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Sample records for median cleft face

  1. [Median cleft of the upper lip. Apropos of 3 cases. The Association for the Study of Facial Clefts].

    PubMed

    Vanrenterghem, L; Joly, B; Podvin, A; Poupart; Bayart, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors report three cases of Median Cleft of the upper lip, a clinical entity really deserving the term of "hare lip", a very ancient denomination who dates back to the Tang Dynasty and unfairly used to describe the usual lateral clefts of the lip. The denominations of "true" and "false" median cleft lips recovering respectively such different embryopathic realities as clefts of the median element with varying degrees of vertical separation and as agenesis of the fronto-nasal process accompanied with cerebral anomalies are no more used now. Median clefts of the upper lip can be included in the "neurocristopathies" by less or more precocious dysneurulation of the fronto-nasal process creating anomalies from various single midline defects of the upper lip of our three cases, to associated midline defects like in the Median Cleft face syndrome (fronto-nasal dysplasia) described by De Myer and Sedano to holoprosencephaly (arhinencephaly), which are rarely associated.

  2. Frontonasal dysplasia (Median cleft face syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Seema; Sharma, Vipin; Bothra, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of a rare case of frontonasal dysplasia (FND) in a full-term girl with birth weight of 2.750 kg. The baby had the classical features of FND. There were no other associated anomalies. There was no history of consanguinity and no family history of similar conditions. So inheritance of this case could be considered sporadic. Maxillofacial surgery should be considered for all patients for whom improvement is possible. However, in developing countries where there are considerable limitations in provision of social services, with economic and educational constraints, correction of such major defects remains a challenging task. PMID:22346197

  3. Quantitative analysis of orofacial development and median clefts in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Allyson E; Dickinson, Amanda J

    2014-05-01

    Xenopus has become a useful tool to study the molecular mechanisms underlying orofacial development. However, few quantitative analyses exist to describe the anatomy of this region. In this study we combine traditional facial measurements with geometric morphometrics to describe anatomical changes in the orofacial region during normal and abnormal development. Facial measurements and principal component (PC) analysis indicate that during early tadpole development the face expands primarily in the midface region accounting for the development of the upper jaw and primary palate. The mouth opening correspondingly becomes flatter and wider as it incorporates the jaw elements. A canonical variate analysis of orofacial and mouth opening shape emphasized that changes in the orofacial shape occur gradually. Orofacial anatomy was quantified after altered levels of retinoic acid using all-trans retinoic acid or an inhibitor of retinoic acid receptors or by injecting antisense oligos targeting RALDH2. Such perturbations resulted in major decreases in the width of the midface and the mouth opening illustrated in facial measurements and a PC analysis. The mouth opening shape also had a gap in the primary palate resulting in a median cleft in the mouth opening that was only illustrated quantitatively in the morphometric analysis. Finally, canonical and discriminant function analysis statistically distinguished the orofacial and mouth opening shape changes among the different modes used to alter retinoic acid signaling levels. By combining quantitative analyses with molecular studies of orofacial development we will be better equipped to understand the complex morphogenetic processes involved in palate development and clefting.

  4. Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome associated with unique cleft palate: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Holla, Goda; Ramakrishna, Yeluri; Holla, Anup; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2014-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome is a rare dental anomaly that affects 1:50,000 live births. SMMCI syndrome is characterized by the presence of a single central incisor located on the maxillary midline in both primary and permanent dentitions. It may occur as an isolated finding or in association with developmental defects and systemic involvement. Congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI syndrome can include short stature, mild forms of deviation in craniofacial morphology, mild to severe intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, and cleft lip and/or palate. This report describes a clinical case of a 7-year-old girl with SMMCI syndrome--in addition to bilateral residual cleft and associated nasal regurgitation--that was treated with a removable maxillary obturator.

  5. A case of false median cleft of upper lip with IV-A holoprosencephaly that underwent cheiloplasty at 2.5 years of age.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, J; Arai, N; Kiyosaki, I; Uzawa, N; Ishii, J; Yoshimasu, H; Amagasa, T

    2000-11-01

    Holoprosencephaly results from the incomplete development of midline structures within the cerebrum and encompasses a series of abnormalities of mid-facial development. Here, we report a case of male holoprosencephaly associated with false median cleft of upper lip. This patient belonged clinically to the DeMyer's group IV holoprosencephaly, semilobar type. An infant with this type of holoprosencephaly has been thought to die generally within 1 to 2 years after birth and to rarely benefit from an operation. In this case, the patient had cheiloplasty at the age of 2.5 years at the request of his parents and he lives currently, being 3 years and 2 months old.

  6. Nonsyndromic Mandibular Symphysis Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Guttikonda, Leela Krishna; Nadella, Koteswara Rao; Uppaluru, Vijayalakshmi; Kodali, Rama Mohan; Nallamothu, Ranganadh

    2014-01-01

    Median cleft of lower lip and mandible is a rare congenital anomaly described as cleft number 30 of Tessier's classification. In minor forms only lower lip cleft is seen. We report the case of a patient with median cleft of lower lip, severe ankyloglossia, cleft of mandibular symphysis, and residual cleft involving on right soft palate and associated with other facial clefts. These deformities were corrected in multiple stage procedure, consisting of release of the tongue from floor of the mouth and lower alveolus and fixation of the mandibular cleft done with right iliac bone graft using stainless steel miniplate. PMID:24711928

  7. Tessier 30 facial cleft

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Nirmal C.; Kalita, Kabita; Gogoi, Manoj; Deuri, Pradip K.

    2012-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible and complete duplication of the tongue is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but complete duplication of the tongue as part of the Tessier 30 cleft is not yet reported. PMID:22529554

  8. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Age Support Resources Books for Kids and Adults Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area FAQs for Parents ... cleft palate, or both cleft lip and cleft palate. Cleft lip and cleft palate are congenital defects, or birth ...

  9. Craniofacial clefting and sutural dystopia.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Edwards, T J; David, D J

    1991-07-01

    Sutural anomalies in conjunction with craniofacial clefting are unusual. A case of median frontal clefting is presented in which there was an absence of a normal metopic suture and replacement by paramedian frontal sutures. The association of an underlying brain anomaly, with attendant surgical difficulties, is noted, as are the radiological techniques of preoperative diagnosis.

  10. Submucous Clefts

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a child is evaluated for a submucous cleft palate is abnormal nasal speech. Other symptoms may include persistent middle ear disease and feeding/swallowing difficulties. A submucous cleft palate may be identified by the presence of a ...

  11. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... and advocacy priorities National Network of Perinatal Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? ... how the body develops or how the body works. Cleft lip and cleft palate are common birth ...

  12. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... can breast-feed, a cleft palate may make sucking difficult. Ear infections and hearing loss. Babies with cleft palate are especially at risk of developing middle ear fluid and hearing loss. Dental problems. If the cleft extends through the upper gum, ...

  13. The role of folate metabolism in orofacial development and clefting.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Stacey E; Kennedy, Allyson E; Wyatt, Brent H; Moore, Alexander D; Pridgen, Deborah E; Cherry, Amanda M; Mavila, Catherine B; Dickinson, Amanda J G

    2015-09-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with numerous diseases and birth defects including orofacial defects. However, whether folate has a role in the face during early orofacial development has been unclear. The present study reveals that pharmacological and antisense oligonucleotide mediated inhibition of DHFR, an integral enzyme in the folate pathway, results in specific changes in the size and shape of the midface and embryonic mouth. Such defects are accompanied by a severe reduction in the muscle and cartilage jaw elements without significant change in neural crest pattern or global levels of methylation. We propose that the orofacial defects associated with DHFR deficient function are the result of decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death via DNA damage. In particular, localized apoptosis may also be depleting the cells of the face that express crucial genes for the differentiation of the jaw structures. Folate supplementation is widely known to reduce human risk for orofacial clefts. In the present study, we show that activating folate metabolism can reduce median oral clefts in the primary palate by increasing cell survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that a minor decrease in DHFR function exacerbates median facial clefts caused by RAR inhibition. This work suggests that folate deficiencies could be a major contributing factor to multifactorial orofacial defects.

  14. Tessier 30 Facial Cleft with Duplication of Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Jayanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and the neck with complete duplication of the tongue repaired at neonatal period is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but cleft of the neck with complete duplication of the tongue as a part of the Tessier 30 cleft is very rare. We could not find such report in the available English literature. PMID:28082778

  15. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    PubMed

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru.

  16. Cleft palate - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cleft palate ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cleft palate : Cleft Palate Foundation -- www.cleftline.org March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/professionals/14332_1210.asp ...

  17. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  18. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cleft Lip and Palate KidsHealth > For Teens > Cleft Lip and Palate Print ... slight scar on her upper lip. What Are Cleft Lip and Palate? Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that ...

  19. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. OBJECTIVES: To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. METHODS: A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. RESULTS: On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. CONCLUSIONS: The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory

  20. Cleft lip and palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001051.htm Cleft lip and palate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that affect the upper lip ...

  1. Cleft palate caused by congenital teratoma.

    PubMed

    Veyssière, Alexis; Streit, Libor; Traoré, Hamady; Bénateau, Hervé

    2017-02-01

    A cleft palate results from incomplete fusion of the lateral palatine processes, the median nasal septum and the median palatine process. This case report describes a rare case of congenital teratoma originating from the nasal septum that may have interfered with the fusion of the palatal shelves during embryonic development, resulting in a cleft palate. An infant girl was born at 40 weeks of gestation weighing 3020 g with a complete cleft palate associated with a large central nasopharyngeal tumour. Computed tomography (CT) of the head showed a well defined mass of mixed density. The tumour was attached to the nasal septum in direct contact with the cleft palate. A biopsy confirmed the teratoma. Tumour resection was performed at 5 months, soft palate reconstruction at 7 months and hard palate closure at 14 months. There was no sign of local recurrence 1 year later. Most teratomas are benign and the prognosis is usually good. However, recurrence is not rare if germ cell carcinomatous foci are present within the teratoma. For these reasons, we advocate the use of a two-stage procedure in which closure of the cleft palate is postponed until histological examination confirms complete excision of the teratoma.

  2. Cleft palate repair and variations

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon

    2009-01-01

    Cleft palate affects almost every function of the face except vision. Today a child born with cleft palate with or without cleft lip should not be considered as unfortunate, because surgical repair of cleft palate has reached a highly satisfactory level. However for an average cleft surgeon palatoplasty remains an enigma. The surgery differs from centre to centre and surgeon to surgeon. However there is general agreement that palatoplasty (soft palate at least) should be performed between 6-12 months of age. Basically there are three groups of palatoplasty techniques. One is for hard palate repair, second for soft palate repair and the third based on the surgical schedule. Hard palate repair techniques are Veau-Wardill-Kilner V-Y, von Langenbeck, two-flap, Aleveolar extension palatoplasty, vomer flap, raw area free palatoplasty etc. The soft palate techniques are intravelar veloplasty, double opposing Z-plasty, radical muscle dissection, primary pharyngeal flap etc. And the protocol based techniques are Schweckendiek's, Malek's, whole in one, modified schedule with palatoplasty before lip repair etc. One should also know the effect of each technique on maxillofacial growth and speech. The ideal technique of palatoplasty is the one which gives perfect speech without affecting the maxillofacial growth and hearing. The techniques are still evolving because we are yet to design an ideal one. It is always good to know all the techniques and variations so that one can choose whichever gives the best result in one's hands. A large number of techniques are available in literature, and also every surgeon incorporates his own modification to make it a variation. However there are some basic techniques, which are described in details which are used in various centres. Some of the important variations are also described. PMID:19884664

  3. Cleft Palate; A Multidiscipline Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Richard B., Ed.

    Nineteen articles present a multidisciplinary approach to the management of facial clefts. The following subjects are discussed: the history of cleft lip and cleft palate surgery; cogenital defects; classification; the operation of a cleft palate clinic; physical examination of newborns with cleft lip and/or palate; nursing care; anesthesia;…

  4. Branchial cleft cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... Branchial cleft cysts form during development of the embryo . They occur when tissues in the neck area ( ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 19. Read More Cyst Fetal development Review Date 11/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  5. Cleft Palate Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sequence, Crouzon Syndrome, and Treacher Collins Syndrome. Cleftline™ Bears Our Cleftline™ bears bring comfort to children with cleft lip and ... anxiety they experience from having facial differences. Each bear is custom-made with stitches across its upper ...

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate

    MedlinePlus

    ... that include feeding problems, middle ear fluid and hearing loss, dental problems, and speech problems. Feeding problems Have ... hearing problems Kids with cleft palate can have hearing loss . This may be caused by fluid building up ...

  7. Isolated Mitral Cleft in Trisomy 21: An Initially 'Silent' Lesion.

    PubMed

    Thankavel, Poonam P; Ramaciotti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cardiac anomalies are common in trisomy 21, and transthoracic echocardiogram within the first month of life is recommended. While a cleft mitral valve associated with atrioventricular septal defect has been well defined in this population, the prevalence of isolated mitral valve cleft has not been previously reported. The aim of our study was to define the occurrence of isolated mitral cleft in the first echocardiogram of patients with trisomy 21. This retrospective chart review examined echocardiographic data on all Trisomy 21 patients <1 year of age obtained during January 1, 2010, to May 1, 2014, at our institution. Images were reviewed by one of the authors with no knowledge of the official diagnosis. In addition to evaluation for isolated mitral valve cleft, data obtained included presence of additional congenital heart defects and need for surgical intervention. A total of 184 patients (median age 5 days) were identified. Isolated mitral cleft was identified in 12 patients (6.5 %). Four were diagnosed retrospectively (33 %). Only one had mitral regurgitation on initial echocardiogram. Seven required surgery for closure of ventricular septal defects. Isolated mitral cleft is present in an important number of neonates with Trisomy 21. Mitral regurgitation is often absent in the neonatal period and should not be used as a reliable indicator of absence of valve abnormality. Careful attention should be directed toward the mitral valve during the first echocardiogram to exclude an isolated cleft, which can lead to progressive mitral regurgitation.

  8. Definition of critical periods for Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced holoprosencephaly, cleft lip, and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Galen W; Melberg, Cal G; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Parins, Kia F; Kietzman, Henry W; Everson, Joshua L; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Lipinski, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO). Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD) 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in "non-syndromic" orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug.

  9. Prevalence, pattern and perceptions of cleft lip and cleft palate among children born in two hospitals in Kisoro District, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cleft lip with or without cleft palate is one of the most common congenital anomalies that affect the oro-facial region. The aim of the study was to determine the period prevalence, pattern and perceptions of cleft lip and cleft palate in children born between 2005 and 2010 in two hospitals in Kisoro District, Uganda. Methods The study involved a retrospective review of medical records of mothers who delivered live babies between January 2005 and December 2010 in Kisoro Hospital and St. Francis Hospital, Mutolere in Kisoro District. Key informant interviews of mothers (n = 20) of the children with cleft lip and/or clip palate and selected medical staff (n = 24) of the two hospitals were carried out. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Over the 6 year period, 25,985 mothers delivered live babies in Kisoro Hospital (n = 13,199) and St. Francis Hospital, Mutolere (n = 12,786) with 20 babies having oro-facial clefts. The overall period prevalence of the clefts was 0.77/1,000 live births. Sixty percent (n = 12) of children had combined cleft lip and palate and the same proportion had clefts on the left side of the face. More boys were affected than girls: 13 versus 7. About 45% of mothers were hurt on realizing that they had delivered a child with an oro-facial cleft. Forty percent of mothers indicated that a child with oro-facial cleft was regarded as an outcast. About 91.7% (n = 22) of the medical staff reported that these children were not accepted in their communities. Surgical intervention and psychosocial support were the management modalities advocated for by most respondents. Conclusion/recommendations The period prevalence of combined cleft lip and palate in two hospitals in Kisoro District was comparable to some findings elsewhere. Cleft lip and cleft palate are a medical and psychosocial problem in Kisoro District that calls for sensitization and counseling of the families and communities of the affected children

  10. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  11. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Bonegrafting the Cleft Maxilla skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Information for Parents & Individuals Bonegrafting the Cleft Maxilla To download the PDF version of this factsheet, ...

  12. Branchial Cleft Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Nahata, Vaishali

    2016-01-01

    Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity. PMID:27904209

  13. Intermediate and Definitive Cleft Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gary, Celeste; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2016-11-01

    Intermediate and definitive cleft rhinoplasties are a challenging part of definitive cleft care. The anatomy of the cleft nose is severely affected by the structural deficits associated with congenital orofacial clefting. A comprehensive understanding of the related anatomy is crucial for understanding how to improve the appearance and function in patients with secondary cleft nasal deformities. Timing of intermediate and definitive rhinoplasty should be carefully considered. A thorough understanding of advanced rhinoplasty techniques is an important part of providing adequate care for patients with these deformities.

  14. The Young Child with Cleft Lip and Palate: Intervention Needs in the First Three Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonson, Rebecca; Reinhartsen, Debra

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the multiple medical, dental, therapeutic, psychosocial, and early intervention needs faced by children with cleft lip and cleft plate during the first three years of life. The physiological development of children with these disabilities is described and the need for interdisciplinary team involvement is emphasized. (Author/CR)

  15. The cleft seal for bottle-feeding--A report on case studies.

    PubMed

    Dawjee, S M; Du Plessis, F

    2006-08-01

    Clefting of the lip and palate is the most frequent craniofacial malformation that occurs in newborn babies. The greatest immediate challenge facing a neonate with a cleft is to take nourishment. In developing countries and particularly in rural areas, palatal obturators and other aids that can assist in feeding are not easily available or accessible. The aim of this study was to develop, evaluate and report on the cleft seal, a simple and inexpensive device that is used with a feeding bottle to promote nourishment of a neonate with a cleft palate. The cleft seal is made of either silicone or thermoform plastic and consists of a spoon-like projection attached to a circular washer. The latter fits snugly between the teat base and collar of the feeding bottle, while the spoon-like projection forms a canopy over the teat and separates the nasal cavity from the mouth during feeding. Closure of the cleft emulates the natural feeding process and favours normal orofacial development. Results from this study indicate that there is an increase in nutritional intake over a shorter feeding time when using the cleft seal. Parents also report an absence of nasal regurgitation. The greatest advantage of the cleft seal lies in its negligible cost and ease of use, which can enable distribution and application in remote neonatal centres, where nursing and parental care givers are often at a loss as to what to do when faced with a newborn with a cleft palate.

  16. Anomalous median nerve associated with persistent median artery.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Chikwe, J; Evans, S E

    1994-01-01

    A right human forearm showed persistence of the median artery in combination with anomalies of the median nerve and of the palmar circulation. The median nerve formed a ring enclosing the median artery, gave off its 3rd palmar digital branch in the forearm, and had a high palmar cutaneous nerve origin and a double thenar supply. The superficial palmar arch was incomplete. The median artery extended into the hand, providing the 2nd common palmar digital artery and the artery to the radial side of the index finger. It anastomosed with the radial artery in the 1st web space. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7961153

  17. Closing the cleft over a throbbing heart: neonatal sternal cleft

    PubMed Central

    J, Ashok Raja; G, Mathevan; K, Mathiarasan; P, Ramasubramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Sternal cleft is a rare anomaly comprising 0.5% of chest wall malformations. We present a case of a neonate with a ‘V’-shaped upper partial sternal cleft at birth. A hyperpigmented cutaneous nevi was present over the cleft. Primary approximation and closure of the defect was performed at 1 week of life. We discuss the presentation and management, and review the literature. PMID:25100810

  18. Bilateral cleft lip.

    PubMed

    Mulliken, John B

    2004-04-01

    The surgeon's objectives are normal nasolabial appearance and normal speech. The principles for synchronous repair of bilateral cleft lip have been established, and the techniques continue to evolve. Primary repair impairs maxillary growth, but little can be done at this time except to practice gentle craftsmanship and to minimize tension on the lower labial closure. The cutaneous lip should never be reopened for revision, and the number of secondary procedures involving the nasal cartilages should be kept to a minimum. Many adolescents with repaired bilateral cleft lip need maxillary advancement to improve projection of the nasal tip, to protrude the upper lip, and to attain normal sagittal skeletal harmony. With expected improvements in the technology of distraction osteogenesis, maxillary advancement may someday become as acceptable as orthodontic treatment.

  19. Cleft Nasal Deformity and Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoav; Buchanan, Edward P.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Stal, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The cleft nasal deformity is a complex challenge in plastic surgery involving the skin, cartilage, mucosa, and skeletal platform. Ever since Blair and Brown first described the intricacies of the cleft pathology in 1931, the appropriate approach has been extensively debated in the literature with respect to timing, technique, and extent of surgical intervention. In this article, the authors review the literature and summarize the various modalities for achieving a successful rhinoplasty in the patient with a cleft nasal deformity. PMID:24179452

  20. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  1. Facial tissue depths in children with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) is a craniofacial malformation affecting more than seven million people worldwide that results in defects of the hard palate, teeth, maxilla, nasal spine and floor, and maxillodental asymmetry. CLP facial soft-tissue depth (FSTD) values have never been published. The purpose of this research is to report CLP FSTD values and compare them to previously published FSTD values for normal children. Thirty-eight FSTDs were measured on cone beam computed tomography images of CLP children (n = 86; 7-17 years). MANOVA and ANOVA tests determined whether cleft type, age, sex, and bone graft surgical status affect tissue depths. Both cleft type (unilateral/bilateral) and age influence FSTDs. CLP FSTDs exhibit patterns of variation that differ from normal children, particularly around the oronasal regions of the face. These differences should be taken into account when facial reconstructions of children with CLP are created.

  2. CLEFT PALATE. FOUNDATIONS OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUTHERFORD, DAVID; WESTLAKE, HAROLD

    DESIGNED TO PROVIDE AN ESSENTIAL CORE OF INFORMATION, THIS BOOK TREATS NORMAL AND ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, AND FUNCTION OF THE LIPS AND PALATE AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS TO CLEFT LIP AND CLEFT PALATE SPEECH. PROBLEMS OF PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT, HEARING, AND SPEECH IN CLEFT LIP OR CLEFT PALATE INDIVIDUALS ARE DISCUSSED. NASAL RESONANCE…

  3. Syndromes and anomalies associated with cleft

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, R.

    2009-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are one of the commonest birth defects, and may be associated with other congenital anomalies. The majority of these orofacial clefts are nonsyndromic. A significant percentage of these clefts both syndromic and non-syndromic may have associated anomalies. Apart from reviewing other studies, this article also analyses a study of associated anomalies from a tertiary cleft centre in India. PMID:19884681

  4. Molecular basis of cleft palates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft palate, including complete or incomplete cleft palates, soft palate clefts, and submucosal cleft palates, is the most frequent congenital craniofacial anomaly in humans. Multifactorial conditions, including genetic and environmental factors, induce the formation of cleft palates. The process of palatogenesis is temporospatially regulated by transcription factors, growth factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and membranous molecules; a single ablation of these molecules can result in a cleft palate in vivo. Studies on knockout mice were reviewed in order to identify genetic errors that lead to cleft palates. In this review, we systematically describe these mutant mice and discuss the molecular mechanisms of palatogenesis. PMID:26322171

  5. Cleft palate in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Joan M; Rosen, Heather; Desai, Urmen; Mulliken, John B; Meara, John G; Rogers, Gary F

    2009-09-01

    The frequency of associated cleft palate is known to be high in some fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Apert syndrome. However, there is little information on the frequency of palatal clefts in the FGFR2-mediated disorder, that is, Pfeiffer syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of palatal clefts in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome. The records of patients with Pfeiffer syndrome managed in our craniofacial unit were reviewed. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome were included. Diagnostic criteria were as follows: characteristic mutations in FGFR1 or FGFR2 or, in the absence of genetic testing, clinical findings consistent with Pfeiffer syndrome as determined by a clinical geneticist or our most experienced surgeon (J.B.M.). Only 2 clefts were noted in 25 patients (8%), including 1 with a submucous cleft and 1 with an overt palatal cleft. Many patients (87%) were described as having a high-arched and narrow palate, and 1 had a low, broad palate. Nine patients were noted to have choanal atresia or stenosis. Clefting of the palate does occur in Pfeiffer syndrome but at a low frequency.

  6. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  7. [Cleft lip and palate--problematic cleft speech].

    PubMed

    Hortis-Dzierzbicka, M A

    1999-01-01

    The early restoration of facial and palatal morphology in patients with cleft of lip and/or palate provides the anatomical base for good speech outcome. The author gives the up todate overview of the main problems concerning cleft speech, such as velopalatal insufficiency and typical articulation errors. The article describes the modern methods for the evaluation of VPI and current trends in treatment modalities for VPI.

  8. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  9. Lasers for median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Gilling, A P

    2001-08-01

    Laser treatment encompases a variety of techniques using different laser wavelengths, application systems, and surgical techniques to achieve contrasting tissue effects such as incision, resection, vaporization, or coagulation. Many studies have proven the clinical efficacy of the various laser techniques for the treatment of benign prostatiuc hyperplasia, including randomized studies versus transurethral prostatectomy (TURP). Recently, long-term follow-up of up to 5 years has demonstrated the durability of the results, although in some of the studies, retreatment rates were higher than after TURP. Median lobes were never seen as a contraindication for treatment in the laser based procedures. Technically, laser treatment techniques such as side-firing transurethral coagulation, contact- and free-beam laser vaporization, interstitial laser coagulation, and the holmium laser-based resection and enucleation are fully suitable for treatment of median lobes. Surprisingly, no studies focussing specifically on laser treatment of median lobes have been published.

  10. Non-Local Euclidean Medians.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Singer, Amit

    2012-11-01

    In this letter, we note that the denoising performance of Non-Local Means (NLM) can be improved at large noise levels by replacing the mean by the Euclidean median. We call this new denoising algorithm the Non-Local Euclidean Medians (NLEM). At the heart of NLEM is the observation that the median is more robust to outliers than the mean. In particular, we provide a simple geometric insight that explains why NLEM performs better than NLM in the vicinity of edges, particularly at large noise levels. NLEM can be efficiently implemented using iteratively reweighted least squares, and its computational complexity is comparable to that of NLM. We provide some preliminary results to study the proposed algorithm and to compare it with NLM.

  11. Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    Intended for parents of children with cleft lip and cleft palate, the booklet provides an overview of the condition. Addressed are the following topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): prenatal development and birth defects (facial development); possible causes of cleft lip/cleft palate (common misconceptions, genetic factors, environmental…

  12. Understanding Cleft and Craniofacial Team Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area Team Disclaimer States: ...

  13. Using frogs faces to dissect the mechanisms underlying human orofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Amanda J G

    2016-03-01

    In this review I discuss how Xenopus laevis is an effective model to dissect the mechanisms underlying orofacial defects. This species has been particularly useful in studying the understudied structures of the developing face including the embryonic mouth and primary palate. The embryonic mouth is the first opening between the foregut and the environment and is critical for adult mouth development. The final step in embryonic mouth formation is the perforation of a thin layer of tissue covering the digestive tube called the buccopharyngeal membrane. When this tissue does not perforate in humans it can pose serious health risks for the fetus and child. The primary palate forms just dorsal to the embryonic mouth and in non-amniotes it functions as the roof of the adult mouth. Defects in the primary palate result in a median oral cleft that appears similar across the vertebrates. In humans, these median clefts are often severe and surgically difficult to repair. Xenopus has several qualities that make it advantageous for craniofacial research. The free living embryo has an easily accessible face and we have also developed several new tools to analyze the development of the region. Further, Xenopus is readily amenable to chemical screens allowing us to uncover novel gene-environment interactions during orofacial development, as well as to define underlying mechanisms governing such interactions. In conclusion, we are utilizing Xenopus in new and innovative ways to contribute to craniofacial research.

  14. Using Frogs Faces to Dissect the Mechanisms Underlying Human Orofacial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Amanda J.G.

    2016-01-01

    In this review I discuss how Xenopus laevis is an effective model to dissect the mechanisms underlying orofacial defects. This species has been particularly useful in studying the understudied structures of the developing face including the embryonic mouth and primary palate. The embryonic mouth is the first opening between the foregut and the environment and is critical for adult mouth development. The final step in embryonic mouth formation is the perforation of a thin layer of tissue covering the digestive tube called the buccopharyngeal membrane. When this tissue does not perforate in humans it can pose serious health risks for the fetus and child. The primary palate forms just dorsal to the embryonic mouth and in non-amniotes it functions as the roof of the adult mouth. Defects in the primary palate result in a median oral cleft that appears similar across the vertebrates. In humans, these median clefts are often severe and surgically difficult to repair. Xenopus has several qualities that make it advantageous for craniofacial research. The free living embryo has an easily accessible face and we have also developed several new tools to analyze the development of the region. Further, Xenopus is readily amenable to chemical screens allowing us to uncover novel gene-environment interactions during orofacial development, as well as to define underlying mechanisms governing such interactions. In conclusion, we are utilizing Xenopus in new and innovative ways to contribute to craniofacial research. PMID:26778163

  15. TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting.

    PubMed

    Midro, A; Hubert, E; Preferansow, J; Iwaszkiewicz-Pawłowska, A

    1993-01-01

    A case of TAR syndrome with bilateral cleft lip and palate is presented. Bilateral symmetric focomelia, normal thumbs among five fingers of hands, synostosis of IVth and Vth metacarpal bones and some defects of lower limbs with associated thrombocytopenia were noted. Dysmorphic facial features included hypertelorism, epicanthus, blue sclerae, broad nasal root, micrognathia, low-set ears, sparse blond hair. To our knowledge this patient represents an unusual association of TAR syndrome with orofacial clefting. A common background of TAR and Roberts/SC syndrome is suggested.

  16. How to Feed Cleft Patient?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saima Yunus

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleft lip and palate patients have all rights like other normal individuals, to enjoy the benefits of nourishment. Knowledge has to be there about the different feeding positions like straddle, dancer hand position along with the use of specially designed bottles and nipples. Parent's should be trained about the correct positions of feeding, in extreme of the cases in which parents are not able to follow these instructions, feeding obturators can be given. How to cite this article: Jindal MK, Khan SY. How to Feed Cleft Patient? Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):100-103. PMID:25206201

  17. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  18. Prevalence of cleft lip and/or palate in children from Lodz between years 1981-2010.

    PubMed

    Antoszewski, Bogusław; Fijałkowska, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital malformations constitute a serious problem of both medical and social nature. Cleft lip and/or palate represent the most common congenital anomaly of the face that is why it is essential to know the real frequency of the described phenomenon. The aim of this paper is to determine the frequency of cleft lip and/or palate and the types of malformations that occurred in Lodz city between the years 1981-2010. Our clinic has been carrying on the studies concerning the incidence of cleft lip and/or palate since 1981. The Polish Registry of Congenital Malformations has been operating in Poland since 1 April 1997. The team has managed to obtain data, from the Registry, concerning the total number of all live born infants and the number of children with cleft lip and/or palate, who were born in Lodz, between 1998 and 2010. In years 1981-2010, 319 children, in 210 952 live born infants, were born with cleft lip and/or palate in Lodz. The isolated cleft palate was observed more frequently in girls and the unilateral cleft of lip and palate in boys. In all three decades palate clefts are more common whereas bilateral lip, alveolus and palate clefts are more infrequent. A small tendency to decrease in actual cleft lip and/or palate frequency among children, in the period of 30 years, is observed in Lodz. Over the years it has still been observed that the isolated cleft palate is the most common type of defect.

  19. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun Kumar; Nandini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM) too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it's management both at the time of cleft lip repair and also secondarily

  20. Cleft of the secondary palate without cleft lip diagnosed with three-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in a fetus with Fryns' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benacerraf, B R; Sadow, P M; Barnewolt, C E; Estroff, J A; Benson, C

    2006-05-01

    We present a case of Fryns' syndrome diagnosed prenatally using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A cleft of the soft palate was diagnosed using 3D thick-slice ultrasonography. Other sonographic findings included a right diaphragmatic hernia, enlarged echogenic kidneys and severe polyhydramnios. The detection of the cleft palate was instrumental in suggesting the diagnosis of Fryns' syndrome in a fetus which also had a diaphragmatic hernia. These findings were also demonstrated with prenatal MRI. The technique of imaging the soft palate en face using a thick-slice technique is presented.

  1. Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate--What to Know and Who Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Craniofacial defects such as cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common of all birth defects in the United States, with one in every 600 newborns affected. Cleft lip and/or palate can occur as an isolated condition or may be one component of an inherited disease or syndrome. Dealing with the condition is an extremely difficult and…

  2. [Cleft lip and palate in Campeche Mayas].

    PubMed

    Weiss, K M; Georges, E; Levy, B; Aguirre, A; Portilla, R J; Gaitán, C L; Leyva, E; Rodríguez, T

    1988-07-01

    It has been suggested that among American Indians, as in some genetically-related Asiatic ethnic groups, incidence of cleft lip and/or cleft palate is higher than among people of Caucasian extraction. Such hypothesis, plus growing demand for services observed at a center for the surgery of cleft lip and cleft palate in Campeche state, led the authors to undertake research among the Maya residents of that region. However, neither careful review of case histories nor field research performed in several Indian communities could confirm the hypothesis of a higher incidence among this ethnic community.

  3. Surgical correction of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Rahul; Huppa, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Surgical cleft repair aims to restore function of the oro-nasal sphincter and oro-nasal soft tissues and re-establish the complex relationship between perioral and perinasal muscle rings without compromising subsequent mid-facial growth and development. Here we review the surgical anatomy of this region, optimal timing for surgical repair and current thinking on the use of surgical adjuncts. In addition, an overview of current surgical techniques available for the repair of cleft lip, cleft palate and velopharyngeal insufficiency is presented. Finally, we briefly discuss nasal revision surgery and the use of osteotomy, including distraction osteogenesis in the cleft patient.

  4. Maiden morsel - feeding in cleft lip and palate infants

    PubMed Central

    Devi, E. Sree; Sai Sankar, A. J.; Manoj Kumar, M. G.; Sujatha, B.

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are the most common craniofacial anomalies that have an incidence of 0.28 to 3.74 per 1000 live births globally. Due to the great advancements in the field of medical science, these anomalies can today be corrected. However, it cannot be ignored that the parents of these patients may face psychological stress due to the cleft defects in the baby. Also, these conditions may cause financial difficulties to the parents and cause anxiety to the mother about the proper feeding of their infant. Feeding problems can range from excessive air intake to failure to thrive. As the management of such cases is lengthy and includes a multi-disciplinary team approach, it is the role of the Pediatrician/Pedodontist to educate the mother about the proper feeding techniques. In this article, we have reviewed and highlighted the various traditional and advanced devices and techniques which help in the successful management of these individuals. PMID:24478964

  5. Geometric median for missing rainfall data imputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Siti Nur Zahrah Amin; Deni, Sayang Mohd; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Missing data is a common problem faced by researchers in environmental studies. Environmental data, particularly, rainfall data are highly vulnerable to be missed, which is due to several reasons, such as malfunction instrument, incorrect measurements, and relocation of stations. Rainfall data are also affected by the presence of outliers due to the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall measurements. These problems may harm the quality of rainfall data and subsequently, produce inaccuracy in the results of analysis. Thus, this study is aimed to propose an imputation method that is robust towards the presence of outliers for treating the missing rainfall data. Geometric median was applied to estimate the missing values based on the available rainfall data from neighbouring stations. The method was compared with several conventional methods, such as normal ratio and inverse distance weighting methods, in order to evaluate its performance. Thirteen rainfall stations in Peninsular Malaysia were selected for the application of the imputation methods. The results indicated that the proposed method provided the most accurate estimation values compared to both conventional methods based on the least mean absolute error. The normal ratio was found to be the worst method in estimating the missing rainfall values.

  6. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date.

  7. International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Vincent K L; Lee, Seng-Teik T; Lambrecht, Thomas J; Barnett, John; Gorney, Mark; Hardjowasito, Widanto; Lemperle, Gottfried; McComb, Harold; Natsume, Nagato; Stranc, Mirek; Wilson, Libby

    2002-01-01

    The International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions was set up to provide a report to be presented at the Eighth International Congress of Cleft Palate and Associated Craniofacial Anomalies on September 12, 1997, in Singapore. The aim of the report was to provide data from a wide range of different international teams performing volunteer cleft missions and, thereafter, based on the collected data, to identify common goals and aims of such missions. Thirteen different groups actively participating in volunteer cleft missions worldwide were selected from the International Confederation of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's list of teams actively participating in volunteer cleft missions. Because of the time frame within which the committee had to work, three groups that did not respond by the stipulated deadline were omitted from the committee. The represented members and their respective institutions have undertaken more than 50 volunteer cleft missions to underdeveloped nations worldwide within the last 3 years. They have visited over 20 different countries, treating more than 3,500 patients worldwide. Based on the data collected and by consensus, the committee outlined recommendations for future volunteer cleft missions based on 1) mission objectives, 2) organization, 3) personal health and liability, 4) funding, 5) trainees in volunteer cleft missions, and 6) public relations. The task force believed that all volunteer cleft missions should have well-defined objectives, preferably with long-term plans. The task force also decided that it was impossible to achieve a successful mission without good organization and close coordination. All efforts should be made, and care taken, to ensure that there is minimal morbidity and no mortality. Finally, as ambassadors of goodwill and humanitarian aid, the participants must make every effort to understand and respect local customs and protocol. The main aims are to provide top-quality surgical service, train local

  8. Review of secondary alveolar cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Cho-Lee, Gui-Youn; García-Díez, Eloy-Miguel; Nunes, Richard-Agostinho; Martí-Pagès, Carles; Sieira-Gil, Ramón; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The alveolar cleft is a bony defect that is present in 75% of the patients with cleft lip and palate. Although secondary alveolar cleft repair is commonly accepted for these patients, nowadays, controversy still remains regarding the surgical technique, the timing of the surgery, the donor site, and whether the use of allogenic materials improve the outcomes. The purpose of the present review was to evaluate the protocol, the surgical technique and the outcomes in a large population of patients with alveolar clefts that underwent secondary alveolar cleft repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 109 procedures in 90 patients with alveolar cleft were identified retrospectively after institutional review board approval was obtained. The patients were treated at a single institution during a period of 10 years (2001-2011). Data were collected regarding demographics, type of cleft, success parameters of the procedure (oronasal fistulae closure, unification of the maxillary segments, eruption and support of anterior teeth, support to the base of the nose, normal ridge form for prosthetic rehabilitation), donor site morbidity, and complications. Pre- and postoperative radiological examination was performed by means of orthopantomogram and computed tomography (CT) scan. Results: The average patient age was 14.2 years (range 4–21.3 years). There were 4 right alveolar-lip clefts, 9 left alveolar-lip clefts, 3 bilateral alveolar-lip clefts, 18 right palate-lip clefts, 40 left palate-lip clefts and 16 bilateral palate-lip clefts. All the success parameters were favorable in 87 patients. Iliac crest bone grafts were employed in all cases. There were three bone graft losses. In three cases, allogenic materials used in a first surgery performed in other centers, underwent infection and lacked consolidation. They were removed and substituted by autogenous iliac crest bone graft. Conclusions: The use of autogenous iliac crest for secondary alveolar bone grafting

  9. Demographics of orofacial clefts in Canada from 2002 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Pavri, Sabrina; Forrest, Christopher R

    2013-03-01

    Objective : Orofacial clefts such as cleft lip, cleft palate, and cleft lip and palate are the most frequent congenital anomalies of the head and neck. The purpose of this study was to determine the current demographics for orofacial clefts in Canada. Methods : A request for data from all Canadian provinces (excluding Quebec due to incompatibilities with provincial coding systems) for the fiscal years 2002-2003 to 2007-2008 was submitted to the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Variables evaluated included gender, cleft type, gestational age, birth weight, income quintile, and institution health region. Results : Over the period studied, the prevalence of orofacial clefts ranged from 11.0 to 15.3 per 10,000 live births (1 in 654 to 1 in 909 live births). The distribution of cleft types for live births with orofacial clefts was 17% for cleft lip, 41% for cleft palate, and 42% for cleft lip and palate, of which cleft lip and cleft lip and palate were male dominant (62% and 66% male, respectively) and cleft palate was female dominant (56% female). Saskatchewan and Manitoba had significantly higher cleft birthrates (P < .05) compared with the other provinces. Birth weight and gestational age (but not income quintile) were significantly (P < .0001) lower for newborns with orofacial clefting compared with those with no cleft. Conclusions : Canada has one of the highest orofacial cleft birthrates in the world (prevalence of 12.7 per 10,000 live births, approximately 1 in 790 live births). This study presents an updated demographic of orofacial clefts in Canadian newborns and may be useful in predicting the burden of anticipated health care.

  10. Unusual facial cleft in Fryns syndrome: defect of stomodeum?

    PubMed

    Girisha, K M; Bhat, P; Adiga, P K; Pai, A H; Rai, L

    2010-01-01

    Unusual facial cleft in Fryns syndrome: defect of stomodeum?: We report on a fetus with Fryns syndrome. The facial cleft was unusual. There was bilateral cleft lip with cleft palate. The intermaxillary segment was connected through the base of a mound in the midline to the lower lip. We believe this is an atypical facial cleft in Fryns syndrome and likely represents a defective stomodeum.

  11. The Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study: expanding the cleft phenotype. Background and justification.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth M; Neiswanger, Katherine; Martin, Rick A; Mooney, Mark P; Kane, Alex A; Wenger, Sharon L; Losee, Joseph; Deleyiannis, Frederick; Ma, Lian; De Salamanca, Javier E; Czeizel, Andrew E; Marazita, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study was begun in 1993 with the primary goal of identifying genes involved in nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in a variety of populations worldwide. Based on the results from a number of pilot studies and preliminary genetic analyses, a new research focus was added to the Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study in 1999: to elucidate the role that associated phenotypic features play in the familial transmission patterns of orofacial clefts in order to expand the definition of the nonsyndromic cleft phenotype. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of phenotypic features associated with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. These features include fluctuating and directional asymmetry, non-right-handedness, dermatoglyphic patterns, craniofacial morphology, orbicularis oris muscle defects, dental anomalies, structural brain and vertebral anomalies, minor physical anomalies, and velopharyngeal incompetence.

  12. Adaptive marginal median filter for colour images.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Samuel; Gregori, Valentín; Sapena, Almanzor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new filter for impulse noise reduction in colour images which is aimed at improving the noise reduction capability of the classical vector median filter. The filter is inspired by the application of a vector marginal median filtering process over a selected group of pixels in each filtering window. This selection, which is based on the vector median, along with the application of the marginal median operation constitutes an adaptive process that leads to a more robust filter design. Also, the proposed method is able to process colour images without introducing colour artifacts. Experimental results show that the images filtered with the proposed method contain less noisy pixels than those obtained through the vector median filter.

  13. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  14. Dental anomalies inside the cleft region in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Jamile; Araújo, Luana; Guimarães, Laís; Maranhão, Samário; Lopes, Gabriela; Medrado, Alena; Coletta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with non syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL±P) present high frequency of dental anomalies, which may represent complicating factors for dental treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies inside cleft area in a group of Brazilians with NSCL±P. Material and Methods Retrospective analysis of 178 panoramic radiographs of patients aged from 12 to 45 years old and without history of tooth extraction or orthodontic treatment was performed. Association between cleft type and the prevalence of dental anomalies was assessed by chi-square test with a significance level set at p≤ 0.05. Results Dental anomalies were found in 88.2% (n=157) of the patients. Tooth agenesis (47.1%), giroversion (20%) and microdontia (15.5%) were the most common anomalies. Individuals with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (CLP, p<0.0001), bilateral complete CLP (p=0.0002) and bilateral incomplete CLP (p< 0.0001) were more affected by tooth agenesis than individuals with other cleft types. The maxillary lateral incisors were the most affected teeth (p<0.0001). Conclusions The present study revealed a high frequency of dental anomalies inside cleft region in NSCL±P patients, and further demonstrated that patients with unilateral complete CLP and bilateral incomplete CLP were frequently more affected by dental anomalies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that dental anomalies should be considered during dental treatment planning of individuals affected by NSCL±P. Key words:Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without palate, dental anomaly, tooth agenesis, microdontia. PMID:26615505

  15. Cleft lip and palate repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lip and palate Cleft lip and palate repair Review Date 5/9/2016 Updated by: David A. ... and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  16. Cleft Lip – A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Shkoukani, Mahdi A.; Chen, Michael; Vong, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts comprise a range of congenital deformities and are the most common head and neck congenital malformation. Clefting has significant psychological and socio- economic effects on patient quality of life and require a multidisciplinary team approach for management. The complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors play a significant role in the incidence and cause of clefting. In this review, the embryology, classification, epidemiology, and etiology of cleft lip are discussed. The primary goals of surgical repair are to restore normal function, speech development, and facial esthetics. Different techniques are employed based on surgeon expertise and the unique patient presentations. Pre-surgical orthopedics are frequently employed prior to definitive repair to improve outcomes. Long term follow up and quality of life studies are discussed. PMID:24400297

  17. Patterns of orofacial clefting in the facial morphology of bats: a possible naturally occurring model of cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Orr, David J A; Teeling, Emma C; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Finarelli, John A

    2016-11-01

    A normal feature of the facial anatomy of many species of bat is the presence of bony discontinuities or clefts, which bear a remarkable similarity to orofacial clefts that occur in humans as a congenital pathology. These clefts occur in two forms: a midline cleft between the two premaxillae (analogous to the rare midline craniofacial clefts in humans) and bilateral paramedian clefts between the premaxilla and the maxillae (analogous to the typical cleft lip and palate in humans). Here, we describe the distribution of orofacial clefting across major bat clades, exploring the relationship of the different patterns of clefting to feeding mode, development of the vomeronasal organ, development of the nasolacrimal duct and mode of emission of the echolocation call in different bat groups. We also present the results of detailed radiographic and soft tissue dissections of representative examples of the two types of cleft. The midline cleft has arisen independently multiple times in bat phylogeny, whereas the paramedian cleft has arisen once and is a synapomorphy uniting the Rhinolophidae and Hipposideridae. In all cases examined, the bony cleft is filled in by a robust fibrous membrane, continuous with the periosteum of the margins of the cleft. In the paramedian clefts, this membrane splits to enclose the premaxilla but forms a loose fold laterally between the premaxilla and maxilla, allowing the premaxilla and nose-leaf to pivot dorsoventrally in the sagittal plane under the action of facial muscles attached to the nasal cartilages. It is possible that this is a specific adaptation for echolocation and/or aerial insectivory. Given the shared embryological location of orofacial clefts in bats and humans, it is likely that aspects of the developmental control networks that produce cleft lip and palate in humans may also be implicated in the formation of these clefts as a normal feature in some bats. A better understanding of craniofacial development in bats with and

  18. Ocular Manifestations of Oblique Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Ortube, Maria Carolina; Dipple, Katrina; Setoguchi, Yoshio; Kawamoto, Henry K.; Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the Tessier classification, craniofacial clefts are numbered from 0 to 14 and extend along constant axes through the eyebrows, eyelids, maxilla, nostrils, and the lips. We studied a patient with bilateral cleft 10 associated with ocular abnormalities. Method Clinical report with orbital and cranial computed tomography. Results After pregnancy complicated by oligohydramnios, digoxin, and lisinopril exposure, a boy was born with facial and ocular dysmorphism. Examination at age 26 months showed bilateral epibulbar dermoids, covering half the corneal surface, and unilateral morning glory anomaly of the optic nerve. Ductions of the right eye were normal, but the left eye had severely impaired ductions in all directions, left hypotropia, and esotropia. Under anesthesia, the left eye could not be rotated freely in any direction. Bilateral Tessier cleft number 10 was implicated by the presence of colobomata of the middle third of the upper eyelids and eyebrows. As the cleft continued into the hairline, there was marked anterior scalp alopecia. Computed x-ray tomography showed a left middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst and calcification of the reflected tendon of the superior oblique muscle, trochlea, and underlying sclera, with downward and lateral globe displacement. Discussion Tessier 10 clefts are very rare and usually associated with encephalocele. Bilateral 10 clefts have not been reported previously. In this case, there was coexisting unilateral morning glory anomaly and arachnoid cyst of the left middle cranial fossa but no encephalocele. Conclusions Bilateral Tessier facial cleft 10 may be associated with alopecia, morning glory anomaly, epibulbar dermoids, arachnoid cyst, and restrictive strabismus. PMID:20856062

  19. Treatment of maxillary cleft palate: Distraction osteogenesis vs. orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rachmiel, Adi; Even-Almos, Michal; Aizenbud, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the treatment of hypoplastic, retruded maxillary cleft palate using distraction osteogenesis vs. orthognathic surgery in terms of stability and relapse, growth after distraction and soft tissue profile changes. Materials and Methods: The cleft patients showed anteroposterior maxillary hypoplasia with class III malocclusion and negative overjet resulting in a concave profile according to preoperative cephalometric measurements, dental relationship, and soft tissue analysis. The patients were divided in two groups of treatment : S0 eventeen were treated by orthognathic Le Fort I osteotomy fixed with four mini plates and 2 mm screws, and 19 were treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with rigid extraoral devices (RED) connected after a Le Fort I osteotomy. The rate of distraction was 1 mm per day to achieve Class I occlusion with slight overcorrection and to create facial profile convexity. Following a 10 week latency period the distraction devices were removed. Results: In the RED group the maxilla was advanced an average of 15.80 mm. The occlusion changed from class III to class I. The profile of the face changed from concave to convex. At a 1-year follow up the results were stable. The mean orthognathic movement was 8.4 mm. Conclusion: In mild maxillary deficiency a one stage orthognathic surgery is preferable. However, in patients requiring moderate to large advancements with significant structural deficiencies of the maxilla or in growing patients the distraction technique is preferred. PMID:23483803

  20. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  1. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  2. Prevalence at birth of cleft lip with or without cleft palate: data from the International Perinatal Database of Typical Oral Clefts (IPDTOC).

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    As part of a collaborative project on the epidemiology of craniofacial anomalies, funded by the National Institutes for Dental and Craniofacial Research and channeled through the Human Genetics Programme of the World Health Organization, the International Perinatal Database of Typical Orofacial Clefts (IPDTOC) was established in 2003. IPDTOC is collecting case-by-case information on cleft lip with or without cleft palate and on cleft palate alone from birth defects registries contributing to at least one of three collaborative organizations: European Surveillance Systems of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) in Europe, National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) in the United States, and International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Surveillance and Research (ICBDSR) worldwide. Analysis of the collected information is performed centrally at the ICBDSR Centre in Rome, Italy, to maximize the comparability of results. The present paper, the first of a series, reports data on the prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate from 54 registries in 30 countries over at least 1 complete year during the period 2000 to 2005. Thus, the denominator comprises more than 7.5 million births. A total of 7704 cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (7141 livebirths, 237 stillbirths, 301 terminations of pregnancy, and 25 with pregnancy outcome unknown) were available. The overall prevalence of cleft lip with or without cleft palate was 9.92 per 10,000. The prevalence of cleft lip was 3.28 per 10,000, and that of cleft lip and palate was 6.64 per 10,000. There were 5918 cases (76.8%) that were isolated, 1224 (15.9%) had malformations in other systems, and 562 (7.3%) occurred as part of recognized syndromes. Cases with greater dysmorphological severity of cleft lip with or without cleft palate were more likely to include malformations of other systems.

  3. Frontonasal and fibrous dysplasia in a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Albright, Steven B; Hollier, Larry H; Buchanan, Edward P

    2013-07-01

    Frontonasal dysplasia is a rare entity. It has characteristic physical deformities: hypertelorism, broad nasal root, median facial cleft of the upper lip or palate, clefting of the nasal alae, poorly formed nasal tip, cranium bifidum occultum, and a widow's peak hairline. Fibrous dysplasia is a benign bone tumor in which normal bone is replaced by fibrous, poorly formed osseus tissues. We present a patient with frontonasal dysplasia who desired correction of her hypertelorism. Incidentally, fibrous dysplasia was found in her left orbit complicating surgical correction. In addition, the patient has velopharyngeal insufficiency and a class III malocclusion. The interplay of all these craniofacial defects makes the sequencing and timing of surgery important in this unique patient.

  4. Perioperative complications in infant cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Homann, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Reich, Alexander; Joos, Ulrich; Werkmeister, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleft surgery in infants includes special risks due to the kind of the malformation. These risks can be attributed in part to the age and the weight of the patient. Whereas a lot of studies investigated the long-term facial outcome of cleft surgery depending on the age at operation, less is known about the complications arising during a cleft surgery in early infancy. Methods We investigated the incidence and severity of perioperative complications in 174 infants undergoing primary cleft surgery. The severity and the complications were recorded during the intraoperative and the early postoperative period according to the classification by Cohen. Results Our study revealed that minor complications occurred in 50 patients. Severe complications were observed during 13 operations. There was no fatal complication in the perioperative period. The risk of complications was found to be directly correlated to the body weight at the time of the surgery. Most of the problems appeared intraoperatively, but they were also followed by complications immediately after the extubation. Conclusion In conclusion, cleft surgery in infancy is accompanied by frequent and sometimes severe perioperative complications that may be attributed to this special surgical field. PMID:17280602

  5. Spectrographic measures of the speech of young children with cleft lip and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Casal, C; Domínguez, C; Fernández, A; Sarget, R; Martínez-Celdrán, E; Sentís-Vilalta, J; Gay-Escoda, C

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive children with repaired cleft lip and/or palate [isolated cleft lip (CL) 6, isolated cleft palate (CP) 7, unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) 7, and bilateral cleft lip and palate 2] with a mean age of 27 months underwent spectrographic measures of tape-recorded speech (DSP Sona-Graph digital unit). Controls were 22 age- and sex-matched noncleft children. Data analyzed included (1) the Spanish vocalic variables [a, i, u, e, o]: first formant, second formant, duration, and context; (2) obstruent variables [p, t, k]: burst, voice onset time, and duration, and (3) nasal variables [m]: first formant, second formant, and duration. Statistically significant differences were observed between the CL group and the control group in the first formant of [e] and in the increase of the frequency of the [t] burst. Comparison between UCLP and controls showed differences in the second formant of [a], in the first formant of [o], and in the second formant of [o]. These results suggest a small but significant influence of either the cleft lip or its repair on lip rounding for [o] and [u]. In addition, tongue position differences were most likely responsible for the differences seen with [a] and [e]. Spectrographic differences in the current patients did not contribute to meaningful differences in speech sound development. Individualized care (orthodontics, surgery, speech therapy) in children with cleft lip and/or palate attended at specialized craniofacial units contributes to normalization of speech development.

  6. Risk of Oral Clefts (Cleft Lip and/or Palate) in Infants Born to Mothers Taking Topamax (Topiramate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of oral clefts. Q8. Does FDA have post marketing adverse event reports of oral clefts with topiramate? ... based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, BUT the potential ...

  7. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  8. Algorithms for the treatment of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Stal, S; Klebuc, M; Taylor, T D; Spira, M; Edwards, M

    1998-10-01

    Developing standardized outcomes and algorithms of treatment is a constantly evolving task. This article examines four variables in this process: cleft type, operative technique, surgical experience, and timing. Input from international cleft lip and palate programs regarding techniques and treatment modalities provide a dynamic tool for assessment and the development of guidelines in the treatment of the cleft lip and palate patient.

  9. Isolated congenital palatal fistula without submucous cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet; Olgun, Haşim; Tan, Onder; Caner, Ibrahim

    2009-09-01

    Congenital fistula of the palate is a rare deformity. It has been generally associated with cleft palate. Treatment of cleft palate is surgical intervention. We present a child with congenital fistula of palate that was not associated with submucous cleft and closed spontaneously at 18 months.

  10. Speech evaluation for patients with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Ann W

    2014-04-01

    Children with cleft palate are at risk for speech problems, particularly those caused by velopharyngeal insufficiency. There may be an additional risk of speech problems caused by malocclusion. This article describes the speech evaluation for children with cleft palate and how the results of the evaluation are used to make treatment decisions. Instrumental procedures that provide objective data regarding the function of the velopharyngeal valve, and the 2 most common methods of velopharyngeal imaging, are also described. Because many readers are not familiar with phonetic symbols for speech phonemes, Standard English letters are used for clarity.

  11. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  12. Median Citation Index vs Journal Impact Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2015-03-01

    The Journal Impact Factor is an arithmetic mean: It is the average number of citations, in a year, to a journal's articles that were published the previous two years. But for the vast majority of scholarly journals, the distribution of these citations is skewed (non-symmetric). We argue that a more representative member of the skewed distribution of citations is its median, not the mean. We thus introduce the Median Citation Index (MCI) and compare it to the journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a potentially more suitable choice of the ``center'' of the distribution, or its typical value. Unlike the JIF, the MCI is far less sensitive to outlier (very highly cited) papers or to gaming, and does not lend itself to the hype of calculating it to three decimal digits.

  13. Three-dimensional nasal changes following maxillary advancement in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A; McCance, A M; James, D R; Moss, J P

    1996-06-01

    Three-dimensional laser surface scanning of the face was performed before and after Le Fort I maxillary advancement in 24 patients with replaced clefts of the lip and palate. The surgery resulted in advancement of the upper lip and para-alar tissues and an increase in the relative prominence of the nose within the face. These changes were produced at the expense of an increase in nasal width and a reduction in nasal tip protrusion. The changes in nasal morphology showed significant variation among patients.

  14. A semblance-guided median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.C. ); Toksoz, M.N. ); Purdy, G.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A slowness selective median filter based on information from a local set of traces is described and implemented. The filter is constructed in two steps, the first being an estimation of a preferred slowness and the second, the selection of a median or trimmed mean value to replace the original data point. A symmetric window of traces defining the filter aperture is selected about each trace to be filtered and the filter applied repeatedly to each time point. The preferred slowness is determined by scanning a range of linear moveouts within the user-specified slowness passband. Semblance is computed for each trial slowness and the preferred slowness selected from the peak semblance value. Data points collected along this preferred slowness are then sorted from lowest to highest and in the case of a pure median filter, the middle point(s) selected to replace the original data point. This approach may be sued as a velocity filter to estimate coherent signal within a specified slowness passband and reject coherent energy outside this range. For applications of this type, other velocity estimators may be used in place of the authors semblance measure to provide improved velocity estimation and better filter performance. The filter aperture may also be extended to provide increased velocity estimation, but will result in additional lateral smearing of signal. The authors show that, in addition to a velocity filter, their approach may be used to improve signal-to-noise ratios in noisy data. The median filter tends to suppress the amplitude of random background noise and semblance weighting may be used to reduce the amplitude of background noise further while enhancing coherent signal.

  15. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  16. Older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and palate: a qualitative study exploring aging and appearance.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Claire; Harcourt, Diana

    2015-03-01

    Objective : To explore older adults' experiences of living with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P), focusing on aging and appearance. Design : An exploratory-descriptive qualitative study. Participants : Individual semi-structured interviews (five via telephone, one face-to-face) conducted with six adults between the ages of 57 and 82 years. Results : Interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which resulted in five themes: cleft across the life span, keeping up appearances, being one of a kind, resilience and protection, and cleft in an ever-changing society. A CL/P had an ongoing impact on participants' lives, although its relevance shifted over time and some aspects of life (e.g., romantic relationships, decisions about having children of their own) were particularly affected. Participants seemed at ease living with CL/P as an older adult and considered it an important aspect of their identity, yet they still described feeling isolated at times and had little contact with other people with a cleft. They felt that health care could be more considerate to the needs of older people with a cleft, particularly around dentistry and information provision. Participants thought societal attitudes toward visible differences had changed over the years, but not necessarily for the better. A paradox was evident between reports of being noticed by others because of their cleft and simultaneously feeling invisible or ignored because of their age. Conclusions : These findings have implications for provision of care for older adults with a CL/P and for younger people with a CL/P who will be the older generation of the future.

  17. Tobacco smoking and oral clefts: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Little, Julian; Cardy, Amanda; Munger, Ronald G.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between maternal smoking and non-syndromic orofacial clefts in infants. METHODS: A meta-analysis of the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy was carried out using data from 24 case-control and cohort studies. FINDINGS: Consistent, moderate and statistically significant associations were found between maternal smoking and cleft lip, with or without cleft palate (relative risk 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.25-1.44) and between maternal smoking and cleft palate (relative risk 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.35). There was evidence of a modest dose-response effect for cleft lip with or without cleft palate. CONCLUSION: The evidence of an association between maternal tobacco smoking and orofacial clefts is strong enough to justify its use in anti-smoking campaigns. PMID:15112010

  18. A Multivariate Analysis of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Facial Skeletal Morphology.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    Unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) occurs when the maxillary and nasal facial prominences fail to fuse correctly during development, resulting in a palatal cleft and clefted soft and hard tissues of the dentoalveolus. The UCLP deformity may compromise an individual's ability to eat, chew, and speak. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 7-17-year-old individuals born with UCLP (n = 24) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 24) were assessed. Coordinate values of three-dimensional anatomical landmarks (n = 32) were recorded from each CBCT image. Data were evaluated using principal coordinates analysis (PCOORD) and Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA). Approximately 40% of morphometric variation is captured by PCOORD axes 1-3, and the negative and positive ends of each axis are associated with specific patterns of morphological differences. Approximately 36% of facial skeletal measures significantly differ by confidence interval testing (α = 0.10) between samples. Although significant form differences occur across the facial skeleton, strong patterns of morphological differences were localized to the lateral and superioinferior aspects of the nasal aperture, particularly on the clefted side of the face. The UCLP deformity strongly influences facial skeletal morphology of the midface and oronasal facial regions, and to a lesser extent the upper and lower facial skeletons. The pattern of strong morphological differences in the oronasal region combined with differences across the facial complex suggests that craniofacial bones are integrated and covary, despite influences from the congenital cleft.

  19. Community Mobilization and Awareness Creation for Orofacial Cleft Services: A Survey of Nigerian Cleft Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The opportunity to provide free surgical care for orofacial clefts has opened a new vista and is enhanced by well-informed communities who are aware of the free surgical services available to them. It is the responsibility of cleft care providers to adequately inform these communities via a combination of community mobilization and awareness creation. Methods. This was a nationwide, cross-sectional descriptive study of all orofacial cleft service providers in Nigeria using a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Results. A total of 4648 clefts have been repaired, 50.8% by the ten government-owned and 49.2% by the five nongovernment-owned organizations included in the study. The nongovernment-owned institutions seemed to be more aggressive about community mobilization and awareness creation than government-owned ones, and this was reflected in their patient turnout. Most of the organizations studied would prefer a separate, independent body to handle their awareness campaign. Conclusion. Community mobilization requires skill and dedication and may require formal training or dedicated budgets by government-owned and nongovernment-owned institutions alike. Organizations involved in cleft care provision must take community mobilization and awareness seriously if the largely unmet needs of orofacial cleft patients in Nigeria are to be tackled. PMID:27350971

  20. Alveolar graft in the cleft lip and palate patient: Review of 104 cases

    PubMed Central

    Tobella-Camps, María L.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Alveolar bone grafting is a vital part of the rehabilitation of cleft patients. The factors that have been most frequently associated with the success of the graft are the age at grafting and the pre-grafting orthodontic treatment. Objectives: 1) Describe the cases of alveolar bone grafts performed at the Maxilofacial Unit of Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona (HSJD); and 2) Analyze the success/failure of alveolar grafts and related variables. Material and Methods: Descriptive retrospective study using a sample of 104 patients who underwent a secondary alveolar graft at the Craniofacial Unit of HSJD between 1998 and 2012. The graft was done by the same surgeon in all patients using bone from the iliac crest. Results: 70% of the patients underwent the procedure before the age of 15 (median 14.45 years); 70% of the graft patients underwent pre-graft maxillary expansion. A total of 100 cases were recorded as successful (median age of 14.58 years, 68 underwent pre-graft expansion) and only 4 were recorded as failures (median age of 17.62 years, 3 underwent pre-graft expansion). We did not find statistically significant differences in age at the time of grafting or pre-surgical expansion when comparing the success and failure groups. We found the success rate of the graft to be 96.2%. Conclusions: The number of failures was too small to establish a statistically significant conclusion in our sample regarding the age at grafting and pre-grafting expansion. The use of alveolar bone grafting from the iliac crest has a very high success rate with a very low incidence of complications. Existing controversies regarding secondary bone grafting and the wide range of success rates found in the literature suggest that it is necessary to establish a specific treatment protocol that ensures the success of this procedure. Key words:Alveolar graft, cleft lip and palate, alveolar cleft, alveolar defect. PMID:24880440

  1. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews parents' emotional reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child. It examines when parents were told of the deformity and discusses the duties of the speech-language pathologist and the psychologist in counseling the parents and the child. (Author/JDD)

  2. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  3. Cleft lip and palate care in Romania.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vanessa

    2011-11-01

    Vanessa Martin travelled with a surgical team to Romania over a period of 12 years to support nurses and improve practice in the treatment of cleft lip and palate. She recounts her experiences and the changes that took place during that time.

  4. [The mandible in labio-maxillary clefts].

    PubMed

    Cadenat, H; Barthélémy, R; Izac, F; Clouet, M; Fabert, G

    1977-01-01

    The writers have studied mandibular anomalies in a series of 20 surgically treated clefts. Anomalies of shape occur in one case out of two and are in the form of a mandible which is too long. Anomalies of position most often show a mandible in front of the maxillary and to the rear in comparison to the base of the skull.

  5. Dental sequellae of alveolar clefts: utility of endosseous implants. Part I: therapeutic protocols.

    PubMed

    Samama, Yves; Tulasne, Jean-François

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this publication is to offer teams specializing in the primary and secondary treatment of labio-alveolar-palatal clefts a prosthetic evaluation for more rational management of the dental sequellae of clefts for patients who, when they reach adulthood, often wish to improve their facial esthetics, in which the dental element plays a significant part. The reorganization and restoration of the upper anterior teeth, and their esthetic integration with respect to the face and lips, would then be less of a problem for plastic surgeons or orthodontists. In this respect, the installation in this sector of implants, following ambitious bone surgery involving the sacrifice, in bilateral forms, of the teeth of the medial process is a protocol that could usefully be taken into account.

  6. Dental sequellae of alveolar clefts: utility of endosseous implants. Part II: clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Samama, Yves; Tulasne, Jean-François

    2014-09-01

    This second part follows on from part 1 published in the previous issue of this journal. The aim of this publication is to offer teams specializing in the primary and secondary treatment of labio-alveolar-palatal clefts a prosthetic evaluation for more rational management of the dental sequellae of clefts for patients who, when they reach adulthood, often wish to improve their facial esthetics, in which the dental element plays an important part. The reorganization and restoration of the maxillary anterior teeth and their esthetic integration with respect to the face and lips would then be less of a problem for plastic surgeons and orthodontists. In this regard, the installation in this sector of implants, following ambitious bone surgery involving the sacrifice of the teeth of the medial nasal process in bilateral forms, is a protocol that could usefully be taken into account.

  7. Robust non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel image filter with superior performance on detail-preserving removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on natural gray-scale images. The non-local means filter is in the limelight as a way of Gaussian noise removal with superior performance on detail preservation. By referring the fundamental concept of the non-local means, we had proposed a non-local median filter as a specialized way for random-valued impulse noise removal so far. In the non-local processing, the output of a filter is calculated from pixels in blocks which are similar to the block centered at a pixel of interest. As a result, aggressive noise removal is conducted without destroying the detailed structures in an original image. However, the performance of non-local processing decreases enormously in the case of high noise occurrence probability. A cause of this problem is that the superimposed noise disturbs accurate calculation of the similarity between the blocks. To cope with this problem, we propose an improved non-local median filter which is robust to the high level of corruption by introducing a new similarity measure considering possibility of being the original signal. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural gray-scale images.

  8. FOXE1 association with both isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and isolated cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Lina M.; Mansilla, Maria Adela; Bullard, Steve A.; Cooper, Margaret E.; Busch, Tamara D.; Machida, Junichiro; Johnson, Marla K.; Brauer, David; Krahn, Katherine; Daack-Hirsch, Sandy; L'Heureux, Jamie; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Rivera, Dora; López, Ana Maria; Moreno, Manuel A.; Hing, Anne; Lammer, Edward J.; Jones, Marilyn; Christensen, Kaare; Lie, Rolv T.; Jugessur, Astanand; Wilcox, Allen J.; Chines, Peter; Pugh, Elizabeth; Doheny, Kim; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are a common complex birth defect caused by genetic and environmental factors and/or their interactions. A previous genome-wide linkage scan discovered a novel locus for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) at 9q22–q33. To identify the etiologic gene, we undertook an iterative and complementary fine mapping strategy using family-based CL/P samples from Colombia, USA and the Philippines. Candidate genes within 9q22–q33 were sequenced, revealing 32 new variants. Concurrently, 397 SNPs spanning the 9q22–q33 2-LOD-unit interval were tested for association. Significant SNP and haplotype association signals (P = 1.45E − 08) narrowed the interval to a 200 kb region containing: FOXE1, C9ORF156 and HEMGN. Association results were replicated in CL/P families of European descent and when all populations were combined the two most associated SNPs, rs3758249 (P = 5.01E − 13) and rs4460498 (P = 6.51E − 12), were located inside a 70 kb high linkage disequilibrium block containing FOXE1. Association signals for Caucasians and Asians clustered 5′ and 3′ of FOXE1, respectively. Isolated cleft palate (CP) was also associated, indicating that FOXE1 plays a role in two phenotypes thought to be genetically distinct. Foxe1 expression was found in the epithelium undergoing fusion between the medial nasal and maxillary processes. Mutation screens of FOXE1 identified two family-specific missense mutations at highly conserved amino acids. These data indicate that FOXE1 is a major gene for CL/P and provides new insights for improved counseling and genetic interaction studies. PMID:19779022

  9. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning.

  10. Correlations between initial cleft size and dental anomalies in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients after alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Fatima; Reiser, Erika; Thor, Andreas; Hakelius, Malin; Nowinski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine in individuals with unilateral cleft lip and palate the correlation between initial cleft size and dental anomalies, and the outcome of alveolar bone grafting. Methods A total of 67 consecutive patients with non-syndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) were included from the cleft lip and palate-craniofacial center, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. All patients were operated by the same surgeon and treated according to the Uppsala protocol entailing: lip plasty at 3 months, soft palate closure at 6 months, closure of the residual cleft in the hard palate at 2 years of age, and secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) prior to the eruption of the permanent canine. Cleft size was measured on dental casts obtained at the time of primary lip plasty. Dental anomalies were registered on radiographs and dental casts obtained before bone grafting. Alveolar bone height was evaluated with the Modified Bergland Index (mBI) at 1 and 10-year follow-up. Results Anterior cleft width correlated positively with enamel hypoplasia and rotation of the central incisor adjacent to the cleft. There was, however, no correlation between initial cleft width and alveolar bone height at either 1 or 10 years follow-up. Conclusions Wider clefts did not seem to have an impact on the success of secondary alveolar bone grafting but appeared to be associated with a higher degree of some dental anomalies. This finding may have implications for patient counseling and treatment planning. PMID:26923345

  11. Assessment of differentially expressed plasma microRNAs in nonsyndromic cleft palate and nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Gao, Yanli; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Bei; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as a new class of regulatory molecules that influence many biological functions. However, the expression profile of plasma microRNAs in nonsyndromic cleft palate (NSCP) or nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate (NSCLP) remains poorly investigated. In this study, we used Agilent human miRNA microarray chips to monitor miRNA levels in three NSCP plasma samples (mixed as the CP group), three NSCLP plasma samples (mixed as the CLP group) and three normal plasma samples (mixed as the Control group). Six selected plasma miRNAs were validated in samples from an additional 16 CP, 33 CLP and 8 healthy children using qRT-PCR. Using Venn diagrams, distinct and overlapping dysregulated miRNAs were identified. Their respective target genes were further assessed using gene ontology and pathway analysis. The results show that distinct or overlapping biological processes and signalling pathways were involved in CP and CLP. Our study showed that the common key gene targets reflected functional relationships to the Notch, Wnt, phosphatidylinositol and Hedgehog signalling pathways. Further studies should examine the mechanism of the potential target genes, which may provide new avenues for future clinical prevention and therapy. PMID:27863433

  12. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  13. Censored Median Regression and Profile Empirical Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2007-01-01

    We implement profile empirical likelihood based inference for censored median regression models. Inference for any specified sub-vector is carried out by profiling out the nuisance parameters from the “plug-in” empirical likelihood ratio function proposed by Qin and Tsao. To obtain the critical value of the profile empirical likelihood ratio statistic, we first investigate its asymptotic distribution. The limiting distribution is a sum of weighted chi square distributions. Unlike for the full empirical likelihood, however, the derived asymptotic distribution has intractable covariance structure. Therefore, we employ the bootstrap to obtain the critical value, and compare the resulting confidence intervals with the ones obtained through Basawa and Koul’s minimum dispersion statistic. Furthermore, we obtain confidence intervals for the age and treatment effects in a lung cancer data set. PMID:19112527

  14. VIEW OF CRESCENTSHAPED ISLAND/MEDIAN WITH LARGE MONKEYPOD TREE AT SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CRESCENT-SHAPED ISLAND/MEDIAN WITH LARGE MONKEYPOD TREE AT SOUTHEAST “CORNER” OF BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Spectrum of Dental Phenotypes in Nonsyndromic Orofacial Clefting

    PubMed Central

    Howe, B.J.; Cooper, M.E.; Vieira, A.R.; Weinberg, S.M.; Resick, J.M.; Nidey, N.L.; Wehby, G.L.; Marazita, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with oral clefts show a wide range of dental anomalies, adding complexity to understanding the phenotypic spectrum of orofacial clefting. The evidence is mixed, however, on whether the prevalence of dental anomalies is elevated in unaffected relatives and is mostly based on small samples. In the largest international cohort to date of children with nonsyndromic clefts, their relatives, and controls, this study characterizes the spectrum of cleft-related dental anomalies and evaluates whether families with clefting have a significantly higher risk for such anomalies compared with the general population. A total of 3,811 individuals were included: 660 cases with clefts, 1,922 unaffected relatives, and 1,229 controls. Dental anomalies were identified from in-person dental exams or intraoral photographs, and case-control differences were tested using χ2 statistics. Cases had higher rates of dental anomalies in the maxillary arch than did controls for primary (21% vs. 4%, P = 3 × 10−8) and permanent dentitions (51% vs. 8%, P = 4 × 10−62) but not in the mandible. Dental anomalies were more prevalent in cleft lip with cleft palate than other cleft types. More anomalies were seen in the ipsilateral side of the cleft. Agenesis and tooth displacements were the most common dental anomalies found in case probands for primary and permanent dentitions. Compared with controls, unaffected siblings (10% vs. 2%, P = 0.003) and parents (13% vs. 7%, P = 0.001) showed a trend for increased anomalies of the maxillary permanent dentition. Yet, these differences were nonsignificant after multiple-testing correction, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in some families carrying susceptibility to both overt clefts and dental anomalies. Collectively, the findings suggest that most affected families do not have higher genetic risk for dental anomalies than the general population and that the higher prevalence of anomalies in cases is primarily a physical consequence of the cleft

  16. Maurer's clefts, the enigma of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mundwiler-Pachlatko, Esther; Beck, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, completely remodels the infected human erythrocyte to acquire nutrients and to evade the immune system. For this process, the parasite exports more than 10% of all its proteins into the host cell cytosol, including the major virulence factor PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte surface protein 1). This unusual protein trafficking system involves long-known parasite-derived membranous structures in the host cell cytosol, called Maurer’s clefts. However, the genesis, role, and function of Maurer’s clefts remain elusive. Similarly unclear is how proteins are sorted and how they are transported to and from these structures. Recent years have seen a large increase of knowledge but, as yet, no functional model has been established. In this perspective we review the most important findings and conclude with potential possibilities to shed light into the enigma of Maurer’s clefts. Understanding the mechanism and function of these structures, as well as their involvement in protein export in P. falciparum, might lead to innovative control strategies and might give us a handle with which to help to eliminate this deadly parasite. PMID:24284172

  17. The Evolution of Human Genetic Studies of Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFCs)—primarily cleft lip and cleft palate—are among the most common birth defects in all populations worldwide, and have notable population, ethnicity, and gender differences in birth prevalence. Interest in these birth defects goes back centuries, as does formal scientific interest; scientists often used OFCs as examples or evidence during paradigm shifts in human genetics, and have also used virtually every new method of human genetic analysis to deepen our understanding of OFC. This review traces the evolution of human genetic investigations of OFC, highlights the specific insights gained about OFC through the years, and culminates in a review of recent key OFC genetic findings resulting from the powerful tools of the genomics era. Notably, OFC represents a major success for genome-wide approaches, and the field is poised for further breakthroughs in the near future. PMID:22703175

  18. Corticosteroid use during pregnancy and risk of orofacial clefts

    PubMed Central

    Hviid, Anders; Mølgaard-Nielsen, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    Background The association between the risk of orofacial clefts in infants and the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy is unclear from the available evidence. We conducted a nationwide cohort study of all live births in Denmark over a 12-year period. Methods We collected data on all live births in Denmark from Jan. 1, 1996, to Sept. 30, 2008. We included live births for which information was available from nationwide health registries on the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy, the diagnosis of an orofacial cleft and possible confounders. Results There were 832 636 live births during the study period. Exposure to corticosteroids during the first trimester occurred in 51 973 of the pregnancies. A total of 1232 isolated orofacial clefts (i.e., cleft lip, cleft palate, or cleft lip and cleft palate) were diagnosed within the first year of life, including 84 instances in which the infant had been exposed to corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy. We did not identify any statistically significant increased risk of orofacial clefts associated with the use of corticosteroids: cleft lip with or without cleft palate, prevalence odds ratio (OR) 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–1.38]; cleft palate alone, prevalence OR 1.23 (95% CI 0.83–1.82). Odds ratios for risk of orofacial clefts by method of delivery (i.e., oral, inhalant, nasal spray, or dermatologic and other topicals) were consistent with the overall results of the study and did not display significant heterogeneity, although the OR for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with the use of dermatologic corticosteroids was 1.45 (95% CI 1.03–2.05). Interpretation Our results add to the safety information on a class of drugs commonly used during pregnancy. Our study did not show an increased risk of orofacial clefts with the use of corticosteroids during pregnancy. Indepth investigation of the pattern of association between orofacial clefts and the use of dermatologic

  19. Surgical Repair of a Superior Sternal Cleft in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Tobias; Kellner, Maximilian; Boemers, Thomas Michael; Mack-Detlefsen, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Sternal cleft is a rare congenital malformation with little more than 100 cases published worldwide. Incomplete sternal clefting in a female newborn is the most frequent form seen. First-line treatment is the surgical defect closure in the neonatal period. Presurgical examination has to focus on common associated malformations, in particular cardiac defects. The surgical repair of sternal cleft itself shows satisfying functional and cosmetic results with low complication rates. We present the case of a 4-month-old male infant with a superior sternal cleft. PMID:26788449

  20. Sociological aspects of cleft palate adults: IV. Social integration.

    PubMed

    Peter, J P; Chinsky, R R; Fisher, M J

    1975-07-01

    The patterns of social integration of adults with primary and secondary groups were evaluated for 196 adult cleft subjects, their 190 siblings and 209 random controls. Results indicated that cleft adults tended to rely on the extended family for mutual aid and social activities. They also participated less frequently in voluntary associations and relied on a few one-to-one friendships. Social activities tended to be that of informal visiting patterns. While it would be inaccurate to characterize the cleft adult family as grossly different from other American families, they are a definable population experiencing some degree of limitation associated with having a cleft.

  1. Effects of lip repair on maxillofacial morphology in patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qinghua; Chen, Zhengxi; Yang, Yang; Chen, Zhenqi

    2014-11-01

    Objective : To evaluate the effects of lip repair on maxillofacial development of patients with unilateral cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Design : Retrospective. Patients : A total of 75 patients were recruited, including 38 surgical patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and alveolus and 37 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate who had lip but not palate repair. As controls, 38 patients with no cleft were selected. All subjects were divided according to two growth stages: before the pubertal peak (GS1) and after the pubertal peak (GS2). Interventions : Lateral cephalograms of all subjects were obtained. Main Outcome Measures : Cephalograms were analyzed and compared in the study and control groups. Results : The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate in both GS1 and GS2 demonstrated an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth with retroclined maxillary incisors. The patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate showed a shorter length of maxilla, a more clockwise-rotated mandible, and retroclined maxillary incisors. Conclusions : There was an almost normal maxillary and mandibular growth but retroclined maxillary incisors in patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate who had received lip repair only, indicating that lip repair may not have a negative impact on the maxillofacial development and influences only the inclination of the maxillary incisors. The shorter anterior-posterior maxillary length and larger gonial angle in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate compared with those in patients with unilateral cleft lip and alveolus suggest that these variations in maxillary and mandibular growth may be a consequence of the cleft itself.

  2. Moustache reconstruction in patients with cleft lip: (final aesthetic touches in clefts-part ii).

    PubMed

    Duskova, Marketa; Sosna, Bohuslav; Sukop, Andrej

    2006-09-01

    Men with clefts often have limited or even missing moustache growth in scar areas or in the upper lip prolabium. However the histological testing showed the absence or at least the inactive form of androgenic receptor in hair follicle of cleft site, transplantation of autologous grafts harvested from hair was successful in all six cases either into scars or the prolabium. A more natural effect was achieved by using micrografts. The positive reaction of patients proved there is a need for detailed treatment in highly outgoing individuals.

  3. Median filtering algorithms for multichannel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, A.; Chilingarian, A.

    2011-05-01

    Particle detectors of worldwide networks are continuously measuring various secondary particle fluxes incident on Earth surface. At the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC), the data of 12 cosmic ray particle detectors with a total of ˜280 measuring channels (count rates of electrons, muons and neutrons channels) are sent each minute via wireless bridges to a MySQL database. These time series are used for the different tasks of off-line physical analysis and for online forewarning services. Usually long time series contain several types of errors (gaps due to failures of high or low voltage power supply, spurious spikes due to radio interferences, abrupt changes of mean values of several channels or/and slowly trends in mean values due to aging of electronics components, etc.). To avoid erroneous physical inference and false alarms of alerting systems we introduce offline and online filters to "purify" multiple time-series. In the presented paper we classify possible mistakes in time series and introduce median filtering algorithms for online and off-line "purification" of multiple time-series.

  4. Three-dimensional facial analysis of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Siti Adibah; Aidil Koay, Noor Airin

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the facial features of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and compared them with a normal control group using a three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry camera. This cross-sectional study examined 3D measurements of the facial surfaces of 20 Chinese children with repaired UCLP and 40 unaffected Chinese children aged 7 to 12 years old, which were captured using the VECTRA 3D five-pod photosystem and analyzed using Mirror software. Twenty-five variables and two ratios were compared between both groups using independent t-test. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was determined using ten randomly selected images and analyzed using intra-class correlation coefficient test (ICC). The level of significance was set at p < 0.0018. Intra- and inter-observers’ reliability was considered fair to excellent with an ICC value ranging from 0.54 to 0.99. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.0018) were found mainly in the nasolabial region. The cleft group exhibited wider alar base root width, flattened nose and broader nostril floor width on the cleft side. They tended to have shorter upper lip length and thinner upper vermillion thickness. Faces of Chinese children with repaired UCLP displayed meaningful differences when compared to the normal group especially in the nasolabial regions.

  5. Three-dimensional facial analysis of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Siti Adibah; Aidil Koay, Noor Airin

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the facial features of Chinese children with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) and compared them with a normal control group using a three-dimensional (3D) stereophotogrammetry camera. This cross-sectional study examined 3D measurements of the facial surfaces of 20 Chinese children with repaired UCLP and 40 unaffected Chinese children aged 7 to 12 years old, which were captured using the VECTRA 3D five-pod photosystem and analyzed using Mirror software. Twenty-five variables and two ratios were compared between both groups using independent t-test. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was determined using ten randomly selected images and analyzed using intra-class correlation coefficient test (ICC). The level of significance was set at p < 0.0018. Intra- and inter-observers’ reliability was considered fair to excellent with an ICC value ranging from 0.54 to 0.99. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.0018) were found mainly in the nasolabial region. The cleft group exhibited wider alar base root width, flattened nose and broader nostril floor width on the cleft side. They tended to have shorter upper lip length and thinner upper vermillion thickness. Faces of Chinese children with repaired UCLP displayed meaningful differences when compared to the normal group especially in the nasolabial regions. PMID:27507713

  6. Gonioscopically Guided Nonpenetrating Cyclodialysis Cleft Repair: A Novel Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ian AS; Shah, Brinda; Goyal, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim We present a novel surgical technique for repair of persistent and symptomatic cyclodialysis clefts refractory to conservative or minimally invasive treatment. Background Numerous surgical techniques have been described to close cyclodialysis clefts. The current standard approach involves intraocular repair of cyclodialysis clefts underneath a full-thickness scleral flap. Technique Our technique employs intraoperative use of a direct gonioscope to guide a nonpenetrating surgical repair. Subsequently, a significantly less invasive, nonpenetrating technique utilizing a partial-thickness scleral flap can be performed that reduces potential risks associated with intraocular surgery. The direct gonioscope is also used for confirmation of adequate surgical closure of the cyclodialysis cleft prior to completion of surgery. This technique has been successfully carried out to repair traumatic chronic cyclodialysis clefts associated with hypotony in two patients. There were no significant adverse events as a result of using this technique. Conclusion The novel technique described increases the likelihood of successful and permanent repair of cyclodialysis clefts with resolution of symptoms associated with hypotony, through direct intraoperative visualization of the cleft. Clinical significance Gonioscopically guided nonpenetrating cyclodialysis cleft repair offers significant benefits over previously described techniques. Advantages of our technique include gonioscopic cleft visualization, enabling accurate localization of the area requiring repair, and subsequent confirmation of adequate closure of the cleft. Using a partial-thickness scleral flap is also less invasive and reduces risks associated with treatment of this potentially challenging complication of ocular trauma. How to cite this article Rodrigues IAS, Shah B, Goyal S, Lim S. Gonioscopically Guided Nonpenetrating Cyclodialysis Cleft Repair: A Novel Surgical Technique. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2017

  7. A Descriptive Epidemiology Study of Oral Cleft in Sergipe, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luiza, Andrea; Noronha de Góis, Diego; Santos, Jadson Alípio Santana de Sousa; Brito de Oliveira, Rosany Larissa; Ferreira da Silva, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The nonsyndromic orofacial cleft is the fourth most common birth defect, but in Brazil, data about the cleft epidemiology are not accurate. Objective This study aimed to describe the epidemiologic characteristics of oral cleft cases at Specialized Society Attending Cleft Patient in Sergipe State. Methods Data were obtained from patients' medical records in relation to the following characteristics: age; gender; race; origin; cleft type; additional malformations and/or complications; prenatal accomplishment; treatment applied. For diagnosis analysis, it was noted if mothers had received prenatal care and if they had ultrasonography performed and if the cleft was viewed in it. Results We observed a prevalence of male gender (54%). Age between 0 and 4 years old was most prevalent (53%), and pheoderma race was observed in 47%. Transincisive foramen cleft was found in 52.3% of the individuals. The prevalence of pre- and transincisive foramen cleft was higher in men (66.3 and 55.7%), women accounted for 65.0% of postincisive foramen, and atypical facial cleft (0.3%) occurred in one case. Associated malformations and complications were present in 12% of patients. Prenatal care was reported by 48% of the mothers. Conclusion In this study male gender was the most affected, and 0 to 4 years was the most frequent age group. Transincisive foramen cleft type was most frequently encountered. Prenatal care was reported by most mothers. So, this study found that early treatment is a reality in SEAFESE (Service Specializing in Cleft Care of Sergipe), and consequently the chances of successful integration of the child to society will be better. PMID:25992043

  8. Fordyce Happiness Program and Happiness in Mothers of Children with a Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosavi Asl, Fatemeh-Sadat; Abbasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Facial deformities and aesthetic and functional anomalies in children may be a cause of real distress in families. Problems faced by parents in coping with a child’s anomaly can be upsetting and lead parents to exhibit over-severe behavior. The present study was conducted in order to study the effect of happiness program on the happiness of the mothers of children with a cleft lip and palate. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 64 mothers of children with a cleft lip and palate enrolled by convenience random sampling were assigned to an intervention or control group based on a simple random sampling. Then, a program of happiness training was implemented consisting of 10 sessions of 2 hours each. A demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire were completed prior to and 2 months after the last session of intervention. The data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics, consisting of a paired t-test, independent t-test and Chi-square test using SPSS version 20. Results: The independent t-test indicated a significant difference in mean happiness score after training between the intervention and control groups (P<0.05). Moreover, the paired t-test indicated a significant difference in mean happiness score between before and after training in the intervention group, although the difference was not statistically significant for the control group (P>0.05). Conclusion: In light of the efficacy of happiness training on the promotion of happiness in the mothers of children with a cleft lip and palate, this model is recommended as a healthcare intervention to decrease stress in mothers following the birth of an infant with a cleft lip and palate. PMID:28008390

  9. Minimally Painful Local Anesthetic Injection for Cleft Lip/Nasal Repair in Grown Patients

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher; Wong, Alison L.; Chokotho, Tilinde

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a recent interest in injecting large body and face areas with local anesthetic in a minimally painful manner. The method includes adherence to minimal pain injection details as well feedback from the patient who counts the number of times he feels pain during the injection process. This article describes the successes and limitations of this technique as applied to primary cleft lip/nasal repair in grown patients. Methods: Thirty-two primary cleft lip patients were injected with local anesthesia by 3 surgeons and then underwent surgical correction of their deformity. At the beginning of the injection of the local anesthetic, patients were instructed to clearly inform the injector each and every time they felt pain during the entire injection process. Results: The average patient felt pain only 1.6 times during the injection process. This included the first sting of the first 27-gauge needle poke. The only pain that 51% of the patients felt was that first poke of the first needle; 24% of the patients only felt pain twice during the whole injection process. The worst pain score occurred in a patient who felt pain 6 times during the injection process. Ninety-one percent of the patients felt no pain at all after the injection of the local anesthetic and did not require a top-up. Conclusion: It is possible to successfully and reliably inject local anesthesia in a minimally painful manner for cleft lip and nasal repair in the fully grown cleft patient. PMID:25289364

  10. Orthodontically guided bone transport in the treatment of alveolar cleft: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Elena; Otero, Marta; Berraquero, Rosario; Wucherpfennig, Begona; Hernández-Godoy, Juan; Guiñales, Jorge; Vincent, Germán; Burgueño, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conventional treatments are sometimes not possible in certain alveolar cleft cases due to the severity of the gap which separates the fragments. Various management strategies have been proposed, including sequential surgical interventions or delaying treatment until adulthood to then carry out maxillary osteotomies. A further alternative approach has also been proposed, involving the application of bone transport techniques to mobilise the osseous fragments and thereby reduce the gap between lateral fragments and the premaxilla. Case Report We introduce the case of a 10-year-old patient who presented with a bilateral alveolar cleft and a severe gap. Stable occlusion between the premaxilla and the mandible was achieved following orthodontic treatment, making it inadvisable to perform a retrusive osteotomy of the premaxilla in order to close the alveolar clefts. Faced with this situation, it was decided we would employ a bone transport technique under orthodontic guidance using a dental splint. This would enable an osseous disc to be displaced towards the medial area and reduce the interfragmentary distance. During a second surgical intervention, closure of the soft tissues was performed and the gap was filled in using autogenous bone. Conclusions The use of bone transport techniques in selected cases allows closure of the osseous defect, whilst also preserving soft tissues and reducing the amount of bone autograft required. In our case, we were able to respect the position of the premaxilla and, at the same time, generate new tissues at both an alveolar bone and soft tissue level with results which have remained stable over the course of time. Key words:Alveolar cleft, bone transport, graft. PMID:26855699

  11. Game Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jill

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "Game Face: Life Lessons Across the Curriculum", a teaching kit that challenges assumptions and builds confidence. Game Face, which is derived from a book and art exhibition, "Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like?", uses layered and powerful images of women and girls participating in sports to teach…

  12. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hang Suk; Choi, Hyun Gon; Kim, Soon Heum; Park, Hyung Jun; Shin, Dong Hyeok; Jo, Dong In; Kim, Cheol Keun

    2012-01-01

    Background The bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essential treatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture and size of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the success rate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, some studies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of the cleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet. We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessment according to the cleft type. Methods The study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according to the cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysis software. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimation and intraoperative measurement was analyzed. Results The difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3 cm3 (P=0.084). There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleft palate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05). Conclusions Assessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysis software can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volume of cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract an additional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate. PMID:23094242

  13. Cleft palate in a male water buffalo calf.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Y; Ranjbar, R; Ghadiri, A R; Afsahr, F Saberi; Nejad, S Goorani; Mahabady, M Khaksary; Afrough, M; Karampoor, R; Tavakoli, A

    2007-12-15

    Congenital palatal defects are common in animals but there is only one report of water buffalo has been recorded in Iran. One died male water buffalo calf was examined after hysterotomy operation. At necropsy findings, brachygnathia, palate cleft and small lungs were diagnosed. It is the second report of water buffalo cleft palate in Iran.

  14. Feeding Techniques for Children Who Have Cleft Lip and Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    This pamphlet on feeding techniques for children who have cleft lip and palate emphasizes the role of the parent as part of a team involving many specialists. The pamphlet begins with explanations of complete and incomplete separations of the lip, unilateral and bilateral cleft lips, corrective surgical procedures, etc. The importance of weight…

  15. Primary Closure of A Sternal Cleft in A Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Ramdial, Shaal; Pillay, Desigan; Madaree, Anil

    2016-01-01

    A three day old neonate was referred to our department with a problem of a sternal cleft. Sternal clefts are often associated with a myriad of other abnormalities ranging from mild to severe. We present our experience with such a problem, and review the current literature concerning it. PMID:27853697

  16. Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in oral cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, M M; Rocha, C M G; Katina, T; Caldas, M; Codorniz, A; Medeiros, C

    2003-01-01

    To establish the prevalence of congenital heart diseases (CHDs) in cleft patients, the type of cleft and the presence of a syndrome were coded in 220 patients. A Doppler echocardiogram with color-flow mapping (DE) was obtained in all patients. Mean age was 112.0 +/- 101.2 months (range, 1-576 months), and 56.8% (125) were males. Cleft lip and palate occurred in 144 patients (65.5%), cleft lip in 40 (18.2%), and cleft palate in 36 (16.4%). Cleft palates were more frequent among females. Twenty-four CHDs were diagnosed in 21 of 220 patients (9.5%): 7 mitral valve prolapses, 6 atrial septal defects, 4 patent ductus arteriosus, 3 ventricular septal defects, 2 cases of tetralogy of Fallot, 1 pulmonary stenosis, and 1 bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of CHD did not correlate with the type of cleft. Syndromes occurred in 28 patients (12.7%), and this association was higher among patients with a cleft palate.

  17. Early Speech Production of Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrem, Theresa; Broen, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    The study comparing word-initial target phonemes and phoneme production of five toddlers with cleft palate and five normal toddlers found that the cleft palate children tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels and fewer words with word-initial stops, fricatives, and affricates than normal children. (Author/DB)

  18. Single-Word Intelligibility in Speakers with Repaired Cleft Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara; Chau, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Many speakers with repaired cleft palate have reduced intelligibility, but there are limitations with current procedures for assessing intelligibility. The aim of this study was to construct a single-word intelligibility test for speakers with cleft palate. The test used a multiple-choice identification format, and was based on phonetic contrasts…

  19. The caries prevalence of oral clefts in eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wen-Lin; Zhang, Dai-Zun; Xu, Yao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available concerning the prevalence of caries among patients with oral clefts in Eastern China. Consecutive patients aged 6-18 with oral clefts were recruited. Patients were stratified into 2 groups according to their ages, namely Group I with aged 6-12 and Group II with aged 13-18. For each age group, the children were further divided into three subgroups according to the types of oral clefts they had: cleft lip/cleft lip and alveolus (CL), cleft palate only (CP), and cleft lip and palate (CLP). Dental caries were examined by using the decayed, missing, and filled index for primary teeth (dmft) and Decay, Missing and Filled index for Permanent teeth (DMFT) according to criteria of the World Health Organization. 268 eligible patients with oral clefts were included in the study. The mean DMFT for Group I was 1.77 (SD2.58) while that for Group II was 6.96 (SD4.35). The mean DMFT was statistically significant different between the age group I and age group II (t=12.21, P<0.05). In Group I, the dmft scores was 4.68 (SD3.67) for CL group, while that for the CP group was 7.36 (SD3.93), and that for the CLP group was 5.72 (SD 3.87). The mean dmft was no statistically significant different among cleft types (F=3.13, P>0.05). Also in Group I, the mean DMFT was 1.56 (SD2.18) for CL group, while that for the CP group was 1.24 (SD 1.81) and that for the CLP group was 2.08 (SD2.96). There were no statistically significant different in mean DMFT among different cleft types (F=1.09, P>0.05). In Group II, the mean DMFT was 6.06 (SD3.97) for CL group while that for the CP group was 7.71 (SD 4.94) and that for the CLP group was 7.05 (SD4.32). No significant difference was shown in the mean DMFT among different cleft groups (CL, CP, and CLP) (F=0.55, P>0.05). During assess the prevalence of dental caries among Eastern Chinese with oral clefts; the study confirmed that the prevalence of caries was increased with increasing age for oral clefts patients. It was

  20. Ten-Year Cleft Surgery in Nepal: Achievements and Lessons Learned for Better Cleft Care Abroad

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Hans-Dieter; Koch, Heribert; Koller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate surgery abroad is devoid of global consensus regarding standards of therapy, follow-up, and outcome. Cleft surgery in Nepal during a 10-year sustained program provided the opportunity to inform on the need for such standards. Methods: Medical records were evaluated from the cleft clinic at Sushma Koirala Memorial Hospital, Sankhu, Kathmandu, Nepal, from 1997 to 2007. Four groups were identified for analysis: total cohort, total surgical cohort (TSC), primary program patients (PPP; patients had not been operated on before), and nonprimary program patients (non-PPP; patients operated on elsewhere before). Patient demographics, diagnostic, primary and secondary surgery (corrective surgery), and follow-up were evaluated. Results: One thousand forty-five patients were eligible for surgery. Three hundred twenty-three of 1,045 patients (30.9%) did not seek treatment, although scheduled for surgery. One thousand two hundred one procedures were performed in 722 patients [TSC; 845 PPP (70.4%); 356 non-PPP (29.64%)]. Corrective procedures were performed in 257 of 1,201 [3.5% (30 of 845 procedures in 509 patients) PPP vs 63.7% (227 of 356 procedures in 213 patients) non-PPP]. One hundred six lips were completely reoperated on (1 PPP vs 105 non-PPP), and 42 palates underwent a total revision (5 PPP vs 37 non-PPP). The surgical outcome of the TSC group in terms of complication rate was similar to the one in developed countries. Conclusions: The high rate of corrective surgery reveals the need for global regulatory mechanisms and the need for nongovernmental organizations to introduce strategies for delivering sustained cleft care until achieving full rehabilitation. The World Health Organization should establish standards for cleft care delivered in less developed countries. PMID:27579235

  1. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  2. The gingival Stillman’s clefts: histopathology and cellular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cassini, Maria Antonietta; Cerroni, Loredana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Orlandi, Augusto; Pilloni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study Stillman’s cleft is a mucogingival triangular-shaped defect on the buccal surface of a root with unknown etiology and pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to examine the Stillman’s cleft obtained from excision during root coverage surgical procedures at an histopathological level. Materials and method Harvesting of cleft was obtained from two periodontally healthy patients with a scalpel and a bevel incision and then placed in a test tube with buffered solution to be processed for light microscopy. Results Microscopic analysis has shown that Stillman’s cleft presented a lichenoid hand-like inflammatory infiltration, while in the periodontal patient an inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia was identified. Conclusion Stillman’s cleft remains to be investigated as for the possible causes of such lesion of the gingival margin, although an inflammatory response seems to be evident and active from a strictly histopathological standpoint. PMID:26941897

  3. Protocols in Cleft Lip and Palate Treatment: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Ladeira, Pedro Ribeiro Soares; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To find clinical decisions on cleft treatment based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method. Searches were made in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library on cleft lip and/or palate. From the 170 articles found in the searches, 28 were considered adequate to guide clinical practice. Results. A scarce number of RCTs were found approaching cleft treatment. The experimental clinical approaches analyzed in the 28 articles were infant orthopedics, rectal acetaminophen, palatal block with bupivacaine, infraorbital nerve block with bupivacaine, osteogenesis distraction, intravenous dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and alveoloplasty with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Conclusions. Few randomized controlled trials were found approaching cleft treatment, and fewer related to surgical repair of this deformity. So there is a need for more multicenter collaborations, mainly on surgical area, to reduce the variety of treatment modalities and to ensure that the cleft patient receives an evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:23213503

  4. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  5. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP) - Part 3: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; CARVALHO, Roberta Martinelli; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira das; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassutaka Faria; SOARES, Simone; MAZZOTTINI, Reinaldo; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face. PMID:23329251

  6. Syntax and Discourse in Near-Native French: Clefts and Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study examines aspects of the syntax-discourse interface in near-native French. Two cleft structures--"c'est" clefts and "avoir" clefts--are examined in experimental and spontaneous conversational data from 10 adult Anglophone learners of French and ten native speakers of French. "C'est" clefts mark focus, and…

  7. The Heterogeneous P-Median Problem for Categorization Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Simon J.; Aloise, Daniel; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    The p-median offers an alternative to centroid-based clustering algorithms for identifying unobserved categories. However, existing p-median formulations typically require data aggregation into a single proximity matrix, resulting in masked respondent heterogeneity. A proposed three-way formulation of the p-median problem explicitly considers…

  8. Cleft contribution to ring current formation

    SciTech Connect

    Delcourt, D.C. ); Sauvaud, J.A. ); Moore, T.E. )

    1990-12-01

    The storm time transport of ionospheric plasma from the cleft fountain to the plasma sheet and ring current is investigated by means of three-dimensional trajectory codes. Using observations to define the source location and flow rate. The authors trace test particles during a taillike to dipolelike reconfiguration of the geomagnetic field. Emphasis is placed on the behavior of heavy ions of low charge state (O{sup +}). As a result of their long periods of gyration, these ions are highly sensitive to rapid field variations and possible display transient nonadiabatic motions. It is demonstrated that O{sup +} which have originated in the high-latitude ionosphere but which find themselves in the vicinity of the equator at substorm onset can experience considerable erergization (from several keV up to several hundred keV) and pitch angle increase leading to trapping, as an effect of the induced electric field. These effects accompany a rapid earthward transport from midtail ({approximately}10-15 R{sub E}) to geosynchronous altitudes. The average particle energy and density involved suggest a substantial contribution of the cleft O{sup +} fountain to the ring current during substorms.

  9. Nasal airway and septal variation in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Friel, Michael T; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Flores, Roberto L; Tholpady, Sunil; Kula, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) affects the dentoalveolar and nasolabial facial regions. Internal and external nasal dysmorphology may persist in individuals born with CLP despite surgical interventions. 7-18 year old individuals born with unilateral and bilateral CLP (n = 50) were retrospectively assessed using cone beam computed tomography. Anterior, middle, and posterior nasal airway volumes were measured on each facial side. Septal deviation was measured at the anterior and posterior nasal spine, and the midpoint between these two locations. Data were evaluated using principal components analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and post-hoc ANOVA tests. PCA results show partial separation in high dimensional space along PC1 (48.5% variance) based on age groups and partial separation along PC2 (29.8% variance) based on CLP type and septal deviation patterns. MANOVA results indicate that age (P = 0.007) and CLP type (P ≤ 0.001) significantly affect nasal airway volume and septal deviation. ANOVA results indicate that anterior nasal volume is significantly affected by age (P ≤ 0.001), whereas septal deviation patterns are significantly affected by CLP type (P ≤ 0.001). Age and CLP type affect nasal airway volume and septal deviation patterns. Nasal airway volumes tend to be reduced on the clefted sides of the face relative to non-clefted sides of the face. Nasal airway volumes tend to strongly increase with age, whereas septal deviation values tend to increase only slightly with age. These results suggest that functional nasal breathing may be impaired in individuals born with the unilateral and bilateral CLP deformity.

  10. A Case of Complex Facial Clefts Treated with Staged-tissue Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Shigemura, Yuka; Nuri, Takashi; Iwanaga, Hiroyuki; Seno, Takaya

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Craniofacial clefts involve all soft tissue and skeletal elements throughout the cleft. Usefulness of tissue expansion in craniofacial clefts is reported. Surgery for a complex type of facial clefts is more difficult and more extensive than for a simple one. We experienced a primary case of complex facial clefts (Tessier No. 2 and 12 on the right and 3, 11, and 5 on the left). Soft-tissue closure of all clefts could be completed by using 4 tissue expanders and 7 operations. Because multiple tissue deficiencies and abnormalities exist in craniofacial clefts, especially complex type, a planned, staged, sequential approach by tissue expansion is necessary to produce ideal results. PMID:25587498

  11. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro.

  12. Risk factors involved in orofacial cleft predisposition – review

    PubMed Central

    Nelke, Kamil; Pawlas, Krystyna; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Clefts that occur in children are a special topic. Avoiding risk factors, and also an early diagnosis of cleft possibility can result in minimizing or avoiding them. If on the other hand when clefts occur they require a long-term, multistage specialized treatment. Etiology of clefts seems to be related to many factors. Factors such as genetic, environmental, geographic and even race factors are important. Identification of risk factors can lead to prevention and prophylactic behaviors in order to minimize its occurrence. Exposure to environmental factors at home and work that lead to cleft predisposition should not be disregarded. It seems that before planning a family it would be wise to consult with doctors of different specializations, especially in high-risk families with cleft history in order to analyze previous lifestyle. Clefts are very common in hereditary facial malformations and are causing a lot of other irregularities in the head and neck region. In this paper after a brief papers review authors present socio-geographic, environmental and also work place related factors that are influencing pregnant women condition and should be taken under serious consideration. PMID:28352691

  13. Unfavourable results in the repair of the cleft lip

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Puthucode V.; Adenwalla, Hirji Sorab

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Unfavorable results in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip repair are often easy to spot but not always easy to prevent as to treat. We have tried to deal with the more common problems and explain possible causes and the best possible management options from our experience. Unilateral cleft lip repair: Unfavorable results immediately after repair involve Dehiscence and Scaring. Delayed blemishes include vermillion notching, a short lip, deficiency in the height of the lateral vermillion on the cleft side, white roll malalignment, oro-vestibular fistula, the cleft lip nose deformity, a narrow nostril and a “high-riding” nostril. We analyze the causes of these blemishes and outline our views regarding the treatment of these. Bilateral cleft lip: Immediate problems again include dehiscence as also loss of prolabium or premaxilla. Delayed unfavorable results are central vermillion deficiency, a lip that is too tight, bilateral cleft lip nose deformity, problems with the premaxilla and maxillary growth disturbances. Here again we discuss the causation of these problems and our preferred methods of treatment. Conclusion: We have detailed the significant unfavorable results after unilateral and bilateral cleft lip surgery. The methods of treatment advocated have been layer from our own experience. PMID:24501453

  14. Evolution of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Infants with Cleft Palate and Micrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Christopher M.; Taylor, Jesse A.; Vossough, Arastoo; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Thomas, Allison; Bradford, Ruth; Lioy, Janet; Tapia, Ignacio E.; Assadsangabi, Reza; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Children with craniofacial anomalies are a heterogeneous group at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the prevalence and structural predictors of OSA in this population are unknown. We hypothesized that infants with micrognathia would have more significant OSA than those with isolated cleft palate ± cleft lip (ICP), and those with ICP would have more significant OSA than controls. We postulated that OSA severity would correlate with reduced mandibular size, neurodevelopmental scores, and growth. Methods: Prospective cohort study. 15 infants with ICP, 19 with micrognathia, and 9 controls were recruited for polysomnograms, neurodevelopmental testing, cephalometrics (ICP and micrognathia groups) at baseline and a follow-up at 6 mo. Results: Baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) [median (range)] of the micrognathia group [20.1 events/h (0.8, 54.7)] was greater than ICP [3.2 (0.3, 30.7)] or controls [3.1 (0.5, 23.3)] (p = 0.001). Polysomnographic findings were similar between ICP and controls. Controls had a greater AHI than previously reported in the literature. Cephalometric measures of both midface hypoplasia and micrognathia correlated with OSA severity. Neurodevelopment was similar among groups. OSA improved with growth in participants with ICP and postoperatively in infants with micrognathia. Conclusions: Micrognathia, but not ICP, was associated with more significant OSA compared to controls. Both midface and mandibular hypoplasia contribute to OSA in these populations. OSA improved after surgical correction in most infants with micrognathia, and improved without intervention before palate repair in infants with ICP. Citation: Cielo CM, Taylor JA, Vossough A, Radcliffe J, Thomas A, Bradford R, Lioy J, Tapia IE, Assadsangabi R, Shults J, Marcus CL. Evolution of obstructive sleep apnea in infants with cleft palate and micrognathia. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):979–987. PMID:27092700

  15. The lack of isolated palatal clefts in Czech Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Peterka, M; Peterková, R; Likovský, Z

    2006-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are usually divided into three basic types: isolated cleft lip (CL), cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (CP). The incidence of specific cleft types in a population and their relative numbers show specific differences between ethnic groups and races. However, there are no available data about the incidence and relative numbers of orofacial cleft types (CL, CLP, CP) in the gypsy ethnic group. The aim of this study was to compare relative numbers of specific types of orofacial clefts between the Czech gypsy and non-gypsy populations. We conducted a retrospective epidemiological study using a set of all living patients with orofacial clefts born in the Czech Republic from 1964 until 2002. The cleft patients were subdivided into three groups: 5304 non-gypsy children, both parents of whom were non-gypsies (NN), 98 gypsy children, both parents of whom were gypsies (GG) and 18 children with one parent non-gypsy and one parent gypsy (NG). The relative number of isolated CP was 37.1% in NN children. However, the relative number of CP was significantly reduced to 5.1% (P < 0.01) in the GG group. Conversely, the relative number of CLP was higher (P < 0.01) in the GG group (62.2%) in comparison to the NN group (39.2%). The tendency to decrease in the relative number of CP and increase in the relative number of CLP was also apparent in the NG group, but not so well expressed. We hypothesize that the decrease in CP and increase in CLP and CL in gypsies might be caused by their genetic predis-position to CL. Since the CP originates later than CL during embryonic development, some CP arise in embryos with already existing CL giving rise to CLP. Consequently, the missing isolated CP might be hidden in the group of CLP patients postnatally.

  16. Face Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of face painting as a technique for making the endangered species issue tangible for children while addressing the complexity of the issue. Children are "given" an animal of their own and are educated about the animal while having their faces painted to resemble the animal. (LZ)

  17. Prosthetic management of soft palate cleft--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dosumu, O O; Ogunrinde, T J; Ogundipe, O T

    2006-09-01

    The treatment of cleft in the soft palate can be achieved essentially by surgical reconstruction or prosthetic obturation. The goals of prosthetic intervention are to prevent food and liquid leakage into the nose and to improve speech intelligibility by ensuring functional velopharyngeal port closure. In this report, the prosthetic management of a 5-year-old child with soft palatal cleft is presented. The impression of the cleft was taken with tissue conditioner, Visco -gel, TM (De Trey, Amalgamated Dental London) and the pharyngeal obturator (speech bulb) was made in clear acrylic resin. Patient tolerated the appliance well and was referred to speech therapist for speech articulation.

  18. Presurgical nasal moulding in a neonate with cleft lip

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Anshula; Shah, Dixit; Macwan, Chirag S

    2014-01-01

    The concept of presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNM) was developed to improve the aesthetic result of surgically corrected cleft lip. This paper presents the method of fabrication of PNM appliance and the case of a 30-day-old neonate with unilateral cleft lip in whom nasal moulding was performed. Treatment was initiated at 30 days and continued for 60 days after which the surgical correction of cleft lip was performed. Significant improvement in aesthetics and symmetry of the nose was achieved at the end of the treatment. PMID:24928928

  19. Cortical Clefts and Cortical Bumps: A Continuous Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Furruqh, Farha; Thirunavukarasu, Suresh; Vivekandan, Ravichandran

    2016-01-01

    Cortical ‘clefts’ (schizencephaly) and cortical ‘bumps’ (polymicrogyria) are malformations arising due to defects in postmigrational development of neurons. They are frequently encountered together, with schizencephalic clefts being lined by polymicrogyria. We present the case of an eight-year-old boy who presented with seizures. Imaging revealed closed lip schizencephaly, polymicrogyria and a deep ‘incomplete’ cleft lined by polymicrogyria not communicating with the lateral ventricle. We speculate that hypoperfusion or ischaemic cortical injury during neuronal development may lead to a spectrum of malformations ranging from polymicrogyria to incomplete cortical clefts to schizencephaly. PMID:27630923

  20. Assessing Angle's malocclusion among cleft lip and/or palate patients in Jammu

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akshay; Gupta, Anur; Bhardwaj, Amit; Vikram, S.; Gomathi, Ajeetha; Singh, Karanprakash

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to examine the patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate and its association with different types of malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was done among 168 patients with abnormalities of cleft lip and/or palate. Angle's classification of malocclusion was applied for assessment of occlusion as Class I, Class II, and Class III. The types of oral clefts classification such as cleft lip unilateral and cleft lip bilateral, cleft palate (CP), unilateral cleft lip with palate (UCLP) and bilateral cleft lip with palate (BCLP) was considered. Chi-square test was applied to analyze the data at P < 0.05. Results: The study showed different categories of clefts patients as cleft lip (81), CP (31), and both cleft lip and palate (53). The occurrence of unilateral cleft lip (44) was maximum among the sample followed by UCLP (39), and bilateral cleft lip (31). Maximum subjects with Class II (10.7%) and Class III (4.9%) malocclusion were seen with unilateral cleft lip deformities. None of the patients with UCLP had Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: Cleft lip was the most commonly observed deformity and high frequency of Class II and III malocclusion was evident. Therefore, patients with such abnormalities should be screened timely. PMID:27195223

  1. Candidate pathway based analysis for cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Xiao; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this research was to identify potential biological pathways associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and to explore the potential biological mechanisms underlying these associated pathways on risk of NSCL/P. This project was based on the dataset of a previously published genome-wide association (GWA) study on NSCL/P (Beaty et al. 2010). Case-parent trios used here originated from an international consortium (The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium, GENEVA) formed in 2007. A total of 5,742 individuals from 1,908 CL/P case-parents trios (1,591 complete trios and 317 incomplete trios where one parent was missing) were collected and genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad array. Candidate pathways were selected using a list of 356 genes that may be related to oral clefts. In total, 42 candidate pathways, which included 1,564 genes and 40,208 SNPs were tested. Using a pathway-based analysis approach proposed by Wang et al (2007), we conducted a permutation-based test to assess the statistical significance of the nominal p-values of 42 candidate pathways. The analysis revealed several pathways yielding nominally significant p-values. However, controlling for the family wise error rate, none of these pathways could retain statistical significance. Nominal p-values of these pathways were concentrated at the lower tail of the distribution, with more than expected low p-values. A permutation based test for examining this type of distribution pattern yielded an overall p-value of 0.029. Thus, while this pathway-based analysis did not yield a clear significant result for any particular pathway, we conclude that one or more of the genes and pathways considered here likely do play a role in oral clefting.

  2. Endoscopic excision of branchial cleft cyst in the neck using mammary areolae and axilla approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jia; Fan, Ziyi; Gong, Yu; Yuan, Qiaoying; Zhong, Ling; Fan, Linjun

    2012-10-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are prone to recurrence and secondary infections, and hence, surgical resection is necessary. These masses are traditionally removed through an overlying incision; however, the resulting scar can be considered aesthetically displeasing. We accomplished a case of endoscopic resection of branchial cleft cyst in the right side of the neck of an 18-year-old female patient. Incisions were made in the bilateral mammary areolae and right axilla of the patient. We completely resected the mass using an ultrasonic scalpel and electrocoagulation hook within 45 minutes. All of the procedures were finished on the deep face of platysma muscle, which was not severed. There was no significant bleeding during the operation and the postoperative recovery was smooth, without recurrence for 6 months. The endoscopic resection of the neck mass through bilateral areolae and axillary incisions is simple, safe, and feasible, because there were covert incisions and fewer complications.

  3. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P.

  4. Clinical characteristics of horses and foals diagnosed with cleft palate in a referral population: 28 cases (1988-2011).

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sarah D; Norman, Tracy E; Arnold, Carolyn E; Coleman, Michelle C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this case series was to characterize the population, case presentations, and outcomes of 28 equids diagnosed with cleft palate over a 25-year period. The incidence of cleft palate was 0.04%. The median age at presentation was 2 mo (range: 1 d to 3 y). Fifty percent of the animals were < 2 mo old, 21% were ≥ 2 mo but < 1 y old, and 29% were 1 y of age or older. Males and females were nearly equally represented. Short-term outcomes included euthanasia in 50%, surgical repair in 11%, supportive care in 4%, and no treatment in 32% of cases; 46% of the animals survived to discharge. Defects involving both the hard and soft palate and/or aspiration pneumonia generally had less favorable outcomes. Though cleft palate is rare in horses, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses of all ages with nasal discharge, a cough, a history of recurrent respiratory infections, poor growth, or chronic submandibular lymphadenopathy. Endoscopic evaluation of the pharynx may aid in earlier diagnosis and prognostication for owners.

  5. Relapse after orthodontic correction of maxillary median diastema: a follow-up evaluation of consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Shashua, D; Artun, J

    1999-06-01

    An evaluation of 96 treated orthodontic patients with maxillary median diastema ranging from 0.50 mm to 5.62 mm (mean 1.22, SD 0.85) was performed 4.0 to 9.0 years after completion of active treatment. Pre- and posttreatment data were gathered from available records. Follow-up data were gathered from records and interviews of 37 patients, and from phone interviews of 59 patients. The incidence of diastema relapse was 49% when scored as either presence of a measurable space at follow-up, a history of orthodontic or prosthetic retreatment to close a reopened space, or continued use of a retainer to control relapse tendency. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pretreatment diastema size and presence of a family member with a similar condition were the only significant risk factors for relapse (p<0.05), while pretreatment spacing in the maxillary anterior dentition approached significance (p = 0.10). No association was found between relapse and presence of an abnormal frenum or an osseous intermaxillary cleft, although patients with an abnormal frenum had a wider pretreatment diastema than those with a normal frenum (p<0.05). Fremitus of the maxillary incisors was the only parameter at follow-up associated with space reopening (p<0.01).

  6. Computational Embryology and Predictive Toxicology of Cleft Palate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capacity to model and simulate key events in developmental toxicity using computational systems biology and biological knowledge steps closer to hazard identification across the vast landscape of untested environmental chemicals. In this context, we chose cleft palate as a model ...

  7. EXPERIMENTAL MODELS FOR THE STUDY OF ORAL CLEFTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicology and teratology studies routinely utilize animal models to determine the potential for chemical and physical agents to produce reproductive and developmental toxicity, including birth defects such as cleft palate. The standardized teratology screen typically tests co...

  8. Characteristics of the Thermal Ion Bulk Parameters in the Cleft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, V. N.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk parameters for the thermal ions (0.3 to 25 eV) have been derived using data from the Scanning Thermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS) on the Sounding of the Cleft Ion Fountain Energization Region (SCIFER) experiment. The SCIFER rocket was launched into the ionospheric cleft region at 1000 MLT with a maximum altitude of 1450 km. The heated cleft plasma was observed to be H(+) dominated, in sharp contrast with observations of the same region near solar maximum. Regions of particular interest include the sharp, heated equatorward wall of the cleft and highly structured patches of transversely-accelerated ions (TAI). Densities, temperatures and velocities are used to characterize and distinguish these regions and to compare to predicted bulk parameters from candidate heating mechanisms.

  9. Cleft and Case: Two Sources of Interference for FL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Edwin A.

    1975-01-01

    Examines errors made by English speakers learning German and, in attempting to find sources for them, contrasts certain phenomena of German and English grammar. The phenomena in question are cleft sentences and the treatment of case. (TL)

  10. Ankyloglossia with cleft lip: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Jangid, Kritika; Alexander, Aurelian Jovita; Jayakumar, Nadathur Doraiswamy; Varghese, Sheeja; Ramani, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This article presents a rare case of ankyloglossia associated with cleft lip treated with diode laser in a 12-year-old Indian boy who had undergone surgical correction of associated cleft lip soon after birth. Correction of ankyloglossia at a young age would lead to enhanced phonetics, improved oral hygiene, and overall personality development.

  11. Ankyloglossia with cleft lip: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jangid, Kritika; Alexander, Aurelian Jovita; Jayakumar, Nadathur Doraiswamy; Varghese, Sheeja; Ramani, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is a congenital anomaly affecting the tongue, which is characterized by thick, short lingual frenulum. This condition causes many difficulties such as limited tongue protrusion, breastfeeding difficulties, speech impairment and lack of self-confidence. It is very rarely associated with any other congenital craniofacial disorders such as cleft lip, X-linked cleft palate, Van der Woude syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Orofacial digital syndrome, Beckwith Weidman syndrome or Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome. This article presents a rare case of ankyloglossia associated with cleft lip treated with diode laser in a 12-year-old Indian boy who had undergone surgical correction of associated cleft lip soon after birth. Correction of ankyloglossia at a young age would lead to enhanced phonetics, improved oral hygiene, and overall personality development. PMID:26941523

  12. Repair of bilateral cleft lip and its variants

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, John B.

    2009-01-01

    The surgeon who lifts a scalpel to repair a bilateral cleft lip and nasal deformity is accountable for: 1) precise craftsmanship based on three-dimensional features and four-dimensional changes; 2) periodic assessment throughout the child's growth; and 3) technical modifications during primary closure based on knowledge gained from long-term follow-up evaluation. These children should not have to endure the stares prompted by nasolabial stigmata that result from outdated concepts and technical misadventures. The principles for repair of bilateral complete cleft lip have evolved to such a level that the child's appearance should be equivalent to, or surpass, that of a unilateral complete cleft lip. These same principles also apply to the repair of the variants of bilateral cleft lip, although strategies and execution differ slightly. PMID:19884685

  13. Un Futuro Prometedor para su Nino con Labio Hendido y Paladar Hendido. Edicion Refundida (Bright Promise for Your Child with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate. Revised Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Eugene T.; Berlin, Asa J.

    The booklet, written in Spanish, is intended to help parents of babies with cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Topics covered include the sequence of prenatal development and the effects of birth defects, common misconceptions about what causes the conditions, possible hereditary and environmental causes, and what it means to have a cleft palate or a…

  14. Papillary Carcinoma in Median Aberrant Thyroid (Ectopic) - Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K, Shashidhar; Deshmane, Vijaya Laxmi; Kumar, Veerendra; Arjunan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Median ectopic thyroid may be encountered anywhere from the foramen caecum to the diaphragm. Non lingual median aberrant thyroid (incomplete descent) usually found in the infrahyoid region and malignant transformation in this ectopic thyroid tissue is very rare. We report an extremely rare case of papillary carcinoma in non lingual median aberrant thyroid in a 25-year-old female. The differentiation between a carcinoma arising in the median ectopic thyroid tissue and a metastatic papillary carcinoma from an occult primary in the main thyroid gland is also discussed. PMID:25121039

  15. PREVALENCE OF CLEFT LIP AND PALATE IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Chincharadze, S; Vadachkoria, Z; Mchedlishvili, I

    2017-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate take significant place in congenital malformations. We aimed to study epidemiological peculiarities of these pathologies in Georgia for 2006-2015. We compared magnitude of its distribution with the data from 1981-1990. Prevalence of cleft lip and palate in Georgia in 2006-2015 was 0.95±0.04 per 1000 live births, while in 1981-1990- it was 1.05, i.e. in contrast to 1980's frequency of these pathological conditions decreased to some extent. Distribution of cleft lip and palate varies across the country regions. The most intensive spread has been observed in Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, where prevalence composed 2.28/1000. In the rest of the regions frequency of these pathologies is significantly lower. For instance, in Kakheti the rate is equal to 1,87/1000, in Kvemo Kartli - 1.56/1000, in Shida Kartli - 1.55/1000. In the rest of the regions prevalence rate is lower than the country average. It should be noted that in Tbilisi the rate is as low as 0.80/1000. The lowest level has been reported in Guria - 0.56/1000. Currently cleft lip with palate is the most frequently occurring anomaly in Georgia accounting for 39.8% of all congenital malformations. Cleft lip alone ranks the second - 36.1%, followed by cleft palate (24.1%). These pathologies are more frequent in boys than in girls. 60.3% of the cases are reported in males, in contrast to girls - 39.7% (p<0.01). Usually, cleft palate is the most common among girls, but in our case, it had higher prevalence among boys, 53.6% vs. 46,4%. Thus cleft lip and palate distribution in Georgia is characterized by epidemiological peculiarities, which should be considered in implementation of preventive measures.

  16. Nasalance measures in German-speaking cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Swennen, Gwen R J; Grimaldi, Hannes; Upheber, Juliane; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Dempf, Rupert

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate nasalance measures in German-speaking patients with different types of repaired cleft lip and palate and to find out if significant nasalance gender differences exist in the different cleft groups. A total of 125 German-speaking cleft patients (74 male and 51 female) were included in this study: 18 patients with isolated unilateral cleft lip (UCL; mean age: 13.00 +/- 2.03 years), 66 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP; mean age: 14.80 +/- 3.45 years), 25 patients with isolated cleft palate (CP; mean age: 14.60 +/- 3.48 years), and 16 patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP; mean age: 14.30 +/- 3.61 years). Nasalance data were collected and computed using the NasalView hardware/software system (Fa. Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA). Speech stimuli according to a modified Heidelberg Rhinophonia Assessment Form (sustained vowels "a," "e," "i," "o," and "u"; oral and nasal sentences; and three oral-nasal reading passages) were used to obtain nasalance scores. Nasalance distance and ratio were also calculated for the oral and nasal sentences and for one of the oral-nasal reading passages. Unpaired t tests showed no significant gender nasalance differences in each cleft group. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences in mean nasalance distance and ratio. For the nasal sentence, a significant difference (P = 0.032) in mean nasalance scores was found between the UCL and UCLP groups.

  17. Congenital Palatal Fistula Associated with Submucous Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Eshete, Mekonen; Camison, Liliana; Abate, Fikre; Hailu, Taye; Demissie, Yohannes; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Butali, Azeez; Losken, H. Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although cleft lip and cleft palate are among the most common congenital malformations, the presence of an isolated congenital palatal fistula along with a submucous cleft is very rare. This appears as an oval-shaped, full-thickness fenestration in the palatal midline that does not fully extend anteriorly or posteriorly, accompanied by the findings of a submucous cleft. Because of the uncommon nature of this entity, there is controversy about its etiology, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Two cases of children with congenital palatal fistulae and a submucous cleft palate are presented who were treated in different settings by different surgeons. Cases are discussed along with a thorough review of the available literature. Results: Patient 1 presented at 4 years of age with “a hole in the palate” since birth and abnormal speech. His palatal fistula and submucous cleft were repaired with a modified von Langenbeck technique in Ethiopia. At a 2-year follow-up, the palate remained closed, but hypernasal speech persisted. Patient 2 was a 1-year-old presenting with failure to thrive and nasal regurgitation, who underwent a Furlow palatoplasty in the United States with good immediate results. She was unfortunately lost to follow-up. Conclusions: A congenital fenestration of the palate is rare. Reports reveal suboptimal speech at follow-up, despite various types of repair, especially when combined with a submucous cleft. Available literature suggests that repair should not focus on fistula closure only but instead on providing adequate palate length to provide good velopharyngeal function, as in any cleft palate repair. PMID:27014542

  18. Orthognathic surgery in the cleft lip and palate patient.

    PubMed

    Herber, S C; Lehman, J A

    1993-10-01

    Orthognathic surgery for the cleft lip and palate patient should be designed to achieve good facial aesthetics and a stable, functional occlusion. Maxillary and mandibular osteotomies, which benefit cleft lip and palate patients with associated dentofacial deformities, should be modified to meet the needs of the individual patient. Soft-tissue correction of the upper lip and nose adds to the overall aesthetic result, but should be performed as a separate procedure.

  19. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins.

  20. Anterior pillarplasty: a modification in cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Çelebiler, Özhan; Ersoy, Burak; Numanoğlu, Ayhan

    2011-07-01

    After the primary repair of cleft palate, surgeons are frequently confronted with a short soft palate and a wide velopharyngeal space, both of which are known to diminish the quality of speech. We introduce a new modification of the primary repair of cleft palate that lengthens the soft palate and helps to reduce the volume of the velopharyngeal space. Ten patients younger than 12 months with nonsyndromic cleft palate were operated on with this technique. The incision at the cleft margin extended behind the uvula as a modification to the classic design of mucoperiosteal flaps. The sagittally divided mucosal layers of each anterior tonsillar pillar are sutured at the midline 1 cm posterior to the new uvula. The rate of postoperative fistula formation and other complications were evaluated postoperatively. One patient had a uvular and partly pillar detachment at the postoperative period. All other clefts healed without complication. The primary repair of the cleft palate with the anterior pillarplasty technique is a safe and easy-to-perform procedure. This modification can effectively reduce the transverse diameter of the velopharyngeal space and increase the anteroposterior length of the palate.

  1. Is alveolar cleft reconstruction still controversial? (Review of literature)

    PubMed Central

    Seifeldin, Sameh A.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CL/P) is a frequent congenital malformation that manifests in several varieties including unilateral or bilateral and complete or incomplete. Alveolar cleft reconstruction remains controversial with regard to timing, graft materials, surgical techniques, and methods of evaluation. Many studies have been conducted addressing these points to develop an acceptable universal protocol for managing CL/P. The primary goal of alveolar cleft reconstruction in CL/P patients is to provide a bony bridge at the cleft site that allows maxillary arch continuity, oronasal fistula repair, eruption of the permanent dentition into the newly formed bone, enhances nasal symmetry through providing alar base support, orthodontic movement and placement of osseointegrated implants when indicated. Other goals include improving speech, improvement of periodontal conditions, establishing better oral hygiene, and limiting growth disturbances. In order to rehabilitate oral function in CL/P patients alveolar bone grafting is necessary. Secondary bone grafting is the most widely accepted method for treating alveolar clefts. Autogenous bone graft is the primary source for reconstructing alveolar cleft defects and is currently the preferred grafting material. PMID:26792963

  2. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate: identification of sporadic cases with a high level of genetic predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, F C; Sofaer, J A

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that asymmetry for certain bilaterally represented features may be an indicator of genetic predisposition to cleft lip with or without cleft palate and may therefore be of value in the individual assessment of recurrence risk, particularly for sporadic cases. An asymmetry score has been devised that may be of use in identifying those with a high level of genetic predisposition. Stepwise logistic regression selected nine variables that together correctly classified 85% of familial cleft patients and unrelated non-cleft controls. Applying the same regression equation to sporadic cases, 26% fell into the range occupied by the majority of familial patients, suggesting that these had a high level of genetic predisposition. PMID:3572999

  3. Citation Characteristics of Research Articles under the Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University.

    PubMed

    Thanapaisal, Soodjai; Thanapaisal, Chaiwit; Thanapaisal, Sukhumal

    2015-08-01

    Center of Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Deformities, Khon Kaen University, has cooperated with the Medical Association of Thailand in publishing the special five issues of JMT (Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand) during the years 2010-2014 in order to promote research activities and working network of related fields in cleft lip-cleft palate and craniofacial deformities. This study aimed to examine the features of 106 research articles in terms of authors and disciplines, and analyze the citations considering sources, country and years after publication. The scope of study also included citations in the form of journal, which was presented as journal ranking compared with impact factors and Bradford's Law on journal citation. The results of study will be useful in developing multidisciplinary research activities of the center and especially assist in the acquisition of academic journals for essential sources of reference.

  4. Median and ulnar antidromic sensory studies to the fourth digit.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Andrew; Lohman, James; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The literature documents multiple reports of neurological injury resulting from both the implantation and the removal of orthopedic devices. These injuries can be easily and objectively evaluated with nerve conduction studies. This study was undertaken to derive a normative database for median and ulnar sensory conduction studies to the fourth digit. Testing was done utilizing a 14-cm antidromic technique on 192 asymptomatic subjects with no risk factors for neuropathy. The subjects were studied bilaterally. Onset latency, peak latency, onset-to-peak amplitude, peak-to-peak amplitude, rise time, and duration were recorded. Increasing age and body mass index were associated with decreasing amplitudes and area. No other demographic factors correlated with differences in waveform measurements. Mean onset latency was 2.7 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 2.6 +/- 0.2 for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak latency was 3.4 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 3.3 +/- 0.3 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean onset-to-peak amplitude was 21 +/- 12 muV for the median nerve and 23 +/- 12muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak-to-peak amplitude was 34 +/- 20 muV for the median nerve and 36 +/- 23 muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean area was 25 +/- 17 nVs for the median nerve and 28 +/- 19 nVs for the ulnar nerve. Mean rise time was 0.7 +/- 0.1 ms for the median nerve and 0.7 +/- 0.2 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean duration was 1.9 +/- 0.4 ms for the median nerve and 1.9 +/- 0.5 ms for the ulnar nerve. The mean difference in onset and peak latency between the median and ulnar nerves (median minus ulnar) was 0.1 +/- 0.2 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of median greater than ulnar onset and peak latency was 0.5 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of ulnar greater than median onset latency was 0.2 ms (0.3 ms for peak latency). The upper limit of normal drop in median peak-to-peak amplitude from one side to the other was 56%. For the ulnar nerve this value was 73%.

  5. Academic Achievement of Children and Adolescents With Oral Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Brent; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul A.; Ansley, Timothy N.; Speltz, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Previous studies of academic achievement of children with oral clefts have mostly relied on small, clinic-based samples prone to ascertainment bias. In the first study in the United States to use a population-based sample with direct assessment, we evaluated the academic achievement of children with oral clefts relative to their classmates. METHODS: Children born with isolated oral clefts in Iowa from 1983 to 2003 were identified from the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders and matched to unaffected classmates by gender, school/school district, and month and year of birth. Academic achievement was assessed by using standardized tests of academic progress developed by the Iowa Testing Programs. Iowa Testing Programs data were linked to birth certificates for all children. Regression models controlled for household demographic and socioeconomic factors. The analytical sample included 588 children with clefts contributing 3735 child-grade observations and 1874 classmates contributing 13 159 child-grade observations. RESULTS: Children with oral clefts had lower scores than their classmates across all domains and school levels, with a 5-percentile difference in the overall composite score. Children with clefts were approximately one-half grade level behind their classmates and had higher rates of academic underachievement and use of special education services by 8 percentage points. Group differences were slightly lower but remained large and significant after adjusting for many background characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Children with oral clefts underperformed across all academic areas and grade levels compared with their classmates. The results support a model of early testing and intervention among affected children to identify and reduce academic deficits. PMID:24753523

  6. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  7. Face Prints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadash, Dre Ann

    1984-01-01

    Eighth graders made prints of their own faces, using photographic papers and chemicals. Describes the supplies needed and the printing process involved. Because junior high school students are so concerned with self, this was a very meaningful activity for them. (CS)

  8. Cleft lift procedure for pilonidal disease: technique and perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Favuzza, J; Brand, M; Francescatti, A; Orkin, B

    2015-08-01

    Pilonidal disease is a common condition affecting young patients. It is often disruptive to their lifestyle due to recurrent abscesses or chronic wound drainage. The most common surgical treatment, "cystectomy," removes useful tissue unnecessarily and does not address the etiology of the condition. Herein, we describe the etiology of pilonidal disease and our technique for definitive management of pilonidal disease using the cleft lift procedure. In this paper, we present our method of performing the cleft lift procedure for pilonidal disease including perioperative management and surgical technique. We have used the cleft lift procedure in nearly 200 patients with pilonidal disease, in both primary and salvage procedures settings. It has been equally successful in both settings with a high rate of success. It results in a closed wound with relatively minimal discomfort and straightforward wound care. We have described our current approach to recurrent and complex pilonidal disease using the cleft lift procedure. Once learned, the cleft lift procedure is a straightforward and highly successful solution to a chronic and challenging condition.

  9. 1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST SHOWING REVOLUTIONARY WAR MONUMENT 56/1 - Greene Street Historic District, Greene Street, Gordon Highway to Augusta Canal Bridge, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  10. 2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO EAST ROCKS ROAD BRIDGE, CA. 1940. COLLECTION CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. - Merritt Parkway, East Rocks Road Bridge, Spanning Merritt Parkway, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  11. 12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, Copy of photograph ca. 1940. Collection Connecticut Department of Transportation. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  12. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  13. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  14. Early bone grafting in complete cleft lip and palate cases following maxillofacial orthopedics. II. The soft tissue development from seven to thirteen years of age.

    PubMed

    Larson, O; Nordin, K E; Nylén, B; Eklund, G

    1983-01-01

    The subsequent effect of preoperative maxillofacial orthopedics and early bone grafting on the development of the soft tissue profile of the face was studied with roentgencephalometric analysis on cleft patients between 7 and 13 years of age. They were divided into two unilateral and one bilateral complete-cleft group, all having been bone grafted early with the "four-flap" technique. The two unilateral groups were one group of 39 children operated on between 1960 and 1965 without preoperative orthopedics and one group of 46 children operated on between 1965 and 1972 after preoperative orthopedics ("T-traction"). The bilateral group comprised 19 children operated on between 1960 and 1972 after premaxillary retropositioning pressure, combined when necessary, with outward rotation of the lateral maxillary segments. Comparisons of facial growth were made with U.S. non-grafted clefts and with nonclefts. The effect of the preoperative orthopedic management facilitated the subsequent surgical procedure by a narrowing of the cleft and replacement of the deviated maxillary and nasal structures. The results were within limits of the non-grafted cases, with the exception of the soft tissue overlying the subnasal region. The reduced prominence of that region was explained by the primary surgical procedure, which made the lip adherent to the alveolar crest. In comparison with nonclefts, all parameters indicated a reduced growth capacity.

  15. Epigenetic Integration of the Developing Brain and Face

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Trish E.; Schmidt, Eric J.; Boughner, Julia C.; Jamniczky, Heather A.; Marcucio, Ralph S.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2011-01-01

    The integration of the brain and face and to what extent this relationship constrains or enables evolutionary change in the craniofacial complex is an issue of long-standing interest in vertebrate evolution. To investigate brain-face integration, we studied the covariation between the forebrain and midface at gestational days 10-10.5 in four strains of laboratory mice. We found that phenotypic variation in the forebrain is highly correlated with that of the face during face formation such that variation in the size of the forebrain correlates with the degree of prognathism and orientation of the facial prominences. This suggests strongly that the integration of the brain and face is relevant to the etiology of midfacial malformations such as orofacial clefts. This axis of integration also has important implications for the evolutionary developmental biology of the mammalian craniofacial complex. PMID:21901785

  16. Cleft size at the time of palate repair in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate as an indicator of maxillary growth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y-F; Prasad, N K K; Chiu, Y-T; Yun, C; Chen, P K-T

    2010-10-01

    Cleft size at the time of palate repair might affect the difficulty of surgical repair and, thus, indirectly postoperative maxillary growth. This retrospective study aimed to determine whether a correlation existed between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the growth of the maxilla. Maxillary dental casts of 39 infants with non-syndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, taken at the time of palate repair, were used to measure cleft size. Cleft size was defined as the percentage of the total palatal area. The later growth of the maxilla was determined using lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs taken at 9 years of age. The Pearson correlation analysis was used for statistical analysis. The results showed negative correlations between cleft size and the maxillary length (PMP-ANS, PMP-A) and the maxillary protrusion (S-N-ANS, SNA). These data suggest that in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate there is a significant correlation between the cleft size at the time of palate repair and the maxillary length and protrusion. Patients with a large cleft at the time of palate repair have a shorter and more retrusive maxilla than those with a small cleft by the age of 9 years.

  17. Initial size of cleft does not correlate with size and function of nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Erika; Andlin-Sobocki, Anna; Mani, Maria; Holmström, Mats

    2011-06-01

    The noses of patients with clefts are often functionally inadequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between size of the maxillary cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). This is a long-term follow up study including 53 patients with UCLP born between 1960 and 1987 and treated at the Cleft Lip and Palate Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Lip repair was performed at 3-4 months of age followed by either a one-stage or a two-stage palatal closure. The size of the cleft was measured on infant maxillary dental casts. Nasal minimum cross-sectional area (cm(2)) and volume (cm(3)) (acoustic rhinometry), air flow resistance (Pa s/cm(3)) (rhinomanometry), peak inspiratory flow (l/min) (peak nasal inspiratory flow) and number of identified odours (Scandinavian odor-identification test) were assessed in adulthood. The size of the maxillary cleft varied considerably at infancy. The size of the nasal airway and its function on the cleft side in adulthood were reduced compared with the non-cleft side, but no correlations were found between size of the initial cleft in infancy and size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood. In adults born with UCLP, therefore, size of the maxillary cleft in infancy does not seem to affect size and function of the nasal airway in adulthood.

  18. Facial aesthetics and perceived need for further treatment among adults with repaired cleft as assessed by cleft team professionals and laypersons.

    PubMed

    Foo, Peter; Sampson, Wayne; Roberts, Rachel; Jamieson, Lisa; David, David

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the ratings of professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft regarding the facial aesthetics of adult patients previously treated for orofacial clefting. The necessity for further treatment, as perceived by the respective groups, is also compared. The design of the study was a cross-sectional study. Professionals (two plastic surgeons, one dentist, one orthodontist, and one psychologist) and laypeople (one male and one female adult without a cleft and one male and one female adult with a cleft) were recruited to rate photographs of 80 non-syndromic cleft patients treated by the Australian Craniofacial Unit from 1975 to 2009. Facial aesthetics were measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). High values indicated good aesthetics. Necessity for further treatment was also measured by a VAS (0-100 mm). High values indicated high perceived need for further treatment. The professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perception of need for further treatment than the raters with and without a cleft. The laypeople with a cleft rated facial aesthetics significantly higher and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than laypeople without a cleft. The non-surgical professionals rated facial aesthetics significantly lower and had a lower perceived need for further treatment than the surgical professionals. Differences exist in the facial aesthetics ratings and perceived need for further surgery between professionals and laypeople with and without a cleft. This should be considered when managing cleft treatment expectations.

  19. Early Predictors of Attachment in Infants with Cleft Lip and/or Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speltz, Matthew L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined attachment classification of children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate (ICP) and comparison group at 12 months of age; found no significant differences. Findings suggest that infants with clefts, despite special needs and caregiving requirements, seem not to have elevated risk for insecure attachments at the end…

  20. Use of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate in cleft lip repair.

    PubMed

    Magee, William P; Ajkay, Nicolas; Githae, Bernard; Rosenblum, Richard S

    2003-01-01

    Octyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) is a synthetic tissue adhesive recently approved for skin closure. This study was designed to assess its effectiveness for use in clefts lip repairs. Sixty-four patients with unilateral, bilateral, or midline cleft lip defects were repaired. The ages at repair ranged from 4 days to 19 months, with an average of 46.5 days. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 3 years. No complications were found. Several advantages were observed: shorter operative time, formation of a protective barrier, simplified incision care, no need for suture removal, and improved scar outcome. This study supports octyl-2-cyanoacrylate as an alternative to skin sutures in primary cleft lip repair.

  1. The cleft ion fountain - A two-dimensional kinetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Lockwood, M.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of ionospheric ions from a source in the polar cleft ionosphere through the polar magnetosphere is investigated using a two-dimensional, kinetic, trajectory-based code. The transport model includes the effects of gravitation, longitudinal magnetic gradient force, convection electric fields, and parallel electric fields. Individual ion trajectories as well as distribution functions and resulting bulk parameters of density, parallel average energy, and parallel flux for a presumed cleft ionosphere source distribution are presented for various conditions to illustrate parametrically the dependences on source energies, convection electric field strengths, ion masses, and parallel electric field strengths. The essential features of the model are consistent with the concept of a cleft-based ion fountain supplying ionospheric ions to the polar magnetosphere, and the resulting plasma distributions and parameters are in general agreement with recent low-energy ion measurements from the DE 1 satellite.

  2. Rathke cleft cyst masquerading as pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengxian; Bao, Xinjie; Liu, Xiaohai; Deng, Kan; Feng, Ming; Yao, Yong; Wang, Renzhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) is a rare cystic sellar entity, which is usually small in size and asymptomatic in most patients. RCC presenting panhypopituitarism and a cystic lesion with rim enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging is extremely rare. Therefore, it is easy to be misdiagnosed as pituitary abscess because of the similar clinical manifestations and neuroimaging changes. Case summary: We report a rare case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess clinically and radiologically with no evidence of central nervous system infection. The patient was initially suspected to be diagnosed with pituitary abscess, which was denied by the histopathological findings of RCC with no intraoperative drainage of abscess. We present an uncommon case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess in a 62-year-old Chinese male patient. The patient was admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital complaining of severe frontal pulsatile headache, visual acuity deficit, polyuria, polydipsia, and slight disturbance of consciousness. The biochemical and endocrinological examinations revealed severe hyponatremia and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar lesion with the apparent cystic change and rim enhancement. Accordingly, pituitary abscess was misdiagnosed at the beginning. The patient received hormone replacement therapy and underwent a trans-sphenoidal surgery. The surgical findings were uneventful. The histopathological examinations showed no infiltration of inflammatory cells or pus, and proved the lesion to be RCC. Conclusion: Through this rare case, we aim to emphasize that the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions requires constant vigilance and that RCC may lead to clinical and radiological changes similar with pituitary abscess. PMID:28272259

  3. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements.

  4. Isolated cleft lip with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Renuka; Kumar, Ajay; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts are one of the most common birth defects and may be associated with other genetic anomalies. Aggressive periodontitis is a rare condition that progresses rapidly, but affects only a small percentage of the population. Most of the cases of aggressive periodontitis are familial. Even though, literature has documented the association of various genetic disorders with aggressive periodontitis, the aggressive periodontitis in patients with isolated cleft lip (CL) have never been addressed. Here, we report a rare case of isolated CL with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The concomitant presentation of isolated CL with aggressive periodontitis in an individual has clinical significance for multi-disciplinary care. PMID:25810600

  5. Simplified feeding appliance for an infant with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Masih, Shaila; Chacko, Reena Annie; Thomas, Abi M; Singh, Namita; Thomas, Rodny; Abraham, Deena

    2014-01-01

    A child born with cleft palate may experience difficulties while feeding. Early surgical treatment may need to be postponed until certain age and weight gain of the infant. The case presented here is of a 1-month-old neonate born with cleft palate, assisted with a new feeding appliance made with ethylene vinyl acetate using pressure molding technique to aid in proper feeding. The patient's weight and health significantly improved after the insertion of obturator. The advantages of this material included being lightweight, moldability, good palatal fit and decreased soft tissue injury.

  6. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems.

  7. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  8. Oblique lip-alveolar banding in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, S; Bütow, K-W

    2015-04-01

    We report an oblique lip-alveolar band, a rare banding of soft tissue that involves the lip and alveolus, which we have found in five patients with cleft lip and palate (0.2%), compared with an incidence of the Simonartz lip-lip band of 5.7%). To our knowledge this has not been reported previously. In two patients the bands affected the cleft lip and alveolus bilaterally, with or without the palatal cleft, and in three the bands were unilateral cleft lip and alveolus with or without the palatal cleft.

  9. Lateral facial cleft associated with accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and peripheral facial weakness.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, D; Toplu, G; Türkseven, A; Senses, D A; Yiğit, B

    2014-07-01

    Transverse facial cleft is a very rare malformation. The Tessier no. 7 cleft is a lateral facial cleft which emanates from oral cavity and extends towards the tragus, involving both soft tissue and skeletal components. Here, we present a case having transverse facial cleft, accessory mandible having teeth, absent parotid gland and ipsilateral peripheral facial nerve weakness. After surgical repair of the cleft in 2-month of age, improvement of the facial nerve function was detected in 3-year of age. Resection of the accessory mandible was planned in 5-6 years of age.

  10. Interpolated histogram method for area optimised median computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Darji, Anand D.

    2013-04-01

    The article describes an area efficient algorithm for real-time approximate median computation on VLSI platforms. The improvement in performance and area optimisation are achieved through linear interpolation within a reduced number of histogram bins. In order to reduce the hardware utilisation further, an approximation technique for interpolation is also proposed. This approach extends the utility of the histogram method to data sets having a large dynamic range. The performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of mean squared error (MSE) and resource utilisation is provided and compared to that of the existing algorithms. This comparison indicates that more than 60% optimisation in resources is achieved with marginal compromise in the accuracy of the median. The proposed algorithm finds applications in the areas of image processing, time series analysis and median absolute deviation (MAD) computation.

  11. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety.

  12. Radiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: Imaging for the Prenatal Period and throughout Life.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Zachary R; Peacock, Zachary S; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in prenatal imaging have made possible the in utero diagnosis of cleft lip and palate and associated deformities. Postnatal diagnosis of cleft lip is made clinically, but imaging still plays a role in detection of associated abnormalities, surgical treatment planning, and screening for or surveillance of secondary deformities. This article describes the clinical entities of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) and isolated cleft palate and documents their prenatal and postnatal appearances at radiography, ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and computed tomography (CT). Imaging protocols and findings for prenatal screening, detection of associated anomalies, and evaluation of secondary deformities throughout life are described and illustrated. CLP and isolated cleft palate are distinct entities with shared radiologic appearances. Prenatal US and MR imaging can depict clefting of the lip or palate and associated anomalies. While two- and three-dimensional US often can depict cleft lip, visualization of cleft palate is more difficult, and repeat US or fetal MR imaging should be performed if cleft palate is suspected. Postnatal imaging can assist in identifying associated abnormalities and dentofacial deformities. Dentofacial sequelae of cleft lip and palate include missing and supernumerary teeth, oronasal fistulas, velopharyngeal insufficiency, hearing loss, maxillary growth restriction, and airway abnormalities. Secondary deformities can often be found incidentally at imaging performed for other purposes, but detection is necessary because they may have considerable implications for the patient.

  13. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    PubMed

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog.

  14. Occlusal Disorders among Patients with Total Clefts of Lip, Alveolar Bone, and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska-Stolarz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Clefts are common birth defects. They are accompanied by various malformations, including disturbances in facial look as well as skeletal disorders that include malocclusions, most frequently crossbites and class III anomalies. The aim of the study was to present the commonest malocclusions in patients with total cleft of the lip, alveolar bone and palate (n = 154) and compare the results to the healthy on-cleft patients (n = 151). Normal occlusion, characteristic for I angle class, was observed in 50% of the control group and 30% of the examined. In the examined patients with clefts, most frequently crossbite and open bite on the cleft side was observed. In patients with clefts, only 2 out of 154 patients presented isolated dental anomalies. In healthy individuals the commonest occlusal disorder was distal occlusion and dental anomalies. The commonest malocclusions among patients with clefts are crossbites and class III malocclusions. PMID:24982898

  15. Primary and revision cleft lip repairs using octyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joshua M; Paige, Keith T

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of our retrospective review is to examine our method and outcomes for the application of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the repair of primary and revision cleft lips in both pediatric and adult patients. Records and photographs were reviewed and analyzed for patient age, type of cleft, revision or primary repair, complications, length of follow-up, and aesthetic outcomes. Eighteen patients, both children and adults, who underwent cleft lip repairs using tissue adhesive performed by a single surgeon between 1999 and 2003 were included. Twelve patients underwent primary repair and 6 patients underwent revision repair. Repairs were performed using the Millard rotation advancement technique and the Mohler variant. The lateral advancement flap was kept long and redundant in its transverse dimension to create a pressure fit everting the skin edges with minimal sutures to set up the closure for application of the tissue adhesive. Seventeen of eighteen patients had excellent cosmetic outcomes. One patient had minor necrosis of the tip of the advancement flap. No allergic reactions, wound infections, or dehiscences occurred. The use of octyl-2-cyanoacrylate for the skin closure of primary and revision cleft lip repairs in both children and adults results in excellent cosmetic outcomes. Employing our pressure-fit technique for skin eversion prior to application of the tissue adhesive may be advantageous. The lack of suture removal in the pediatric population and decreased operative time are additional benefits.

  16. CLEFT Process for GaAs Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J. C. C.; Bozler, C. O.; Mcclelland, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    CLEFT (cleavage of lateral epitaxial films for transfer) process involves growing ultrathin gallium arsenide (GaAs solar cell on much thicker layer of same material). Growth method is completed solar cell easily separated by cleaving from much thicker substrate. Thick substrate is reusable in making additional cells, which reduces cell material cost.

  17. [Cleft palate surgery with ENT-pathology correction].

    PubMed

    Radkevich, A A; Vakhrushev, S G; Gantimurov, A A; Ivanov, V A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the cases of cleft palate surgical treatment with simultaneous intervention in ENT organs (bypass of the tympanic cavity, segmental or total adenotomy, etc.) with the restoration of vomer anatomy and hard palate reconstruction by means of super-elastic low-profile nickel titanium implant. The article describes the advantages of the method in comparison with the conventional ones.

  18. Congenital medium sternal cleft with partial ectopia cordis repair.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Paulo Rego; Antunes, Sónia; Couto, Alexandra; Santos, Gonçalo Cassiano; Leal, Luis Gagp; Magalhães, Manuel Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Congenital sternal malformation is a rare anomaly often diagnosed as an asymptomatic condition at birth. The authors report a clinical case of a full-term female neonate with congenital sternal cleft and partial ectopia cordis. Successful surgical repair was accomplished at 6 days of age. When surgery is performed shortly after birth, the procedure is easier and better results are achieved.

  19. Embryology, sternal clefts, ectopia cordis, and Cantrell's pentalogy.

    PubMed

    Engum, Scott A

    2008-08-01

    Sternal clefts, ectopia cordis, and Cantrell's pentalogy continue to be very rare congenital anomalies in pediatric surgery. Unfortunately, these conditions present as neonatal emergencies and demand early surgical intervention. This article reviews the embryological development of the chest wall, specific sternal defect anomalies, along with available methods of treatment.

  20. Usefulness of Microfat Grafting in Patients With Repaired Cleft Lip.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yong Chan; Park, Tae Seo; Kang, Gyu Bin; Nam, Su Bong; Bae, Seong Hwan

    2016-10-01

    In many patients, the volume of the upper lip is deficient after cleft lip repair operation. However, there is no well-established procedure to correct this volume deficiency. In the present study, the authors attempted to increase the overall three-dimensional volume of the upper lip in repaired cleft lip patients with upper lip volume deficiency through autogenous microfat grafting. Thirty patients with upper lip volume deficiency after cleft lip repair underwent fat grafting in the upper lip from November 2007 to March 2015. Among these patients, postoperative outcome was evaluated in 15 patients using 2 methods for the evaluation. One method involved measuring the change in the shape of lips using pre- and postoperative photographs, and the other involved investigating the levels of satisfaction with the surgical results by distributing a scoring questionnaire to patients, doctors, and the general public. The ratio of upper lip protrusion relative to the lower lip increased by 46.71% on average after operation, and the sum of the vermilion heights increased by 31.68% on average. In the survey of satisfaction levels, patients, plastic surgeons, and the general public gave mean scores of 3.80, 3.91, and 4.03, respectively. When volume deficiency of the upper lip is present in repaired cleft lip patients, correction using autogenous microfat grafting is believed to be effective.

  1. Comparison of two different gingivectomy techniques for gingival cleft treatment.

    PubMed

    Malkoc, Siddik; Buyukyilmaz, Tamer; Gelgor, Ibrahim; Gursel, Mihtikar

    2004-06-01

    Interdental clefts or invaginations contribute to orthodontic relapse and poor periodontal health in extraction cases. These clefts or invaginations can be removed both by electrosurgical or conventional surgical gingivectomy techniques. This study investigates and compares the efficacy of two different techniques to remove gingival clefts with respect to periodontal health and patient tolerance. Twenty-two patients (mean age, 15.7 years) with bilateral gingival clefts participated in this study. In each patient, the gingival invaginations were removed by gingivectomy using electrosurgery on one side and conventional surgery on the contralateral side. The length and depth of the invaginations, the gingival index of the adjacent teeth, and the changes in visual analogue scale scores were recorded before and after the operation for both groups. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data statistically. The results showed significant improvement in invagination depth and length and gingival index scores for both techniques. There were no statistical differences between the two gingivectomy techniques with respect to gingival health and patient tolerance. Both techniques can be used to remove the gingival invaginations efficiently.

  2. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S.

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  3. Production of Two Nasal Sounds by Speakers With Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Bressmann, Tim; Radovanovic, Bojana; Harper, Susan; Klaiman, Paula; Fisher, David; Kulkarni, Gajanan V

    2016-12-29

    Manyspeakers with cleft palate develop atypical consonant productions, especially for pressure consonants such as plosives, fricatives, and affricates. The present study investigated the nature of nasal sound errors. The participants were eight female and three male speakers with cleft palate between the ages of 6 to 20. Speakers were audio-recorded, and midsagittal tongue movement was captured with ultrasound. The speakers repeated vowel-consonant-vowel with the vowels /α/, /i/, and /u/ and the alveolar and velar nasal consonants /n/ and //. The productions were reviewed by three listeners. The participants showed a variety of different placement errors and insertions of plosives, as well as liquid productions. There was considerable error variability between and within speakers, often related to the different vowel contexts. Three speakers co-produced click sounds. The study demonstrated the wide variety of sound errors that some speakers with cleft palate may demonstrate for nasal sounds. Nasal sounds, ideally in different vowel contexts, should be included in articulation screenings for speakers with cleft palate, perhaps more than is currently the case.

  4. The Cleft Care UK study. Part 4: perceptual speech outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sell, D; Mildinhall, S; Albery, L; Wills, A K; Sandy, J R; Ness, A R

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objectives To describe the perceptual speech outcomes from the Cleft Care UK (CCUK) study and compare them to the 1998 Clinical Standards Advisory Group (CSAG) audit. Setting and sample population A cross-sectional study of 248 children born with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2007 who underwent speech assessment. Materials and methods Centre-based specialist speech and language therapists (SLT) took speech audio–video recordings according to nationally agreed guidelines. Two independent listeners undertook the perceptual analysis using the CAPS-A Audit tool. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were tested. Results For each speech parameter of intelligibility/distinctiveness, hypernasality, palatal/palatalization, backed to velar/uvular, glottal, weak and nasalized consonants, and nasal realizations, there was strong evidence that speech outcomes were better in the CCUK children compared to CSAG children. The parameters which did not show improvement were nasal emission, nasal turbulence, hyponasality and lateral/lateralization. Conclusion These results suggest that centralization of cleft care into high volume centres has resulted in improvements in UK speech outcomes in five-year-olds with unilateral cleft lip and palate. This may be associated with the development of a specialized workforce. Nevertheless, there still remains a group of children with significant difficulties at school entry. PMID:26567854

  5. [Lipid peroxidation indices in children with congenital cleft palate].

    PubMed

    Nagirnyĭ, Ia P

    1989-01-01

    Observed were 66 children with congenital palate clefts and a control group of 25 children. The data suggest that the disease involves the lipid peroxidation disorders and impairment of the antioxydative defence. The results can be used for designing the antioxydant and membrane-stabilizing therapies in out-patient departments.

  6. Speech and language in the patient with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Mildinhall, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the normal development of speech and speech problems that may arise for the child born with cleft lip and/or palate. It describes current trends and the importance of multidisciplinary working in this complex field. The contribution of the speech and language therapist to the management of this population is considered.

  7. Iatrogenic selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    A lesion of the median nerve may occur as a consequence of a compression by a haematoma or for a direct damage of the axons caused by a needle insertion. To date, no investigation reported a very selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow, with the suffering limited only to the fibres for the first digit. A 53 year-old left-handed violinist underwent an arterial blood gas drawing. The patient complained immediately of an electrical shock impression going down the arm, followed by pin sensation into the first finger. A tingling sensation associated with numbness in the first fingertip and difficulty in the index-thumb pinch became progressively evident. The ENG-EMG findings showed an impairment mainly of the sensory fibres innervating the first digit and a drop of the motor action potential amplitude when the nerve was stimulated at the elbow. We reported a very partial lesion of the left median nerve at the elbow in a violinist who had a selective involvement of the fibres for his first digit. Even minimal lesions of the median nerve may impair severely the quality of life of patients.

  8. Mean, Median and Mode from a Decision Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Melinda Miller; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The classroom activity described here allows mathematically mature students to explore the role of mean, median and mode in a decision-making environment. While students discover the importance of choosing a measure of central tendency, their understanding of probability distributions, maximization, and prediction is reinforced through active…

  9. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO TAKEN CIRCA 1909 SEEN FROM TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT CHANNING WAY LOOKING NW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Elementary School Teachers' Understanding of the Mean and Median

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a snapshot of elementary school teachers' understanding of the mean and median. The research is presented in light of recent work regarding preservice teachers' understanding of the mean. Common misconceptions are identified which lead to potential implications for teacher preparation programs. One of the primary concerns…

  11. Revision of the Solanum medians complex (Solanum section Petota)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum medians is a widely distributed wild potato species growing along the coast and along the western slopes of the Andes from central Peru and northern Chile, from along the coastal lomas near sea level to 3800 m. Fertile diploid and triploid cytotypes are common, are believed to associated wit...

  12. Famous face recognition, face matching, and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Lander, Karen; Poyarekar, Siddhi

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously established that extraverts who are skilled at interpersonal interaction perform significantly better than introverts on a face-specific recognition memory task. In our experiment we further investigate the relationship between extraversion and face recognition, focusing on famous face recognition and face matching. Results indicate that more extraverted individuals perform significantly better on an upright famous face recognition task and show significantly larger face inversion effects. However, our results did not find an effect of extraversion on face matching or inverted famous face recognition.

  13. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  14. A Comparative Study of Oral Microbiota in Infants with Complete Cleft Lip and Palate or Cleft Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Few reports have been published on the early microbiota in infants with various types of cleft palate. We assessed the formation of the oral microbiota in infants with complete cleft lip and palate (CLP n = 30) or cleft soft palate (CSP n = 25) in the neonatal period (T1 time) and again in the gum pad stage (T2 time). Culture swabs from the tongue, palate, and/or cleft margin at T1 and T2 were taken. We analysed the prevalence of the given bacterial species (the percentage) and the proportions in which the palate and tongue were colonised by each microorganism. At T1, Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis) were the most frequently detected in subjects with CLP or CSP (63% and 60%, resp.). A significantly higher frequency of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus MSSA) was observed in CLP compared to the CSP group. At T2, significantly higher percentages of S. mitis, S. aureus MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family were noted in CLP infants compared to the CSP. S. mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis appeared with the greatest frequency on the tongue, whereas Streptococcus salivarius was predominant on the palate. The development of the microbiota in CLP subjects was characterised by a significant increase in the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28393073

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Lower Facial Asymmetry in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate and Non-Cleft Patients with Class III Skeletal Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yifan; Chen, Gui; Fu, Zhen; Ma, Lian; Li, Weiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), both the condylar-fossa relationships and the mandibular and condylar asymmetries between unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients and non-cleft patients with class III skeletal relationship, and to investigate the factors of asymmetry contributing to chin deviation. Methods The UCLP and non-cleft groups consisted of 30 and 40 subjects, respectively, in mixed dentition with class III skeletal relationships. Condylar-fossa relationships and the dimensional and positional asymmetries of the condyles and mandibles were examined using CBCT. Intra-group differences were compared between two sides in both groups using a paired t-test. Furthermore, correlations between each measurement and chin deviation were assessed. Results It was observed that 90% of UCLP and 67.5% of non-cleft subjects had both condyles centered, and no significant asymmetry was found. The axial angle and the condylar center distances to the midsagittal plane were significantly greater on the cleft side than on the non-cleft side (P=0.001 and P=0.028, respectively) and were positively correlated with chin deviation in the UCLP group. Except for a larger gonial angle on the cleft side, the two groups presented with consistent asymmetries showing shorter mandibular bodies and total mandibular lengths on the cleft (deviated) side. The average chin deviation was 1.63 mm to the cleft side, and the average absolute chin deviation was significantly greater in the UCLP group than in the non-cleft group (P=0.037). Conclusion Compared with non-cleft subjects with similar class III skeletal relationships, the subjects with UCLP showed more severe lower facial asymmetry. The subjects with UCLP presented with more asymmetrical positions and rotations of the condyles on axial slices, which were positively correlated with chin deviation. PMID:26237311

  16. August median streamflow on ungaged streams in Eastern Coastal Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2004-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in eastern coastal Maine. The methods apply to streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 0.04 to 73.2 square miles and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer ranging from 0 to 71 percent. The equations were developed with data from three long-term (greater than or equal to 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations, 23 partial-record streamflow- gaging stations, and 5 short-term (less than 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record streamflow-gaging stations and short-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily streamflows at nearby long-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at streamflow-gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for different periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Thirty-one stations were used for the final regression equations. Two basin characteristics?drainage area and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer?are used in the calculated regression equation to estimate August median streamflow for ungaged streams. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -27 to 38 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -30 to 43 percent. Model error is larger than

  17. Frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patients undergoing cleft lip and palate surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu L.; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O.; Desalu, Ibironke; Ladeinde, Akinola L.; Adeyemo, Titilope A.; Mofikoya, Bolaji O.; Hassan, Olakunle O.; Akanmu, Alani S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study aims to determine the frequency of homologous blood transfusion in patientsundergoing cleft lip and palate surgery at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Setting and Design: A prospective study of transfusion rate in cleft surgery conducted at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Material and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients who required cleft lip and palate surgery were recruited into the study. Data collected included age, sex and weight of patients, type of cleft defects, type of surgery done, preoperative haematocrit, duration of surgery, amount of blood loss during surgery, the number of units of blood cross-matched and those used. Each patient was made to donate a unit of homologous blood prior to surgery. Results: There were 52 females and 48 males with a mean age of 64.4 ± 101.1 months (range, 3-420 months). The most common cleft defect was isolated cleft palate (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip (28%). Cleft palate repair was the most common procedure (45%) followed by unilateral cleft lip repair (41%). The mean estimated blood loss was 95.8 ± 144.9 ml (range, 2-800ml). Ten (10%) patients (CL=2; CP=5, BCL=1; CLP=2) were transfused but only two of these were deemed appropriate based on percentage blood volume loss. The mean blood transfused was 131.5 ± 135.4ml (range, 35-500ml). Six (60%) of those transfused had a preoperative PCV of < 30%. Only 4.9% of patients who had unilateral cleft lip surgery were transfused as compared with 50% for CLP surgery, 11% for CP surgery, and 10% for bilateral cleft lip surgery. Conclusions: The frequency of blood transfusion in cleft lip and palate surgery was 10% with a cross-match: transfusion ratio of 10 and transfusion index of 0.1. A "type and screen" policy is advocated for cleft lip and palate surgery. PMID:20924451

  18. Median polish for quality assurance of a PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J; Rucker, R H

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity data for the PC 4600, a multiplanar positron emission tomograph system, were obtained over a period of several months during installation and routine clinical operation. These data were analyzed using the exploratory data analysis techniques of median polish (MP), box and whisker plots, and coded residuals. These techniques proved to be useful in spotting trends and identifying problems. Median polish had advantages over traditional percent difference techniques under some conditions because it allows separate study of more than one effect and is particularly resistant to the influence of outliers. The other exploratory data analysis techniques used are of value in interpreting the results of the MP procedure. The methods presented have direct application to any quantitative multiplanar emission tomographic imaging quality assurance program.

  19. Bayesian median regression for temporal gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Keming; Vinciotti, Veronica; Liu, Xiaohui; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2007-09-01

    Most of the existing methods for the identification of biologically interesting genes in a temporal expression profiling dataset do not fully exploit the temporal ordering in the dataset and are based on normality assumptions for the gene expression. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian median regression model to detect genes whose temporal profile is significantly different across a number of biological conditions. The regression model is defined by a polynomial function where both time and condition effects as well as interactions between the two are included. MCMC-based inference returns the posterior distribution of the polynomial coefficients. From this a simple Bayes factor test is proposed to test for significance. The estimation of the median rather than the mean, and within a Bayesian framework, increases the robustness of the method compared to a Hotelling T2-test previously suggested. This is shown on simulated data and on muscular dystrophy gene expression data.

  20. Pre-speech in children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only: phonetic analysis related to morphologic and functional factors.

    PubMed

    Lohmander-Agerskov, A; Söderpalm, E; Friede, H; Persson, E C; Lilja, J

    1994-07-01

    Pre-speech in 35 children with clefts of the lip and palate or palate only were analyzed for place and manner of articulation. Transcriptions were made from tape recorded babbling sequences. Two children without clefts were used as reference. All of the children with clefts were treated according to a regimen of early surgical repair of the velum cleft and delayed closure of the cleft in the hard palate. The frequency of selected phonetic features was calculated. Correlations between phonetic/perceptual and functional and morphological factors were tested. Supraglottal articulation dominated among all the children indicating a sufficient velopharyngeal mechanism. The results also showed correlations between cleft type and place of articulation. Anteriorly placed sounds (i.e., bilabial, dental, and alveolar sounds) occurred frequently among the children with cleft palate only and in the noncleft children. In children with cleft lip and palate, posteriorly placed articulations predominated. It was postulated that early intervention may have a positive effect on articulatory development.

  1. Virtual & Real Face to Face Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teneqexhi, Romeo; Kuneshka, Loreta

    2016-01-01

    In traditional "face to face" lessons, during the time the teacher writes on a black or white board, the students are always behind the teacher. Sometimes, this happens even in the recorded lesson in videos. Most of the time during the lesson, the teacher shows to the students his back not his face. We do not think the term "face to…

  2. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  3. Weighted median image sharpeners for the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco; Paredes, José L; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2002-01-01

    A class of robust weighted median (WM) sharpening algorithms is developed in this paper. Unlike traditional linear sharpening methods, weighted median sharpeners are shown to be less sensitive to background random noise or to image artifacts introduced by JPEG and other compression algorithms. These concepts are extended to include data dependent weights under the framework of permutation weighted medians leading to tunable sharpeners that, in essence, are insensitive to noise and compression artifacts. Permutation WM sharpeners are subsequently generalized to smoother/sharpener structures that can sharpen edges and image details while simultaneously filter out background random noise. A statistical analysis of the various algorithms is presented, theoretically validating the characteristics of the proposed sharpening structures. A number of experiments are shown for the sharpening of JPEG compressed images and sharpening of images with background film-grain noise. These algorithms can prove useful in the enhancement of compressed or noisy images posted on the World Wide Web (WWW) as well as in other applications where the underlying images are unavoidably acquired with noise.

  4. Microseismic event denoising via adaptive directional vector median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Lu, Ji-Ren; Jiang, Tian-Qi; Liang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel denoising scheme via Radon transform-based adaptive vector directional median filters named adaptive directional vector median filter (AD-VMF) to suppress noise for microseismic downhole dataset. AD-VMF contains three major steps for microseismic downhole data processing: (i) applying Radon transform on the microseismic data to obtain the parameters of the waves, (ii) performing S-transform to determine the parameters for filters, and (iii) applying the parameters for vector median filter (VMF) to denoise the data. The steps (i) and (ii) can realize the automatic direction detection. The proposed algorithm is tested with synthetic and field datasets that were recorded with a vertical array of receivers. The P-wave and S-wave direct arrivals are properly denoised for poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) records. In the simulation case, we also evaluate the performance with mean square error (MSE) in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The result shows that the distortion of the proposed method is very low; the SNR is even less than 0 dB.

  5. Median statistics estimates of Hubble and Newton's constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethapudi, Suryarao; Desai, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    Robustness of any statistics depends upon the number of assumptions it makes about the measured data. We point out the advantages of median statistics using toy numerical experiments and demonstrate its robustness, when the number of assumptions we can make about the data are limited. We then apply the median statistics technique to obtain estimates of two constants of nature, Hubble constant (H0) and Newton's gravitational constant ( G , both of which show significant differences between different measurements. For H0, we update the analyses done by Chen and Ratra (2011) and Gott et al. (2001) using 576 measurements. We find after grouping the different results according to their primary type of measurement, the median estimates are given by H0 = 72.5^{+2.5}_{-8} km/sec/Mpc with errors corresponding to 95% c.l. (2 σ) and G=6.674702^{+0.0014}_{-0.0009} × 10^{-11} Nm2kg-2 corresponding to 68% c.l. (1σ).

  6. Median Robust Extended Local Binary Pattern for Texture Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Lao, Songyang; Fieguth, Paul W; Guo, Yulan; Wang, Xiaogang; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2016-03-01

    Local binary patterns (LBP) are considered among the most computationally efficient high-performance texture features. However, the LBP method is very sensitive to image noise and is unable to capture macrostructure information. To best address these disadvantages, in this paper, we introduce a novel descriptor for texture classification, the median robust extended LBP (MRELBP). Different from the traditional LBP and many LBP variants, MRELBP compares regional image medians rather than raw image intensities. A multiscale LBP type descriptor is computed by efficiently comparing image medians over a novel sampling scheme, which can capture both microstructure and macrostructure texture information. A comprehensive evaluation on benchmark data sets reveals MRELBP's high performance-robust to gray scale variations, rotation changes and noise-but at a low computational cost. MRELBP produces the best classification scores of 99.82%, 99.38%, and 99.77% on three popular Outex test suites. More importantly, MRELBP is shown to be highly robust to image noise, including Gaussian noise, Gaussian blur, salt-and-pepper noise, and random pixel corruption.

  7. [The treatment of cleft lip, cleft palate and other dysmorphisms: the ideal technic and therapeutic reality].

    PubMed

    Chancholle, A R; Saboye, J

    2004-12-01

    Good results in any surgical or orthodontic procedure require expert technique, well adapted to the problem and scrupulously executed. A technique that would achieve the best results can be described as "ideal" and can serve as a theoretical model for all similar cases. But, in dealing with apparently similar problems: cleft lips and palates, Class II or Class III cases... in reality, we are treating individual patients, none quite the same as any other. These differences derive from the varying characteristics of individual patients and from the varying and unpredictable responses of their tissues, and from their varying capacities to accommodate to and withstand insults, suffering, and the sensory-motor effects of their deformities and of the treatment they undergo, and, finally, from their variable readiness to submit to and to pay for treatment with their time and with their money. Any therapeutic technique must take into account these realities which sometimes oblige us to modify an ideal technique so that it will fit the specialized needs of a patient, an accommodation that can be defined as "therapeutic realism". When we ignore this reality, we risk the paradox of providing patients with technically ideal results that they find unsatisfactory or discover that what we thought was a technically mediocre outcome has delighted our patient: ultimately, it is the patient's judgment that determines the "therapeutic result" and is, in effect, the Final Evaluation of the technical result.

  8. Olfactory cleft computed tomography analysis and olfaction in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Preeti; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Storck, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volumetric analysis of the olfactory cleft by using computed tomography has been associated with olfaction in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). However, existing studies have not comprehensively measured olfaction, and it thus remains unknown whether correlations differ across specific dimensions of odor perception. Objective: To use comprehensive measures of patient-reported and objective olfaction to evaluate the relationship between volumetric olfactory cleft opacification and olfaction. Methods: Olfaction in patients with CRS was evaluated by using “Sniffin' Sticks” tests and a modified version of the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders. Olfactory cleft opacification was quantified by using two- and three-dimensional, computerized volumetric analysis. Correlations between olfactory metrics and olfactory cleft opacification were then calculated. Results: The overall CRS cohort included 26 patients without nasal polyposis (CRSsNP) (68.4%) and 12 patients with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) (31.6%). Across the entire cohort, total olfactory cleft opacification was 82.8%, with greater opacification in the CRSwNP subgroup compared with CRSsNP (92.3 versus 78.4%, p < 0.001). The percent total volume opacification correlated with the total Sniffin' Sticks score (r = −0.568, p < 0.001) as well as individual threshold, discrimination, and identification scores (p < 0.001 for all). Within the CRSwNP subgroup, threshold (r = −0.616, p = 0.033) and identification (r = −0.647, p = 0.023) remained highly correlated with total volume opacification. In patients with CRSsNP, the threshold correlated with total volume scores (r = −0.457, p = 0.019), with weaker and nonsignificant correlations for discrimination and identification. Correlations between total volume opacification and the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders were qualitatively similar to objective olfactory findings in both CRSwNP (r = −0.566, p = 0.070) and CRSsNP (r = −0.310, p

  9. [The impact of cleft lip and palate on the parent-child relationships].

    PubMed

    Grollemund, B; Galliani, E; Soupre, V; Vazquez, M-P; Guedeney, A; Danion, A

    2010-09-01

    Cleft lips and palates (CLPs) are the most common human facial malformations. Depending on the ethnic and/or geographical origin of the studied populations, they can affect up to 1/500 newborns. The treatment of these patients is multidisciplinary because these malformations have not only aesthetic consequences but also functional consequences as the phonation, hearing, deglutition, mastication and ventilation are altered. These consequences can also be psychological since the building of the body image, the way others perceive it, is likely to be seriously altered. In Europe there are over 210 reference hospitals for children affected by CLP. Besides, about 190 different protocols were identified. So far no generic protocol was recognized by the medical community as a whole. This discrepancy can be explained by the fact that the aesthetic and functional result of a protocol cannot be accurately assessed before adulthood when the child's growth is complete. Patients presenting with CLP don't usually seem to present with any serious psychological or psychiatric pathology. Yet a close review of the related literature shows that disorders are actually described: behavioural troubles, anxiety, depression and esthetic dissatisfaction with one's face in children as well as in adults. The difficulty in interpreting these disorders lies in the various factors that are likely to impact this condition (family setting, importance and type of the cleft, surgery protocol, growth, social environment). A multidisciplinary examination of the face and a careful consideration of concerned families show the importance of the psychological context and the risks of a dis-harmonious structuring of the parents-child relationships on the child's development. The identification of the difficulties faced by these families, depending on the child's age, can be easily identified. Of course they can be identified at birth when the family first sees the child and later on at each stage of the

  10. Epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the East of ireland in the 25-year period 1984-2008.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Robert; Owens, Miriam; Delany, Caroline; Earley, Michael; McGillivary, Anne; Orr, David J; Duggan, Laura

    2014-07-01

    Objective : To describe the epidemiology of orofacial clefts in the east of Ireland. Design and Setting : A descriptive epidemiologic study on 851 cases of orofacial cleft identified over a 25-year period from 1984 to 2008 from more than 500,000 births. Results : There were 438 (51.5%) cases of cleft lip with or without cleft palate and 413 (48.5%) cases of cleft palate. The total birth prevalence was 16.0 per 10,000 births for all orofacial clefts, 8.2 for cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and 7.8 for cleft palate. Of all cases, 63.7% (542/851) occurred as isolated anomalies, 21.5% (183/851) were associated with multiple anomalies, and 14.8% (126/851) were associated with a syndrome or chromosomal anomaly. A significantly increasing trend over the 25-year period was observed for cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with syndromes or chromosomal anomalies among mothers younger than 35 years but not in those older than 35 years. Conclusion : A slightly higher rate of orofacial clefts was observed in the east of Ireland than was observed in European and multinational studies during the study period, and there were higher rates of cleft palate. The rising trend in the proportion of mothers aged 35 years or older in Ireland is not contributing significantly to orofacial clefts associated with chromosomal syndromes.

  11. Dynamic epithelia of the developing vertebrate face.

    PubMed

    Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J Gage

    2015-06-01

    A segmental series of endoderm-derived pouch and ectoderm-derived cleft epithelia act as signaling centers in the developing face. Their precise morphogenesis is therefore essential for proper patterning of the vertebrate head. Intercellular adhesion and polarity are highly dynamic within developing facial epithelial cells, with signaling from the adjacent mesenchyme controlling both epithelial character and directional migration. Endodermal and ectodermal epithelia fuse to form the primary mouth and gill slits, which involves basement membrane dissolution, cell intercalations, and apoptosis, as well as undergo further morphogenesis to generate the middle ear cavity and glands of the neck. Recent studies of facial epithelia are revealing both core programs of epithelial morphogenesis and insights into the coordinated assembly of the vertebrate head.

  12. Social Security: a financial appraisal for the median voter.

    PubMed

    Galasso, V

    Several explanations have been proposed for why voters continue to support unfunded social security systems. Browning (1975) suggests that the extremely large unfunded pension systems of most democracies depend on the existence of a voting majority composed of middle-aged and older people who fail to fully internalize the cost of financing the system. In fact, when voting, economically rational workers consider only their current and future contributions to the system and their expected pension benefits--not their past contributions, which they regard as sunk costs. If, for a majority of voters, the expected continuation return from social security exceeds the return from alternative assets, an unfunded social security system is politically sustainable. This article explores the validity of Browning's proposition by quantifying the returns that U.S. voters in presidential elections from 1964 to 1996 have obtained, or expect to obtain, from Social Security. Did "investments" in Social Security outperform alternative forms of investment, such as mutual funds or pension funds, for a majority of the voters? What can be expected for the future? The U.S. Social Security system redistributes income within age cohorts on the basis of sex, income, and marital status. To account for some of these features, the median voter is represented by a family unit whose members--a husband who accounts for 70 percent of household earnings and a wife who accounts for 30 percent--make joint economic and voting decisions. Thus, retirement and survival benefits paid out to the spouse of an insured worker can be included in the calculation of Social Security returns. Interval estimates of voters' family incomes from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to obtain the median voter's household earnings. The median voter's age is derived from the ages of those who voted in presidential elections, not from the ages of the entire electorate. The median voter's contributions to Social Security are the

  13. [Investigation of children with congenital cleft lip and palate by Eysenck personality questionnaire(Junior)

    PubMed

    Zhang, H Z; Hu, J F

    1998-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To approach the personality of the children suffering from congenital cleft lip and palate. METHODS: The subject were 50 children (aged 7 to 17) with congenital cleft lip and palate,and 50 normal children as control.Both groups were investigated by Eysenck personality questionnaire EPQ(Junior). RESULTS: According to the general quantitative table of EPQ(Junior),the abnormal cases in cleft group were significantly more than those in control(P<0.005),and also were the abnormal cases in the single quantitative or in the multiple quantitative tables of EPQ(Junior)(P<0.005) respectively. CONCLUSION: The poor personality in children with cleft lip and palate is correlated to the cleft condition.Therefore it is necessary to pay attention to the prevention of poor personality while the cleft lip and palate is treated.

  14. Post Septorhinoplasty Custom-Made Unilateral Nasal Stent for Nasal Cleft Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu; Bhoria, Mohaneesh; Boora, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nasal cleft deformity is a complicated problem. Utilization of nasal stent in post septorhinoplastyaims at establishing and maintaining airway patency, tissue position, and reduces tissue contracture after surgery. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient presented with history of surgical reconstruction of congenital cleft lip and cleft palate with secondary septorhinoplasty of nasal cleft deformity. Patient was referred for nasal stent 1 week after septorhinoplasty. This case report provides a novel technique for fabrication of esthetic nasal stent after postseptorhinoplasty for secondary cleft nose deformity correction. Conclusion: This case report presents a simple, convenient technique for nasal stent fabrication for prevention of restenosis for cleft nose deformity post secondary septorhinoplasty. Provision of nasal stent allows breathing, maintains esthetics, comfort, nasal patency, and contour with minimal discomfort. PMID:25789253

  15. p63 and IRF6: brothers in arms against cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2010-05-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate, which can also occur together as cleft lip and palate, are frequent and debilitating congenital malformations, with complex geneses that have both genetic and environmental factors implicated. Mutations in the genes encoding the p53 homolog p63 and interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) are major causes of cleft lip and cleft palate, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this have not been clear. However, in this issue of the JCI, Thomason et al. and Moretti et al. independently show that p63 and IRF6 operate within a regulatory loop to coordinate epithelial proliferation and differentiation during normal palate development. Disruption of this loop as a result of mutations in p63 or IRF6 causes congenital clefting.

  16. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  17. [The orthodontist and the child with a cleft palate].

    PubMed

    Lesne, C

    2004-09-01

    Dealing with this type of malformation, the orthodontist is confronted with a three-level problem: inter-personal, social, and technical. Because families consider the birth of a cleft palate child to be a disaster, orthodontists who undertake their treatment should understand the genesis of the turbulence that families will have to endure. Most parents learn to deal with these difficulties, but the affected children are going to have to submit to the stares of those they encounter. Adolescence is a critical period for them and it is also the time when they will visit their orthodontist most frequently. Problems that accompany treatment of these patients are numerous and the treating orthodontists must point them out and explain them tactfully. The treating team must also establish a therapeutic alliance to envelop the cleft palate patients, ensuring maintenance of expert cooperation between specialists responsible for different aspects of their treatment.

  18. Bridging the synaptic cleft: lessons from orphan glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sabine M; Hollmann, Michael

    2010-08-24

    For neurons to communicate, signals must cross the cell-to-cell distance at their points of contact. At the predominant cell-cell contact in the central nervous system, the chemical synapse, the synaptic cleft spans roughly 20 nanometers. To signal across this distance, the presynaptic neuron secretes a diffusible neurotransmitter, which is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neuron. Although this signaling mechanism has become common knowledge, it remains unclear how synapses are maintained when they are not in immediate use. New evidence reveals how Nature solved this problem at a particular type of synapse in the cerebellum: Three old acquaintances bridge the cleft. The ionotropic glutamate receptor GluD2 constitutes the postsynaptic anchor that indirectly interacts with the presynaptic anchor neurexin through a presynaptically secreted soluble factor, a member of the C1q protein family named Cbln1. This trio collaborates to align pre- and postsynaptic sides.

  19. Semaphorin signaling facilitates cleft formation in the developing salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ling; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Huang, Hsiu-Ru; Hsu, Su-Ming; Cheng, Hwai-Jong; Huang, Pei-Hsin

    2007-08-01

    Semaphorin signaling plays integral roles in multiple developmental processes. Branching morphogenesis is one such role that has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we show in mice that functional blockage of neuropilin 1 (Npn1) inhibits cleft formation in the developing submandibular gland (SMG) cultured ex vivo. This Npn1-dependent morphogenesis is mediated by Sema3A and Sema3C in an additive manner, and can be abolished by decreasing the expression of plexin A2 or plexin D1. VEGF, another known Npn1 ligand, has no apparent effects on SMG development. FGF signaling, which also mediates SMG branching morphogenesis, acts in parallel with semaphorin signaling. Finally, in contrast to the effect of FGF signaling, we find that semaphorins do not stimulate the proliferation of SMG epithelial cells. Instead, the semaphorin signals act locally on the epithelial cells to facilitate SMG cleft formation.

  20. Maternal effects in human cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed Central

    Bingle, G J; Niswander, J D

    1977-01-01

    To look for a persistent maternal effect of CL(P) and CP, 8,000 pedigrees were screened for half sibships, and data were pooled from 16 investigators. After excluding known genetic or cytogenetic diagnoses from the probands with facial clefts, a recurrence risk of .011 was obtained for CL(P) based upon 342 maternal half sibs. This was nearly identical to the risk of .014 based upon 210 paternal half sibs. CP proband frequencies of .004 for maternal half sibs and .009 for the paternal counterparts were also found. The lack of significant maternal effects in this data supports previously reported data from twin studies and from interracial crosses from Hawaii. The lack of maternal effect in human CL(P) and CP is in contrast to genetic data on clefting in mice. PMID:930925

  1. [Aspiration syndrome due to laryngeal cleft in an infant].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Demarchi, Victoria; Zanetta, Adrián; Urquizo, Mauricio; Lobos, Pablo; Razetti, Juan

    2014-02-01

    Aspiration is the passage of food content and endogenous secretions into the airway. Anatomical, neuromuscular or functional anomalies are among the major causes. The laryngeal cleft is a rare congenital anomaly that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of aspiration syndrome in neonates and infants. The main symptoms are stridor, recurrent respiratory infections and cyanotic crisis, cough and choking during feeding. The diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic examination. The therapeutic behaviour will depend on the extent of the cleft, among other factors. We describe the clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods and treatment of an infant with this disease, and we emphasize the need for recognition of swallowing disorders in children in order to establish an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent and avoid malnutrition as well as a severe and potentially irreversible lung compromise.

  2. Face adaptation depends on seeing the face.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Farshad; Koch, Christof; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2005-01-06

    Retinal input that is suppressed from visual awareness can nevertheless produce measurable aftereffects, revealing neural processes that do not directly result in a conscious percept. We here report that the face identity-specific aftereffect requires a visible face; it is effectively cancelled by binocular suppression or by inattentional blindness of the inducing face. Conversely, the same suppression does not interfere with the orientation-specific aftereffect. Thus, the competition between incompatible or interfering visual inputs to reach awareness is resolved before those aspects of information that are exploited in face identification are processed. We also found that the face aftereffect remained intact when the visual distracters in the inattention experiment were replaced with auditory distracters. Thus, cross-modal or cognitive interference that does not affect the visibility of the face does not interfere with the face aftereffect. We conclude that adaptation to face identity depends on seeing the face.

  3. Complete sternal cleft associated with right clavicular, manubrial, and thyroid hypoplasia, pectus deformity, and spinal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Golden, Eleza T; Alazraki, Adina; Loewen, Jonathan; Braithwaite, Kiery

    2016-01-01

    Sternal cleft anomalies are rare. Associated anomalies include pentalogy of Cantrell and posterior fossa abnormalities, hemangiomas, arteriopathy, cardiac anomalies, eye abnormalities, and sternal defects syndrome. There is only a single report of complete sternal cleft, pectus excavatum, and right clavicular hypoplasia in an adult. Thyroid hemiagenesis is also very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of complete sternal cleft, pectus deformity, and right clavicular hypoplasia in a child and the first case with right thyroid hemiagenesis.

  4. [Orofacial closure defects: cleft lip and palate. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Díaz Casado, G H; Díaz Grávalos, G J

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial clefts are a common problem that can lead to significant healthcare use and costs, as well as suffering on the part of the affected individuals and families. There are several theories explaining their origin, but some of the findings are inconsistent. The most accepted theories involve a major genetic basis that could be modified by the presence of external agents. Understanding the underlying causes could help to prevent its occurrence, an area in which the family physician can play an important role.

  5. Chemical meningitis: a rare presentation of Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Mrelashvili, Anna; Braksick, Sherri A; Murphy, Lauren L; Morparia, Neha P; Natt, Neena; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-04-01

    Rathke's cleft cysts (RCC) are usually benign, sellar and/or suprasellar lesions originating from the remnants of Rathke's pouch. Rarely, RCC can present with chemical meningitis, sellar abscess, lymphocytic hypophysitis, or intracystic hemorrhage. We describe an unusual presentation of RCC in which the patient presented with a clinical picture of chemical meningitis consisting of meningeal irritation, inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid profile, and enhancing pituitary and hypothalamic lesions, in addition to involvement of the optic tracts and optic nerve.

  6. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  7. Important aspects of oral lining in unilateral cleft lip repair.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rong-Min; Lee, Sang Woo

    2009-09-01

    To achieve an aesthetic lip in cleft lip repair, central fullness and slight eversion of the vermilion are necessary. If only cutaneous anthropometric length is considered, symmetry and good vermilion contour may be obtained, but a seemingly tightness of the lip can occur. To prevent this, it is necessary to obtain sufficient central mucosal tissue of the oral lining.The authors used 2 methods to obtain adequate tissue of the central area of the oral lining. First, the mucosa of the central area of the oral lining was supplemented using a medial mucosal flap, and the amount of superfluous tissue was minimized. Second, a relaxing incision was placed at the oral lining of the lateral flap, which was subsequently centrally advanced.A total of 389 patients with a unilateral cleft lip underwent surgery using these methods and achieved satisfactory results. Occasional cases of lateral vermilion bulging were encountered during long-term follow-up, but these were easily corrected by bulging excision.Consideration of the oral lining is essential in cleft lip repair. The authors were able to reconstruct an aesthetically pleasing lip with central fullness by obtaining an adequate amount of tissue in the central area of oral lining.

  8. A modified feeding plate for a newborn with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Mustafa; Karaçay, Seniz; Atay, Arzu; Günay, Yumuşhan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives : Cleft palate is a common congenital maxillofacial defect. We wish to present the fabrication of a modified feeding plate that will adapt to the changing palatal and velopharyngeal morphology during function. Case Report : A neonate with unilateral cleft lip and palate was referred to our clinic for the fabrication of a feeding plate. Intraoral examination revealed a cleft involving the uvula and the soft palate, with an alveolar defect on the left side. An impression was taken and a dental cast was obtained. A 1-mm Bioplast clear soft plate was pressed on the model. After trimming the edges of the plate, several retentive holes were made for its attachment to the hard plate. With the Bioplast soft plate replaced on the cast, plaster was used to cover parts of the soft plate that were not to come in contact with the hard plate. Biocryl resin was put on the retentive holes and 2-mm Biocryl C Rosa-transparent plate was pressed. The edges of the plate were cut, trimmed, and polished. Conclusion : This modified feeding plate effectively obstructed the soft palate defect. The adaptation of the flexible bulb of the appliance with the soft palate was excellent. Evaluation with nasoendoscopy revealed the synchronized movement of the bulb of the appliance with the soft palate during swallowing. Soft extension of the feeding plate eliminated the risk of irritation, and the baby accepted the appliance easily.

  9. Non-cleft causes of velopharyngeal dysfunction: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Ann W; Marshall, Jennifer L; Wilson, Margaret M

    2015-03-01

    Although a history of cleft palate is the most common cause of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), there are other disorders that can also cause hypernasality and/or nasal emission. These include other structural anomalies of the velopharyngeal valve (velopharyngeal insufficiency), neurophysiological disorders that result in inadequate velopharyngeal movement (velopharyngeal incompetence), and even faulty articulation placement in the pharynx (velopharyngeal mislearning). Unfortunately, individuals with non-cleft causes of hypernasality and/or nasal emission do not typically present at a cleft palate/craniofacial center where there are professionals who specialize in the evaluation and treatment of these disorders. As a result, they are often misdiagnosed and do not receive appropriate treatment. In this review, we present various conditions that can cause hypernasality and/or nasal emission during speech. We discuss appropriate treatment based on the underlying cause of the condition. It is important that pediatric otolaryngologists are able to recognize these disorders so that affected patients are referred to specialists in velopharyngeal dysfunction for treatment.

  10. Topographic Mapping of the Synaptic Cleft into Adhesive Nanodomains

    PubMed Central

    de Arce, Karen Perez; Schrod, Nikolas; Metzbower, Sarah W. R.; Allgeyer, Edward; Kong, Geoffrey K.-W.; Tang, Aihui; Krupp, Alexander J.; Stein, Valentin; Liu, Xinran; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Lucic, Vladan; Biederer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The cleft is an integral part of synapses, yet its macromolecular organization remains unclear. We here show that the cleft of excitatory synapses exhibits a distinct density profile as measured by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Aiming for molecular insights, we analyzed the synapse-organizing proteins SynCAM 1 and EphB2. Cryo-ET of SynCAM 1 knock-out and overexpressor synapses showed that this immunoglobulin protein shapes the cleft’s edge. In agreement, SynCAM 1 delineates the postsynaptic perimeter as determined by immuno-electron microscopy (EM) and superresolution imaging. In contrast, the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase is enriched deeper within the postsynaptic area. Unexpectedly, SynCAM 1 can form ensembles proximal to postsynaptic densities, and synapses containing these ensembles were larger. Postsynaptic SynCAM 1 surface puncta were not static but became enlarged after a long-term depression paradigm. These results support that the synaptic cleft is organized on a nanoscale into sub-compartments marked by distinct trans-synaptic complexes. PMID:26687224

  11. Spontaneous pituitary adenoma occurring after resection of a Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Raber, Michael R; Cote, David J; Laws, Edward R

    2016-11-01

    Rathke's cleft cysts (RCC) are benign cystic lesions that originate from remnants of the epithelial lining of Rathke's pouch. RCC are known rarely to occur together with a concomitant pituitary adenoma. Here, we report a patient with a pituitary adenoma arising in the same location as a previously-resected RCC, 3 years post-operatively, and review the literature of "collision" sellar lesions. Consecutive transsphenoidal operations from a single-center between 2008 and 2016 were reviewed to identify patients with pituitary adenoma arising after surgical resection of RCC, and a systematic search of the literature was also performed to identify such patient reports, as well as reports of concomitant pituitary adenoma and RCC. Of 837 transsphenoidal operations from our own experience, one patient with pituitary adenoma occurring after RCC resection was identified and is reported here. A systematic review of the literature resulted in identification of 34 patients with concomitant RCC and pituitary adenoma and no incidents of pituitary adenoma occurring after resection of RCC. Concomitant occurrence of RCC and pituitary adenoma was more commonly diagnosed in women (61%), at a median age of diagnosis of 44 years. The RCC histological analysis in these patients consistently described ciliated columnar or cuboidal epithelium. Although rare, the presence of a new, pathologically-distinct lesions in the sella after prior surgical treatment, is possible. During post-operative monitoring, physicians should consider that what appears as a "recurrent" lesion may actually be growth of a new and entirely different lesion.

  12. Identification of germline mutations in the cancer predisposing gene CDH1 in patients with orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Figueiredo, Joana; van Rooij, Iris A L M; Simões-Correia, Joana; van der Post, Rachel S; Melo, Soraia; Seruca, Raquel; Carels, Carine E L; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2013-03-01

    Orofacial clefts (OFC) are among the most common birth defects worldwide. The etiology of non-syndromic OFC is still largely unknown. During embryonic development, the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin, encoded by CDH1, is highly expressed in the median edge epithelium of the palate. Furthermore, in multiple families with CDH1 mutations, OFC cases are observed. To determine whether CDH1 is a causative gene for non-syndromic OFC and to assess whether CDH1 mutation screening in non-syndromic OFC patients enables identification of families at risk of cancer, direct sequencing of the full coding sequence of CDH1 was performed in a cohort of 81 children with non-syndromic OFC. Eleven children had heterozygous CDH1 sequence variants, 5 cases with 4 distinct missense mutations and 8 cases with 4 intronic variants. Using a combination of in silico predictions and in vitro functional assays, three missense mutations in four non-syndromic OFC patients were predicted to be damaging to E-cadherin protein function. The intronic variants including one tested in an in vitro assay appeared to be benign, showing no influence on splicing. Functionally relevant heterozygous CDH1 missense mutations were found in 4 out of 81 (5%) patients with non-syndromic OFC. This finding opens a new pathway to reveal the molecular basis of non-syndromic OFC. Cancer risk among carriers of these mutations needs to be defined.

  13. [Sequels of labial-alveolar-velopalatine clefts observed in charity missions. Analysis and management].

    PubMed

    Saboye, J; Chancholle, A-R

    2007-09-01

    A lot of children with cleft lip and palate are not operated in the developing world, due to a lack of surgeons, hospitals, or simply because the condition is not considered as a priority. Charity missions give the opportunity to repair these malformations. Non-operated cleft lip and palate are the first problem, but our surgery may cause growth disturbances and sometimes a second operation is needed, more difficult than the first one in mission conditions. Repairing a cleft palate needs to be adapted to the type of cleft but also to the age of the child, a velopalatine pharyngoplasty can be performed in some cases.

  14. Maternal obesity is a risk factor for orofacial clefts: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, R; Colombo, A; Suazo, J

    2015-10-01

    Orofacial clefts are the most prevalent birth defects that affect craniofacial structures and implicate genetic and environmental factors in their aetiology. Maternal metabolic state and nutrition have been related to these and other structural malformations, and studies of maternal obesity before pregnancy have shown controversial results about its association with the risk of orofacial clefts in their offspring. Our aim was to assess the combined effect of several single studies of maternal obesity on the risk of orofacial clefts using meta-analysis. We searched for these reports in the PubMed database, and selected 8 studies that met our criteria for eligibility. As a result of this analysis, and using maternal normal weight as a reference, we found that maternal obesity does increase the risk of orofacial clefts in their offspring (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.26). When these clefts are considered separately, maternal obesity is associated with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.23), and with cleft palate alone (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.35). Our results support the relation between maternal obesity and orofacial clefts, and confirm two previous meta-analyses that considered fewer studies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this statistical evidence have not been fully elucidated.

  15. Equatorward shift of the cleft during magnetospheric substorms as observed by Isis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila , W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Isis 1 satellite observations of the cleft position during magnetospheric substorms show that the cleft shifts equatorward as the interplanetary B sub z component turns southward and substorm activity increases and that it shifts back toward higher latitudes as substorm activity subsides and B sub z returns northward. Also, unusually low latitudes for the cleft (less than 70 deg invariant latitude) were found during geomagnetic storms with significant Dst values and large negative B sub z values. Significant shifts occur in the cleft location with no accompanying effect seen in the AE index; however, B sub z is observed to be southward during these periods.

  16. Oral clefts with associated anomalies: findings in the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sárközi, Andrea; Wyszynski, Diego F; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Background Over the years, great efforts have been made to record the frequency of orofacial clefts in different populations. However, very few studies were able to account for the etiological and phenotypic heterogeneity of these conditions. Thus, data of cases with syndromic orofacial clefts from large population-based studies are infrequent. Methods Clinically recognized and notified syndromes and associations including cleft lip with or without cleft palate and other congenital anomalies were selected from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry (HCAR) between 1973 and 1982 and prevalence rates were calculated. Results Of 3,110 cases reported as having orofacial clefts, 653 had multiple congenital abnormalities. Of these, 60 (9.2%) had a known etiology (monogenic: 25 or 3.8%, chromosomal: 31 or 4.7%, teratogenic: 4 or 0.6%). Seventy-three subjects (11.2%) had schisis in addition to the oral cleft. Skeletal anomalies were the most common malformations among cases with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP). Disorders of the central nervous system and cardiovascular malformations were also frequently associated. Conclusion Surveillance systems, such as the HCAR, provide useful information about prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in a population. However, in a field where new syndromes are being discovered and classifications regularly updated, these rates should only be accepted as provisional. PMID:15985166

  17. Clinical Aspects associated with Syndromic forms of Orofacial Clefts in a Colombian population

    PubMed Central

    Briceño Balcazar, Ignacio; Martinez Lozano, Julio; Collins, Andrew; Uricoechea Patiño, Daniel Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present descriptive epidemiology of Orofacial Clefts and to determine the association of syndromic forms with antenatal high-risk conditions, preterm birth, and comorbidities among nested-series of cases. Methods: A study of nested-series of cases was conducted. Frequencies of cleft type, associated congenital anomalies, syndromic, non-syndromic and multiple malformation forms, and distribution of Orofacial Clefts according to sex and affected-side were determined. Odds ratios were calculated as measures of association between syndromic forms and antenatal high-risk conditions, preterm birth and comorbidities. A total of three hundred and eleven patients with Orofacial Clefts were assessed in a 12-month period. Results: The most frequent type of Orofacial Clefts was cleft lip and palate, this type of cleft was more frequent in males, whereas cleft palate occurred more often in females. The most common cases occurred as non-syndromic forms. Aarskog-Scott syndrome showed the highest frequency amongst syndromic forms. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, developmental dysplasia of the hip, central nervous diseases and respiratory failure showed significant statistical associations (p <0.05) with syndromic forms. Conclusions: These data provide an epidemiological reference of Orofacial Clefts in Colombia. Novel associations between syndromic forms and clinical variables are determined. In order to investigate causality relationships between these variables further studies must be carried out. PMID:26848196

  18. Sociological aspects of cleft palate adults. III. Vocational and economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Peter, J P; Chinsky, R R; Fisher, M J

    1975-04-01

    Vocational and economic aspects of social functioning were evaluated for 196 adult cleft subjects, their 190 siblings and 209 random controls. Results indicated that cleft adults functioned within normal limits with regard to employment. However, levels of income were substantively lower than control groups. Cleft subjects compare favorably with their siblings and random controls in occupational mobility over the levels attained by their fathers. It would appear that cleft subjects experience some limitation in their ability to secure vocational and economic rewards from society.

  19. Dental management of Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome associated with oral cleft and hypodontia.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, Shanmugasundaram; Thirumurthy, Velliangattur Ramasamy; Yuvaraja, Bindhoo A

    2016-01-01

    Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS) is a rare type of autosomal dominant disorder characterized by association of ectodermal dysplasia (ED) with cleft lip/palate. The main features include dry, brittle hair with alopecia in adulthood, dental anomalies (hypodontia, microdontia with delayed eruption, fissured tongue, and retruded maxilla), hypohidrosis, dysplastic nails, and clefting. Palmar-plantar keratoderma is seen frequently. RHS has signs and symptoms that overlap considerably with those of ankyloblepharon-ED-clefting syndrome and ectrodactyly-ED-clefting syndrome. This manuscript discusses a case of RHS, one of the four members in three generations who had ED with variable degree of involvement of hair, teeth, nail, and sweat glands.

  20. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000).

  1. Neural Organization of the Median Ocellus of the Dragonfly

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, John E.; Chappell, Richard L.

    1972-01-01

    Two types of presumed synaptic contacts have been recognized by electron microscopy in the synaptic plexus of the median ocellus of the dragonfly. The first type is characterized by an electron-opaque, button-like organelle in the presynaptic cytoplasm, surrounded by a cluster of synaptic vesicles. Two postsynaptic elements are associated with these junctions, which we have termed button synapses. The second synaptic type is characterized by a dense cluster of synaptic vesicles adjacent to the presumed presynaptic membrane. One postsynaptic element is observed at these junctions. The overwhelming majority of synapses seen in the plexus are button synapses. They are found most commonly in the receptor cell axons where they synaptically contact ocellar nerve dendrites and adjacent receptor cell axons. Button synapses are also seen in the ocellar nerve dendrites where they appear to make synapses back onto receptor axon terminals as well as onto adjacent ocellar nerve dendrites. Reciprocal and serial synaptic arrangements between receptor cell axon terminals, and between receptor cell axon terminals and ocellar nerve dendrites are occasionally seen. It is suggested that the lateral and feedback synapses in the median ocellus of the dragonfly play a role in enhancing transients in the postsynaptic responses. PMID:5049076

  2. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  3. Color demosaicking using deinterlacing and median-based filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Wen-Jan; Tai, Shen-Chuan

    2010-10-01

    Color demosaicking is critical to the image quality of single-sensor-based imaging devices. Caused by the sampling pattern of color filter array (CFA), the demosaicked images typically suffer from visual color artifacts in regions of high frequency and sharp edge structures, degrading the quality of camera output. We present a new high-quality demosaicking algorithm by taking advantage of deinterlacing and median-based filtering techniques. We treat the sampled green data of Bayer CFA as a form of diagonal interlaced green planes and make use of some key concepts about spatial deinterlacing to help the edge estimation in terms of both various directions and accuracy. In addition, a specific edge feature, sharp line edge of width 1 pixel, can also be handed well by the proposed method. The median-based filtering techniques are developed for suppressing most visual demosaicking artifacts, such as zipper effect, false color artifact, and interpolation artifact. Experimental results show that our algorithm is effective in suppressing visual artifacts, preserving the edges of image with sharpness and satisfying visual inspection, while keeping computational efficiency.

  4. Linkage study of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate using candidate genes and mapped polymorphic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.D.; Nelson, L.D.; Conner, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) involves fusion or growth failure of facial primordia during development. Complex segregation analysis of clefting populations suggest that an autosomal dominant gene may play a role in this common craniofacial disorder. We have ascertained 16 multigenerational families with CL(P) and tested linkage to 29 candidate genes and 139 mapped short tandem repeat markers. The candidate genes were selected based on their expression in craniofacial development or were identified through murine models. These include: TGF{alpha}, TGF{beta}1, TGF{beta}2, TGF{beta}3, EGF, EGFR, GRAS, cMyc, FGFR, Jun, JunB, PDFG{alpha}, PDGF{beta}, IGF2R, GCR Hox7, Hox8, Hox2B, twirler, 5 collagen and 3 extracellular matrix genes. Linkage was tested assuming an autosomal dominant model with sex-specific decreased penetrance. Linkage to all of the candidate loci was excluded in 11 families. RARA was tested and was not informative. However, haplotype analysis of markers flanking RARA on 17q allowed exclusion of this candidate locus. We have previously excluded linkage to 61 STR markers in 11 families. Seventy-eight mapped short tandem repeat markers have recently been tested in 16 families and 30 have been excluded. The remaining are being analyzed and an exclusion map is being developed based on the entire study results.

  5. Rare Variants in the Epithelial Cadherin Gene Underlying the Genetic Etiology of Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luciano Abreu; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Melo, Soraia; Malcher, Carolina; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; Figueiredo, Joana; Alvizi, Lucas; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Naslavsky, Michel Satya; Alonso, Nivaldo; Felix, Temis Maria; Zatz, Mayana; Seruca, Raquel; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-11-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial cleft (NSOFC) is a complex disease of still unclear genetic etiology. To investigate the contribution of rare epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene variants to NSOFC, we target sequenced 221 probands. Candidate variants were evaluated via in vitro, in silico, or segregation analyses. Three probably pathogenic variants (c.760G>A [p.Asp254Asn], c.1023T>G [p.Tyr341*], and c.2351G>A [p.Arg784His]) segregated according to autosomal dominant inheritance in four nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) families (Lod score: 5.8 at θ = 0; 47% penetrance). A fourth possibly pathogenic variant (c.387+5G>A) was also found, but further functional analyses are needed (overall prevalence of CDH1 candidate variants: 2%; 15.4% among familial cases). CDH1 mutational burden was higher among probands from familial cases when compared to that of controls (P = 0.002). We concluded that CDH1 contributes to NSCL/P with mainly rare, moderately penetrant variants, and CDH1 haploinsufficiency is the likely etiological mechanism.

  6. A Face Inversion Effect without a Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandman, Talia; Yovel, Galit

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have attributed the face inversion effect (FIE) to configural processing of internal facial features in upright but not inverted faces. Recent findings suggest that face mechanisms can be activated by faceless stimuli presented in the context of a body. Here we asked whether faceless stimuli with or without body context may induce…

  7. Learning Faces from Photographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmore, Christopher A.; Liu, Chang Hong; Young, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies examining face learning have mostly used only a single exposure to 1 image of each of the faces to be learned. However, in daily life, faces are usually learned from multiple encounters. These 6 experiments examined the effects on face learning of repeated exposures to single or multiple images of a face. All experiments…

  8. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  9. Cleft lip and Palate: A 30-year Epidemiologic Study in North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kianifar, Hamidreza; Hasanzadeh, Nadia; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Ezzati, Atefeh; Kianifar, Homa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are among the most common congenital anomalies worldwide. This study was conducted in order to explore the incidence and related factors of cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) among live births in Mashhad, North-Eastern Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, records of 28,519 infants born between March 1982 and March 2011 at three major hospitals in Mashhad were screened for oral clefts. Clinical and demographic factors relating to diagnosed cases, including birth date, gender, birth weight, maternal age, number of pregnancies, type and side of cleft and presence of other congenital anomalies were recorded for analysis. Results: The overall incidence of CL/P was 1.9 per 1,000 live births. Cleft lip associated with cleft palate (CLP) was the most prevalent type of cleft (50%), followed by isolated cleft lip (35.2%) and isolated cleft palate (14.8%). A total of 92.6% of oral clefts were bilateral and 5.5% were located on the right side. In addition, clefts were found to be more common in male than female births (male/female ratio=2.3). The rate of associated congenital anomalies in CL/P newborns was 37%. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of oral clefts across three decades of study; except for CLP which was significantly more prevalent between 2002–2011 (P=0.027). There were no significant differences with regard to season of birth, associated anomalies or maternal age of affected newborns in the three time periods of the study. Furthermore, maternal age and number of pregnancies were not significantly different among the three types of cleft (P=0.43 and P=0.91, respectively). Although the mean birth weight of patients affected with isolated cleft palate was considerably lower than that of the other two types of cleft, the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates a frequency of CL/P close to the findings in East Asian countries and higher than

  10. Oral health-related quality of life in children with orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jared A; Vig, Katherine W L; Firestone, Allen R; Mercado, Ana; da Fonseca, Marcio; Johnston, William

    2013-03-01

    Objectives : To determine the impact of orofacial clefts on the oral health-related quality of life of affected children and whether the oral health-related quality of life of children with orofacial clefts differs among different age groups. To assess whether the responses of children with orofacial clefts differ from the caregivers' perceptions of their child's oral health-related quality of life and compare with data from a control group. Design : Cross-sectional study. Patients/Setting : A total of 75 subjects with cleft lip and/or cleft palate (mean age, 13.0 years) from the Nationwide Children's Hospital Craniofacial Anomalies Clinic, as well as their caregivers, and 75 control subjects (mean age, 13.9 years). Main Outcome Measure : Self-reported oral health-related quality of life measured with the Child Oral Health Impact Profile, a reliable and valid questionnaire designed for use with children and teenagers. Results : Children with orofacial clefts had statistically significant lower quality of life scores than control subjects had for overall oral health-related quality of life, Functional Well-being, and Social Emotional Well-being. There was a statistically significant difference in the interaction of age group and Social-Emotional Well-being between children with orofacial clefts and control children. No statistically significant differences were found between the responses of children with orofacial clefts and their caregivers' reports. Conclusions : Presence of an orofacial cleft significantly decreases overall oral health-related quality of life, Functional Well-being, and Social-Emotional Well-being in children and adolescents. The negative impact of orofacial clefts on Social-Emotional Well-being is greater in 15- to 18-year-olds than in younger age groups. Children with orofacial clefts and their caregivers had very similar evaluations of the child's oral health-related quality of life.

  11. Dental caries in the primary dentition of german children with cleft lip, alveolus, and palate.

    PubMed

    Kirchberg, Anja; Makuch, Almut; Hemprich, Alexander; Hirsch, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Objective : The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries in children with cleft lip, alveolus, and/or cleft palate living in central Germany between 1996 and 2010. Participants : A total of 295 children 1 to 6 years of age from three birth cohorts (BC) with clefts from central Germany were included in the study. They were compared with 548 1- to 6-year-old cleft-free children from the same region. Setting : Children with clefts underwent a dental examination in an outpatient dental clinic at the University of Leipzig. The first BC was examined between 1996 and 1998, the second between 2002 and 2004, and the third between 2008 and 2010. Controls were examined at day-care centers in Leipzig during the same periods. Main Outcome Measure : The standard dental caries index for the primary dentition (dmf/t3-4) was used for clinical assessment. Results : Over the entire study period, the mean prevalence of dental caries in deciduous teeth was significantly higher (1.32 dmf/t3-4) in children with clefts compared with cleft-free children. However, a decline in caries (approximately 1 dmf/t3-4) and an increase in the proportion of children with healthy primary dentition were observed in both groups. These results represent a caries decline of 61% in children with clefts. Conclusions : Caries rates for children 1 to 6 years of age with clefts from central Germany showed a considerable decline over the last years. The caries rates for clefts patients in the third BC (2008 to 2010) was similar to that of cleft-free children in the first BC (1996 to 1998).

  12. Locally released retinoic acid leads to facial clefts in the chick embryo but does not alter the expression of receptors for fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Richman, J M; Delgado, J L

    1995-01-01

    Systemic administration of retinoic acid (RA) affects the growth of the upper beak of chick embryos; however, the mechanism for generating a cleft upper beak is not known. In the present study, we wished to elucidate the molecular basis of the retinoid-induced lip clefting. In order to ensure that facial prominences were locally exposed to levels of retinoid known to affect gene expression, we implanted beads soaked in different concentrations of RA in the right nasal pit or in the centre of the frontonasal mass. Beads soaked in 5 mg/ml RA placed in the right nasal pit caused full clefting of the upper beak with a deviation of the midline toward the right side of the face. The asymmetry was principally due to a decrease in size or total elimination of the right lateral nasal prominence. RA-soaked beads placed in the centre of the frontonasal mass created full bilateral clefts that were more symmetrical than those produced by beads in the nasal pit. Lower concentrations of retinoic acid produced less severe facial abnormalities. Control experiments show that the implanted bead itself has no effect on growth or fusion of the facial prominences. The specific effects of retinoids on facial growth may be due to a localized decrease in responsiveness to growth factors. Gene expression patterns for two fibroblast growth factor receptors (Cek-2, Cek-3, [chicken embryo kinase]) in normal and RA-treated embryos were examined by in situ hybridization. In normal embryos, Cek-2 and Cek-3 transcripts are expressed at very high levels in the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the eye. Cek-3 is additionally expressed in the centre of the frontonasal mass. The application of beads to the right nasal pit did not change the level of expression or distribution of transcripts for Cek-2 or Cek-3. This data suggests that retinoic acid may be affecting other aspects of the FGF receptor-ligand interaction.

  13. Enhancement of Multispectral Chromosome Image Classification Using Vector Median Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvelis, Petros S.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    Multiplex in-situ hybridization (M-FISH) is a combinatorial labeling technique in which each chromosome is labeled with 5 fluors and a DNA stain and is used for chromosome analysis. Although M-FISH facilitates the visual detection of gross anomalies, misclassified pixels and cross-hybridization often makes manual examination difficult and introduces operator bias. The success of the technique largely depends on the accuracy of pixel classification. In this work we study the use of nonlinear Vector Median Filtering (VMF) methods to induce the accuracy of pixel classification. We have evaluated our methodology using a subset of images publicly available and the classifier was trained and tested on non-overlapping chromosome images. An overall accuracy of 74.13% is reported when introducing VMF.

  14. Current Controversies in Diagnosis and Management of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ysunza, Pablo Antonio; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Pamplona, Maria Carmen; Calderon, Juan F.; Shaheen, Kenneth; Chaiyasate, Konkgrit; Rontal, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background. One of the most controversial topics concerning cleft palate is the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Objective. This paper reviews current genetic aspects of cleft palate, imaging diagnosis of VPI, the planning of operations for restoring velopharyngeal function during speech, and strategies for speech pathology treatment of articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate. Materials and Methods. An updated review of the scientific literature concerning genetic aspects of cleft palate was carried out. Current strategies for assessing and treating articulation disorders associated with cleft palate were analyzed. Imaging procedures for assessing velopharyngeal closure during speech were reviewed, including a recent method for performing intraoperative videonasopharyngoscopy. Results. Conclusions from the analysis of genetic aspects of syndromic and nonsyndromic cleft palate and their use in its diagnosis and management are presented. Strategies for classifying and treating articulation disorders in patients with cleft palate are presented. Preliminary results of the use of multiplanar videofluoroscopy as an outpatient procedure and intraoperative endoscopy for the planning of operations which aimed to correct VPI are presented. Conclusion. This paper presents current aspects of the diagnosis and management of patients with cleft palate and VPI including 3 main aspects: genetics and genomics, speech pathology and imaging diagnosis, and surgical management. PMID:26273595

  15. Nasopharyngeal Development in Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wermker, Kai; Jung, Susanne; Joos, Ulrich; Kleinheinz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this paper was to evaluate cephalometrically the nasopharyngeal development of patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Influencing factors were evaluated and cleft to noncleft subjects were compared to each other. Material and Methods. The lateral cephalograms of 66 patients with complete cleft lip and palate were measured and compared retrospectively to the cephalograms of 123 healthy probands. Measurements were derived from a standardized analysis of 56 landmarks. Results. We observed significant differences between cleft and control group: the cleft patients showed amaxillary retroposition and a reduced maxillary length; the inclination of the maxilla was significantly more posterior and cranial; the anterior nasopharyngeal height was reduced; the nasopharyngeal growth followed a vertical tendency with reduced sagittal dimensions concerning hard and soft tissue. The velum length was reduced. In the cleft group, an accumulation of mandibular retrognathia and an anterior position of the hyoid were observed. Skeletal configuration and type of growth were predominantly vertical. Conclusions. Our data provides a fundamental radiological analysis of the nasopharyngeal development in cleft patients. It confirms the lateral cephalogram as a basic diagnostic device in the analysis of nasopharyngeal and skeletal growth in cleft patients. PMID:22523495

  16. EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVIDENCE FOR EGFR PATHWAY MEDIATION OF CLEFT PALATE INDUCTION BY TCDD. B D Abbott, A R Buckalew, and K E Leffler. RTD, NHEERL, ORD,US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is teratogenic in C57BL/6J mice, producing cleft palate (CP) after exposure...

  17. Psychosocial Aspects of Cleft Lip and Palate: Implications for Parental Education. Research Report 138.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalland, Mirjam

    This study focused on the psychosocial aspects of cleft lip and/or palate on maternal emotional reactions and the family, with emphasis on the effect on the maternal-infant bond. Interviews were conducted with 40 mothers of 1-year-old infants with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenological…

  18. Verbal Competence in Narrative Retelling in 5-Year-Olds with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Lohmander, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research regarding expressive language performance in children born with cleft palate is sparse. The relationship between articulation/phonology and expressive language skills also needs to be further explored. Aims: To investigate verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-old children born with unilateral cleft lip and palate…

  19. Syntactic Structure and Information Structure: The Acquisition of Portuguese Clefts and "Be"-Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Maria; Santos, Ana Lúcia; Soares-Jesel, Carla

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the acquisition of different types of clefts and of "be"-fragments in European Portuguese. We first present the main syntactic and discourse properties of different cleft structures and of "be"-fragments in European Portuguese, and we discuss how data from first language acquisition may contribute to…

  20. Primary repair of a large incomplete sternal cleft in an asymptomatic infant with Prolene mesh.

    PubMed

    Baqain, Eyad B; Lataifeh, Isam M; Khriesat, Wadah M; Fraiwan, Nayef M; Armooti, Mohamed A

    2008-10-01

    A cleft of the sternum is a rare congenital anomaly, often diagnosed as an asymptomatic condition at birth. We present a case of a large incomplete sternal cleft in a full-term baby boy. Surgical repair of the sternum with the use of Prolene mesh was performed during the neonatal period without cardiac compression.

  1. Initial counselling for cleft lip and palate: parents' evaluation, needs and expectations.

    PubMed

    Kuttenberger, J; Ohmer, J N; Polska, E

    2010-03-01

    During the first counselling after the birth of a child with cleft lip and palate (CLP) information about the malformation should be delivered and a long-standing relationship between the cleft team and the affected family must be established. The present study was conducted to evaluate the parents' experiences, needs and expectations with this first consultation. A questionnaire was sent to 105 parents at the cleft clinic, which could be answered anonymously. It collected demographic data, data on the parents' pre-existing level of information and the parents' assessment of the counselling at the cleft centre. Seventy percent of the questionnaires were returned. In 16% the clefts were diagnosed prenatally, in 32% there were relatives with clefts. Seventy-one percent of the parents received detailed counselling, 89% of which occurred in the first week. The parents requested that information about surgery (80%), feeding the child (63%) and the aetiology of clefts (44%) should be given. The quality of the consultation was rated very good or good by 87% of families. This study confirms the importance of initial counselling for CLP. The exceptional psychological situation of the family has to be considered and a close collaboration between cleft centre and maternity hospitals is mandatory.

  2. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome causing blindness in a child.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jamie B; Butrus, Salim; Bazemore, Marlet G

    2011-02-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome, the result of a mutation in the gene encoding tumor protein p63, causes ocular surface disease. It is typically progressive, with vision loss in adulthood. We present a case of severe corneal disease, glaucoma, and blindness related to ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome in a 3-year-old female patient.

  3. Nasalance Scores of Children with Repaired Cleft Palate Who Exhibit Normal Velopharyngeal Closure during Aerodynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if children with repaired cleft palate and normal velopharyngeal (VP) closure as determined by aerodynamic testing exhibit greater acoustic nasalance than control children without cleft palate. Method: Pressure-flow procedures were used to identify 2 groups of children based on VP closure during the production of /p/ in the…

  4. A Respirometric Technique to Evaluate Velopharyngeal Function in Speakers with Cleft Palate, with and without Prostheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harvey R.; Ferrand, Carole T.

    1987-01-01

    Respirometric quotients (RQ), the ratio of oral air volume expended to total volume expended, were obtained from the productions of oral and nasal airflow of 10 speakers with cleft palate, with and without their prosthetic appliances, and 10 normal speakers. Cleft palate speakers without their appliances exhibited the lowest RQ values. (Author/DB)

  5. Significance and targeting of small, central clefts in severe fractures treated with vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rad, A Ehteshami; Gray, L A; Kallmes, D F

    2008-08-01

    We report a small cohort of patients with severe osteoporotic fractures treated with vertebroplasty. We note a high prevalence of small, central, intraosseous clefts in these severe fractures. Rather than filling the small amount of residual bone marrow around the periphery of these severe fractures, as suggested by previous authors, we suggest central needle placement to fill these central clefts.

  6. Analysis of potential oral cleft risk factors in the Kosovo population.

    PubMed

    Salihu, Sami; Krasniqi, Blerim; Sejfija, Osman; Heta, Nijazi; Salihaj, Nderim; Geci, Agreta; Sejdini, Milaim; Arifi, Hysni; Isufi, Ramazan; Ueeck, Brett A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of potential risk factors such as positive family cleft history, smoking, use of drugs during pregnancy, and parental age with oral clefts in offspring within the Kosovo population. We conducted a population-based case-control study of live births in Kosovo from 1996 to 2005. Using a logistic regression model, 244 oral cleft cases were compared with 488 controls. We have excluded all syndromic clefts. Heredity increases the risk of clefts in newborns [odds ratio (OR) = 8.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.12-23.52]. Clefts were also associated with smoking (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 0.75-4.08), use of drugs during pregnancy (OR = 2.25, 95% CI 0.82-5.12), increasing maternal age (OR = 1.83, 95% CI 1.42-2.49), and increasing paternal age (OR = 1.3, 95% CI 1.2- 1.4). We found heredity to be the most important factor for cleft occurrence in Kosovar newborns. Another significant potential risk factor for occurrence of clefts is the parental age. We found the use of drugs and smoking during pregnancy to be less significant.

  7. Radical Dissection of Greater Palatine Artery and Dynamic Reconstruction of Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Nauman Ahmad; Chaudry, Ayesha; Ishaq, Irfan; Aslam, Muhammad; Shamim, Romaisa; Kafeel, Mirza Muhammad; Aazam, Muhammad; Sailer, Hermann; Ganatra, Muhammad Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Restoration of proper anatomy and physiology is an integral part of cleft palate repair. The senior author has devised a new technique of radical release of greater palatine vessels, which helps in achieving tension-free closure of palatal cleft. In addition, release and transposition of palatal muscles is performed without the use of operative microscope, resulting in improved palatal function. This technique is applicable to all types of clefts of the palate and can be performed on adult patients as well. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective case series of cleft palate repairs performed over a period of 3 years. Single-stage repair with modified Bardach’s technique for complete cleft palate and von Langenbeck’s technique for incomplete cleft palate with radical release of greater palatine vessels and levator complex retropositioning was performed. The outcome measures were closure of palatal defect and speech production. A follow-up of at least 6 months was completed in each patient. Results: A total of 1568 patients were included in the study. Their age ranged from 9 months to 54 years. The overall fistula rate was 6.1%. Improvement of speech was observed even in adult patients. Conclusions: Radical release of greater palatine artery and levator complex transposition can dramatically improve results of cleft palate repair. This technique helps in dynamic reconstruction of cleft palate and can be effectively applied in all age groups. PMID:28280675

  8. A review of cleft lip and palate management: Experience of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Osunde, Otasowie Daniel; Akpasa, Izegboya Olohitae

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip (CL) and palate (CLP) management is multidisciplinary. A cleft team was formed in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital to address the health needs of cleft patients in the centre. Aim: This paper aims at documenting the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) management protocol for orofacial clefts and also to review our experience with CLP surgeries performed at AKTH since our partnering with Smile Train. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of all the cleft patients surgically treated from January 2006 to December 2014 under Smile Train sponsorship was undertaken. A descriptive narrative of the cleft team protocol was also given. Results: One hundred and fifty-five patients (80 males, 75 females) had surgical repairs of either the lip or palate. CL patients were 83 (53.55%), while CLP patients were 45 (29.03%) and isolated cleft palate patients were 27 (17.42%). Conclusion: The inclusion of various specialities in the cleft team is highly desirable. Poverty level amongst our patients frequently limits our management to surgical treatment sponsored by the Smile Train, despite the presence of other residual problems. PMID:26712291

  9. Processing of Japanese Cleft Constructions in Context: Evidence from Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yano, Masataka; Tateyama, Yuki; Sakamoto, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have found "subject gap preference" in relative clauses and cleft constructions in English, French, and other languages. In contrast, previous studies have reported "object gap preference" in cleft constructions in Japanese. However, the effect of integrating a filler and its gap may be influenced by the effect…

  10. Study of relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure in cleft palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zheng, Qian; Shi, Bing; Yin, Heng; Meng, Tian; Zheng, Guang-ning

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to analyze the relationship between clinical factors and velopharyngeal closure (VPC) in cleft palate patients. METHODS: Chi-square test was used to compare the postoperative velopharyngeal closure rate. Logistic regression model was used to analyze independent variables associated with velopharyngeal closure. RESULTS: Difference of postoperative VPC rate in different cleft types, operative ages and surgical techniques was significant (P=0.000). Results of logistic regression analysis suggested that when operative age was beyond deciduous dentition stage, or cleft palate type was complete, or just had undergone a simple palatoplasty without levator veli palatini retropositioning, patients would suffer a higher velopharyngeal insufficiency rate after primary palatal repair. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft type, operative age and surgical technique were the contributing factors influencing VPC rate after primary palatal repair of cleft palate patients. PMID:22279464

  11. Development of speech services for people with cleft palate in Thailand: lack of professionals.

    PubMed

    Prathanee, Benjamas

    2012-11-01

    Cleft lip/palate is one of the most common birth defects and has a high incidence in Thailand. Most children with cleft still have social stigma from speech and language defects after surgical treatment. Speech and language therapies are required at an early age and require long-term care until teenager or adult. Unfortunately, there are insufficient speech services for cleft because of a lack of qualified speech and language pathologists in Thailand. Development consisted of two remedy modalities of bottom-up and top-down models, Community-Based Speech Therapy Model for people with Cleft Lip Cleft Palate including networking and standard assessments of both subjective and objective measurements. That might be the best and most suitable way to solve problems of lacking speech services in Thailand or developing countries which have similar contexts.

  12. Palatal changes after lip surgery in different types of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G J; Hoeksma, J B; Prahl-Andersen, B

    1994-09-01

    This study concerns palatal development during 6 months following primary lip closure. The sample consisted of 75 children with different forms of cleft lip and palate and 51 noncleft children. The palate was measured at 3 months of age, just before lip surgery, after surgery at 6 months, and again at 9 months of age. The results showed that lip closure has a strong effect in the anterior alveolar region. This effect was restricted to 3 months after surgery. The changes in complete clefts were more explicit than in incomplete cleft forms. Furthermore, the data showed that arch depth reduction due to lip surgery was compensated for by continued anteroposterior palatal growth. Early orthopedics appeared to prevent major palatal collapse immediately after lip surgery. Finally simultaneous closure of the alveolar cleft at the nasal side resulted in continued reduction of anterior cleft width.

  13. Nasoalveolar molding for infants born with clefts of the lip, alveolus, and palate.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Barry H; Maull, Deirdre

    2004-04-01

    The principle objective of presurgical nasoalveolar molding (NAM) is to reduce the severity of the initial cleft deformity. This enables the surgeon and the patient to enjoy the benefits associated with a repair of a cleft deformity that is of minimal severity. Retraction of the premaxilla, presurgical elongation of the columella, correction of the nasal cartilage deformity, alignment of the cleft alveolar segments, increase in the surface area of the nasal mucosal lining, up-righting of the columella, and achieving close approximation of the cleft lip segments at rest result from gentle application of forces through the NAM appliance. Preservation of these presurgical changes is achieved through the coordinated and modified surgical technique of the primary cleft repair.

  14. Changing perspectives in cleft lip and palate: from acrylic to allele.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T; Senders, Craig W; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2008-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate deformities are the most common congenital abnormalities of the head and neck. Advancements in the various multidisciplinary fields involved in cleft management have substantially improved functional and aesthetic outcomes. The legitimacy of such controversial topics as gingivoperiosteoplasty, primary rhinoplasty, and presurgical nasoalveolar molding is heavily contested. Bone morphogenetic protein and other recombinant growth factors may play important roles in future cleft care. As the candidate alleles that contribute to cleft lip and palate are further elucidated, the complex interplay of environmental influence and genetic predisposition is emphasized. Translational research from fields such as fetal wound healing, tissue engineering, and gene therapy may have clinical applications as cleft care continues to evolve.

  15. Parents' emotional and social experiences of caring for a child through cleft treatment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Pauline A; Kirk, Susan A; Caress, Ann-Louise; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the experiences of parents caring for a child through long-term treatment for cleft lip and/or cleft palate. We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 parents with children between the ages of 20 weeks and 21 years to explore experiences across the treatment program. We analyzed the data using a constructivist grounded theory approach and present in detail in this article one subcategory from the analysis: managing emotions. Throughout childhood and adolescence, parents experienced conflicting emotions about their child's impairment, uncertainty about cleft treatment, and stigmatizing attitudes. Although parents attempted to manage emotional tensions by pursuing cleft treatments, the interventions could themselves be a source of conflict for them. We suggest that routine assessment of parents' emotional and social well-being should be included in cleft treatment programs, and access to psychosocial support made available.

  16. Periodontal plastic surgery for management of cleft alveolar ridge: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amit A; Yeltiwar, Ramreddy K

    2012-02-01

    Cleft lips, alveoli, and palates are the most common congenital malformations of the head and neck region, all of which often can be managed successfully when presented at a young age. It is a common belief that clefts in the alveolar ridge should be treated with the help of bone grafting materials. This could be the best option when the cleft is to be treated in early age, when the patient is still developing and has high regenerative potential. However, in adults, the literature supports the fact that bone grafting in alveolar clefts has a higher chance for failure. The present case report exemplifies a periodontal plastic surgical procedure involving a combination of connective tissue and free gingival grafting to restore the form and function of a cleft alveolar ridge in an adult patient.

  17. Non-syndromal oro-facial clefts in the Canterbury/ West Coast region, 1960-2000.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Peter; Esson, Ian

    2005-09-01

    The paper-based clinical assessment notes from Christchurch Hospital Cleft Clinic were transferred to electronic form in 2002. This enabled analysis of the types of non-syndromal orofacial clefts presenting within the Canterbury and West Coast region over a 41 year period. The incidence of oro-facial clefting was similar to that described in previous New Zealand studies, but higher than that found in United Kingdom studies. Orthodontists providing care in the cleft clinics in New Zealand have begun to investigate the use of a standardised electronic national database of patients presenting with oro-facial clefts. It is expected that this could provide the basis for a more detailed, robust and standardised database for future analysis.

  18. The Relationship of Exposure to Anesthesia on Outcomes in Children With Isolated Oral Clefts.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Amy L; Goodwin, Jon W; Choi, James; Block, Robert I; Nopoulos, Peg

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between exposure to anesthesia and previously identified differences in cognitive functioning, growth, and volumetric brain measures among a sample of children, adolescents, and young adults with isolated oral clefts. Data from a cross-sectional study were combined with a retrospective chart review. Data were obtained for 87 participants with isolated cleft lip and/or palate (55% male), ranging from 7.5 to 27 years old (mean = 15.78, standard deviation = 4.58). Measures of interest included cognitive functioning, growth measures, and brain volumes. Number of surgeries and time under anesthesia were obtained through systematic medical record review. Potential sex and cleft type differences in exposure as well as relationships between anesthesia exposure and outcome measures were evaluated. Participants with isolated cleft lip and palate had more surgeries and were under anesthesia longer. For participants with isolated cleft lip only, more surgeries were correlated to lower verbal IQ and higher frontal lobe volume.

  19. [Associated brachial cleft anomalies in the cat eye syndrome].

    PubMed

    Avior, Galit; Derowe, Ari; Fliss, Dan M; Leicear-Trejo, Leonor; Braverman, Itzhak

    2007-02-01

    The cat eye syndrome is a congenital malformation usually associated with anal atresia, ocular coloboma, downward slanting eyes, microphthalmia, hypertelorism, strabismus, preauricular tags or fistulas, congenital heart defect particularly septal defect, urinary tract abnormalities, skeletal anomalies and frequently mental and physical retardation. A small supernumerary chromosome (smaller than chromosome 21) is present, frequently has 2 centromeres, is bisatellited and represents an inv dup 22 (q11). A two years old female presented to our department with an association of cat eye syndrome with preauricular tags and a first branchial arch anomaly. This article discusses the surgical management and the association between the cat eye syndrome and first branchial cleft anomaly.

  20. Prevalence of dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Neda; Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Aliakbarian, Majid; Hasanzadeh, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a group of patients with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) in the northeast of Iran. Ninety-one patients referring to the Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic of Mashhad Dental School were enrolled and classified into right CL/P, left CL/P, and bilateral CL/P groups. Photographs, dental casts, and panoramic and periapical radiographs were retrieved, and dental anomalies were recorded. χ test was used to analyze the frequency of dental anomalies according to type of cleft and sex. Missing maxillary lateral incisors was the most frequent dental anomaly, which was slightly higher in the bilateral group (61.1%). There were significantly more cases of missing lateral incisors outside the cleft area in right CL/P (P = 0.015). Peg lateral incisors were observed in 33.3% of bilateral CL/P compared with 28% of right and 23.3% of left unilateral cases. The sample presented rotations of central incisors in the cleft area in 33.3% of bilateral clefts. In unilateral clefts, it occurred more frequently in the right side (48%). Sexual dimorphism appeared only for maxillary central incisor rotation in the cleft area, which showed significantly greater frequency in females (P = 0.025). Transposition of maxillary canine and first premolars was found in 5.5% of bilateral, 8% of right, and 3.3% of left unilateral clefts. The prevalence of dental anomalies in the studied sample seems to be higher than that reported in the normal population. More anomalies were observed at the cleft side. The frequency of most anomalies was not significantly different between the 2 sexes.

  1. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. [Bilateral cleft lip and palate. Anatomic and clinical characteristics and therapeutic results].

    PubMed

    Morand, B; Raphaël, B

    2004-09-01

    Treatment teams that conceive and nourish their ideas in a multi-disciplinary environment are best suited to elaborate therapeutic protocols. Their concepts should be based on consistent evaluation of their treatment results as documented by precise and reproducible records. In the wide array of maxillo-facial anatomical deformities presented clinically, bilateral cleft lips and palates are the rarest (20%), but they are also the most serious because of the inherent disconnection of maxillary structures that accompanies them and because of the grave disturbances they inflict on the development of the middle third of the face. Surgeons have devised an extraordinary gamut of protocols to correct these disorders and then abandoned them because of the problematical and ephemeral results they provided. The authors, after evaluating their own results, modified their therapeutic approach in 1994. They present their current protocol, which calls for an orthopedic phase carried out when the patient is 2 months old and two surgical phases when the patient is 3 and then 7 months old.

  3. Orbital Prosthetic Rehabilitation in “ADAM Complex” Multiple Orofacial-Cleft Disruption Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barabde, Aparna; Barabde, Shailesh M.; Bhagat, Ashish; Thakare, Amar

    2013-01-01

    To be human is great; to look human is wonderful! It is nature's greatest gift! Mother nature's womb is the safest place on earth for any life, but the calamity strikes and no one knows how Hence, Treasure your exceptions!, since nature seems nowhere accustomed more openly to display, its secret mysteries than in cases where it shows traces of its workings apart from the beaten path. A dismorphological pattern of congenital oro-craniofacial and limb defects which is a rare form of amniotic rupture sequence required persistent coordinated efforts of multiple disciplines and had manifested as bizarre orofacial clefting, cat eye syndrome with an ectopic eye, and aberrant tissue band lesions on limb. The challenge was to meet the child's clamour for functional demands on premature exposure to open world and was overcome through a phased treatment implementation. Anophthalmos resulting from multiple ophthalmic surgeries for aberrant ectopic left eye and cat eye syndrome of right eye required a staged sequential preemptive planning for a successful outcome. Every phase of fabrication of orbital prosthesis comes with an impending challenge. Thus, a well-defined technique eliminating the common errors and creating a natural looking prosthesis, in the face of limitations, is imperative. PMID:23762737

  4. Orbital Prosthetic Rehabilitation in "ADAM Complex" Multiple Orofacial-Cleft Disruption Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barabde, Aparna; Barabde, Shailesh M; Bhagat, Ashish; Thakare, Amar

    2013-01-01

    To be human is great; to look human is wonderful! It is nature's greatest gift! Mother nature's womb is the safest place on earth for any life, but the calamity strikes and no one knows how Hence, Treasure your exceptions!, since nature seems nowhere accustomed more openly to display, its secret mysteries than in cases where it shows traces of its workings apart from the beaten path. A dismorphological pattern of congenital oro-craniofacial and limb defects which is a rare form of amniotic rupture sequence required persistent coordinated efforts of multiple disciplines and had manifested as bizarre orofacial clefting, cat eye syndrome with an ectopic eye, and aberrant tissue band lesions on limb. The challenge was to meet the child's clamour for functional demands on premature exposure to open world and was overcome through a phased treatment implementation. Anophthalmos resulting from multiple ophthalmic surgeries for aberrant ectopic left eye and cat eye syndrome of right eye required a staged sequential preemptive planning for a successful outcome. Every phase of fabrication of orbital prosthesis comes with an impending challenge. Thus, a well-defined technique eliminating the common errors and creating a natural looking prosthesis, in the face of limitations, is imperative.

  5. Expanding the cleft phenotype: the dental characteristics of unaffected parents of Australian children with non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Aspinall, Andrea; Raj, Supriya; Jugessur, Anil; Marazita, Mary; Savarirayan, Ravi; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2014-01-01

    Background The aetiology of isolated clefts of the lip and/or palate remains obscure. Unaffected family members are treated as if their genetic risks are equivalent and low. Given the number of genes associated with both clefting and dental anomalies, the hypothesis that such anomalies contribute to the cleft phenotype should be explored. Aim To describe the dental characteristics of parents of children with non-syndromic cleft lip ± palate. Design Unaffected parents of Australian children with a cleft of the lip ± palate underwent dental examination including radiographs, photographs, and impressions. Dental anomalies were identified. Results Data were available on 101 parents (49 males, 52 females). Fifty-one participants had at least one dental anomaly. Twelve (11.8%) individuals had congenital absence of teeth, with seven missing multiple teeth. The tooth most commonly missing was the upper right lateral incisor. Five subjects (4.9%) had microdontia (upper lateral incisor most commonly affected). Four subjects (4.0%) had supernumerary teeth. Enamel defects were present in 27 (26.7%) cases with the incisors (46.8%) followed by premolars (24.2%) most affected. Conclusions This study supports previous work suggesting that ‘unaffected’ parents of children with clefts of the lip ± palate may present with dental anomalies. PMID:24237197

  6. Neural Organization of the Median Ocellus of the Dragonfly

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Richard L.; Dowling, John E.

    1972-01-01

    Intracellular responses from receptors and postsynaptic units have been recorded in the median ocellus of the dragonfly. The receptors respond to light with a graded, depolarizing potential and a single, tetrodotoxin-sensitive impulse at "on." The postsynaptic units (ocellar nerve dendrites) hyperpolarize during illumination and show a transient, depolarizing response at "off." The light-evoked slow potential responses of the postsynaptic units are not altered by the application of tetrodotoxin to the ocellus. It appears, therefore, that the graded receptor potential, which survives the application of tetrodotoxin, is responsible for mediating synaptic transmission in the ocellus. Comparison of pre- and postsynaptic slow potential activity shows (a) longer latencies in postsynaptic units by 5–20 msec, (b) enhanced photosensitivity in postsynaptic units by 1–2 log units, and (c) more transient responses in postsynaptic units. It is suggested that enhanced photosensitivity of postsynaptic activity is a result of summation of many receptors onto the postsynaptic elements, and that transients in the postsynaptic responses are related to the complex synaptic arrangements in the ocellar plexus to be described in the following paper. PMID:5049075

  7. Posterolateral approach to ruptured median and paramedian cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Fager, C A

    1983-12-01

    The trend toward anterior diskectomy for median and paramedian cervical disk rupture has tended to obscure progressive development of the posterolateral approach to these lesions. Modifications of surgical technique from the classic posterior approach have allowed direct access to these lesions, provided for satisfactory decompression of the spinal cord, especially when there is associated spondylosis, and avoided all of the disadvantages of anterior disk surgery. Of 28 patients operated on since 1950, 26 have had significant preoperative myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Two patients with obvious spinal cord compression and massive myelographic defects had no neurologic deficit. Improvement has been observed in every patient; 16 patients have had full recovery, and 8 others have had minor residual symptoms and asymptomatic signs. Although four patients have been lost to follow-up, they were all seen at least once after operation. No instance of increased deficit has been seen postoperatively, in contrast to the author's experience with spondylotic myelopathy. Postoperative contrast studies, which have now been performed on eight patients, confirm satisfactory excision of these lesions and decompression.

  8. Approximate Median Regression for Complex Survey Data with Skewed Response

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Raphael André; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Sinha, Debajyoti; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Pan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ready availability of public-use data from various large national complex surveys has immense potential for the assessment of population characteristics using regression models. Complex surveys can be used to identify risk factors for important diseases such as cancer. Existing statistical methods based on estimating equations and/or utilizing resampling methods are often not valid with survey data due to complex survey design features. That is, stratification, multistage sampling and weighting. In this paper, we accommodate these design features in the analysis of highly skewed response variables arising from large complex surveys. Specifically, we propose a double-transform-both-sides (DTBS) based estimating equations approach to estimate the median regression parameters of the highly skewed response; the DTBS approach applies the same Box-Cox type transformation twice to both the outcome and regression function. The usual sandwich variance estimate can be used in our approach, whereas a resampling approach would be needed for a pseudo-likelihood based on minimizing absolute deviations (MAD). Furthermore, the approach is relatively robust to the true underlying distribution, and has much smaller mean square error than a MAD approach. The method is motivated by an analysis of laboratory data on urinary iodine (UI) concentration from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PMID:27062562

  9. Facing facts: neuronal mechanisms of face perception.

    PubMed

    Dekowska, Monika; Kuniecki, Michał; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    The face is one of the most important stimuli carrying social meaning. Thanks to the fast analysis of faces, we are able to judge physical attractiveness and features of their owners' personality, intentions, and mood. From one's facial expression we can gain information about danger present in the environment. It is obvious that the ability to process efficiently one's face is crucial for survival. Therefore, it seems natural that in the human brain there exist structures specialized for face processing. In this article, we present recent findings from studies on the neuronal mechanisms of face perception and recognition in the light of current theoretical models. Results from brain imaging (fMRI, PET) and electrophysiology (ERP, MEG) show that in face perception particular regions (i.e. FFA, STS, IOA, AMTG, prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex) are involved. These results are confirmed by behavioral data and clinical observations as well as by animal studies. The developmental findings reviewed in this article lead us to suppose that the ability to analyze face-like stimuli is hard-wired and improves during development. Still, experience with faces is not sufficient for an individual to become an expert in face perception. This thesis is supported by the investigation of individuals with developmental disabilities, especially with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD).

  10. Attention Capture by Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Stephen R. H.; Law, Anna S.; Burton, A. Mike; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2008-01-01

    We report three experiments that investigate whether faces are capable of capturing attention when in competition with other non-face objects. In Experiment 1a participants took longer to decide that an array of objects contained a butterfly target when a face appeared as one of the distracting items than when the face did not appear in the array.…

  11. Prenatal Counseling, Ultrasound Diagnosis, and the Role of Maternal-Fetal Medicine of the Cleft Lip and Palate Patient.

    PubMed

    James, Jeffrey N; Schlieder, Daniel W

    2016-05-01

    A multidisciplinary team is the standard of care and the cornerstone of management of cleft patients. With readily improving advanced diagnostic modalities, early prenatal diagnosis of cleft lip and palate increasingly becomes a topic of importance for both the team caring for and families of cleft patients. Maternal-fetal medicine is a fellowship subspecialty of obstetrics that can offer high-quality care and coordination to the cleft team. Both 3-D and 4-D sonography lead to early prenatal diagnosis of cleft patients; however, differences in training result in variations in its diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee’s facial–recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1) familiar faces, (2) novel faces and (3) intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity. PMID:27602275

  13. Tissue engineering in cleft palate and other congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Panetta, Nicholas J; Gupta, Deepak M; Slater, Bethany J; Kwan, Matthew D; Liu, Karen J; Longaker, Michael T

    2008-05-01

    Contributions from multidisciplinary investigations have focused attention on the potential of tissue engineering to yield novel therapeutics. Congenital malformations, including cleft palate, craniosynostosis, and craniofacial skeletal hypoplasias represent excellent targets for the implementation of tissue engineering applications secondary to the technically challenging nature and inherent inadequacies of current reconstructive interventions. Apropos to the search for answers to these clinical conundrums, studies have focused on elucidating the molecular signals driving the biologic activity of the aforementioned maladies. These investigations have highlighted multiple signaling pathways, including Wnt, fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, and bone morphogenetic proteins, that have been found to play critical roles in guided tissue development. Furthermore, a comprehensive knowledge of these pathways will be of utmost importance to the optimization of future cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The scope of this review encompasses a discussion of the molecular biology involved in the development of cleft palate and craniosynostosis. In addition, we include a discussion of craniofacial distraction osteogenesis and how its applied forces influence cell signaling to guide endogenous bone regeneration. Finally, this review discusses the future role of cell-based tissue engineering in the treatment of congenital malformations.

  14. Radar and satellite observations of the storm time cleft

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Foster, J.C.; Holt, J.M.; Redus, R.H.; Rich, F.J.

    1990-08-01

    During the magnetic storm of February 8-9, 1986, the region of strong ion convection in the vicinity of the dayside cusp expanded equatorward into the field of view of the Millstone Hill radar at lower mid-latitudes. High-speed (>1.5 km/s) poleward ion flows were found at latitudes as low as 60 deg invariant latitude, at least 10 deg lower than the typical cleft/cusp position for moderately disturbed (Kp>4) magnetospheric conditions. The ion velocity pattern responded promptly to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field By direction. The large-scale two-dimensional convection pattern across the dayside was well resolved using radar azimuth scan data at Millstone Hill, thus enabling us to place the fine-scale radar/satellite observations of the storm time cusp and cleft in the context of the large-scale pattern. We present a detailed comparison of radar and DMSP F7 satellite observations in the prenoon sector during a period of Kp > 7, to examine the low-altitude signatures of various plasma regions in the vicinity of the cusp. The combination of particle precipitation, magnetic field perturbation, radar measurements of ion heating, and convection consistently suggests the unusual low-latitude position of cusp at 65 invariant latitude.

  15. Midline Cervical Cleft: Review of an Uncommon Entity

    PubMed Central

    Puscas, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Midline cervical cleft is a rare congenital malformation which nonetheless has a classic presentation. This study presents one of the largest single series of new patients with MCC and provides an exhaustive review and catalogue of publications from the international literature. Materials and Methods. Retrospective chart review performed in two academic medical centers and literature review performed with primary verification of all quoted references. Results. Ten patients with MCC were identified (8 boys and 2 girls). All patients presented with the classic findings of this congenital anomaly, and the length of the skin defect correlated with an increase in the patient's age. Surgical excision was complete in all cases. Thorough international literature review yielded only 195 verifiable previously reported cases. Conclusions. This is one of the largest series of new patients with midline cervical cleft presented in the world literature. Although rare (with less than 200 cases published to date) this entity does have a reliable presentation that should lead to rapid and accurate diagnosis. Complete surgical excision at an early age is appropriate since the anomaly increases in length commensurate with the patient's age. PMID:25983756

  16. Presurgical orthopedic premaxillary alignment in cleft lip and palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Motoki, D S; Yamashiro, D K

    1994-11-01

    Premaxillary malposition is a difficult problem in cleft lip and palate repair. Orthopedic palatal devices are excellent in positioning the premaxilla, though they are somewhat cumbersome and require complex techniques in adjusting precisely the position of the premaxilla prior to repair. A new technique has been developed for premaxillary repositioning in conjunction with palatal shelf expansion and obturation. The procedure implements microplate fixation anterior to the premaxillary segment and linked to a palatal splint by adjustable elastics. The microplate is inserted through a nasal floor incision and secured by a tight submucosal tunnel through minimal dissection between the prolabium and premaxilla. The last hole of each microplate protrudes through the mucosa and is attached to a pin-retained palatal splint by an elastic chain. Differential tension is applied to the chains to allow gradual repositioning of the protruding maxilla while the splint expands and maintains positioning of the lateral palatal segments. These elastic retractors can be adjusted by staff in the outpatient office. During the past 2 years, this technique has been used successfully in 21 consecutive patients with unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and palate. Its technical ease and design allows simple adjustments to control premaxillary positioning and growth before definitive surgical closure.

  17. Cleft lip and palate surgery: 30 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Cesar A.

    2012-01-01

    Ten cleft lip and palate patients with complete unilateral (five patients) and bilateral (five patients) clefts were treated by a multidisciplinary team integrated by psychologists, surgeons, orthodontists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists, and speech pathologists, to obtain ideal soft tissue and hard tissue continuity, facial symmetry, functional and esthetic dentitions, excellent nasal architecture, subtle, and hidden lip scars. No hypernasality and adequate social adaptation were found in the 30 years follow-up (20-30 years follow-up with an average of 25.5 years). The patients were treated in a pro-active fashion avoiding complications and related problems, executing the ideal surgical, dental, and speech therapy plan, based on a close follow-up over the entire period. Those patients treated at the right time required less surgeries and less salvaging maneuvers and presented complete dentitions with less dental prosthesis or dental implants and stable occlusions, than those who missed the ideal dental and surgical treatment opportunities. The focus of this article is the need of a close long-term follow-up to ensure an ideal patient's quality of life. PMID:23483117

  18. Programmed versus Face-to-Face Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, William M.; Ewing, Thomas N.

    1971-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effectiveness of a programmed Self-Counseling Manual and a normal precollege counseling interview by experienced counselors. Findings supported the use of programmed counseling as an adjunct to or substitute for face-to-face counseling. (Author)

  19. Three-dimensional digital evaluation of dental arches in infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Viviane Mendes; Jorge, Paula Karine; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Gomide, Márcia Ribeiro; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and compare the dimensions of the dental arches on three-dimensional digital study models in children with and without cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery. The sample consisted of 223 digital models of children aged 3-9 months, divided into 5 groups: without craniofacial deformities, unilateral and bilateral incomplete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral and bilateral complete cleft lip and alveolus, unilateral cleft lip and palate, and bilateral cleft lip and palate. Dental casts of the maxillary dental arches of the children were used. The dental casts underwent a process of scanning through 3D scanner and the measurements used for the correlation among groups were made on the scanned images. Statistical analysis was performed by t test and ANOVA followed by Tukey test. The results showed that the intercanine distance and anterior cleft width was wider in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. The intertuberosity distances and posterior cleft width was wider in children with bilateral cleft lip and palate among the groups. Children with cleft lip and palate before the primary surgery had wider maxillary arch dimensions than the children without cleft lip and palate.

  20. Novel homozygous mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*), in the PVRL1 gene underlies cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome in an Asian patient.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazue; Hayashi, Ryota; Fujita, Hideki; Kubota, Masaya; Kondo, Mai; Shimomura, Yutaka; Niizeki, Hironori

    2015-07-01

    Cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations of the poliovirus receptor-like 1 (PVRL1) gene encoding nectin-1. Nectin-1 is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that is important for the initial step in the formation of adherens junctions and tight junctions; it is expressed in keratinocytes, neurons, and the developing face and palate. Clinical manifestations comprise a unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, ectodermal dysplasia, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and/or toes, and in some cases, mental retardation. We present the first report, to our knowledge, of an Asian individual with cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with a novel PVRL1 mutation. A 7-year-old Japanese boy, the first child of a consanguineous marriage, showed hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with sparse, brittle, fine, dry hair and hypodontia, the unique facial appearance with cleft lip/palate, cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and mild mental retardation. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the hair demonstrated pili torti and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Mutation analysis of exon 2 of PVRL1 revealed a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.400C>T (p.Arg134*). His parents were heterozygous for the mutant alleles. All four PVRL1 mutations identified in cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome to date, including this study, resulted in truncated proteins that lack the transmembrane domain and intracellular domain of nectin-1, which is necessary to initiate the cell-cell adhesion process.

  1. Secondary Cleft Lip Reconstruction and the Use of Pedicled, Deepithelialized Scar Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nadjmi, Nasser; Amadori, Sara; Van de Casteele, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal time to create symmetry in a cleft lip is during primary repair; a secondary effort later is more difficult due to potential scarring and possible tissue deficiency of the repaired cleft lip. A plethora of methods for secondary correction have been described that have the goal of constructing the philtral column, ameliorating bad scar results, and augmenting lip volume, for example. Nevertheless, there is no single procedure that yields completely satisfactory results. In addition, the appropriate timing for secondary surgical corrections of the cleft lip is still under debate. Methods: We present a new technique for secondary lip reconstruction of unilateral and bilateral cleft patients using pedicled, de-epithelialized cleft scar tissue as an autologous graft to obtain sustainable lip volume. Our results were evaluated by physicians and patient-parent satisfaction surveys. Results: The esthetic outcomes of 29 patients were assessed using a patient satisfaction questionnaire and a physician survey based on the preoperative and postoperative clinical images. The success of the procedure was evaluated using a 5-point scale. The total scores of both the physician and patient assessments were high, although no correlation was found between the scores. Conclusions: Cleft lip reconstruction using pedicled, deepithelialized scar tissue leads to excellent physician and patient satisfaction scores; this technique can be executed at any patient age and as a secondary repair for any given primary type of cleft disorder. PMID:27826467

  2. Alveolar Bone Grafting in Cleft Patients from Bone Defect to Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Vuletić, Marko; Jokić, Dražen; Rebić, Jerko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Macan, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common congenital deformity affecting craniofacial structures. Orofacial clefts have great impact on the quality of life which includes aesthetics, function, psychological impact, dental development and facial growth. Incomplete fusion of facial prominences during the fourth to tenth week of gestation is the main cause. Cleft gaps are closed with alveolar bone grafts in surgical procedure called osteoplasty. Autogenic bone is taken from the iliac crest as the gold standard. The time of grafting can be divided into two stages: primary and secondary. The alveolar defect is usually reconstructured between 7 and 11 years and is often related to the development of the maxillary canine root. After successful osteoplasty, cleft defect is closed but there is still a lack of tooth. The space closure with orthodontic treatment has 50-75% success. If the orthodontic treatment is not possible, in order to replace the missing tooth there are three possibilities: adhesive bridgework, tooth transplantation and implants. Dental implant has the role of holding dental prosthesis, prevents pronounced bone atrophy and loads the augmentation material in the cleft area. Despite the fact that autologous bone from iliac crest is the gold standard, it is not a perfect source for reconstruction of the alveolar cleft. Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) is appropriate as an alternative graft material. The purpose of this review is to explain morphology of cleft defects, historical perspective, surgical techniques and possibilities of implant and prosthodontic rehabilitation. PMID:27688373

  3. Prevalence of Oral Habits in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Barsi, Paula Caroline; Ribeiro da Silva, Thaieny; Costa, Beatriz; da Silva Dalben, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of oral habits in children with clefts aged three to six years, compared to a control group of children without clefts in the same age range, and compared the oral habits between children with clefts with and without palatal fistulae. The sample was composed of 110 children aged 3 to 6 years with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and 110 children without alterations. The prevalence of oral habits and the correlation between habits and presence of fistulae (for children with clefts) were analyzed by questionnaires applied to the children caretakers. The cleft influenced the prevalence of oral habits, with lower prevalence of pacifier sucking for children with cleft lip and palate and higher prevalence for all other habits, with significant association (P < 0.05). There was no significant association between oral habits and presence of fistulae (P > 0.05). The lower prevalence of pacifier sucking and higher prevalence of other oral habits agreed with the postoperative counseling to remove the pacifier sucking habit when the child is submitted to palatoplasty, possibly representing a substitution of habits. There was no causal relationship between habits and presence of palatal fistulae. PMID:23533744

  4. Coping With Cleft: A Conceptual Framework of Caregiver Responses to Nasoalveolar Molding

    PubMed Central

    Sischo, Lacey; Broder, Hillary L.; Phillips, Ceib

    2014-01-01

    Objective To present a conceptual framework of caregiver coping and adaptation to early cleft care using nasoalveolar molding. Design In-depth interviews were conducted at three time points with caregivers of infants with cleft lip or cleft lip and palate whose children had nasoalveolar molding to treat their cleft. Qualitative data were analyzed using modified grounded theory. Results Most caregivers expressed initial apprehension and anxiety about the responsibilities of care associated with nasoalveolar molding (e.g., changing and positioning tapes, cleaning the appliance). In subsequent interviews, caregivers often reported positive feelings related to their active participation in their child’s treatment for cleft. These positive feelings were associated with increased self-esteem and feelings of empowerment for the caregivers. Although caregivers also identified burdens associated with nasoalveolar molding (e.g., stress related to lip taping, concerns about the appliance causing sores in their child’s mouth, travel to weekly appointments), they tended to minimize the impact of these issues in comparison with the perceived benefits of nasoalveolar molding. Conclusions Despite the increased burden of care, many caregivers of infants with cleft used nasoalveolar molding as a problem-focused coping strategy to deal with their child’s cleft. Completing nasoalveolar molding was often associated with positive factors such as increased empowerment, self-esteem, and bonding with their infant. PMID:25225840

  5. Environmental factors related to the occurrence of oral clefts in a Brazilian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Campos Neves, Ana Thereza de Saboia; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fabio; Borges, Alvaro Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Background: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Craniofacial Rehabilitation Center in the General Hospital of the University of Cuiabá, Cuiabá city, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Poisson regression model was used to analyze the relationship between antenatal factors and the occurrence of oral clefts in 116 patients. Results: Oral clefts were more common in males (64.66%) and White race (46.02%). The mean age of the children was 21.91 months. The most common type of cleft was cleft lip and palate (CLP, 55.17%). Maternal and paternal smoking in the first trimester of pregnancy and parity were significantly associated with the occurrence of CLP. Parent's age, educational level, and occupation did not interfere in the occurrence of oral clefts. There was also no significant association between maternal illness, medication use, alcohol consumption, and maternal exposure to chemicals in the first trimester of pregnancy and the occurrence of clefts in this population. Conclusion: The analysis of the environmental factors present during the pregnancy of children with oral clefts revealed a significant association between parity (second onward), maternal smoking, and paternal smoking and the occurrence of CL and/or palate in this population. PMID:27397957

  6. Electrical properties of sheep Purkinje strands. Electrical and chemical potentials in the clefts.

    PubMed Central

    Levis, R A; Mathias, R T; Eisenberg, R S

    1983-01-01

    The impedence of sheep Purkinje strands, measured to 3-5 kHz, is interpreted with circuit models based on morphology. The strand is described as a one-dimensional electrical cable. Clefts between myocytes of the strand allow radial current to flow in parallel with current across the outer membrane. A lumped model of the clefts, in which all the cleft membrane is in series with 100 omega-cm2, fits only below 20 Hz. Two distributed models, pie and disk, fit at all frequencies with somewhat different (31%) luminal resistivities, but with similar membrane parameters. Series resistance representing the endothelial sheath is small. Simulations of voltage clamp experiments include measured linear parameters and nonlinear membrane channels, as well as radial variation of cleft concentration, membrane flux, voltage, and current. Cleft potential is drastically nonuniform when sodium current flows. Cleft potential is reasonably uniform when calcium and potassium currents flow, but the calcium and potassium concentrations change markedly, enough to turn off the calcium current, even if the calcium channel did not inactivate. We conclude that physiological current flows produce significant nonuniformities in electrochemical potentials in the clefts of this cardiac preparation. PMID:6360228

  7. Nasolabial symmetry and aesthetics in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Fudalej, Piotr; Katsaros, Christos; Hozyasz, Kamil; Borstlap, Wilfred A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between nasolabial symmetry and aesthetics in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (CUCLP). Frontal and basal photographs of 60 consecutively treated children with CUCLP (cleft group: 41 boys and 19 girls, mean (SD) age 11 (2) years) and 44 children without clefts (control group: 16 boys and 28 girls, mean (SD) age 11(2) years), were used for evaluation of nasolabial symmetry and aesthetics. Nasal and labial measurements were made to calculate the coefficient of asymmetry (CA). The 5-grade aesthetic index described by Asher-McDade et al. was used to evaluate nasolabial appearance. Correlation and regression analysis were used to identify an association between aesthetics and CA, sex, and the presence of CUCLP. Ten measurements in the cleft, and 2 in the control, group differed significantly between the cleft and non-cleft (or right and left) sides, respectively. The significantly higher values of 9 of 11 CA in the children with CUCLP indicated that they had more asymmetrical nasolabial areas than children without clefts. However, the regression analyses showed that only a few CA were associated with nasolabial aesthetics. In conclusion, nasolabial aesthetics and nasolabial symmetry seem to be only weakly associated in patients with CUCLP.

  8. Bone grafting, corticotomy, and orthodontics: treatment of cleft alveolus in a chinese cohort.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li-Xia; Shen, Guo-Fang; Fang, Bing; Xia, Yun-Hui; Ma, Xu-Hui; Wang, Bo

    2013-11-01

    Objective : A multimodal therapy was applied to solve a set of related problems including collapse of the posterior segment, high level gingival margin of canine, and resorption of grafted bone in a cohort of Chinese youngsters with cleft lip and palate. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits of this treatment procedure. Methods : Thirty patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate were included in this prospective study. All patients had previously undergone only cleft lip and palate repair and presented with alveolar cleft and an obvious step in the gingival margin between the canine tooth and the teeth beside it. A multimodal therapy that included bone grafting, corticotomy, and orthodontics was applied to solve these problems. Grafted bone volume, parallelism of the roots, root resorption, gingival margin, and mobility of the canine on the cleft side were established before surgery, 1 week after surgery, and after straightening of the canine. Results : Less than 25% of the grafted bone was reabsorbed in 25 of the 30 patients, while less than 50% was resorbed in the remaining five. The roots of the canines on the cleft side were mostly parallel to the adjacent teeth. Root resorption and mobility of the canines were slight. The difference in the gingival margin between the canines on the cleft side and the other side was small. Conclusions : Canines moved into the grafted bone safely and effectively, thus achieving a normal gingival margin and retaining grafted bone volume in one operation.

  9. A glucocorticoid receptor in fetal mouse: its relationship to cleft palate formation.

    PubMed

    Hackney, J F

    1980-02-01

    Fetal mouse tissue was investigated for a glucocorticoid binding receptor which might be responsible for cleft palate formation. Fetal mouse heads contain a soluble component which binds the glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide in vitro with high affinity. This binding component is present in small finite amounts. Other glucocorticoids compete with triamcinolone acetonide for the binding site in a manner consistent with their potency ranking as cleft palate teratogens. Several mineralocorticoids and progestins also compete when administered in vitro but not when administered in vivo. Triamcinolone acetonide binding was determined in three mouse strains, A/J, C3H, and C57BL, which are listed in decreasing order of cleft palate susceptibility to cortisone. No positive correlation was found between cortisone cleft palate susceptibility and either triamcinolone acetonide binding affinity or binding amount in fetuses from these strains. Cleft palate dose response curves for triamcinolone acetonide were determined in these strains, but they were not parallel to each other as they were for cortisone. This suggests that triamcinolone acetonide may cause cleft palate by different mechanisms in these strains. Thus, fetal mouse tissue contains an apparent glucocorticoid receptors, but its relationship to cleft palate formation in mice is not clear.

  10. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Rosar, Julia Petruccelli; Sathler, Renata; Ozawa, Terumi Okada

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations. Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds has been previously reported. However, recent studies showed that maxillary lateral incisors have dual embryonic origin, being partially formed by both the medial nasal process and the maxillary process. In other words, the mesial half of the lateral incisor seems to come from the medial nasal process while the distal half of the lateral incisor originates from the maxillary process. In cleft patients, these processes do not fuse, which results in different numerical and positional patterns for lateral incisors relating to the alveolar cleft. In addition to these considerations, this study proposes a nomenclature for maxillary lateral incisors in patients with cleft lip and palate, based on embryology and lateral incisors position in relation to the alveolar cleft. Conclusion: Embryological knowledge on the dual origin of maxillary lateral incisors and the use of a proper nomenclature for their numerical and positional variations renders appropriate communication among professionals and treatment planning easier, in addition to standardizing research analysis. PMID:26560830

  11. Long-term skeletal stability after maxillary advancement with distraction osteogenesis using a rigid external distraction device in cleft maxillary deformities.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Alvaro A; Polley, John W; Friede, Hans; Ko, Ellen W

    2004-11-01

    Rigid external distraction is a highly effective technique for correction of maxillary hypoplasia in patients with orofacial clefts. The clinical results after correction of sagittal maxillary deformities in both the adult and pediatric age groups have been stable. The purpose of this retrospective longitudinal cephalometric study was to review the long-term stability of the repositioned maxilla in cleft patients who underwent maxillary advancement with rigid external distraction. Between April 1, 1995, and April 1, 1999, 17 consecutive patients with cleft maxillary hypoplasia underwent maxillary advancement using rigid external distraction. There were 13 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 5.2 to 23.6 years (mean, 12.6 years). After a modified complete high Le Fort I osteotomy and a latency period of 3 to 5 days, patients underwent maxillary advancement with rigid external distraction until proper facial convexity and dental overjet and overbite were obtained. After active distraction, a 3- to 4-week period of rigid retention was undertaken; this was followed by removable elastic retention for 6 to 8 weeks using, during sleep time, an orthodontic protraction face mask. Cephalometric radiographs were obtained preoperatively, after distraction, at 1 year after distraction, and 2 or more years after distraction. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years (minimum, 2.1 years; maximum, 5.3 years). The following measurements were obtained in each cephalogram: three linear horizontal and two linear vertical maxillary measurements, two angular craniomaxillary measurements, and one craniomandibular measurement. Differences between the preoperative and postoperative cephalometric values were analyzed by paired t tests (p < 0.05). The cephalometric analysis demonstrated postoperatively significant advancement of the maxilla. In addition, the mandibular plane angle opened 1.2 degrees after surgery. After the 1- to 3-year follow-up period, the maxilla was

  12. Insulated face brick

    SciTech Connect

    Cromrich, J.; Cromrich, L.B.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method for forming insulated brick intended solely for use in building walls and having superior insulation qualities and lighter weight consonant with the load bearing capabilities of building bricks and the appearance of facing brick. It comprises dry mixing two parts of vermiculite and one part of brick clay, thereby forming a dry mixture having a vermiculite to clay ratio of approximately two-to-one by volume; adding water to the dry mixture and mixing, so that a substantially dry admixture having expanded vermiculite and brick clay is formed; forming a facing layer solely from brick clay; molding and compressing the substantially dry admixture, so as to form a generally rectangular main body layer having parallel top and bottom faces, a pair of parallel side faces and a pair of parallel end faces, respectively, the top and bottom faces being substantially larger in area than the respective side faces, and the side faces being substantially larger in area than the respective end faces, the body layer further having at least one bore formed therein, the bore running from the top face to the bottom face perpendicularly thereto and substantially parallel to the side surfaces thereof, the bore being substantially centrally disposed and wherein the facing layer is disposed on one of the side surfaces of the body portion; curing the molded admixture having the facing layer disposed thereon; whereby a cured brick is formed; and firing the cured brick and the facing layer disposed thereon, whereby an integral brick is formed having top and bottom faces of the brick which are entirely devoid of facing layers, wherein the brick has the desired load bearing capability substantially between its top and bottom faces, whereby the outer facing layer only provides the desired appearance and weather resistance, and further whereby the weight of the brick is substantially reduced.

  13. [Fourth branchial cleft deformity with skin orifice: a series of 10 cases].

    PubMed

    Huang, S L; Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Liang, L; Luo, X N; Lu, Z M; Zhang, S Y

    2016-10-07

    Objective: To report rare cases of congenital neck cutaneous sinus with an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint and to investigate their origins and managements. Methods: A total of ten patients with congenital neck cutaneous sinus having an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint treated in the Guangdong General Hospital from January 2010 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There four boys and six girls, aging from 11 months to 96 months with an average of 33.4 months, and they had a common feature showing a congenital cutaneous sinus with an orifice near sternoclavicular joint. Discharge of pus from the orifice or abscess formation was commonly seen soon after infection. With bacteriological study, staphylococcus aureus was positive in five cases and klebsiella pneumonia in a case. Another orifice of fistula/sinus was not depicted in pyriform with barium swallow X-ray in five cases Ultrasound studies of three cases demonstrated anechoic (i.e., nearly black) and solid-cystic lesion near sternoclavicular joint with posterior acoustic enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed isointensity of the lesion on T1 and T2 weighted images with heterogeneous enhancement and a close relationship with sternoclavicular joint. All patients underwent laryngoscopic examination, which showed no orifice of sinus in pyriform at same side. Surgical resection of fistula/sinus was performed in all cases. The lengths of the fistula varied from 5 mm to 22 mm with an average of 11 mm. Postoperative pathological examination showed all specimens were accordance with fistula. No complications were noticed. Recurrence was not observed in the cases by following-up of 6 months to 70 months (median: 33 months). Conclusion: Congenital neck cutaneous sinus with orifice near the sternoclavicular joint maybe a special clinical phenotype of the fourth branchial cleft sinus with skin orifice in cervicothoracic junction. Differential diagnoses between low cervical diseases

  14. Comparative study of nasoalveolar molding methods: nasal elevator plus DynaCleft® versus NAM-Grayson in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Luis; Ford, Alison; Gutiérrez, Carolina; Tastets, María Eugenia; García, Jacqueline

    2013-09-01

    Objective : To compare nasoalveolar molding (NAM) effect employing a nasal elevator plus DynaCleft® and NAM-Grayson system in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. Method : Prospective study in two groups. Group A included 20 consecutive patients treated with DynaCleft® and a nasal elevator before lip surgery. Group B included 20 patients treated with NAM-Grayson system. Maxillary casts and standard view photographs were done before and after treatment. Columella deviation angle, soft tissue distance of the cleft, intercommisural distance, and nostril height and width were traced and measured on the printed photos; a ratio was obtained and compared before and after treatment. Cleft width, anterior width, and anteroposterior distances were measured on the maxillary cast. Results : Group A began treatment at an average age of 14.3 days and group B at an average age of 16.9 days; no complications were observed. For group A, the initial average alveolar cleft within the cast was 10.7 mm, and after treatment it was 6.6 mm. For group B, pretreatment width was 11.2 mm, and after treatment it was 5.9 mm. No differences were found on the anterior and posterior width, and A-P distance of both groups. The initial mean columellar angle in group A was 38.1°, and after treatment it was 61.5°; for group B the initial mean columellar angle was 33.6°, and after treatment it was 59.5°. Results of Mann-Whitney U and Student's t tests showed no differences (P > .05). Width and height dimensions of the nostril showed minor differences. Conclusions : Both methods significantly reduced the cleft width and improved the nasal asymmetry. Our findings show that both methods produced similar results.

  15. Genetic factors influencing risk to orofacial clefts: today's challenges and tomorrow's opportunities.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Terri H; Marazita, Mary L; Leslie, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial clefts include cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and cleft lip and palate (CLP), which combined represent the largest group of craniofacial malformations in humans with an overall prevalence of one per 1,000 live births. Each of these birth defects shows strong familial aggregation, suggesting a major genetic component to their etiology. Genetic studies of orofacial clefts extend back centuries, but it has proven difficult to define any single etiologic mechanism because many genes appear to influence risk. Both linkage and association studies have identified several genes influencing risk, but these differ across families and across populations. Genome-wide association studies have identified almost two dozen different genes achieving genome-wide significance, and there are broad classes of 'causal genes' for orofacial clefts: a few genes strongly associated with risk and possibly directly responsible for Mendelian syndromes which include orofacial clefts as a key phenotypic feature of the syndrome, and multiple genes with modest individual effects on risk but capable of disrupting normal craniofacial development under the right circumstances (which may include exposure to environmental risk factors). Genomic sequencing studies are now underway which will no doubt reveal additional genes/regions where variants (sequence and structural) can play a role in controlling risk to orofacial clefts. The real challenge to medicine and public health is twofold: to identify specific genes and other etiologic factors in families with affected members and then to devise effective interventions for these different biological mechanisms controlling risk to complex and heterogeneous birth defects such as orofacial clefts.

  16. Genetic factors influencing risk to orofacial clefts: today’s challenges and tomorrow’s opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Terri H.; Marazita, Mary L.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial clefts include cleft lip (CL), cleft palate (CP), and cleft lip and palate (CLP), which combined represent the largest group of craniofacial malformations in humans with an overall prevalence of one per 1,000 live births. Each of these birth defects shows strong familial aggregation, suggesting a major genetic component to their etiology. Genetic studies of orofacial clefts extend back centuries, but it has proven difficult to define any single etiologic mechanism because many genes appear to influence risk. Both linkage and association studies have identified several genes influencing risk, but these differ across families and across populations. Genome-wide association studies have identified almost two dozen different genes achieving genome-wide significance, and there are broad classes of ‘causal genes’ for orofacial clefts: a few genes strongly associated with risk and possibly directly responsible for Mendelian syndromes which include orofacial clefts as a key phenotypic feature of the syndrome, and multiple genes with modest individual effects on risk but capable of disrupting normal craniofacial development under the right circumstances (which may include exposure to environmental risk factors). Genomic sequencing studies are now underway which will no doubt reveal additional genes/regions where variants (sequence and structural) can play a role in controlling risk to orofacial clefts. The real challenge to medicine and public health is twofold: to identify specific genes and other etiologic factors in families with affected members and then to devise effective interventions for these different biological mechanisms controlling risk to complex and heterogeneous birth defects such as orofacial clefts. PMID:27990279

  17. An epidemiological and genetic study of facial clefting in France. I. Epidemiology and frequency in relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiti, C; Briard, M L; Feingold, J; Pavy, B; Psaume, J; Migne-Tufferaud, G; Kaplan, J

    1982-01-01

    The frequencies of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) and isolated cleft palate (CP) have been estimated in France to be 0.082% and 0.035%, respectively, after exclusion of malformation syndromes. A genetic and epidemiological study has been carried out on 468 patients with CL(P) and 163 with CP. The results are given in detail and some specific points are discussed: the apparently low incidence in France, the relationship between sex ratio and abortion rates, the maternal effects, and the possibility of an association between CL(P) and CP. PMID:7200146

  18. A New Classification System for Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Infants to assist Presurgical Infant Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Daigavane, P S; Hazarey, P V; Niranjane, P; Vasudevan, S D; Thombare, B R; Daigavane, S

    2015-01-01

    The proposed advantages of pre-surgical naso-alveolar moulding (PNAM) are easy primary lip repair which heals under minimum tension reducing the scar formation and improving the aesthetic results in addition to reshaping of alar cartilage and improvement of nasal symmetry.However, the anatomy and alveolar morphology varies for each cleft child; the procedure for PNAM differs accordingly. In an attempt to categorize unilateral cleft lip and palate cases as per anatomical variations, a new classification system has been proposed. This classification aims to give an insight in unilateral cleft morphology based on which modification in PNAM procedure could be done.

  19. Incidental detection of superior sternal cleft on Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate bone scan

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Nusrat IJ; Pawar, Shwetal Uday; Tilve, Gundu Hari

    2013-01-01

    A sternal cleft is an extremely rare developmental anomaly, which results from failure of fusion of sternal bars which contribute to the formation of the sternum. Most cases are diagnosed in early childhood, where it is associated with serious other midline defects. A sternal cleft is seen as a photopenic area on technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate bone scan and can be confused with other conditions. We report an extremely rare case of isolated upper sternal cleft in a 45-years-old male, found incidentally on Tc-99m MDP bone scan. PMID:24163521

  20. Management of the Amniotic Band Syndrome with Cleft Palate: Literature Review and Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Ortega, Carolina; Flores-Velázquez, Joselín; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Noyola-Frías, Miguel Ángel; Santos-Díaz, Miguel Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Amniotic Band Syndrome (ABS) is a group of congenital malformations that includes the majority of typical constriction rings and limb and digital amputations, together with major craniofacial, thoracic, and abdominal malformations. The syndrome is caused by early rupture of the amniotic sac. Some of the main oral manifestations include micrognathia, hyperdontia, and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, which is present in 14.6% of patients with this syndrome. The purpose of this report was to describe the clinical characteristics and the oral treatment provided to a 6-month-old male patient affected with ABS with cleft lip and palate. PMID:28246561

  1. TGF-alpha genotypes, oral clefts, and environmental risk factors: A population-based California study

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; Lammer, E.J.

    1994-09-01

    Several studies have shown a relation between genetic variation at the TGF-alpha locus and oral clefts. These studies had limited sample sizes and also lacked data on additional factors potentially related to clefting. We investigated the influence on clefting from risk factors, such as maternal smoking, dependent on TFG-alpha genotype. This was accomplished using a large population-bases case-control study of fetuses and liveborn infants with oral clefts among a 1987-89 cohort of California births (N=548,844). To obtain data on potential risk factors, telephone interviews were conducted with mothers of 731 (84.5% of eligible) cleft cases, and 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed controls. DNA was obtained from newborn screening bloodspots and genotyped by using SSCP designed to detect the Taq1 RFLP. Among mothers who completed an interview, genotyping results were available for 571 (78.1%) cases and 640 (87.2%) controls. Compared to controls, the risk estimate for TGF-alpha polymorphism as measured by the odds ratio was: 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.64, 1.5) for isolated cleft lip {plus_minus}palate; 0.88 (0.33, 2.2) for nonisolated cleft lip {plus_minus}palate; 1.6 (0.94, 2.8) for isolated cleft palate; 1.9 (0.82, 4.3) for nonisolated cleft palate; and 2.2 (0.99, 5.0) for clefts with known etiology. This dataset also revealed 1.4 to 2-fold increased risks for maternal cigarette smoking > 19 cigs/day in early pregnancy. Among these heavy smokers, risk of clefting was even more increased for infants with the TGF-alpha polymorphism. Our data suggest an association between the TGF-alpha uncommon allele and some phenotypic subgroups as well as provide evidence for a genetic-environment interaction between maternal smoking and the variant in the etiology of clefting. The fraction of cases possibly attributed to this interaction, however, was small.

  2. Surgically repaired cleft lips depicted in paintings of the late Gothic period and the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Pirsig, W; Haase, S; Palm, F

    2001-04-01

    Paintings and drawings by Lucas Moser, Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer, and Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen suggest that they employed people who had had cleft lips operated on as models for their works of art. Created between 1431 and 1520, the portraits show diagnostic facial profiles with a curved nasal dorsum, short columella, maxillary retrusion, and pseudoprogenia. The first medical illustration of cleft lip surgery was published in 1564 by Ambroise Paré. It was therefore late Gothic and Renaissance artists who depicted the conspicuous signs of surgically treated patients with cleft lip more than 130 years before the surgeons.

  3. [Endoscopic fenestration of median supratentorial cerebrospinal fluid cysts].

    PubMed

    Melikian, A G; Ozerova, V I; Bragina, N N; Kolycheva, M V

    1999-01-01

    supplemented by ventricular septal fenestration and third-ventricular bottom perforation. Twelve patients were followed up for 6 to 36.5 months (mean 15 months). There has been no information about 6 patients since their discharge. In 12 (66.5%) surgery yielded expected results and the fenestration of cystic walls was followed by their retraction and a steady-state regression of local and/or hypertensive symptoms. In 5 (28%) patients, the complaints and clinical data remained unchanged despite although incomplete but objective cystic relaxation. This was most frequently noted in patients (n = 4) with arachnoidal cysts of the interpedicular cistern and the third ventricle who had endocrine disorders. In one case the operation was stopped due to bleeding. Totally, 5 patients were found to have complications (hemorrhage, ventriculitis). None patient died. Some aspects of indications for endoscopy and surgical techniques are considered. It is concluded that endoscopic internal bypass surgery in patients wit median cystic liquor malformations is the treatment of choice. When equipment is adjusted, fenestration of the membranous walls of these cysts by using an endoscope is reliable and safe. Such patients may be recommended endoscopic technology used as the method of choice.

  4. Face to Face Communications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M.; Davon, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    It has been reported that human face-to-face communications in space are compromised by facial edema, variations in the orientations of speakers and listeners, and background noises that are encountered in the shuttle and in space stations. To date, nearly all reports have been anecdotal or subjective, in the form of post-flight interviews or questionnaires; objective and quantitative data are generally lacking. Although it is acknowledged that efficient face-to-face communications are essential for astronauts to work safely and effectively, specific ways in which the space environment interferes with non-linguistic communication cues are poorly documented. Because we have only a partial understanding of how non-linguistic communication cues may change with mission duration, it is critically important to obtain objective data, and to evaluate these cues under well-controlled experimental conditions.

  5. Coregistering 3D Models, Range, and Optical Imagery Using Least-Median Squares Fitting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    coregistration estimation algorithms. We consider the use of median filtering in the construction of consistent correspondences. Finally, we test our coregistration with a median filtering system on real ATR data.

  6. The Role of the Velopharyngeal Sphincter in the Speech of Patients with Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate Using Perceptual Methods

    PubMed Central

    Georgievska-Jancheska, Tatjana; Gjorgova, Juliana; Popovska, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The velopharyngeal sphincter (VPS) plays the main role in speech formation. The cleft palate, due to the damage of the soft palate, leads to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal sphincter thus causing speech disorder. AIM: To establish a link between the nasal air escape and the perceptual symptoms in the speech of patients with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate using auditory-visual perceptual procedures for determining the influence the velopharyngeal dysfunction has on speech. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with speech disorders, out of which 10 have cleft palate or cleft lip and palate (experimental group), participated in the perceptual assessment by means of Czermak mirror fogging test for assessing the nasal air escape and Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale (PWSS) for assessing the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. RESULTS: The respondents with a considerable nasal air escape have a higher velopharyngeal inability, that is, probably incompetent nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. There is a strong correlation between the nasal air escape and the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter (the coefficient of linear correlation r = 0.9756). The calculated p-value is p = 0.000002. CONCLUSION: The perceptual speech symptoms and the nasal air escape provide unique insight into the state and role the velopharyngeal sphincter has in speech. PMID:28028412

  7. A case of Rathke's cleft cyst presenting with diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Erşahin, Y; Ozdamar, N; Demirtaş, E; Mutluer, S

    1995-11-01

    Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs) are considered to arise from the remnants of Rathke's pouch, an invagination of the stomodeum. They are classically described as benign epithelium lined intrasellar cysts containing mucoid material, and also found in 2-33% of routine autopsy series. The most common presenting symptoms are visual impairment, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypopituitarism and headache. Diabetes insipidus has been described in patients with RCC. Very few cases presented with only diabetes insipidus in adults. To our knowledge, our patient is the first case of RCC presenting with only diabetes insipidus in childhood. A 9-year-old girl presented with diabetes insipidus. The physical, neurological and endocrinological examinations were normal, except for diabetes insipidus. Magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a hyperintense lesion with supra sellar extension in the posterior pituitary both on T1 and T2 weighted images. Subtotal excision of RCC was performed via transsphenoidal surgery. However, diabetes insipidus persisted after the surgery.

  8. Optic Neuritis Caused by Rathke's Cleft Cyst in Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Namie; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Onoda, Takatsugu; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Adachi-Usami, Emiko

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of right optic neuritis caused by Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC) in a young adult. A 15-year-old boy presented with reduced visual acuity in the right eye. He was diagnosed with optic neuritis in the right eye 4 years earlier at other clinics before he was referred to our department. During our one-year examinations, the cause of the reduced vision in his right eye could not be determined conclusively. At the age of 17 years, a RCC was detected by a neurosurgeon who specialized in hypophyseal diseases. He underwent microscopic transsphenoidal resection of the cyst, and his vision recovered to 1.2 and he has had no recurrence for at least 9 months. We suggest that repeated rupturing of the RCC was the cause of the optic neuritis, and a RCC can be successfully treated by surgery even after 3 years of optic neuritis. PMID:25045561

  9. Primary repair of sternal cleft with a double osteochondroplasty flap

    PubMed Central

    Ballouhey, Quentin; Armendariz, Mateo; Vacquerie, Virginie; Marcheix, Pierre Sylvain; Berenguer, Daniel; Mouliès, Dominique; Fourcade, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Sternal cleft is a rare congenital malformation affecting the anterior part of the chest wall. Surgical closure is recommended. It should be done early during the neonatal period because of the chest's flexibility. Associated abnormalities may have been previously excluded. Different surgical repairs have been described, but none has been proved to be superior to the others. We present the description of 2 cases managed with an original surgical technique. After dissecting the two sternal bars, they were approximated with several intercostal sutures under close cardiac and respiratory monitoring. A double perichondrium flap technique was then used and resulted in a double perichondrium layer. This technique is suitable for most cases and offers satisfying anatomical restoring and cosmetic results. PMID:23956263

  10. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft: Can It Be Treated in Newborn?

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Roya; Sahebpour, Alireza Alam; Ghasemi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare developmental anomaly of the anterior neck, mostly found in Caucasian females. Most authors consider it within the spectrum of branchial arch developmental abnormalities. There have been about 100 reported cases in the literature. However, there is no agreement on the age of surgery in this anomaly. Case Presentation In this report we present our experience of managing this anomaly in the early neonatal period in two neonates. One of them had concomitantly congenital heart disease. Conclusion It is important to recognize this rare congenital anomaly in neonate. Although the exact time of surgery for CMCC is not mentioned, based on our results the earliest time of intervention is recommended since then the operating result will be excellent. PMID:23431110

  11. Incomplete reduction of branchial clefts in Mutton Merino lambs.

    PubMed

    Leask, Rhoda; Pettey, Kenneth P; Bath, Gareth F

    2014-05-19

    Congenital malformations of the branchial arches, clefts and grooves have not been previously reported in sheep. These defects may be due to infectious agents (especially viruses), toxins or genetic abnormalities. Defects were reported in two of a set of quadruplet lambs born prematurely to an eight-tooth Mutton Merino ewe. The lambs weighed between 2.0 kg and 2.5 kg; this is below the normal expected birth weight of 3.5 kg for quadruplet lambs, below which viability is compromised. The firstborn lamb was severely affected by bilateral oroauricular fistulae. The second lamb was unilaterally affected on the right, less severely than the first. The third lamb was normal and the fourth was mummified. The occurrence of another case in this small flock almost a decade earlier indicates that there could be genetic involvement.

  12. The Coexistence of Rathke Cleft Cyst and Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingtong; An, Yanyan; Huang, Zhihong; Niu, Jianyi; Yuan, Xunhui; Bai, Yun'an; Guo, Liemei

    2016-03-01

    Both of Pituitary adenoma (PA) and Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) are the most common and benign sellar lesions. Generally, the origin of RCC is considered to be derived from remnants of Rathke punch, while PA is formed by proliferation of the anterior wall of Rathke pouch. Although they have a possibility to share a common embryological origin, the coexistence of PA and RCC is extremely rare. Here, the authors report a 50-year-old male patient who was found to have a large cystic sellar lesion, and surgical resection revealed components of a RCC coexisting with a PA. This collision reminded us of the possibility of RCC coexisting with PA. Furthermore, a clinicopathologic relation of them were reviewed and investigated.

  13. 20 years of cleft lip and palate missions.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, J Thomas; Kreusch, Thomas; Marsh, Jeff L; Schopper, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Volunteer missions for cleft lip and palate (CLP) care in Indonesia (1991-1992), India (1994-2003), Bhutan (2005-2010), and Kenya (2011), took place always at the same Hospital in each country. Altogether over a thousand patients were operated using a conservative protocol: Safety first - no experiments. Five months and 5 kg were the basic rules. For the native doctors, training help for self-help was priority. In the announcements, patients with CLP were primarily addressed. Burns, contractions, tumors, and trauma-cases were the second priority. Fresh trauma was done in night shifts with the local surgeons in order not to interfere. Besides facial esthetics speech was the number one issue, following priorities fell into place. Cultural aspects played a certain role in the different countries and continents.

  14. 76 FR 39474 - Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds.... 1550-0021, Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices. SUMMARY: The OTS is terminating the collection of data used to calculate and publish the Monthly Median Cost...

  15. [Bilateral labio-maxillo-palatal clefts. Therapeutic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Raphaël, B; Morand, B; Bettega, G; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Lebeau, J

    2001-06-01

    The wide diversity of bilateral facial clefts makes it most difficult to assess surgical success, particularly in terms of long-term outcome. The aim of this work was to examine the rationale for the current protocol used for cleft surgery at the Grenoble University Hospital. In a first group of 28 children, a 3-step surgical protocol was applied. The first two steps were performed between 4 and 8 months with at least 3 months between each procedure. Skoog's unilateral cheilo-rhino-uranoplasty was used, associated with a periosteal tibial graft. The third step, performed between 10 and 12 months, was for staphylorraphy. Outcome was analyzed at 15 years and evidenced the deleterious effect of excessive and asymmetrical premaxillary scars, of the 2-step cheiloplasty and of columella lengthenings from the lip. The frequency of secondary revision of the superior labial vestibule and the medial labial tubercule (43%) was considered to be high; this procedure should be re-examined as should be osteotomy (32% revision). Palatine closure, acquired in 82% of the cases and premaxillary stability, achieved in 86%, would appear to favor use of the periosteal tibial graft. The osteogenic capacity of this graft tissue was less satisfactory after a second harvesting (from the same tibia three months later). These results have led us to modify our protocol, favoring early and total closure of the bony palate and continued use of the periosteal tibial graft. We now use the following operative protocol: premaxillary alignment using an active orthopedic plate at 2 months, lip adhesion associated with staphylorraphy and passive palatine contention plate at 3 months, definitive bilateral cheilo-uranoplasty associated with a single periosteal graft at 7 months. The preliminary results with this protocol in a group of 12 children have shown better quality scars, more harmonious maxillary arches, an excellent occlusion of the deciduous dentition, and preservation of the positive results

  16. [Children born with a cleft: treatment at the CHUV in Lausanne].

    PubMed

    Hohlfeld, J; de Buys Roessingh, A; Herzog, G; Fabre, M; Cherpillod, J; Waridel, F; Pasche, P; Jaques, B; Broome, M; Despars, J; Peter, C; Zbinden-Trichet, C; Fleury, L; Bourgey, M-J

    2009-02-18

    A cleft can be labial, labial-maxillary, unilateral or bilateral labial-maxillary-palatal, or isolated palatal. A multidisciplinary team includes several specialists who will handle the diverse problems of children born with a cleft. This team will follow the child through each developmental stage and assemble an optimal treatment plan, thus reducing the onus on the family. Depending on the type of cleft and the age of the child, feeding, speech, ORL, dental, orthodontic, esthetic and possibly also psychological problems will be taken care of. This is why cleft treatment starts at the time it is diagnosed, before or after birth, and ends when the child is fully grown. It requires a complete interdisciplinary team and the collaboration with obstetricians and geneticians.

  17. Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, and Cleft Lip-Palate Syndrome; Its Association with Conductive Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss associated with the ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip palate syndrome was reported in one sporadic case and in a pedigree with four cases in three generations. (GW)

  18. Dental surgery under general anesthesia for preschool patients with orofacial clefts.

    PubMed

    Karp, Jeffrey M

    2009-01-01

    Preschool children with orofacial clefts are prone to develop early childhood caries (ECC). Management of ECC often necessitates the use of general anesthesia, yet little information is published about this treatment approach in cleft patients. The purpose of this article was to describe the hospital core of 12 patients with orofacial clefts (mean age = 44 months; range = 22-62 months) and ECC treated in 15 total dental surgeries under general anesthesia. The mean surgical time was 85 minutes (range = 35-134 minutes). Severe ECC was diagnosed in all cases, with 83 percent of patients having 10 or more carious teeth. Preformed metal crowns and extractions were performed on 30 percent and 15 percent of all primary teeth, respectively. This case series found the clinical presentation of ECC in patients with orofacial clefts to be comparable to the noncleft populotion. Treatment of ECC is feasible through dental surgery under general anesthesia with appropriate perioperotive planning.

  19. Strategies to improve regeneration of the soft palate muscles after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2012-12-01

    Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. These patients are unable to separate the nasal from the oral cavity leading to air loss during speech. Although surgical repair ameliorates soft palate function by joining the clefted muscles of the soft palate, optimal function is often not achieved. The regeneration of muscles in the soft palate after surgery is hampered because of (1) their low intrinsic regenerative capacity, (2) the muscle properties related to clefting, and (3) the development of fibrosis. Adjuvant strategies based on tissue engineering may improve the outcome after surgery by approaching these specific issues. Therefore, this review will discuss myogenesis in the noncleft and cleft palate, the characteristics of soft palate muscles, and the process of muscle regeneration. Finally, novel therapeutic strategies based on tissue engineering to improve soft palate function after surgical repair are presented.

  20. Clear double layer Bioplast feeding plate for neonates with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, R. Burcu Nur; Mutlu, Meltem; Germec-Cakan, Derya

    2015-01-01

    An infant with cleft palate was referred to cleft clinic of the Orthodontic Department. The mother was concerned to feed the child because of the escape of milk from the nose. Intraoral examination revealed a large palatal cleft extending from hard to soft palate involving uvula. The impression was taken and dental cast obtained. A 3 mm soft and afterward a 1 mm hard Bioplast plate was pressed using Biostar device (Scheu-Dental Gmbh, Iserlohn, Germany) on the model. Finally, a hole was prepared on the anterior part to put a thread through it. The infant tolerated the plate immediately and encounters no difficulties during feeding. The inlaying soft Bioplast plates eliminate the risk of tissue irritation, whereas the covering hard Bioplast plate supplies endurance. The fabrication of the clear Bioplast feeding plate is easy and less time-consuming compared with acrylic plates and may be recommended in crowded and overloaded cleft centers. PMID:26929704

  1. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/Palate

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a child with cleft lip and/or palate, nutrition is the first priority as for any other child. These children have specific physical limitations. To fulfill their nutritional requirement, these children need modifications in order to thrive and grow. Failure to adjust to these needs could place the children into a potential life-threatening situation. One of the immediate problems to be addressed in a newborn with cleft lip/palate is difficulty in feeding. Nasal regurgitation and choking are common because of inability of the palate to separate the nasal and oral cavities. The case presented here discusses the management of feeding problem in the infant with cleft lip/palate. How to cite this article: Goswami M, Jangra B, Bhushan U. Management of feeding Problem in a Patient with Cleft Lip/ Palate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):143-145. PMID:27365936

  2. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant

    PubMed Central

    Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle. PMID:27190971

  3. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vinuta Siddayya; Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-04-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle.

  4. Symptomatic Rathke's cleft cyst with a co-existing pituitary tumor; Brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ranjith; Back, Adam G.; Komisarow, Jordan M.; Owens, Timothy R.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Britz, Gavin W.

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs) share a common embryological origin. Occasionally, these two lesions can present within the same patient. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have a large sellar lesion after complaints of persistent headaches and horizontal nystagmus. Surgical resection revealed components of a RCC co-existing with a pituitary adenoma. A brief review of the literature was performed revealing 38 cases of co-existing Rathke's cleft cysts and pituitary adenomas. Among the cases, the most common symptoms included headache and visual changes. Rathke's cleft cysts and pituitary adenomas are rarely found to co-exist, despite having common embryological origins. We review the existing literature, discuss the common embryology to these two lesions and describe a unique case from our institution of a co-existing Rathke's cleft cyst and pituitary adenoma. PMID:24551002

  5. Clear double layer Bioplast feeding plate for neonates with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, R Burcu Nur; Mutlu, Meltem; Germec-Cakan, Derya

    2015-01-01

    An infant with cleft palate was referred to cleft clinic of the Orthodontic Department. The mother was concerned to feed the child because of the escape of milk from the nose. Intraoral examination revealed a large palatal cleft extending from hard to soft palate involving uvula. The impression was taken and dental cast obtained. A 3 mm soft and afterward a 1 mm hard Bioplast plate was pressed using Biostar device (Scheu-Dental Gmbh, Iserlohn, Germany) on the model. Finally, a hole was prepared on the anterior part to put a thread through it. The infant tolerated the plate immediately and encounters no difficulties during feeding. The inlaying soft Bioplast plates eliminate the risk of tissue irritation, whereas the covering hard Bioplast plate supplies endurance. The fabrication of the clear Bioplast feeding plate is easy and less time-consuming compared with acrylic plates and may be recommended in crowded and overloaded cleft centers.

  6. NON-METASTATIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA WITHIN A RATHKE’S CLEFT CYST

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian T.; Segkos, Konstantinos; Kasper, Ekkehard M.; Pallotta, Johanna A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial and sellar squamous cell carcinoma is an extremely rare entity, usually caused by malignant transformation of epidermoid cysts, or very rarely other non-malignant epithelial cysts. Malignant transformation of a Rathke’s cleft cyst has never been described. We present a 49-year-old male patient who presented with a 3-month history of progressive frontotemporal headaches. Imaging revealed a 1.2 cm cystic pituitary mass consistent with a hemorrhagic Rathke’s cleft cyst. The patient underwent trans-sphenoidal resection of the pituitary cyst, and pathologic analysis revealed a squamous cell carcinoma lining a Rathke’s cleft cyst. Extensive imaging and otorhinolaryngologic evaluation revealed no primary source for metastasis. We feel this represents the first case of a patient with a pituitary lesion in which presentation and MRI imaging were consistent with Rathke’s cleft cyst, yet histology revealed squamous cell carcinoma in situ. PMID:25715776

  7. Cleft lip and palate: Parental experiences of stigma, discrimination, and social/structural inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu Lanre; James, Olutayo; Butali, Azeez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate (CLP) are the most common craniofacial birth impairment and one of the most common congenital impairments in humans. Anecdotal evidence suggests that stigmatization, discrimination, and sociocultural inequalities are common “phenomenon” experienced by families of children with CLP in Nigeria. This study aimed to explore the stigmatization, discrimination, and sociocultural inequalities experiences of families with children born with CLP. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out at the surgical outpatient cleft clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study among mothers of children born with CLP, using both interviewer-administered questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. Results: A total of 51 mothers of children with cleft lip and/or palate participated in the study. 35.3% of respondents believed cleft was an “act of God,” whereas others believed it was either due to “evil spirit” (5.9%), “wicked people” (9.8%). Seventy-three percent of the mothers were ashamed of having a child with orofacial cleft. Two of the respondents wanted to abandon the baby in the hospital. About a quarter of the respondent wished the child was never born and 59% of the fathers were ashamed of the facial cleft. Fifty-one percent admitted that their relatives were ashamed of the orofacial cleft, and 65% admitted that their friends were ashamed of the cleft. In addition, 22% of the respondents admitted that they have been treated like an outcast by neighbors, relatives, and friends because of the cleft of their children. When asked about refusal to carry the affected children by friends, relatives, and neighbors, 20% of respondents said “Yes.” Conclusions: Myths surrounding the etiology of orofacial cleft are prevalent in Nigeria. Parents and individuals with CLP experience stigma as well as social and structural inequalities due to societal perceptions and

  8. Energy efficient face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehnal, J.; Sedy, J.; Etsion, I.; Zobens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Torque, face temperature, leakage, and wear of a flat face seal were compared with three coned face seals at pressures up to 2758 kPa and speeds up to 8000 rpm. Axial movement of the mating seal parts was recorded by a digital data acquisition system. The coning of the tungsten carbide primary ring ranged from .51 micro-m to 5.6 micro-m. The torque of the coned face seal balanced to 76.3% was an average 42% lower, the leakage eleven times higher, than that of the standard flat face seal. The reduction of the balance of the coned face seal to 51.3% resulted by decreasing the torque by an additional 44% and increasing leakage 12 to 230 times, depending on the seal shaft speed. No measurable wear was observed on the face of the coned seals.

  9. Congenital isolated cleft mitral valve leaflet and apical muscular ventricular septal defect in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Depenbrock, Sarah M; Visser, Lance C; Kohnken, Rebecca A; Russell, Duncan S; Simpson, Katharine M; Bonagura, John D

    2015-09-01

    A 5-week-old Holstein heifer calf presented for emergency treatment of signs referable to gastrointestinal disease and hypovolemic shock. Fluid resuscitation uncovered clinical signs of primary cardiac disease and echocardiography revealed multiple congenital cardiac defects. Malformations included a cleft anterior mitral valve leaflet resembling an isolated cleft mitral valve and an apically-located muscular ventricular septal defect. The echocardiographic and postmortem findings associated with these defects are presented and discussed in this report.

  10. Impressions in cleft lip and palate--a novel two stage technique.

    PubMed

    Pani, Sharat Chandra; Hedge, Amitha M

    2008-01-01

    Though the field of presurgical orthopedics for the management of children with cleft Lip and Palate (CLAP) has made great advances over the past few decades, little is found in literature regarding the imressions required to fabricate these appliances. The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel two stage technique utilizing greenstick compound and addition silicone impression material to provide a safe, economical and accurate method for recording impressions in children with cleft lip and palate.

  11. [Principles of treatment of total unilateral cleft lip and palate. Suggested protocol].

    PubMed

    Simon, E; Duroure, F; Coing, C; Sellal, S; Chassagne, J F; Stricker, M

    2004-09-01

    Complete uni-lateral cleft palates resulting from failed union between internal and external nasal buds cause an imbalance of both superficial and deep nasal structures. After summarizing the principles that should guide the care of these anomalies, the authors present their therapeutic procedure, in which orthopaedic and surgical treatments are intimately associated. They conclude their presentation by emphasizing the difficulty of predicting the definitive result because of the extreme diversity of the sequellae that always accompany the treatment of cleft palates.

  12. Folate and One-Carbon Metabolism Gene Polymorphisms and Their Associations With Oral Facial Clefts

    PubMed Central

    Boyles, Abee L.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Taylor, Jack A.; Meyer, Klaus; Fredriksen, Åse; Ueland, Per Magne; Drevon, Christian A.; Vollset, Stein Emil; Lie, Rolv Terje

    2008-01-01

    Folate metabolism plays a critical role in embryonic development. Prenatal folate supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and probably oral facial clefts. Previous studies of related metabolic genes have associated polymorphisms in cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) with cleft risk. We explored associations between genes related to one-carbon metabolism and clefts in a Norwegian population-based study that included 362 families with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and 191 families with cleft palate only (CPO). We previously showed a 39% reduction in risk of CL/P with folic acid supplementation in this population. In the present study we genotyped 12 polymorphisms in nine genes related to one-carbon metabolism and looked for associations of clefting risk with fetal polymorphisms, maternal polymorphisms, as well as parent-of-origin effects, using combined likelihood-ratio tests (LRT). We also stratified by maternal periconceptional intake of folic acid (>400 μg) to explore gene-exposure interactions. We found a reduced risk of CL/P with mothers who carried the CBS C699T variant (rs234706); relative risk was 0.94 with one copy of the T allele (95% CI 0.63-1.4) and 0.50 (95% CI 0.26-0.96) with two copies (P = 0.008). We found no evidence of interaction of this variant with folate status. We saw no evidence of risk from the MTHFR C677T variant (rs1801133) either overall or after stratifying by maternal folate intake. No associations were found between any of the polymorphisms and CPO. Genetic variations in the nine metabolic genes examined here do not confer a substantial degree of risk for clefts. Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.† PMID:18203168

  13. Frontal Encephalocele Associated With a Bilateral Tessier Number Three Cleft and Fraser Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wood, Benjamin C; Yi, Sojung; Oh, Albert K; Rogers, Gary F; Magge, Suresh N

    2015-09-01

    Oblique craniofacial clefts and encephaloceles are each rare conditions, and only a few instances of these findings in combination have been described. Each pathologic entity presents a unique reconstructive challenge. The authors report the case of a male infant who presented with a large right frontoencephalocele and bilateral Tessier number 3 clefts. A review of the pertinent literature, including specific considerations related to perioperative management and technical aspects of the surgical approach, is discussed.

  14. No spreading across the southern Juan de Fuca ridge axial cleft during 1994-1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwell, C.D.; Hildebrand, J.A.; Spiess, Fred N.; Morton, J.L.; Normark, W.R.; Reiss, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40' N and 130??20' W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (~1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5??7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.Direct-path acoustic measurements between seafloor transponders observed no significant extension (-10 ?? 14 mm/yr) from August 1994 to September 1996 at the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (44??40 minutes N and 130??20 minutes W). The acoustic path for the measurement is a 691-m baseline straddling the axial cleft, which bounds the Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. Given an expected full-spreading rate of 56 mm/yr, these data suggest that extension across this plate boundary occurs episodically within the narrow (approx. 1 km) region of the axial valley floor, and that active deformation is occurring between the axial cleft and the plate interior. A cleft-parallel 714-m baseline located 300 m to the west of the cleft on the Pacific plate monitored system performance and, as expected, observed no motion (+5 ?? 7 mm/yr) between the 1994 and 1996 surveys.

  15. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Wyszynski, D.F. |; Lewanda, A.F. |; Beaty, T.H.

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  16. CRISPLD2 VARIANTS INCLUDING A C471T SILENT MUTATION MAY CONTRIBUTE TO NONSYNDROMIC CLEFT LIP WITH OR WITHOUT CLEFT PALATE

    PubMed Central

    Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Cooper, Margaret E.; Fonseca, Renata F.; Tropp, Stephen; Govil, Manika; Granjeiro, Jose M.; Imoehl, Sandra R.; Mansilla, M. Adela; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Ma, Lian; Chiquet, Brett T.; Student, Dental; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess association between nonsyndromic (NS) cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) and SNPs within the CRISPLD2 gene (cysteine-rich secretory protein LCCL domain containing 2). Design Four SNPs within the CRISPLD2 gene domain (rs1546124, rs8061351, rs2326398, rs4783099) were genotyped to test for association via family-based association methods. Participants 5,826 individuals from 1,331 families in which one or more family member is affected with CL(P). Results Evidence of association was seen for SNP rs1546124 in USA (p=0.02) and Brazilian (p=0.04) Caucasian cohorts. We also found association of SNP rs1546124 with cleft palate alone (CP) in South Americans (Guatemala and ECLAMC) and combined Hispanics (Guatemala, ECLAMC and Texas Hispanics) (p=0.03 for both comparisons), and with both cleft lip with cleft palate (CLP; p=0.04) and CL(P) (p=0.02) in North Americans. Strong evidence of association was found for SNP rs2326398 with CP in Asian populations (p=0.003) and with CL(P) in Hispanics (p=0.03), and also with bilateral CL(P) in the Brazilians (p=0.004). In the Brazilians, SNP rs8061351 showed association with cleft subgroups incomplete CL(P) (p=0.004), and unilateral incomplete CL(P) (p=0.003). Prediction of SNP functionality revealed that the C allele in the C471T silent mutation (overrepresented in cases with CL(P) presents two putative exonic splicing enhancer motifs and creates a binding site AP-2 alpha, a transcription factor involved in craniofacial development. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that variants in the CRISPLD2 gene may be involved in the etiology of NS CL(P). PMID:20815724

  17. Genetic risk factors for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a Brazilian population with high African ancestry.

    PubMed

    do Rego Borges, Andrea; Sá, Jamile; Hoshi, Ryuichi; Viena, Camila Sane; Mariano, Lorena C; de Castro Veiga, Patricia; Medrado, Alena Peixoto; Machado, Renato Assis; de Aquino, Sibele Nascimento; Messetti, Ana Camila; Spritz, Richard A; Coletta, Ricardo D; Reis, Silvia R A

    2015-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL ± P) is the most common orofacial birth defect, exhibiting variable prevalence around the world, often attributed to ethnic and environmental differences. Linkage analyses and genome-wide association studies have identified several genomic susceptibility regions for NSCL ± P, mostly in European-derived or Asian populations. Genetic predisposition to NSCL ± P is ethnicity-dependent, and the genetic basis of susceptibility to NSCL ± P likely varies among populations. The population of Brazil is highly admixed, with highly variable ancestry; thus, the genetic determinants of NSCL ± P susceptibility may be quite different. This study tested association of 8 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), previously identified by genome-wide studies in other populations, with NSCL ± P in a Brazilian population with high African ancestry. SNPs rs560426, rs642961, rs1530300, rs987525, rs3758249, rs7078160, rs17085106, and rs13041247 were genotyped in 293 Brazilian patients with NSCL ± P and 352 unaffected Brazilian controls. Each sample was also genotyped for 40 biallelic short insertion/deletion polymorphic markers to characterize genetic ancestry. The average African ancestry background was 31.1% for the NSCL ± P group and 36.7% for the control group. After adjustment for ancestry and multiple testing, the minor alleles of rs3758249 (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25-2.01, P = 0.0001) and rs7078160 (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.21-2.07, P = 0.0002) were significantly associated with risk of NSCL ± P. Polymorphisms located in IRF6 (rs642961) and 8q24 (rs1530300 and rs987525) showed marginal associations in this Brazilian population with high African ancestry. These results indicate that rs3758249 at 9q22 and rs7078160 at 10q25.3 represent risk loci for NSCL ± P in the Brazilian population with high African ancestry.

  18. Maxillary lateral incisors of subjects with cleft lip and/or palate: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Watanabe, M; Nakano, M; Takahama, Y

    1992-07-01

    Maxillary lateral incisors on the alveolar cleft were investigated in 431 cleft children registered in the Department of Orthodontics, Kyushu University Dental Hospital. The majority of primary maxillary lateral incisors were located on the distal side of the alveolar cleft in both unilateral cleft lip and alveolus (UCLA) and unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) subjects. Permanent teeth in UCLA tend to be located distally, but in UCLP they tend to be congenitally absent (p less than .01). The majority of primary teeth had normal shapes; the majority of permanent teeth were of intermediate type or were missing congenitally. One third of the UCLA and one half of the UCLP subjects who had primary maxillary lateral incisors were not followed by permanent replacements. The location of the majority of permanent maxillary lateral incisors tallied with that of the primary ones except in four UCLA, ten UCLP, and two bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) subjects. Four UCLA and ten UCLP subjects who had primary lateral incisors on the distal side were followed by their permanent successors on the mesial side. Three UCLP and one BCLP subjects had permanent maxillary lateral incisors even though they had no temporary predecessors.

  19. Autoantibodies to folate receptor alpha during early pregnancy and risk of oral clefts in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bille, Camilla; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Mansilla, Maria A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Christensen, Kaare; Ballard, Johnathan L; Gorman, Elizabeth B; Cabrera, Robert M; Finnell, Richard H

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether IgG and IgM autoantibodies to folate receptor alpha (FRalpha) in pregnant women are associated with an increased risk of oral cleft-affected offspring. A case-control study nested in the prospective Danish National Birth Cohort (100,418 pregnancies, enrolled during 1997-2003) was done. Hundred eighty-five children were born with an oral cleft. Maternal serum from their mothers (cases) was compared with maternal serum from 779 randomly selected mothers of nonmalformed children (controls). We found that the average level of FRalpha IgG autoantibodies did not differ significantly among cases and controls (p = 0.71). Slightly higher levels of FRalpha IgM autoantibodies were found among controls compared with cases. This was, however, not statistically significant (p = 0.06), except for mothers of children with isolated cleft lip (p = 0.04). Blocking of folate binding to FR was similar among cases and controls (p = 0.54). The results did not change when stratifying into the cleft subgroups, nor when only isolated oral cleft cases were considered. In conclusion, high maternal autoantibody levels and blocking of folate binding to FRalpha in maternal serum during pregnancy are not associated with an increased risk of oral clefts in the offspring in this population-based cohort.

  20. The use of an inferior pennant flap during unilateral cleft lip repair improves lip height symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Aaron J.; Patel, Kamlesh B.; Skolnick, Gary B.; Woo, Albert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to improve the rotation of Cupid’s bow and achieve sufficient vertical lip height, several variations of the Millard rotation-advancement have incorporated a small laterally-based triangular flap above the cutaneous roll. This study uses three-dimensional photogrammetry to evaluate the outcomes of unilateral cleft lip repairs performed with and without pennant flaps. Methods Three-dimensional photographs were analyzed to assess postoperative lip height asymmetry in 90 unilateral cleft lip patients (58 complete, 32 incomplete) treated between 2001 and 2012. Cleft lip repairs were performed by 3 pediatric cleft surgeons using different techniques. Thirty-nine of 90 (43%) procedures utilized an inferiorly placed triangular flap. All patients were photographed at least 9 months postoperatively (mean = 4.2 years). Lip height asymmetry was based on the vertical distances from the subnasale to the peaks of Cupid’s bow. Results Regression analysis revealed that the use of a pennant flap was a significant predictor of postoperative lip height asymmetry (B = 4.2%, p = 0.015). The surgeon performing the repair was also a significant factor in patients with complete cleft lips (B = 3.6%, p = 0.005). All three surgeons achieved greater lip height symmetry when a pennant flap was performed. Conclusions The results of unilateral cleft lip repairs are affected by both the surgeon and the surgical technique. Procedures that utilized a pennant flap showed better philtral height symmetry than non-pennant repairs. PMID:26505705

  1. Association between velopharyngeal function and dental-consonant misarticulations in children with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, J; Haapanen, M L; Laitinen, J; Paaso, M; Ranta, R

    2001-06-01

    We studied the association between velopharyngeal function and misarticulation of the dental consonants /r/, /s/ and /l/ in children with cleft lip/palate. We assessed 278 6-year-old Finnish-speaking non-syndromic children (115 girls, 163 boys) with isolated cleft palate (n= 81), cleft lip/alveolus (n= 82) or unilateral (n= 84) or bilateral (n= 31) cleft lip and palate. Auditory analysis of speech and velopharyngeal function, the presence of fistulae, previous velopharyngoplasty and speech therapy, as well as surgical technique and timing of primary palatal surgery were obtained from the hospital records. The misarticulations of the sounds /r/, /s/ and /l/ were evaluated in spontaneous speech by two experienced speech pathologists from the cleft team. Velopharyngeal function was categorised, on the basis of the effect on speech, into competent, marginal incompetent and obvious incompetent. Nasal grimace and distortions due to palatal fistulae were registered. The results indicated that velopharyngeal function was not significantly associated with misarticulation of any of the sounds /r/, /s/ and /l/ or their combinations in any cleft groups. The technique and timing of primary palatal surgery, the presence of fistulae and previous pharyngoplasty were not associated with misarticulations. On the basis of these results we conclude that dental-consonant misarticulations occur independently of velopharyngeal function, primary palatal surgical technique and timing of palatoplasty.

  2. Spelling Processes of Children With Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Karen Shi Mei; Young, Selena Ee-Li; Liow, Susan Jane Rickard; Purcell, Alison Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective :  To compare the cognitive-linguistic processes underlying spelling performance of children with cleft lip and/or palate with those of typically developing children. Design :  An assessment battery including tests of hearing, articulation, verbal short-term and working memory, and phonological awareness, as well as word and nonword spelling, was administered to both groups. Participants :  A total of 15 children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate were case-matched by age and sex to 15 typically developing children. The children were aged between 6 and 8 years and were bilingual, with English the dominant language. Results :  Wilcoxon signed-rank tests revealed that the performance of children with cleft lip and/or palate was significantly poorer on phoneme deletion and nonword spelling (P < .05) compared with typically developing children. Spearman correlation analyses revealed different relationships between the cognitive-linguistic and spelling measures for the cleft lip and/or palate and typically developing groups. Conclusions :  Children with cleft lip and/or palate underachieve in phonological awareness and spelling skills. To facilitate early intervention for literacy problems, speech-language pathologists should routinely assess the cognitive-linguistic processing of children with cleft lip and/or palate, especially phonological awareness, as part of their case management protocols.

  3. Dental anomalies in children with cleft lip and palate in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this paper was to describe the prevalence and type of dental anomalies in the primary and permanent dentition in children with a cleft condition at Princess Margaret Hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Materials and Methods: The details of 162 current dental patients extracted from the main dental database through their year of birth for the period 1998–2001 were selected consecutively. Dental records and X-rays were examined by one examiner (WN) and verified by a second examiner (RB) to determine dental development. The mean age of the subjects was 10.8 years with equal numbers of males and females. Subjects were further divided into cleft type; unilateral cleft lip (UCL) and palate, bilateral cleft lip (BCL) and palate, UCL, BCL, and cleft palate. Results: One hundred sixty-two subjects were grouped into 21 categories of anomaly or abnormality. Prevalence rates for the categories were calculated for the overall group and for gender and cleft type. Conclusion: Overall, 94% of patients were found to have at least one dental anomaly, with fifty-six (34%) patients having more than one anomaly or abnormality. PMID:27095907

  4. Timing and sequence of primary tooth eruption in children with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Tatiana Yuriko; GOMIDE, Márcia Ribeiro; CARRARA, Cleide Felício de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the timing and sequence of eruption of primary teeth in children with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies of the University of São Paulo, Bauru, SP, Brazil, with a sample of 395 children (128 girls and 267 boys) aged 0 to 48 months, with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate Results Children with complete bilateral clefts presented a higher mean age of eruption of all primary teeth for both arches and both genders, compared to children without clefts. This difference was statistically significant for all teeth, except for the maxillary first molar. Mean age of eruption of most teeth was lower for girls compared to boys. The greatest delay was found for the maxillary lateral incisor, which was the eighth tooth of children with clefts of both genders. Analyzing by gender, the maxillary lateral incisor was the eighth tooth to erupt in girls and the last in boys. Conclusion The results suggest an interference of the cleft on the timing and sequence of eruption of primary teeth. PMID:20856997

  5. Selection bias in genetic-epidemiological studies of cleft lip and palate

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, K.; Holm, N.V.; Kock, K. ); Olsen, J. ); Fogh-Anderson, P.

    1992-09-01

    The possible impact of selection bias in genetic and epidemiological studies of cleft lip and palate was studied, using three nationwide ascertainment sources and an autopsy study in a 10% sample of the Danish population. A total of 670 cases were identified. Two national record systems, when used together, were found suitable for ascertaining facial cleft in live births. More than 95% ascertainment was obtained by means of surgical files for cleft lip (with or without cleft palate) without associated malformations/syndromes. However, surgical files could be a poor source for studying isolated cleft palate (CP) (only a 60% and biased ascertainment), and they cannot be used to study the prevalence of associated malformations or syndromes in facial cleft cases. The male:female ratio was 0.88 in surgically treated cases of CP and was 1.5 in nonoperated CP cases, making the overall sex ratio for CP 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.86-1.4) The sex ratio for CP without associated malformation was 1.1 (95% confidence limits 0.84-1.6). One of the major test criteria in CP multifactorial threshold models (higher CP liability among male CP relatives) must be reconsidered, if other investigations confirm that a CP sex-ratio reversal to male predominance occurs when high ascertainment is achieved. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Nasoalveolar Molding in Cleft Care—Experience in 40 Patients from a Single Centre in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Andrea; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys J.

    2015-01-01

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) has gained wide acceptance and evidence in cleft therapy. However, standardized treatment protocols and experiences recorded from European centres are lacking. The results of 40 infants with cleft lip and palate treated with presurgical NAM according to the Grayson technique were analyzed. Standardized parameters of cleft width and nasal symmetry were measured in pre- and posttreatment plaster casts and in digitalized 3-dimensional STL models. Statistical analyses were performed by using Student´s t-test in a per-protocol manner. 27 out of 40 infants completed NAM and were analyzed. In 13 patients NAM was either temporarily interrupted or terminated prematurely due to skin irritations or lack of parental support. These cases were excluded from statistical analysis, resulting in a drop-out rate of 32.5%. Intersegmental alveolar distance (ISAD), intersegmental lip distance (ISLD), nostril height (NH), nostril width (NW) and columella deviation angle (CDA) were significantly changed in unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) (n = 8). In unilateral cleft lip (UCL) (n = 9), only ISLD, NH and CDA were significantly changed. ISAD of the right and left side, ISLD of the right and left side, premaxilla deviation angle, nostril height and columella length were changed significantly in bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) cases (n = 10). NAM is a suitable presurgical treatment modality. A positive effect has been seen in UCLP and BCLP infants, as compared with their birth status. PMID:25734535

  7. Tooth ankylosis in deciduous teeth of children with cleft lip and/or palate.

    PubMed

    Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio; Duque, Cristiane; Silva, Juliana Yassue Barbosa da; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho de; Costa, Beatriz; Gomide, Marcia Ribeiro

    2004-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the prevalence of tooth ankylosis in deciduous molars of Caucasian children with cleft lip and/or palate aged 5 to 12 years, of both genders. A total of 330 patients seen at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies of the University of São Paulo for routine treatment were clinically evaluated. The prevalence of ankylosis was analyzed in relation to gender, age range (5-7, 8-10, 11-12 years), type of cleft, affected tooth and arch. The total group showed a prevalence of 18%, with no statistical difference between genders and among types of cleft; ankylosis was more often in the mandibular arch, lower first molars and among children in the age ranges 8-10 and 11-12 years. The results agreed with those observed in the related literature for patients without clefts, pointing out the absence of influence of the cleft on the prevalence of ankylosis. This reinforces the importance of early diagnosis of this anomaly and of the treatment of choice, which are similar in patients with or without clefts.

  8. Tobacco and alcohol use during pregnancy and risk of oral clefts. Occupational Exposure and Congenital Malformation Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, C; Cordier, S; Goujard, J; Aymé, S; Bianchi, F; Calzolari, E; De Walle, H E; Knill-Jones, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between maternal tobacco and alcohol consumption during the first trimester of pregnancy and oral clefts. METHODS: Data were derived from a European multicenter case-control study including 161 infants with oral clefts and 1134 control infants. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses showed an increased risk of cleft lip with or without cleft palate associated with smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07, 3.04) and an increased risk of cleft palate associated with alcohol consumption (OR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.02, 5.09). The former risk increased with the number of cigarettes smoked. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides further evidence of the possible role of prevalent environmental exposures such as tobacco and alcohol in the etiology of oral clefts. PMID:10705862

  9. Tfap2a-dependent changes in mouse facial morphology result in clefting that can be ameliorated by a reduction in Fgf8 gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebecca M; Feng, Weiguo; Phang, Tzulip; Fish, Jennifer L; Li, Hong; Spritz, Richard A; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hooper, Joan; Jamniczky, Heather; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Williams, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Failure of facial prominence fusion causes cleft lip and palate (CL/P), a common human birth defect. Several potential mechanisms can be envisioned that would result in CL/P, including failure of prominence growth and/or alignment as well as a failure of fusion of the juxtaposed epithelial seams. Here, using geometric morphometrics, we analyzed facial outgrowth and shape change over time in a novel mouse model exhibiting fully penetrant bilateral CL/P. This robust model is based upon mutations in Tfap2a, the gene encoding transcription factor AP-2α, which has been implicated in both syndromic and non-syndromic human CL/P. Our findings indicate that aberrant morphology and subsequent misalignment of the facial prominences underlies the inability of the mutant prominences to fuse. Exencephaly also occured in some of the Tfap2a mutants and we observed additional morphometric differences that indicate an influence of neural tube closure defects on facial shape. Molecular analysis of the CL/P model indicates that Fgf signaling is misregulated in the face, and that reducing Fgf8 gene dosage can attenuate the clefting pathology by generating compensatory changes. Furthermore, mutations in either Tfap2a or Fgf8 increase variance in facial shape, but the combination of these mutations restores variance to normal levels. The alterations in variance provide a potential mechanistic link between clefting and the evolution and diversity of facial morphology. Overall, our findings suggest that CL/P can result from small gene-expression changes that alter the shape of the facial prominences and uncouple their coordinated morphogenesis, which is necessary for normal fusion.

  10. Fryns syndrome with atypical findings--with large midline cleft on forehead but normal cranial MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Demirel, G; Oguz, S S; Celik, I H; Yilmaz, Y; Uras, N; Erdeve, O; Dilmen, U

    2010-01-01

    We report a newborn with Fryns syndrome and atypical findings like a large midline cleft on forehead. Abnormal findings included congenital left diaphragmatic hernia, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, anteverted nostrils, cleft palate, low set ears, tapered fingers, macrocephaly, congenital heart defect, midline defects and renal anomalies. This is the first case that has a midline cleft on forehead with normal cranial MRI findings.

  11. A 20-year experience in unilateral cleft lip repair: From Millard to the triple unilimb Z-plasty technique

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study describes a 20-year experience of treating patients with unilateral cleft lip. During this time, various techniques were used including Millard's technique and its modification and two types of geometrically designed procedures. The study objective was to compare surgical outcomes of different surgical techniques for unilateral cleft lip repair. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective audit of outcomes after unilateral cleft lip repair performed by a single surgeon since 1995. Of the 827 patients who underwent surgery, 277 met the criterion of having anthropometric measurements performed ≥1 year postoperatively. The patients were stratified into three groups according to cleft severity: incomplete, complete with less deficiency (3–6 mm difference between cleft and non-cleft lip height) and complete with more deficiency (>6 mm difference between cleft and non-cleft lip height). Anthropometric measurements, scar assessment and complications were recorded. Results: There were no differences in outcomes between Millard and Reichert-Millard techniques for incomplete unilateral cleft lip. For complete unilateral cleft lip and less tissue deficiency, lip symmetry was better using upper rotation advancement plus double unilimb Z-plasty than the Reichert-Millard technique. For complete unilateral cleft lip and more tissue deficiency, lip symmetry was better after triple unilimb Z-plasty than after upper rotation advancement plus double unilimb Z-plasty. Conclusions: We presented a 20-year experience performing unilateral cleft lip repair. An individualised classification system with corresponding surgical techniques was successfully used during this period. The individualised surgical protocol used in this study allowed us to achieve improved surgical outcomes. PMID:28216814

  12. Association between FOXE1 and non-syndromic orofacial clefts in a northeastern Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Lu, Yongping; Ai, Lisi; Jiao, Boqiang; Yu, Jiantao; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Non-syndromic orofacial clefts are among the most common congenital defects, and several reports have shown that the FOXE1 gene has strong associations with them. To find out if the gene was a risk factor we used a case-control and family-based analysis, and recruited 230 patients with non-syndromic oral clefts including 179 with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and 51 with non-syndromic cleft palate alone, their parents (166 mothers and 161 fathers, including 135 complete trios), and 180 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to genotype the 2 most strongly associated markers (rs4460498 and rs3758249) in FOXE1, and case-control and family-based associations were analysed. In the case-control analyses we found a significant association with non-syndromic cleft lip and palate in rs4460498 (p=0.009) and rs3758249 (p=0.014), but no association in patients with cleft palate alone. For rs4460498 in FOXE1, the odds ratio (OR) for cases with CC homozygotes compared with TC+CC genotypes was 1.813 (95% CI 1.176 to 2.796), and for rs3758249 in FOXE1, the OR for cases with GG homozygotes compared with those with AG+AA genotypes was 0.561 (95%CI 0.371 to 0.848). The results of transmission-disequilibrium tests for rs4460698 and rs3758249 for non-syndromic orofacial clefts were p=0.003, OR=2.781 (95% CI 1.414 to 5.469) and p=0.001, OR=2.552 (95%CI 1.574 to 4.138), respectively. This suggests that FOXE1 (rs4460498 and rs3758249) is strongly associated with non-syndromic cleft lip and palate in populations in northeast China, and further study between FOXE1 and non-syndromic orofacial clefts is necessary.

  13. Diagnosis of mitral valve cleft using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aiyun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Pan

    2017-01-01

    Background Mitral valve cleft (MVC) is the most common cause of congenital mitral insufficiency, and MVC may occur alone or in association with other congenital heart lesions. Direct suture and valvuloplasty are the major and effective treatments for mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by MVC. Therefore, it is important to determine the location and magnitude of the pathological damage due to MVC when selecting a surgical procedure for treatment. This study explored the application value of transthoracic real-time 3-dimensional (3D) echocardiography (RT-3DE) in the diagnosis of MVC. Methods From October 2012 to June 2016, 19 consecutive patients with MVC diagnosed by 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography in our hospital were selected for this study. Full-volume RT-3DE was performed on all patients. The 3D-imaging data were cropped and rotated in 3 views (horizontal, sagittal, and coronal) with 6 directions to observe the position and shape of the MVC and the spatial position between the cleft and its surrounding structures. The maximum longitudinal diameter and the maximum width of the cleft were measured. The origin of the mitral regurgitant jet and the severity of MR were evaluated, and these RT-3DE data were compared with the intraoperative findings. Results Of the 19 patients studied, 4 patients had isolated cleft mitral valve, and cleft mitral valves combined with other congenital heart lesions were detected in 15 patients. The clefts of 6 patients were located in the A2 segment, the clefts of 4 patients were located in the A1 segment, the clefts of 4 patients were located in the A3 segment, the clefts of 4 patients were located in the A2–A3 segment, and the cleft of 1 patient was located in the P2 segment. Regarding the shape of the cleft, 13 patients had V-shaped clefts, and the others had C- or S-shaped clefts. The severity of the MR at presentation was mild in 2 patients, moderate in 9 and severe in 8. Two of the patients with mild MR did not undergo surgery

  14. A method for determining the median line of measured cylindrical and conical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecki, Dariusz; Zwierzchowski, Jarosław

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents a novel method for the determination of the median line of the cylindrical and conical surfaces. This method can be incorporated into virtually any cylindricity measurement strategy, including the bird-cage strategy and the helical line strategy. In the study, a median line was determined by minimizing the functional made up of two components. The form of the first component results from the classic definition of the median line provided in the corresponding standard. The other, termed the bending energy, is responsible for ensuring appropriate smoothness of the median line. In order to solve this variational problem, the median line was approximated by means of linear combination of cubic B-spline functions. A simulation and experiments were conducted to establish the suitability of the algorithm developed for the determination of the median line using the helical-line and the cross-section measurement strategy.

  15. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-Dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)-the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces.

  16. Three-dimensional morphometric analysis of brain shape in nonsyndromic orofacial clefting

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth M; Andreasen, Nancy C; Nopoulos, Peg

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies report structural brain differences in individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts (NSOFC) compared with healthy controls. These changes involve non-uniform shifts in tissue volume within the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, suggesting that the shape of the brain may be altered in cleft-affected individuals. To test this hypothesis, a landmark-based morphometric approach was utilized to quantify and compare brain shape in a sample of 31 adult males with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), 14 adult males with cleft palate only (CPO) and 41 matched healthy controls. Fifteen midline and surface landmarks were collected from MRI brain scans and the resulting 3D coordinates were subjected to statistical shape analysis. First, a geometric morphometric analysis was performed in three steps: Procrustes superimposition of raw landmark coordinates, omnibus testing for group difference in shape, followed by canonical variates analysis (CVA) of shape coordinates. Secondly, Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA) was carried out on scaled inter-landmark distances to identify localized shape differences throughout the brain. The geometric morphometric analysis revealed significant differences in brain shape among all three groups (P < 0.001). From CVA, the major brain shape changes associated with clefting included selective enlargement of the anterior cerebrum coupled with a relative reduction in posterior and/or inferior cerebral portions, changes in the medio-lateral position of the cerebral poles, posterior displacement of the corpus callosum, and reorientation of the cerebellum. EDMA revealed largely similar brain shape changes. Thus, compared with controls, major brain shape differences were present in adult males with CL/P and CPO. These results both confirm and expand previous findings from traditional volumetric studies of the brain in clefting and provide further evidence that the neuroanatomical phenotype in individuals with NSOFC is a

  17. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  18. A novel synaptic junction preparation for the identification and characterization of cleft proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2017-01-01

    Identification of synaptic cleft components has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preparation enriched in synaptic junctions devoid of adjoining peripheral membranes. Prior strategies for the isolation of synaptic junctions, relying on detergents for the removal of peripheral membranes, resulted in substantial loss of membranes lining the cleft. Here, a novel, detergent-free method is described for the preparation of a synaptic junction (SJ) fraction, using phospholipase A2. Limited digestion of synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fraction with phospholipase A2 followed by centrifugation over a sucrose cushion results in selective removal of membranes peripheral to the cleft while junctional membranes remain relatively intact as observed by electron microscopy. Enrichment in synaptic junctional structures and loss of membranes peripheral to the junctional area are further verified by demonstrating enrichment in PSD-95 and loss in mGluR5, respectively. The SJ fraction is enriched in neuroligins and neurexins, in agreement with immuno-electron microscopy data showing their selective localization to the junctional area. Among additional cell adhesion molecules tested, N-cadherin and specific isoforms of the SynCAM and SALM families also show marked enrichment in the SJ fraction, suggesting preferential localization at the synaptic cleft while others show little enrichment or decrease, suggesting that they are not restricted to or concentrated at the synaptic cleft. Treatment of the SJ fraction with glycosidases results in electrophoretic mobility shifts of all cell adhesion molecules tested, indicating glycosylation at the synaptic cleft. Biochemical and ultrastructural data presented indicate that the novel synaptic junction preparation can be used as a predictive tool for the identification and characterization of the components of the synaptic cleft. PMID:28362857

  19. Pre Surgical Nasoalveolar Molding: Changing Paradigms in Early Cleft Lip and Palate Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Prashanth Sadashiva; Deshmukh, Seema; Bhagyalakshmi, A; Srilatha, KT

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alveolar and nasal reconstruction for patients with cleft lip and palate is a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. Various procedures have been attempted to reduce the cleft gap so as to obtain esthetic results post surgically. Yet there is need of continuous exploration of newer and better methods. Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate generally requires a team approach with paedodontists playing a major role of performing nasoalveolar molding. Presurgical Nasoalveolar Molding (PNAM) was introduced to reshape the alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair. Over the time there have been changes in the concepts of the same. To assess these changing concepts a pubmed search was performed with different related terminologies and articles over a period of 30 years were obtained. Among the articles retrieved, studies performed over different concepts in early management of cleft lip and palate was selected for the systematic review. Aims This paper describes the changing paradigms in the management of patients with cleft lip and palate, focuses on the current concept of Presurgical nasoalveolar molding(PNAM) and discusses the long term benefits of the same. Conclusion The concept of the management of cleft lip and palate has changed over the time with more emphasis on the nasal and alveolar molding prior to the primary lip repair. This molding reduces the number reconstructive surgeries performed later for the purpose of esthetics. How to cite this article: Murthy P S, Deshmukh S, Bhagyalakshmi A, Srilatha K T. Pre Surgical Nasoalveolar Molding: Changing Paradigms in Early Cleft Lip and Palate Rehabilitation. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(2):76-86. PMID:24155594

  20. Cleft Palate Habilitation; Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Cleft Palate Habilitation (5th, Syracuse University, New York, May 11-12, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencione, Ruth M., Ed.

    With emphasis on the growing interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of cleft palate, Ruth M. Lencione introduces the subject covering incidence, causes, and classification. Richard B. Stark discusses surgery of the primary pharyngeal flap and E. Harris Nober presents a review of the literature on hearing problems. Aubrey L. Ruess examined…

  1. Cleft Type, Age, and Sex Differences in Teen-Agers' Ratings of Their Own Behavior, Self-Esteem, and Attitude toward Clefting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Philip

    1980-01-01

    The behavior, self-esteem, and attitude toward clefting of 94 adolescents being treated at a clinic for oral-facial anomalies and communicative disorders were examined. Younger teenagers were more aggressive, more active, and had more somatic complaints than did the older teenagers. (SBH)

  2. Effect of cleft palate repair on the susceptibility to contraction-induced injury of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenitally-clefted goat palates.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite cleft palate repair, velopharyngeal competence is not achieved in ~ 15% of patients, often necessitating secondary surgical correction. Velopharyngeal competence postrepair may require the conversion of levator veli palatini muscle fibers from injury-susceptible type 2 fibers to injury-resi...

  3. Face transplantation: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Face transplantation is a complex vascular composite allotransplantation (VCA) surgery. It involves multiple types of tissue, such as bone, muscles, blood vessels, nerves to be transferred from the donor to the recipient as one unit. VCAs were added to the definition of organs covered by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule and National Organ Transplant Act. Prior to harvest of the face from the donor, a tracheostomy is usually performed. The osteotomies and dissection of the midface bony skeleton may involve severe hemorrhagic blood loss often requiring transfusion of blood products. A silicon face mask created from the facial impression is used to reconstruct the face and preserve the donor’s dignity. The recipient airway management most commonly used is primary intubation of an existing tracheostoma with a flexometallic endotracheal tube. The recipient surgery usually averages to 19-20 h. Since the face is a very vascular organ, there is usually massive bleeding, both in the dissection phase as well as in the reperfusion phase. Prior to reperfusion, often, after one sided anastomosis of the graft, the contralateral side is allowed to bleed to get rid of the preservation solution and other additives. Intraoperative product replacement should be guided by laboratory values and point of care testing for coagulation and hemostasis. In face transplantation, bolus doses of pressors or pressor infusions have been used intraoperatively in several patients to manage hypotension. This article reviews the anesthetic considerations for management for face transplantation, and some of the perioperative challenges faced. PMID:28058213

  4. Acceptable differences in sensory and motor latencies between the median and ulnar nerves.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Elizabeth A; Prahlow, Nathan D; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The median and ulnar nerves are often studied during the same electrodiagnostic examination. The sensory and motor latencies of these nerves have been compared to detect a common electrodiagnostic entity: median neuropathy at the wrist. However, this comparison could also be used to diagnose less common ulnar pathology. For this reason, it is important to establish normal values for comparing median and ulnar sensory and motor latencies. Previous research deriving these differences in latency has had some limitations. The purpose of this study was to derive an improved normative database for the acceptable differences in latency between the median and ulnar sensory and motor nerves of the same limb. Median and ulnar sensory and motor latencies were obtained from 219 and 238 asymptomatic risk-factor-free subjects, respectively. An analysis of variance was performed to determine whether physical characteristics, specifically age, race, gender, height, or body mass index (as an indicator of obesity), correlated with differences in latency. Differences in sensory latencies were unaffected by physical characteristics. The upper limit of normal difference between median and ulnar (median longer than ulnar) onset latency was 0.5 ms (97th percentile), whereas the peak latency value was 0.4 ms (97th percentile). The upper limit of normal difference between ulnar-versus-median (ulnar longer than median) onset latency was 0.3 ms (97th percentile), whereas the peak-latency value was 0.5 ms (97th percentile). The mean difference in motor latencies correlated with age, with older subjects having a greater variability. In subjects aged 50 and over, the mean difference in median-versus-ulnar latency was 0.9 ms +/- 0.4 ms. The upper limit of normal difference (median longer than ulnar) was 1.7 ms (97th percentile). The upper limit of normal ulnar motor latency is attained if the ulnar latency comes within 0.3 ms of the median latency. In individuals less than 50 years of age, the

  5. Prevention of oro-facial clefts in developing world.

    PubMed

    Oginni, Fadekemi O; Adenekan, Anthony T

    2012-07-01

    Oro-facial cleft (OFC) remains a prominent health issue in developed and developing countries alike. It is the commonest craniofacial birth defect in humans. Mounting evidence suggest a polygenic, multifactorial and a list of epigenetic events. Primary prevention of OFC is based on recognition of the etiologic and risk factors. While a number of preventive strategies are in place for OFC in most developed countries of the world, the majority of developing countries are distant from achieving this goal for a number of reasons. Notable among these are a huge knowledge and practice gap in the field of genetics and dearth of accurate data. In addition, improper coordination and absenteeism from antenatal care contributed greatly to this set back. With ongoing efforts aimed at determining the genetics of nonsyndromic OFC in developing countries, researches directed at identifying environmental factors should equally be in place. Pending the outcome of these, implicated environmental and attitudinal risk factors in other populations could serve as preventive template in health education and interventions. Since risk factors vary between populations, definitive and effective preventive strategies and models would vary from place to place and from time to time. Frantic effort directed at identifying specific implicated risk factors in developing countries should include developing and keeping comprehensive national perinatal database and centralization of antenatal care protocol. Additionally, active health education at every level and a focus on developing manpower in the field of genetics should be in place. These would be designed and tailored toward identified, proven, and emerging risk factors.

  6. Genetics and Management of the Patient with Orofacial Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Luciano Abreu; Meira, Joanna Goes Castro; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip or palate (CL/P) is a common facial defect present in 1 : 700 live births and results in substantial burden to patients. There are more than 500 CL/P syndromes described, the causes of which may be single-gene mutations, chromosomopathies, and exposure to teratogens. Part of the most prevalent syndromic CL/P has known etiology. Nonsyndromic CL/P, on the other hand, is a complex disorder, whose etiology is still poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies have contributed to the elucidation of the genetic causes, by raising reproducible susceptibility genetic variants; their etiopathogenic roles, however, are difficult to predict, as in the case of the chromosomal region 8q24, the most corroborated locus predisposing to nonsyndromic CL/P. Knowing the genetic causes of CL/P will directly impact the genetic counseling, by estimating precise recurrence risks, and the patient management, since the patient, followup may be partially influenced by their genetic background. This paper focuses on the genetic causes of important syndromic CL/P forms (van der Woude syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, and Robin sequence-associated syndromes) and depicts the recent findings in nonsyndromic CL/P research, addressing issues in the conduct of the geneticist. PMID:23213504

  7. Extending multidisciplinary management of cleft palate to the developing world.

    PubMed

    Furr, Maxwell C; Larkin, Elissa; Blakeley, Robert; Albert, Thomas W; Tsugawa, Lance; Weber, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    The needs of patients with a cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) extend beyond surgical repair. A multidisciplinary approach to the care of patients with CL/P is the widely accepted standard in most regions of the developed world. Patients with CL/P in developing countries have needs similar to those of patients in industrialized nations. However, the existing shortages of healthcare resources have precluded provision of the most basic care to those with a CL/P. Innovative applications of technology can facilitate the delivery of speech therapy, evaluation of audiometric data, and limited dental evaluation for these patients with a modest financial investment. One method by which this care might be provided is with the use of Internet-based modalities. This represents a near universally available method to fill a conspicuous gap in the preoperative evaluation and postoperative care of patients with CL/P in the developing world. With rapidly expanding access to the Internet, particularly with wireless-3G connectivity worldwide, it is time to expand our delivery of humanitarian care beyond surgery alone in treating patients with CL/P in medically underserved areas.

  8. Social motivation in individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Ellen; Koscik, Timothy R; Conrad, Amy L; Moser, David J; Nopoulos, Peg

    2013-01-01

    Social isolation is common among individuals with isolated cleft lip and palate (ICLP), but the available data on why this may be are mixed. We present a novel theory relating to reduced social motivation in ICLP, called the social abulia hypothesis. Based on this hypothesis, we predicted that reduced social motivation would lead to reduced responsiveness to negative social feedback, in terms of both explicit responses and noncontrolled, psychophysiological responses. Twenty males with ICLP and 20 normal comparison males between 13 and 25 years old participated in the study. Social motivation was examined by measuring participants' response to negative social feedback (social exclusion). Additionally, psychophysiological reactivity to positive and negative social stimuli was measured. In order to rule out other potential contributors to social isolation, we tested basic social perception, emotion recognition, and social anxiety. In line with the social abulia hypothesis, we show that negative social feedback had less of an effect on males with ICLP than on healthy male peers, which was evident in explicit responses and noncontrolled, psychophysiological responses to negative social feedback. Our results could not be attributed to problems in social perception, a lack of understanding facial expressions, or increased social anxiety, as groups did not differ on these constructs. This study suggests that current views on social isolation in ICLP may need to be reconsidered to include the possibility that isolation in this population may be the direct result of reduced social motivation.

  9. New neonatal classification of unilateral cleft lip and palate part 2: to predict permanent lateral incisor agenesis and maxillary growth.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Jean-Charles; Delestan, Christian; Montoya, Pedro; Matei, Lucia; Bigorre, Michèle; Herlin, Christian; Baümler, Caroline; Daures, Jean-Pierre; Captier, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    Objectives : To bring a neonatal classification system of unilateral cleft lip and palate and to correlate this classification with the distribution of the permanent lateral incisor and maxillary growth. Design : Retrospective with longitudinal follow-up. Setting : Tertiary. Patients : A total of 112 individuals with treated unilateral cleft lip and palate and 30 controls. Main Outcome Measures : Unilateral cleft lip and palate neonatal casts were classified anatomically in four categories, in which Class 1 corresponds to a maxillary arch with a narrow alveolar cleft; Class 2 corresponds to a balanced form; Class 3 corresponds to a wide cleft and short maxilla; and Class 4 corresponds to a wide cleft and long maxilla. The classification was correlated with the distribution of the permanent lateral incisor. Maxillary growth was evaluated using a cephalometric analysis after the age of 10 years. Results : Clinical classification of unilateral cleft lip and palate found 10 cases of Class 1 (8.9%), 34 cases of Class 2 (30.4%), 46 cases of Class 3 (41.1%), and 22 cases of Class 4 (19.6%). The permanent lateral incisor was most often present in narrower clefts (Classes 1 and 2); whereas, large clefts (Classes 3 and 4) were relatively more frequently associated with an agenesis of the permanent lateral incisor (P = .019). Maxillary growth impairment was most severe in Class 3, with a mean sella-nasion-A point angle at 71.9° ± 4.6° (P < .001). Conclusions : Using the cleft width, arch form, and shape of the nasal septum, unilateral cleft lip and palate can be classified into four different classes at birth, which can all give information about permanent lateral incisor agenesis and maxillary growth.

  10. Spontaneous Involution of Rathke’s Cleft Cysts without Visual Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wook; Hwang, Kihwan; Joo, Jin-Deok; Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Chae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been various reports in the literature regarding the conservative management of pituitary apoplexy, pituitary incidentalomas and Rathke cleft cysts (RCCs). However, to the best of our knowledge, spontaneous involution of cystic sellar mass has rarely been reported. We report 14 cases of cystic sellar masses with spontaneous involution. Methods A total of 14 patients with spontaneous regression of cystic sellar masses in our hospital were included. The median age was 35 years (range, 5–67), and 8 patients were male. Clinical symptoms, hormone study and MRI were evaluated for all patients. The initial MRI showed all 14 patients with RCCs. Eight patients were presented with sudden onset of headache, and 1 patient with dizziness. Another patient, a 5-year-old child, was presented with delayed growth. Three patients had no symptoms via regular medical work up. All 14 patients had no visual symptoms. The follow-up period ranged from 5.7 to 42.8 months, with the mean of 17.3 months. Results The mean initial tumor size was 1.29 cm3 (range, 0.05 to 3.23). After involution, the tumor size decreased to 0.23 cm3 (range, 0 to 0.68) without any treatments. Repeated MRI showed a spontaneous decrease in tumor volume by 78% (range, 34 to 99). The initial MRI showed that the tumor was in contact with the optic chiasm in 7 patients, while compressing on the optic chiasm in 3 patients. Five patients were initially treated with hormone replacement therapy due to hormone abnormality. After the follow-up period, only 2 patients needed a long-term hormone replacement therapy. Conclusion The spontaneous involution of RCCs is not well quantified before. Their incidence has not been well demonstrated, but this phenomenon might be underreported. Conservative management can be a treatment option in some RCCs without visual symptoms, even in those that are large in size and in contact with the optic nerve via imaging study. PMID:27867913

  11. Median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Reser, Diana; Caliskan, Etem; Tolboom, Herman; Guidotti, Andrea; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Sternotomy is considered to be the gold standard incision in cardiac surgery, resulting in low failure rates and excellent proven long-term outcomes. It can also be used in thoracic surgery for mediastinal, bilateral pulmonary or lower trachea and main stem bronchus surgery. Sternotomy has to be performed properly to avoid short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. The surgical technique is well established and certain principles are recognized to be crucial to minimize complications. The identification of the correct landmarks, midline tissue preparation, osteotomy with the avoidance of injury to underlying structures like pleura, pericardium, innominate vein, brachiocephalic artery and ectatic ascending aorta, and targeted bleeding control are important steps of the procedure. As important as the performance of a proper sternotomy is a correct sternal closure. An override or shift of the sternal edges has to be avoided by placing the wires at a proper distance from each other without injuring the thoracic pedicle. The two sternal halves have to be tightly re-approximated to facilitate healing of the bone and to avoid instability, which is a risk factor for wound infection. With a proper performance of sternotomy and sternal closure, instability and wound infections are rare and depend on patient-related risk factors.

  12. Feeding issues and interventions in infants and children with clefts and craniofacial syndromes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Claire K

    2011-05-01

    Problems with oral feeding occur in varying degrees in infants born with cleft lip/palate and/or craniofacial syndromes. The extent of clefting is associated with the severity of feeding problems, and if cleft lip/palate occurs in conjunction with a craniofacial syndrome, additional structural, airway, and neuromotor issues may be present. The infant's feeding and swallowing skills may be significantly impaired, characterized by inefficient oral feeding skills coupled with poor airway protection ability during swallowing. Inadequate airway protection during swallowing has serious implications for the infant's respiratory health as sequelae of chronic aspiration during feeding may include recurrent respiratory illness, pneumonia, and lung damage. Feeding difficulty in nonsyndromic and syndromic cleft lip/palate infants has been documented as source of considerable stress for parents and can have a potential negative effect on the parent-infant bonding process. Therefore, timely identification of feeding problems by the speech pathologist with subsequent intervention and modification in the feeding method is essential, along with provision of early feeding instruction to families. The objective of this article is to review expert opinion and available evidence regarding factors that influence feeding success and efficiency in infants with nonsyndromic and syndromic cleft lip/palate. The types of compensatory strategies or interventions that are effective in alleviation of feeding and swallowing difficulties will be described. Descriptive reports, expert opinion, and available evidence from clinical trials to support the use of feeding interventions in treatment are reviewed.

  13. Three-dimensional evaluation of surgical techniques in neonates with orofacial cleft

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Ambrosio, Eloá Cristina Passucci; Mello, Bianca Zeponi Fernandes; Jorge, Paula Karine; Soares, Simone; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Individuals with cleft lip and palate have many anatomic and functional alterations compromising esthetics, hearing, speech, occlusion, and development/craniofacial growth. The rehabilitative treatment of these patients is very challenging and starts at birth aiming at the best treatment for all functional demands. This study aimed to evaluate the dimensional alterations of the dental arches of neonates with cleft lip and palate after two different primary surgical techniques. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised 114 digital models of children aged from 3 to 36 months, with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate divided into two groups. Two different phases were evaluated: precheiloplasty and 1 year after palatoplasty. The evaluation was performed through the digital models of each child obtained by scanning digitalization (3D Scanner). Dental arches measurements were accomplished through Appliance Designer software. The following measurements were assessed: dental arch area, anterior amplitude of the cleft, total length of dental arch, intercanine distance, and intertuberosity distance. t-test was applied to compare differences between groups. Results: No statistically significant differences were observed between groups at precheiloplasty phase. At 1 year after palatoplasty, the groups differed in the total length of dental arch (P = 0.002), with greater values for Group I. Conclusion: This study suggests that the results of the different surgical techniques may alter the growth and development of the dental arches of neonates with cleft lip and palate. PMID:28299266

  14. The clinical application of rhBMP-7 for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Ashraf; Roshan, Cherian P; Gillgrass, Toby; Naudi, Kurt; Ray, Arup

    2016-01-01

    In this study, radiographic assessment was performed to find out the effectiveness of bone regeneration following the application of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (rhBMP-7) for the reconstruction of alveolar cleft defects in 11 cases: nine unilateral and two bilateral alveolar clefs. Reconstruction of the alveolar cleft was performed by using 3.5 mg of rhBMP-7 (Osigraft OP1) on a type I collagen carrier. Radiographs were taken 6 months post operation using a Gendex Intraoral Unit with Agfa Dentus M2 Comfort occlusal film. The amount of bony infill was graded on a Kindelan four-point scale. The patients were followed up for an average of 6.6 years. Based on the radiographic analysis, eight out of the nine unilateral alveolar cleft cases received a score of grade I and one patient had a grade II score, using the Kindelan scale. In the two bilateral alveolar clefts, only one side had bone formation. The radiographic appearance showed a normal trabecular pattern similar to the adjacent bone. Thus, rhBMP-7 was radiographically and clinically successful in regenerating the bone at the alveolar cleft which resulted in shortening of the operation time, absence of donor-site morbidity and a shorter hospital stay. The promising results of this preliminary study should encourage a phase II trial to compare bone grafts with BMP for the reconstruction of alveolar defects.

  15. Nostril Morphometry Evaluation before and after Cleft Lip Surgical Correction: Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Feijo, Mario Jorge Frassy; Brandão, Stella Ramos; Pereira, Rui Manoel Rodrigues; Santos, Mariana Batista de Souza; Justino da Silva, Hilton

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose to this work is to review systematically the morphological changes of the nostrils of patients undergoing surgery for correction of cleft lip and identify in the literature the issues involved in the evaluation of surgical results in this population. Review of Literature A review was conducted, searching for clinical evidence from MEDLINE. The search occurred in January 2012. Selection criteria included original articles and research articles on individual subjects with cleft lip or cleft palate with unilateral nostril anthropometric measurements before and after surgical correction of cleft lip and measurements of soft tissues. There were 1,343 articles from the search descriptors and free terms. Of these, five articles were selected. Discussion Most studies in this review evaluated children in Eastern countries, using different measurement techniques but with the aid of computers, and showed improved nostril asymmetry postoperatively compared with preoperatively. Conclusion There is a reduction of the total nasal width postoperatively compared with preoperative measurements in patients with cleft lip. PMID:25992089

  16. Ionosonde observations of the northern magnetospheric cleft during December 1974 and January 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, G. S.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Winningham, J. D.; Lepping, R. P.; Delana, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    During December 1974 and January 1975, the northern magnetospheric cleft was monitored by ionosondes at Cape Parry and Sachs Harbor, Northwest Territories, Canada, in support of rocket shots into the cleft. Ionograms were taken nominally at 15-min intervals but as rapidly as two per minute during times of particular interest. Analysis of 5 days of data shows the ionosphere at cleft latitudes to be very complex and dynamic. The ionograms often show considerable structure and can change appearance significantly in a minute or two. The cleft at times appears to move equatorward in response either to a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field or to the occurrence of geomagnetic disturbances. This response is in agreement with the conclusions of previous satellite studies. Behavior contrary to this generalization is not uncommon, however, and therefore it may not always hold on time scales considerably shorter than the satellite orbital period of at least 1 hour. The rate of the cleft's motion may vary from about 0.05 to 0.5 deg/min.

  17. Corpus callosum shape is altered in individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth M; Parsons, Trish E; Fogel, Melissa R; Walter, Courtney P; Conrad, Amy L; Nopoulos, Peg

    2013-05-01

    Individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) have altered brain structure compared with healthy controls. Preliminary evidence suggests that the corpus callosum may be dysmorphic in orofacial clefting; however, this midline brain structure has not been systematically assessed in this population. The goal of the present study was to carry out a morphometric assessment of the corpus callosum and its relationship to cognitive performance in a well-characterized patient cohort with orofacial cleft. Midline brain images were obtained from previously collected MRI scans of 24 CL/P subjects and 40-adult-male controls. Eight landmarks on the corpus callosum were digitized on each image and their x,y coordinate locations saved. A geometric morphometrics analysis was applied to the landmark coordinate data to test for shape differences across groups. The relationship between corpus callosum shape and IQ was explored with nonparametric correlation coefficients. Results revealed significant differences in mean corpus callosum shape between CL/P cases and controls (P = 0.029). The CL/P corpus callosum was characterized by increased overall convexity resulting from a superior and posterior displacement. Within CL/P cases, increased corpus callosum shape dysmorphology was moderately correlated with reduced performance IQ (r = 0.546). These results provide additional evidence that midline brain changes may be an important part of the orofacial cleft phenotype.

  18. Haploinsufficiency of MEIS2 is associated with orofacial clefting and learning disability.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Stefan; Berland, Siren; Gradek, Gyri Aasland; Bongers, Ernie; de Leeuw, Nicole; Pfundt, Rolph; Fannemel, Madeleine; Rødningen, Olaug; Brendehaug, Atle; Haukanes, Bjørn Ivar; Hovland, Randi; Helland, Gunnar; Houge, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    MEIS2 is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor of the TALE superfamily that has been proven important for development. We confirm and extend a recent single clinical report stating that deletions in MEIS2 can cause cleft palate [Crowley et al. (2010); Am J Med Genet 152A:1326-1327]. Here we report on five additional patients with 15q14 deletions of sizes 0.6, 0.6, 1.0, 1.9, and 4.8 Mb, respectively, all involving MEIS2. In addition, we present a family with four affected individuals and an intragenic 58 kb direct duplication disrupting MEIS2. In total, 7/9 cases had clefting, from mild (submucous cleft palate) to severe (cleft lip and palate), and 3/9 cases had ventricular septal defects. All cases had delayed motor development and most had learning disability, at worst in the mild intellectual disability range. The cases had overlapping facial features (broad forehead, finely arched eyebrows, mildly shortened philtrum, and tented upper lip) but individually they were not considered to be dysmorphic. Our results show that MEIS2 is a gene needed for palate closure. In syndromic cases of cleft palate, MEIS2 should be considered among the candidate genes, for example, in cases without 22q11.2 deletions.

  19. Effects of rapid maxillary expansion in cleft patients resulting from the use of two different expanders

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Daniel Santos Fonseca; Cardinal, Lucas; Bartolomeo, Flávia Uchôa Costa; Palomo, Juan Martin; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; Andrade, Ildeu; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dental effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in cleft patients using two types of expanders. Methods: Twenty unilateral cleft lip and palate patients were randomly divided into two groups, according to the type of expander used: (I) modified Hyrax and (II) inverted Mini-Hyrax. A pretreatment cone-beam computed tomographic image (T0) was taken as part of the initial orthodontic records and three months after RME, for bone graft planning (T1). Results: In general, there was no significant difference among groups (p > 0.05). Both showed a significant transverse maxillary expansion (p < 0.05) and no significant forward and/or downward movement of the maxilla (p > 0.05). There was greater dental crown than apical expansion. Maxillary posterior expansion tended to be larger than anterior opening (p < 0.05). Cleft and non-cleft sides were symmetrically expanded and there was no difference in dental tipping between both sides (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The appliances tested are effective in the transverse expansion of the maxilla. However, these appliances should be better indicated to cleft cases also presenting posterior transverse discrepancy, since there was greater expansion in the posterior maxillary region than in the anterior one. PMID:27683832

  20. Non-syndromic cleft lip and palate: could stress be a causal factor?

    PubMed

    Wallace, Graeme H; Arellano, Jacinta M; Gruner, Tini M

    2011-03-01

    The aetiology of non-syndromic cleft lip and palate has as yet not been clearly defined. Familial relationships, environmental toxins and nutritional status have all been considered without conclusive results, although in some studies a potential link between non-syndromic cleft lip and palate and any one or more of these factors has been proposed. Elevated stress, particularly an extended term of traumatic stress, can lead to oxidative damage at the cellular level via hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, high cortisol and cytokine production. The effect of this hormonal shift is to re-direct the blood supply to the mother's muscles, thereby reducing the supply to the placenta, causing a potential nutritional deficiency which may then result in a genetic alteration in the foetus. Mothers with a child aged two years or younger who had been born with a cleft, who were members of CleftPals, a family support group, volunteered to be participants in this qualitative study. The research first called for a survey to be completed by the mother and this was then followed by an interview conducted by the researcher. The study involved families living in the three eastern States of Australia. The results suggest that physical and/or emotional stress may well be implicated in clefting. While little work has been done in considering stress as a causal factor, the existing literature suggests, as does this study, that elevated stress levels at, or soon after, conception appear to affect foetal development.

  1. Face Search at Scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Otto, Charles; Jain, Anil K

    2016-06-20

    rsons of interest among the billions of shared photos on these websites. Despite significant progress in face recognition, searching a large collection of unconstrained face images remains a difficult problem. To address this challenge, we propose a face search system which combines a fast search procedure, coupled with a state-of-the-art commercial off the shelf (COTS) matcher, in a cascaded framework. Given a probe face, we first filter the large gallery of photos to find the top-k most similar faces using features learned by a convolutional neural network. The k retrieved candidates are re-ranked by combining similarities based on deep features and those output by the COTS matcher. We evaluate the proposed face search system on a gallery containing 80 million web-downloaded face images. Experimental results demonstrate that while the deep features perform worse than the COTS matcher on a mugshot dataset (93.7% vs. 98.6% TAR@FAR of 0.01%), fusing the deep features with the COTS matcher improves the overall performance (99.5% TAR@FAR of 0.01%). This shows that the learned deep features provide complementary information over representations used in state-of-the-art face matchers. On the unconstrained face image benchmarks, the performance of the learned deep features is competitive with reported accuracies. LFW database: 98.20% accuracy under the standard protocol and 88.03% TAR@FAR of 0.1% under the BLUFR protocol; IJB-A benchmark: 51.0% TAR@FAR of 0.1% (verification), rank 1 retrieval of 82.2% (closed-set search), 61.5% FNIR@FAR of 1% (open-set search). The proposed face search system offers an excellent trade-off between accuracy and scalability on galleries with millions of images. Additionally, in a face search experiment involving photos of the Tsarnaev brothers, convicted of the Boston Marathon bombing, the proposed cascade face search system could find the younger brother's (Dzhokhar Tsarnaev) photo at rank 1 in 1 second on a 5M gallery and at rank 8 in 7

  2. Dynamic Face Seal Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radial face seal arrangement is disclosed comprising a stationary seal ring that is spring loaded against a seal seat affixed to a rotating shaft. The radial face seal arrangement further comprises an arrangement that not only allows for preloading of the stationary seal ring relative to the seal seat, but also provides for dampening yielding a dynamic seating response for the radial face seal arrangement. The overall seal system, especially regarding the selection of the material for the stationary seal ring, is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from below ambient up to 900 C.

  3. Development and Validation of the Quality-of-Life Adolescent Cleft Questionnaire in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Piombino, Pasquale; Ruggiero, Federica; Dell’Aversana Orabona, Giovanni; Scopelliti, Domenico; Bianchi, Alberto; De Simone, Federica; Carnevale, Nina; Brancati, Federica; Iengo, Maurizio; Grassia, Maria Gabriella; Cataldo, Rosanna; Califano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Only a few reports in the literature have described the use of specific instruments for assessing the quality of life in adolescents and young adults with cleft lip and palate (CLP). This condition markedly affects their lifestyle, even after surgical treatment. In the present study, we aimed to develop a quality-of-life assessment tool specifically designed for such patients with CLP. Our multidisciplinary team created a questionnaire focused on the physical, psychological, and social satisfaction of adolescents and young adults with CLP, which was adapted from 3 dimensions of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey. The questionnaire was administered to a randomized sample of 40 adolescents and young adults (aged 16–24 years) with CLP who had completed treatment protocols and 40 (aged 16–24 years) who were not affected by CLP. The statistical results stated that the questionnaire had good reliability and validity; the Cronbach α coefficient was found to be 0.944. Moreover, factorial analysis confirmed the presence of 3 subscales that were the fundamental components of this questionnaire, which is consistent with the areas theoretically proposed and from which the items were designed and selected. Thus, we validated our novel questionnaire that was administered in the present study and proved its consistency. However, further investigations on a larger population would be useful to confirm these findings. PMID:25010834

  4. Gaze cueing by pareidolia faces

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Visual images that are not faces are sometimes perceived as faces (the pareidolia phenomenon). While the pareidolia phenomenon provides people with a strong impression that a face is present, it is unclear how deeply pareidolia faces are processed as faces. In the present study, we examined whether a shift in spatial attention would be produced by gaze cueing of face-like objects. A robust cueing effect was observed when the face-like objects were perceived as faces. The magnitude of the cueing effect was comparable between the face-like objects and a cartoon face. However, the cueing effect was eliminated when the observer did not perceive the objects as faces. These results demonstrated that pareidolia faces do more than give the impression of the presence of faces; indeed, they trigger an additional face-specific attentional process. PMID:25165505

  5. Near-medians that avoid the corners; a combinatorial probability approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The breakpoint median for a set of k ≥ 3 random genomes tends to approach (any) one of these genomes ("corners") as genome length increases, although there are diminishing proportion of medians equidistant from all k ("medians in the middle"). Algorithms are likely to miss the latter, and this has consequences for the general case where input genomes share some or many gene adjacencies, where the tendency for the median to be closer to one input genome may be an artifact of the corner tendency. Results We present a simple sampling procedure for constructing a "near median" that represents a compromise among k random genomes and that has only a slightly greater breakpoint distance to all of them than the median does. We generalize to the realistic case where genomes share varying proportions of gene adjacencies. We present a supplementary sampling scheme that brings the constructed genome even closer to median status. Conclusions Our approach is of particular use in the phylogenetic context where medians are repeatedly calculated at ancestral nodes, and where the corner effect prevents different parts of the phylogeny from communicating with each other. PMID:25572274

  6. The Influence of the Elderly on School Spending in a Median Voter Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Deborah; Kenny, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    How do the elderly influence school spending if they are a minority of the population? We estimate the determinants of school spending in a median voter model, comparing four assumptions about how the elderly influence the identity of the median voter. Using a county-level panel, we find that elderly preferences are best characterized by assuming…

  7. A case of epidermoid median raphe cyst traversing the corpora cavernosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Alice; Capolicchio, John-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Median raphe cysts are congenital lesions that typically have a superficial appearance. We present a very unusual case of a deep perineal mass in a six-year-old boy. The lesion extends into the corpus cavernosum, suggesting that the anomaly was an early embryological event. Histopathological features are consistent with an epidermoid type of median raphe cyst. PMID:28360959

  8. Short-term isotretinoin-induced elkonyxis and median nail dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alli, Nuran; Dogan, Sibel

    2016-03-01

    Elkonyxis and median nail distrophy are very rare nail fold disorders due to the damage in nail matrix and proximal nail fold. Herein, we report a patient with both elkonyxis and median nail distrophy occured two months into a treatment course of isotretinoin that is to our knowledge for the first time.

  9. The Impact of Early Infant Jaw-Orthopaedics on Early Speech Production in Toddlers with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohmander, Anette; Lillvik, Malin; Friede, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of study was to investigate the impact of pre-surgical Infant Orthopaedics (IO) on consonant production at 18 months of age in children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) and to compare the consonant production to that of age-matched children without clefts. The first ten children in a consecutive series of 20 with UCLP…

  10. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  11. Delayed closure of the hard palate: a comparison of speech in children with open and functionally closed residual clefts.

    PubMed

    Lohmander-Agerskov, A; Friede, H; Lilja, J; Söderpalm, E

    1996-06-01

    The speech of 20 children with cleft in the hard palate that had not yet been repaired was evaluated and analysed at 7 years of age. The cleft in the hard palate was open in 14 patients and functionally closed in six. All children were born with cleft lip and palate and treated surgically according to a routine that included delayed closure of the hard palate until age 8-10 years. The soft palate was repaired at approximately 6-8 months of age. Tape recordings were used for perceptual analysis of the speech. Maxillary casts were used to assess approximate age for functional closure of the residual cleft. Speech results showed only mild hypernasality for both groups of subjects which indicates acceptable velopharyngeal function in the whole group. Children with open residual clefts had significantly more nasal escape and a higher prevalence of compensatory retracted articulation than children with functionally closed clefts. The functional closure seems to have occurred at about the age of 18-36 months. Factors which appear to facilitate narrowing of the residual cleft include the original width of the cleft, the amount of tissue in the alveolar and palatal processes, and anterior placement of a vomer flap.

  12. Cleft deformities in adults and children aged over six years in Nigeria: Reasons for late presentation and management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Wasiu L; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle O; Desalu, Ibironke; Ladeinde, Akinola L; Mofikoya, Bolaji O; Adeyemi, Michael O; Adepoju, Adegbenga A; Hassan, Olufemi O

    2009-01-01

    In developing countries, untreated cleft lips and palates are found with increasing frequency and patients often present to the surgeon far past the optimal time for closure of the cleft deformities. A prospective study was conducted between March 2007 and September 2009, to identify the reasons and treatment challenges of delayed presentation of cleft lip and palate deformities at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Out of a total of 150 patients with cleft defects during the period, 43 (28.7%) were adults and children aged over six years. The mean age of these patients at the time of presentation was 17.3 years. The most common reasons for late presentation were lack of money (56.7%), lack of health care services nearby (18.4%), and lack of awareness of treatment availability (13.3%). Common challenges in these patients included surgical, orthodontic, speech, anesthetic, and psychological. Although adult clefts were significantly enlarged in three dimensions the anatomic landmarks were easier to discern than in an infant. However, extensive soft tissue dissection in adult cleft lip repair resulted in significant postoperative edema. Closure of wide palatal cleft often required the use of adjunct intraoral flaps. Despite late presentation, surgical outcome of these patients was satisfactory and comparable to cleft repair in infants. PMID:23674906

  13. Spectral Analysis of Word-Initial Alveolar and Velar Plosives Produced by Iranian Children with Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshghi, Marziye; Zajac, David J.; Bijankhan, Mahmood; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Spectral moment analysis (SMA) was used to describe voiceless alveolar and velar stop-plosive production in Persian-speaking children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP). Participants included 11 children with bilateral CLP who were undergoing maxillary expansion and 20 children without any type of orofacial clefts. Four of the children with…

  14. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  15. Contraction-induced injury to single permeabilized muscle fibers from normal and congenitally-clefted goat palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine (LVP) muscle. It was determined that muscle fiber type, size, and sensitivity to contraction-induced injury was different between cleft palate ind...

  16. Anatomy research of nasolabial muscle structure in fetus with cleft lip: an iodine staining technique based on microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiajun; Yin, Ningbei

    2014-05-01

    A thorough knowledge of the anatomic structure of the orbicularis oris of the upper lip and the nasalis in fetus with cleft lip is the key for the success of cleft lip repair. To understand the anatomic structure of the muscles of nasolabial region in fetus with cleft lip, the nasolabial tissues in 4 aborted fetuses with cleft lip were soaked for 7 days with iodine solution (Lugol solution of 3.75%) and were given micro-computed tomography. After the iodine solution permeated into the soft tissues, a good contrast was showed between muscle fibers and other fibrillar connective tissues. Through the observation of the obtained images, we found that most orbicularis oris fibers gathered into bundles with clear outline and only had slight deformation and displacement on the health side of the cleft of the unilateral incomplete cleft lip; however, in the lateral cleft, the muscle fibers not only had deformation and displacement but also were immature, disorganized, and not gathered into bundles. After being restored in Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine format, the obtained images were then transferred into Materialise's interactive medical image control system, edited, and reconstructed into three-dimensional models. The models clearly showed the spatial relationship between the muscular tissues of the nasolabial region and the nasolabial outline in fetus with cleft lip.

  17. Preoperative evaluation of micro-organisms in non-operated cleft in soft palate: impact on use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Roode, G J; Bütow, K-W; Naidoo, S

    2017-02-01

    To identify the pathogenic micro-organisms that had colonised preoperatively in clefts in the soft palate and oro-nasopharynx, we retrospectively studied the preoperative microbiological profiles of 200 infants who had had primary repair of all types of cleft in the soft palate. Data from a private practice that specialises in the repair of facial clefts were extracted randomly from patients' files. We analysed the results of the culture of preoperative swabs taken from clefts in the soft palate and oro-nasopharynx, and the resistance profile of organisms towards various antibiotics. A total of 23 different pathogenic micro-organisms were isolated from 115 (57%) of the sample. Klebsiella pneumoniae most commonly colonised clefts in the lip, alveolus, and palate. This was considerably higher than in other groups. The second most common micro-organism was Staphylococcus aureus, which was found most often in patients with isolated clefts in the hard palate. Those with complete cleft lip and palate presented with more pathogenic micro-organisms in preoperative cultures than those with other types of cleft. We need to find a way to control pathogenic micro-organisms in the oral and oro-nasopharyngeal region preoperatively to limit postoperative complications.

  18. Shadow Probability of Detection and False Alarm for Median-Filtered SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter; Miller, John A.; Bishop, Edward E.; Horndt, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Median filtering reduces speckle in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery while preserving edges, at the expense of coarsening the resolution, by replacing the center pixel of a sliding window by the median value. For shadow detection, this approach helps distinguish shadows from clutter more easily, while preserving shadow shape delineations. However, the nonlinear operation alters the shadow and clutter distributions and statistics, which must be taken into consideration when computing probability of detection and false alarm metrics. Depending on system parameters, median filtering can improve probability of detection and false alarm by orders of magnitude. Herein, we examine shadow probability of detection and false alarm in a homogeneous, ideal clutter background after median filter post-processing. Some comments on multi-look processing effects with and without median filtering are also made.

  19. An Analysis of the Frame-Content Theory in Babble of 9-Month-Old Babies with Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Gwendolyn; Hardin-Jones, Mary; Chapman, Kathy L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the consonant-vowel co-occurrence patterns predicted by the Frame-Content theory in 16 nine-month-old babies with unrepaired cleft palate ([plus or minus]cleft lip) and 16 age-matched non-cleft babies. Babble from these babies was phonetically transcribed and grouped according to the intrasyllabic predictions…

  20. The Effect of Cleft Lip and Palate, and the Timing of Lip Repair on Mother-Infant Interactions and Infant Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Lynne; Hentges, Francoise; Hill, Jonathan; Karpf, Janne; Mistry, Beejal; Kreutz, Marianne; Woodall, Peter; Moss, Tony; Goodacre, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Background: Children with cleft lip and palate are at risk for psychological problems. Difficulties in mother-child interactions may be relevant, and could be affected by the timing of lip repair. Method: We assessed cognitive development, behaviour problems, and attachment in 94 infants with cleft lip (with and without cleft palate) and 96…

  1. Complete sternal cleft — A rare congenital malformation and its repair in a 3-month-old boy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Patil, Prashant S.; Kekre, Geeta; Kamble, Ravi; Dikshit, Kiran Vishesh

    2016-01-01

    Complete midline sternal cleft is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from failed midline ventral fusion of the sternal bars. Very few cases of complete sternal cleft have been described in literature. We present a case of complete sternal cleft in a 3-month-old child. The patient underwent primary closure of the defect using stainless steel wires. PMID:27046980

  2. The Correlation between Maternal Exposure to Air Pollution and the Risk of Orofacial Clefts in Infants: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ajit; Ahmed, Mairaj K.; Taub, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the possible correlation between ambient air pollution and orofacial cleft anomalies in newborns. Material and Methods A literature search was performed using the PubMed and Google Scholar, using the keywords “air pollution”, “cleft lip”, “cleft palate”, “carbon monoxide”, “ozone”, “sulfur dioxide”, “nitrogen oxide”, “nitrogen dioxide”, and “aerodynamic diameter”. Eight epidemiologic articles met the criteria of correlating either carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), nitrogen oxides (NOx), airborne particulate matter of less than 10 µm in diameter (PM10), or sulfur dioxide (SO2) exposures with clefting of the palate alone, clefting of the lip alone, or clefting of the lip and palate. Odds ratios were extracted from the eight studies and tabulated in this meta-analysis. Quality analysis showed six high quality, one medium quality, and one low quality study. Results Meta-analysis of the combined data confirmed the association of O3 exposure and risk of orofacial cleft anomalies (OR = 1.08; P = 0.02). NOx was consistently associated with decreased risk of cleft lip with or without palate and cleft palate. Conclusions Ozone showed the strongest correlation with cleft lip and cleft palate anomalies. However, the studies overall showed an inconsistent correlation between orofacial clefts and air pollutants. PMID:27099696

  3. Head and face reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... and facial skin. That is why sometimes a plastic surgeon (for skin and face) and a neurosurgeon ( ... Mosby; 2015:chap 24. McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  4. The Median-Median Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Graphing bivariate data in a scatter plot and drawing an approximate line of best fit for the data have become commonly recommended activities for middle school and high school students. The graphing calculator has provided a mechanism for students both to approximate a best-fit line and to calculate the best-fit line using a built-in option. Two…

  5. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  6. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  7. The developmental characteristics of mastoid pneumatisation in cleft palate children: the genetic influence.

    PubMed

    Srzentić, Mladen; Handzić, Jadranka; Trotić, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Physiologic and developmental role of mastoid pneumatisation in children with otitis media with effusion (OME) is still controversial. For measuring mastoid pneumatisation and examine developmental characteristics, we used children with orofacial malformation of high risk for long term negative pressure in the middle ear and are expected to have lower rate of size and growth of pneumatisation. Mastoid were measured on Schuller's mastoid X-ray pictures planimetrically in study group of 146 children with bilateral (BCLP), unilateral (UCLP) and isolated (ICP) cleft palate, and control group of non-cleft 52 children, both groups with confirmed otitis media with effusion and no previous otological surgery. The lowest pneumatisation found in BCLE, BCLP and UCLP showed no growth of mastoid with age and lower mastoid size than OME controls. ICP is the only cleft type with growth of mastoid with aging. OME patients has the highest size of mastoid and growth rate with aging.

  8. Congenital midline cervical cleft: clinical approach to a congenital anterior neck defect.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Cantarella, Giovanna; Colombo, Lorenzo; Agosti, Viola; Amodeo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Monica; Mazzola, Isabella; Mosca, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Numerous malformations can affect the anterior part of the neck presenting at birth as a real diagnostic challenge for the pediatrician or the primary care physician who initially evaluate the baby. Congenital midline cervical cleft represents a rare defect of the midline neck, which is sometimes wrongly diagnosed as a thyroglossal duct anomaly, dermoid cyst, branchial cleft anomaly or "birthmark". A prompt clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment during early infancy are essential to ensure both functional and aesthetic outcome. We report a case of a female neonate with a midline cervical cleft diagnosed immediately after birth. The main features of other congenital anomalies of the anterior neck are also discussed referring to their embryologic origin.

  9. Application of levator veli palatini retropositioning combined with Buccinator myomucosal island flap for congenital cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Y. J.; Zhang, H. C.; Zhang, Y.; Cheng, Y. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, C.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cleft palate causes a serious obstacle to children with regard to language and eating function. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical application of a type of palatoplasty that has a reduced impact on the maxillary growth and good function in velopharyngeal competence. A total of 37 patients with cleft palate were treated with levator veli palatini retropositioning combined with Buccinator myomucosal island flap. The patients were successfully treated in the first phase and were followed up for 1–3 years. Speech intelligibility was satisfactory and no fistula occurred. In conclusion, the results suggested that levator veli palatini retropositioning combined with the Buccinator myomucosal island flap may restore normal anatomic structure and location of the levator veli palatini, obtain good velopharyngeal competence, and decrease the incidence rate thereof. Thus, levator veli palatini retropositioning combined with the Buccinator myomucosal island flap is a functional procedure for cleft palate repair. PMID:27698756

  10. Segmental maxillary distraction with a novel device for closure of a wide alveolar cleft

    PubMed Central

    Bousdras, Vasilios A.; Liyanage, Chandra; Mars, Michael; Ayliffe, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of a wide alveolar cleft with initial application of segmental distraction osteogenesis is reported, in order to minimise cleft size prior to secondary alveolar bone grafting. The lesser maxillary segment was mobilised with osteotomy at Le Fort I level and, a novel distractor, facilitated horizontal movement of the dental/alveolar segment along the curvature of the maxillary dental arch. Following a latency period of 4 days distraction was applied for 7 days at a rate of 0.5 mm twice daily. Radiographic, ultrasonographic and clinical assessment revealed new bone and soft tissue formation 8 weeks after completion of the distraction phase. Overall the maxillary segment did move minimising the width of the cleft, which allowed successful closure with a secondary alveolar bone graft. PMID:24987601

  11. Modified Activation Technique for Nasal Stent of Nasoalveolar Molding Appliance for Columellar Lengthening in Bilateral Cleft Lip/Palate.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita P

    2016-03-22

    Bilateral cleft lip/cleft palate is associated with nasal deformities typified by a short columella. The presurgical nasoalveolar molding (NAM) therapy approach includes reduction of the size of the intraoral alveolar cleft as well as positioning of the surrounding deformed soft tissues and cartilages. In a bilateral cleft patient, NAM, along with columellar elongation, eliminates the need for columellar lengthening surgery. Thus the frequent surgical intervention to achieve the desired esthetic results can be avoided. This article proposes a modified activation technique of the nasal stent for a NAM appliance for columellar lengthening in bilateral cleft lip/palate patients. The design highlights relining of the columellar portion of the nasal stent and the wire-bending of the nasal stent to achieve desirable results within the limited span of plasticity of the nasal cartilages. With this technique the vertical taping of the premaxilla to the oral plate can be avoided.

  12. Double-layered reconstruction of the nasal floor in complete cleft deformity of the primary palate using superfluous lip tissue.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Wook; Kwon, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Min-Keun

    2015-12-01

    After cleft lip repair, many patients suffer from nasolabial fistulas, asymmetrical nasal floor, or an indistinct nostril sill, as well as intraoral wound dehiscence and subsequent scar contracture of surgical wounds leading to vestibular stenosis. For successful primary nasolabial repair of complete cleft deformity of the primary palate, cleft surgeons need special care in reconstructing the sound nasal floor. Especially when the cleft gap is wide or when any type of nasoalveolar molding therapy was not performed, three-dimensional reconstruction of the nasal floor is critical for a balanced nasal shape. In this study, the author describes an effective method for reconstructing a double-layered nasal floor using two mucosal flaps from both sides of the fissured upper lip. This is a report of six patients with unilateral or bilateral complete cleft of the primary palate with a detailed description of the surgical technique and a literature review.

  13. Prevention of oro-facial clefts in developing world

    PubMed Central

    Oginni, Fadekemi O.; Adenekan, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01

    Oro-facial cleft (OFC) remains a prominent health issue in developed and developing countries alike. It is the commonest craniofacial birth defect in humans. Mounting evidence suggest a polygenic, multifactorial and a list of epigenetic events. Primary prevention of OFC is based on recognition of the etiologic and risk factors. While a number of preventive strategies are in place for OFC in most developed countries of the world, the majority of developing countries are distant from achieving this goal for a number of reasons. Notable among these are a huge knowledge and practice gap in the field of genetics and dearth of accurate data. In addition, improper coordination and absenteeism from antenatal care contributed greatly to this set back. With ongoing efforts aimed at determining the genetics of nonsyndromic OFC in developing countries, researches directed at identifying environmental factors should equally be in place. Pending the outcome of these, implicated environmental and attitudinal risk factors in other populations could serve as preventive template in health education and interventions. Since risk factors vary between populations, definitive and effective preventive strategies and models would vary from place to place and from time to time. Frantic effort directed at identifying specific implicated risk factors in developing countries should include developing and keeping comprehensive national perinatal database and centralization of antenatal care protocol. Additionally, active health education at every level and a focus on developing manpower in the field of genetics should be in place. These would be designed and tailored toward identified, proven, and emerging risk factors. PMID:23482510

  14. First branchial cleft anomalies: presentation, variability and safe surgical management.

    PubMed

    Magdy, Emad A; Ashram, Yasmine A

    2013-05-01

    First branchial cleft (FBC) anomalies are uncommon. The aim of this retrospective clinical study is to describe our experience in dealing with these sporadically reported lesions. Eighteen cases presenting with various FBC anomalies managed surgically during an 8-year period at a tertiary referral medical institution were included. Ten were males (56 %) and eight females (44 %) with age range 3-18 years. Anomaly was right-sided in 12 cases (67 %). None were bilateral. Nine patients (50 %) had prior abscess incision and drainage procedures ranging from 1 to 9 times. Two also had previous unsuccessful surgical excisions. Clinical presentations included discharging tract openings in external auditory canal/conchal bowl (n = 9), periauricular (n = 6), or upper neck (n = 4); cystic postauricular, parotid or upper neck swellings (n = 5); and eczematous scars (n = 9). Three distinct anatomical types were encountered: sinuses (n = 7), fistulas (n = 6), and cysts (n = 5). Complete surgical excision required superficial parotidectomy in 11 patients (61 %). Anomaly was deep to facial nerve (FN) in three cases (17 %), in-between its branches in two (11 %) and superficial (but sometimes adherent to the nerve) in remaining cases (72 %). Continuous intraoperative electrophysiological FN monitoring was used in all cases. Two cases had postoperative temporary lower FN paresis that recovered within 2 months. No further anomaly manifestation was observed after 49.8 months' mean postoperative follow-up (range 10-107 months). This study has shown that awareness of different presentations and readiness to identify and protect FN during surgery is essential for successful management of FBC anomalies. Intraoperative electrophysiological FN monitoring can help in that respect.

  15. Predictors of poor dental arch relationship in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Liao, Yu-Fang; Shetty, Akshai

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional outcome study using retrospective data capture of treatment histories was to examine the characteristics of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate who had poor dental arch relationship (i.e., Goslon 5). The study sample comprised 120 children born with nonsyndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate between 1995 and 2003, and were aged between 5.0 and 7.0 years (mean age, 5.1 years) at the time of data collection. The dental arch relationship was assessed using the Goslon yardstick from intraoral dental photographs. An independent investigator recorded treatment histories from the clinical notes. The inter- and intraexaminer agreements evaluated by weighted kappa statistics were high. There was no association between dental arch relationship and the type of presurgical orthopedics or pharyngeal flap. Dental arch relationship was associated with the initial cleft size (odds ratio, OR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.1-1.5, p < 0.01), surgeon grade for palate repair (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.2-19.9, p < 0.05), and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-8.1, p = 0.05). These data suggest that intraoral dental photographs provide a reliable method for rating dental arch relationship. Wide initial cleft, high-volume surgeon, and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty are predictors of poor dental arch relationship outcome in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. These findings may improve treatment outcome by modifying the treatment protocol for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  16. PATTERN OF DISOCCLUSION IN PATIENTS WITH COMPLETE CLEFT LIP AND PALATE

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Daniella Andaluza Dias; Teixeira, Marcelo Lucchesi; Pinto, João Henrique Nogueira; Lopes, José Fernando Scarelli; Dalben, Gisele da Silva

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the pattern of disocclusion during excursive mandibular movements and presence or absence of occlusal interferences and occlusal pathologies (gingival recession and abfraction). Method: examination of 120 individuals divided into two groups, as follows: Group 1-90 patients with complete cleft lip and palate (study group), subdivided into 30 patients with complete left unilateral cleft lip and palate, 30 patients with complete right unilateral cleft lip and palate and 30 patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate; Group 2-30 individuals without clefts (control group). Results: 58.8% of patients in Group 1 presented unilateral or bilateral canine guidance, 26.6% presented unilateral or bilateral group function and 54.4% presented lateral movements through the posterior teeth. Regarding protrusive movements, 80% presented anterior guidance and 20% presented posterior guidance. In Group 2, 69.6% of individuals presented unilateral or bilateral canine guidance, 43.2% presented unilateral or bilateral group function and only 13.3% presented lateral movements through the posterior teeth; 3.4% presented protrusion through the posterior teeth. Conclusions: there was no difference in the pattern of disocclusion between subgroups of patients with clefts. Group 2 presented predominance of bilateral group function, whereas Group 1 presented a higher prevalence of posterior guidance during lateral movements. Protrusion occurred primarily through anterior guidance in Group 2 and through the posterior teeth in Group 1. There was high prevalence of occlusal interferences at the molar area for both groups, yet with no correlation with occlusal pathologies (recession and abfraction). PMID:19089065

  17. Complete sequencing shows a role for MSX1 in non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Jezewski, P; Vieira, A; Nishimura, C; Ludwig, B; Johnson, M; O'Brien, S; Daack-Hirsch, S; Schultz, R; Weber, A; Nepomucena, B; Romitti, P; Christensen, K; Orioli, I; Castilla, E; Machida, J; Natsume, N; Murray, J

    2003-01-01

    MSX1 has been proposed as a gene in which mutations may contribute to non-syndromic forms of cleft lip and/or cleft palate. Support for this comes from human linkage and linkage disequilibrium studies, chromosomal deletions resulting in haploinsufficiency, a large family with a stop codon mutation that includes clefting as a phenotype, and the Msx1 phenotype in a knockout mouse. This report describes a population based scan for mutations encompassing the sense and antisense transcribed sequence of MSX1 (two exons, one intron). We compare the completed genomic sequence of MSX1 to the mouse Msx1 sequence to identify non-coding homology regions, and sequence highly conserved elements. The samples studied were drawn from a panethnic collection including people of European, Asian, and native South American ancestry. The gene was sequenced in 917 people and potentially aetiological mutations were identified in 16. These included missense mutations in conserved amino acids and point mutations in conserved regions not identified in any of 500 controls sequenced. Five different missense mutations in seven unrelated subjects with clefting are described. Evolutionary sequence comparisons of all known Msx1 orthologues placed the amino acid substitutions in context. Four rare mutations were found in non-coding regions that are highly conserved and disrupt probable regulatory regions. In addition, a panel of 18 population specific polymorphic variants were identified that will be useful in future haplotype analyses of MSX1. MSX1 mutations are found in 2% of cases of clefting and should be considered for genetic counselling implications, particularly in those families in which autosomal dominant inheritance patterns or dental anomalies appear to be cosegregating with the clefting phenotype. PMID:12807959

  18. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  19. An intraoral appliance for management of the protrusive premaxilla in bilateral cleft lip.

    PubMed

    Reisberg, D J; Figueroa, A A; Gold, H O

    1988-01-01

    Management of the protruding premaxilla and prolabium in bilateral cleft lip and palate can be a confounding problem. This report introduces an intraoral traction appliance that has been successfully used to move the premaxilla and prolabium to a more favorable position for surgical repair of the bilateral cleft lip. The appliance consists of a palatal baseplate for anchorage and a latex rubber traction strip looped over the prolabium to retract the premaxillary segment. The results in five cases are presented and compared to two cases where no presurgical management was performed and lip repair had been delayed for medical reasons. Advantages and disadvantages of the appliance are discussed.

  20. Skeletal facial balance and harmony in the cleft patient: Principles and techniques in orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Salyer, Kenneth E.; Xu, Haisong; Portnof, Jason E.; Yamada, Akira; Chong, David K.; Genecov, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    The management of the palatal cleft, dental arch, and subsequent maxillary form is a challenge for the craniomaxillofacial surgeon. The purpose of this paper is to present the experience of a senior surgeon (KES) who has treated over 2000 patients with cleft lip and palate. This paper focuses on the experience of a recent series of 103 consecutive orthognathic cases treated by one surgeon with a surgical-orthodontic, speech-oriented approach. It will concentrate on not only correcting the occlusion, as others have described, but also on how a surgeon who was trying to achieve optimal aesthetic balance, harmony, and beauty, approached this problem. PMID:19884671

  1. Congenital Sternal Cleft along with Persistent Left-Sided Superior Vena Cava: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Anindya Kumar; Sardar, Syamal Kumar; Sur, Amitava

    2013-01-01

    Congenital sternal cleft is a rare abnormality resulting from fusion failure of sternum. It occurs in isolation or along with defects of abdominal wall, diaphragm, pericardium, and heart. Early surgical correction is required to protect the underlying structures for risk of cardiac compression. Here we report a case of 20-day female child presenting with congenital sternal cleft associated with multiple congenital heart disease and left-sided superior vena cava. She was operated by the cardiothoracic surgical team successfully and is doing well on followup. We discuss this rare case, imaging studies, and surgical strategy. PMID:23841006

  2. Primary repair of sternal cleft in infancy using combined periosteal flap and sliding osteochondroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Muthialu, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    Sternal clefts are rare congenital malformations of the chest wall. Immediate correction in neonates or in infancy is beneficial in terms of providing skeletal cover with little or no need for any prosthetic material for reconstruction. In the absence of internal midline defects, one should aim to provide complete correction when the chest wall is still compliant, and cardiorespiratory compromise is expected to be least after correction. We report on 2 children who underwent primary sternal-cleft repair using a periosteal advancement flap along with mobilization of lateral sternal bars after sliding osteotomy of corresponding ribs. PMID:23427313

  3. MEGALENCEPHALY, POLYMICROGYRIA, POLYDACTYLY AND HYDROCEPHALUS (MPPH) SYNDROME: A NEW CASE WITH OCCIPITAL ENCEPHALOCELE AND CLEFT PALATE.

    PubMed

    Demir, N; Peker, E; Gülşen I; Kaba, S; Tuncer, O

    2015-01-01

    The megalencephaly, polymicrogyria, polydactyly, and hydrocephalus (MPPH) syndrome is quite rarely seen. The four main findings in this syndrome may be accompanied by severe psychomotor retardation, blindness, hypotonia, convulsions, and facial dysmorphism. In this paper, we present a female newborn at 39 weeks gestational age born to parents who are first degree cousins. Beside the facial dysmorphism and four main features of the MPPH syndrome, the findings on the physical examination of the patient were, hypertonicity, occipital encephalocele, cleft palate, and multiple polyps in the tongue. The presence of occipital encephalocele, cleft palate, and polyps in the tongue in this patient was not reported previously in the literature.

  4. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    PubMed Central

    Ellore, Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Taranatha, Mahantesha; Nara, Asha; Gunjalli, Gururaj; Bhat, Ashwin Devasya

    2012-01-01

    Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this article. PMID:23293501

  5. Roberts-SC syndrome, a rare syndrome and cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Jyotsna; Dewan, Madhu; Hussain, Altaf

    2008-07-01

    Roberts SC syndrome is a rare syndrome with only 17 previously recognized patients reported in medical literature. The syndrome is characterized by multiple malformations, particularly, symmetrical limb reduction, craniofacial anomalies such as bilateral cleft lip and palate, micrognathia, and severe growth and mental retardation. Our patient, a young child of five years having Roberts-SC, was successfully operated for cleft palate under general anesthesia. The main features of the syndrome and the technical problems of anesthesia and surgery are discussed in this report.

  6. Cleft palate speech and velopharyngeal dysfunction: the approach of the speech therapist.

    PubMed

    De Bodt, M; Van Lierde, K

    2006-01-01

    Cleft palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction cause communication disorders in many different ways (articulation, resonance, voice and language). These problems are mainly present in childhood but remain a matter of concern for many years. Speech and language pathologists are involved in speech and language assessment and speech therapy procedures. This article gives an overview of the standard procedures of the speech pathologist in a cleft palate team and discusses the relationship between the team and private practices or school teams, as well as the practical aspects relating to reimbursement by the National Institute of Health and Invalidity (RIZIV).

  7. Simultaneous premaxillary repositioning and cheiloplasty in adult patients with unrepaired bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ui-Lyong; Cho, Jun-Bum; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Primary cheiloplasty in adult patients with unrepaired complete bilateral cleft lip and palate is quite challenging due to severe premaxillary anterior projection. To get the best repair results, the author carried out repositioning of the premaxilla and repair of the lip deformity in a single stage. Positive results for the primary lip repair and appropriate repositioning of the premaxilla were achieved. No avascular necrosis of the premaxilla was observed. Repositioning of the premaxilla and repair of the lip deformity in a single operation appears to be a reliable method for treating adult patients with previously unrepaired or poorly repaired bilateral cleft lip and palate.

  8. Modified Intraoral Repositioning Appliance in Complete Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, NK; Gahlawat, Subhash

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the modified repositioning appliance was to overcome the shortcoming of existing design for repositioning protruded premaxilla in a child with bilateral cleft lip and palate. Methods The basic principles of design were similar to Latham’s appliance but the surgical pinning of premaxillary segment was avoided and instead acrylic splint was prepared. Conclusions This technique avoids any invasive procedure, is useful to reposition protruded premaxillary segment in bilateral cleft lip and palate cases specifically in child who reports late with deciduous dentition. PMID:27672252

  9. Bilateral cleft lip and palate: A morphometric analysis of facial skeletal form using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ghoneima, Ahmed; Kula, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    Bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) is caused by a lack of merging of maxillary and nasal facial prominences during development and morphogenesis. BCLP is associated with congenital defects of the oronasal facial region that can impair ingestion, mastication, speech, and dentofacial development. Using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, 7- to 18-year old individuals born with BCLP (n = 15) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 15) were retrospectively assessed. Coordinate values of three-dimensional facial skeletal anatomical landmarks (n = 32) were measured from each CBCT image. Data were evaluated using principal coordinates analysis (PCOORD) and Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA). PCOORD axes 1-3 explain approximately 45% of the morphological variation between samples, and specific patterns of morphological differences were associated with each axis. Approximately, 30% of facial skeletal measures significantly differ by confidence interval testing (α = 0.10) between samples. While significant form differences occur across the facial skeleton, strong patterns of differences are localized to the lateral and superioinferior aspects of the nasal aperture. In conclusion, the BCLP deformity significantly alters facial skeletal morphology of the midface and oronasal regions of the face, but morphological differences were also found in the upper facial skeleton and to a lesser extent, the lower facial skeleton. This pattern of strong differences in the oronasal region of the facial skeleton combined with differences across the rest of the facial complex underscores the idea that bones of the craniofacial skeleton are integrated.

  10. Middle cerebral artery median peak systolic velocity validation: effect of measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Tamula M; Alexander, Amy; Szychowski, Jeff M; Owen, John

    2010-09-01

    We sought to validate center-specific published medians and estimate the effects of sonologist and Doppler measurement techniques on middle cerebral artery (MCA) peak systolic velocity (PSV) values. We studied 154 gravidas with normal singletons who underwent MCA PSV measurement at 18 to 35 weeks' gestation by one of three experienced sonologists. Pregnancies complicated by a known fetal anomaly (structural or aneuploidy), amniotic fluid volume disturbance, intrauterine growth restriction, multiple gestation, or isoimmunization were excluded. MCA PSV was measured using both manual caliper and auto-trace techniques. Regression models of log-transformed PSV values and gestational age were developed. Although auto-trace medians were significantly lower than those obtained with manual calipers ( P < 0.0001), they more closely approximated published medians used in clinical practice. Minimal intersonologist differences (maximum mean difference <3 cm/s) were statistically significant ( P < 0.01). Compared with manual caliper, auto-trace measurement yielded significantly lower medians. However, center-specific medians obtained by our sonologists using auto-trace more closely approximated published standards. Estimated interobserver variability suggested that different sonologists may utilize the same median values. We suggest that centers that utilize Doppler velocimetry for the prediction of fetal anemia examine their measurement protocol and consider formal confirmation of their own center-specific median values.

  11. Successful Decoding of Famous Faces in the Fusiform Face Area

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2015-01-01

    What are the neural mechanisms of face recognition? It is believed that the network of face-selective areas, which spans the occipital, temporal, and frontal cortices, is important in face recognition. A number of previous studies indeed reported that face identity could be discriminated based on patterns of multivoxel activity in the fusiform face area and the anterior temporal lobe. However, given the difficulty in localizing the face-selective area in the anterior temporal lobe, its role in face recognition is still unknown. Furthermore, previous studies limited their analysis to occipito-temporal regions without testing identity decoding in more anterior face-selective regions, such as the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In the current high-resolution functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study, we systematically examined the decoding of the identity of famous faces in the temporo-frontal network of face-selective and adjacent non-face-selective regions. A special focus has been put on the face-area in the anterior temporal lobe, which was reliably localized using an optimized scanning protocol. We found that face-identity could be discriminated above chance level only in the fusiform face area. Our results corroborate the role of the fusiform face area in face recognition. Future studies are needed to further explore the role of the more recently discovered anterior face-selective areas in face recognition. PMID:25714434

  12. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IRF6 and TFAP2A in non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) in a northern Chinese population

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jinna; Song, Tao; Jiao, Xiaohui; Qin, Chunlin; Zhou, Jin

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} IRF6 rs642961 polymorphism is intensively associated with NSCLP. {yields} IRF6 rs2235371 polymorphism is not associated with NSCLP in the northern Chinese population. {yields} This investigation failed to yield any evidence for the involvement of TFAP2A polymorphisms in NSCLP in the northern Chinese population. -- Abstract: Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is a common birth defect that is presumably caused by genetic factors alone or gene alterations in combination with environmental changes. A number of studies have shown an association between NSCLP and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene in several populations. The transcription factor AP-2a (TFAP2A), which is involved in regulating mid-face development and upper lip fusion, has also be considered a candidate gene contributing to the etiology of NSCLP. The potential importance of IRF6 and TFAP2A in the NSCLP is further highlighted by a study showing that the two molecules are in the same developmental pathway. To further assess the roles of the IRF6 and TFAP2A in NSCLP, we investigated two identified IRF6 SNPs (rs2235371, rs642961) and three TFAP2A tag SNPs (rs3798691, rs1675414, rs303050) selected from HapMap data in a northern Chinese population, a group with a high prevalence of NSCLP. These SNPs were examined for association with NSCLP in 175 patients and 160 healthy controls. We observed a significant correlation between IRF6 rs642961 and NSCLP, and a lack of association between IRF6 rs2235371 polymorphisms and NSCLP in this population. This investigation indicated that there is no association between the three SNPs in the TFAP2A and NSCLP, suggesting that TFAP2A may not be involved in the development of NSCLP in the northern Chinese population. Our study provides further evidence regarding the role of IRF6 variations in NSCLP development and finds no significant association between TFAP2A and NSCLP in this

  13. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  14. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  15. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed Central

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G.; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)–the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces. PMID:26535910

  16. Face the Fats Quiz 2

    MedlinePlus

    Face the Fats Quiz II Do you know your fats by heart? Ready to make informed choices about the foods you eat? From ... some familiar foods. Welcome to Face the Fats Quiz II - and be sure to check out Face ...

  17. Early, computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Modeling Planned, Le Fort I Advancement With Internal Distractors to Treat Severe Maxillary Hypoplasia in Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine S; Swanson, Jordan; Yu, Jason; Taylor, Jesse A

    2017-04-11

    Traditionally, maxillary hypoplasia in the setting of cleft lip and palate is treated via orthognathic surgery at skeletal maturity, which condemns these patients to abnormal facial proportions during adolescence. The authors sought to determine the safety profile of computer-aided design/computer-aided modeling (CAD/CAM) planned, Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis with internal distractors in select patients presenting at a young age with severe maxillary retrusion. The authors retrospectively reviewed our "early" Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis experience-patients performed for severe maxillary retrusion (≥12 mm underjet), after canine eruption but prior to skeletal maturity-at a single institution. Patient demographics, cleft characteristics, CAD/CAM operative plans, surgical complications, postoperative imaging, and outcomes were analyzed. Four patients were reviewed, with a median age of 12.8 years at surgery (range 8.6-16.1 years). Overall mean advancement was 17.95 + 2.9 mm (range 13.7-19.9 mm) with mean SNA improved 18.4° to 87.4 ± 5.7°. Similarly, ANB improved 17.7° to a postoperative mean of 2.4 ± 3.1°. Mean follow-up was 100.7 weeks, with 3 of 4 patients in a Class I occlusion with moderate-term follow-up; 1 of 4 will need an additional maxillary advancement due to pseudo-relapse. In conclusion, Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis with internal distractors is a safe procedure to treat severe maxillary hypoplasia after canine eruption but before skeletal maturity. Short-term follow-up demonstrates safety of the procedure and relative stability of the advancement. Pseudo-relapse is a risk of the procedure that must be discussed at length with patients and families.

  18. Recurrence risk for offspring of twins discordant for oral cleft: a population-based cohort study of the Danish 1936-2004 cleft twin cohort.

    PubMed

    Grosen, Dorthe; Bille, Camilla; Pedersen, Jacob Krabbe; Skytthe, Axel; Murray, Jeffrey C; Christensen, Kaare

    2010-10-01

    Our objective in this Danish population-based cohort study was to estimate the recurrence risk of isolated oral cleft (OC) for offspring of the unaffected co-twins of OC discordant twin pairs and to compare this risk to the recurrence risk in the offspring of the affected co-twin as well as to the risk in the background population. During 1936-2004, 207 twin pairs were ascertained, among whom at least one twin had an OC. The index persons were twins discordant for OC who had children (N=117), and their offspring (N=239). The participants were ascertained by linkage between The Danish Facial Cleft Database, The Danish Twin Registry and The Danish Civil Registration System. In the study OC recurrence risk for offspring of the affected and unaffected twin and relative risk were compared to the background prevalence. We found that among 110 children of the 54 OC affected twins, two (1.8%) children had OC corresponding to a significantly increased relative risk (RR=10; 95% CI 1.2-35) when compared to the frequency in the background population. Among the 129 children of the 63 unaffected twins, three (2.3%) children were affected, corresponding to a significantly increased relative risk (RR=13; 95% CI 2.6-36) when compared the background prevalence. We concluded that in OC discordant twin pairs similar increased recurrence risks were found among offspring of both OC affected and OC unaffected twins. This provides further evidence for a genetic component in cleft etiology and is useful information for genetic counseling of twin pairs discordant for clefting.

  19. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  20. Association study between Van der Woude Syndrome causative gene GRHL3 and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in a Chinese cohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yirui; Sun, Yimin; Huang, Yongqing; Pan, Yongchu; Jia, Zhonglin; Ma, Lijuan; Ma, Lan; Lan, Feifei; Zhou, Yuxi; Shi, Jiayu; Yang, Xiong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hongbing; Jiang, Min; Yin, Aihua; Cheng, Jing; Wang, Lin; Yang, Yinxue; Shi, Bing

    2016-08-15

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is one of the most common birth defects worldwide and is characterized by abnormalities of the orofacial structure. Syndromic CL/P is mainly caused by Mendelian disorders such as Van der Woude Syndrome (VWS). However, >70% of CL/P cases are nonsyndromic, characterized by isolated orofacial cleft without any known syndrome. The etiology of nonsyndromic CL/P (NSCL/P) remains elusive, but it has been suggested that causative genes of syndromic CL/P might also contribute to NSCL/P. As such, the VWS causative gene IRF6 has been extensively studied in NSCL/P. Recently, GRHL3 was identified as another VWS causative gene. Thus, it may be a novel candidate gene for NSCL/P. In the present study, we genotyped 10 tag SNPs covering GRHL3 and performed association analysis with NSCL/P in 504 cases and 455 healthy controls. Our preliminary results identified rs10903078, rs4638975, and a haplotype rs10903078-rs6659209 of GRHL3 that exceeded the significance threshold (p<0.05), though none survived Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. As the first study between GRHL3 and NSCL/P, the contribution of this gene to NSCL/P etiology should be interpreted with caution based on existing evidence. Further, the robustness of association between GRHL3 and NSCL/P should be further validated in expanded cohorts.