with other congenital abnormalities, leading to various craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Crouzon, Pfeiffer or Carpenter. It may also be a component of the amniotic rupture sequence or to different dysplasias, such as campomelic dysplasia, thanatophoric dysplasia type 2, or the asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy of Jeune. The case presented does not fulfil all the characteristics needed to be included within a specific syndrome, and on not having a family history that suggests a hereditary pattern or chromosome abnormalities, it is concluded that it is a case of a congenital anomaly of sporadic presentation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Rathke cleft cyst masquerading as pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengxian; Bao, Xinjie; Liu, Xiaohai; Deng, Kan; Feng, Ming; Yao, Yong; Wang, Renzhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) is a rare cystic sellar entity, which is usually small in size and asymptomatic in most patients. RCC presenting panhypopituitarism and a cystic lesion with rim enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging is extremely rare. Therefore, it is easy to be misdiagnosed as pituitary abscess because of the similar clinical manifestations and neuroimaging changes. Case summary: We report a rare case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess clinically and radiologically with no evidence of central nervous system infection. The patient was initially suspected to be diagnosed with pituitary abscess, which was denied by the histopathological findings of RCC with no intraoperative drainage of abscess. We present an uncommon case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess in a 62-year-old Chinese male patient. The patient was admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital complaining of severe frontal pulsatile headache, visual acuity deficit, polyuria, polydipsia, and slight disturbance of consciousness. The biochemical and endocrinological examinations revealed severe hyponatremia and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar lesion with the apparent cystic change and rim enhancement. Accordingly, pituitary abscess was misdiagnosed at the beginning. The patient received hormone replacement therapy and underwent a trans-sphenoidal surgery. The surgical findings were uneventful. The histopathological examinations showed no infiltration of inflammatory cells or pus, and proved the lesion to be RCC. Conclusion: Through this rare case, we aim to emphasize that the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions requires constant vigilance and that RCC may lead to clinical and radiological changes similar with pituitary abscess. PMID:28272259

  18. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems.

  19. Speech evaluation and treatment for patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, David P; Henne, Lisa J

    2003-02-01

    This compendium has been written in conjunction with a cleft lip and palate surgical mission that took place in Villahermosa, Mexico, February 4-9, 2001. Fifty children, 10 per day, received lip or palate surgery. This report, available in both English and Spanish, is intended as a practical and concise guide to basic aspects of evaluation and treatment of speech disorders associated with cleft palate. More detailed and comprehensive sources dealing with this topic are available and have been reviewed by D. P. Kuehn and K. T. Moller (2000).

  20. Isolated cleft lip with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Renuka; Kumar, Ajay; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts are one of the most common birth defects and may be associated with other genetic anomalies. Aggressive periodontitis is a rare condition that progresses rapidly, but affects only a small percentage of the population. Most of the cases of aggressive periodontitis are familial. Even though, literature has documented the association of various genetic disorders with aggressive periodontitis, the aggressive periodontitis in patients with isolated cleft lip (CL) have never been addressed. Here, we report a rare case of isolated CL with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The concomitant presentation of isolated CL with aggressive periodontitis in an individual has clinical significance for multi-disciplinary care. PMID:25810600

  1. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shaila; Chacko, Reena Annie; Thomas, Abi M; Singh, Namita; Thomas, Rodny; Abraham, Deena

    2014-01-01

    A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient's weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury.

  2. Unilateral Cleft Lip: Principles and Practice of Surgical Management

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Management of cleft lip and palate requires a unique understanding of the various dimensions of care to optimize outcomes of surgery. The breadth of treatment spans multiple disciplines and the length of treatment spans infancy to adulthood. Although the focus of reconstruction is on form and function, changes occur with growth and development. This review focuses on the surgical management of the primary cleft lip and nasal deformity. In addition to surgical treatment, the anatomy, clinical spectrum, preoperative care, and postoperative care are discussed. Principles of surgery are emphasized and controversies are highlighted. PMID:24179447

  3. Interpolated histogram method for area optimised median computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Darji, Anand D.

    2013-04-01

    The article describes an area efficient algorithm for real-time approximate median computation on VLSI platforms. The improvement in performance and area optimisation are achieved through linear interpolation within a reduced number of histogram bins. In order to reduce the hardware utilisation further, an approximation technique for interpolation is also proposed. This approach extends the utility of the histogram method to data sets having a large dynamic range. The performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of mean squared error (MSE) and resource utilisation is provided and compared to that of the existing algorithms. This comparison indicates that more than 60% optimisation in resources is achieved with marginal compromise in the accuracy of the median. The proposed algorithm finds applications in the areas of image processing, time series analysis and median absolute deviation (MAD) computation.

  4. Lateral facial cleft associated with accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and peripheral facial weakness.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, D; Toplu, G; Türkseven, A; Senses, D A; Yiğit, B

    2014-07-01

    Transverse facial cleft is a very rare malformation. The Tessier no. 7 cleft is a lateral facial cleft which emanates from oral cavity and extends towards the tragus, involving both soft tissue and skeletal components. Here, we present a case having transverse facial cleft, accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and ipsilateral peripheral facial nerve weakness. After surgical repair of the cleft in 2-month of age, improvement of the facial nerve function was detected in 3-year of age. Resection of the accessory mandible was planned in 5-6 years of age. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oblique lip-alveolar banding in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, S; Bütow, K-W

    2015-04-01

    We report an oblique lip-alveolar band, a rare banding of soft tissue that involves the lip and alveolus, which we have found in five patients with cleft lip and palate (0.2%), compared with an incidence of the Simonartz lip-lip band of 5.7%). To our knowledge this has not been reported previously. In two patients the bands affected the cleft lip and alveolus bilaterally, with or without the palatal cleft, and in three the bands were unilateral cleft lip and alveolus with or without the palatal cleft. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tessier 3 Cleft in a Pre-Hispanic Anthropomorphic Figurine in El Salvador, Central America.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Ramon Manuel; Martinez, Maria Guadalupe

    2017-03-01

    In 1976, Paul Tessier provided a numerical classification system for rare facial clefts, numbered from 0 to 14. The Tessier 3 cleft is a rare facial cleft extending from the philtrum of the upper lip through the wing of the nostril, and reaches the medial canthus of the eye. The aim of this document was to describe a pre-Hispanic anthropomorphic figurine dating from the classic period (200 A.D.-900 A.D.), which has a Tessier 3 cleft. We also discuss the documented pre-Hispanic beliefs about facial clefts.

  7. Mutations in PHF8 are associated with X linked mental retardation and cleft lip/cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Laumonnier, F; Holbert, S; Ronce, N; Faravelli, F; Lenzner, S; Schwartz, C; Lespinasse, J; Van Esch, H; Lacombe, D; Goizet, C; Phan-Dinh, T; van Bokhoven, H; Fryns, J; Chelly, J; Ropers, H; Moraine, C; Hamel, B; Briault, S

    2005-01-01

    Truncating mutations were found in the PHF8 gene (encoding the PHD finger protein 8) in two unrelated families with X linked mental retardation (XLMR) associated with cleft lip/palate (MIM 300263). Expression studies showed that this gene is ubiquitously transcribed, with strong expression of the mouse orthologue Phf8 in embryonic and adult brain structures. The coded PHF8 protein harbours two functional domains, a PHD finger and a JmjC (Jumonji-like C terminus) domain, implicating it in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling. The association of XLMR and cleft lip/palate in these patients with mutations in PHF8 suggests an important function of PHF8 in midline formation and in the development of cognitive abilities, and links this gene to XLMR associated with cleft lip/palate. Further studies will explore the specific mechanisms whereby PHF8 alterations lead to mental retardation and midline defects. PMID:16199551

  8. Mutations in PHF8 are associated with X linked mental retardation and cleft lip/cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Laumonnier, F; Holbert, S; Ronce, N; Faravelli, F; Lenzner, S; Schwartz, C E; Lespinasse, J; Van Esch, H; Lacombe, D; Goizet, C; Phan-Dinh Tuy, F; van Bokhoven, H; Fryns, J-P; Chelly, J; Ropers, H-H; Moraine, C; Hamel, B C J; Briault, S

    2005-10-01

    Truncating mutations were found in the PHF8 gene (encoding the PHD finger protein 8) in two unrelated families with X linked mental retardation (XLMR) associated with cleft lip/palate (MIM 300263). Expression studies showed that this gene is ubiquitously transcribed, with strong expression of the mouse orthologue Phf8 in embryonic and adult brain structures. The coded PHF8 protein harbours two functional domains, a PHD finger and a JmjC (Jumonji-like C terminus) domain, implicating it in transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodelling. The association of XLMR and cleft lip/palate in these patients with mutations in PHF8 suggests an important function of PHF8 in midline formation and in the development of cognitive abilities, and links this gene to XLMR associated with cleft lip/palate. Further studies will explore the specific mechanisms whereby PHF8 alterations lead to mental retardation and midline defects.

  9. Genome-wide meta-analyses of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate identify six new risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kerstin U; Mangold, Elisabeth; Herms, Stefan; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Paul, Anna; Becker, Jessica; Herberz, Ruth; AlChawa, Taofik; Nasser, Entessar; Böhmer, Anne C; Mattheisen, Manuel; Alblas, Margrieta A; Barth, Sandra; Kluck, Nadine; Lauster, Carola; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf H; Hemprich, Alexander; Pötzsch, Simone; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Daratsianos, Nikolaos; Kreusch, Thomas; Murray, Jeffrey C; Marazita, Mary L; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scott, Alan F; Beaty, Terri H; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Wienker, Thomas F; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P; Rubini, Michele; Mossey, Peter A; Hoffmann, Per; Lange, Christoph; Cichon, Sven; Propping, Peter; Knapp, Michael; Nöthen, Markus M

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted the first meta-analyses for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) using data from the two largest genome-wide association studies published to date. We confirmed associations with all previously identified loci and identified six additional susceptibility regions (1p36, 2p21, 3p11.1, 8q21.3, 13q31.1 and 15q22). Analysis of phenotypic variability identified the first specific genetic risk factor for NSCLP (nonsyndromic cleft lip plus palate) (rs8001641; PNSCLP = 6.51 × 10−11; homozygote relative risk = 2.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.84–3.16). PMID:22863734

  10. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  11. Myofibroma in the palm presenting with median nerve compression symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Heidi; Kulber, David A

    2014-08-01

    A myofibroma is a benign proliferation of myofibroblasts in the connective tissue. Solitary myofibromas are a rare finding especially in an adult. We report a case of a 23-year-old man presenting with an enlarging mass over his right palm. The patient is an active weight lifter. He reported numbness and tingling in the median nerve distribution. Nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging scans suggested a tumor involving or compressing the median nerve. The final diagnosis of myofibroma was made only after the histopathological diagnosis.

  12. Tendon transfers for radial and median nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H

    2005-01-01

    Paralysis or irreparable injury to the radial or median nerve results in considerable impairment of hand function that directly affects activities of daily living. Radial nerve loss prevents wrist and digit extension, which hinders object acquisition and release. Median nerve loss deprives the hand of thumb function, especially opposition, which impedes prehension. Tendon transfers to restore function are indicated when nerve recovery is no longer expected. Tendon transfer can re-establish active movement and enhance function. The maximum benefit after tendon transfer, however, requires a close working relationship among patient, therapist, and physician. This article will highlight the surgical principles and rehabilitative process to achieve this goal.

  13. [Case of median nerve paralysis after hepatic segmentectomy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Tanaka, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of a median nerve palsy. Hepatic segmentectomy and lymphnode dissection were performed in a 21-year-old man for multiple liver and retroperitoneal lymph nodes metastasis of seminoma. After surgery, patient complained of motor paralysis and hypesthesia of the left palm side of the thumb, first finger and radial half of the middle finger. He was diagnosed as having median nerve palsy. Motor paralysis and hypesthesia gradually disappeared over the two weeks after surgery. We should pay attention to appropriate positioning of the arm during surgery, and preoperative use of paclitaxel needs to be considered as etiology for perioperative peripheral nerve palsy.

  14. Virtual & Real Face to Face Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teneqexhi, Romeo; Kuneshka, Loreta

    2016-01-01

    In traditional "face to face" lessons, during the time the teacher writes on a black or white board, the students are always behind the teacher. Sometimes, this happens even in the recorded lesson in videos. Most of the time during the lesson, the teacher shows to the students his back not his face. We do not think the term "face to…

  15. Early hard palate closure using a vomer flap in unilateral cleft lip and palate: effects on cleft width.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Johanna P; Breugem, Corstiaan C

    2014-05-01

    Although no universal consensus exists on treatment of cleft palates, early hard palate closure is commonly performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of a vomer flap for early hard palate closure on residual palatal cleft width in patients with a unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP). Forty-seven UCLP patients were retrospectively divided into two groups. Group A consisted of 25 patients who underwent early lip closure and simultaneous hard palate closure using a vomer flap. Group B included 22 patients who had lip closure only at first surgery. Palatal cleft widths of both groups were measured at two time points and were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test to examine the influence of vomerplasty in this very early stage. No significant difference of baseline characteristics between the groups was found, and comparison of age at the time of surgeries was not significantly different. Mean age at the time of vomerplasty was 4.0 months. After the first surgery, a significantly greater total cleft width reduction of 5.0 mm average was found in group A compared to only 1.5 mm reduction in group B. This reduction took place after an average of 7.1 and 7.0 months, respectively. Lip closure accompanied by early hard palate closure using a vomer flap is associated with a significant postoperative reduction of the residual cleft when compared to lip closure only. This study shows another great advantage of performing early hard palate closure using a vomer flap.

  16. Reaction to the birth of a child with cleft lip or cleft palate in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mzezewa, S; Muchemwa, F C

    2010-07-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is often a distressful abnormality for both mother and child. In our setting, CLP is generally associated with witchcraft or ancestral spirits. The mother is often accused of infidelity during pregnancy. We wanted to determine the feelings of parents and the wider public towards CLP babies, to establish what parents believed were the causes of CLP and to establish the postpartum marital status. One hundred and twenty-four parents were prospectively included in the study. They were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. One hundred and fifteen mothers and four fathers said they loved their babies. Thirty-eight parents attributed CLP to witchcraft. Nineteen percent of the mothers were divorced. The responses to our questionnaire show that although CLP babies are loved by their parents, the condition is associated with stigma and superstition.

  17. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    PubMed

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: Imaging for the Prenatal Period and throughout Life.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Zachary R; Peacock, Zachary S; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in prenatal imaging have made possible the in utero diagnosis of cleft lip and palate and associated deformities. Postnatal diagnosis of cleft lip is made clinically, but imaging still plays a role in detection of associated abnormalities, surgical treatment planning, and screening for or surveillance of secondary deformities. This article describes the clinical entities of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate and documents their prenatal and postnatal appearances at radiography, ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and computed tomography (CT). Imaging protocols and findings for prenatal screening, detection of associated anomalies, and evaluation of secondary deformities throughout life are described and illustrated. CLP and isolated cleft palate are distinct entities with shared radiologic appearances. Prenatal US and MR imaging can depict clefting of the lip or palate and associated anomalies. While two- and three-dimensional US often can depict cleft lip, visualization of cleft palate is more difficult, and repeat US or fetal MR imaging should be performed if cleft palate is suspected. Postnatal imaging can assist in identifying associated abnormalities and dentofacial deformities. Dentofacial sequelae of cleft lip and palate include missing and supernumerary teeth, oronasal fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hearing loss, maxillary growth restriction, and airway abnormalities. Secondary deformities can often be found incidentally at imaging performed for other purposes, but detection is necessary because they may have considerable implications for the patient.

  19. Can we predict a difficult intubation in cleft lip/palate patients?

    PubMed

    Arteau-Gauthier, Isabelle; Leclerc, Jacques E; Godbout, Audrey

    2011-10-01

    To find predictors of a difficult intubation in infants with an isolated or a syndromic cleft lip/palate. Retrospective review: single-blind trial. Tertiary care centre. A total of 145 infants born with cleft lip/palate were enrolled. Three clinical and seven lip/palate anatomic parameters were evaluated. The grade of intubation was determined by the anesthesiologist at the time of the labioplasty/staphylorrhaphy surgery at 3 and 10 months, respectively. Intubation grade. The relative risk of a difficult intubation in the cleft lip, cleft palate without the Pierre Robin sequence, cleft lip-palate, and cleft palate with Pierre Robin sequence groups was 0, 2.7, 10, and 23%, respectively. The infants born with the Pierre Robin sequence had a statistically significant higher intubation grade. The degree of difficulty was increased in cases with early airway and feeding problems (p < .0001). Within the group of cleft palate patients without any lip malformation, a wider cleft was associated with a higher intubation grade with statistical significance (p  =  .0323). Infants born with Pierre Robin sequence have a statistically significantly higher risk of difficult intubation. Within this group, of all the studied factors, a clinical history of early airway and feeding problems was the best predictor of a difficult endotracheal intubation. In cleft palate patients without any cleft lip, larger width of the cleft is also a significant predictor.

  20. Prevention of orofacial clefts caused by smoking: implications of the Surgeon General's report.

    PubMed

    Honein, Margaret A; Devine, Owen; Grosse, Scott D; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2014-11-01

    According to the 2014 Surgeon General's Report, smoking in early pregnancy can cause orofacial clefts. We sought to examine the implications of this causal link for the potential prevention of orofacial clefts in the United States. Using published data on the strength of the association between orofacial clefts and smoking in early pregnancy and the prevalence of smoking at the start of pregnancy, we estimated the attributable fraction for smoking as a cause of orofacial clefts. We then used the prevalence of orofacial clefts in the United States to estimate the number of orofacial clefts that could be prevented in the United States each year by eliminating exposure to smoking during early pregnancy. We also estimated the financial impact of preventing orofacial clefts caused by maternal smoking based on a published estimate of attributable healthcare costs through age 10 for orofacial clefts. The estimated attributable fraction of orofacial clefts caused by smoking in early pregnancy was 6.1% (95% uncertainty interval 4.4%, 7.7%). Complete elimination of smoking in early pregnancy could prevent orofacial clefts in approximately 430 infants per year in the United States, and could save an estimated $40.4 million in discounted healthcare costs through age 10 for each birth cohort. Understanding the magnitude of the preventable burden of orofacial clefts related to maternal smoking could help focus smoking cessation efforts on women who might become pregnant. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Occlusal Disorders among Patients with Total Clefts of Lip, Alveolar Bone, and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska-Stolarz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Clefts are common birth defects. They are accompanied by various malformations, including disturbances in facial look as well as skeletal disorders that include malocclusions, most frequently crossbites and class III anomalies. The aim of the study was to present the commonest malocclusions in patients with total cleft of the lip, alveolar bone and palate (n = 154) and compare the results to the healthy on-cleft patients (n = 151). Normal occlusion, characteristic for I angle class, was observed in 50% of the control group and 30% of the examined. In the examined patients with clefts, most frequently crossbite and open bite on the cleft side was observed. In patients with clefts, only 2 out of 154 patients presented isolated dental anomalies. In healthy individuals the commonest occlusal disorder was distal occlusion and dental anomalies. The commonest malocclusions among patients with clefts are crossbites and class III malocclusions. PMID:24982898

  2. Anesthetic Techniques and Perioperative Complications of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Surgery at Srinagarind Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bunsangjaroen, Piyaporn; Thongrong, Cattleya; Pannengpetch, Patt; Somsaad, Supakorn; Rojanapithayakorn, Nonthida; Polsena, Lumpai; Litu, Duangnate; Sriraj, Wimonrat; Kasemsiri, Pornthep

    2015-08-01

    Cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP) are common craniofacial abnormalities with an incidence of around 1:800. Surgical are corrections often performed during the first year of life. These patients have risks for difficult intubation and various perioperative complications due to their young age and craniofacial abnormalities. The purpose of the retrospective descriptive study is to report the data of anesthetic techniques and complications of repairing CLCP in Srinagarind Hospital. These results could improve the caring and services for these groups of patients. Data was retrieved from anesthetic records of patients undergoing correction of CLCP from the period January 2005 to January 2009. Demographic data, clinical diagnosis, type operation, anesthetic technique, total opiod were analyzed using direct laryngoscopic view, grading intubation, method of intubation, and as well perioperative complications were also analyzed. A total of 469 anesthetic records were obtained. The most common type of CLCP was unilateral side (45.48%). The highest incidence of difficult intubation was found in the CP and unilateral CLCP subgroup (4.48% and 4.48%, respectively). All patients were successfully intubated with a stylet except one patient, in whom retrograde intubation was used. Perioperative complications included desaturation, reintubation, postoperative bleeding, and post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). And the highest incidence of PONV was found in the CP (8.95%). Correlation between fentanyl using and postoperative desaturation was statistically significant when multivariate analysis was used (OR = 1.2; p = 0.01). Patients with unilateral CLCP or CP had a higher risk for difficult intubation. Fortunately, all of the patients were successfully intubated with advanced anesthetists' skill. Long operative periods and a large dose of opioid could contribute to the postoperative desaturation and PONV.

  3. Transforming growth factor beta-3 and environmental factors and cleft lip with/without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zeqiang; Huang, Chengle; Ding, Kaihong; Lin, Jianyan; Gong, Binzhong

    2010-07-01

    To identify the interactions among two loci (C641A and G15572-) of transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGFbeta3), and exposures in pregnancy with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P), a hospital-based case-control study was conducted. Associations among offspring polymorphisms of TGFbeta3 C641A and G15572-, paternal smoking, paternal high-risk drinking, maternal passive smoking, and maternal multivitamin supplement with CL/P were analyzed by logistic regression analysis, and the results showed that maternal passive smoking exposures and maternal multivitamin use were associated with the risk of CL/P but offspring polymorphisms of TGFbeta3 C641A and G15572-, paternal smoking, and paternal high-risk drinking were not. Interactions among these variables were analyzed using the multifactor dimensionality reduction method, and the results showed that the two-factor model, including maternal passive smoking and TGFbeta3 C641A, among all models evaluated had the best ability to predict CL/P risk with a maximum cross-validation consistency (9/10) and a maximum average testing accuracy (0.5892; p = 0.0010). These findings suggested that maternal passive smoking exposure is a risk factor for CL/P, whereas maternal multivitamin supplement is a protective factor. The polymorphism of TGFbeta3 C641A participates in interaction effect for CL/P with environmental exposures, although the polymorphism was not associated with CL/P in single-locus analysis, and synergistic effect of TGFbeta3 C641A and maternal passive smoking could provide a new tool for identifying high-risk individuals of CL/P and also an additional evidence that CL/P is determined by both genetic and environmental factors.

  4. GFA Taq I polymorphism and cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) risk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijia; Ma, Lian

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) Taq I polymorphism has been indicated to be correlated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) susceptibility, but study results are still debatable. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. We conducted a comprehensive search of Embase, Ovid, Web of Science, the Cochrane database, PubMed, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM-disc, 1979-2014), the database of National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979-2014) and the full paper database of Chinese Science and Technology of Chongqing (VIP, 1989-2014) to identify suitable studies. There were 18 studies suitable for this meta-analysis, involving a total of 3135 cases and 3575 controls. Significantly increased CL/P risk was observed (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 1.17-1.89; P = 0.001). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, there was evidence in the Caucasian population for an association between this polymorphism and CL/P risk (OR = 1.52; 95% CI 1.14-2.02; P = 0.004). However, no significant association was found between this his polymorphism and CL/P risk in African and Hispanic populations. According to a specific CL/P type, increased clip lip and palate risk and clip palate risk were found (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.10-1.73; P = 0.005; OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.01-1.66; P = 0.042). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis found that the TGFA Taq I polymorphism may be associated with CL/P susceptibility. PMID:26064247

  5. Revisiting the Recurrence Risk of Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Cherise M.; Wang, Xiaojing; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Grubs, Robin E.; Costello, Bernard J.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Sub-epithelial defects (i.e. discontinuities) of the superior orbicularis oris (OO) muscle appear to be a part of the phenotypic spectrum of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL±P). Analysis of the OO phenotype as a clinical tool is hypothesized to improve familial recurrence risk estimates of CL±P. Study subjects (n=3912) were drawn from 835 families. Occurrences of CL±P were compared in families with and without members with an OO defect. Empiric recurrence risks were calculated for CL±P and OO defects among first degree relatives (FDRs). Risks were compared to published data and/or to other outcomes of this study using chi square or Fisher's exact tests. In our cohort, the occurrence of CL±P was significantly increased in families with OO defects versus those without (p < 0.01, OR = 1.74). The total FDR recurrence of isolated OO defects in this cohort is 16.4%; the sibling recurrence is 17.2%. The chance for one or more FDRs of a CL±P proband to have an OO defect is 11.4%; or 14.7% for a sibling. Conversely, the chance for any FDR of an individual with an OO defect to have CL±P is 7.3%; or for a sibling, 3.3%; similar to published recurrence risk estimates of nonsyndromic (NS) CL±P. This study supports sub-epithelial OO muscle defects as being part of the CL±P spectrum and suggests a modification to recurrence risk estimates of CL±P by utilizing OO defect information. PMID:20949506

  6. Revisiting the recurrence risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Cherise M; Wang, Xiaojing; Desensi, Rebecca S; Grubs, Robin E; Costello, Bernard J; Marazita, Mary L

    2010-11-01

    Sub-epithelial defects (i.e., discontinuities) of the superior orbicularis oris (OO) muscle appear to be a part of the phenotypic spectrum of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P). Analysis of the OO phenotype as a clinical tool is hypothesized to improve familial recurrence risk estimates of CL ± P. Study subjects (n = 3,912) were drawn from 835 families. Occurrences of CL ± P were compared in families with and without members with an OO defect. Empiric recurrence risks were calculated for CL ± P and OO defects among first-degree relatives (FDRs). Risks were compared to published data and/or to other outcomes of this study using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. In our cohort, the occurrence of CL ± P was significantly increased in families with OO defects versus those without (P < 0.01, OR = 1.74). The total FDR recurrence of isolated OO defects in this cohort is 16.4%; the sibling recurrence is 17.2%. The chance for one or more FDRs of a CL ± P proband to have an OO defect is 11.4%; or 14.7% for a sibling. Conversely, the chance for any FDR of an individual with an OO defect to have CL ± P is 7.3%; or for a sibling, 3.3%; similar to published recurrence risk estimates of nonsyndromic (NS) CL ± P. This study supports sub-epithelial OO muscle defects as being part of the CL ± P spectrum and suggests a modification to recurrence risk estimates of CL ± P by utilizing OO defect information. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. The Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale for 18-Year-Old Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: A Tool for Nasolabial Aesthetics Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mulder, F J; Mosmuller, D G M; de Vet, H C W; Mouës, C M; Breugem, C C; van der Molen, A B Mink; Griot, J P W Don

    2016-12-20

      To develop a reliable and easy-to-use method to assess the nasolabial appearance of 18-year-old patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP).   Retrospective analysis of nasolabial aesthetics using a 5-point ordinal scale and newly developed photographic reference scale: the Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale (CARS). Three cleft surgeons and 20 medical students scored the nasolabial appearance on standardized frontal photographs.   Medical Center X.   Inclusion criteria: 18-year-old patients, unilateral cleft lip and palate, available photograph of the frontal view. history of facial trauma, congenital syndromes affecting facial appearance. Eighty photographs were available for scoring.   The interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the CARS for 18-year-old patients when used by cleft surgeons and medical students.   The interobserver reliability for the nose and lip together was 0.64 for the cleft surgeons and 0.61 for the medical students. There was an intraobserver reliability of 0.75 and 0.78 from the surgeons and students, respectively, on the nose and lip together. No significant difference was found between the cleft surgeons and medical students in the way they scored the nose (P = 0.22) and lip (P = 0.72).   The Cleft Aesthetic Rating Scale for 18-year-old patients has a substantial overall estimated reliability when the average score is taken from three or more cleft surgeons or medical students assessing the nasolabial aesthetics of CLP patients.

  8. Treatment of 4-5 year old patients with cleft lip and cleft palate in Tawanchai Center: prevalence and type of associated malformations.

    PubMed

    Pradubwong, Suteera; Pongpagatip, Sumalee; Pathumwiwatana, Pornpen; Kiatchoosakun, Pakaphan; Panamonta, Manat; Chowchuen, Bowornsilp

    2014-10-01

    Patients with cleft lip/palate may have other associated malformations but the reported prevalence and type of associated malformations varied between different studies. To report the prevalence and the type of associated malformations in Northeastern Thai patients with cleft lip/palate. A retrospective study of 123 cleft lip/palate patients aged 4-5 years was carried out at the Tawanchai Cleft Center, Khon Kaen University during the periodfrom October to December 2011. Data were collected by reviewing the patients medical records. Seventeen (14%) of the 123patients had associated malformations. Four (21%) of the 19patients with cleft palate, eleven (15%) of the 74 patients with clefts lip and palate, and two (7%) of the 30 patients with cleft lip had associated malformations. The organ systems affected by associated malformations were cardiovascular system (41%), craniofacial anomaly (23%), skeletal system (12%), urogenital system (12%) and central nervous systemn (12%). Atrial septal defect and tetralogy ofFallot were most common associated cardiovascular malformation found. The high prevalence of associated malformationsfound in patients with cleft lip/palate emphasizes the needfor a thorough screening of associated malformations and congenital heart disease ofall cleft lip/palatepatients.

  9. Postoperative observation of children after endoscopic type 1 posterior laryngeal cleft repair.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathan S; Liu, Judy Z; Bhushan, Bharat; Holinger, Lauren D; Schroeder, James W

    2015-01-01

    To report the perioperative management and surgical outcomes in a large series of pediatric patients with endoscopically repaired type 1 posterior laryngeal cleft (PLC). Case series with chart review. Urban, tertiary care, free-standing pediatric hospital. Patients who underwent endoscopic carbon dioxide laser-assisted repair of type 1 posterior laryngeal clefts between January 2006 and December 2012. Medical records were reviewed. Fifty-four patients (34 male) underwent repair of type 1 PLC. Median age was 25.5 months (range, 2-120 months). Indications for repair included aspiration (n = 39; 72%), chronic bronchitis (n = 13; 24%), and stridor with feeds (n = 2; 4%). No children remained intubated postoperatively. Thirty-three patients (61%) stayed in overnight observation ("Obs PLC") and 21 patients (39%) stayed in the pediatric intensive care unit ("PICU PLC") postoperatively. Between Obs PLC and PICU PLC groups, there was no significant difference in age (mean 22 vs 30 months, respectively; P = .28). Comorbidities were similar between the groups. Symptoms improved in 41 of the 54 patients (76%). No postoperative complications were noted. Two patients required revision PLC repair. The cost of admitting a patient to a lower acuity location was estimated to be 60% less per day than cost of a PICU admission. The endoscopic surgical repair of a type 1 PLC is successful and has a low morbidity and complication rate. Patients may be safely managed in an observation unit and without postoperative intubation. This approach achieved a marked cost reduction in postoperative care. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  10. Elementary School Teachers' Understanding of the Mean and Median

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a snapshot of elementary school teachers' understanding of the mean and median. The research is presented in light of recent work regarding preservice teachers' understanding of the mean. Common misconceptions are identified which lead to potential implications for teacher preparation programs. One of the primary concerns…

  11. Mean, Median and Mode from a Decision Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Melinda Miller; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The classroom activity described here allows mathematically mature students to explore the role of mean, median and mode in a decision-making environment. While students discover the importance of choosing a measure of central tendency, their understanding of probability distributions, maximization, and prediction is reinforced through active…

  12. A Nonparametric Test for Equality of Survival Medians

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Chen, Zhongxue; Jeon, Sangchoon; Gardiner, Joseph C.; Ning, Jing

    2014-01-01

    In clinical trials researchers often encounter testing for equality of survival medians across study arms based on censored data. Even though Brookmeyer-Crowley (BC) introduced a method for comparing medians of several survival distributions, still some researchers misuse procedures which are designed for testing the homogeneity of survival curves. These procedures include the log-rank, Wilcoxon, and the Cox model. This practice leads to inflation of the probability of a type I error, particularly when the underlying assumptions of these procedures are not met. We propose a new nonparametric method for testing the equality of several survival medians based on Kaplan-Meier estimation from randomly right censored data. We derive asymptotic properties of this test statistic. Through simulations we compute and compare the empirical probabilities of type I errors and power of this new procedure with that of the Brookmeyer-Crowley (BC), the log-rank and the Wilcoxon method. Our simulation results indicate that performance of these test procedures depends on the level of censoring and appropriateness of the underlying assumptions. When the objective is to test homogeneity of survival medians rather than survival curves and the assumptions of these tests are not met, some of these procedures severely inflate the probability of a type I error. In these situations, our test statistic provides an alternative to the BC test. PMID:22302559

  13. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO TAKEN CIRCA 1909 SEEN FROM TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT CHANNING WAY LOOKING NW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Iatrogenic selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    A lesion of the median nerve may occur as a consequence of a compression by a haematoma or for a direct damage of the axons caused by a needle insertion. To date, no investigation reported a very selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow, with the suffering limited only to the fibres for the first digit. A 53 year-old left-handed violinist underwent an arterial blood gas drawing. The patient complained immediately of an electrical shock impression going down the arm, followed by pin sensation into the first finger. A tingling sensation associated with numbness in the first fingertip and difficulty in the index-thumb pinch became progressively evident. The ENG-EMG findings showed an impairment mainly of the sensory fibres innervating the first digit and a drop of the motor action potential amplitude when the nerve was stimulated at the elbow. We reported a very partial lesion of the left median nerve at the elbow in a violinist who had a selective involvement of the fibres for his first digit. Even minimal lesions of the median nerve may impair severely the quality of life of patients.

  15. Morphine and endorphins modulate dopamine turnover in rat median eminence.

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, S N; Swift, R M; Miller, R J

    1979-01-01

    The is evidence that some of the actions of both endogenous and exogenous opioids (e.g., stimulation of prolactin release) are mediated by interaction with catecholaminergic systems. Morphine (1.67, 5, and 15 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneally) altered dopamine turnover as measured by the alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine method in the median eminence, neostriatum, and frontal cortex of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The turnover rate of dopamine was reduced in the median eminence and frontal cortex but accelerated in the neostriatum. In the frontal cortex all doses were effective in decreasing dopamine turnover; however, in the median eminence the lowest dose of morphine did not significantly alter dopamine turnover. All three doses accelerated dopamine turnover in the neostriatum. Naloxone effectively reversed the effects of morphine at all doses in all brain areas, whereas it had no effect on turnover when given alone. In the median eminence, neostriatum, and frontal cortex, intraventricular injection of [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]-enkephalin (25 micrograms) or beta-endorphin (15 micrograms) produced the same effects on dopamine turnover as morphine. The actions of these peptides were blocked by naloxone. It is hypothesized that opiates and opioid peptides increase prolactin release by reducing the activity of the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic system. PMID:288082

  16. Contralateral electrodiagnosis in patients with abnormal median distal sensory latency.

    PubMed

    Hoogstins, Charlotte E S; Becker, Stéphanie J E; Ring, David

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that electrodiagnostic evidence of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) on the contralateral, less-severe side correlates with disease severity. We retrospectively reviewed 285 adults that had bilateral electrodiagnostic testing and a median distal sensory latency (DSL) greater than 3.6 ms on at least one side. Variables associated with abnormal contralateral median DSL were analyzed in bivariable and multivariable analysis. Patients with a nonrecordable median DSL on the worst side were significantly more likely to have electrodiagnostic evidence of contralateral CTS compared to patients with a prolonged DSL on the worst side (90 versus 65 %, respectively; p < 0.001). Bilateral symptoms were reported by 75 % of patients. The best logistic regression model for electrodiagnostic evidence of contralateral CTS included nonrecordable median DSL of the worst side and polyneuropathy (p < 0.001 and p = 0.14, respectively). The finding that disease severity relates to the probability of contralateral abnormalities is consistent with the concept that CTS is typically bilateral. Patients with CTS on one side should be advised of the likelihood that it can be present or may develop on the other side.

  17. VIEW OF STONE STAIR DETAIL IN MEDIAN FROM WEST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF STONE STAIR DETAIL IN MEDIAN FROM WEST SIDE OF PIEDMONT NORTH OF BANCROFT WAY LOOKING TOWARDS CALIFORNIA MEMORIAL STADIUM TO THE EAST. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 16, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Revision of the Solanum medians complex (Solanum section Petota)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solanum medians is a widely distributed wild potato species growing along the coast and along the western slopes of the Andes from central Peru and northern Chile, from along the coastal lomas near sea level to 3800 m. Fertile diploid and triploid cytotypes are common, are believed to associated wit...

  19. A mutation in RYK is a genetic factor for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Akita, Sadanori; Tin, Nguyen Thi Duc; Natsume, Nagato; Nakano, Yoko; Niikawa, Norio; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro

    2006-05-01

    The RYK, EPHB2, and EPHB3 genes are attractive candidates for cleft lip and/or palate and cleft palate only pathogenesis. Both the Ryk-deficient mouse and Ephb2/Ephb3 (genes for interaction molecules with RYK) double-mutant mouse show cleft palate. Mutation searches for RYK, EPHB2, and EPHB3 were carried out in a large number of Japanese and Vietnamese patients with cleft lip and/or palate and cleft palate only. Case-control study and transmission disequilibrium tests were performed also, using three single nucleotide polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block in RYK. Seven haplotypes were constructed from the single nucleotide polymorphisms. A missense mutation, 1355G>A (Y452C), in RYK was identified in one Vietnamese patient with cleft lip and/or palate. This mutation was not found among 1646 Vietnamese, Japanese, and Caucasians, including 354 cleft lip and/ or palate and cleft palate only patients. Colony formation assay using NIH3T3 cells transfected with mutant cDNA revealed that mutant RYK had significantly reduced protein activity, compared with those with wild-type RYK, implying that the transformation ability of RYK is depleted by this mutation. Although a case-control study and transmission disequilibrium tests on three individual single nucleotide polymorphisms provided no evidence for association with oral clefts, a case-control study on one rare haplotype suggested a positive association in Japanese patients with cleft lip and/or palate and cleft palate only. No mutations in EPHB2 and EPHB3 were found in any patients examined. The findings suggested that a missense mutation, 1355G>A, and one rare single nucleotide polymorphisms haplotype may play a role in the development of cleft lip and/or palate in the Vietnamese, and cleft lip and/ or palate and cleft palate only in the Japanese.

  20. Dynamic epithelia of the developing vertebrate face.

    PubMed

    Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J Gage

    2015-06-01

    A segmental series of endoderm-derived pouch and ectoderm-derived cleft epithelia act as signaling centers in the developing face. Their precise morphogenesis is therefore essential for proper patterning of the vertebrate head. Intercellular adhesion and polarity are highly dynamic within developing facial epithelial cells, with signaling from the adjacent mesenchyme controlling both epithelial character and directional migration. Endodermal and ectodermal epithelia fuse to form the primary mouth and gill slits, which involves basement membrane dissolution, cell intercalations, and apoptosis, as well as undergo further morphogenesis to generate the middle ear cavity and glands of the neck. Recent studies of facial epithelia are revealing both core programs of epithelial morphogenesis and insights into the coordinated assembly of the vertebrate head.