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Sample records for mediate cardiovascular transplantation

  1. Erythropoietin-mediated protection in kidney transplantation: nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives improve function without increasing risk of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Willem G; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2014-03-01

    The protective, nonerythropoietic effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have become evident in preclinical models in renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury and kidney transplantation. However, four recently published clinical trials using high-dose EPO treatment following renal transplantation did not reveal any protective effect for short-term renal function and even reported an increased risk of thrombosis. This review focusses on the current status of protective pathways mediated by EPO, the safety concerns using high EPO dosage and discusses the discrepancies between pre-clinical and clinical studies. The protective effects are mediated by binding of EPO to a heteromeric receptor complex consisting of two β-common receptors and two EPO receptors. An important role for the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is proposed. EPO-mediated cytoprotection still has enormous potential. However, only nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may induce protection without increasing the risk of cardiovascular events. In preclinical models, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives, such as carbamoylated EPO and ARA290, have been tested. These EPO derivatives improve renal function and do not affect erythropoiesis. Therefore, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may be able to render EPO-mediated cytoprotection useful and beneficial for clinical transplantation.

  2. Screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, Sneha; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Pre-kidney transplant cardiac screening has garnered particular attention from guideline committees as an approach to improving post-transplant success. Screening serves two major purposes: To more accurately inform transplant candidates of their risk for a cardiac event before and after the transplant, thereby informing decisions about proceeding with transplantation, and to guide pre-transplant management so that post-transplant success can be maximized. Transplant candidates on dialysis are more likely to be screened for coronary artery disease than those not being considered for transplantation. Thorough history and physical examination taking, resting electrocardiography and echocardiography, exercise stress testing, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography, cardiac biomarker measurement, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging all play contributory roles towards screening for cardiovascular disease before kidney transplantation. In this review, the importance of each of these screening procedures for both coronary artery disease and other forms of cardiac disease are discussed. PMID:26722655

  3. Cardiovascular disease in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Emily P; Fellström, Bengt C; Holdaas, Hallvard; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients have a markedly increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population, although considerably lower than that of patients receiving maintenance haemodialysis. CVD in transplant recipients is poorly characterised and differs from the nonrenal population, with a much higher proportion of fatal to nonfatal cardiac events. In addition to traditional ischaemic heart disease risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes and smoking, there are additional factors to consider in this population such as the importance of hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy and uraemic cardiomyopathy. There are factors specific to transplantation such immunosuppressive therapies and graft dysfunction which contribute to this altered risk profile. However, understanding and treatment is limited by the absence of large randomised intervention trials addressing risk factor modification, with the exception of the ALERT study. The approach to managing these patients should begin early and be multifactorial in nature.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  5. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Management in Prerenal Transplantation Candidates.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Eric M; Hall, Amanda K; Hess, Jordan; Abraham, Jo; Smith, Brigham; Hopkins, Paul N; Shihab, Fuad; Welt, Frederick; Owan, Theophilus; Fang, James C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) assessment in prerenal transplant patients varies by center. Current guidelines recommend stress testing for candidates if ≥ 3 CV risk factors exist. We evaluated the CV assessment and management in 685 patients referred for kidney transplant over a 7-year period. All patients had CV risk factors, and the most common cause of end-stage renal disease was diabetes. Thirty-three percent (n = 229) underwent coronary angiography. The sensitivity of stress testing to detect obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) was poor (0.26). Patients who had no CAD, nonobstructive CAD, or CAD with intervention had significantly higher event-free survival compared with patients with obstructive CAD without intervention. There were no adverse clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, stroke, revascularization, and graft failure) within 30 days post-transplant in patients who had preoperative angiography (n = 77). Of the transplanted patients who did not have an angiogram (n = 289), there were 8 clinical events (6 myocardial infarctions) in the first 30 days. In conclusion, our results indicate that stress testing and usual risk factors were poor predictors of obstructive CAD and that revascularization may prove beneficial in these patients.

  6. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  7. Updates on cytochrome P450-mediated cardiovascular drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy W M; Frishman, William H; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P (CYP) 450 is a superfamily of hemoproteins that play an important role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, fatty acids, and many medications. Many agents used for management of cardiovascular diseases are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of CYP450 enzymes.When two agents that are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of CYP450 are administered together, drug interactions with significant clinical consequences may occur. This review discusses CYP450-mediated cardiovascular drug interactions as well as noncardiovascular drug interactions that produced significant cardiovascular side effects. The principles in predicting drug interactions are also discussed.

  8. Inflammation, Coronary Artery Calcification and Cardiovascular Events in Incident Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Peter; Wolfe, Megan; Joffe, Marshall; Rosas, Sylvia E

    2010-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery calcification (CAC) predicts cardiovascular events in the general population. We conducted a prospective study to determine if inflammatory markers were predictive of CAC and if CAC predicted cardiovascular events and mortality in incident renal transplant recipients. Methods A prospective cohort of 112 asymptomatic incident renal transplant recipients who had no prior history of coronary artery revascularization or myocardial infarction had coronary calcifications measured early post-transplant and at least 18 months later by Agatston score and volume method. Results The mean CAC score was 367.7 (682.3). Inflammatory markers such as WBC and CRP were predictive of CAC severity. Recipients with cardiovascular events (n=11) or death (n=12) during the follow-up period had higher mean [675.1 (669.3) vs. 296.8(669.0), p=0.02] and median [434.8 vs. 28.9, p=0.01] CAC score compared to those without them. Recipients with CAC score less than 100 had a better cumulative survival rate compared to the recipients with CAC score greater than 100 [95.1 vs. 82.3%, p=0.03]. We found a significant unadjusted and adjusted association between CAC score and cardiovascular events and mortality. A quarter (25.9%) of recipients had CAC progression. Coronary calcification progression also predicted cardiovascular events and mortality after adjustment for diabetes, age, dialysis vintage and presence of CAC at time of transplant. Conclusion CAC is prevalent in renal recipients and is predictive of cardiovascular events and mortality. Changes in coronary calcification are common and predict clinical outcomes. Inflammatory markers are predictive of CAC severity at time of transplant, but are not predictive of future cardiovascular event or mortality. PMID:20934074

  9. Functional cardiovascular reserve predicts survival pre-kidney and post-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Stephen M S; Iqbal, Hasan; Kanji, Hemali; Hamborg, Thomas; Aldridge, Nicolas; Krishnan, Nithya; Imray, Chris H E; Banerjee, Prithwish; Bland, Rosemary; Higgins, Robert; Zehnder, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance is an important comorbidity in patients with CKD. Anaerobic threshold (AT) determines the upper limits of aerobic exercise and is a measure of cardiovascular reserve. This study investigated the prognostic capacity of AT on survival in patients with advanced CKD and the effect of kidney transplantation on survival in those with reduced cardiovascular reserve. Using cardiopulmonary exercise testing, cardiovascular reserve was evaluated in 240 patients who were waitlisted for kidney transplantation between 2008 and 2010, and patients were followed for ≤5 years. Survival time was the primary endpoint. Cumulative survival for the entire cohort was 72.6% (24 deaths), with cardiovascular events being the most common cause of death (54.2%). According to Kaplan-Meier estimates, patients with AT <40% of predicted peak VO2 had a significantly reduced 5-year cumulative overall survival rate compared with those with AT ≥40% (P<0.001). Regarding the cohort with AT <40%, patients who underwent kidney transplantation (6 deaths) had significantly better survival compared with nontransplanted patients (17 deaths) (hazard ratio, 4.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.78 to 11.38; P=0.002). Survival did not differ significantly among patients with AT ≥40%, with one death in the nontransplanted group and no deaths in the transplanted group. In summary, this is the first prospective study to demonstrate a significant association of AT, as the objective index of cardiovascular reserve, with survival in patients with advanced CKD. High-risk patients with reduced cardiovascular reserve had a better survival rate after receiving a kidney transplant.

  10. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease during the first 2 years after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Laurés, A S; Gómez, E; Baltar, J; Alvarez-Grande, J

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the role of cardiovascular risk factors in the occurrence of cardiovascular events among 100 consecutive renal transplant recipients during the first 2 years after transplantation. The following parameters were analyzed: (1) demographic data (gender, age, dialysis duration, preexistent diabetes, and pretransplantation events) as well as (2) basal 1-year, and 2-year posttransplantation data for events, body mass index, arterial hypertension, number of drugs for hypertension control, use of ACE or ARA II inhibitors, treatment with lipid- lowering drugs, de novo diabetes, anemia, immunosuppression with cyclosporine versus tacrolimus, and homocysteine, folic acid, serum creatinine, uric acid, PTH-i, and cholesterol total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. At the end of the second posttransplantation year, 14 patients versus 86 who did not experience a new cardiovascular event. Patients in the event group had more events pretransplantation and during the first posttransplantation year than those in the non event group (57.1% vs 17.4%; P = .003 and 78.6% vs 2.3%; P = .000, respectively). Furthermore, the former cohort of patients were older, had greater ventricular hypertrophy and had higher triglyceride and serum creatinine concentrations during the 2 years after transplantation. A multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed the relationship between events within 1 year of transplantation and serum creatinine level at the end of 2 years as well as the development of cardiovascular disease within 2 years. In conclusion, our data suggest the need for aggressive intervention during the first year to prevent the development of new cardiovascular events. Renoprotective strategies may also contribute to reduce the cardiovascular risk of renal transplant recipients.

  11. Adipokines and the cardiovascular system: mechanisms mediating health and disease.

    PubMed

    Northcott, Josette M; Yeganeh, Azadeh; Taylor, Carla G; Zahradka, Peter; Wigle, Jeffrey T

    2012-08-01

    This review focuses on the role of adipokines in the maintenance of a healthy cardiovascular system, and the mechanisms by which these factors mediate the development of cardiovascular disease in obesity. Adipocytes are the major cell type comprising the adipose tissue. These cells secrete numerous factors, termed adipokines, into the blood, including adiponectin, leptin, resistin, chemerin, omentin, vaspin, and visfatin. Adipose tissue is a highly vascularised endocrine organ, and different adipose depots have distinct adipokine secretion profiles, which are altered with obesity. The ability of many adipokines to stimulate angiogenesis is crucial for adipose tissue expansion; however, excessive blood vessel growth is deleterious. As well, some adipokines induce inflammation, which promotes cardiovascular disease progression. We discuss how these 7 aforementioned adipokines act upon the various cardiovascular cell types (endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, cardiomyocytes, and cardiac fibroblasts), the direct effects of these actions, and their overall impact on the cardiovascular system. These were chosen, as these adipokines are secreted predominantly from adipocytes and have known effects on cardiovascular cells.

  12. Platelets in Early Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Fan, Ran; Dvorina, Nina; Chiesa-Vottero, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is a major complication in renal transplantation. The pathologic manifestations of acute antibody-mediated rejection that has progressed to functional impairment of a renal transplant have been defined in clinical biopsy specimens. However, the initial stages of the process are difficult to resolve with the unavoidable variables of clinical studies. We devised a model of renal transplantation to elucidate the initial stages of humoral rejection. Kidneys were orthotopically allografted to immunodeficient mice. After perioperative inflammation subsided, donor-specific alloantibodies were passively transferred to the recipient. Within 1 hour after a single transfer of antibodies, C4d was deposited diffusely on capillaries, and von Willebrand factor released from endothelial cells coated intravascular platelet aggregates. Platelet-transported inflammatory mediators platelet factor 4 and serotonin accumulated in the graft at 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations compared with other platelet-transported chemokines. Activated platelets that expressed P-selectin attached to vascular endothelium and macrophages. These intragraft inflammatory changes were accompanied by evidence of acute endothelial injury. Repeated transfers of alloantibodies over 1 week sustained high levels of platelet factor 4 and serotonin. Platelet depletion decreased platelet mediators and altered the accumulation of macrophages. These data indicate that platelets augment early inflammation in response to donor-specific antibodies and that platelet-derived mediators may be markers of evolving alloantibody responses. PMID:25145937

  13. Post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantion immune-mediated cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Panagiotis D; Resnick, Igor B; Or, Reuven; Elad, Sharon; Zilberman, Irina; Yoffe, Luba; Levovic, Alexander; Miron, Svetlana; Gesundheit, Benjamin; Slavin, Shimon; Shapira, Michael-Yechiel

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated cytopenias after allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be categorized as either alloimmune when host or donor immunity reacts against donor or host elements, respectively, or autoimmune when donor immunity reacts against donor hematopoietic tissue, owing to poorly understood mechanisms that result in severe impairment of central and peripheral tolerance. Immune cytopenias are manifested as monolineage or more rarely as bilineage cytopenias, and are usually mediated through humoral immune mechanisms. On the contrary, immune-mediated pancytopenia is a rare event with only few cases reported in the literature. The exact pathogenesis of immune pancytopenia is not well known although it is possible that cellular immunity may play a significant role. The importance of these syndromes lies in the fact that they can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Differential diagnosis from other causes of post-transplant pancytopenia is of extreme value because these disorders can respond to various treatment modalities.

  14. Does the kinin system mediate in cardiovascular abnormalities? An overview.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jagdish N

    2003-11-01

    All the components of the kallikrein-kinin system are located in the cardiac muscle, and its deficiency may lead to cardiac dysfunction. In recent years, numerous observations obtained from clinical and experimental models of diabetes, hypertension, cardiac failure, ischemia, myocardial infarction, and left ventricular hypertrophy have suggested that the reduced activity of the local kallikrein-kinin system may be instrumental for the induction of cardiovascular-related diseases. The cardioprotective property of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors is primarily mediated via the kinin-releasing pathway, which may cause regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive situations. The ability of kallikrein gene delivery to produce a wide spectrum of beneficial effects makes it an excellent candidate in treating hypertension and cardiovascular and renal diseases. In addition, stable kinin agonists may also be available in the future as therapeutic agents for cardiovascular and renal disorders.

  15. Patterns of Care and Outcomes in Cardiovascular Disease After Kidney Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Amit K.; Chang, Yu-Hui; Steidley, D. Eric; Heilman, Raymond; Khurmi, Narjeet; Wasif, Nabil; Etzioni, David; Moss, Adyr A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important driver of mortality after kidney transplantation. Its broader impact on posttransplant health care utilization in US hospitals is unknown. Methods We used administrative claims data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the American Hospital Association Annual Survey to identify hospitalizations for kidney transplant patients with a cardiovascular diagnosis from 2005 to 2011. CVD hospitalizations were stratified by transplant hospital status to characterize patterns in inpatient health care utilization and outcomes. Based on these analyses, the domestic burden of treatment for posttransplant CVD (myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, dysrhythmia, cardiac arrest, malignant hypertension) was estimated. Results The total domestic burden of post-kidney transplant hospitalization between 2005 and 2011 is estimated at 389 138 of which 26.5% of episodes were related to CVD (n = 103 118). CVD was responsible for a growing proportion of post-transplant hospitalizations over time (24.4%-30.4%, P < 0.001). Compared with nontransplant hospitals, transplant hospitals had similar length of stay (median length of stay, 3.7 days), higher median costs per hospitalization (US $10 364 vs US $8606, overall US $9324), and lower adjusted mortality (3.2% vs 3.9%, overall 3.6%; P = 0.003). Conclusions Inpatient CVD care is increasing over time for kidney transplant patients, accounting for 30% of all post-transplant hospitalizations. Variation exists in the inpatient care, outcomes, and costs between by hospital type. Further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms behind these phenomena. PMID:28361110

  16. Filtration Markers, Cardiovascular Disease, Mortality, and Kidney Outcomes in Stable Kidney Transplant Recipients: The FAVORIT Trial.

    PubMed

    Foster, M C; Weiner, D E; Bostom, A G; Carpenter, M A; Inker, L A; Jarolim, P; Joseph, A A; Kusek, J W; Pesavento, T; Pfeffer, M A; Rao, M; Solomon, S D; Levey, A S

    2017-03-03

    Cystatin C and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) are filtration markers associated with adverse outcomes in non-transplant populations, sometimes with stronger associations than for creatinine. We evaluated associations of estimated glomerular filtration rate from cystatin C (eGFRcys ), B2M (eGFRB2M ), and creatinine (eGFRcr ) with cardiovascular outcomes, mortality, and kidney failure in stable kidney transplant recipients using a case-cohort study nested within the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial. A random subcohort was selected (N=508; mean age 51.6 years, median transplant vintage 4 years, 38% women, 23.6% non-white race) with enrichment for cardiovascular events (N=306; 54 within the subcohort), mortality (N=208; 68 within the subcohort), and kidney failure (N=208; 52 within the subcohort). Mean eGFRcr , eGFRcys , and eGFRB2M were 46.0, 43.8, and 48.8 mL/min/1.73m(2), respectively. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios for eGFRcys and eGFRB2M <30 vs. 60+ were 2.02 (95% CI 1.09-3.76; p=0.03) and 2.56 (1.35-4.88; p=0.004) for cardiovascular events; 3.92 (2.11-7.31) and 4.09 (2.21-7.54; both p<0.001) for mortality; and 9.49 (4.28-21.00) and 15.53 (6.99-34.51; both p<0.001) for kidney failure. Associations persisted with additional adjustment for baseline eGFRcr . We conclude that cystatin C and B2M are strongly associated with cardiovascular events, mortality, and kidney failure in stable kidney transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Central autonomic network mediates cardiovascular responses to acute inflammation: Relevance to increased cardiovascular risk in depression?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Cooper, Ella; Voon, Valerie; Miles, Ken; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a risk factor for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Depressed mood is also a cardiovascular risk factor. To date, research into mechanisms through which inflammation impacts cardiovascular health rarely takes into account central effects on autonomic cardiovascular control, instead emphasizing direct effects of peripheral inflammatory responses on endothelial reactivity and myocardial function. However, brain responses to inflammation engage neural systems for motivational and homeostatic control and are expressed through depressed mood state and changes in autonomic cardiovascular regulation. Here we combined an inflammatory challenge, known to evoke an acute reduction in mood, with neuroimaging to identify the functional brain substrates underlying potentially detrimental changes in autonomic cardiovascular control. We first demonstrated that alterations in the balance of low to high frequency (LF/HF) changes in heart rate variability (a measure of baroreflex sensitivity) could account for some of the inflammation-evoked changes in diastolic blood pressure, indicating a central (rather than solely local endothelial) origin. Accompanying alterations in regional brain metabolism (measured using 18FDG-PET) were analysed to localise central mechanisms of inflammation-induced changes in cardiovascular state: three discrete regions previously implicated in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity, the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate and pons, strongly mediated the relationship between inflammation and blood pressure. Moreover, activity changes within each region predicted the inflammation-induced shift in LF/HF balance. These data are consistent with a centrally-driven component originating within brain areas supporting stressor evoked blood pressure reactivity. Together our findings highlight mechanisms binding psychological and physiological well-being and their perturbation by peripheral inflammation. PMID:23416033

  18. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future.

  19. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Beth J.; Kaandorp, Joepe J.; Kane, Andrew D.; Camm, Emily J.; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M.; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S.; Derks, Jan B.; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Giussani, Dino A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2–1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P < 0.05). Hypoxic pregnancy in young offspring accelerated endothelial dysfunction (maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine: 42 ± 1%, P < 0.05) but this was dissociated from increased vascular short telomere length abundance. Maternal allopurinol rescued maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine in aged offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy but not in young offspring of hypoxic pregnancy. Aged offspring of hypoxic allopurinol pregnancy compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P < 0.05). These data provide evidence for divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.—Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26932929

  20. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Allison, Beth J; Kaandorp, Joepe J; Kane, Andrew D; Camm, Emily J; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S; Derks, Jan B; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-05-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2-1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P < 0.05). Hypoxic pregnancy in young offspring accelerated endothelial dysfunction (maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine: 42 ± 1%, P < 0.05) but this was dissociated from increased vascular short telomere length abundance. Maternal allopurinol rescued maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine in aged offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy but not in young offspring of hypoxic pregnancy. Aged offspring of hypoxic allopurinol pregnancy compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P < 0.05). These data provide evidence for divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.-Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

  1. Acute antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Cooper, James E

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has now been recognized as one of the most important causes of graft loss. Transplantation across HLA barriers and nonadherence can result in acute antibody-mediated rejection, which is associated with particularly worse graft outcomes. New technologies, including genomic studies and assays to detect and define donor-specific antibodies, have provided important insights into the pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute antibody-mediated rejection but have engendered many questions about the clinical application of these tests in the prognosis and prevention of this protean disease process. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of acute antibody-mediated rejection, the evolving diagnostic criteria, and specific challenges related to its prognosis, treatment, and prevention.

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors in children after kidney transplantation--from short-term to long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kaidar, Maital; Berant, Michael; Krauze, Irit; Cleper, Roxana; Mor, Eitan; Bar-Nathan, Nathan; Davidovits, Miriam

    2014-02-01

    Cardiovascular-related mortality is 100-fold higher in pediatric renal transplant recipients than in the age-matched general population. Seventy-seven post-renal transplant children's charts were reviewed for cardiovascular risk factors at two and six months after transplantation (short term) and at two yr after transplantation and the last follow-up visit (mean 7.14 ± 3.5 yr) (long term). Significant reduction was seen in cardiovascular risk factors prevalence from two months after transplantation to last follow-up respectively: Hypertension from 52.1% to 14%, hypercholesterolemia from 48.7% to 33%, hypertriglyceridemia from 50% to 12.5%, anemia from 29.6% to 18.3%, hyperparathyroidism from 32% to 18.3% and hyperglycemia from 11.7% to 10%, and left ventricular hypertrophy from 25.8% at short term to 15%. There was an increase in the prevalence of obesity from 1.5% to 3.9% and of CKD 3-5 from 4.75% to 24%. The need for antihypertensive treatment decreased from 54% to 42%, and the percentage of patients controlled by one medication rose from 26% to 34%, whereas the percentage controlled by 2, 3, and 4 medications decreased from 21.9%, 5.5%, and 1.4% to 6%, 2%, and 0. Children after renal transplantation appear to have high rates of cardiovascular risk factors, mainly on short-term follow-up.

  3. Cardiovascular risk after orthotopic liver transplantation, a review of the literature and preliminary results of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Giuseppina; Fracanzani, Anna L; Caccamo, Lucio; Donato, Maria F; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical techniques and greater efficacy of new anti-rejection drugs have significantly improved the survival of patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). This has led to an increased incidence of metabolic disorders as well as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases as causes of morbidity and mortality in OLT patients. In the last decade, several studies have examined which predisposing factors lead to increased cardiovascular risk (i.e., age, ethnicity, diabetes, NASH, atrial fibrillation, and some echocardiographic parameters) as well as which factors after OLT (i.e., weight gain, metabolic syndrome, immunosuppressive therapy, and renal failure) are linked to increased cardiovascular mortality. However, currently, there are no available data that evaluate the development of atherosclerotic damage after OLT. The awareness of high cardiovascular risk after OLT has not only lead to the definition of new but generally not accepted screening of high risk patients before transplantation, but also to the need for careful patient follow up and treatment to control metabolic and cardiovascular pathologies after transplant. Prospective studies are needed to better define the predisposing factors for recurrence and de novo occurrence of metabolic alterations responsible for cardiovascular damage after OLT. Moreover, such studies will help to identify the timing of disease progression and damage, which in turn may help to prevent morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Our preliminary results show early occurrence of atherosclerotic damage, which is already present a few weeks following OLT, suggesting that specific, patient-tailored therapies should be started immediately post OLT. PMID:27833378

  4. Are lipid-dependent indicators of cardiovascular risk affected by renal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Schena, A; Di Paolo, S; Morrone, L F; Resta, F; Stallone, G; Schena, F P

    2000-04-01

    Hyperlipoproteinemia has been reported to frequently occur in kidney transplanted patients, thus possibly explaining, at least in part, the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in this population. To evaluate the impact of renal transplantation (Tx), and related immunosuppressive therapy, on plasma lipoprotein and Lp(a) profile, we selected a cohort of kidney transplanted patients (36 M/14 F; age 33.8 + 12.0 yr, range 13-62) lacking significant causes of hyperlipidemia. All patients received a triple immunosuppressive regimen and showed a stable renal function after Tx (plasma creatinine: 1.36 +/- 0.35 mg/dL). One year after Tx, we found a significant increase of total cholesterol (TC), LDL, HDL, ApoB and ApoA-I (p < 0.005), while plasma triglyceride levels remained unmodified. Lp(a) plasma levels after Tx were within the normal range and displayed a significant inverse relationship with apo(a) size. Noteworthy, LDL/HDL ratio and ApoB/ ApoA-I ratio in kidney transplanted patients were almost superimposable with those of normal controls. Specifically, LDL/HDL ratio significantly decreased in 64% of patients after Tx, due to a prevalent increase of HDL, and was associated with a moderate amelioration of plasma TG. In a multiple linear regression model, post-Tx HDL level was significantly related to recipient's age, gender, BMI and cyclosporine (CyA) trough levels (Adj-R2 = 0.35, p = 0.0002), with gender and CyA trough levels being the better predictors of HDL. In conclusion, immunosuppressive regimens, in themselves, do not appear to significantly increase the atherogenic risk related to lipoproteins. Rather, other factors can affect the lipoprotein profile and its vascular effects in renal transplant recipients.

  5. Metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients: prevalence, risk factors, and association with cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Braun, Marius; Mor, Eytan; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Harif, Yael; Ben Ari, Ziv

    2011-01-01

    Features of metabolic syndrome are not uncommon in patients after liver transplantation. To examine the prevalence and risk factors of posttransplantation metabolic syndrome (PTMS), the files of 252 transplant recipients (mean age, 54.5 ± 2.8 years, 57.9% male) were reviewed for pretransplant and posttransplant clinical and laboratory parameters (mean follow-up, 6.2 ± 4.4 years). Rates of obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2) ), hypertriglyceridemia (>150 mg/dL), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <40 mg/dL (men) or <50 mg/dL (women), hypertension, and diabetes were significantly higher after transplantation than before. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 5.4% of patients before transplantation and 51.9% after. Besides significantly higher rates of the typical metabolic derangements (P < 0.0001), the patients with PTMS were older and heavier than those without PTMS, and they had a higher rate of pretransplant hepatitis C virus infection (P < 0.03) and more posttransplant major vascular and cardiac events (20 events in 15.2% of patients with PTMS versus 6 events in 4.9% of patients without PTMS; P < 0.007). There was no between-group difference in mortality or causes of death (mainly related to recurrent disease, graft failure, and sepsis). Significant independent predictors of PTMS on logistic regression analysis were age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04), pretransplant nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (OR = 3.4), body mass index (OR = 1.13), diabetes (OR = 5.95), and triglycerides (OR = 1.01). The rate of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients is more than twice that reported for the general population. PTMS is associated with cardiovascular morbidity but not mortality, and it may be predicted by pretransplantation conditions. Prospective studies are required to determine the significance and management of PTMS.

  6. BP, cardiovascular disease, and death in the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation trial.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Myra A; John, Alin; Weir, Matthew R; Smith, Stephen R; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Kasiske, Bertram L; Kusek, John W; Bostom, Andrew; Ivanova, Anastasia; Levey, Andrew S; Solomon, Scott; Pesavento, Todd; Weiner, Daniel E

    2014-07-01

    The optimal BP level in kidney transplant recipients remains uncertain. This post hoc analysis of the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) trial cohort assessed associations of BP with a pooled cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcome and with all-cause mortality. In 3474 prevalent kidney transplant patients, mean age was 52±9 years, 63% were men, 76% were white, 20% had a history of CVD, 40% had a history of diabetes mellitus, and the median time since transplant was 4.1 years (25th to 75th percentiles, 1.7-7.4); mean systolic BP was 136±20 mmHg and mean diastolic BP was 79±12 mmHg. There were 497 CVD events and 406 deaths. After adjustment for demographic and transplant characteristics and CVD risk factors, each 20-mmHg increase in baseline systolic BP associated with a 32% increase in subsequent CVD risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.19 to 1.46) and a 13% increase in mortality risk (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.27). Similarly, after adjustment, at diastolic BP levels<70 mmHg, each 10-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP level associated with a 31% increase in CVD risk (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.62) and a 31% increase in mortality risk (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.66). However, at diastolic BP levels>70 mmHg, there was no significant relationship between diastolic BP and outcomes. Higher systolic BP strongly and independently associated with increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality, without evidence of a J shape, whereas only lower levels of diastolic BP associated with increased risk of CVD and death in this trial.

  7. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after intestinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Sheng; Cruz Jr, Ruy J; Cai, Jun-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence, risk factors and clinical outcomes of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) after intestinal transplantation (ITx). METHODS A retrospective single-center analysis was performed to identify cases of acute ABMR after ITx, based on the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA), acute tissue damage, C4d deposition, and allograft dysfunction. RESULTS Acute ABMR was identified in 18 (10.3%) out of 175 intestinal allografts with an average occurrence of 10 d (range, 4-162) after ITx. All acute ABMR cases were presensitized to donor human leukocyte antigens class I and/or II antigens with a detectable DSA. A positive cross-match was seen in 14 (77.8%) cases and twelve of 18 patients (66.7%) produced newly-formed DSA following ITx. Histological characteristics of acute ABMR include endothelial C4d deposits, interstitial hemorrhage, and severe congestion with focal fibrin thrombin in the lamina propria capillaries. Multivariate analysis identified a liver-free graft and high level of panel reactive antibody as a significant independent risk factor. Despite initial improvement after therapy, eleven recipients (61.1%) lost transplant secondary to rejection. Of those, 9 (50%) underwent graft removal and 4 (22.2%) received second transplantation following acute ABMR. At an average follow-up of 32.3 mo (range, 13.3-76.4), 8 (44.4%) recipients died. CONCLUSION Our results indicate that acute ABMR is an important cause of intestine graft dysfunction, particularly in a liver-exclusive graft and survivors are at an increased risk of developing refractory acute rejection and chronic rejection. More effective strategies to prevent and manage acute ABMR are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:28058223

  8. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation: The protective role of Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    PubMed

    D'Avola, D; Cuervas-Mons, V; Martí, J; Ortiz de Urbina, J; Lladó, L; Jimenez, C; Otero, E; Suarez, F; Rodrigo, J M; Gómez, M A; Fraga, E; Lopez, P; Serrano, T; Rios, A; Fábrega, E; Herrero, J I

    2017-02-03

    Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are recognized long-term causes of death after liver transplantation (LT). The objective of this multicenter study was to analyse the prevalence and the evolution of CV risk factors and CV morbidity and mortality in 1819 liver transplant recipients along 5 years after LT. The influence of baseline variables on survival, morbidity and mortality was studied. There was a continuous and significant increase of the prevalence of all the CV risk factors (except smoking) after LT. CV diseases were the fourth cause of mortality in the 5 years after LT, causing 12% of deaths during the follow-up. Most CV events (39%) occurred in the first year after LT. Pre-existing CV risk factors such as age, pre-LT CV events, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and hyperuricemia, and mycophenolate-free immunosuppressive therapy, increased post-LT CV morbidity and mortality. The development of new onset CV risk factors after LT, such as dyslipidemia and obesity, independently affected late CV morbidity and mortality. Tacrolimus and steroids increased the risk of post-transplant diabetes, while cyclosporine increased the risk of arterial hypertension dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome.

  9. Diagnostic criteria of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Mosquera Reboredo, J M; Vázquez Martul, E

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of anti-donor antibody-mediated rejection or humoral rejection (ABMR) is one of the main discussions at the moment in kidney transplantation. The search for histopathological markers that help us to diagnose ABMR has been more problematic, in contrast to the histological expression of cellular or tubulointerstitial rejection. Although the relationship between post-transplant anti-donor antibodies and the allograft's prognosis has been a topic of discussion for a long time, led in the main by P.Terasaki, it was not until the beginning of 1990s when P. Halloran studied the humoral mechanisms of rejection in greater depth. Feutch described the importance of C4d deposits as a marker that shows a humoral mechanism of allograft rejection in 1993. As a result of many studies carried out, the Banff consensus group established some diagnostic histopathological criteria of acute (ABMR) in 2003. These have been modified slightly in later meetings of the group. Furthermore, in 2005 this same working group looked at the physiopathological mechanisms causing chronic allograft failure in more detail and established the criteria defining chronic humoral rejection. In this review, we are trying to update any useful histopathological criteria for diagnosing acute and chronic ABMR.

  10. Cardiovascular Outcomes in the Outpatient Kidney Transplant Clinic: The Framingham Risk Score Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kiberd, Bryce; Panek, Romuald

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and death in kidney transplant recipients. This study examines the Framingham risk score's ability to predict cardiac and stroke events. Because cyclosporine and tacrolimus have different cardiovascular risk profiles, these agents were also examined. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A prospective cohort evaluation of 540 patients were followed for a median of 4.7 yr in an outpatient kidney transplant clinic. Baseline Framingham risk scores were calculated and all cardiovascular outcomes were collected. Results: Rates per 100 patient-years were 1.79 for cardiac and 0.78 for stroke events. The ratio of observed-to-predicted cardiac events was 1.64-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 2.94] for the cohort, 2.74-fold higher (95% CI 1.70 to 4.24) in patients age 45 to 60 with prior cardiac disease or diabetes mellitus, but not higher in other age subgroups. Stroke was not increased above predicted. Risk scores for cardiac (c = 0.65, P = 0.003) and stroke (c = 0.71, P = 0.004) events were modest predictors. 10-yr event scores for cardiac (9.3 versus 13.5%, P < 0.001) and stroke (7.1 versus 10.0%, P = 0.002) were lower for tacrolimus compared with cyclosporine-treated patients. However observed cardiac events were higher in tacrolimus recipients (2.50, 95% CI 1.09 to 5.90) in an adjusted Cox model. Conclusions: Although risk scores are only modest predictors, patients with the highest event rates are easily identified. Treating high-risk patients with cardioprotective medications should remain a priority. PMID:18322053

  11. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease following hematopoietic cell transplantation: screening and preventive practice recommendations from CIBMTR and EBMT

    PubMed Central

    DeFilipp, Zachariah; Duarte, Rafael F.; Snowden, John A.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Greenfield, Diana M.; Miranda, José López; Arat, Mutlu; Baker, K. Scott; Burns, Linda J.; Duncan, Christine N.; Gilleece, Maria; Hale, Gregory A.; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K.; Hogan, William J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Malone, Adriana K.; McCarthy, Philip; Mohty, Mohamad; Norkin, Maxim; Paplham, Pamela; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Richart, John M.; Salooja, Nina; Schouten, Harry C.; Schoemans, Helene; Seber, Adriana; Steinberg, Amir; Wirk, Baldeep M.; Wood, William A.; Battiwalla, Minoo; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Savani, Bipin N.; Shaw, Bronwen E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and all cause mortality. Long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have a substantial risk of developing MetS and cardiovascular disease, with the estimated prevalence of MetS being 31–49% amongst HCT recipients. While MetS has not yet been proven to impact cardiovascular risk after HCT, an understanding of the incidence and risk factors for MetS in HCT recipients can provide the foundation to evaluate screening guidelines and develop interventions that may mitigate cardiovascular-related mortality. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to review literature and recommend practices appropriate to HCT recipients. Here we deliver consensus recommendations to help clinicians provide screening and preventive care for MetS and cardiovascular disease among HCT recipients. All HCT survivors should be advised of the risks of MetS and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition and ongoing risk factors. PMID:27184625

  12. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease following hematopoietic cell transplantation: screening and preventive practice recommendations from CIBMTR and EBMT.

    PubMed

    DeFilipp, Z; Duarte, R F; Snowden, J A; Majhail, N S; Greenfield, D M; Miranda, J L; Arat, M; Baker, K S; Burns, L J; Duncan, C N; Gilleece, M; Hale, G A; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, B K; Hogan, W J; Hsu, J W; Inamoto, Y; Kamble, R T; Lupo-Stanghellini, M T; Malone, A K; McCarthy, P; Mohty, M; Norkin, M; Paplham, P; Ramanathan, M; Richart, J M; Salooja, N; Schouten, H C; Schoemans, H; Seber, A; Steinberg, A; Wirk, B M; Wood, W A; Battiwalla, M; Flowers, M E D; Savani, B N; Shaw, B E

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and all cause mortality. Long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have a substantial risk of developing MetS and cardiovascular disease, with the estimated prevalence of MetS being 31-49% among HCT recipients. Although MetS has not yet been proven to impact cardiovascular risk after HCT, an understanding of the incidence and risk factors for MetS in HCT recipients can provide the foundation to evaluate screening guidelines and develop interventions that may mitigate cardiovascular-related mortality. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal of reviewing literature and recommend practices appropriate to HCT recipients. Here we deliver consensus recommendations to help clinicians provide screening and preventive care for MetS and cardiovascular disease among HCT recipients. All HCT survivors should be advised of the risks of MetS and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition and ongoing risk factors.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Screening and Preventive Practice Recommendations from the CIBMTR and EBMT.

    PubMed

    DeFilipp, Zachariah; Duarte, Rafael F; Snowden, John A; Majhail, Navneet S; Greenfield, Diana M; Miranda, José López; Arat, Mutlu; Baker, K Scott; Burns, Linda J; Duncan, Christine N; Gilleece, Maria; Hale, Gregory A; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K; Hogan, William J; Hsu, Jack W; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Malone, Adriana K; McCarthy, Philip; Mohty, Mohamad; Norkin, Maxim; Paplham, Pamela; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Richart, John M; Salooja, Nina; Schouten, Harry C; Schoemans, Helene; Seber, Adriana; Steinberg, Amir; Wirk, Baldeep M; Wood, William A; Battiwalla, Minoo; Flowers, Mary E D; Savani, Bipin N; Shaw, Bronwen E

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and all-cause mortality. Long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have a substantial risk of developing MetS and cardiovascular disease, with an estimated prevalence of MetS of 31% to 49% among HCT recipients. Although MetS has not yet been proven to impact cardiovascular risk after HCT, an understanding of the incidence and risk factors for MetS in HCT recipients can provide the foundation to evaluate screening guidelines and develop interventions that may mitigate cardiovascular-related mortality. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to review literature and recommend practices appropriate to HCT recipients. Here we deliver consensus recommendations to help clinicians provide screening and preventive care for MetS and cardiovascular disease among HCT recipients. All HCT survivors should be advised of the risks of MetS and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition and ongoing risk factors.

  14. Identifying Subphenotypes of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Merino Lopez, M; Barreto Pereira, A

    2016-03-01

    The key lesions in antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (ABMR) are microcirculation inflammation (peritubular capillaritis and/or glomerulitis lesions, abbreviated "pg") and glomerular double contours (cg lesions). We used these features to explore subphenotypes in 164 indication biopsies with ABMR-related diagnoses: 137 ABMR (109 pure and 28 mixed with T cell-mediated rejection [TCMR]) and 27 transplant glomerulopathy (TG), identified from prospective multicenter studies. The lesions indicated three ABMR subphenotypes: pgABMR, cgABMR, and pgcgABMR. Principal component analysis confirmed these subphenotypes and showed that TG can be reclassified as pgcgABMR (n = 17) or cgABMR (n = 10). ABMR-related biopsies included 45 pgABMR, 90 pgcgABMR, and 25 cgABMR, with four unclassifiable. Dominating all time intervals was the subphenotype pgcgABMR. The pgABMR subphenotype presented earliest (median <2 years), frequently mixed with TCMR, and was most associated with nonadherence. The cgABMR subphenotype presented late (median 9 years). Subphenotypes differed in their molecular changes, with pgABMR having the most histologic-molecular discrepancies (i.e. potential errors). Donor-specific antibody (DSA) was not identified in 29% of pgcgABMR and 46% of cgABMR, but failure rates and molecular findings were similar to cases where DSA was known to be positive. Thus, ABMR presents distinct subphenotypes, early pg-dominant, late cg-dominant, and combined pgcg phenotype, differing in time, molecular features, accompanying TCMR, HLA antibody, and probability of nonadherence.

  15. Cardiovascular, muscular and perceptual contributions to physical fatigue in prevalent kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie; Jones, David; Bosch, Jos A; McPhee, Jamie; Crabtree, Nicola; McTernan, Philip G; Kaur, Okdeep; Inston, Nicholas; Moore, Sue; McClean, Andrew; Harper, Lorraine; Phillips, Anna C; Borrows, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Physical fatigue is debilitating and common among kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). This study investigated the mechanistic aetiology of physical fatigue in this setting through examinations of muscle mass, muscular and cardiovascular function, and perceived exertion. The incidence of physical fatigue, its association with quality of life (QoL), and the predictors of perceived exertion, were evaluated. This single-centre observational cross-sectional study enrolled 55 KTRs. Muscle mass was quantified using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Muscular function was assessed by jumping mechanography. Cardiovascular function (maximal oxygen consumption and oxygen pulse) was estimated during submaximal exercise testing, with perceived exertion determined using age-adjusted Borg scale-ratings. Physical fatigue was measured using Multi-Dimensional Fatigue Inventory-20. QoL was assessed using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36. Demographic, clinical, nutritional, psychosocial and behavioural predictors of perceived exertion were assessed. Of clinical importance, increased perceived exertion was the only independent predictor of physical fatigue (P = 0.001), with no association found between physical fatigue and muscular or cardiovascular parameters. Physical fatigue occurred in 22% of KTRs, and negatively impacted on QoL (P < 0.001). Predictors of heightened perception included anxiety (P < 0.05) and mental fatigue (P < 0.05). Perception is a key determinant of physical fatigue in KTRs, paving the way for future interventions.

  16. Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk in survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baker, K S; Chow, E; Steinberger, J

    2012-05-01

    Increasing numbers of hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) are being performed annually with a greater number of long-term survivors. There is increasing concern regarding the late complications and long-term effects that are secondary to treatment exposures before HCT as well as during the HCT conditioning therapy. In both the autologous as well as allogeneic transplant setting, transplant survivors experience mortality rates higher than the general population and the risk of premature cardiovascular (CV)-related death is increased 2.3-fold compared with the general population. The etiology of CV-related deaths in HCT survivors is multifactorial; however, increasing evidence suggests that HCT survivors are at higher risk of developing adverse CV risk factors leading to the development of the metabolic syndrome (a constellation high triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, hypertension, high fasting blood sugars and increased waist circumference), which then predisposes individuals to risk for early CV-related death. Resistance to insulin is the primary underlying pathophysiologic mechanism that contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and HCT survivors have been shown to be more likely to develop hypertension, hyperlipidemia and to be insulin resistant. However, the relationship between HCT-related treatment exposures (total body irradiation, high dose chemotherapy, calcineurin inhibitors, steroids, etc) and transplant-related complications (such as GVHD) with the development of CV risk factors and insulin resistance is still in the early stages of investigation. Greater knowledge of the concern regarding CV risk in HCT survivors among both patients and care providers will provide the opportunity for appropriate screening as well as interventions for modifiable risk factors.

  17. European homograft bank: twenty years of cardiovascular tissue banking and collaboration with transplant coordination in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jashari, R; Goffin, Y; Vanderkelen, A; Van Hoeck, B; du Verger, A; Fan, Y; Holovska, V; Brahy, O

    2010-01-01

    Established in 1989 in Brussels as an international nonprofit association, the European Homograft Bank (EHB) has been collaborating closely with the transplant coordination of the different centers in Belgium and other European countries. Donor selection is made after discussion of exclusion criteria with the transplant coordinator of the procurement center. EHB collaborates with 15 Belgian, 11 German, 10 French, 10 Swiss, 3 Italian, 3 Dutch, and some other procurement and/or implantation centers. Donor ages range from newborn to 65 years. Tissue preparation, morphologic evaluation, and functional testing are performed under Class A laminar flow. After decontamination in a cocktail of 3 antibiotics (lincomycin, vancomycin, and polymixin B) during 20-48 hours, the tissues cryopreserved with liquid nitrogen to -100 degrees C are stored in vapors of liquid nitrogen below -150 degrees C for a maximum of 5 years. Systematic virologic examination of donor blood is performed for HIV, HTLV, hepatitis B/C, and syphilis, as well as for enteroviruses, Q fever, malaria, and West Nile virus by indication. Bacteriologic examination for anaerobic and aerobic contamination is performed at the different steps of processing. Histologic examination for malignant disease and infection is performed systematically. Indications for implantation are discussed with the requesting surgeon. Transport to the implantation center is carried out safely in a dry shipper at -150 degrees C or in dry ice at -76 degrees C. The EHB received 4,511 hearts and 1,169 batches of arteries from January 1989 to December 2008. The 5,133 heart valves (1,974 aortic, 3,106 pulmonary, and 53 mitral) and 2,066 arterial segments have been prepared and stored; 4,600 cryopreserved valvular (2,717 pulmonary, 1,835 aortic, and 48 mitral) and 1,937 arterial allografts have been distributed for implantation in various European Cardiovascular Centers. EHB is not always able to meet the increased demand for heart valves and

  18. Cardiovascular effects of Juniperus excelsa are mediated through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-Ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Zafar, Muhammad Abdullah; Hazrat, Ali; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Juniperus excelsa Bieb. is used in folk medicine for lowering blood pressure (BP). Its BP-lowering effect, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilator effects, and cardio-modulatory effect are reported here. The crude extract of J. excelsa (Je.Cr) which tested positive for the presence of anthraquinone, flavonoids, saponins, sterols, terpenes, and tannins induced a dose-dependent (10-300 mg/kg) fall in the arterial BP of anesthetized rats. In isolated rabbit aorta, Je.Cr (0.01-5.0 mg/mL) inhibited high K(+) (80 mM)- and phenylephrine (1 μM)-induced contractions, like that caused by verapamil and papaverine. In endothelium-intact rat aortic preparations, N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride-sensitive vasodilator activity was noted from Je.Cr, which also relaxed the endothelium-denuded aorta tissues. In guinea pig atria, Je.Cr initially caused mild cardiac stimulation, followed by inhibition, like that exhibited by papaverine. Je.Cr prolonged the R-R interval in electrocardiogram of rats under anesthesia. These results reveal that cardiovascular effects of J. excelsa are mediated possibly through a combination of Ca(++) antagonism, nitric oxide-modulating mechanism, and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanism, which explain its medicinal use in hypertension.

  19. Elevated Circulating Interleukin 33 Levels in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Holly; Soliman, Mahmoud; Elmoselhi, Hamdi; Shoker, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background The Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events calculator (CRCRTR-MACE) estimates the burden of cardiovascular risk in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Our recent study of 95 RTR reported the 7-year median risk of cardiovascular events (CVE) to be 9.97%, ranging from 1.93 to 84.27%. Nearly a third (28.4%) of the cohort was above 20% risk for a CVE. Since interleukins (ILs) as part of the inflammatory response may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), we extended this study to identify which ILs are associated with high cardiovascular risk in this population. Methods Twenty-two ILs were measured by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay in 95 RTR and 56 normal controls. Stepwise analysis after multivariate determination of significant demographic and inflammatory variables was performed between the high and low-CVD risk groups (which were arbitrarily set at scores <10% and ≥20%, respectively). Normalized data was presented as mean ± SD and non-normalized data as median (minimum–maximum). Significance was measured at <0.05. Results 27.5% of the low-risk and 31.3% of the high-risk groups had mean IL levels above the 95 percentile of the normal control levels. In the non-parametric analysis IL-6, 9, 16, 17 and 33 were significantly higher in the high-risk group compared to the control. Univariate analysis (UVA) of the high-risk group identified IL-33 as the only IL that remained significantly higher than the control and low-risk groups (p = 0.000). The percentage of patients with IL-33 levels above the 90 percentile of control value in the low and high-risk groups were 15.6% and 52.0%, respectively (p<0.002). UVA of factors significant to high IL-33 levels included estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), while diabetes mellitus, serum phosphorus, microalbuminuria and age also remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Circulating IL-33 level is positively associated with high CRCRTR-MACE score

  20. Socioeconomic status and risk factors for cardiovascular disease: impact of dietary mediators.

    PubMed

    Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Hatzis, George; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Androulakis, Emmanuel; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the western societies. A number of risk factors such as family history, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity are responsible for a significant proportion of the overall cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, recent data suggest there is a gradient in the incidence, morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease across the spectrum of socioeconomic status, as this is defined by educational level, occupation or income. Additionally, dietary mediators seem to play significant role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, mediating some of the discrepancies in atherosclerosis among different socioeconomic layers. Therefore, in the present article, we aim to review the association between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular disease risk factors and the role of different dietary mediators.

  1. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  2. Redox-mediated signal transduction by cardiovascular Nox NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert; Schröder, Katrin

    2014-08-01

    The only known function of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some Nox enzymes show high tissue-specific expression and the ROS locally produced are required for synthesis of hormones or tissue components. In the cardiovascular system, Nox enzymes are low abundant and function as redox-modulators. By reacting with thiols, nitric oxide (NO) or trace metals, Nox-derived ROS elicit a plethora of cellular responses required for physiological growth factor signaling and the induction and adaptation to pathological processes. The interactions of Nox-derived ROS with signaling elements in the cardiovascular system are highly diverse and will be detailed in this article, which is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System".

  3. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population.

  4. L-Leucine and NO-mediated cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Zhenlong; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Reduced availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the vasculature is a major factor contributing to the impaired action of insulin on blood flow and, therefore, insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. Available evidence shows that vascular insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in developed nations. Interestingly, increased concentrations of L-leucine in the plasma occur in obese humans and other animals with vascular dysfunction. Among branched-chain amino acids, L-leucine is unique in inhibiting NO synthesis from L-arginine in endothelial cells and may modulate cardiovascular homeostasis in insulin resistance. Results of recent studies indicate that L-leucine is an activator of glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GFAT), which is the first and a rate-controlling enzyme in the synthesis of glucosamine (an inhibitor of endothelial NO synthesis). Through stimulating the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and thus protein synthesis, L-leucine may enhance GFAT protein expression, thereby inhibiting NO synthesis in endothelial cells. We propose that reducing circulating levels of L-leucine or endothelial GFAT activity may provide a potentially novel strategy for preventing and/or treating cardiovascular disease in obese and diabetic subjects. Such means may include dietary supplementation with either α-ketoglutarate to enhance the catabolism of L-leucine in the small intestine and other tissues or with N-ethyl-L-glutamine to inhibit GFAT activity in endothelial cells. Preventing leucine-induced activation of GFAT by nutritional supplements or pharmaceutical drugs may contribute to improved cardiovascular function by enhancing vascular NO synthesis.

  5. Treatment Options and Strategies for Antibody Mediated Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection is a significant clinical problem encountered in a subset of renal transplant recipients. This type of rejection has a variable pathogenesis from the presence of donor specific antibodies with no overt disease to immediate hyperacute rejection and many variations between. Antibody mediated rejection is more common in human leukocyte antigen sensitized patients. In general, transplant graft survival after antibody mediated rejection is jeopardized, with less than 50% graft survival 5 years after this diagnosis. A variety of agents have been utilized singly and in combinations to treat antibody mediated rejection with differing results and significant research efforts are being placed on developing new targets for intervention. These same agents have been used in desensitization protocols with some success. In this review, we describe the biology of antibody mediated rejection, review the available agents to treat this form of rejection, and highlight areas of ongoing and future research into this difficult clinical problem. PMID:21940179

  6. Positive childhood experiences and ideal cardiovascular health in midlife: Associations and mediators.

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; Chen, Ying; Guida, Jennifer L; Albert, Michelle A; Williams, David R

    2017-04-01

    In 2010, the American Heart Association introduced a new conceptual framework to encourage a focus on primary prevention and provided a definition for "ideal cardiovascular health". In this study we examined the relationship between positive childhood experience and ideal cardiovascular health in mid-life, and the extent to which education, depression, and social support mediate this association. Data are from participants in the Midlife and Aging in the United States study who completed a clinic-based assessment of health (N=1255, aged 34-84years, 2004-2005). We created a positive childhood experiences index based on retrospective report of eight childhood experiences, and calculated a continuous ideal cardiovascular health score for each participant following the American Heart Association's definition of ideal, intermediate and poor cardiovascular health across seven health metrics (analyses conducted in 2015-2016). Positive childhood experiences were associated with ideal cardiovascular health: compared to individuals in the lowest quartile, respondents in the second, third, and fourth quartile of positive childhood experiences scored 0.42 (standard error (SE)=0.18), 0.92 (SE=0.18) and 1.04 (SE=0.18) units higher on ideal cardiovascular health, adjusting for age, sex, and race. Respondent's education, depression status, and social support fully mediated the direct effect of positive childhood experiences on ideal cardiovascular health, with the largest indirect effect for education. These results suggest that positive childhood experiences are associated with ideal cardiovascular health in midlife. Strategies to promote cardiovascular wellbeing may benefit from a focus on social interventions early in life; educational attainment, major depression, and social support may represent key points of intervention.

  7. Role of arterial baroreceptors in mediating cardiovascular response to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcritchie, R. J.; Vatner, S. F.; Patrick, T. A.; Braunwald, E.; Boettcher, D.; Heyndrickx, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the role of the major arterial baroreceptors during moderately severe exercise by comparing the responses of untethered conscious dogs instrumented for the measurement of aortic pressure and cardiac output with those of dogs with total arterial baroreceptor denervation. The reflex heart rate responses to intravenous bolus doses of methoxamine were also examined in intact animals, both at rest and during exercise. Methoxamine is found to cause striking bradycardia at rest, but little bradycardia during exercise. Experimental findings suggest that the arterial baroreceptor reflex is normally inhibited during severe exercise and therefore plays little role in modulating the cardiovascular response to exercise.

  8. Cardiovascular

    NASA Video Gallery

    Overview of Cardiovascular research which addresses risks of space flight, including adaptive changes to the cephalad fluid shift (such as reduced circulating blood volume), potential for heart rhy...

  9. Enhanced infarct myocardium repair mediated by thermosensitive copolymer hydrogel-based stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Lang, Meidong; Xiao, Yan; Lian, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation by intramyocardial injection has been proposed as a promising therapy strategy for cardiac repair after myocardium infarction. However, low retention and survival of grafted MSCs hinder its further application. In this study, copolymer with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylic acid/2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) ratio of 88:9.6:2.4 was bioconjugated with type I collagen to construct a novel injectable thermosensitive hydrogel. The injectable and biocompatible hydrogel-mediated MSC transplantation could enhance the grafted cell survival in the myocardium, which contributed to the increased neovascularization, decreased interstitial fibrosis, and ultimately improved heart function to a significantly greater degree than regular MSC transplantation. We suggest that this novel hydrogel has the potential for future stem cell transplantation. PMID:25432986

  10. Enhanced infarct myocardium repair mediated by thermosensitive copolymer hydrogel-based stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yu; Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Lang, Meidong; Xiao, Yan; Lian, Sheng; Guo, Changfa; Wang, Chunsheng

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation by intramyocardial injection has been proposed as a promising therapy strategy for cardiac repair after myocardium infarction. However, low retention and survival of grafted MSCs hinder its further application. In this study, copolymer with N-isopropylacrylamide/acrylic acid/2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) ratio of 88:9.6:2.4 was bioconjugated with type I collagen to construct a novel injectable thermosensitive hydrogel. The injectable and biocompatible hydrogel-mediated MSC transplantation could enhance the grafted cell survival in the myocardium, which contributed to the increased neovascularization, decreased interstitial fibrosis, and ultimately improved heart function to a significantly greater degree than regular MSC transplantation. We suggest that this novel hydrogel has the potential for future stem cell transplantation.

  11. A role for the central histaminergic system in the leptin-mediated increase in cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sumangala P; Dunbar, Joseph C

    2005-01-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) histaminergic neurons have been shown to regulate feeding behavior and are a target of leptin in the brain. The present study aimed to examine the involvement of the histaminergic system in the leptin-mediated regulation of cardiovascular dynamics. We investigated the cardiovascular responses to the CNS administration of histamine, leptin and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) both in the presence and absence of the histamine H1 antagonist, chlorpheniramine. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine resulted in an immediate increase in both mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and vasoconstricted the iliac, renal and superior mesenteric vessels. The i.c.v. pretreatment with chlorpheniramine attenuated the histamine-induced increase in MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. The i.c.v. administration of leptin increased MAP and HR and decreased vascular conductance. The i.c.v. pretreatment with chlorpheniramine decreased the leptin-induced increase in MAP and the leptin-mediated iliac vasoconstriction. The i.c.v. administration of alpha-MSH also increased MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. However, pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not influence the central alpha-MSH-mediated increase in MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. These results indicate that the central histaminergic system mediated by H1 receptors have a role in the central signaling pathway and is involved in leptin's regulation of cardiovascular dynamics. It appears that leptin directly or indirectly stimulates histaminergic neurons that lead to increased cardiovascular activity.

  12. Reviewing the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection and renal graft pathology after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morozumi, Kunio; Takeda, Asami; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Horike, Keiji; Gotoh, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    The clinicopathological context of rejection after kidney transplantation was well recognized. Banff conferences greatly contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis and to establish the pathologic criteria of rejection after kidney transplantation. The most important current problem of renal transplantation is de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production leading chronic rejection and graft loss. Microvascular inflammation is considered as a reliable pathological marker for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the presence of DSA. Electron microscopic study allowed us to evaluate early changes in peritubular capillaries in T-lymphocyte mediated rejection and transition to antibody-mediated rejection. Severe endothelial injuries with edema and activated lymphocyte invaded into subendothelial space with early multi-layering of peritubular capillary basement membrane suggest T-lymphocyte mediated rejection induce an unbounded chain of antibody-mediated rejection. The risk factors of AMR after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are important issues. Anti-ABO blood type antibody titre of IgG excess 32-fold before transplant operation is the only predictable factor for acute AMR. Characteristics of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAAMR) are one of the most important problems. Light microscopic findings and C4d stain of peritubular capillary and glomerular capillary are useful diagnostic criteria of CAAMR. Microvascular inflammation, double contour of glomerular capillary and thickening of peritubular capillary basement are good predictive factors of the presence of de novo DSA. C4d stain of linear glomerular capillary is a more sensitive marker for CAAMR than positive C4d of peritubular capillary. Early and sensitive diagnostic attempts of diagnosing CAAMR are pivotal to prevent chronic graft failure.

  13. Subclinical cardiovascular changes in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Nasser, Yasser; Moura, Marta C; Mertens, Luc; McCrindle, Brian W; Parekh, Rulan S; Ng, Vicky L; Church, Peter C; Mouzaki, Marialena

    2016-06-01

    CV disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following solid organ transplantation in adults. While the prevalence of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors is increased in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients, it is not clear whether they have subclinical CV changes. cIMT, central pWV, and CAC are indicative of subclinical CV disease, and, in adults, predict future CV events. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the prevalence of subclinical CV changes, as measured by cIMT, pWV, and CAC among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE(®) and EMBASE and conducted meta-analysis for studies that evaluated cIMT, central pWV, and CAC among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients (kidney, lung, intestine and liver). The search identified nine eligible studies that included a total of 259 patients and 685 healthy controls. Eight studies reported on kidney transplant recipients and one study on a combined cohort of kidney and liver transplant recipients. The mean cIMT of transplant recipients was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (mean difference = 0.05 mm, 95% CI 0.02-0.07; p < 0.0001) with an estimated pooled prevalence of elevated cIMT of 56.0% (95% CI 17.0-95.0). The one study that assessed pWV showed increased vascular stiffness in transplant recipients compared to healthy controls. No studies assessing for CAC were found. There were limited data regarding subclinical CV disease following pediatric solid organ transplantation. In conclusion, kidney transplantation in childhood is associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical CV changes compared to healthy children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether children have increased CV morbidity and mortality after transplantation.

  14. Olfactory mucosa for transplant-mediated repair: a complex tissue for a complex injury?

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Susan L; Riddell, John S; Barnett, Susan C

    2010-01-15

    Damage to the brain and spinal cord leads to permanent functional disability because of the very limited capacity of the central nervous system (CNS) for repair. Transplantation of cells into regions of CNS damage represents one approach to enhancing this repair. At present, the ideal cell type for transplant-mediated repair has not been identified but autologous transplantation would be advantageous. Olfactory tissue, in part because of its capacity for regeneration, has emerged as a promising source of cells and several clinical centers are using olfactory cells or tissues in the treatment of CNS damage. Until now, the olfactory ensheathing cell, a specialized glial cell of the olfactory system has been the main focus of attention. Transplants of this cell have been shown to have a neuroprotective function, support axonal regeneration, and remyelinate demyelinated axons. However, the olfactory mucosa is a heterogeneous tissue, composed of a variety of cells supporting both its normal function and its regenerative capacity. It is therefore possible that it contains several cell types that could participate in CNS repair including putative stem cells as well as glia. Here we review the cellular composition of the olfactory tissue and the evidence that equivalent cell types exist in both rodent and human olfactory mucosa suggesting that it is potentially a rich source of autologous cells for transplant-mediated repair of the CNS.

  15. MID TERM RESULTS AFTER OPEN HEART SURGERY IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS AWAITING KIDNEY TRANSPLANT: DOES CARDIOVASCULAR SURGICAL INTERVENTION PRIOR TO TRANSPLANTATION PROLONG SURVIVAL?

    PubMed

    Ozbek, C; Sever, K; Demirhan, O; Mansuroglu, D; Kurtoglu, N; Ugurlucan, M; Sevmis, S; Karakayali, H

    2015-12-01

    - group, whereas the length of follow up was significantly higher in the Tp+ group. The use of inotropic agents was significantly higher in the Tp- group. A logistic regression analysis was made to determine the factors affecting mortality. Revision (p=0.013), blood transfusion (p=0.017), ventilation time (p=0.019), and length of stay in the intensive care unit (p=0.009) were found as predictors of mortality. Survival rates at years 1, 2 and 3 were 86.1%, 81%, 77.5% in the Tp- group, and 96.0%, 96.3%, 90.4% in the Tp+ group. Median survival rate was 41.35±2.02 in the Tp- group, and 49.64±1.59 in the Tp+ group which was significantly higher compared to the Tp- group (p=0.048). Chronic renal failure is among the perioperative risk factors for patients undergoing open heart surgery. Transplantation is still an important health issue due to insufficiency of available transplant organs. Patients with chronic renal failure are well known to have higher risks for coronary artery disease. A radical solution of the cardiovascular system problems prior to kidney transplantation seems to have a significant contribution to the post transplant survival.

  16. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients.

  17. Molecular diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in human kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; Reeve, J; Loupy, A; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Skene, A; de Freitas, D G; Kreepala, C; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Halloran, P F

    2013-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the major cause of kidney transplant failure, but the histology-based diagnostic system misses most cases due to its requirement for C4d positivity. We hypothesized that gene expression data could be used to test biopsies for the presence of antibody-mediated rejection. To develop a molecular test, we prospectively assigned diagnoses, including C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection, to 403 indication biopsies from 315 patients, based on histology (microcirculation lesions) and donor-specific HLA antibody. We then used microarray data to develop classifiers that assigned antibody-mediated rejection scores to each biopsy. The transcripts distinguishing antibody-mediated rejection from other conditions were mostly expressed in endothelial cells or NK cells, or were IFNG-inducible. The scores correlated with the presence of microcirculation lesions and donor-specific antibody. Of 45 biopsies with scores>0.5, 39 had been diagnosed as antibody-mediated rejection on the basis of histology and donor-specific antibody. High scores were also associated with unanimity among pathologists that antibody-mediated rejection was present. The molecular score also strongly predicted future graft loss in Cox regression analysis. We conclude that microarray assessment of gene expression can assign a probability of ABMR to transplant biopsies without knowledge of HLA antibody status, histology, or C4d staining, and predicts future failure.

  18. Urinary Markers of Fibrosis and Risk of Cardiovascular Events and Death in Kidney Transplant Recipients: the FAVORIT Trial.

    PubMed

    Park, M; Katz, R; Shlipak, M G; Weiner, D; Tracy, R; Jotwani, V; Hughes-Austin, J; Gabbai, F; Hsu, C Y; Pfeffer, M; Bansal, N; Bostom, A; Gutierrez, O; Sarnak, M; Levey, A; Ix, J H

    2017-03-29

    Cardiovascular risk remains high in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) despite improved kidney function after transplant. Urinary markers of kidney fibrosis and injury may help to reveal mechanisms of this risk. In a case-cohort study among stable KTRs who participated in the FAVORIT trial, we measured 4 urinary proteins known to correlate with kidney tubulointerstitial fibrosis on biopsy (urine alpha 1 microglobulin [α1m], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], procollagen type I [PINP] and type III [PIIINP] N-terminal amino peptide) and evaluated associations with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (N=300) and death (N=371). In adjusted models, higher urine α1m (hazard ratio [HR] per doubling of biomarker 1.40 [95% CI 1.21, 1.62]), MCP-1 (HR 1.18 [1.03, 1.36]), and PINP (HR 1.13 [95% CI 1.03, 1.23]) were associated with CVD events. These 3 markers were also associated with death (HR per doubling α1m 1.51 [95% CI 1.32, 1.72]; MCP-1 1.31 [95% CI 1.13, 1.51]; PINP 1.11 [95% CI 1.03, 1.20]). Higher concentrations of urine α1m, MCP-1, and PINP may identify KTRs at higher risk for CVD events and death. These markers may identify a systemic process of fibrosis involving both the kidney and cardiovascular system, and give new insights into mechanisms linking the kidney with CVD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Expanding role of delta-like 4 mediated notch signaling in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Daiju; Aikawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Cardiometabolic disease, a global health threat, has been linked to chronic inflammation, in which activated macrophages play a key role. Macrophages are highly heterogeneous hematopoietic cells found in nearly every tissue in the body. Various stimuli recruit monocytes into the cardiovascular system and metabolic organs, where they differentiate to macrophages, and activate these pro-inflammatory phagocytes, leading to the initiation and development of inflammation in these organs. Key regulators of macrophage activation therefore may serve as therapeutic targets for cardiometabolic disease. The Notch signaling pathway, involving 5 ligands and 4 receptors, regulates the differentiation of various cell types during development, and also contributes to the disease processes in adults. We found that the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (Dll4) activates macrophages in vitro as determined by the induction of genes and pathways associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Our recent study demonstrated in vivo that blockade of Dll4 by a neutralizing antibody attenuates key features typical of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, such as accumulation of activated macrophages in arteries and fat; chronic atherosclerosis; arterial and valvular calcification; insulin resistance; and fatty liver. These results suggest that Dll4-mediated Notch signaling participates in the shared disease mechanisms for cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the role of macrophages and Dll4/Notch signaling in the development of inflammation in both the cardiovascular system and metabolic organs. 

  20. Acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pape, Lars; Becker, Jan U; Immenschuh, Stephan; Ahlenstiel, Thurid

    2015-03-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is a diagnostic challenge in renal transplantation medicine. However, it is an important diagnosis to make, since chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) is the main cause of long-term graft loss. Antibody-mediated rejection is diagnosed by detecting donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) in the blood in combination with observing typical histomorphological signs in kidney biopsy, as described in the Banff classification. Therapy is based on the removal of DSAs by administering intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption. Reoccurrence of antibodies is diminished by the use of rituximab, increased immunosuppression, and in some cases additional experimental substances. A combination of these techniques has been shown to be successful in the majority of cases of acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. Routine DSA monitoring is warranted for early detection of antibody-mediated rejection.

  1. Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Hepatocyte Transplantation: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charlotte A; Dhawan, Anil; Smith, Richard A; Mitry, Ragai R; Fitzpatrick, Emer

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) is emerging as a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with certain liver-based metabolic disease and acute liver failure. Hepatocytes are generally infused into the portal venous system, from which they migrate into the liver cell plates of the native organ. One of the major hurdles to the sustained success of this therapy is early cell loss, with up to 70% of hepatocytes lost immediately following infusion. This is largely thought to be due to the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR), resulting in the activation of complement and coagulation pathways. Transplanted hepatocytes produce and release tissue factor (TF), which activates the coagulation pathway, leading to the formation of thrombin and fibrin clots. Thrombin can further activate a number of complement proteins, leading to the activation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and subsequent hepatocyte cell death. Inflammatory cells including granulocytes, monocytes, Kupffer cells, and natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to cluster around transplanted hepatocytes, leading to their rapid clearance shortly after transplantation. Current research aims to improve cell engraftment and prevent early cell loss. This has been proven successful in vitro using pharmacological interventions such as melagatran, low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Effective inhibition of IBMIR would significantly improve hepatocyte engraftment, proliferation, and function, providing successful treatment for patients with liver-based metabolic diseases.

  2. Role of MicroRNAs in Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System-Mediated Cardiovascular Inflammation and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression either by inhibiting translation or protein degradation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs play a role in cardiovascular disease and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system- (RAAS-) mediated cardiovascular inflammation, either as mediators or being targeted by RAAS pharmacological inhibitors. The exact role(s) of microRNAs in RAAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling is/are still in early stage of investigation. However, few microRNAs have been shown to play a role in RAAS signaling, particularly miR-155, miR-146a/b, miR-132/122, and miR-483-3p. Identification of specific microRNAs and their targets and elucidating microRNA-regulated mechanisms associated RAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling might lead to the development of novel pharmacological strategies to target RAAS-mediated vascular pathologies. This paper reviews microRNAs role in inflammatory factors mediating cardiovascular inflammation and RAAS genes and the effect of RAAS pharmacological inhibition on microRNAs and the resolution of RAAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling. Also, this paper discusses the advances on microRNAs-based therapeutic approaches that may be important in targeting RAAS signaling. PMID:26064773

  3. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J.; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function. PMID:26033914

  4. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function.

  5. Late antibody-mediated rejection by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibody after renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cippà, Pietro E; Gaspert, Ariana; Etter, Christoph; Guenduez, Zehra; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Rüsi, Barbara; Fehr, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The role of donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies after renal transplantation is controversial, and only preformed HLA-DP-specific antibodies have been shown to mediate rejection. Here we present a case of late humoral rejection mediated by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies in a non-sensitized recipient. This unique case demonstrates the pathogenic role of de novo anti-DP antibodies and suggests that HLA-DP matching might be relevant for renal transplantation.

  6. IL-34 is a Treg-specific cytokine and mediates transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bézie, Séverine; Picarda, Elodie; Ossart, Jason; Tesson, Laurent; Usal, Claire; Renaudin, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines and metabolic pathway-controlling enzymes regulate immune responses and have potential as powerful tools to mediate immune tolerance. Blockade of the interaction between CD40 and CD40L induces long-term cardiac allograft survival in rats through a CD8+CD45RClo Treg potentiation. Here, we have shown that the cytokine IL-34, the immunoregulatory properties of which have not been previously studied in transplantation or T cell biology, is expressed by rodent CD8+CD45RClo Tregs and human FOXP3+CD45RCloCD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. IL-34 was involved in the suppressive function of both CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs and markedly inhibited alloreactive immune responses. Additionally, in a rat cardiac allograft model, IL-34 potently induced transplant tolerance that was associated with a total inhibition of alloantibody production. Treatment of rats with IL-34 promoted allograft tolerance that was mediated by induction of CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. Moreover, these Tregs were capable of serial tolerance induction through modulation of macrophages that migrate early to the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that human macrophages cultured in the presence of IL-34 greatly expanded CD8+ and CD4+ FOXP3+ Tregs, with a superior suppressive potential of antidonor immune responses compared with non-IL-34-expanded Tregs. In conclusion, we reveal that IL-34 serves as a suppressive Treg-specific cytokine and as a tolerogenic cytokine that efficiently inhibits alloreactive immune responses and mediates transplant tolerance.

  7. T regulatory Cell–mediated Immunotherapy for Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Afzal

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) play a vital role in suppressing heightened immune response, and thereby promote a state of immunological tolerance. Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, which makes them potential candidates for cell-based immunotherapy in the suppression of uncontrolled activation of graft-specific inflammatory cells and toxic mediators. Graft-specific inflammatory cells (T effector cells) and other inflammatory mediators (immunoglobulins, active complement mediators) are mainly responsible for graft vascular deterioration followed by acute/chronic rejection. Treg-mediated immunotherapy is under investigation to induce allospecific tolerance in various ongoing clinical trials in organ transplant recipients. Treg immunotherapy shows promising results; however, key issues regarding Treg immunotherapy remain unresolved, including the mechanism of action and specific Treg cell phenotypes responsible for a state of tolerance. This review highlights the involvement of various subsets of Tregs during immune suppression, the novelty of Treg functions, effects on angiogenesis, emerging technologies for effective Treg expansion, and plasticity and safety associated with clinical applications. Altogether, this information will assist in designing single/combined Treg-mediated therapies for successful clinical trials in solid organ transplantations. PMID:27878210

  8. The role of complement in antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stegall, Mark D; Chedid, Marcio F; Cornell, Lynn D

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have suggested that the complement system has an active role in both acute and chronic allograft rejection. These studies have been facilitated by improved techniques to detect antibody-mediated organ rejection, including immunohistological staining for C4d deposition in the allograft and solid-phase assays that identify donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) in the serum of transplant recipients. Studies with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against complement component C5, have shown that activation of the terminal complement pathway is necessary for the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients of living-donor kidney allografts who have high levels of DSAs. The extent to which complement activation drives chronic antibody-mediated injury leading to organ rejection is less clear. In chronic antibody-mediated injury, early complement activation might facilitate chemotaxis of inflammatory cells into the allograft in a process that later becomes somewhat independent of DSA levels and complement factors. In this Review, we discuss the different roles that the complement system might have in antibody-mediated allograft rejection, with specific emphasis on renal transplantation.

  9. Pivotal Cytoprotective Mediators and Promising Therapeutic Strategies for Endothelial Progenitor Cell-Based Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including atherosclerosis, stroke, and myocardial infarction, is a major cause of death worldwide. In aspects of cell therapy against CVD, it is generally accepted that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are potent neovascular modulators in ischemic tissues. In response to ischemic injury signals, EPCs located in a bone marrow niche migrate to injury sites and form new vessels by secreting various vasculogenic factors including VEGF, SDF-1, and FGF, as well as by directly differentiating into endothelial cells. Nonetheless, in ischemic tissues, most of engrafted EPCs do not survive under harsh ischemic conditions and nutrient depletion. Therefore, an understanding of diverse EPC-related cytoprotective mediators underlying EPC homeostasis in ischemic tissues may help to overcome current obstacles for EPC-mediated cell therapy for CVDs. Additionally, to enhance EPC's functional capacity at ischemic sites, multiple strategies for cell survival should be considered, that is, preconditioning of EPCs with function-targeting drugs including natural compounds and hormones, virus mediated genetic modification, combined therapy with other stem/progenitor cells, and conglomeration with biomaterials. In this review, we discuss multiple cytoprotective mediators of EPC-based cardiovascular repair and propose promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CVDs. PMID:28090210

  10. Auto-antibodies as emergent prognostic markers and possible mediators of ischemic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Roux-Lombard, P; Pagano, S; Montecucco, F; Satta, N; Vuilleumier, N

    2013-02-01

    During the last 15 years, a growing body of evidence supported the fact that auto-antibodies represent not only emergent markers but also active mediators of cardiovascular disease (CVD), clinically represented mostly by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and stroke. There is a contrasted relationship between auto-antibodies and CVD, some being protective, while others acting as potential risk factors. Therefore, we performed a review of the literature on the respective cardiovascular prognostic value of the most relevant auto-antibodies in ACS and stroke, and their putative pathophysiological properties in atherogenesis. This review highlights auto-antibodies as active modulators of the innate immune system in atherogenesis (either toward a pro- or anti-inflammatory response), or by affecting basal heart rate regulation (anti-apoA-1 IgG). Given their apparent prognostic independency towards traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the data available in the literature indicates that some of those auto-antibodies could be of valuable help for cardiovascular risk stratification in the future, especially because their deleterious effects have been shown to be potentially abrogated in vivo and in vitro by existing therapeutic modalities. Although evidence in humans is currently lacking, these studies may open innovative therapeutic perspectives for CVD in the future.

  11. Predictive Value of Echocardiographic Abnormalities and the Impact of Diastolic Dysfunction on In-hospital Major Cardiovascular Complications after Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Chang, Suyon; Kim, So Yeon; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kang, Soojeong; Choi, Yong Seon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show characteristic abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. We evaluated the influence of these abnormalities on adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes after living donor kidney transplantation in patients with valid preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation. We then observed any development of major postoperative cardiovascular complications and pulmonary edema until hospital discharge. In-hospital major cardiovascular complications were defined as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, newly-onset atrial fibrillation, clinical pulmonary edema requiring endotracheal intubation or dialysis. Among the 242 ESRD study patients, 9 patients (4%) developed major cardiovascular complications, and 39 patients (16%) developed pulmonary edema. Diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion time, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), left atrium volume index (LAVI), and high E/E' ratios were risk factors of major cardiovascular complications, while age, LVEDd, LVMI, LAVI, and high E/E' ratios were risk factors of pulmonary edema. The optimal E/E' cut-off value for predicting major cardiovascular complications was 13.0, showing 77.8% sensitivity and 78.5% specificity. Thus, the patient's E/E' ratio is useful for predicting in-hospital major cardiovascular complications after kidney transplantation. We recommend that goal-directed therapy employing E/E' ratio be enacted in kidney recipients with baseline diastolic dysfunction to avert postoperative morbidity. (http://Clinical Trials.gov number: NCT02322567) PMID:27499694

  12. Microbial mediation of biogeochemical cycles revealed by simulation of global changes with soil transplant and cropping.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengxin; Xue, Kai; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shanshan; Bai, Shijie; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-10-01

    Despite microbes' key roles in driving biogeochemical cycles, the mechanism of microbe-mediated feedbacks to global changes remains elusive. Recently, soil transplant has been successfully established as a proxy to simulate climate changes, as the current trend of global warming coherently causes range shifts toward higher latitudes. Four years after southward soil transplant over large transects in China, we found that microbial functional diversity was increased, in addition to concurrent changes in microbial biomass, soil nutrient content and functional processes involved in the nitrogen cycle. However, soil transplant effects could be overridden by maize cropping, which was attributed to a negative interaction. Strikingly, abundances of nitrogen and carbon cycle genes were increased by these field experiments simulating global change, coinciding with higher soil nitrification potential and carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux. Further investigation revealed strong correlations between carbon cycle genes and CO2 efflux in bare soil but not cropped soil, and between nitrogen cycle genes and nitrification. These findings suggest that changes of soil carbon and nitrogen cycles by soil transplant and cropping were predictable by measuring microbial functional potentials, contributing to a better mechanistic understanding of these soil functional processes and suggesting a potential to incorporate microbial communities in greenhouse gas emission modeling.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C; Osborne, Andrew; Martin, Keith R

    2015-10-01

    A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long-term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft-induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM-MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis-mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft-induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM-MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM-MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell-induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation-based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve.

  14. Microbial mediation of biogeochemical cycles revealed by simulation of global changes with soil transplant and cropping

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mengxin; Xue, Kai; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shanshan; Bai, Shijie; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Despite microbes' key roles in driving biogeochemical cycles, the mechanism of microbe-mediated feedbacks to global changes remains elusive. Recently, soil transplant has been successfully established as a proxy to simulate climate changes, as the current trend of global warming coherently causes range shifts toward higher latitudes. Four years after southward soil transplant over large transects in China, we found that microbial functional diversity was increased, in addition to concurrent changes in microbial biomass, soil nutrient content and functional processes involved in the nitrogen cycle. However, soil transplant effects could be overridden by maize cropping, which was attributed to a negative interaction. Strikingly, abundances of nitrogen and carbon cycle genes were increased by these field experiments simulating global change, coinciding with higher soil nitrification potential and carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux. Further investigation revealed strong correlations between carbon cycle genes and CO2 efflux in bare soil but not cropped soil, and between nitrogen cycle genes and nitrification. These findings suggest that changes of soil carbon and nitrogen cycles by soil transplant and cropping were predictable by measuring microbial functional potentials, contributing to a better mechanistic understanding of these soil functional processes and suggesting a potential to incorporate microbial communities in greenhouse gas emission modeling. PMID:24694714

  15. Successful Salvage Treatment of Resistant Acute Antibody-Mediated Kidney Transplant Rejection with Eculizumab.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif A; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Lawati, Nabil M

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) jeopardises short- and long-term transplant survival and remains a challenge in the field of organ transplantation. We report the first use of the anticomplement agent eculizumab in Oman in the treatment of a 61-year-old female patient with ABMR following a living unrelated kidney transplant. The patient was admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in 2013 on the eighth day post-transplantation with serum creatinine (Cr) levels of 400 µmol/L which continued to rise, necessitating haemodialysis. A biopsy indicated ABMR with acute cellular rejection. No improvement was observed following standard ABMR treatment and she continued to require dialysis. Five doses of eculizumab were administered over six weeks with a subsequent dramatic improvement in renal function. The patient became dialysis-free with serum Cr levels of 119 µmol/L within four months. This case report indicates that eculizumab is a promising agent in the treatment of ABMR.

  16. Atypical HUS associated with severe, unexpected antibody-mediated rejection post kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Sarah; Mallett, Andrew; Oliver, Kimberley; Hyland, Valentine; Hawley, Carmel; Malmanche, Theo; Isbel, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of an unsensitized patient with end-stage kidney disease secondary to atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) with mutations in CD46/MCP and CFH who developed severe, intractable antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) unresponsive to therapy post kidney transplantation. There were no haematological features of thrombotic microangiopathy. The patient received standard induction therapy and after an initial fall in serum creatinine, severe ABMR developed in the setting of urosepsis. Despite maximal therapy with thymoglobulin, plasma exchange and methylprednisolone, rapid graft loss resulted and transplant nephrectomy was performed. Luminex at 4 weeks showed a new DSA and when repeated after nephrectomy showed antibodies to each of the 5 mismatched antigens with high MFI. The rate of recurrence of disease in patients with aHUS referred for transplantation is 50% and is associated with a high rate of graft loss. It is dependent in part on the nature of the mutation with circulating factors CFH and CFI more likely to cause recurrent disease than MCP which is highly expressed in the kidney. There is increasing interest in the role of complement in the development and propagation of ABMR via terminal complement activation. This case suggesting that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway within the transplant kidney may have contributed to the severe AMR. Very little is known about the impact of complement dysregulation and the development of anti HLA antibodies however the strength of HLA antibody formation was prominent in this case.

  17. Eculizumab to treat antibody-mediated rejection in a 7-year-old kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Hassib; Rotman, Samuel; Matter, Maurice; Girardin, Eric; Aubert, Vincent; Pascual, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    We report on successful early eculizumab administration to treat acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient. The recipient is a 7-year-old boy who received, 6 months after a desensitization protocol with monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusion, a second kidney transplant in the presence of low donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). Both pretransplant lymphocytotoxic and flow cytometric crossmatch were negative. Allograft function recovered promptly, with excellent initial function. On postoperative day (POD) 4, the child developed significant proteinuria with an acute rise in serum creatinine. Allograft biopsy showed severe acute ABMR. Intravenous eculizumab (600 mg), preceded by a single session of plasmapheresis, was administered on POD 5 and 12 along with a 4-day thymoglobulin course. After the first dose of eculizumab, a strikingly rapid normalization of allograft function with a decrease in proteinuria occurred. However, because circulating DSA levels remained elevated, the child received 3 doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (POD 15, 16, and 17), with a significant subsequent decrease in DSA levels. At 9 months after transplant, the child continues to maintain excellent allograft function with undetectable circulating DSA levels. This unique case highlights the potential efficacy of using early eculizumab to rapidly reverse severe ABMR in pediatric transplantation, and therefore it suggests a novel therapeutic approach to treat acute ABMR.

  18. Cardiovascular disease: Risk factors and applicability of a risk model in a Greek cohort of renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Anastasopoulos, Nikolaos-Andreas; Dounousi, Evangelia; Papachristou, Evangelos; Pappas, Charalampos; Leontaridou, Eleni; Savvidaki, Eirini; Goumenos, Dimitrios; Mitsis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence and the determinants of cardiovascular morbidity in Greek renal transplant recipients (RTRs) expressed as major advance cardiac event (MACE) rate. METHODS Two hundred and forty-two adult patients with a functioning graft for at least three months and available data that were followed up on the August 31, 2015 at two transplant centers of Western Greece were included in this study. Baseline recipients’ data elements included demographics, clinical characteristics, history of comorbid conditions and laboratory parameters. Follow-up data regarding MACE occurrence were collected retrospectively from the patients’ records and MACE risk score was calculated for each patient. RESULTS The mean age was 53 years (63.6% males) and 47 patients (19.4%) had a pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) before transplantation. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 52 ± 17 mL/min per 1.73 m2. During follow-up 36 patients (14.9%) suffered a MACE with a median time to MACE 5 years (interquartile range: 2.2-10 years). Recipients with a MACE compared to recipients without a MACE had a significantly higher mean age (59 years vs 52 years, P < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of pre-existing CVD (44.4% vs 15%, P < 0.001). The 7-year predicted mean risk for MACE was 14.6% ± 12.5% overall. In RTRs who experienced a MACE, the predicted risk was 22.3% ± 17.1% and was significantly higher than in RTRs without an event 13.3% ± 11.1% (P = 0.003). The discrimination ability of the model in the Greek database of RTRs was good with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.68 (95%CI: 0.58-0.78). CONCLUSION In this Greek cohort of RTRs, MACE occurred in 14.9% of the patients, pre-existing CVD was the main risk factor, while MACE risk model was proved a dependable utility in predicting CVD post RT. PMID:28280695

  19. Serum Fetuin-A Levels Are Associated with Vascular Calcifications and Predict Cardiovascular Events in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Céline; Schlieper, Georg; Nguyen, Pauline; Krüger, Thilo; Coche, Emmanuel; Robert, Annie; Floege, Jorgen; Goffin, Eric; Jadoul, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Vascular calcifications predict cardiovascular disease, the major cause of death in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). We studied the determinants of fetuin-A, a potent circulating calcification inhibitor encoded by the AHSG gene, and tested its association with vascular calcifications and long-term survival and cardiovascular events (CVEs) in RTRs. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Two hundred seventy-seven prevalent RTRs from a single center were included. CVEs and deaths were prospectively recorded during a 5-year follow-up. Results Independent determinants of lower serum fetuin-A levels were lower plasma cholesterol, the AHSG rs4918 G allele, and history of smoking. Low serum fetuin-A level was a determinant of aortic calcifications (assessed using spiral CT). Low fetuin-A levels (≤0.47 g/L, first quintile) were independently associated with CVEs and deaths (hazard ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 3.04). The association was confirmed for all-cause mortality, and the major adverse cardiovascular endpoints were analyzed separately. Patients with low fetuin-A and high high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (>4.36 mg/L, fourth quintile) levels had a 3.5-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality and CVEs. In the presence of inflammation, CVE-free survival was influenced by common variants in the AHSG gene. Conclusions These data show that low fetuin-A levels are independently associated with aortic calcifications and a higher risk of CVEs and mortality. They support fetuin-A as a circulating biomarker able to identify RTRs at risk for vascular calcifications and CVEs. PMID:21527649

  20. Olanzapine-induced early cardiovascular effects are mediated by the biological clock and prevented by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Romo-Nava, Francisco; Buijs, Frederik N; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Benítez-King, Gloria; Basualdo, MariCarmen; Perusquía, Mercedes; Heinze, Gerhard; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2017-05-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGA) are associated with adverse cardiometabolic side effects contributing to premature mortality in patients. While mechanisms mediating these cardiometabolic side effects remain poorly understood, three independent studies recently demonstrated that melatonin was protective against cardiometabolic risk in SGA-treated patients. As one of the main target areas of circulating melatonin in the brain is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), we hypothesized that the SCN is involved in SGA-induced early cardiovascular effects in Wistar rats. We evaluated the acute effects of olanzapine and melatonin in the biological clock, paraventricular nucleus and autonomic nervous system using immunohistochemistry, invasive cardiovascular measurements, and Western blot. Olanzapine induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the SCN followed by the paraventricular nucleus and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus indicating a potent induction of parasympathetic tone. The involvement of a SCN-parasympathetic neuronal pathway after olanzapine administration was further documented using cholera toxin-B retrograde tracing and vasoactive intestinal peptide immunohistochemistry. Olanzapine-induced decrease in blood pressure and heart rate confirmed this. Melatonin abolished olanzapine-induced SCN c-Fos immunoreactivity, including the parasympathetic pathway and cardiovascular effects while brain areas associated with olanzapine beneficial effects including the striatum, ventral tegmental area, and nucleus accumbens remained activated. In the SCN, olanzapine phosphorylated the GSK-3β, a regulator of clock activity, which melatonin prevented. Bilateral lesions of the SCN prevented the effects of olanzapine on parasympathetic activity. Collectively, results demonstrate the SCN as a key region mediating the early effects of olanzapine on cardiovascular function and show melatonin has opposing and potentially protective effects warranting additional investigation.

  1. Challenges inherent to the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Nicholas; Westall, Glen; Paraskeva, Miranda; Ciciulla, John; Cantwell, Linda; Snell, Greg

    2015-01-01

    A bilateral sequential lung transplant was performed on a young female with cystic fibrosis-related bronchiectasis. She had negative prospective T- and B-cell crossmatch, and no known donor-specific antibodies. Post-transplantation, she developed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates of uncertain etiology, compounded by persistent tachycardia and questionable medication adherence. Despite aggressive intervention for suspected cellular rejection with high-dose intravenous corticosteroid, immunoglobulin, and anti-thymocyte globulin, her condition deteriorated to ultimately require ventilatory support. The eventual discovery of eplet donor-recipient mismatches on related DQB1 alleles raised the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection. Before plasmapheresis could be instituted, the patient rapidly succumbed to respiratory failure. Postmortem examination confirmed features of atypical allograft rejection, without evidence of classic acute cellular rejection. This is an unconventional case of antibody-mediated lung allograft rejection – an entity that is currently a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Prevention of donor-specific antibodies by correct donor-recipient matching, and optimizing adherence post-transplantation are most important. PMID:25802749

  2. Immune-Mediated Inflammation May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, Philip L.; Ellinwood, N. Matthew; Schwartz, Philip H.; Dickson, Patricia I.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease, a progressive manifestation of α-L-iduronidase deficiency or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, continues in patients both untreated and treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or intravenous enzyme replacement. Few studies have examined the effects of α-L-iduronidase deficiency and subsequent glycosaminoglycan storage upon arterial gene expression to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Methods Gene expression in carotid artery, ascending, and descending aortas from four non-tolerized, non-enzyme treated 19 month-old mucopolysaccharidosis type I dogs was compared with expression in corresponding vascular segments from three normal, age-matched dogs. Data were analyzed using R and whole genome network correlation analysis, a bias-free method of categorizing expression level and significance into discrete modules. Genes were further categorized based on module-trait relationships. Expression of clusterin, a protein implicated in other etiologies of cardiovascular disease, was assessed in canine and murine mucopolysaccharidosis type I aortas via Western blot and in situ immunohistochemistry. Results Gene families with more than two-fold, significant increased expression involved lysosomal function, proteasome function, and immune regulation. Significantly downregulated genes were related to cellular adhesion, cytoskeletal elements, and calcium regulation. Clusterin gene overexpression (9-fold) and protein overexpression (1.3 to 1.62-fold) was confirmed and located specifically in arterial plaques of mucopolysaccharidosis-affected dogs and mice. Conclusions Overexpression of lysosomal and proteasomal-related genes are expected responses to cellular stress induced by lysosomal storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Upregulation of immunity-related genes implicates the potential involvement of glycosaminoglycan-induced inflammation in the pathogenesis of mucopolysaccharidosis-related arterial disease, for

  3. Antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplantation: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yolanda W; Singh, Manpreet; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplant is the preferred treatment of pediatric end-stage renal disease. One of the most challenging aspects of pediatric kidney transplant is the prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR), which is one of the main causes of graft dysfunction and early graft loss. Most challenges are similar to those faced in adult kidney transplants; however, factors unique to the pediatric realm include naivety of the immune system and the small number of studies and randomized controlled trials available when considering pharmacological treatment options. Here, we present a case of ABMR in a pediatric patient and a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of ABMR. ABMR in pediatric kidney transplant continues to be a frustrating condition to treat because (1) there still remain many unidentified potential antigens leading to ABMR, (2) children and adults are at different stages of their immune system development, and, thus, (3) the full pathophysiology of alloimmunity is still not completely understood, and (4) the efficacy and safety of treatment in adults may not be directly translated to children. As we continue to gain a better understanding towards the precise alloimmune mechanism that drives a particular ABMR, we can also improve pharmacotherapeutic choices. With continued research, they will become more precise in treating a particular mechanism versus using a broad scope of immunosuppression such as steroids. However, there is much more to be uncovered, such as identifying more non-human leukocyte antigens and their role in alloimmunity, determining the exact mechanism of adults achieving complete operational tolerance, and understanding the difference between pediatric and adult transplant recipients. Making strides towards a better understanding of these mechanisms will lead to continued efficacy and safety in treatment of pediatric ABMR.

  4. Transplantation of T cell-mediated, lymphoreticular disease from the scurfy (sf) mouse.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, V L; Rouse, B T; Wilkinson, J E

    1994-08-01

    The X-linked mutation, scurfy (sf), causes a fatal lymphoreticular disease characterized by runting, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinemia, exfoliative dermatitis, Coombs'-positive anemia, and death by 24 days of age. T lymphocytes are required to mediate this syndrome as shown by a total absence of disease in mice bred to be scurfy and nude (sf/Y; nu/nu). The scurfy phenotype is not transmitted by sf/Y bone marrow transplants, though cells of scurfy origin do reconstitute all lymphoid organs in the recipient mouse. These data suggest that scurfy disease results from an abnormal T cell development process and not from an intrinsic stem cell defect. We therefore tested the ability of transplanted scurfy thymuses to transmit scurfy disease to congenic euthymic mice, to athymic (nude) mice, and to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Euthymic recipients of sf/Y thymic grafts remained clinically normal as did all SCID and nude recipients of normal thymus transplants. Morphological lesions similar to those found in scurfy mice occurred in all H-2-compatible nude and SCID recipients of sf/Y thymic grafts. Intraperitoneal injections of scurfy thymocytes, splenocytes, and lymph node cells also transmitted the scurfy phenotype to H-2-compatible nude mice and SCID mice. Our findings indicate that scurfy disease can be transmitted to T cell-deficient mice by engraftment of scurfy T cells, but that pathogenic scurfy T cell activities can be inhibited (or prevented) in immunocompetent recipient mice.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C.; Osborne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft‐induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM‐MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis‐mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin‐2 (Lcn‐2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft‐induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM‐MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM‐MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell‐induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation‐based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve. Stem Cells 2015;33:3006–3016 PMID:26175331

  6. Severe antibody-mediated rejection following IVIG infusion in a kidney transplant recipient with BK-virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mainra, R; Xu, Q; Chibbar, R; Hassan, A; Shoker, A

    2013-06-01

    Intravenous immune-globulin (IVIG) use in renal transplantation has increased, with common uses including desensitization, treatment of antibody mediated rejection and adjunctive therapy for BK virus nephropathy. Although considered generally safe, potential side effects can occur in up to 23% of patients including acute kidney injury. We present a case of an unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a renal transplant recipient following IVIG infusion. A 48-year-old nonsensitized female with end stage renal disease secondary to polycystic kidney disease received a deceased donor kidney transplant. The initial post-transplant period was unremarkable however at three years post-transplant the patient develops BK virus nephropathy. Despite a reduction in immunosuppression, graft function worsened and IVIG infusion was commenced. Immediately following the IVIG infusion, the patient develops anuric acute kidney injury necessitating hemodialysis. Renal transplant biopsy performed before and after the IVIG infusion revealed the de novo development of acute antibody mediated rejection and donor specific antibodies in the serum. Anti-HLA and donor-specific antibodies were also confirmed in a diluted sample of the IVIG preparation. We argue that the anti-HLA antibodies present in the IVIG caused an acute antibody mediated rejection in this previously nonsensitized female.

  7. Asymptomatic Antibody-mediated Rejection After Heart Transplantation Predicts Poor Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Grace W.; Kobashigawa, Jon A.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kittleson, Michelle M.; Reed, Elaine F.; Kiyosaki, Krista K.; Ardehali, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been associated with poor outcome after heart transplantation. The diagnosis of AMR usually includes endomyocardial biopsy findings of endothelial cell swelling, intravascular macrophages, C4d+ staining, and associated left ventricular dysfunction. The significance of AMR findings in biopsy specimens of asymptomatic heart transplant patients (normal cardiac function and no symptoms of heart failure) is unclear. Methods Between July 1997 and September 2001, AMR was found in the biopsy specimens of 43 patients. Patients were divided into 2 groups: asymptomatic AMR (AsAMR, n = 21) and treated AMR (TxAMR with associated left ventricular dysfunction, n = 22). For comparison, a control group of 86 contemporaneous patients, without AMR, was matched for age, gender, and time from transplant. Outcomes included 5-year actuarial survival and development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Patients were considered to have AMR if they had ≥ 1 endomyocardial biopsy specimen positive for AMR. Results The 5-year actuarial survival for the AsAMR (86%), TxAMR (68%), and control groups (79%) was not significantly different (p = 0.41). Five-year freedom from CAV (≥ 30% stenosis in any vessel) was AsAMR, 52%; TxAMR, 68%; and control, 79%. Individually, freedom from CAV was significantly lower in the AsAMR group compared with the control group (p = 0.02). There was no significant difference between AsAMR vs TxAMR and TxAMR vs control for CAV. Conclusions Despite comparable 5-year survival with controls after heart transplantation, AsAMR rejection is associated with a greater risk of CAV. Trials to treat AsAMR to alter outcome are warranted. PMID:19416767

  8. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection.

  9. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.

  10. Metabolic profiling of murine plasma reveals an unexpected biomarker in rofecoxib-mediated cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Li, Ning; Yang, Jun; Li, Nan; Qiu, Hong; Ai, Ding; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Zhu, Yi; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic administration of high levels of selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs), particularly rofecoxib, valdecoxib, and parecoxib, increases risk for cardiovascular disease. Understanding the possibly multiple mechanisms underlying these adverse cardiovascular events is critical for evaluating the risks and benefits of coxibs and for development of safer coxibs. The current understanding of these mechanisms is likely incomplete. Using a metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that oral administration of rofecoxib for 3 mo results in a greater than 120-fold higher blood level of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which correlates with a significantly shorter tail bleeding time in a murine model. We tested the hypothesis that this dramatic increase in 20-HETE is attributable to inhibition of its metabolism and that the shortened bleeding time following rofecoxib administration is attributable, in part, to this increase. The s.c. infusion of 20-HETE shortened the tail bleeding time dramatically. Neither 20-HETE biosynthesis nor cytochrome P4A-like immune reactivity was increased by rofecoxib administration, but 20-HETE production increased in vitro with the addition of coxib. 20-HETE is significantly more potent than its COX-mediated metabolites in shortening clotting time in vitro. Furthermore, 20-HETE but not rofecoxib significantly increases rat platelet aggregation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest 20-HETE as a marker of rofecoxib exposure and that inhibition of 20-HETE's degradation by rofecoxib is a partial explanation for its dramatic increase, the shortened bleeding time, and, possibly, the adverse cardiovascular events associated with rofecoxib. PMID:20837537

  11. [Hydrogen sulfide as a biologically active mediator in the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2004-07-19

    Recent studies suggest that apart from nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is another inorganic gaseous mediator in the cardiovascular system. H2S is synthesized from L-cysteine by either cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) or cystathionin gamma--lyase (CSE), both using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (vitamin B6) as a cofactor. CBS is the main H2S-producing enzyme in the brain and CSE is involved in H2S formation in the cardiovascular system. H2S induces hypotension in vivo and vasodilation vitro by opening KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Chronic administration of CSE inhibitor induces arterial hypertension in the rat. In addition, decreased H2S generation has been demonstrated in the vasculature of spontaneously hypertensive rat, in experimental hypertension induced by NO synthase blockade, and in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, and administration of exogenous H2S donor has significant therapeutic effects in these models. Deficiency of H2S may contribute to atherogenesis in some patients with hyperhomocysteinemia, in whom the metabolism of homocysteine to cysteine and H2S is compromised by vitamin B6 deficiency. Reduced H2S production in the brain was observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, excess of H2S may lead to mental retardation in patients with Down's syndrome and may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypotension associated with septic shock.

  12. Endogenous Fibrinolysis: An Important Mediator of Thrombus Formation and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Osita N; Gorog, Diana A

    2015-04-28

    Most acute cardiovascular events are attributable to arterial thrombosis. Plaque rupture or erosion stimulates platelet activation, aggregation, and thrombosis, whilst simultaneously activating enzymatic processes that mediate endogenous fibrinolysis to physiologically maintain vessel patency. Interplay between these pathways determines clinical outcome. If proaggregatory factors predominate, the thrombus may propagate, leading to vessel occlusion. However, if balanced by a healthy fibrinolytic system, thrombosis may not occur or cause lasting occlusion. Despite abundant evidence for the fibrinolytic system regulating thrombosis, it has been overlooked compared with platelet reactivity, partly due to a lack of techniques to measure it. We evaluate evidence for endogenous fibrinolysis in arterial thrombosis and review techniques to assess it, including biomarkers and global assays, such as thromboelastography and the Global Thrombosis Test. Global assays, simultaneously assessing proaggregatory and fibrinolytic pathways, could play a role in risk stratification and in identifying impaired fibrinolysis as a potential target for pharmacological modulation.

  13. Computer-mediated communication and time pressure induce higher cardiovascular responses in the preparatory and execution phases of cooperative tasks.

    PubMed

    Costa Ferrer, Raquel; Serrano Rosa, Miguel Ángel; Zornoza Abad, Ana; Salvador Fernández-Montejo, Alicia

    2010-11-01

    The cardiovascular (CV) response to social challenge and stress is associated with the etiology of cardiovascular diseases. New ways of communication, time pressure and different types of information are common in our society. In this study, the cardiovascular response to two different tasks (open vs. closed information) was examined employing different communication channels (computer-mediated vs. face-to-face) and with different pace control (self vs. external). Our results indicate that there was a higher CV response in the computer-mediated condition, on the closed information task and in the externally paced condition. These role of these factors should be considered when studying the consequences of social stress and their underlying mechanisms.

  14. Aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are predisposed to ultrafine carbon particle (UfCP) mediated cardiovascular impairment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Elderly individuals are considered to be more susceptible to particulate matter (PM) related cardiovascular (CV) health effects. In this study we investigated UfCP mediated CV effects on aged SHRs and compared the findings to that of adult SHRs to identify age related...

  15. A type I interferon signature characterizes chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rascio, Federica; Pontrelli, Paola; Accetturo, Matteo; Oranger, Annarita; Gigante, Margherita; Castellano, Giuseppe; Gigante, Maddalena; Zito, Anna; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Ranieri, Elena; Stallone, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) represents the main cause of kidney graft loss. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, we characterized the molecular signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and, separately, of CD4(+) T lymphocytes isolated from CAMR patients, compared to kidney transplant recipients with normal graft function and histology. We enrolled 29 patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, 29 stable transplant recipients (controls), and 8 transplant recipients with clinical and histological evidence of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy. Messenger RNA and microRNA profiling of PBMCs and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was performed using Agilent microarrays in eight randomly selected patients per group from CAMR and control subjects. Results were evaluated statistically and by functional pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and validated in the remaining subjects. In PBMCs, 45 genes were differentially expressed between the two groups, most of which were up-regulated in CAMR and were involved in type I interferon signalling. In the same patients, 16 microRNAs were down-regulated in CAMR subjects compared to controls: four were predicted modulators of six mRNAs identified in the transcriptional analysis. In silico functional analysis supported the involvement of type I interferon signalling. To further confirm this result, we investigated the transcriptomic profiles of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in an independent group of patients, observing that the activation of type I interferon signalling was a specific hallmark of CAMR. In addition, in CAMR patients, we detected a reduction of circulating BDCA2(+) dendritic cells, the natural type I interferon-producing cells, and their recruitment into the graft along with increased expression of MXA, a type I interferon-induced protein, at the tubulointerstitial and vascular level. Finally, interferon alpha mRNA expression was significantly increased in CAMR compared to control

  16. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR. PMID:28255564

  17. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Jina; Yang, Cheng; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; Zhu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients' immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients' humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR.

  18. A novel model for studies of blood-mediated long-term responses to cellular transplants

    PubMed Central

    Lindblom, Susanne; Hong, Jaan; Nilsson, Bo; Korsgren, Olle; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Aims Interaction between blood and bio-surfaces is important in many medical fields. With the aim of studying blood-mediated reactions to cellular transplants, we developed a whole-blood model for incubation of small volumes for up to 48 h. Methods Heparinized polyvinyl chloride tubing was cut in suitable lengths and sealed to create small bags. Multiple bags, with fresh venous blood, were incubated attached to a rotating wheel at 37°C. Physiological variables in blood were monitored: glucose, blood gases, mono- and divalent cations and chloride ions, osmolality, coagulation (platelet consumption, thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT)), and complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9), haemolysis, and leukocyte viability. Results Basic glucose consumption was high. Glucose depletion resulted in successive elevation of extracellular potassium, while sodium and calcium ions decreased due to inhibition of energy-requiring ion pumps. Addition of glucose improved ion balance but led to metabolic acidosis. To maintain a balanced physiological environment beyond 6 h, glucose and sodium hydrogen carbonate were added regularly based on analyses of glucose, pH, ions, and osmotic pressure. With these additives haemolysis was prevented for up to 72 h and leukocyte viability better preserved. Despite using non-heparinized blood, coagulation and complement activation were lower during long-term incubations compared with addition of thromboplastin and collagen. Conclusion A novel whole-blood model for studies of blood-mediated responses to a cellular transplant is presented allowing extended observations for up to 48 h and highlights the importance of stringent evaluations and adjustment of physiological conditions. PMID:25322825

  19. Therapeutic interventions for Advanced Glycation-End Products and its Receptor-Mediated Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Tiwari, Shuchita

    2016-10-06

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are heterogeneous group of molecules formed from non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with amino group of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid. Interaction of AGEs with its cell-bound receptor (RAGE) results in generation of oxygen radicals, nuclear factor kappa-β, pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules, and is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Circulating soluble forms of RAGE (sRAGE) and endo-secretory RAGE (esRAGE) compete with RAGE for ligand binding and function as a decoy. This paper describes the endogenous and exogenous (high dietary AGEs, cooking food under high dry heat, elevated pH, and long period) sources of AGEs. AGE-RAGE-mediated CVD includes atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, carotid artery disease, hypertension, peripheral vascular diseases, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and microangiopathy. The therapeutic intervention with reduction in AGEs and RAGE, and elevation in sRAGE has been reported for the treatment of AGE-RAGE-mediated CVD. Reduction in levels of AGEs can be achieved by reduction in consumption of food containing low amount of AGEs, cooking food at low temperature, moist heat, and shorter duration. AGE formation can be reduced with drugs, vitamins and stoppage of cigarette smoking. Statins, telmisartan, and curcumin have been used for suppression of RAGE. Statins, ACE-inhibitors, Rosiglitazone and vitamin D have been used to increase levels of sRAGE. Finally exogenous administration of sRAGE can be helpful in amelioration of CVD. In conclusion, AGE-RAGE-mediated CVD could be attenuated with reduction in consumption of AGEs, suppression of RAGE and elevation of sRAGE.

  20. Thallium stress testing does not predict cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, J.L.; Fenton, R.A.; Arthur, R.S. )

    1991-05-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of thallium stress testing as a predictor of perioperative cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing cadaveric renal transplantation. Demographic factors influencing the exercise performance in these patients were also examined. The medical records of 189 consecutive patients with diabetic nephropathy who were evaluated for cadaveric renal transplantation were reviewed. Thallium stress testing was the initial examination of cardiovascular status in 141 patients. An adequate examination was one in which at least 70% of maximum heart rate was achieved. A thallium stress test was normal if there were no ST segment depressions on the electrocardiogram and no perfusion abnormalities on the thallium scan. Forty-four patients underwent cardiac catheterization as the initial evaluation (Group C) and four patients underwent transplantation without a formal cardiovascular evaluation (Group D). Sixty-four of the 141 patients undergoing thallium stress testing had an adequate and normal examination (Group A). The incidence of perioperative cardiac events in this group was 2%. Seventy-seven patients (Group B) had an abnormal (n = 41) or an inadequate (n = 36) thallium stress test and most (n = 61) then underwent coronary angiography. The use of beta-blockers was the only predictor of an abnormal or inadequate thallium stress test. Forty-three percent of patients with inadequate or abnormal thallium stress tests had significant coronary artery disease on cardiac catheterization. The perioperative risk of cardiac events was not different in Group A versus Groups B, C, and D combined. Survival of Group A and B patients was not different but was significantly longer than that of Group C patients.

  1. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taner, Timucin; Heimbach, Julie K; Rosen, Charles B; Nyberg, Scott L; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    In simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK), the liver can protect the kidney from hyperacute rejection and may also decrease acute cellular rejection rates. Whether the liver protects against chronic injury is unknown. To answer this we studied renal allograft surveillance biopsies in 68 consecutive SLK recipients (14 with donor-specific alloantibodies at transplantation [DSA+], 54 with low or no DSA, [DSA-]). These were compared with biopsies of a matched cohort of kidney transplant alone (KTA) recipients (28 DSA+, 108 DSA-). Overall 5-year patient and graft survival was not different: 93.8% and 91.2% in SLK, and 91.9% and 77.1% in KTA. In DSA+ recipients, KTA had a significantly higher incidence of acute antibody-mediated rejection (46.4% vs. 7.1%) and chronic transplant glomerulopathy (53.6% vs. 0%). In DSA- recipients at 5 years, KTA had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of T cell-mediated rejection (clinical plus subclinical, 30.6% vs. 7.4%). By 5 years, DSA+ KTA had a 44% decline in mean GFR while DSA+SLK had stable GFR. In DSA- KTA, the incidence of a combined endpoint of renal allograft loss or over a 50% decline in GFR was significantly higher (20.4% vs. 7.4%). Simultaneously transplanted liver allograft was the most predictive factor for a significantly lower incidence of cellular (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.27) and antibody-mediated injury (odds ratio 0.11, confidence interval 0.03-0.32), as well as graft functional decline (odds ratio 0.22, confidence interval 0.06-0.59). Thus, SLK is associated with reduced chronic cellular and antibody-mediated alloimmune injury in the kidney allograft.

  2. Microarray diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant biopsies: an international prospective study (INTERCOM).

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Pereira, A B; Chang, J; Matas, A; Picton, M; De Freitas, D; Bromberg, J; Serón, D; Sellarés, J; Einecke, G; Reeve, J

    2013-11-01

    In a reference set of 403 kidney transplant biopsies, we recently developed a microarray-based test that diagnoses antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) by assigning an ABMR score. To validate the ABMR score and assess its potential impact on practice, we performed the present prospective INTERCOM study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01299168) in 300 new biopsies (264 patients) from six centers: Baltimore, Barcelona, Edmonton, Hannover, Manchester and Minneapolis. We assigned ABMR scores using the classifier created in the reference set and compared it to conventional assessment as documented in the pathology reports. INTERCOM documented uncertainty in conventional assessment: In 41% of biopsies where ABMR features were noted, the recorded diagnoses did not mention ABMR. The ABMR score correlated with ABMR histologic lesions and donor-specific antibodies, but not with T cell-mediated rejection lesions. The agreement between ABMR scores and conventional assessment was identical to that in the reference set (accuracy 85%). The ABMR score was more strongly associated with failure than conventional assessment, and when the ABMR score and conventional assessment disagreed, only the ABMR score was associated with early progression to failure. INTERCOM confirms the need to reduce uncertainty in the diagnosis of ABMR, and demonstrates the potential of the ABMR score to impact practice.

  3. Dietary carotenoids are associated with cardiovascular disease risk biomarkers mediated by serum carotenoid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chung, Sang-Jin; McCullough, Marjorie L; Song, Won O; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K

    2014-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia and elevated circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations are cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Previous studies indicated that higher serum carotenoid concentrations were inversely associated with some of these biomarkers. However, whether dietary carotenoid intake is inversely associated with these CVD risk biomarkers is not well known. We assessed the associations between individual dietary carotenoid intake and CVD risk biomarkers and tested whether the serum carotenoid concentrations explain (mediate) or influence the strength of (moderate) the associations, if any association exists. Dietary data collected from 2 24-h dietary recalls and serum measurements in adult men (n = 1312) and women (n = 1544) from the NHANES 2003-2006 were used. Regression models designed for survey analysis were used to examine the associations between individual dietary carotenoids and log-transformed blood cholesterol, CRP, and tHcy. The corresponding individual serum carotenoid concentration was considered as mediator (and moderator if applicable). After adjustment for covariates, significant inverse associations with LDL cholesterol were observed for dietary β-carotene (P < 0.05) and lutein + zeaxanthin (P < 0.001), and with tHcy for dietary β-carotene (P < 0.05), lycopene (P < 0.05), and total carotenoids (P < 0.05). Dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake was also positively associated with HDL cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.01). Most of these associations were null after additional adjustment for corresponding serum carotenoid concentrations, indicating the complete mediation effects of serum carotenoids. Serum β-carotene significantly moderated the associations between dietary β-carotene and CRP (P-interaction < 0.05), and quartile 4 of dietary β-carotene was associated with lower CRP concentrations only among participants with serum β-carotene > 0.43 μmol/L. In this population-based cross-sectional study

  4. The role of inflammatory and immunological mediators in periodontitis and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    De Nardin, E

    2001-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated periodontitis (PD) as a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Persistent infections such as periodontitis induce inflammatory and immune responses which may contribute to coronary atherogenesis, and, in conjunction with other risk factors, may lead to coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, mechanisms are described that may help explain the association between periodontal infections and CHD. Periodontal diseases are bacterial infections associated with bacteremia, inflammation, and a strong immune response, all of which may represent significant risk factors for the development of atherogenesis, CHD, and myocardial infarction (MI). Several mechanisms may participate in this association, including those induced by oral organisms, and those associated with host response factors. This review will focus on host factors. Oral pathogens and inflammatory mediators (such as interleukin [IL]-1 and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha) from periodontal lesions intermittently reach the bloodstream inducing systemic inflammatory reactants such as acute-phase proteins, and immune effectors including systemic antibodies to periodontal bacteria. This review will describe the potential role of various inflammatory as well as immunologic factors that may play a role in periodontitis as a possible risk factor for CHD.

  5. Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Demarzo, Marcelo M. P.; Montero-Marin, Jesús; Stein, Phyllis K.; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Provinciale, Jaime G.; García-Campayo, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The psychological construct of mindfulness refers to an awareness that emerges by intentionally paying attention to the present experience in a non-judgmental or evaluative way. This particular quality of awareness has been associated to several indicators of physical and psychological health, and can be developed using mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), and therefore MBIs have been successfully applied as preventive and complementary interventions and therapies in medicine and psychology. Together with quiet sitting and lying meditation practices, mindful physical exercises such as “mindful walking” and “mindful movement” are key elements in MBIs and couple muscular activity with an internally directed focus, improving interoceptive attention to bodily sensations. In addition, MBIs seem to share similar mechanisms with physical fitness (PF) by which they may influence cardiovascular responses to stress. Based on these facts, it is feasible to raise the question of whether physical training itself may induce the development of that particular quality of awareness associated with mindfulness, or if one's dispositional mindfulness (DM) (the tendency to be more mindful in daily life) could moderate the effects of exercise on cardiovascular response to stress. The role of mindfulness as a mediator or moderator of the effect of exercise training on cardiovascular responses to stress has barely been studied. In this study, we have hypothesized pathways (moderation and mediation) by which mindfulness could significantly influence the effects of PF on cardiovascular responses to stress and discussed potential practical ways to test these hypotheses. PMID:24723891

  6. Difference in outcomes after antibody-mediated rejection between abo-incompatible and positive cross-match transplantations.

    PubMed

    Couzi, Lionel; Manook, Miriam; Perera, Ranmith; Shaw, Olivia; Ahmed, Zubir; Kessaris, Nicos; Dorling, Anthony; Mamode, Nizam

    2015-10-01

    Graft survival seems to be worse in positive cross-match (HLAi) than in ABO-incompatible (ABOi) transplantation. However, it is not entirely clear why these differences exist. Sixty-nine ABOi, 27 HLAi and 10 combined ABOi+HLAi patients were included in this retrospective study, to determine whether the frequency, severity and the outcome of active antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) were different. Five-year death-censored graft survival was better in ABOi than in HLAi and ABOi+HLAi patients (99%, 69% and 64%, respectively, P = 0.0002). Features of AMR were found in 38%, 95% and 100% of ABOi, HLAi and ABOi+HLAi patients that had a biopsy, respectively (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001). After active AMR, a declining eGFR and graft loss were observed more frequently in HLAi and HLAi+ABOi than in ABOi patients. The poorer prognosis after AMR in HLAi and ABOi+HLAi transplantations was not explained by a higher severity of histological lesions or by a less aggressive treatment. In conclusion, ABOi transplantation offers better results than HLAi transplantation, partly because AMR occurs less frequently but also because outcome after AMR is distinctly better. HLAi and combined ABOi+HLAi transplantations appear to have the same outcome, suggesting there is no synergistic effect between anti-A/B and anti-HLA antibodies.

  7. Dietary Intake as a Link between Obesity, Systemic Inflammation, and the Assumption of Multiple Cardiovascular and Antidiabetic Drugs in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Bruna; Maresca, Immacolata Daniela; Germanò, Roberta; Trio, Rossella; Nastasi, Anna Maria; Federico, Stefano; Memoli, Andrea; Apicella, Luca; Memoli, Bruno; Sabbatini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated dietary intake and nutritional-inflammation status in ninety-six renal transplant recipients, 7.2 ± 5.0 years after transplantation. Patients were classified as normoweight (NW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB), if their body mass index was between 18.5 and 24.9, 25.0 and 29.9, and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Food composition tables were used to estimate nutrient intakes. The values obtained were compared with those recommended in current nutritional guidelines. 52% of the patients were NW, 29% were OW, and 19% were OB. Total energy, fat, and dietary n-6 PUFAs intake was higher in OB than in NW. IL-6 and hs-CRP were higher in OB than in NW. The prevalence of multidrug regimen was higher in OB. In all patients, total energy, protein, saturated fatty acids, and sodium intake were higher than guideline recommendations. On the contrary, the intake of unsaturated and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber was lower than recommended. In conclusion, the prevalence of obesity was high in our patients, and it was associated with inflammation and the assumption of multiple cardiovascular and antidiabetic drugs. Dietary intake did not meet nutritional recommendations in all patients, especially in obese ones, highlighting the need of a long-term nutritional support in renal transplant recipients. PMID:23984354

  8. Cannabidiol Limits T Cell–Mediated Chronic Autoimmune Myocarditis: Implications to Autoimmune Disorders and Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Shin; Erdelyi, Katalin; Matyas, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Varga, Zoltan V; Liaudet, Lucas; Hask’, György; ’iháková, Daniela; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pal

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death in young adults and adolescents. Many cases of myocarditis are associated with autoimmune processes in which cardiac myosin is a major autoantigen. Conventional immunosuppressive therapies often provide unsatisfactory results and are associated with adverse toxicities during the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana that exerts antiinflammatory effects independent of classical cannabinoid receptors. Recently, 80 clinical trials have investigated the effects of CBD in various diseases from inflammatory bowel disease to graft versus host disease. CBD-based formulations are used for the management of multiple sclerosis in numerous countries, and CBD also received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of refractory childhood epilepsy and glioblastoma multiforme. Herein, using a well-established mouse model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced by immunization with cardiac myosin emmulsified in adjuvant resulting in T cell–mediated inflammation, cardiomyocyte cell death, fibrosis and myocardial dysfunction, we studied the potential beneficial effects of CBD. EAM was characterized by marked myocardial T-cell infiltration, profound inflammatory response and fibrosis (measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunohistochemistry analyses) accompanied by marked attenuation of both systolic and diastolic cardiac functions measured with a pressure-volume conductance catheter technique. Chronic treatment with CBD largely attenuated the CD3+ and CD4+ T cell–mediated inflammatory response and injury, myocardial fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction in mice. In conclusion, CBD may represent a promising novel treatment for managing autoimmune myocarditis and possibly other autoimmune disorders and organ transplantation. PMID:26772776

  9. A Probabilistic Approach to Histologic Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Famulski, K S; Chang, J

    2017-01-01

    Histologic diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in kidney transplant biopsies uses lesion score cutoffs such as 0 versus >0 rather than actual scores and requires donor-specific antibody (DSA); however, cutoffs lose information, and DSA is not always reliable. Using microarray-derived molecular ABMR scores as a histology-independent estimate of ABMR in 703 biopsies, we reassessed criteria for ABMR to determine relative importance of various lesions, the utility of equations using actual scores rather than cutoffs, and the potential for diagnosing ABMR when DSA is unknown or negative. We confirmed that the important features for ABMR diagnosis were peritubular capillaritis (ptc), glomerulitis (g), glomerular double contours, DSA and C4d staining, but we questioned some features: arterial fibrosis, vasculitis, acute tubular injury, and sum of ptc+g scores. Regression equations using lesion scores predicted molecular ABMR more accurately than score cutoffs (area under the curve 0.85-0.86 vs. 0.75). DSA positivity improved accuracy, but regression equations predicted ABMR with moderate accuracy when DSA was unknown. Some biopsies without detectable DSA had high probability of ABMR by regression, although most had HLA antibody. We concluded that regression equations using lesion scores plus DSA maximized diagnostic accuracy and can estimate probable ABMR when DSA is unknown or undetectable.

  10. Better understanding of transplant glomerulopathy secondary to chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Remport, Adam; Ivanyi, Bela; Mathe, Zoltan; Tinckam, Kathryn; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2015-11-01

    Transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is generally accepted to result from repeated episodes of endothelial activation, injury and repair, leading to pathological abnormalities of double contouring or multi-layering of the glomerular basement membrane. TG is a major sequel of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR), from pre-existing or de novo anti-HLA antibodies. Hepatitis C infection, thrombotic microangiopathy or other factors may also contribute to TG development. TG prevalence is 5-20% in most series, reaching 55%, in some high-risk cohorts, and is associated with worse allograft outcomes. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, few well-studied treatment options have been proposed. Similar to desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis with or without immunoabsorption, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, bortezomib and eculizumab have been proposed in the treatment of TG due to cABMR individually or in various combinations. Robust clinical trials are urgently needed to address this major cause of allograft loss. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, and the preventive and treatment options for TG secondary to cABMR.

  11. Treatment of simultaneous acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirasiritham, S; Khunprakant, R; Techawathanawanna, N; Jirasiritham, Si; Mavichak, V

    2010-04-01

    This is a case report of a living related donor kidney transplantation using basiliximab induction and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate sodium, and steroid. On the second posttransplant day, the patient developed acute antibody-mediated rejection, which was treated with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Five days later, the graft had still not responded to the treatment. Another biopsy revealed additional acute cellular rejection (Banff IIA). As alemtuzumab can rapidly deplete T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells, the patient was treated with alemtuzumab (30 mg subcutaneously) together with methylprednisolone (500 mg) and two more plasmaphereses. The kidney graft responded within 48 hours, producing more than 4 L of urine per day. The total lymphocyte decreased from 530/microL to 50/microL remaining in the 50 to 220/microL range. The patient received valgancyclovir and cotrimoxazole as infection prophylaxis. The kidney graft responded well to the rescue treatment and the patient was discharged with a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/mL and has been uneventfully followed in the outpatient clinic for 8 months. Today, with the potent, effective, and selective immunosuppressive regimens, the rate and severity of acute cellular rejection in kidney transplantation has decreased in most centers. However, the rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection has increased to levels greater than those of acute cellular rejection in many centers. Acute antibody-mediated rejection is more difficult and expensive to treat successfully. The treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection included plasmapheresis and IVIG. Herein we have reported a case of kidney transplantation simultaneously developing acute antibody-mediated and acute cellular rejection; the patient was successfully treated with alemtuzumab.

  12. European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Cardiovascular Imaging Department of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology recommendations for the use of cardiac imaging to assess and follow patients after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Badano, Luigi P; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; Edvardsen, Thor; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Muraru, Denisa; Bacal, Fernando; Nieman, Koen; Zoppellaro, Giacomo; Marcondes Braga, Fabiana G; Binder, Thomas; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the physiology of the transplanted heart, complications of invasive tests routinely performed to detect graft rejection (GR), and the specific pathologies that may affect the transplanted heart. A joint EACVI/Brazilian cardiovascular imaging writing group committee has prepared these recommendations to provide a practical guide to echocardiographers involved in the follow-up of heart transplant patients and a framework for standardized and efficient use of cardiovascular imaging after heart transplant. Since the transplanted heart is smaller than the recipient's dilated heart, the former is usually located more medially in the mediastinum and tends to be rotated clockwise. Therefore, standard views with conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography are often difficult to obtain generating a large variability from patient to patient. Therefore, in echocardiography laboratories equipped with three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) scanners and specific expertise with the technique, 3DE may be a suitable alternative to conventional 2D echocardiography to assess the size and the function of cardiac chambers. 3DE measurement of left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) size and function are more accurate and reproducible than conventional 2D calculations. However, clinicians should be aware that cardiac chamber volumes obtained with 3DE cannot be compared with those obtained with 2D echocardiography. To assess cardiac chamber morphology and function during follow-up studies, it is recommended to obtain a comprehensive echocardiographic study at 6 months from the cardiac transplantation as a baseline and make a careful quantitation of cardiac chamber size, RV systolic function, both systolic and diastolic parameters of LV function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Subsequent

  13. Risk of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with anti-HLA-C donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aubert, O; Bories, M-C; Suberbielle, C; Snanoudj, R; Anglicheau, D; Rabant, M; Martinez, F; Scemla, A; Legendre, C; Sberro-Soussan, R

    2014-06-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). However, the clinical relevance of anti-HLA-C antibodies remains unclear. We evaluated the clinical relevance of the presence of anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0 in renal transplant recipients. In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 608 patients who underwent kidney transplantation between August 2008 and March 2012 were screened for the presence of isolated anti-HLA-C DSA at day 0. A total of 22 renal transplant recipients were selected and followed for a period of 1 year. AMR was classified according to the Banff classification. The 22 patients were compared with 88 immunized patients. Acute AMR was diagnosed in six patients (27.3%). The median level of DSA at day 0 was 1179 (530-17,941). The mean fluorescence intensity in the anti-C group was 4966 (978-17,941) in the AMR group and 981 (530-8012) in the group of patients without AMR. Acute AMR was diagnosed less frequently in the 88 immunized individuals (9.1%) than in the DSA anti-C group (p = 0.033). The level of DSA at day 0 was predictive for AMR (p = 0.017). Patients with a high level of pretransplant anti-HLA-C DSAs are likely to develop acute AMR during the first year after transplantation.

  14. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies.

  15. Acrolein Inhalation Alters Arterial Blood Gases and Triggers Carotid Body Mediated Cardiovascular Responses in Hypertensive Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution increases risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. While the mechanisms accounting for these effects are unclear, several epidemiological studies have reported decreases in oxygen ...

  16. Ultrafine carbon particle mediated cardiovascular impairment of aged spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Previous studies provided compelling evidences for particulate matter (PM) associated cardiovascular health effects. Elderly individuals, particularly those with preexisting conditions like hypertension are regarded to be vulnerable. Experimental data are warranted to...

  17. Presentation and Outcomes of C4d-Negative Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Orandi, B J; Alachkar, N; Kraus, E S; Naqvi, F; Lonze, B E; Lees, L; Van Arendonk, K J; Wickliffe, C; Bagnasco, S M; Zachary, A A; Segev, D L; Montgomery, R A

    2016-01-01

    The updated Banff classification allows for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the absence of peritubular capillary C4d staining. Our objective was to quantify allograft loss risk in patients with consistently C4d-negative AMR (n = 51) compared with C4d-positive AMR patients (n = 156) and matched control subjects without AMR. All first-year posttransplant biopsy results from January 2004 through June 2014 were reviewed and correlated with the presence of donor-specific antibody (DSA). C4d-negative AMR patients were not different from C4d-positive AMR patients on any baseline characteristics, including immunologic risk factors (panel reactive antibody, prior transplant, HLA mismatch, donor type, DSA class, and anti-HLA/ABO-incompatibility). C4d-positive AMR patients were significantly more likely to have a clinical presentation (85.3% vs. 54.9%, p < 0.001), and those patients presented substantially earlier posttransplantation (median 14 [interquartile range 8-32] days vs. 46 [interquartile range 20-191], p < 0.001) and were three times more common (7.8% vs 2.5%). One- and 2-year post-AMR-defining biopsy graft survival in C4d-negative AMR patients was 93.4% and 90.2% versus 86.8% and 82.6% in C4d-positive AMR patients, respectively (p = 0.4). C4d-negative AMR was associated with a 2.56-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.08-6.05, p = 0.033) increased risk of graft loss compared with AMR-free matched controls. No clinical characteristics were identified that reliably distinguished C4d-negative from C4d-positive AMR. However, both phenotypes are associated with increased graft loss and thus warrant consideration for intervention.

  18. Shear-mediated platelet activation in the free flow: Perspectives on the emerging spectrum of cell mechanobiological mechanisms mediating cardiovascular implant thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Marvin J; Sheriff, Jawaad; Hutchinson, Marcus; Tran, Phat; Bajaj, Naing; Garcia, Joe G N; Scott Saavedra, S; Bluestein, Danny

    2017-01-04

    Shear-mediated platelet activation (SMPA) is central in thrombosis of implantable cardiovascular therapeutic devices. Despite the morbidity and mortality associated with thrombosis of these devices, our understanding of mechanisms operative in SMPA, particularly in free flowing blood, remains limited. Herein we present and discuss a range of emerging mechanisms for consideration for "free flow" activation under supraphysiologic shear. Further definition and manipulation of these mechanisms will afford opportunities for novel pharmacologic and mechanical strategies to limit SMPA and enhance overall implant device safety.

  19. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Ameln, Anne Klotzsche-von; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood–islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation. PMID:26676803

  20. Developmental endothelial locus-1 modulates platelet-monocyte interactions and instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction in islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Kotlabova, Klara; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ferreira, Anaisa; Chen, Lan-Sun; Gercken, Bettina; Steffen, Anja; Kemter, Elisabeth; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Waskow, Claudia; Hosur, Kavita; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Ludwig, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-04-01

    Platelet-monocyte interactions are strongly implicated in thrombo-inflammatory injury by actively contributing to intravascular inflammation, leukocyte recruitment to inflamed sites, and the amplification of the procoagulant response. Instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) represents thrombo-inflammatory injury elicited upon pancreatic islet transplantation (islet-Tx), thereby dramatically affecting transplant survival and function. Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is a functionally versatile endothelial cell-derived homeostatic factor with anti-inflammatory properties, but its potential role in IBMIR has not been previously addressed. Here, we establish Del-1 as a novel inhibitor of IBMIR using a whole blood-islet model and a syngeneic murine transplantation model. Indeed, Del-1 pre-treatment of blood before addition of islets diminished coagulation activation and islet damage as assessed by C-peptide release. Consistently, intraportal islet-Tx in transgenic mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of Del-1 resulted in a marked decrease of monocytes and platelet-monocyte aggregates in the transplanted tissues, relative to those in wild-type recipients. Mechanistically, Del-1 decreased platelet-monocyte aggregate formation, by specifically blocking the interaction between monocyte Mac-1-integrin and platelet GPIb. Our findings reveal a hitherto unknown role of Del-1 in the regulation of platelet-monocyte interplay and the subsequent heterotypic aggregate formation in the context of IBMIR. Therefore, Del-1 may represent a novel approach to prevent or mitigate the adverse reactions mediated through thrombo-inflammatory pathways in islet-Tx and perhaps other inflammatory disorders involving platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation.

  1. European Transplant Registry of Senior Renal Transplant Recipients on Advagraf

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Graft Failure; Death; Acute Rejection of Renal Transplant; Infections; Bone Disease; Post Transplant Diabetes Mellitus; Quality of Life; HLA Antibody Production; Cardiovascular Risk Factors; Non-HLA Antibody Production

  2. Perforin Mediates Endothelial Cell Death and Resultant Transplant Vascular Disease in Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jonathan C.; Kerjner, Alexandra; Wong, Brian W.; McManus, Bruce M.; Granville, David J.

    2004-01-01

    T cell-induced endothelial injury is an important event in the development of transplant vascular disease (TVD), the leading expression of chronic rejection of vascularized organ transplants. However, the precise contribution of perforin to vascular damage in allografts and resultant TVD has not been addressed in vivo. Minor histocompatability antigen mismatched mouse heterotopic cardiac transplants were performed from 129J donors into C57Bl/6 (wild-type (WT)) or perforin knockout (PKO) recipients. Perforin was abundant in immune infiltrates in the myocardium and vasculature of transplanted hearts in WT mice. Allograft coronary arteries in both WT and PKO mice had considerable vasculitis. There was also marked endothelial disruption, as well as TUNEL-positivity in the endothelial region, in coronary arteries of hearts transplanted into WT mice that was not evident in PKO recipients (P = 0.05). At 30 days post-transplantation, intimal thickening was assessed on elastic Van Gieson-stained ventricular sections. There was an average of 54.2 ± 6.7% luminal narrowing of coronary arteries in allografts from WT mice as compared to 13.4 ± 5.1% luminal narrowing in PKO counterparts (P < 0.00002). In summary, perforin plays a primary role in endothelial damage and the resultant onset and progression of TVD. PMID:15215168

  3. Do behavioral responses mediate or moderate the relation between cardiovascular reactivity to stress and parental history of hypertension?

    PubMed

    Frazer, Nicole L; Larkin, Kevin T; Goodie, Jeffrey L

    2002-05-01

    To examine whether differences in behavioral responses to stress mediated or moderated the relation between cardiovascular response to stress and parental history of hypertension, 64 healthy undergraduates-16 men with hypertensive parents (PH+), 16 men without hypertensive parents (PH-), 16 PH+ women, and 16 PH- women-participated in a mental arithmetic task, mirror tracing task, and 2 interpersonal role plays. PH+ participants exhibited higher resting heart rates than PH- participants and higher resting systolic blood pressures (SBPs) than PH- women. PH+ participants exhibited greater SBP responses to tasks and engaged in more negative verbal and nonverbal behavior across tasks than PH- counterparts. Differences in behavioral responding neither mediated nor moderated the observed relation between parental history status and SBP response to stress.

  4. Successful cell-mediated cytokine-activated immunotherapy for relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Shapira, Michael Y; Resnick, Igor B; Amar, Avraham; Kristt, Don; Dray, Lilianne; Budowski, Einat; Or, Reuven

    2009-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely aggressive disease with a high relapse rate even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report the successful outcome of cell-mediated cytokine-activated immunotherapy in a high-risk pediatric AML patient who relapsed shortly after allogeneic HSCT. Donor lymphocyte infusion along with interferon induced a graft-versus-leukemia effect, presenting as a reversible episode of graft-versus-host disease, which led to stable complete donor chimerism and total eradication of AML for over 24 months, at the time of this report. The curative potential of immunotherapy in hematological malignancies is discussed.

  5. Nitric oxide and GABA mediate bi-directional cardiovascular effects of orexin in the nucleus tractus solitarii of rats.

    PubMed

    Shih, C-D; Chuang, Y-C

    2007-11-09

    The present study investigated the cardiovascular effects of orexin (OX)-A and OX-B in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and delineated the engagement of nitric oxide (NO) and GABA in OX-induced cardiovascular responses. In adult male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, microinjection bilaterally into the NTS of OX-A or OX-B evoked bi-directional cardiovascular effects in a dose-dependent manner. At a lower dose (5 pmol), OX-A or OX-B decreased systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), and power density of the vasomotor components of SAP signals, our experimental index for sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone. At higher doses (>20 pmol), these two compounds elicited cardiovascular excitatory responses. These bi-directional cardiovascular effects of OX were abolished by co-injection of an OX(1) receptor antagonist, 1-(2-methylbenzoxazol-6-yl)-3-[1,5]naphthyridin-4-yl-urea hydrochloride (SB-334867, 0.75 nmol) or the OX(2) receptor antiserum (1:20). In addition, the vasodepressor effects of low dose (5 pmol) OX-A or OX-B in the NTS were attenuated by a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 5 nmol), a neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (2.5 pmol) or the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (250 pmol). The vasopressor effects of high dose (200 pmol) OX were reversed by co-administration with GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodine (10 pmol) or 2-hydroxy saclofen (100 pmol), or l-NAME (5 nmol). Our results indicate that OX-A or OX-B elicited bi-directional cardiovascular effects via OX receptor-dependent mechanisms. The vasodepressor effects of OX were induced by the nNOS-derived NO and activation of sGC-associated signaling pathway, whereas the vasopressor effects were mediated by interaction with GABAergic or nitrergic neurotransmission in the NTS.

  6. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Salter, Tracey; Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine; Hilton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a "full house" immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting "past resolved" infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  7. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units. PMID:27800206

  8. Antibody-mediated rejection, T cell-mediated rejection, and the injury-repair response: new insights from the Genome Canada studies of kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Reeve, Jeff P; Pereira, Andre B; Hidalgo, Luis G; Famulski, Konrad S

    2014-02-01

    Prospective studies of unselected indication biopsies from kidney transplants, combining conventional assessment with molecular analysis, have created a new understanding of transplant disease states and their outcomes. A large-scale Genome Canada grant permitted us to use conventional and molecular phenotypes to create a new disease classification. T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), characterized histologically or molecularly, has little effect on outcomes. Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) manifests as microcirculation lesions and transcript changes reflecting endothelial injury, interferon-γ effects, and natural killer cells. ABMR is frequently C4d negative and has been greatly underestimated by conventional criteria. Indeed, ABMR, triggered in some cases by non-adherence, is the major disease causing failure. Progressive dysfunction is usually attributable to specific diseases, and pure calcineurin inhibitor toxicity rarely explains failure. The importance of ABMR argues against immunosuppressive drug minimization and stands as a barrier to tolerance induction. Microarrays also defined the transcripts induced by acute kidney injury (AKI), which correlate with reduced function, whereas histologic changes of acute tubular injury do not. AKI transcripts are induced in kidneys with late dysfunction, and are better predictors of failure than fibrosis and inflammation. Thus progression reflects ongoing parenchymal injury, usually from identifiable diseases such as ABMR, not destructive fibrosis.

  9. Understanding the causes of kidney transplant failure: the dominant role of antibody-mediated rejection and nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Sellarés, J; de Freitas, D G; Mengel, M; Reeve, J; Einecke, G; Sis, B; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K; Matas, A; Halloran, P F

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively studied kidney transplants that progressed to failure after a biopsy for clinical indications, aiming to assign a cause to every failure. We followed 315 allograft recipients who underwent indication biopsies at 6 days to 32 years posttransplant. Sixty kidneys progressed to failure in the follow-up period (median 31.4 months). Failure was rare after T-cell-mediated rejection and acute kidney injury and common after antibody-mediated rejection or glomerulonephritis. We developed rules for using biopsy diagnoses, HLA antibody and clinical data to explain each failure. Excluding four with missing information, 56 failures were attributed to four causes: rejection 36 (64%), glomerulonephritis 10 (18%), polyoma virus nephropathy 4 (7%) and intercurrent events 6 (11%). Every rejection loss had evidence of antibody-mediated rejection by the time of failure. Among rejection losses, 17 of 36 (47%) had been independently identified as nonadherent by attending clinicians. Nonadherence was more frequent in patients who progressed to failure (32%) versus those who survived (3%). Pure T-cell-mediated rejection, acute kidney injury, drug toxicity and unexplained progressive fibrosis were not causes of loss. This prospective cohort indicates that many actual failures after indication biopsies manifest phenotypic features of antibody-mediated or mixed rejection and also underscores the major role of nonadherence.

  10. Viral-mediated Labeling and Transplantation of Medial Ganglionic Eminence (MGE) Cells for In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Daniel; Wu, Pei-Rung; Sorrells, Shawn F.; Arnold, Christine; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic cortical interneurons, derived from the embryonic medial and caudal ganglionic eminences (MGE and CGE), are functionally and morphologically diverse. Inroads have been made in understanding the roles of distinct cortical interneuron subgroups, however, there are still many mechanisms to be worked out that may contribute to the development and maturation of different types of GABAergic cells. Moreover, altered GABAergic signaling may contribute to phenotypes of autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Specific Cre-driver lines have begun to parcel out the functions of unique interneuron subgroups. Despite the advances in mouse models, it is often difficult to efficiently study GABAergic cortical interneuron progenitors with molecular approaches in vivo. One important technique used to study the cell autonomous programming of these cells is transplantation of MGE cells into host cortices. These transplanted cells migrate extensively, differentiate, and functionally integrate. In addition, MGE cells can be efficiently transduced with lentivirus immediately prior to transplantation, allowing for a multitude of molecular approaches. Here we detail a protocol to efficiently transduce MGE cells before transplantation for in vivo analysis, using available Cre-driver lines and Cre-dependent expression vectors. This approach is advantageous because it combines precise genetic manipulation with the ability of these cells to disperse after transplantation, permitting greater cell-type specific resolution in vivo. PMID:25938985

  11. Characterization of transfusion-elicited acute antibody-mediated rejection in a rat model of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, G; Wilson, N A; Reese, S R; Jacobson, L M; Zhong, W; Djamali, A

    2014-05-01

    Animal models of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) may provide important evidence supporting proof of concept. We elicited donor-specific antibodies (DSA) by transfusion of donor blood (Brown Norway RT1(n) ) into a complete mismatch recipient (Lewis RT1(l) ) 3 weeks prior to kidney transplantation. Sensitized recipients had increased anti-donor splenocyte IgG1, IgG2b and IgG2c DSA 1 week after transplantation. Histopathology was consistent with ABMR characterized by diffuse peritubular capillary C4d and moderate microvascular inflammation with peritubular capillaritis + glomerulitis > 2. Immunofluorescence studies of kidney allograft tissue demonstrated a greater CD68/CD3 ratio in sensitized animals, primarily of the M1 (pro-inflammatory) phenotype, consistent with cytokine gene analyses that demonstrated a predominant T helper (TH )1 (interferon-γ, IL-2) profile. Immunoblot analyses confirmed the activation of the M1 macrophage phenotype as interferon regulatory factor 5, inducible nitric oxide synthase and phagocytic NADPH oxidase 2 were significantly up-regulated. Clinical biopsy samples in sensitized patients with acute ABMR confirmed the dominance of M1 macrophage phenotype in humans. Despite the absence of tubulitis, we were unable to exclude the effects of T cell-mediated rejection. These studies suggest that M1 macrophages and TH 1 cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute mixed rejection in sensitized allograft recipients.

  12. The molecular landscape of antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection: evidence for NK involvement through CD16a Fc receptors.

    PubMed

    Venner, J M; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Chang, J; Halloran, P F

    2015-05-01

    The recent recognition that antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the major cause of kidney transplant loss creates strong interest in its pathogenesis. We used microarray analysis of kidney transplant biopsies to identify the changes in pure ABMR. We found that the ABMR transcript changes in the initial Discovery Set were strongly conserved in a subsequent Validation Set. In the Combined Set of 703 biopsies, 2603 transcripts were significantly changed (FDR < 0.05) in ABMR versus all other biopsies. In cultured cells, the transcripts strongly associated with ABMR were expressed in endothelial cells, e.g. cadherins CDH5 and CDH13; IFNG-treated endothelial cells, e.g. phospholipase PLA1A and chemokine CXCL11; or NK cells, e.g. cytotoxicity molecules granulysin (GNLY) and FGFBP2. Other ABMR transcripts were expressed in normal kidney but not cell lines, either increased e.g. Duffy chemokine receptor (DARC) or decreased e.g. sclerostin (SOST). Pathway analysis of ABMR transcripts identified angiogenesis, with roles for angiopoietin and vascular endothelial growth factors; leukocyte-endothelial interactions; and NK signaling, including evidence for CD16a Fc receptor signaling elements shared with T cells. These data support a model of ABMR involving injury-repair in the microcirculation induced by cognate recognition involving antibody and CD16a, triggering IFNG release and antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  13. Dietary potassium: a key mediator of the cardiovascular response to dietary sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Bayram, Yeter; Solak, Yalcin; Sanders, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Potassium and sodium share a yin/yang relationship in the regulation of blood pressure (BP). BP is directly associated with the total body sodium and negatively correlated with the total body potassium. Epidemiologic, experimental, and clinical studies have shown that potassium is a significant regulator of BP and further improves cardiovascular outcomes. Hypertensive cardiovascular damage, stroke, and stroke-related death are accelerated by salt intake but might be curbed by increasing dietary potassium intake. The antihypertensive effect of potassium supplementation appears to occur through several mechanisms that include regulation of vascular sensitivity to catecholamines, promotion of natriuresis, limiting plasma renin activity, and improving endothelial function. In the absence of chronic kidney disease, the combined evidence suggests that a diet rich in potassium content serves a vasculoprotective function, particularly in the setting of salt-sensitive hypertension and prehypertension.

  14. Bortezomib in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection in pediatric kidney transplant recipients: A multicenter Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Kizilbash, Sarah; Claes, Donna; Ashoor, Isa; Chen, Ashton; Jandeska, Sara; Matar, Raed Bou; Misurac, Jason; Sherbotie, Joseph; Twombley, Katherine; Verghese, Priya

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection leads to allograft loss after kidney transplantation. Bortezomib has been used in adults for the reversal of antibody-mediated rejection; however, pediatric data are limited. This retrospective study was conducted in collaboration with the Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients who received bortezomib for biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection between 2008 and 2015 were included. The objective was to characterize the use of bortezomib in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Thirty-three patients received bortezomib for antibody-mediated rejection at nine pediatric kidney transplant centers. Ninety percent of patients received intravenous immunoglobulin, 78% received plasmapheresis, and 78% received rituximab. After a median follow-up of 15 months, 65% of patients had a functioning graft. The estimated glomerular filtration rate improved or stabilized in 61% and 36% of patients at 3 and 12 months post-bortezomib, respectively. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis significantly predicted estimated glomerular filtration rate at 12 months after adjusting for chronic histologic changes (P .001). Fifty-six percent of patients showed an at least 25% reduction in the mean fluorescence intensity of the immune-dominant donor-specific antibody, 1-3 months after the first dose of bortezomib. Non-life-threatening side effects were documented in 21 of 33 patients. Pediatric kidney transplant recipients tolerated bortezomib without life-threatening side effects. Bortezomib may stabilize estimated glomerular filtration rate for 3-6 months in pediatric kidney transplant recipients with antibody-mediated rejection.

  15. Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation after a Complete Spinal Cord Transection Mediates Neuroprotective and Immunomodulatory Mechanisms to Facilitate Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Griffis, Khris G.; Haggerty-Skeans, James R.; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2016-01-01

    Multiple neural and peripheral cell types rapidly respond to tissue damage after spinal cord injury to form a structurally and chemically inhibitory scar that limits axon regeneration. Astrocytes form an astroglial scar and produce chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), activate microglia, and recruit blood-derived immune cells to the lesion for debris removal. One beneficial therapy, olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation, results in functional improvements and promotes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. The lack of an OEC-specific marker, however, has limited the investigation of mechanisms underlying their proregenerative effects. We compared the effects of enhanced green fluorescent protein-labeled fibroblast (FB) and OEC transplants acutely after a complete low-thoracic spinal cord transection in adult rats. We assessed the preservation of neurons and serotonergic axons, the levels of inhibitory CSPGs and myelin debris, and the extent of immune cell activation between 1 and 8 weeks postinjury. Our findings indicate that OECs survive longer than FBs post-transplantation, preserve axons and neurons, and reduce inhibitory molecules in the lesion core. Additionally, we show that OECs limit immune-cell activation and infiltration, whereas FBs alter astroglial scar formation and increase immune-cell infiltration and concomitant secondary tissue damage. Administration of cyclosporine-A to enhance graft survival demonstrated that immune suppression can augment OEC contact-mediated protection of axons and neurons during the first 2 weeks postinjury. Collectively, these data suggest that OECs have neuroprotective and immunomodulatory mechanisms that create a supportive environment for neuronal survival and axon regeneration after spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spinal cord injury creates physical and chemical barriers to axon regeneration. We used a complete spinal cord transection model and olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) or

  16. Centrally administered CDP-choline induced cardiovascular responses are mediated by activation of the central phospholipase-prostaglandin signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Bora B; Altinbas, Burcin; Ilhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Erdost, Hatice; Saha, Sikha; Savci, Vahide; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-05-14

    The present study was designed to determine the involvement of central prostaglandin synthesis on the pressor and bradycardic effect of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline). Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CDP-choline was made and blood pressure and heart rate were recorded in male Sprague Dawley rats throughout this study. Microdialysis and immunohistochemical studies were performed to measure extracellular total prostaglandin concentration and to show cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2) immunoreactivities, respectively, in the posterior hypothalamic area. Moreover, rats were pretreated (i.c.v) with mepacrine [a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor], ibuprofen [a nonselective COX inhibitor], neomycine [a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor] or furegrelate [a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis inhibitor] 5 min prior to the injection of CDP-choline to determine the effects of these inhibitors on cardiovascular responses to CDP-choline. Control rats were pretreated (i.c.v) with saline. CDP-choline caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in blood pressure and decrease in heart rate. Immunohistochemical studies showed that CDP-choline increased COX-1 and -2 immunoreactivities in the posterior hypothalamic area. CDP-choline also elevated hypothalamic extracellular total prostaglandin concentration by 62%, as shown in microdialysis studies. Mepacrine or ibuprofen pretreatments almost completely blocked the pressor and bradycardic responses to CDP-choline while neomycine or furegrelate partially attenuated the drug-induced cardiovascular effects. The results suggest that CDP-choline may stimulate prostaglandin synthesis through the activation of PLA2, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and -2) and prostaglandins and at least TXA2, may mediate the drug׳s cardiovascular effects.

  17. The incremental value of brachial flow-mediated dilation measurements in risk stratification for incident cardiovascular events: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sanne A E; den Ruijter, Hester M; Bots, Michiel L

    2012-06-01

    Abstract Adequate risk assessment for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is essential as a guide to initiate drug treatment. Current methods based on traditional risk factors could be improved considerably. Although brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) predicts subsequent cardiovascular events, its predictive value on top of traditional risk factors is unknown. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the incremental predictive value of FMD on top of traditional risk factors in asymptomatic individuals. Using PubMed and reference tracking, three studies were identified that reported on the incremental value of FMD using change in the area under the curve (AUC). Two large cohort studies found no improvement in AUC when FMD was added to traditional risk prediction models, whereas one small case-control study found an improvement. One study used the net reclassification improvement (NRI) to assess whether FMD measurement leads to correct risk stratification in risk categories. Although this study did not find an improvement in AUC, the NRI was statistically significant. Based on the reclassification results of this study, FMD measurement might be helpful in risk prediction. Evidence supporting the use of FMD measurement in clinical practice for risk stratification for CVD on top of traditional risk factors is limited, and future studies are needed.

  18. Antibiotic-mediated modification of the intestinal microbiome in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Whangbo, J; Ritz, J; Bhatt, A

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many patients with severe benign and malignant hematologic disorders. The success of allogeneic HSCT is limited by the development of transplant-related complications such as acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Early pre-clinical studies suggested that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of acute GvHD, and that growth suppression or eradication of intestinal bacteria prevented the development of acute GvHD even in MHC-mismatched transplants. These observations led to the practice of gut decontamination (GD) with oral non-absorbable antibiotics in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT as a method of acute GvHD prophylaxis. Microbiome studies in the modern sequencing era are beginning to challenge the benefit of this practice. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the practice of GD and highlight findings from the limited number of clinical trials evaluating the use of GD for acute GvHD prevention in allogeneic HSCT patients. In addition, we examine the role of the gut microbiota in allogeneic HSCT in the context of recent studies linking the microflora to regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis. We discuss the implications of these findings for future strategies to reduce acute GvHD risk by selective manipulation of the microbiota. PMID:27526283

  19. Dendritic cell-mediated immune humanization of mice: implications for allogeneic and xenogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Gustavo; Daenthanasanmak, Anusara; Münz, Christian; Raykova, Ana; Guzmán, Carlos A; Riese, Peggy; Figueiredo, Constanca; Länger, Florian; Schneider, Andreas; Macke, Laura; Sundarasetty, Bala Sai; Witte, Torsten; Ganser, Arnold; Stripecke, Renata

    2014-05-15

    De novo regeneration of immunity is a major problem after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). HCT modeling in severely compromised immune-deficient animals transplanted with human stem cells is currently limited because of incomplete maturation of lymphocytes and scarce adaptive responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal for the organization of lymph nodes and activation of naive T and B cells. Human DC function after HCT could be augmented with adoptively transferred donor-derived DC. In this study, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of long-lived human DC coexpressing high levels of human IFN-α, human GM-CSF, and a clinically relevant Ag (CMV pp65 protein) promoted human lymphatic remodeling in immune-deficient NOD.Rag1(-/-).IL-2rγ(-/-) mice transplanted with human CD34(+) cells. After immunization, draining lymph nodes became replenished with terminally differentiated human follicular Th cells, plasma B cells, and memory helper and cytotoxic T cells. Human Igs against pp65 were detectable in plasma, demonstrating IgG class-switch recombination. Human T cells recovered from mice showed functional reactivity against pp65. Adoptive immunotherapy with engineered DC provides a novel strategy for de novo immune reconstitution after human HCT and a practical and effective tool for studying human lymphatic regeneration in vivo in immune deficient xenograft hosts.

  20. Modulation of HCV reinfection after orthotopic liver transplantation by fibroblast growth factor-2 and other non-interferon mediators

    PubMed Central

    Van, Nguyen Dinh; Falk, Christine S; Sandmann, Lisa; Vondran, Florian W R; Helfritz, Fabian; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P; Ciesek, Sandra; von Hahn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In HCV infected individuals graft infection occurs shortly after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We aimed to describe the composition of the inflammatory response at this time, how it affects the HCV replication cycle and identify novel proviral and antiviral factors. Design We used a Luminex assay to quantify 50 inflammatory mediators in sera before and shortly after OLT. In vitro grown HCV based on the JFH-1 isolate were used to characterise the effects of patient sera and individual mediators on HCV. Results Although the mediator composition is highly variable between individuals, sera drawn immediately post-OLT significantly enhance HCV infectivity compared with control sera from before OLT in about half of the cases. Among 27 non-interferon inflammatory mediators fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 stood out as it enhanced HCV RNA replication and release of infectious particles. The effect was concentration-dependent and detectable in dividing and non-dividing cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of FGF-2 receptor signalling abrogated the enhancing effect of FGF-2 and inhibited HCV replication in the absence of serum FGF-2 suggesting that HCV replication is dependent on basal activation of the FGF-2 triggered signalling pathway. Finally, in individuals with chronic HCV infection with high viral load, serum FGF-2 was significantly higher compared with those with low viral load. Conclusions Although no single mediator may account for this effect, serum shortly post-OLT enhances HCV infection. FGF-2 is a novel endogenous driver of HCV replication and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25800783

  1. Eculizumab for Treatment of Refractory Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Yelken, B; Arpalı, E; Görcin, S; Kocak, B; Karatas, C; Demiralp, E; Turkmen, A

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is responsible for up to 20%-30% of acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation. In several cases, conventional therapies including plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and anti-CD20 therapy can resolve AMR successfully. But in some cases the load of immunoglobulins that can activate complement cascade may submerge the routine desensitization therapy and result in the formation of membrane attack complexes. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5, was reported to be an option in cases with severe AMR that are resistant to conventional therapy. Here, we present 8 cases that were resistant to conventional therapy and in which eculizumab was given as a salvage treatment. Given the bad prognosis for renal transplants displaying acute injury progressing rapidly to cortical necrosis on the biopsy, the prompt use of eculizumab could have the advantage of immediate effects by stopping cellular injury. This can provide a therapeutic window to allow conventional treatment modalities to be effective and prevent early graft loss.

  2. Prelimbic cortex GABAA receptors are involved in the mediation of restraint stress-evoked cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed

    Fassini, Aline; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Corrêa, Fernando M A

    2016-11-01

    Stress is a response of the organism to homeostasis-threatening stimuli and is coordinated by two main neural systems: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and the autonomic nervous system. Acute restraint stress (RS) is a model of unavoidable stress, which is characterized by autonomic responses including an increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), as well as a drop in tail temperature. The prelimbic cortex (PL) has been implicated in the modulation of functional responses caused by RS. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of PL GABAergic neurotransmission in the modulation of autonomic changes induced by RS. Bilateral microinjection of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline methiodide into the PL reduced pressor and tachycardic responses evoked by RS, in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the tail temperature drop evoked by RS. In order to investigate which peripheral autonomic effector modulated the reduction in RS-cardiovascular responses caused by the blockade of PL GABAA receptors, rats were intravenously pretreated with either atenolol or homatropine methylbromide. The blockade of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system with atenolol blunted the reducing effect of PL treatment with bicuculline methiodide on RS-evoked pressor and tachycardic responses. The blockade of the parasympathetic nervous system with homatropine methylbromide, regardless of affecting the beginning of the tachycardic response, did not impact on the reduction of RS-evoked tachycardic and pressor responses caused by the PL treatment with bicuculline methiodide. The present results indicate that both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities are involved in the reduction of RS-evoked cardiovascular responses evidenced after the blockade of PL GABAA receptors by bicuculline methiodide.

  3. PCL-PDMS-PCL copolymer-based microspheres mediate cardiovascular differentiation from embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liqing

    Poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) based copolymers have received much attention as drug or growth factor delivery carriers and tissue engineering scaffolds due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and tunable biophysical properties. Copolymers of PCL and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) also have shape memory behaviors and can be made into thermoresponsive shape memory polymers for various biomedical applications such as smart sutures and vascular stents. However, the influence of biophysical properties of PCL-PDMS-PCL copolymers on stem cell lineage commitment is not well understood. In this study, PDMS was used as soft segments of varying length to tailor the biophysical properties of PCL-based co-polymers. While low elastic modulus (<10 kPa) of the tri-block copolymer PCL-PDMS-PCL affected cardiovascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells, the range of 60-100 MPa PCL-PDMS-PCL showed little influence on the differentiation. Then different size (30-140 mum) of microspheres were fabricated from PCL-PDMS-PCL copolymers and incorporated within embryoid bodies (EBs). Mesoderm differentiation was induced using bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 for cardiovascular differentiation. Differential expressions of mesoderm progenitor marker KDR and vascular markers CD31 and VE-cadherin were observed for the cells differentiated from EBs incorporated with microspheres of different size, while little difference was observed for cardiac marker alpha-actinin expression. Small size of microspheres (30 mum) resulted in higher expression of KDR while medium size of microspheres (94 mum) resulted in higher CD31 and VE-cadherin expression. This study indicated that the biophysical properties of PCL-based copolymers impacted stem cell lineage commitment, which should be considered for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

  4. Cardiovascular actions of DOPA mediated by the gene product of ocular albinism 1.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Yoshio; Nakamura, Fumio; Masukawa, Daiki; Chen, Sandy; Koga, Motokazu

    2014-01-01

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is the metabolic precursor of dopamine, and the single most effective agent in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. One problem with DOPA therapy for Parkinson's disease is its cardiovascular side effects including hypotension and syncope, the underlying mechanisms of which are largely unknown. We proposed that DOPA is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, but specific receptors for DOPA had not been identified. Recently, the gene product of ocular albinism 1 (OA1) was shown to possess DOPA-binding activity. It was unknown, however, whether or not OA1 is responsible for the actions of DOPA itself. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that OA1 was expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). OA1-positive cells adjacent to tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cell bodies and nerve fibers were detected in the depressor sites of the NTS. OA1 knockdown using oa1-specific shRNA-adenovirus vectors in the NTS reduced the expression levels of OA1 in the NTS. The prior injection of the shRNA against OA1 suppressed the depressor and bradycardic responses to DOPA but not to glutamate in the NTS of anesthetized rats. Thus OA-1 is a functional receptor of DOPA in the NTS, which warrants reexamination of the mechanisms for the therapeutic and untoward actions of DOPA.

  5. Preformed donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies mediate acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jolly, E C; Key, T; Rasheed, H; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M R

    2012-10-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no other donor-specific HLA alloantibodies, suggesting that the HLA-DP-specific antibodies may be directly pathogenic.

  6. Median preoptic nucleus mediates the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia Oda; Naves, Lara Marques; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos Luiz; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Colombari, Eduardo; Rosa, Daniel Alves; Reis, Angela Adamski da Silva; Ianzer, Danielle; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Changes in plasma osmolarity, through central and peripheral osmoreceptors, activate the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) that modulates autonomic and neuroendocrine adjustments. The present study sought to determine the participation of MnPO in the cardiovascular recovery induced by hypertonic saline infusion (HSI) in rats submitted to hemorrhagic shock. The recordings of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were carried out on male Wistar rats (250-300 g). Hemorrhagic shock was induced by blood withdrawal over 20 min until the MAP values of approximately 60 mmHg were attained. The nanoinjection (100 nL) of GABAA agonist (Muscimol 4 mM; experimental group (EXP)) or isotonic saline (NaCl 150 mM; control (CONT)) into MnPO was performed 2 min prior to intravenous overload of sodium through HSI (3 M NaCl, 1.8 mL/kg, b.wt.). Hemorrhagic shock reduced the MAP in control (62 ± 1.1 mmHg) and EXP (61 ± 0.4 mmHg) equipotently. The inhibition of MnPO impaired MAP (CONT: 104 ± 4.2 versus EXP: 60 ± 6.2 mmHg) and RVC (CONT: 6.4 ± 11.4 versus EXP: -53.5 ± 10.0) recovery 10 min after HSI. The overall results in this study demonstrated, for the first time, that the MnPO plays an essential role in the HSI induced resuscitation during hypovolemic hemorrhagic shock.

  7. Characterizing the Mechanistic Pathways of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Xenogeneic Neonatal Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Liuwantara, David; Chew, Yi Vee; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Hawkes, Joanne M.; Burns, Heather L.; O'Connell, Philip J.; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) causes major loss of islets after transplantation and consequently represents the initial barrier to survival of porcine neonatal islet cell clusters (NICC) after xenotransplantation. Methods This study used novel assays designed to characterize the various immunologic components responsible for xenogeneic IBMIR to identify initiators and investigate processes of IBMIR-associated coagulation, complement activation and neutrophil infiltration. The IBMIR was induced in vitro by exposing NICC to platelet-poor or platelet-rich human plasma or isolated neutrophils. Results We found that xenogeneic IBMIR was characterized by rapid, platelet-independent thrombin generation, with addition of platelets both accelerating and exacerbating this response. Platelet-independent complement activation was observed as early as 30 minutes after NICC exposure to plasma. However, membrane attack complex formation was not observed in NICC histopathology sections until after 60 minutes. We demonstrated for the first time that NICC-mediated complement activation was necessary for neutrophil activation in the xenogeneic IBMIR setting. Finally, using the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer, we identified substantial loss of islet function (up to 40%) after IBMIR with surviving NICC showing evidence of mitochondrial damage. Conclusions This study used novel assays to describe multiple key pathways by which xenogeneic IBMIR causes islet destruction, allowing further refinement of future interventions aimed at resolving the issue of IBMIR in xenotransplantation. PMID:27500267

  8. Intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab therapy for severe transplant glomerulopathy in chronic antibody-mediated rejection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Thomas; Nodimar, Celine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Lepreux, Sebastien; Moreau, Karine; Morel, Delphine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Couzi, Lionel; Merville, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is poor. Using B-cell targeting molecules represent a rational strategy to treat TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection. In this pilot study, 21 patients with this diagnosis received four doses of intravenous immunoglobulins and two doses of rituximab (IVIG/RTX group). They were retrospectively compared with a untreated control group of 10 patients. At 24 months post-biopsy, graft survival was similar and poor between the treated and the untreated group, 47% vs. 40%, respectively, p = 0.69. This absence of response of IVIG/RTX treatment was observed, regardless the phenotype of TG. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and decline in eGFR during the first six months after the treatment were risk factors associated with 24-month graft survival. The IVIG/RTX therapy had a modest effect on the kinetics of donor-specific alloantibodies at M24, compared to the untreated group, not associated with an improvement in graft survival. The mean number of adverse events per patient was higher in the IVIG/RTX group than in the control group (p = 0.03). Taken together, IVIG/RTX treatment for severe TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection does not seem to change the natural history of TG and is associated with a high incidence of adverse events.

  9. Ventral Lamina Terminalis Mediates Enhanced Cardiovascular Responses of RVLM Neurons During Increased Dietary Salt

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Julye M.; Bardgett, Megan E.; Stocker, Sean D.

    2009-01-01

    Increased dietary salt enhances sympathoexcitatory and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether neurons of the forebrain lamina terminalis (LT) mediated these changes in the RVLM. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with and without LT lesions were fed normal chow and given access to water or 0.9% NaCl for 14-15 days. Unilateral injection of L-glutamate into the RVLM produced significantly larger increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) of sham rats ingesting 0.9% NaCl versus water. However, these differences were not observed between ventral LT-lesioned rats drinking 0.9% NaCl versus water. Similar findings were observed when angiotensin II or GABA were injected into the RVLM. Interestingly, a subset of animals drinking 0.9% but with damage restricted to the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis did not show enhanced responses to L-glutamate or GABA. In marked contrast, RVLM injection of L-glutamate or GABA produced exaggerated SNA and ABP responses in animals drinking 0.9% NaCl versus water after an acute ventral LT lesion or chronic lesion of the subfornical organ. Additional experiments demonstrate plasma sodium concentration and osmolality were increased at night in rats ingesting 0.9% NaCl. These findings suggest that neurons of the ventral LT mediate the ability of increased dietary salt to enhance the responsiveness of RVLM sympathetic neurons. PMID:19506102

  10. Activation of the transcription factor c-Jun in acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Takahashi, Takamune; Horita, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Izumi; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Teraoka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2010-12-01

    c-Jun is a transcription factor that belongs to the activator protein-1 family of proteins. In human kidney disease, c-Jun is activated in glomerular and tubular cells and plays a major role in renal pathophysiology. However, the contribution of this pathway to renal allograft rejection has not been determined. We investigated whether c-Jun is activated in acute allograft rejection. c-Jun activation was assessed with immunohistochemistry using phospho-specific c-Jun antibodies in control human renal tissue and renal tissue from patients with acute cellular rejection, acute antibody-mediated rejection, and no rejection in the month after transplantation. In patients with acute cellular rejection, c-Jun activation was observed primarily in infiltrated T cells associated with tubulitis, interstitial cell infiltration, and endarteritis. The number of infiltrated phosphorylated c-Jun-positive cells in the tubules and interstitium was correlated with the Banff classification "t" and "i" scores. In patients with acute antibody-mediated rejection, c-Jun activation was observed in injured endothelial cells as well as in infiltrated cells, including macrophages, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries. Furthermore, the serum creatinine levels and changes in serum creatinine from the previous year were significantly correlated with the total tubulointerstitial phosphorylated c-Jun-positive score (representing the number of positive nuclei in the tubules, interstitium, and peritubular capillaries). In conclusion, c-Jun was activated in acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection and was associated with reduced graft function. These findings suggest that c-Jun plays a key role in pathological events and may represent a novel therapeutic target in acute renal allograft rejection.

  11. Post-transplant dyslipidemia: Mechanisms, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Arnav; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant dyslipidemia is highly prevalent and presents unique management challenges to the clinician. The two major outcomes to consider with post-transplant therapies for dyslipidemia are preserving or improving allograft function, and reducing cardiovascular risk. Although there are other cardiovascular risk factors such as graft dysfunction, hypertension, and diabetes, attention to dyslipidemia is warranted because interventions for dyslipidemia have an impact on reducing cardiac events in clinical trials specific to the transplant population. Dyslipidemia is not synonymous with hyperlipidemia. Numerous mechanisms exist for the occurrence of post-transplant dyslipidemia, including those mediated by immunosuppressive drug therapy. Statin therapy has received the most attention in all solid organ transplant recipient populations, although the effect of proper dietary advice and adjuvant pharmacological and non-pharmacological agents should not be dismissed. At all stages of treatment appropriate monitoring strategies for side effects should be implemented so that the benefits from these therapies can be achieved. Clinicians have a choice when there is a conflict between various transplant society and lipid society guidelines for therapy and targets. PMID:27011910

  12. Recurrent atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome post kidney transplant due to a CD46 mutation in the setting of SMARCAL1-mediated inherited kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chan, Samuel; Mallett, Andrew J; Patel, Chirag; Francis, Ross S; Johnson, David W; Mudge, David W; Isbel, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    Disorders in the regulation of the alternate complement pathway often result in complement-mediated damage to the microvascular endothelium and can be associated with both glomerulonephritis and atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Inherited defects in complement regulatory genes or autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins are predictive of the severity of the disease and the risk of recurrence post kidney transplantation. Heterozygous mutations in CD46, which codes for a transmembrane cofactor glycoprotein membrane cofactor protein, usually have a lower incidence of end-stage kidney disease and decreased risk of recurrent disease post transplant, as wild-type membrane cofactor protein is present in the transplanted kidney. However, some patients with CD46 mutations have a second variant in other complement regulatory genes increasing the severity of disease. The following case report illustrates the course of a young adult patient with end-stage kidney disease initially ascribed to seronegative systemic lupus erythematosus, who presented with biopsy-proven thrombotic microangiopathy following kidney transplantation. It highlights the complexity associated with disorders of complement regulation and the need for a high index of suspicion and genetic testing in patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy post-transplant.

  13. Early acute antibody-mediated rejection of a negative flow crossmatch 3rd kidney transplant with exclusive disparity at HLA-DP.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M; Baum, Caitlin E; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-08-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA.

  14. Serotonergic neurons mediate dyskinesia side effects in Parkinson's patients with neural transplants.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Wu, Kit; Loane, Clare; Quinn, Niall P; Brooks, David J; Rehncrona, Stig; Bjorklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Piccini, Paola

    2010-06-30

    Troublesome involuntary movements in the absence of dopaminergic medication, so-called off-medication dyskinesias, are a serious adverse effect of fetal neural grafts that hinders the development of cell-based therapies for Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms underlying these dyskinesias are not well understood, and it is not known whether they are the same as in the dyskinesias induced by l-dopa treatment. Using in vivo brain imaging, we show excessive serotonergic innervation in the grafted striatum of two patients with Parkinson's disease, who had exhibited major motor recovery after transplantation with dopamine-rich fetal mesencephalic tissue but had later developed off-medication dyskinesias. The dyskinesias were markedly attenuated by systemic administration of a serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] receptor (5-HT(1A)) agonist, which dampens transmitter release from serotonergic neurons, indicating that the dyskinesias were caused by the serotonergic hyperinnervation. Our observations suggest strategies for avoiding and treating graft-induced dyskinesias that result from cell therapies for Parkinson's disease with fetal tissue or stem cells.

  15. Immune-mediated nephropathies in kidney transplants: recurrent or de novo diseases.

    PubMed

    Roberti, Isabel; Vyas, Shefali

    2016-11-01

    IMN contribute to ESRD in 13% children with renal transplant (txp). Recurrent or de novo IMN can cause graft dysfunction and/or failure, but the details regarding incidence, therapy, and outcome remain poorly understood. Retrospective single-center study of all pediatric kidney txp was carried out since 1998. Clinical presentation, pathology, therapy, and graft outcomes of children with recurrent or de novo IMN were reviewed. IMN was the primary etiology of ESRD in 28 of the 149 txp recipients. Eleven children had biopsy-proven post-txp IMN-six were recurrent and five had de novo. Presentation varied with changes in SCr and/or proteinuria. Initial therapy included higher doses of steroids, MMF, and tacrolimus. Outcome was excellent with only one late graft loss. Full remission was achieved in all other patients, but some had re-recurrence of the IMN. Median follow-up time was 11.8 years. IMN (recurrent or de novo) occurred in 7.4% (11 of 149) of all kidney txp performed at our center. IMN post-txp was often seen late post-txp, usually asymptomatic and noted to have relapsing pattern. Early diagnosis and prompt therapy resulted in excellent long-term outcome in children diagnosed with post-txp IMN.

  16. [Immunosuppressive treatment after kidney transplant: the frontier of chronic antibody-mediated rejection].

    PubMed

    Biancone, Luigi; Lavacca, Antonio; Beltramo, Silvia; Ariaudo, Claudia; Gallo, Ester; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The recognition of antibody-mediated rejection as an important factor in the reduction of long-term renal graft survival represents a new challenge to the immunosuppressive strategies of recent years, which have been quite successful in reducing the acute rejection rates as well as the side effects of pharmacological immunosuppression. The search for an effective treatment of chronic anti-donor antibody disease has been pursued mostly through limited single-center experiences and therefore in a dispersed fashion, without leading to the definition of a consolidated approach. The most frequently used pharmacological approaches stem from the experience of antibody-mediated acute rejection. In this review we will critically analyze the results reported so far of various intervention strategies and we will discuss future pharmacological novelties targeting the humoral immune response.

  17. Paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus mediate cardiovascular responses evoked by the microinjection of noradrenaline into the medial amygdaloid nucleus of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fortaleza, E A T; Scopinho, A A; Corrêa, F M A

    2012-09-06

    The medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA) is a part of the limbic system and is involved in cardiovascular modulation. We previously reported that microinjection of noradrenaline (NA) into the MeA of unanesthetized rats caused pressor and bradycardiac responses, which were mediated by acute vasopressin release into the systemic circulation. In the present study, we tested the possible involvement of magnocellular neurons of the paraventricular (PVN) and/or supraoptic (SON) of the hypothalamus that synthesize vasopressin in the cardiovascular pathway activated by the microinjection of NA into the MeA. Pressor and bradycardiac responses to the microinjection of NA (27 nmol/100 nL) into the MeA were blocked by pretreatment of either the PVN or the SON with cobalt chloride (CoCl(2), 1 mM/100 nL), thus indicating that both hypothalamic nuclei mediate the cardiovascular responses evoked by microinjection of NA into the MeA. Our results suggest that the pressor and bradycardiac response caused by the microinjection of NA into the MeA is mediated by magnocellular neurons in both the PVN and SON.

  18. The pathological implications of heart transplantation: experience with 50 cases in a single center.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Matsuyama, Taka-Aki; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Sato, Takuma; Seguchi, Osamu; Yanase, Masanobu; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2014-09-01

    Heart transplantation started in Japan in 1999. Since then, 50 transplants have been performed at our center. We performed histopathological analyses of the 50 explanted hearts and the post-transplant biopsy specimens. The median age of recipients was 39 years. The primary diseases before transplant were idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in 33 patients (66%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in seven (14%), restrictive cardiomyopathy in one, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in one, and secondary cardiomyopathy in eight (16%). Before transplantation, 47 patients (94%) had left ventricular assist devices. No severe cardiovascular failure due to allograft rejection occurred. The post-transplant survival rate was 97.6% at 1 year and 93.1% at 10 years. One recipient was lost to sepsis from myelodysplastic syndrome in the fourth year, one died of multiple organ failure and peritonitis 8 months after transplant. Another patient died of recurrent post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD). Mild cardiac dysfunction occurred in seven recipients in the early postoperative period. Moderate acute cellular rejection occurred in six patients (12%), and antibody-mediated rejection occurred in three (6%). The number of heart transplants performed in Japan is very small. However, the outstanding 10-year survival rate is due to donor evaluation and post-transplant care resulting in low grade rejection. Pathological evaluation has also greatly contributed to the results.

  19. Impact of ABO Incompatibility on the Development of Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Presensitized to HLA.

    PubMed

    Chung, Byung Ha; Joo, Yu Young; Lee, Jaesin; Kim, Hyung Duk; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In Sung; Choi, Bum Soon; Oh, Eun-Jee; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    Whether the coexistence of anti-A/B antibody and donor specific anti-HLA antibody (HLA-DSA) has a synergistic impact on the development of acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) is unclear. This study includes 92 KTRs who received a kidney from an ABO-incompatible (ABOi) donor or were presensitized to donor HLA (HLAs) and 292 controls (CONT). HLAs was defined as a crossmatch positivity or the presence of HLA-DSA. We compared the incidence of AAMR among ABOi (n = 58), ABOi+HLAs (n = 12), HLAs (n = 22), and CONT (n = 292) groups and evaluated the risk factors and antibody type (anti-A/B vs. HLA-DSA) responsible for AAMR. AAMR developed less frequently in ABOi and CONT than in the ABOi+HLAs or HLAs (P < 0.05 for all); however, there was no difference between the ABOi+HLAs and HLAs groups. AAMR developed more frequently with strong HLA-DSA at baseline; however, high baseline anti-A/B titer did not affect AAMR development. Strong baseline HLA-DSA was an independent predictor for AAMR, however the baseline anti-A/B titer was not. All four AAMR episodes in ABOi+HLAs were positive to HLA-DSA but not to anti-A/B. In conclusion, ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk for AAMR in HLAs KTRs.

  20. Beta-adrenergic receptor mediated inflammation control by monocytes is associated with blood pressure and risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suzi; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Cheng, Tiefu; Redwine, Laura; Pruitt, Christopher; Mills, Paul J; Ziegler, Michael G; Green, J Michael; Shaikh, Farah; Wilson, Kathleen

    2015-11-01

    Overwhelming data indicate that individuals with even mildly elevated blood pressure (BP) are at great risk for developing clinical hypertension and future cardiovascular disease (CVD). There remains a lack of consensus regarding treatment strategies for mildly elevated BP, termed prehypertension, and the knowledge of pathophysiology and mechanisms of its clinical outcomes remains limited. Our primary aim was to investigate βAR-mediated inflammation control (BARIC) responses of blood monocytes to isoproterenol (Iso) in relation to BP and CVD risk factors, including obesity, depressive mood, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol levels in the 64 prehypertensive compared to 84 individuals with normal BP. BARIC was determined by measuring the degree of inhibition in lipopolysaccharides-stimulated monocytic intracellular TNF production by ex vivo Iso treatment (10(-8)M). Depressive mood was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Fasting metabolic and lipid panels were assessed, and plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-1β, IL-6 were measured in a subset to confirm proinflammatory state of prehypertensive participants. Prehypertensive participants were older, heavier, included more men, and presented higher levels of fasting glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and plasma TNF compared to normotensive participants (p's<.05). BARIC was significantly attenuated in the prehypertensive compared to normotensive group (p<.05). BARIC was negatively associated with systolic BP, diastolic BP, age, BMI, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total and low density cholesterol levels, and somatic depressive symptoms in all participants (p's<.0001 to .05). However, among the prehypertensive individuals BARIC was positively associated with SBP even after controlling for the covariates (age, gender, race, BMI, glucose and lipid panel, somatic BDI scores) (p<.05). This differing nature of the BARIC-SBP relationship between the two BP groups may be attributed to

  1. Alloantibody induced platelet responses in transplants: potent mediators in small packages.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Morrell, Craig N; Baldwin, William M

    2012-12-01

    The early histological studies of organ allografts noted platelets attached to vascular endothelium. Platelets adhere to vessels before any morphological evidence of endothelial injury. Subsequently, in vitro and in vivo experiments have demonstrated that alloantibodies can induce exocytosis of von Willebrand factor and P-selectin from endothelial cells and attachment of platelets within minutes. Platelets also adhere to and stimulate leukocytes. These interactions are increased by complement activation. After attachment platelets degranulate, releasing preformed mediators. Some chemokines stored together in platelet granules can form heteromers with synergistic functions. Heteromers containing platelet factor 4 (PF4; CXCL4) are specific to platelets and provide insights to unique platelet functions and opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Nafar, Mohsen; Sahraei, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Samavat, Shiva; Vaziri, Nosartolah D

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of adverse outcomes throughout the course of transplantation. Transplanted kidneys are prone to oxidative stress-mediated injury by pre-transplant and post-transplant conditions that cause reperfusion injury or imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Besides adversely affecting the allograft, oxidative stress and its constant companion, inflammation, cause cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and other disorders in transplant recipients. Presence and severity of oxidative stress can be assessed by various biomarkers produced from interaction of reactive oxygen species with lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, nitric oxide, glutathione, etc. In addition, expression and activities of redox-sensitive molecules such as antioxidant enzymes can serve as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Via activation of nuclear factor kappa B, oxidative stress promotes inflammation which, in turn, amplifies oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species generation by activated immune cells. Therefore, inflammation markers are indirect indicators of oxidative stress. Many treatment options have been evaluated in studies conducted at different stages of transplantation in humans and animals. These studies have provided useful strategies for use in donors or in organ preservation solutions. However, strategies tested for use in post-transplant phase have been largely inconclusive and controversial. A number of therapeutic options have been exclusively examined in animal models and only a few have been tested in humans. Most of the clinical investigations have been of short duration and have provided no insight into their impact on the long-term survival of transplant patients. Effective treatment of oxidative stress in transplant population remains elusive and awaits future explorations.

  3. Vasopressin and sympathetic system mediate the cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin II in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in rat.

    PubMed

    Nasimi, Ali; Kafami, Marzieh

    2016-07-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is involved in cardiovascular regulation. The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor (AT1), and angiotensinogen were found in the BST. In our previous study we found that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response. This study was performed to find the mechanisms mediating this response in anesthetized rats. Ang II was microinjected into the BST and the cardiovascular responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a blocker of autonomic or vasopressin V1 receptor. The ganglionic nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium dichloride, attenuated the pressor response to Ang II, indicating that the cardiovascular sympathetic system is involved in the pressor effect of Ang II. A selective vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist greatly attenuated the pressor effect of Ang II, indicating that the Ang II increases the arterial pressure via stimulation of vasopressin release as well. In conclusion, in the BST, Ang II as a neurotransmitter increases blood pressure by exciting cardiovascular sympathetic system and directly or indirectly causing vasopressin to release into bloodstream by VPN. This is an interesting new finding that not only circulating Ang II but also brain Ang II makes vasopressin release.

  4. Effect of cocoa/chocolate ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and its relevance to cardiovascular health and disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Kevin D

    2012-11-15

    Prospective studies indicate that high intake of dietary flavanols, such as those contained in cocoa/chocolate, are associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in humans. Numerous mechanisms may underlie these associations such as favorable effects of flavanols on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis, inflammation, and the vascular endothelium. The brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique has emerged as a robust method to quantify endothelial function in humans. Collectively, the preponderance of evidence indicates that FMD is a powerful surrogate measure for firm cardiovascular endpoints, such as cardiovascular-related mortality, in humans. Thus, literally thousands of studies have utilized this technique to document group differences in FMD, as well as to assess the effects of various interventions on FMD. In regards to the latter, numerous studies indicate that both acute and chronic ingestion of cocoa/chocolate increases FMD in humans. Increases in FMD after cocoa/chocolate ingestion appear to be dose-dependent such that greater increases in FMD are observed after ingestion of larger quantities. The mechanisms underlying these responses are likely diverse, however most data suggest an effect of increased nitric oxide bioavailability. Thus, positive vascular effects of cocoa/chocolate on the endothelium may underlie (i.e., be linked mechanistically to) reductions in cardiovascular risk in humans.

  5. Different regulatory and cytotoxic CD4+ T lymphocyte profiles in renal transplants with antibody-mediated chronic rejection or long-term good graft function.

    PubMed

    Giaretta, Fulvia; Bussolino, Stefania; Beltramo, Silvia; Fop, Fabrizio; Rossetti, Maura; Messina, Maria; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Ranghino, Andrea; Basso, Elisa; Camussi, Giovanni; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Biancone, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the different subsets of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes may provide hints on the immunologic mechanisms operating in the long-term fate of a kidney transplant. We analyzed peripheral regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in antibody-mediated chronic rejection (AMCR), in middle-term kidney transplants (2-4 years, MTKT) with good graft function and rejection-free history, in long-term kidney transplants (>15 years, LTKT) and in normal healthy subjects (NHS). Transplant groups with good prognosis (MTKT and LTKT) displayed a significant lower amount of CD4(+)CD25(high) T lymphocytes than NHS, with a trend of a higher percentage in AMCR than in MTKT and LTKT. However, CD4(+)CD25(high) Foxp3(+) cells were significantly higher in LTKT and MTKT than AMCR. Characterization of CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells showed a marked increase of intracellular CTLA-4 in the AMCR group in respect to the other transplant groups, while the expression of the surface molecule seemed to follow a reverse trend. In addition, CD27, a costimulatory receptor involved in long-term T cell survival and prevention of immune tolerance, is significantly reduced in CD4(+)CD25(high) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in the LTKT in respect to the other transplant groups. CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD45RO(+) regulatory T cells with memory function were increased in LTKT compared to NHS and for the latter also in AMCR group. Finally, CD4(+)CTLs that were quantified on the basis of granzyme A expression, were more represented in AMCR patients in comparison to the other groups. Strikingly, CD27 in the CD4(+)CTLs was suppressed in LTKT and MTKT and markedly expressed in AMCR group. No significant differences in the expression of CD28 were observed among different groups. In conclusion, different profiles of Tregs and CD4(+)CTL populations correlate with different long-term conditions of kidney-transplanted patients, suggesting their role in the development

  6. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic transplant; Transplant - liver; Orthotopic liver transplant; Liver failure - liver transplant; Cirrhosis - liver transplant ... The donated liver may be from: A donor who has recently died and has not had liver injury. This type of ...

  7. Plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Maiko; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Naoki; Tanno, Yudo; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. A 33-year-old man was admitted for an episode biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 5.7 mg/dL 1 year following primary kidney transplantation. Histological features included two distinct entities: (1) a focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell (predominantly plasma cells) infiltration with moderate tubulitis; and (2) inflammatory cell infiltration (including neutrophils) in peritubular capillaries. Substantial laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies for DQ4 and DQ6. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed him with plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection. We started 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy three times every 2 weeks for the former and plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the latter histological feature. One month after treatment, a second allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for plasma cell-rich rejection, but moderate, acute antibody-mediated rejection remained. Therefore, we added plasma exchange with IVIG again. After treatment, allograft function was stable, with an S-Cr level of 2.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of the diagnosis of, and treatment for, plasma cell-rich rejection accompanied by acute antibody-mediated rejection in a patient with ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. We also include a review of the related literature.

  8. [Effect of pre-transplant donor specific antibody on antibody-mediated rejection and graft dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Li, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    目的:研究肾移植受者的术前供者特异性抗体(donor specific antibody,DSA)与其术后发生抗体介导的体液排斥反应(antibody-mediated rejection,AMR)及移植肾功能的关系。方法:选取符合要求的肾移植受者88例。术前采用Luminex流式法对肾移植受者进行DSA检测,并将受者分为DSA阳性组(n=20)与DSA阴性组(n=68)。随访时间为2年。术后参照Banff 2005标准对移植肾病理形态进行评估分级,并观察移植肾的情况。结果: DSA阳性组与阴性组AMR发生率分别为20.0%和1.5%,移植物丢失发生率分别为15.0%和1.5%,两组比较差异均有统计学意义(分别P<0.01,P<0.05);AMR受者最高DSA的荧光指数中值(mean fluorescence intensity,MFI)较非AMR受者差异明显(P<0.01);受试者工作特征(receiver operating characteristic,ROC)曲线显示肾移植术后受者发展为AMR的最高MFI阈值为7909.5。两组移植肾功能延迟回复的发生相比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:肾移植术前检测DSA水平,可以预测AMR的发生风险和移植肾功能状态。最高DSA值的MFI截点(7909.5)能够预测AMR发生的风险。.

  9. Histoplasmosis in Patients With Cell-Mediated Immunodeficiency: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, Organ Transplantation, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Keith; Dummer, J Stephen; Miller, Geraldine; Hester, Sydney; Thomas, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Histoplasmosis causes severe disease in patients with defects of cell-mediated immunity. It is not known whether outcomes vary related to the type of immunodeficiency or class of antifungal treatment. Methods.  We reviewed cases of active histoplasmosis that occurred at Vanderbilt University Medical Center from July 1999 to June 2012 in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a history of transplantation, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor use. These groups were compared for differences in clinical presentation and outcomes. In addition, outcomes were related to the initial choice of treatment. Results.  Ninety cases were identified (56 HIV, 23 transplant, 11 TNF-α inhibitor). Tumor necrosis factor-α patients had milder disease, shorter courses of therapy, and fewer relapses than HIV patients. Histoplasma antigenuria was highly prevalent in all groups (HIV 88%, transplant 95%, TNF-α 91%). Organ transplant recipients received amphotericin B formulation as initial therapy less often than other groups (22% vs 57% HIV vs 55% TNF-α; P = .006). Treatment failures only occurred in patients with severe disease. The failure rate was similar whether patients received initial amphotericin or triazole therapy. Ninety-day histoplasmosis-related mortality was 9% for all groups and did not vary significantly with choice of initial treatment. Conclusions.  Histoplasmosis caused milder disease in patients receiving TNF-α inhibitors than patients with HIV or solid organ transplantation. Treatment failures and mortality only occurred in patients with severe disease and did not vary based on type of immunosuppression or choice of initial therapy.

  10. How does illness severity influence depression, health satisfaction and life satisfaction in patients with cardiovascular disease? The mediating role of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs.

    PubMed

    Steca, P; Greco, A; Monzani, D; Politi, A; Gestra, R; Ferrari, G; Malfatto, G; Parati, G

    2013-01-01

    Numerous empirical studies have investigated the relationships between cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and patients' psychological well-being, with a focus almost exclusively on its dark side. Very little is known on the impact of illness severity on both negative and positive indicators of patients' well-being, as well as on the psychosocial variables that may mediate this association. Aim of the study was to investigate the impact of illness severity on depression as well as on health satisfaction and life satisfaction of patients undergoing a cardiovascular rehabilitation. It also aimed at testing the mediation of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs in managing cardiac risk factors. The study involved 172 patients (mean age = 66.43 years; SD = 9.99 years; 76.2% men). Illness severity was measured in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction at discharge from the cardiology department, whereas all psychological dimensions were assessed one week later. Results showed significant relationships among illness severity, depression and health satisfaction that were fully mediated by illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs, but not significant relation between disease severity and life satisfaction (χ2 (1) = 2.30, p = n.s.). Overall, findings underline the importance of working on illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs to contrast depression and to improve health and life satisfaction in patients with CVD.

  11. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  12. Antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients: potential efficacy of B-cell depletion and antibody removal.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Charlene; Miller, Barry; Prak, Eline Luning; Gasiewski, Allison; Kearns, Jane; Tsai, Donald; Jessup, Mariell; Kamoun, Malek

    2006-01-01

    We present four patients with late AMR following cardiac transplantation, which was associated with de novo post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibody production. All patients had negative anti-HLA class I and class II antibodies prior to transplantation (as assessed by sensitive Flow PRA bead assays) and had a negative retrospective T- and B-cell flow cytometric cross-match. Upon presentation with late graft rejection due to AMR, all patients were treated with rituximab and serial plasmapheresis with IVIg plus triple-drug immunosuppression therapy. Despite initial responses to therapy, relapses occurred in all of the patients and necessitated prolonged or multiple hospital admissions and second transplants in two cases. Post-transplant serum antibody monitoring did not prove to be predictive of treatment success or failure. Serum anti-HLA antibodies should be monitored after heart transplantation. We recommend an assessment of anti-HLA antibodies following a decline in immunosuppressant drug levels or in the presence of heart failure symptoms. Anti-HLA antibody detection should be performed using very sensitive techniques such as microparticle-based assays.

  13. Protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function, and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the PI3K/Akt pathway in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Hong-Yang; Jiang, Yi-Nong; Li, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Thymoquinone is the main active monomer extracted from black cumin and has anti‑inflammatory, antioxidant and anti‑apoptotic functions. However, the protective effects of thymoquinone on cardiovascular function in diabetes remain to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underling the beneficial effects of thymoquinone on the cardiovascular function in streptozotocin‑induced diabetes mellitus (DM) rats. Supplement thymoquinone may recover the insulin levels and body weight, inhibit blood glucose levels and reduce the heart rate in DM‑induced rats. The results indicated that the heart, liver and lung to body weight ratios, in addition to the blood pressure levels, were similar for each experimental group. Treatment with thymoquinone significantly reduced oxidative stress damage, inhibited the increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression and suppressed the elevation of cyclooxygenase‑2 levels in DM‑induced rats. In addition, thymoquinone significantly suppressed the promotion of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑6 levels in the DM‑induced rats. Furthermore, administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced caspase‑3 activity and the promotion of phosphorylated‑protein kinase B (Akt) protein expression levels in DM‑induced rats. These results suggest that the protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt pathway in DM‑induced rats.

  14. Blunted GABA-mediated inhibition within the dorsomedial hypothalamus potentiates the cardiovascular response to emotional stress in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Abreu, A R; de Abreu, A R; Santos, L T; de Souza, A A; da Silva, L G; Chianca, D A; de Menezes, R C

    2014-03-14

    Rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) present an exaggerated endocrine response to stress conditions, which, like obesity, show a high correlation with cardiovascular diseases. Meanwhile the GABAergic neurotransmission within the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) is involved in the regulation of the physiological responses during emotional stress. Here we evaluated the influence of obesity, induced by a HFD, on the cardiovascular responses induced by air jet stress in rats, and the role of the GABAergic tonus within the DMH in these changes. Our results showed that consumption of a HFD (45% w/w fat) for 9 weeks induced obesity and increases in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Moreover, obesity potentiated stress responsiveness, evidenced by the greater changes in MAP and HR induced by stress in obese rats. The injection of muscimol into the DMH reduced the maximal increases in HR and MAP induced by stress in both groups; however, the reduction in the maximal increases in MAP in the HFD group was less pronounced. Moreover, the injection of muscimol into the DMH of obese rats was less effective in reducing the stress-induced tachycardia, since the HR attained the same levels at the end of the stress paradigm as after the vehicle injection. Injection of bicuculline into DMH induced increases in MAP and HR in both groups. Nevertheless, obesity shortened the tachycardic response to bicuculline injection. These data show that obesity potentiates the cardiovascular response to stress in rats due to an inefficient GABAA-mediated inhibition within the DMH.

  15. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-mediated integration of cGMP and cAMP signaling in cells of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H

    2005-05-01

    Numerous pharmacological and physiological agents acting via either cAMP- or cGMP-mediated impact the activities of cells of the cardiovascular system. While most define cAMP and cGMP signaling systems as separate and independent, recent advances in our understanding of cyclic nucleotide signaling, and more specifically, of the roles which cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play in these events, have altered this view. In this short chapter, I will review the data identifying expression of several PDEs in cells of the cardiovascular system. In addition, I will review the data that identify PDEs as enzymes capable of allowing integration between cAMP and cGMP signaling in cells, and propose that cAMP and cGMP signaling systems can represent parallel and interdependent signaling systems. Moreover, I will propose that cGMP-mediated effects on the activities of variants of the Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), PDE3 and PDE5 families may act to coordinate linkage between cAMP and cGMP signaling in these cells.

  16. Protective actions of progesterone in the cardiovascular system: potential role of membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) in mediating rapid effects.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei

    2013-06-01

    The protective functions of progesterone in the cardiovascular system have received little attention even though evidence has accumulated that progesterone lowers blood pressure, inhibits coronary hyperactivity and has powerful vasodilatory and natriuretic effects. One possible reason why potential beneficial actions of progesterone on cardiovascular functions have not been extensively studied is that divergent effects to those of progesterone have been observed in many clinical trials with synthetic progestins such as medroxyprogesterone acetate which are associated with increased risk of coronary disease. Evidence that progesterone exerts protective effects on cardiovascular functions is briefly reviewed. The finding that progesterone administration decreases blood vessel vasoconstriction in several animal models within a few minutes suggests that rapid, nongenomic progesterone mechanisms are of physiological importance in regulating vascular tone. Rapid activation of second messenger pathways by progesterone has been observed in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, resulting in alterations in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and calcium influx, respectively. Both nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs) and novel membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) are candidates for the intermediaries in these rapid, cell-surface initiated progesterone actions in endothelial and smooth muscle vascular cells. PRs have been detected in both cell types. New data are presented showing mPRα, mPRβ and mPRγ are also present in human endothelial and smooth muscle vascular cells. Preliminary evidence suggests mPRs mediate rapid progestin signaling in these endothelial cells, resulting in down-regulation of cAMP production and increased nitric oxide synthesis. The role of mPRs in progesterone regulation of cardiovascular functions warrants further investigation.

  17. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  18. Challenges in pediatric transplantation: the impact of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk factors on long-term outcomes and recommended management strategies.

    PubMed

    Filler, Guido

    2011-02-01

    Barriers to successful outcomes following pediatric transplantation have shifted from ischemic reperfusion injury and rejection to more long-term complications. Of particular concern is the high prevalence of CKD owing to preexisting damage and nephrotoxicity, as well as other CV complications such as hypertension and cardiomyopathy. All of these contribute to graft loss and shortened life expectancy, thereby limiting the success story of solid-organ transplantation. Managing CKD and related CV morbidity should be integral to the care of pediatric transplant patients, and timely detection of any irregularities would increase the chances of restoring lost kidney function. GFR is still the widely accepted indicator of renal function, and nuclear medicine techniques are the gold standard measurement methods. These methods are limited by costs, radiation exposure and substrate injection, and current practice still uses the Schwartz estimate, despite its well-documented limitations. Newer endogenous markers of GFR, such as cystatin C clearance, give a more accurate measure of true GFR but have not been embraced in the management of pediatric transplant recipients. Furthermore, indirect markers (e.g., microalbuminuria and hypertension) could also aid early detection of renal damage. The effects of mainstay immunosuppressants on kidney and heart function are varied, with available data indicating favorable outcomes with tacrolimus compared with ciclosporin. There is a need for appropriately designed and powered randomized controlled trials to validate innovative concepts for tailored immunosuppression in the pediatric population. To date, very few studies have generated long-term data in pediatric renal transplant patients - results of 1-4-yr study favored tacrolimus over ciclosporin, but other immunosuppressive agents also need to be evaluated.

  19. A refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We herein report a refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient. A 45-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.8 mg/dL 3 years following primary kidney transplantation. Histological examination revealed moderate to severe inflammatory cell infiltration in the peritubular capillaries. Thorough laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to DR9 and DQ9. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed acute antibody-mediated rejection. The patient underwent 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange. We also administered rituximab (200 mg/body). Six months after the treatment, a second allograft biopsy revealed the progression of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and persistence of mild peritubular capillaritis. Further analysis showed that the anti-DR9 antibodies had disappeared, but that the mean fluorescence intensity value of the anti-DQ9 antibodies had increased. Therefore, we repeated the plasma exchange and IVIG. Allograft function was stable throughout the course of treatment, and the S-Cr level remained at 1.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of treating AMR due to the presence of anti-DQ DSAbs and the necessity for subsequent therapies in refractory cases.

  20. Risk factors for post-transplant diabetes mellitus in renal transplant: Role of genetic variability in the CYP450-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gervasini, Guillermo; Luna, Enrique; García-Cerrada, Montserrat; García-Pino, Guadalupe; Cubero, Juan José

    2016-01-05

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hidroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), which play an important role both in renal transplant and diabetes mellitus (DM). We searched for associations between polymorphisms in this metabolic pathway and the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) in kidney recipients. One-hundred-sixty-four patients were genotyped for common SNPs in this route, namely CYP2C8*3, CYP2C8*4, CYP2C9*2, CYP2C9*3, CYP2J2*7, CYP4A11 F434S and CYP4F2 V433M. Demographic and clinical parameters were retrospectively collected at four time-points in the first year after grafting. Thirty-four patients (20.73%) developed PTDM, which was more prevalent among older patients [OR for older age = 1.06 (1.03-1.10), p < 0.001] and in those with higher body mass index (BMI) [OR for higher average BMI in the first year = 1.13 (1.04-1.23); p < 0.01]. Creatinine clearance [OR = 0.97 (0.95-0.99); p < 0.01] and exposure to tacrolimus [OR = 3.25 (1.15-9.19); p < 0.05] were also relevant for PTDM risk. With regard to genetic variants, logistic regression analysis controlling for significant demographic and clinical variables showed that the V433M polymorphism in CYP4F2, responsible for 20-HETE synthesis, was an independent risk factor for PTDM [OR = 3.94 (1.08-14.33); p < 0.05]. We have shown that a genetic variant in the CYP4F2 gene, the main gene implicated in 20-HETE synthesis, is associated with the risk for PTDM. Our findings suggest that genes in the metabolic pathways of AA may become good candidates in genetic association studies for PTDM.

  1. Pathophysiology of isoprostanes in the cardiovascular system: implications of isoprostane-mediated thromboxane A2 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jochen; Ripperger, Anne; Frantz, Stefan; Ergün, Süleyman; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2014-07-01

    Isoprostanes are free radical-catalysed PG-like products of unsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, which are widely recognized as reliable markers of systemic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in vivo. Moreover, activation of enzymes, such as COX-2, may contribute to isoprostane formation. Indeed, formation of isoprostanes is considerably increased in various diseases which have been linked to oxidative stress, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), and may predict the atherosclerotic burden and the risk of cardiovascular complications in the latter patients. In addition, several isoprostanes may directly contribute to the functional consequences of oxidant stress via activation of the TxA2 prostanoid receptor (TP), for example, by affecting endothelial cell function and regeneration, vascular tone, haemostasis and ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In this context, experimental and clinical data suggest that selected isoprostanes may represent important alternative activators of the TP receptor when endogenous TxA2 levels are low, for example, in aspirin-treated individuals with CVD. In this review, we will summarize the current understanding of isoprostane formation, biochemistry and (patho) physiology in the cardiovascular context.

  2. Role of dendritic cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Cuihua

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent work has elucidated the DC life cycle, including several important stages such as maturation, migration and homeostasis, as well as DC classification and subsets/locations, which provided etiological insights on the role of DCs in disease processes. DCs have a close relationship to endothelial cells and they interact with each other to maintain immunity. DCs are deposited in the atherosclerotic plaque and contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the necrotic cardiac cells induced by ischemia activate DCs by Toll-like receptors, which initiate innate and adaptive immune responses to renal, hepatic and cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Furthermore, DCs are involved in the acute/chronic rejection of solid organ transplantation and mediate transplant tolerance as well. Advancing our knowledge of the biology of DCs will aid development of new approaches to treat many cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, cardiac IRI and transplantation. PMID:21179302

  3. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  4. The PI3K signaling-mediated nitric oxide contributes to cardiovascular effects of angiotensin-(1-7) in the nucleus tractus solitarii of rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhao-Tang; Ren, Chang-Zhen; Yang, Ya-Hong; Zhang, Ru-Wen; Sun, Jia-Cen; Wang, Yang-Kai; Su, Ding-Feng; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2016-01-30

    Angiotensin-1-7 [Ang-(1-7)], acting via the Mas receptor in the central nervous system, is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated as an important modulator in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), a key region involved in control of cardiovascular activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in mediating the effect of Ang-(1-7) on NO generation in the NTS. In Sprague-Dawley rats, acute injection of Ang-(1-7) into the NTS significantly increased NO generation and neuronal/endothelial NO synthase (n/eNOS) activity, which were abolished by the selective Mas receptor antagonist d-Alanine-[Ang-(1-7)] (A-779), the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, or the Akt inhibitor triciribine (TCN). Western blotting analysis further demonstrated that Ang-(1-7) significantly increased levels of Akt/NOS phosphorylation in the NTS, and Ang-(1-7)-induced e/nNOS phosphorylation was antagonized by LY294002 or TCN. Furthermore, gene knockdown of PI3K by lentivirus containing small hairpin RNA in the NTS prevented the Ang-(1-7)-induced increases in NOS/Akt phosphorylation and NO production. The physiological (in vivo) experiments showed that pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME, LY294002, or TCN abolished the decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity induced by Ang-(1-7) injected into the NTS. Our findings suggest that nitric oxide release meditated by the Mas-PI3K-NOS signaling pathway is involved in the cardiovascular effects of Ang-(1-7) in the NTS.

  5. Cre-mediated excision of Fgf8 in the Tbx1 expression domain reveals a critical role for Fgf8 in cardiovascular development in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher B; Wenning, Jennifer M; Lu, Min Min; Epstein, Douglas J; Meyers, Erik N; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2004-03-01

    Tbx1 has been implicated as a candidate gene responsible for defective pharyngeal arch remodeling in DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial syndrome. Tbx1(+/-) mice mimic aspects of the DiGeorge phenotype with variable penetrance, and null mice display severe pharyngeal hypoplasia. Here, we identify enhancer elements in the Tbx1 gene that are conserved through evolution and mediate tissue-specific expression. We describe the generation of transgenic mice that utilize these enhancer elements to direct Cre recombinase expression in endogenous Tbx1 expression domains. We use these Tbx1-Cre mice to fate map Tbx1-expressing precursors and identify broad regions of mesoderm, including early cardiac mesoderm, which are derived from Tbx1-expressing cells. We test the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) functions downstream of Tbx1 by performing tissue-specific inactivation of Fgf8 using Tbx1-Cre mice. Resulting newborn mice display DiGeorge-like congenital cardiovascular defects that involve the outflow tract of the heart. Vascular smooth muscle differentiation in the great vessels is disrupted. This data is consistent with a model in which Tbx1 induces Fgf8 expression in the pharyngeal endoderm, which is subsequently required for normal cardiovascular morphogenesis and smooth muscle differentiation in the aorta and pulmonary artery.

  6. Self-Efficacy Beliefs Mediate the Relationship between Subjective Cognitive Functioning and Physical and Mental Well-Being after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lisa M.; Austin, Jane; Hamilton, Jada G.; Isola, Luis; Rowley, Scott; Warbet, Rachel; Winkel, Gary; Redd, William H.; Rini, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cognitive problems are commonly reported by hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors, and are associated with poorer physical and mental well-being. It was hypothesized that adverse effects of subjective cognitive impairment occur because cognitive difficulties reduce survivors’ confidence that they can manage HSCT-related symptoms—that is, self-efficacy for symptom management. Methods HSCT survivors (n = 245) 9-months to 3-years post-HSCT completed measures of subjective cognitive functioning, self-efficacy for symptom management, and clinically important outcomes: depressed mood, anxiety, and quality of life. Mediation analyses using bootstrapping were conducted to investigate whether effects of subjective cognitive impairment on these outcomes were mediated by self-efficacy for cognitive (SE-Cognitive), emotional (SE-Emotional), social (SE-Social), and physical (SE-Physical) symptom management. Results Self-efficacy mediated relations between subjective cognitive impairment and depressed mood (total indirect effect = −.0064 and 95% confidence interval [CI] −.0097 to −.0036), anxiety (total indirect effect = −.0045, CI −.0072 to −.0021), and quality of life (total indirect effect = .0952, CI .0901 to .2642). SE-Emotional was a unique mediator when the outcome was depressed mood and anxiety. SE-Social, SE-Physical and SE-Emotional were specific mediators when outcome was quality of life. Conclusions Findings support the conclusion that subjective cognitive impairment reduces HSCT survivors’ confidence in their ability to manage common post-HSCT symptoms, with implications for physical and mental well-being. Interventions that help enhance survivors’ self-efficacy are likely to benefit HSCT survivors who report subjective cognitive impairment. PMID:21739524

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-AN; ZHANG, XIAO-DONG; GUO, XING-YU; XIAN, SHU-LIN; LU, YUN-FEI

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT. PMID:26708213

  8. 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-An; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Xing-Yu; Xian, Shu-Lin; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT.

  9. Bradykinin-mediated cardiovascular protective actions of ACE inhibitors. A new dimension in anti-ischaemic therapy?

    PubMed

    Remme, W J

    1997-01-01

    In addition to being accepted therapy in hypertension and heart failure, ACE inhibitors may well offer a new dimension in anti-ischaemic therapy. Currently, anti-ischaemic properties have been demonstrated by ACE inhibitors in selected patient groups, including patients with left ventricular dysfunction with or without a direct temporal relationship with myocardial infarction. Anti-ischaemic effects of ACE inhibitors become apparent late after initiation of treatment and suggest a structural rather than a functional effect. Underlying mechanisms may include a reduction in ventricular dilatation and (abnormal) cardiac hypertrophy, leading to less myocardial oxygen demand and, possibly, improved subendocardial blood supply, and vasculoprotective effects, i.e. anti-atherosclerotic and antiremodelling properties, a beneficial effect on the fibrinolytic system and an improvement in abnormal endothelial vasodilator function. The latter aspect is most probably the pivotal mode of action where the anti-ischaemic profile of ACE inhibition is concerned. An improvement in endothelial dysfunction has been shown in patients with mild to moderate coronary artery disease [Trial on Reversing ENdothelial Dysfunction (TREND)]. It is of importance that, in both clinical experiments and human studies, the role of bradykinin appears central in the structural and functional cardiovascular effects of ACE inhibition. This is particularly true for the improvement of impaired endothelial function. Myocardial ischaemia evokes vasoconstrictor neurohormonal activation, which may lead to coronary vasoconstriction in diseased coronary segments. The subsequent abnormal endothelial function leads to diminished coronary flow and also increases systemic vasotone and afterload, thus unfavourably altering the myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio. Under laboratory conditions, acute ACE inhibition counteracts this activation in humans. However, it is speculated that this anti-ischaemic mechanism may

  10. Oxidized lipids and lipid-mediators are involved in cardiovascular injury induced by diesel exhaust particles and ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms by which air pollutants induce cardiac and vascular injuries are unknown. We hypothesized that these injuries involve alterations in'aortic membrane lipids and lipid-mediators. We exposed male Wistar Kyoto rats (12-15 wk old), nose-only to air, ozone (03; 0.5 ppm),...

  11. Bi-directional CB1 receptor-mediated cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in anaesthetized rats: role of the paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Grzeda, E; Schlicker, E; Luczaj, W; Harasim, E; Baranowska-Kuczko, M; Malinowska, B

    2015-06-01

    The activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors decreases and increases blood pressure (BP) in anaesthetized and conscious rats, respectively. The aim of our study was to check the possible involvement of CB1 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in rats. Methanandamide (metabolically stable analogue of the endocannabinoid anandamide) and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 were microinjected into the PVN of urethane-anaesthetized rats twice (S1 and S2, 20 min apart). Receptor antagonists were administered intravenously (i.v.) 5 min before S1. Methanandamide and CP55940 decreased blood pressure by 15 - 20%. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 reversed the depressor effect into a pressor response of 20 - 30%. The pressor effect of CP55940 observed in the presence of AM251 i.v. was reduced by AM251 given additionally into the PVN but not by the i.v. injection of the CB2 antagonist SR144528 or the vanilloid TRPV1 antagonist ruthenium red. In the presence of the peripherally restricted CB1 receptor antagonist AM6545, CP55940 given into the PVN increased BP by 40%. AM6545 reversed the decrease in BP induced by CP55940 i.v. into a marked increase. Bilateral chemical lesion of the PVN by kainic acid abolished all cardiovascular effects of CP55940 i.v. In conclusion, the cannabinoid CP55940 administered to the PVN of urethane-anaesthetized rats can induce depressor and pressor effects. The direction of the response probably depends on the sympathetic tone. The centrally induced hypertensive response of CP55940 can, in addition, be masked by peripheral CB1 receptors.

  12. Brain mediators of cardiovascular responses to social threat, Part II: Prefrontal-subcortical pathways and relationship with anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; van Ast, Vanessa A.; Hughes, Brent L.; Davidson, Matthew L.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2009-01-01

    Social evaluative threat (SET) is a potent stressor in humans linked to autonomic and endocrine responses, and multiple health problems. Neuroimaging has recently begun to elucidate the brain correlates of SET, but as yet little is known about the mediating cortical-brainstem pathways in humans. This paper replicates and extends findings in a companion paper (Wager et al., submitted) using an independent cohort of participants and different image acquisition parameters. Here, we focused specifically on relationships between the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG), and heart rate (HR). We applied multi-level path analysis to localize brain mediators of SET effects on HR and self-reported anxiety. HR responses were mediated by opposing signals in two distinct sub-regions of the MPFC—increases in rostral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (rdACC) and deactivation in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). In addition, HR responses were mediated by PAG. Additional path analyses provided support for two cortical subcortical pathways: one linking vmPFC, PAG, and HR, and another linking rdACC, thalamus, and HR. PAG responses were linked with HR changes both before and during SET, whereas cortical regions showed stronger connectivity with HR during threat. Self-reported anxiety showed a partially overlapping, but weaker, pattern of mediators, including the vmPFC, dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), and lateral frontal cortex, as well as substantial individual differences that were largely unexplained. Taken together, these data suggest pathways for the translation of social threats into both physiological and experiential responses, and provide targets for future research on the generation and regulation of emotion. PMID:19465135

  13. Contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-11-01

    The cellular immune response plays an important role in almost every major form of cardiovascular disease. The ability to image the key aspects of the immune response in the clinical setting could be used to improve diagnostic information, to provide important prognostic or risk information, and to customize therapy according to disease phenotype. Accordingly, targeted imaging probes for assessing inflammation have been developed for essentially all forms of medical imaging. Molecular imaging of inflammation with contrast ultrasound relies on the detection of targeted microbubble or other gas-filled particle contrast agents. These agents are confined to the vascular space and, hence, have been targeted to either activated leucocytes or endothelial cell adhesion molecules that are upregulated in inflammation and mediate leucocyte recruitment and adhesion. This review focuses on the inflammation-targeting strategies for ultrasound contrast agents and how they have been matched to cardiovascular disease states such as myocardial ischaemia, infarction, atherosclerosis, transplant rejection, and arteriogenesis.

  14. The influence of illness severity on health satisfaction in patients with cardiovascular disease: the mediating role of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs.

    PubMed

    Greco, Andrea; Steca, Patrizia; Pozzi, Roberta; Monzani, Dario; Malfatto, Gabriella; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The importance of psychological factors in improving conditions of cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients is stressed by the guidelines for their prevention and rehabilitation, but little is known about the impact of illness severity on patients' well-being, and on the psychosocial variables that may mediate this association. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs on the relationship between illness severity and health satisfaction in 75 CVD patients undergoing rehabilitation (80% men; mean age = 65.44) at the St. Luca Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. Illness severity was measured in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction; psychological factors were assessed at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Results from path analyses showed that the relationships among CVD severity and health satisfaction were mediated by illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs. Findings underscored the importance of considering illness representations and self-efficacy beliefs to improve well-being in CVD patients.

  15. Kidney transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Barry JM, Conlin MJ. In: Renal transplantation. Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ( ...

  16. Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy kidney ... bloodstream via a machine (dialysis) or a kidney transplant to stay alive. Mayo Clinic's approach . Mayo Clinic ...

  17. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Lung transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or ... lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other ...

  18. Excitatory amino acid receptors mediate asymmetry and lateralization in the descending cardiovascular pathways from the dorsomedial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Lima, Augusto Martins; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Vaz, Gisele; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) are anatomically and functionally connected. Both the DMH and PAG depend on glutamatergic inputs for activation. We recently reported that removal of GABA-ergic tone in the unilateral DMH produces: asymmetry, that is, a right- (R-) sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism, and lateralization, that is, a greater increase in ipsilateral renal sympathetic activity (RSNA). In the current study, we investigated whether excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the DMH-PAG pathway contribute to the functional interhemispheric difference. In urethane (1.2 to 1.4 g/kg, i.p.) anesthetized rats, we observed that: (i) nanoinjections of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA 100 pmol/100 nl) into the unilateral DMH produced the same right-sided predominance in the control of cardiac chronotropy, (ii) nanoinjections of NMDA into the ipsilateral DMH or PAG evoked lateralized RSNA responses, and (iii) blockade of EAA receptors in the unilateral DMH attenuated the cardiovascular responses evoked by injection of NMDA into either the R- or left- (L-) PAG. In awake rats, nanoinjection of kynurenic acid (1 nmol/100 nL) into the L-DMH or R- or L-PAG attenuated the tachycardia evoked by air stress. However, the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia was smallest when the EAA receptors of the R-DMH were blocked. We conclude that EAA receptors contribute to the right-sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism. This interhemispheric difference that involves EAA receptors was observed in the DMH but not in the PAG.

  19. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  20. TGF-β/MAPK signaling mediates the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on urinary control and interstitial cystitis after urinary bladder transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ya; Song, Ya-Jun; Song, Bo; Huang, Chi-Bing; Ling, Qing; Yu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the role of the transforming growth factor-β/mitogen activated protein kinase (TGF-β/MAPK) signaling pathway in the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on urinary control and interstitial cystitis in a rat model of urinary bladder transplantation. Methods: A urinary bladder transplantation model was established using Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were assigned to normal (blank control), negative control (phosphate-buffered saline injection), BMSCs (BMSC injection), sp600125 (MAPK inhibitor injection), or protamine sulfate (protamine sulfate injection) groups. Immunohistochemistry, urodynamic testing, hematoxylin-eosin staining, Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and MTT assay were used to assess BMSC growth, the kinetics of bladder urinary excretion, pathological changes in bladder tissue, bladder tissue ultrastructure, the expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and the effects of antiproliferative factor on cell proliferation. Results: Compared with normal, negative control, BMSCs, and sp600125 groups, rats in the PS group exhibited decreased discharge volume, maximal micturition volume, contraction interval, and bladder capacity but increased residual urine volume, bladder pressure, bladder peak pressure, expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins, levels of inflammatory cytokines, and growth inhibition rate. Levels of inflammatory cytokines and the growth inhibition rate were positively correlated with the expression of TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway-related proteins. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that the TGF-β/MAPK signaling pathway mediates the beneficial effects of BMSCs on urinary control and interstitial cystitis. PMID:28386345

  1. Determining donor-specific antibody C1q-binding ability improves the prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in human leucocyte antigen-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2017-04-01

    Detrimental impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) against human leucocyte antigens on outcomes after kidney transplantation are well documented, however, the value of their capacity to bind complement for predicting antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft survival still needs to be confirmed. We aimed to study DSA characteristics (strength and C1q binding) that might distinguish harmful DSA from clinically irrelevant ones. We retrospectively studied 60 kidney-transplanted patients with preformed DSA detected by single antigen bead (SAB) assays (IgG and C1q kits), from a cohort of 517 kidney graft recipients (124 with detectable anti-HLA antibodies). Patients were divided into DSA strength (MFI < vs. ≥ 15 000) and C1q-binding ability. AMR frequency was high (30%) and it increased with DSA strength (P = 0.002) and C1q+ DSA (P < 0.001). The performance of DSA C1q-binding ability as a predictor of AMR was better than DSA strength (diagnostic odds ratio 16.3 vs. 6.4, respectively). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression showed that C1q+ DSA was a risk factor for AMR (OR = 16.80, P = 0.001), while high MFI DSAs were not. Graft survival was lower in high MFI C1q+ DSA in comparison with patients with C1q- high or low MFI DSA (at 6 years, 38%, 83% and 80%, respectively; P = 0.001). Both DSA strength and C1q-binding ability assessment seem valuable for improving pretransplant risk assessment. Since DSA C1q-binding ability was a better predictor of AMR and correlated with graft survival, C1q-SAB may be a particularly useful tool.

  2. Hand transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amer, Hatem; Carlsen, Brian T; Dusso, Jennifer L; Edwards, Brooks S; Moran, Steven L

    2011-05-01

    The first successful hand transplant was performed in 1998, opening up a new possibility for patients who have suffered mutilating hand injuries. Since then, more than 60 such procedures have been performed throughout the world. This article describes the evolution of hand transplantation, outcomes of patients listed in the International Registry of Hand and Composite Tissue Transplantation, and ethical issues involved in hand transplantation. It also describes the hand transplantation program at Mayo Clinic, which was established in 2010.

  3. Toll-like receptor modulation in cardiovascular disease: a target for intervention?

    PubMed

    Földes, Gábor; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D

    2006-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) form a family of pattern recognition receptors that have emerged as key mediators of innate immunity. These receptors sense invading microbes and initiate the immune response. TLR-mediated inflammation is an important pathogenic link between innate immunity and a diverse panel of clinical disorders. Among the processes in which TLRs play a role are cardiovascular disorders such as cardiac ischaemia, coronary artery disease, ventricular remodelling, cancer angiogenesis or transplant rejection. From these, many important opportunities for disease modification through TLR signalling manipulation can be imagined. Their role as potential targets for therapeutic intervention is just beginning to be appreciated and this article reviews the current status of these treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease.

  4. Recombinant IL-33 prolongs leflunomide-mediated graft survival by reducing IFN-γ and expanding CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells in concordant heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Lu, Fang-Na; Jin, Ning; Yang, Bo; Gao, Chang; Zhao, Bin; Fu, Jia-Zhao; Hong, Shi-Fu; Liang, Han-Ting; Chen, Li-Hong; Chen, Zhi-Shui; Chen, Jie; Qi, Zhong-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a novel IL-1 family member, and its administration has been associated with promotion of T helper type-2 (Th2) cell activity and cytokines, particularly IL-4 and IL-5 in vivo. Recently, IL-33 was shown to increase CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and to suppress levels of the Th1-type cytokine IFN-γ in allogeneic heart transplantation in mice. Therefore, we hypothesized that IL-33 and leflunomide (Lef) could prolong graft survival in the concordant mouse-to-rat heart transplantation model. In this model, xenografts undergo acute humoral xenograft rejection (AHXR) typically on day 3 or cell-mediated rejection approximately on day 7 if AHXR is inhibited by Lef treatment. Recipients were treated with Lef (n=6), IL-33 (n=6), IL-33 combined with Lef (n=6), or left untreated (n=6) for survival studies. Heart grafts were monitored until they stopped beating. Mouse heterotopic grafts were performed, and recipients were sacrificed on days 2 and 7 for histological and flow cytometric analyses. The combination of IL-33 and Lef significantly prolonged the grafts from 17.3±2.3 to 2.8±0.4 days, compared to untreated controls. IL-33 administration with Lef, while facilitating Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4 on day 2 but not day 7), also decreased IFN-γ on day 2 and day 7, compared with Lef treatment only. Furthermore, IL-33 with Lef administration caused an expansion of suppressive CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in rats. The IL-33 and Lef combination therapy resulted in significantly prolonged graft survival, associated with markedly decreased Th1 cells and increased IL-10 levels. In addition, the combination therapy significantly decreased the percentage of CD-45(+) B cells on days 2 and 7, compared with monotherapy. These findings reveal a new immunoregulatory property of IL-33. Specifically, it facilitates regulatory cells, particularly functional CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs that underlie IL-33-mediated cardiac xenograft survival. Moreover, it can decrease Th

  5. Medical Management of Metabolic Complications of Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Abbey; Konyn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Improved short- and long-term survival of liver transplant recipients has led to increased focus on complications of both the early and late posttransplant periods. A variety of metabolic complications have been observed in the post–orthotopic liver transplant population, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Although only a small proportion of patients experience metabolic complications prior to transplantation, the prevalence of these complications posttransplantation reaches or exceeds that of the general population. This is of particular concern, as cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death in the late transplant period. A number of mechanisms mediate these metabolic complications, including reversal of cirrhosis pathophysiology, patient lifestyle factors, and immunosuppressive medications. Titration and modification of immunosuppression have been demonstrated to improve and sometimes even eliminate these conditions. Therefore, given the multiple etiologies contributing to the metabolic derangements, an effective management approach must incorporate lifestyle modifications, immunosuppression titration, and medical management. Best practices and understanding of the mechanisms underlying these complications allow for discussion of initial therapies and strategies; however, further study is necessary to determine the optimal management of metabolic complications over time. PMID:27917074

  6. Changing Paradigms in the Management of Rejection in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Mirela; Takano, Tomoko; Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: P4 medicine denotes an evolving field of medicine encompassing predictive, preventive, personalized, and participatory medicine. Using the example of kidney allograft rejection because of donor-recipient incompatibility in human leukocyte antigens, this review outlines P4 medicine’s relevance to the various stages of the kidney transplant cycle. Sources of information: A search for English articles was conducted in Medline via OvidSP (up to August 18, 2016) using a combination of subject headings (MeSH) and free text in titles, abstracts, and author keywords for the concepts kidney transplantation and P4 medicine. The electronic database search was expanded further on particular subject headings. Findings: Available histocompatibility methods exemplify current applications of the predictive and preventive domains of P4 medicine in kidney transplant recipients’ care. Pharmacogenomics are discussed as means to facilitate personalized immunosuppression regimens and promotion of active patient participation as a means to improve adherence. Limitations: For simplicity, this review focuses on rejection. P4 medicine, however, should more broadly address health concerns in kidney transplant recipients, including competing outcomes such as infections, malignancies, and cardiovascular disease. This review highlights how biomarkers to evaluate these competing outcomes warrant validation and standardization prior to their incorporation into clinical practice. Implications: Consideration of all 4 domains of the P4 medicine framework when caring for and/or studying kidney transplant recipients has the potential of increasing therapeutic efficiency, minimizing adverse effects, decreasing health care costs, and maximizing wellness. Technologies to gauge immune competency, immunosuppression requirements, and early/reversible immune-mediated injuries are required to optimize kidney transplant care. PMID:28270929

  7. Plasma-Derived C1 Esterase Inhibitor for Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Kidney Transplantation: Results of a Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, R A; Orandi, B J; Racusen, L; Jackson, A M; Garonzik-Wang, J M; Shah, T; Woodle, E S; Sommerer, C; Fitts, D; Rockich, K; Zhang, P; Uknis, M E

    2016-05-16

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is typically treated with plasmapheresis (PP) and intravenous immunoglobulin (standard of care; SOC); however, there is an unmet need for more effective therapy. We report a phase 2b, multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled pilot study to evaluate the use of human plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH) as add-on therapy to SOC for AMR. Eighteen patients received 20 000 units of C1 INH or placebo (C1 INH n = 9, placebo n = 9) in divided doses every other day for 2 weeks. No discontinuations, graft losses, deaths, or study drug-related serious adverse events occurred. While the study's primary end point, a difference between groups in day 20 pathology or graft survival, was not achieved, the C1 INH group demonstrated a trend toward sustained improvement in renal function. Six-month biopsies performed in 14 subjects (C1 INH = 7, placebo = 7) showed no transplant glomerulopathy (TG) (PTC+cg≥1b) in the C1 INH group, whereas 3 of 7 placebo subjects had TG. Endogenous C1 INH measured before and after PP demonstrated decreased functional C1 INH serum concentration by 43.3% (p < 0.05) for both cohorts (C1 INH and placebo) associated with PP, although exogenous C1 INH-treated patients achieved supraphysiological levels throughout. This new finding suggests that C1 INH replacement may be useful in the treatment of AMR.

  8. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary hypertension Complications of lung transplantation include rejection of the transplanted lung and infection. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  9. Hair transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007205.htm Hair transplant To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A hair transplant is a surgical procedure to improve baldness. Description ...

  10. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Transplant Liver Transplant Explore this section to learn more about ... resource. www.paulcox.com.au Why is the liver important? The liver is the second largest organ ...

  11. Cornea Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... who had several conditions, such as certain central nervous system conditions, infections, and prior eye surgery or eye conditions, or from people who died from an unknown cause. During your cornea transplant On the day of your cornea transplant, you' ...

  12. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:511-5. Gruessner AC, Gruessner RWG. Pancreas and kidney transplantation for diabetic nephropathy. In: Morris PJ, Knechtle SJ, eds. Kidney Transplantation: ...

  13. Cardiovascular Pharmacology of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, P.; Bátkai, S.; Kunos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids and their synthetic and endogenous analogs affect a broad range of physiological functions, including cardiovascular variables, the most important component of their effect being profound hypotension. The mechanisms of the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in vivo are complex and may involve modulation of autonomic outflow in both the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as direct effects on the myocardium and vasculature. Although several lines of evidence indicate that the cardiovascular depressive effects of cannabinoids are mediated by peripherally localized CB1 receptors, recent studies provide strong support for the existence of as-yet-undefined endothelial and cardiac receptor(s) that mediate certain endocannabinoid-induced cardiovascular effects. The endogenous cannabinoid system has been recently implicated in the mechanism of hypotension associated with hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock, and advanced liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, cannabinoids have been considered as novel antihypertensive agents. A protective role of endocannabinoids in myocardial ischemia has also been documented. In this chapter, we summarize current information on the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids and highlight the importance of these effects in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. PMID:16596789

  14. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  15. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  16. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Is a Well Established Mediating Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality—Should Patients with Elevated Levels Be Supplemented with Citrulline?

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    The arginine metabolite asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a competitive inhibitor and uncoupler of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an enzyme that acts in multifarious ways to promote cardiovascular health. This phenomenon likely explains, at least in part, why elevated ADMA has been established as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events, ventricular hypertrophy, and cardiovascular mortality. Fortunately, the suppressive impact of ADMA on eNOS activity can be offset by increasing intracellular arginine levels with supplemental citrulline. Although the long-term impact of supplemental citrulline on cardiovascular health in patients with elevated ADMA has not yet been studied, shorter-term clinical studies of citrulline administration demonstrate effects suggestive of increased NO synthesis, such as reductions in blood pressure and arterial stiffness, improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased erection hardness, and increased ejection fractions in patients with heart failure. Supplemental citrulline could be a practical option for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality, as it is inexpensive, has a mild flavor, and is well tolerated in doses (3–6 g daily) that can influence eNOS activity. Large and long-term clinical trials, targeting patients at high risk for cardiovascular events in whom ADMA is elevated, are needed to evaluate citrulline’s potential for aiding cardiovascular health. PMID:27417628

  17. Uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Altchek, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Until recently, only life and death situations warranted organ transplantation. Nonvital transplantation, to further a patient s wishes and goals, was not considered justified. It can be argued, however, that this distinction is not morally significant. Patients with kidney failure, for example, can be kept alive by dialysis. But their quality of life would be greatly enhanced by kidney transplant, which is thus considered a justified procedure. So a spectrum of rationales may justify transplantation. Transplantation of the uterus would relieve the anguish of women who greatly desire to conceive a child. Some women do not have a uterus. In some cases this is due to a congenital absence (Rokitansky s syndrome). In other cases, surgical removal of the uterus was required to repair an obstetrical rupture. With a transplanted uterus, many of these women could have the opportunity to become pregnant as a result of nonvital organ transplant. While other organ transplant donations most often come from cadavers and less often from living donors (kidney or partial liver), the donor source for a uterus may be an otherwise healthy living patient who requires uterus removal as a standard care procedure. Furthermore, it should be possible to remove the transplanted uterus from the recipient after successful pregnancies, so the patient would not be subjected to lifelong antirejection medications. Since animal uterus transplantation has been done successfully, human uterus transplantation might be considered for select cases. One such case has been reported.

  18. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  19. Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David ER

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is generally treated with oral diabetic drugs and/or insulin. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with this condition increases over time, even in patients receiving intensive insulin treatment, and this is largely attributable to diabetic complications or the insulin therapy itself. Pancreas transplantation in humans was first conducted in 1966, since when there has been much debate regarding the legitimacy of this procedure. Technical refinements and the development of better immunosuppressants and better postoperative care have brought about marked improvements in patient and graft survival and a reduction in postoperative morbidity. Consequently, pancreas transplantation has become the curative treatment modality for diabetes, particularly for type I diabetes. An overview of pancreas transplantation is provided herein, covering the history of pancreas transplantation, indications for transplantation, cadaveric and living donors, surgical techniques, immunosuppressants, and outcome following pancreas transplantation. The impact of successful pancreas transplantation on the complications of diabetes will also be reviewed briefly. PMID:21253293

  20. Sex Related Differences in the Risk of Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Subsequent Allograft Vasculopathy Post-Heart Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grupper, Avishay; Nestorovic, Emilija M.; Daly, Richard C.; Milic, Natasa M.; Joyce, Lyle D.; Stulak, John M.; Joyce, David L.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Pereira, Naveen L.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies may result in antibodies against HLA, a risk factor for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and subsequent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) after heart transplantation (HTx). The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of AMR events and subsequent risk of CAV among HTx recipients. Methods The study comprised 160 patients (51 [32%] women) who underwent HTx in 2008 to 2014. The cumulative effect of AMR events was calculated by AMR score (sum of myocardial biopsy grading divided by number of biopsies taken during 3 years post-HTx). Results Females had higher levels of anti-HLA I antibodies pre-HTx compared to males which was associated with a history of pregnancies, total number of children and with a higher AMR score at 6 months post-HTx (P < 0.05). Women demonstrated a significant increase in the total incidence of AMR events (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.001) and in AMR scores at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months post-HTx compared to men (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cellular rejection between the groups. A history of AMR events was associated with a significantly increased risk of severe CAV onset (hazard ratio, 7.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31.5; P = 0.012). Conclusions Women are at higher risk for AMR post-HTx which subsequently increases their risk for CAV. Females recipients may benefit from closer surveillance to identify AMR at an earlier stage post-HTx, and targeted immunosuppressive therapy to attenuate the development of CAV. PMID:27795988

  1. Prolonged impairment of very late activating antigen-mediated T cell proliferation via the CD3 pathway after T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, K; Nojima, Y; Tachibana, K; Soiffer, R J; Murray, C; Schlossman, S F; Ritz, J; Morimoto, C

    1994-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) is prolonged T cell dysfunction resulting in a variety of infectious complications in the months to years after hematologic engraftment. We previously showed that immobilized extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin (FN), the CS-1 domain of FN, or collagen (CO) acted synergistically with immobilized anti-CD3 to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, the comitogenic effect of ECMs could be mimicked by immobilized mAb reactive with a common beta 1 chain (CD29) of very late activating (VLA) antigens which include ECM receptors. Since the interaction of T cells with ECMs appears to play an important role in the process of T cell reconstitution following allo-BMT, we examined the expression of VLA antigens (alpha 1-alpha 6, beta 1) and their functional roles in CD3-mediated T cell proliferation at various times after T cell depleted allo-BMT. VLA beta 1 as well as VLA alpha 4, alpha 5, and alpha 6 expression was lower than normal controls during the first 3 mo after allo-BMT and auto-BMT, whereas these expressions returned to normal levels by 4 mo after allo-BMT and auto-BMT. Although alpha 1 and alpha 2 were not expressed on lymphocytes from normal controls, these antigens were expressed on lymphocytes at the detectable levels (5-15%) from patients after allo-BMT and auto-BMT. Both CD29 and CD3 were expressed at normal levels on lymphocytes from patients > 3 mo after allo-BMT, whereas T cell interaction with ECM through VLA proteins or crosslinking of VLA beta 1 expressed by T cells with anti-CD29 mAb results in poor induction of CD3-mediated T cell proliferation for a prolonged period (> 1 yr) after allo-BMT. In contrast, T cell proliferation induced by crosslinking of anti-CD2 or anti-CD26 with anti-CD3 was almost fully recovered by 1 yr post-allo-BMT. After autologous BMT, impaired VLA-mediated T cell proliferation via the CD3 pathway after auto-BMT returned to normal

  2. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  3. Cardiovascular Changes in Cirrhosis: Pathogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamoudi, Waleed K.

    2010-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is associated with a wide range of cardiovascular abnormalities including hyperdynamic circulation, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and pulmonary vascular abnormalities. The pathogenic mechanisms of these cardiovascular changes are multifactorial and include neurohumoral and vascular dysregulations. Accumulating evidence suggests that cirrhosis-related cardiovascular abnormalities play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple life-threatening complications including hepatorenal syndrome, ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, gastroesophageal varices, and hepatopulmonary syndrome. Treatment targeting the circulatory dysfunction in these patients may improve the short-term prognosis while awaiting liver transplantation. Careful fluid management in the immediate post-transplant period is extremely important to avoid cardiac-related complications. Liver transplantation results in correction of portal hypertension and reversal of all the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the cardiovascular abnormalities, resulting in restoration of a normal circulation. The following is a review of the pathogenesis and clinical implications of the cardiovascular changes in cirrhosis. PMID:20616408

  4. Fear of Movement and Low Self-Efficacy Are Important Barriers in Physical Activity after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Klaassen, Gerald; Schutte, Elise; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and exercise are commonly used as preventive measures for cardiovascular disease in the general population, and could be effective in the management of post-transplantation cardiovascular risk. PA levels are low after renal transplantation and very few renal transplant recipients (RTR) meet the PA guidelines. Identification of barriers to regular PA is important to identify targets for intervention to improve PA levels after renal transplantation. We investigated fear of movement and physical self-efficacy as barriers to PA in RTR. Methods RTR were investigated between 2001–2003. The Tampa Score of Kinesiophobia–Dutch Version (TSK-11) was used to assess fear of movement. Physical self-efficacy was measured with the LIVAS-scale. PA was assessed using validated questionnaires (Tecumseh Occupational Activity Questionnaire and the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire). Results A total of 487 RTR (age 51±12 years, 55% men) were studied. Median score [interquartile range] on TSK-11 was 22 [17–26]. Low physical self-efficacy (Exp B:0.41[0.31–0.54], p<0.001) and history of myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack and cerebrovascular accident (Exp B:1.30[1.03–1.63],p = 0.03) were independent determinants for fear of movement. Fear of movement was associated with lower daily PA, occupational, sports and leisure time PA. Mediation-analysis showed that a large part (73%) of the effect of fear of movement on PA was explained by low physical self-efficacy. Conclusions This study was the first to examine fear of movement and self-efficacy in relation to PA in RTR. Fear of movement was associated with a low PA level, and the larger part of this relation was mediated by low physical self-efficacy. Both fear of movement and physical self-efficacy level are important targets for intervention during rehabilitation after renal transplantation. PMID:26844883

  5. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Renier; Hochfeld, Warren E; Dodgen, Tyren M; Ker, James; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    Human genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as more complex structural variations such as insertions, deletions and copy number variants, is partially responsible for the clinical variation seen in response to pharmacotherapeutic drugs. This affects the likelihood of experiencing adverse drug reactions and also of achieving therapeutic success. In this paper, we review key studies in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics that reveal genetic variations underlying the outcomes of drug treatment in cardiovascular disease. Examples of genetic associations with drug efficacy and toxicity are described, including the roles of genetic variability in pharmacokinetics (e.g. drug metabolizing enzymes) and pharmacodynamics (e.g. drug targets). These findings have functional implications that could lead to the development of genetic tests aimed at minimizing drug toxicity and optimizing drug efficacy in cardiovascular medicine.

  6. Purinergic Signaling in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-06

    There is nervous control of the heart by ATP as a cotransmitter in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and sensory-motor nerves, as well as in intracardiac neurons. Centers in the brain control heart activities and vagal cardiovascular reflexes involve purines. Adenine nucleotides and nucleosides act on purinoceptors on cardiomyocytes, AV and SA nodes, cardiac fibroblasts, and coronary blood vessels. Vascular tone is controlled by a dual mechanism. ATP, released from perivascular sympathetic nerves, causes vasoconstriction largely via P2X1 receptors. Endothelial cells release ATP in response to changes in blood flow (via shear stress) or hypoxia, to act on P2 receptors on endothelial cells to produce nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, or prostaglandins to cause vasodilation. ATP is also released from sensory-motor nerves during antidromic reflex activity, to produce relaxation of some blood vessels. Purinergic signaling is involved in the physiology of erythrocytes, platelets, and leukocytes. ATP is released from erythrocytes and platelets, and purinoceptors and ectonucleotidases are expressed by these cells. P1, P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 receptors are expressed on platelets, which mediate platelet aggregation and shape change. Long-term (trophic) actions of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleotides promote migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells via P1 and P2Y receptors during angiogenesis, vessel remodeling during restenosis after angioplasty and atherosclerosis. The involvement of purinergic signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology and its therapeutic potential are discussed, including heart failure, infarction, arrhythmias, syncope, cardiomyopathy, angina, heart transplantation and coronary bypass grafts, coronary artery disease, diabetic cardiomyopathy, hypertension, ischemia, thrombosis, diabetes mellitus, and migraine.

  7. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... will recover in the hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) before moving to a hospital room for one to three weeks. Your doctor may recommend pulmonary rehabilitation after your lung transplant surgery to help you ...

  8. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  9. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the arteries of the lungs ( pulmonary hypertension ) Sarcoidosis Lung transplant may not be done for people ... Chronic Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Lung disease Sarcoidosis Review Date 4/13/2015 Updated by: Dale ...

  10. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Groups Patient Resources Newsroom Minorities AFTER THE TRANSPLANT Medications Staying Healthy Recovery Resources Lifestyle Changes Pregnancy Cancer PEDIATRIC Addressing Children's Needs Coping With Anxiety Helping Your Child Adjust Camps Resources LIVING DONATION ...

  11. Transplant services

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you may have. References Herman M, Keaveny AP. Organ transplantation. In: Walsh D, Caraceni AT, Fainsinger ... Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players ...

  12. Cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rupert A

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major, growing, worldwide problem. It is important that individuals at risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be effectively identified and appropriately stratified according to risk. This review examines what we understand by the term risk, traditional and novel risk factors, clinical scoring systems, and the use of risk for informing prescribing decisions. Many different cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. Established, traditional factors such as ageing are powerful predictors of adverse outcome, and in the case of hypertension and dyslipidaemia are the major targets for therapeutic intervention. Numerous novel biomarkers have also been described, such as inflammatory and genetic markers. These have yet to be shown to be of value in improving risk prediction, but may represent potential therapeutic targets and facilitate more targeted use of existing therapies. Risk factors have been incorporated into several cardiovascular disease prediction algorithms, such as the Framingham equation, SCORE and QRISK. These have relatively poor predictive power, and uncertainties remain with regards to aspects such as choice of equation, different risk thresholds and the roles of relative risk, lifetime risk and reversible factors in identifying and treating at-risk individuals. Nonetheless, such scores provide objective and transparent means of quantifying risk and their integration into therapeutic guidelines enables equitable and cost-effective distribution of health service resources and improves the consistency and quality of clinical decision making. PMID:22348281

  13. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  14. Assessment of the cardiovascular system in pediatric chronic kidney disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Muscheites, Jutta; Meyer, Andreas Alexander; Drueckler, Erdmute; Wigger, Marianne; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Kundt, Guenther; Kienast, Wolfgang; Haffner, Dieter

    2008-12-01

    Long-term survival of children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is mainly limited by cardiovascular disease. Pediatric CKD patients (n = 26) on conservative treatment, dialysis and after renal transplantation were compared with healthy controls (n = 24) with respect to cardiovascular status. Mean baseline diameter of the brachial artery was significantly higher, and mean flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) was significantly reduced, in CKD patients. CKD patients showed significantly increased left ventricular mass index, blood pressure (BP) values and age-related values of mean carotid intima-media thickness [intima-media thickness-standard deviation score (IMT-SDS)] compared with those of controls. Approximately 60% of patients presented with impaired FMD (< or = 5.79%), which was significantly associated with intima-media thickening, although only three patients (12%) presented with both, impaired FMD and increased age-related IMT. The latter was significantly associated with higher values for day-time BP. In contrast, duration and degree of CKD, mode of renal replacement therapy, homocysteine levels and concomitant medication showed no association with cardiovascular status. The majority of our pediatric CKD patients showed reduced endothelial function, which may have preceded the development of carotid arteriopathy. Therefore, routine assessment of FMD may be a useful tool to identify CKD patients at risk of progressive cardiovascular morbidity.

  15. Lentiviral vectors and cardiovascular diseases: a genetic tool for manipulating cardiomyocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, E; Latronico, M V G; Jotti, G S; Condorelli, G

    2012-06-01

    Engineered recombinant viral vectors are a powerful tool for vehiculating genetic information into mammalian cells. Because of their ability to infect both dividing and non-dividing cells with high efficiency, lentiviral vectors have gained particular interest for basic research and preclinical studies in the cardiovascular field. We review here the major applications for lentiviral-vector technology in the cardiovascular field: we will discuss their use in trailing gene expression during the induction of differentiation, in protocols for the isolation of cardiac cells and in the tracking of cardiac cells after transplantation in vivo; we will also describe lentivirally-mediated gene delivery uses, such as the induction of a phenotype of interest in a target cell or the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, a section of the review will be dedicated to reprogramming approaches, focusing attention on the generation of pluripotent stem cells and on transdifferentiation, two emerging strategies for the production of cardiac myocytes from human cells and for the investigation of human diseases. Finally, in order to give a perspective on their future clinical use we will critically discuss advantages and disadvantages of lentivirus-based strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Does hypertension remain after kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Pourmand, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Sanaz; Rahmati, Mohamad Reza; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Gooran, Shahram; Alizadeh, Farimah; Khaki, Siavash; Mortazavi, Seyede Hamideh; Pourmand, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of kidney transplantation with the prevalence of 80%. Studies in adults have shown a high prevalence of hypertension (HTN) in the first three months of transplantation while this rate is reduced to 50- 60% at the end of the first year. HTN remains as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, lower graft survival rates and poor function of transplanted kidney in adults and children. In this retrospective study, medical records of 400 kidney transplantation patients of Sina Hospital were evaluated. Patients were followed monthly for the 1st year, every two months in the 2nd year and every three months after that. In this study 244 (61%) patients were male. Mean ± SD age of recipients was 39.3 ± 13.8 years. In most patients (40.8%) the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was unknown followed by HTN (26.3%). A total of 166 (41.5%) patients had been hypertensive before transplantation and 234 (58.5%) had normal blood pressure. Among these 234 individuals, 94 (40.2%) developed post-transplantation HTN. On the other hand, among 166 pre-transplant hypertensive patients, 86 patients (56.8%) remained hypertensive after transplantation. Totally 180 (45%) patients had post-transplantation HTN and 220 patients (55%) didn't develop HTN. Based on the findings, the incidence of post-transplantation hypertension is high, and kidney transplantation does not lead to remission of hypertension. On the other hand, hypertension is one of the main causes of ESRD. Thus, early screening of hypertension can prevent kidney damage and reduce further problems in renal transplant recipients.

  17. Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary ...

  18. Meniscal allograft transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - meniscus transplant; Surgery - knee - cartilage; Arthroscopy - knee - meniscus transplant ... that you are a good candidate for a meniscus transplant, x-rays of your knee are usually ...

  19. What's new and hot in clinical organ transplantation: report from American Transplant Congress 2012.

    PubMed

    Humar, A

    2013-02-01

    Innovative and exciting advances in the clinical sciences in organ transplantation were presented at the American Transplant Congress 2012. The full spectrum of transplantation was covered with important advancements in many topics. Key areas covered by presentations included living donor outcomes, organ preservation, optimal allocation of deceased donors, new immunosuppression regimens, antibody mediated rejection and the regulatory environment. This review will highlight some of the most interesting and innovative clinical presentations from the meeting.

  20. What's hot, what's new in clinical organ transplantation: report from the American Transplant Congress 2015.

    PubMed

    Sung, R S

    2015-11-01

    Innovative and exciting advances in the clinical sciences in organ transplantation were presented at the American Transplant Congress 2015. The full spectrum of transplantation was covered, with important developments in many topics. Key areas covered by presentations included living donor outcomes, optimal utilization and allocation of deceased donors, new immunosuppression regimens, antibody-mediated rejection and tolerance induction. This review highlights some of the most interesting and noteworthy clinical presentations from the meeting.

  1. Donor bone marrow cells are essential for iNKT cell-mediated Foxp3+ Treg cell expansion in a murine model of transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Miyairi, Satoshi; Hirai, Toshihito; Ishii, Rumi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Nunoda, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-01-26

    Mixed chimerism induction is the most reliable method for establishing transplantation tolerance. We previously described a novel treatment using a suboptimal dose of anti-CD40 ligand (anti-CD40L) and liposomal formulation of a ligand for invariant natural killer T cells administered to sub-lethally irradiated recipient mice after donor bone marrow cell (BMC) transfer. Recipient mice treated with this regimen showed expansion of a Foxp3-positive regulatory T(Treg) cell phenotype, and formation of mixed chimera. However, the mechanism of expansion and bioactivity of Treg cells remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of donor BMCs in the expansion of bioactive Treg cells. The mouse model was transplanted with a heart allograft the day after treatment. The results showed that transfer of spleen cells in place of BMCs failed to deplete host interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, expand host Ki67(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg cells, and prolong graft survival. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice who received Treg cells obtained from BMC-recipients accepted skin grafts in an allo-specific manner. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were a copious cell subset in BMCs, enhanced the Ki67 expression of Treg cells. This suggests that donor BMCs are indispensable for the expansion of host bioactive Treg cells in our novel treatment for transplant tolerance induction.

  2. [Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics].

    PubMed

    Scibona, Paula; Angriman, Federico; Simonovich, Ventura; Heller, Martina M; Belloso, Waldo H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current medical practice takes into account information based on population studies and benefits observed in large populations or cohorts. However, individual patients present great differences in both toxicity and clinical efficacy that can be explained by variations in adherence, unknown drug to drug interactions and genetic variability. The latter seems to explain from 20% up to 95% of patient to patient variability. Treating patients with cardiovascular disorders faces the clinician with the challenge to include genomic analysis into daily practice. There are several examples within cardiovascular disease of treatments that can vary in toxicity or clinical usefulness based on genetic changes. One of the main factors affecting the efficacy of Clopidogrel is the phenotype associated with polymorphisms in the gene CYP 2C9. Furthermore, regarding oral anticoagulants, changes in CYP2C9 and VKORC1 play an important role in changing the clinical response to anticoagulation. When analyzing statin treatment, one of their main toxicities (myopathy) can be predicted by the SLCO1B1 polymorphism. The potential for prediction of toxicity and clinical efficacy from the use of genetic analysis warrants further studies aiming towards its inclusion in daily clinical practice.

  3. Subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-human-leukocyte-antigen-DR53 antibody accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection in a patient with cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Niikura, Takahito; Kawabe, Mayuko; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who had undergone cadaveric kidney transplantation 21 months earlier was admitted to our hospital for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg/dL and no proteinuria. Histological features showed two distinct entities: (i) inflammatory cell infiltration, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries and (ii) focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly plasma cells, with mild tubulitis (Banff 13 classification: i2, t1, g2, ptc2, v0, ci1, ct1, cg0, cv0). Immunohistological studies showed mildly positive C4d immunoreactivity in the peritubular capillaries. The patient had donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53. We diagnosed him with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection. Both antibody-mediated rejection due to anti- human-leucocyte-antigen -DR53 antibodies and plasma cell-rich acute rejection are known to be refractory and have a poor prognosis. Thus, we started plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab for the former and 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy for the latter. Three months after treatment, a follow-up allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for both histological features. This case report considers the importance of an early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53 and plasma cell-rich acute rejection.

  4. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding.

  5. MiR-142-5p and miR-486-5p as biomarkers for early detection of chronic antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kenta; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Inanaga, Yukiko; Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Miwa, Yuko; Murotani, Kenta; Narumi, Shuji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Katayama, Akio; Uchida, Kazuharu; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2017-02-01

    De novo donor-specific HLA antibody (DSA) would not necessarily contribute to chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) in kidney transplantation. Here, we investigated whether PBMC miRNAs could be predictable biomarkers for CAMR. Microarray profiling of 435 mature miRNAs in pooled samples was conducted. Individual analysis revealed that miR-142-5p was significantly (p < 0.01) underexpressed in patients with DSA. After DSA production, miR-486-5p and its target PTEN/foxO3 mRNA were significantly overexpressed (p < 0.01) and underexpressed (p < 0.01), respectively, in patients with biopsy-proven CAMR, compared with non-CAMR. Our studies suggest that miRNA expression patterns may serve as noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers to evaluate immune response and kidney allograft status.

  6. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  7. Transplant biopsy beyond light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Adam, Benjamin; Mengel, Michael

    2015-08-07

    Despite its long-standing status as the diagnostic "gold standard", the renal transplant biopsy is limited by a fundamental dependence on descriptive, empirically-derived consensus classification. The recent shift towards personalized medicine has resulted in an increased demand for precise, mechanism-based diagnoses, which is not fully met by the contemporary transplantation pathology standard of care. The expectation is that molecular techniques will provide novel pathogenetic insights that will allow for the identification of more accurate diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets. Here we review the current state of molecular renal transplantation pathology. Despite significant research activity and progress within the field, routine adoption of clinical molecular testing has not yet been achieved. The recent development of novel molecular platforms suitable for use with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue will offer potential solution for the major barriers to implementation. The recent incorporation of molecular diagnostic criteria into the 2013 Banff classification is a reflection of progress made and future directions in the area of molecular transplantation pathology. Transcripts related to endothelial injury and NK cell activation have consistently been shown to be associated with antibody-mediated rejection. Prospective multicenter validation and implementation of molecular diagnostics for major entities remains an unmet clinical need in transplantation. It is expected that an integrated system of transplantation pathology diagnosis comprising molecular, morphological, serological, and clinical variables will ultimately provide the greatest diagnostic precision.

  8. Immunological aspects of corneal transplant.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Asha

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplant is the most common solid tissue transplant in humans. Advances in microsurgical techniques, eye banking and the use of corticosteroids have improved the success of corneal transplants. Over 65,000 corneal transplants are being performed worldwide annually. Most of these transplants are performed in developed countries. Cornea is considered an immune privileged site. Despite this, immune mediated graft rejection is the most single cause of cornea graft failure and is one of the major postoperative complications. Incidences from as low as 2% to as high as 50% have been reported depending upon the degree of vascularization. Rejection involves donor tissue recognition and various factors may influence this rejection. Major factors include the antigenic load of the donor tissue; other factors include death to enucleation time, methods and temperature of preserving the tissue. Host factors that may impact the graft include ocular surface diseases such as dry eye, chemical burns and autoimmune diseases such as mucous membrane pemphigoid. Following infection, surgery or trauma, cells of the innate immune system invade the cornea as a result of up-regulation of cytokines, cellular adhesion molecules and growth and angiogenic factors. These factors results in neoangiogenesis and lymphoangiogenesis, leading to immune activation and graft rejection. The various immunological mechanisms that may play a role in the corneal transplant are discussed.

  9. Semaphorin signaling in cardiovascular development.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan A; Aghajanian, Haig; Singh, Manvendra K

    2015-02-03

    Semaphorins were originally identified as neuronal guidance molecules mediating their attractive or repulsive signals by forming complexes with plexin and neuropilin receptors. Subsequent research has identified functions for semaphorin signaling in many organs and tissues outside of the nervous system. Vital roles for semaphorin signaling in vascular patterning and cardiac morphogenesis have been demonstrated, and impaired semaphorin signaling has been associated with various human cardiovascular disorders, including persistent truncus arteriosus, sinus bradycardia and anomalous pulmonary venous connections. Here, we review the functions of semaphorins and their receptors in cardiovascular development and disease and highlight important recent discoveries in the field.

  10. ASICs and cardiovascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Abboud, François M; Benson, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    In this review we address primarily the role of ASICs in determining sensory signals from arterial baroreceptors, peripheral chemoreceptors, and cardiopulmonary and somatic afferents. Alterations in these sensory signals during acute cardiovascular stresses result in changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic activities that restore cardiovascular homeostasis. In pathological states, however, chronic dysfunctions of these afferents result in serious sympatho-vagal imbalances with significant increases in mortality and morbidity. We identified a role for ASIC2 in the mechano-sensitivity of aortic baroreceptors and of ASIC3 in the pH sensitivity of carotid bodies. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, we reported decreased expression of ASIC2 in nodose ganglia neurons and overexpression of ASIC3 in carotid bodies. This reciprocal expression of ASIC2 and ASIC3 results in reciprocal changes in sensory sensitivity of baro- and chemoreceptors and a consequential synergistic exaggeration sympathetic nerve activity. A similar reciprocal sensory dysautonomia prevails in heart failure and increases the risk of mortality. There is also evidence that ASIC heteromers in skeletal muscle afferents contribute significantly to the exercise pressor reflex. In cardiac muscle afferents of the dorsal root ganglia, they contribute to nociception and to the detrimental sympathetic activation during ischemia. Finally, we report that an inhibitory influence of ASIC2-mediated baroreceptor activity suppresses the sympatho-excitatory reflexes of the chemoreceptors and skeletal muscle afferents, as well as the ASIC1a-mediated excitation of central neurons during fear, threat, or panic. The translational potential of activation of ASIC2 in cardiovascular disease states may be a beneficial sympatho-inhibition and parasympathetic activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  11. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  12. Transplant production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For field pepper (Capsicum spp.) production, plants can be established from direct seed or transplants depending on the location and cultural practices for the specific pepper type grown. Direct seeding can result in slow, variable, and reduced plant stands due to variations in soil temperature, wat...

  13. Recent advancements in the cardiovascular drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljeet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the disease that affects the cardiovascular system, vascular diseases of the brain and kidney, and peripheral arterial disease. Despite of all advances in pharmacological and clinical treatment, heart failure is a leading cause of morbidness and mortality worldwide. Many new therapeutic advance strategies, including cell transplantation, gene delivery or therapy, and cytokines or other small molecules, have been research to treat heart failure. The main aim of this review article is to focus on nano carriers advancement and addressing the problems associated with old and modern therapeutics such as nonspecific effects and poor stability.

  14. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation.

  15. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Francesca M; Snyder, Katherine A M

    2016-02-01

    The advancing science of transplantation has led to more transplants and longer survival. As a result, primary care physicians are more involved in the care of transplant recipients. Immunosuppressive therapy has significantly decreased rates of transplant rejection but accounts for more than 50% of transplant-related deaths, often due to infections and other risks related to long-term use. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of non-transplant-related mortality. Aggressive risk factor management is recommended for transplant recipients, including a blood pressure goal of less than 130/80 mm Hg and statin therapy in kidney, liver, and heart recipients. Fertility typically increases posttransplant, and female transplant recipients should avoid pregnancy for one year after surgery. The best contraceptive choice is usually an intrauterine device. Because of the increased risk of infection, patients should be tested for graft dysfunction or infection if suspicion arises. Testing should be coordinated with the transplant center. Malignancies are a common cause of death in transplant recipients, requiring careful attention to screening recommendations and informed discussions with patients. Family physicians should maintain an ongoing relationship with the transplant team to discuss medication changes and the risk of infection or graft rejection.

  16. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05). Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes. PMID:27631619

  17. Late effects of blood and marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Lee, Stephanie J

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a curative treatment for a variety of hematologic diseases. Advances in transplantation technology have reduced early transplant-related mortality and expanded application of transplantation to older patients and to a wider variety of diseases. Management of late effects after transplantation is increasingly important for a growing number of long-term survivors that is estimated to be half a million worldwide. Many studies have shown that transplant survivors suffer from significant late effects that adversely affect morbidity, mortality, working status and quality of life. Late effects include diseases of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and endocrine systems, dysfunction of the thyroid gland, gonads, liver and kidneys, infertility, iron overload, bone diseases, infection, solid cancer, and neuropsychological effects. The leading causes of late mortality include recurrent malignancy, lung diseases, infection, secondary cancers and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The aim of this review is to facilitate better care of adult transplant survivors by summarizing accumulated evidence, new insights, and practical information about individual late effects. Further research is needed to understand the biology of late effects allowing better prevention and treatment strategies to be developed.

  18. Social factors and cardiovascular morbidity.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric John

    2017-03-01

    Recent progress in population health at aggregate level, measured by life expectancy, has been accompanied by lack of progress in reducing the difference in health prospects between groups defined by social status. Cardiovascular disease is an important contributor to this undesirable situation. The stepwise gradient of higher risk with lower status is accounted for partly by social gradients in health behaviors. The psychosocial hypothesis provides a stronger explanation, based on social patterning of living and working environments and psychological assets that individuals develop during childhood. Three decades of research based on Whitehall II and other cohort studies provide evidence for psychosocial pathways leading to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Job stress is a useful paradigm because exposure is long term and depends on occupational status. Studies of social-biological translation implicate autonomic and neuroendocrine function among the biological systems that mediate between chronic adverse psychosocial exposures and increased cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular disease incidence.

  19. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  20. CRISPR-mediated knockout of Cybb in NSG mice establishes a model of chronic granulomatous disease for human stem cell gene therapy transplants.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Colin L; Choi, Uimook; Liu, Chengyu; Koontz, Sherry M; Ha, Seung-Kwon; Malech, Harry L

    2017-03-06

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by defects in production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes. Testing of gene and cell therapies for treatment of CGD in human hematopoietic cells requires pre-clinical transplant models. The use of the lymphocyte-deficient NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mouse strain for human hematopoietic cell xenografts to test CGD therapies is complicated by the presence of functional mouse granulocytes capable of producing ROS for subsequent bacterial and fungal killing. To establish a phagocyte-defective mouse model of X-linked CGD (X-CGD) in NSG mice, we utilized clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 for targeted knock-out of mouse Cybb on the X-chromosome by microinjection of NSG mouse zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and CRISPR single-guide RNA targeting Cybb exon 1 or exon 3. This resulted in a high incidence of indel formation at the CRISPR target site, with all mice exhibiting deletions in at least one Cybb allele based on sequence analysis of tail snip DNA. A female mouse heterozygous for a 235-bp deletion in Cybb exon 1 was bred to an NSG male to establish the X-CGD NSG mouse strain, NSG.Cybb[KO]. Resulting male offspring with the 235-bp deletion were found to be defective for production of ROS by neutrophils and other phagocytes, and demonstrated increased susceptibility to spontaneous bacterial and fungal infections with granulomatous inflammation. The establishment of the phagocyte-defective NSG.Cybb[KO] mouse model enables the in vivo assessment of gene and cell therapy strategies for treating CGD in human hematopoietic cell transplants without obfuscation by functional mouse phagocytes, and may also be useful for modeling of other phagocyte disorders in humanized NSG mouse xenografts.

  1. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Concomitant Kaposi sarcoma and multicentric Castleman's disease in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami; Bishburg, Eliahu; Zucker, Mark; Tsang, Patricia; Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Sabnani, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant human herpes virus -8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection is associated with neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are the most common HHV-8-associated neoplastic complications described in solid organ transplant (SOT) patients. Concurrent KS and MCD have been previously described after transplantation only twice - once after liver transplantation and once after renal transplantation. We describe a unique heart transplant patient who also developed concurrent KS and MCD. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of a heart transplant recipient presenting with these two HHV-8-mediated complications at the same time.

  3. Brain mediators of cardiovascular responses to social threat, Part I: Reciprocal dorsal and ventral sub-regions of the medial prefrontal cortex and heart-rate reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; Waugh, Christian E.; Lindquist, Martin; Noll, Doug C.; Fredrickson, Barbara L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2009-01-01

    Social threat is a key component of mental “stress” and a potent generator of negative emotions and physiological responses in the body. How the human brain processes social context and drives peripheral physiology, however, is relatively poorly understood. Human neuroimaging and animal studies implicate the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), though this heterogeneous region is likely to contain multiple sub-regions with diverse relationships with physiological reactivity and regulation. We used fMRI combined with a novel multi-level path analysis approach to identify brain mediators of the effects of a public speech preparation task (social evaluative threat, SET) on heart rate (HR). This model provides tests of functional pathways linking experimentally manipulated threat, regional fMRI activity, and physiological output, both across time (within person) and across individuals (between persons). It thus integrates time series connectivity and individual difference analyses in the same path model. The results provide evidence for two dissociable, inversely coupled sub-regions of MPFC that independently mediated HR responses. SET caused activity increases in a more dorsal pregenual cingulate region, whose activity was coupled with HR increases. Conversely, SET caused activity decreases in a right ventromedial/medial orbital region, which were coupled with HR increases. Individual differences in coupling strength in each pathway independently predicted individual differences in HR reactivity. These results underscore both the importance and heterogeneity of MPFC in generating physiological responses to threat. PMID:19465137

  4. Desensitization: Overcoming the Immunologic Barriers to Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jua; Vo, Ashley; Peng, Alice; Jordan, Stanley C.

    2017-01-01

    HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigen) sensitization is a significant barrier to successful kidney transplantation. It often translates into difficult crossmatch before transplant and increased risk of acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection after transplant. Over the last decade, several immunomodulatory therapies have emerged allowing for increased access to kidney transplantation for the immunologically disadvantaged group of HLA sensitized end stage kidney disease patients. These include IgG inactivating agents, anti-cytokine antibodies, costimulatory molecule blockers, complement inhibitors, and agents targeting plasma cells. In this review, we discuss currently available agents for desensitization and provide a brief analysis of data on novel biologics, which will likely improve desensitization outcomes, and have potential implications in treatment of antibody mediated rejection. PMID:28127571

  5. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  6. PPARs and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Milton; Chang, Lin; Fan, Yanbo; Zhang, Jifeng; Chen, Y Eugene

    2009-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone-receptor superfamily. Originally cloned in 1990, PPARs were found to be mediators of pharmacologic agents that induce hepatocyte peroxisome proliferation. PPARs also are expressed in cells of the cardiovascular system. PPAR gamma appears to be highly expressed during atherosclerotic lesion formation, suggesting that increased PPAR gamma expression may be a vascular compensatory response. Also, ligand-activated PPAR gamma decreases the inflammatory response in cardiovascular cells, particularly in endothelial cells. PPAR alpha, similar to PPAR gamma, also has pleiotropic effects in the cardiovascular system, including antiinflammatory and antiatherosclerotic properties. PPAR alpha activation inhibits vascular smooth muscle proinflammatory responses, attenuating the development of atherosclerosis. However, PPAR delta overexpression may lead to elevated macrophage inflammation and atherosclerosis. Conversely, PPAR delta ligands are shown to attenuate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by improving endothelial cell proliferation and survival while decreasing endothelial cell inflammation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Furthermore, the administration of PPAR ligands in the form of TZDs and fibrates has been disappointing in terms of markedly reducing cardiovascular events in the clinical setting. Therefore, a better understanding of PPAR-dependent and -independent signaling will provide the foundation for future research on the role of PPARs in human cardiovascular biology.

  7. The Effect of Different Glycaemic States on Renal Transplant Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Depczynski, Barbara; O'Sullivan, Anthony J.; Luxton, Grant; Mangos, George

    2016-01-01

    Background. Optimal glycaemic targets following transplantation are unknown. Understanding the impact of DM and posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) may improve patient and graft survival in transplant recipients. Aim. To determine the perioperative and one-year outcomes after renal transplantation and whether these outcomes are affected by preexisting DM, PTDM, or glycaemia during transplant admission. Method. Adult recipients of renal transplants from a single centre over 5.5 years were retrospectively reviewed. Measured outcomes during transplant admission included glycaemia and complications (infective complications, acute rejection, and return to dialysis) and, at 12 months, glycaemic control and complications (cardiovascular complication, graft failure). Results. Of 148 patients analysed, 29 (19.6%) had DM and 27 (18.2%) developed PTDM. Following transplantation, glucose levels were higher in patients with DM and PTDM. DM patients had a longer hospital stay, had more infections, and were more likely return to dialysis. PTDM patients had increased rates of acute rejection and return to dialysis. At 1 year after transplant, there were more cardiovascular complications in DM patients compared to those without DM. Conclusions. Compared to patients without DM, patients with DM or PTDM are more likely to suffer from complications perioperatively and at 12 months. Perioperative glycaemia is associated with graft function and may be a modifiable risk. PMID:28053992

  8. MANAGEMENT OF ALLOSENSITIZED CARDIAC TRANSPLANT CANDIDATES

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Johnson, Maryl R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation remains the best treatment in advanced heart failure patients with a high risk of death. However, an inadequate supply of donor hearts decreases the likelihood of transplantation for many patients. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are being increasingly used as a bridge to transplant in patients who may not survive long enough to receive a heart. This expansion in VAD use has been associated with increasing rates of allosensitization in cardiac transplant candidates. Anti-HLA antibodies can be detected prior to transplantation using different techniques. Complement-dependent lymphocytotoxicity assays are widely used to measure the panel reactive antibody (PRA), and for crossmatch purposes. Newer assays using solid phase flow techniques feature improved specificity and offer detailed information concerning antibody specificities, which may lead to improvements in donor-recipient matching. Allosensitization prolongs the wait time for transplantation and increases the risk of post-transplant complications and death; therefore, decreasing anti-HLA antibodies in sensitized transplant candidates is of vital importance. Plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and rituximab have been used to decrease the PRA prior to transplantation with varying degrees of success. The most significant post-transplant complications seen in allosensitized recipients are antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). AMR often manifests with severe allograft dysfunction and hemodynamic compromise. The underlying pathophysiology is not fully understood, but appears to involve complement-mediated activation of endothelial cells resulting in ischemic injury. The treatment of AMR in cardiac recipients is largely empirical, and includes high-dose corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, IVIG and rituximab. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is characterized by diffuse concentric stenosis of allograft coronary arteries due to intimal

  9. Post-transplantation diabetes-state of the art.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan; Cohney, Solomon

    2016-04-01

    With increasing success in overcoming the immunological and infectious challenges accompanying solid organ transplantation, susceptibility to post-transplant diabetes and cardiovascular disease has assumed increasing importance. Although some guidance is available from diabetes-related literature pertaining to the general population, some aspects are unique to solid organ allograft recipients. Both insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are generally agreed to contribute to development and manifestation of post-transplant diabetes, but controversy continues about which is most important and to what extent post-transplant diabetes is a distinct entity or simply a variant of type 2 diabetes with transplant-specific components. The optimum method and timing for detection and diagnosis of post-transplant diabetes remains an area of uncertainty. However, the greatest needs are to: address the absence of contemporary data for incidence and clinical outcomes associated with post-transplant diabetes; establish the role of glycaemic control; and assess the role of new diabetic therapies in prevention and management of post-transplant diabetes. We place the present knowledge base in the context of other advances in transplantation, challenge some existing ideas, and examine the potential role of emerging diabetes therapies. In highlighting existing deficiencies, we hope to provide direction for future research that will ultimately reduce incidence and improve management of post-transplant diabetes.

  10. Liver transplantation in alcoholic liver disease current status and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Ashwani K; Chaha, Khushdeep S; Rasheed, Khalid; Anand, Bhupinderjit S

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic cirrhosis remains the second most common indication for liver transplantation. A comprehensive medical and psychosocial evaluation is needed when making a decision to place such patients on the transplant list. Most transplant centers worldwide need a minimum of 6 mo of alcohol abstinence for listing these patients. Patients with alcohol dependence are at high risk for relapse to alcohol use after transplantation (recidivism). These patients need to be identified and require alcohol rehabilitation treatment before transplantation. Recidivism to the level of harmful drinking is reported in about 15%-20% cases. Although, recurrent cirrhosis and graft loss from recidivism is rare, occurring in less than 5% of all alcoholic cirrhosis-related transplants, harmful drinking in the post-transplant period does impact the long-term outcome. The development of metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular events and de novo malignancy are important contributors to non liver-related mortality amongst transplants for alcoholic liver disease. Surveillance protocols for earlier detection of de novo malignancy are needed to improve the long-term outcome. The need for a minimum of 6 mo of abstinence before listing makes transplant a nonviable option for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis who do not respond to corticosteroids. Emerging data from retrospective and prospective studies has challenged the 6 mo rule, and beneficial effects of liver transplantation have been reported in select patients with a first episode of severe alcoholic hepatitis who are unresponsive to steroids. PMID:24106395

  11. Therapeutic Efficacy of Bone Marrow Transplant, Intracranial AAV-mediated Gene Therapy, or Both in the Mouse Model of MPS IIIB

    PubMed Central

    Heldermon, Coy D; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Herzog, Erik D; Vogler, Carole; Qin, Elizabeth; Wozniak, David F; Tan, Yun; Orrock, John L; Sands, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting from a deficiency of N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) activity. In an attempt to correct the disease in the murine model of MPS IIIB, neonatal mice were treated with intracranial AAV2/5-NAGLU (AAV), syngeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT), or both (AAV/BMT). All treatments resulted in some improvement in clinical phenotype. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) treatment resulted in improvements in lifespan, motor function, hearing, time to activity onset, and daytime activity level, but no reduction of lysosomal storage. BMT resulted in improved hearing by 9 months, and improved circadian measures, but had no effect on lifespan, motor function, or central nervous system (CNS) lysosomal storage. AAV/BMT treatment resulted in improvements in hearing, time to activity onset, motor function, and reduced CNS lysosomal storage, but had no effect on lifespan. Combination therapy compared to either therapy alone resulted in synergistic effects on hearing and CNS lysosomal inclusions but antagonistic effects on motor function and lifespan. AAV alone is more efficacious than BMT or AAV/BMT treatment for lifespan. BMT was the least efficacious treatment by all measures. CNS-directed AAV treatment alone appears to be the preferred treatment, combining the most efficacy with the least toxicity of the approaches assessed. PMID:20179679

  12. Prophylactic fresh frozen plasma may prevent development of hepatic VOD after stem cell transplantation via ADAMTS13-mediated restoration of von Willebrand factor plasma levels.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Kawa, K; Uemura, M; Kato, S; Ishizashi, H; Isonishi, A; Yagi, H; Park, Y-D; Takeshima, Y; Kosaka, Y; Hara, H; Kai, S; Kanamaru, A; Fukuhara, S; Hino, M; Sako, M; Hiraoka, A; Ogawa, H; Hara, J; Fujimura, Y

    2007-08-01

    We initially conducted a multicenter, randomized trial (n=43), and subsequently a questionnaire study (n=209) of participating hospitals, to evaluate whether infused fresh frozen plasma (FFP) could prevent the occurrence of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Forty-three patients were divided into two groups: 23 receiving FFP infusions and 20 not receiving it. VOD developed in three patients not receiving FFP. Plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen levels were lower at days 0, 7 and 28 after SCT in patients receiving FFP than in those not receiving it, whereas plasma ADAMTS13 activity (ADAMTS13:AC) did not differ between them. Plasma VWF multimer (VWFM) was demonstrated to be defective in the high approximately intermediate VWFM during the early post-SCT phase, but there was a significant increase in high VWFM just before VOD onset. This suggests that a relative enzyme-to-substrate (ADAMTS13/high-VWFM) imbalance is involved in the pathogenesis of VOD. To strengthen this hypothesis, the incidence of VOD was apparently lower in patients receiving FFP infusions than in those not receiving it (0/23 vs 3/20) in the randomized trial. Further, the results combined with the subsequent questionnaire study (0/36 vs 11/173) clearly showed the incidence to be statistically significant (0/59 vs 14/193, P=0.033).

  13. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  14. Perioperative Monitoring in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  15. Cell sheet transplantation for heart tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2013-08-10

    Cell transplantation is attracting considerable attention as the next-generation therapy for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have developed cell sheet engineering as a type of scaffold-less tissue engineering for application in myocardial tissue engineering and the repair of injured heart tissue by cell transplantation. Various types of cell sheet transplantation have improved cardiac function in animal models and clinical settings. Furthermore, cell-based tissue engineering with human induced pluripotent stem cell technology is about to create thick vascularized cardiac tissue for cardiac grafts and heart tissue models. In this review, we summarize the current cardiac cell therapies for treating heart failure with cell sheet technology and cell sheet-based tissue engineering.

  16. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  17. Factors influencing weight gain after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Gallagher-Lepak, S; Zhu, Y R; Porth, C; Kelber, S; Roza, A M; Adams, M B

    1993-10-01

    Weight gain following renal transplantation occurs frequently but has not been investigated quantitatively. A retrospective chart review of 115 adult renal transplant recipients was used to describe patterns of weight gain during the first 5 years after transplantation. Only 23 subjects (21%) were overweight before their transplant. Sixty-six subjects (57%) experienced a weight gain of greater than or equal to 10%, and 49 subjects (43%) were overweight according to Metropolitan relative weight criteria at 1 year after transplantation. There was an inverse correlation between advancing age and weight gain, with the youngest patients (18-29 years) having a 13.3% weight gain and the oldest patients (age greater than 50 years) having the lowest gain of 8.3% at 1 year (P = 0.047). Black recipients experienced a greater weight gain than whites during the first posttransplant year (14.6% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.043), and maintained or increased this difference over the 5-year period. Men and women experienced comparable weight gain during the first year (9.5% vs. 12.1%), but women continued to gain weight throughout the 5-year study (21.0% total weight gain). The men remained stable after the first year (10.8% total weight gain). Recipients who experienced at least a 10% weight gain also increased their serum cholesterol (mean 261 vs. 219) and triglyceride (mean 277 vs. 159) levels significantly, whereas those without weight gain did not. Weight gain did not correlate with cumulative steroid dose, donor source (living-related versus cadaver), rejection history, pre-existing obesity, the number of months on dialysis before transplantation, or posttransplant renal function. Posttransplant weight gain is related mainly to demographic factors, not to treatment factors associated with the transplant. The average weight gain during the first year after renal transplantation is approximately 10%. This increased weight, coupled with changes in lipid metabolism, may be significant in

  18. [Associated factors and clinical implications of post transplant renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Mónica; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Capra, Raúl; Eckhardt, Andrea; De La Fuente, Jorge; Douthat, Walter; De Arteaga, Javier; Massari, Pablo U

    2013-01-01

    A considerable percentage of patients exhibit anemia post kidney transplant. Its origin is multifactorial and the main causes involved depend on the post transplant period considered. We studied in a group of 134 consecutive patients the associated factors and the clinical implications of "late anemia" (6 months post transplant). Multiple regression analysis showed that post transplant oliguria and acute rejection episodes were significantly associated with anemia. Graft survival at 36 months was significantly reduced in the anemic group (83 % versus 96%, p < 0.01). No differences in patients survival or rate of cardiovascular events were observed. We concluded that anemia at 6 months post transplant is independently and significantly associated with events that reduced functioning renal mass and kidney survival.

  19. Women and heart transplantation: an issue of gender equity?

    PubMed

    Young, Lynne; Little, Maureen

    2004-05-01

    Heart transplantation (HT) is increasingly commonplace in countries with advanced health care systems. A review of the family and HT literature points to a gender inequity in the field: Men are more likely to be heart transplant recipients; women are more likely to contribute as their caregivers. In this critique, we argue that there are not only physiological but also social and economic issues that contribute to inequitable access to HT for women. Further, we point out that another invisible inequity in the heart transplant field is the lack of acknowledgment of, and support for, women whose contributions as family caregivers to the heart transplant process often ensure the success of heart transplant procedures. The authors call for recognition of these inequities and the development of policies that have the potential to ensure that women have equitable access to cardiovascular care in general and HT in particular, and that woman are recognized for, and supported in, their role as caregivers.

  20. Ghrelin and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenj

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide that was originally isolated from the stomach. It exerts potent growth hormone (GH)-releasing and orexigenic activities. Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic benefits of ghrelin for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. In animal models of chronic heart failure, the administration of ghrelin improved cardiac function and remodeling; these findings were replicated in human patients with heart failure. Moreover, in an animal study, ghrelin administration effectively reduced pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. In addition, repeated administration of ghrelin to cachectic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had positive effects on overall body function, including muscle wasting, functional capacity and sympathetic activity. The administration of ghrelin early after myocardial infarction (MI) reduced fatal arrhythmia and related mortality. In ghrelin-deficient mice, both exogenous and endogenous ghrelin were protective against fatal arrhythmia and promoted remodeling after MI. Although the mechanisms underlying the effects of ghrelin on the cardiovascular system remain unclear, there are indications that its beneficial effects are mediated through both direct physiological actions, including increased GH levels, improved energy balance and direct actions on cardiovascular cells, and regulation of autonomic nervous system activity. Therefore, ghrelin is a promising novel therapeutic agent for cardiovascular disease.

  1. Transplantation in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Haberal, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The cornerstone events of transplantation history in Turkey are summarized herein. In 1975, we performed the first living-related renal transplant in Turkey. We followed this in 1978 with the first deceased donor kidney transplantation, using an organ supplied by Eurotransplant. In 1979, the law on harvesting, storage, grafting, and transplantation of organs and tissues was enacted; later that year, the first local deceased donor kidney transplantation was performed by our team. In 1988, another groundbreaking event in Turkey was successfully achieved: the first cadaveric liver transplantation. In 1990, the first pediatric living-related segmental liver transplantation in Turkey, the region, and Europe was performed by our team. One month later, an adult-to-adult living-related liver transplantation was successfully performed. In May 1992, we performed the first combined liver-kidney transplantation from a living-related donor, which was the first operation of its kind. To date, we have performed 2,084 kidney and, since 1988, 439 liver transplantations. During 29 years of solid organ transplantation history in Turkey, 20,794 kidney transplants have been performed nationwide in 62 different centers, as well as 6,565 liver, 621 heart, and 168 pancreas transplants. In 2001, the Ministry of Health established the National Coordination Center as an umbrella organization to promote transplantation activities, especially for deceased donor organ procurement. Transplantation activities are accelerating daily throughout the country, but deceased donors are still far below the desired rates.

  2. Neural differentiation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-expressing human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in culture via TrkB-mediated ERK and β-catenin phosphorylation and following transplantation into the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Park, Sang In; Kim, Seong Muk; Jun, Jin Ae; Oh, Ji Hyeon; Ryu, Chung Hun; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Park, Sun Hwa; Park, Soon A; Oh, Wonil; Chang, Jong Wook; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2011-01-01

    periventricular astrocytes. These results indicate that BDNF induces the neural differentiation of hUCB-MSCs in culture via the TrkB-mediated phosphorylation of ERKs and β-catenin and following transplantation into the developing brain.

  3. New options for the management of hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Douthat, Walter Guillermo; Chiurchiu, Carlos Raul; Massari, Pablo Ulises

    2012-01-01

    The persistence and severity of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) post-renal transplantation is relatively frequent and primarily associated with the timing and its magnitude in the pre-transplant period and with the presence of parathyroid adenomas. HPT after renal transplantation is clinically manifested with hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia, bone pain, fractures, and in more serious cases with cardiovascular calcifications that affect the survival. The primary clinical objective for patients with secondary HPT after renal transplantation is to obtain a level of parathyroid hormone (PTH) adequate to the renal transplanted function and to normalize levels of calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D. In many cases during this period, the development of hypercalcemia and/or hypophosphatemia makes it necessary to take different therapeutic measures. The use of vitamin D or its analogues has been extrapolated from the management of pre-transplant HPT obtaining variable outcomes, although its use is limited by its capacity to produce hypercalcemia. Calcimimetics are drugs that have proven be effective in reducing PTH levels in patients with HPT on dialysis and has been effective in reducing up to 50% PTH levels in moderate to severe HPT in post-renal transplantation.When HPT persists after renal transplantation and does not respond to medical treatment, invasive management by percutaneous ethanol injection therapy of parathyroid glands or parathyroidectomy should be considered. The emergence of new methods for the management of HPT expands the availability of therapeutic tools for transplant patients. PMID:24175195

  4. Nutrition in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Tallarita, Tiziano; Ekser, Burcin; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2013-10-01

    Organ transplantation has progressively established itself as the preferred therapy for many end-stage organ failures. However, many of these chronic diseases and their treatments can negatively affect nutritional status, leading to malnutrition and mineral deficiencies.Nutritional status is an important determinant of the clinical outcome of kidney transplant recipients.Malnutrition and obesity may represent a contraindication to transplantation in many cases and may increase the risk of postoperative complications after the transplantation. Nutritional support in kidney transplant recipients is challenging, since it must take into account the pre-transplant nutritional status, the side effects of immunosuppression, the function of the transplanted graft, the presence of infection, and the general status of the patient at the time of the transplantation.With these considerations in mind, we reviewed current literature on the impact of nutritional status on the outcome of kidney transplantation.

  5. Transplantation Immunity. Contemporary Views.

    PubMed

    Zaretskaya, Yuliya M.

    1999-12-01

    "Transplantation immunity in Cyclosporin era" is a special chapter in science under name transplantation immunity. Nowadays, practically all the organs can be grafted: kidney, heart, lung, liver, pancreas both as organ, and as islet cells, bone marrow from relative and unrelative donors. The broad spectrum of grafted organs gave one more surprising peculiarity of transplantation immunity: it operates with different strength after transplantation of various organs. If the decreasing gradient of transplantation immunity could be composed, then it appeared to be approximately in the following order: bone marrow - skin - kidney - heart - lung. The most complicated operating activity of transplantation immunity is occurring after bone marrow transplantation, especially from unrelative donor, because in bone marrow transplantation immunological process develops in both directions. Therefore now, bone marrow is the only organ (tissue), when the complete compatibility between donor and recipient is required after its transplantation; especially in cases with unrelative donors.

  6. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  7. ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Kidney Transplantation without Post-Transplant Therapeutic Plasma Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, J. M.; Fontaine, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Blood group incompatibility remains a significant barrier to kidney transplantation. Approximately one-third of donors are blood group incompatible with their intended recipient. Options for these donor-recipient pairs include blood group incompatible transplantation or kidney paired donation. However, the optimal protocol for blood group incompatible transplantation is unknown. Protocols differ in techniques to remove ABO antibodies, titer targets and immunosuppression regimens. In addition, the mechanisms of graft accommodation to blood group antigens remain poorly understood. We describe a blood group incompatible protocol using pre-transplant therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab in addition to prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. In this protocol, we do not exclude patients based on a high initial titer and do not implement post-transplant TPE. All 16 patients who underwent this protocol received a living donor transplant with 100 percent patient and graft survival, and no reported episodes of antibody-mediated rejection to date with a median follow-up of 2.6 years (range 0.75 to 4.7 years). We conclude that blood group incompatible transplantation can be achieved without post-transplant TPE. PMID:25739580

  8. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 4,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  9. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  10. Potassium in hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hector; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-05-01

    The increased prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in industrialized societies undoubtedly is associated with the modern high-sodium/low-potassium diet. Extensive experimental and clinical data strongly link potassium intake to cardiovascular outcome. Most studies suggest that the sodium-to-potassium intake ratio is a better predictor of cardiovascular outcome than either nutrient individually. A high-sodium/low-potassium environment results in significant abnormalities in central hemodynamics, leading to potential target organ damage. Altered renal sodium handling, impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and increased oxidative stress are important mediators of this effect. It remains of paramount importance to reinforce consumption of a low-sodium/high-potassium diet as a critical strategy for prevention and treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Notch signaling in the developing cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Kyle; Karsan, Aly

    2007-07-01

    The Notch proteins encompass a family of transmembrane receptors that have been highly conserved through evolution as mediators of cell fate. Recent findings have demonstrated a critical role of Notch in the developing cardiovascular system. Notch signaling has been implicated in the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition during development of the heart valves, in arterial-venous differentiation, and in remodeling of the primitive vascular plexus. Mutations of Notch pathway components in humans are associated with congenital defects of the cardiovascular system such as Alagille syndrome, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and bicuspid aortic valves. This article focuses on the role of the Notch pathway in the developing cardiovascular system and congenital human cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Immunobiological determinants in organ transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, C.

    1983-01-01

    The most important development in determining successful organ transplantation has been the improved understanding of the immune response and the interactions between antigens, antibody, immune complexes, complement component, lymphocytes and macrophages. The initiation and termination of an immune response, whether cellular or humoral depends upon cellular interaction between subsets of the lymphocyte cell series and macrophages. An equilibrium between helper and suppressor T cells determines protection of the host from non-self tissue invasion, infection and neoplasia. The role of mediators, immunosuppressants, hybridomas and recombitant DNA technology are briefly considered. The relative importance of tissue typing and blood transfusion in preventing allograft rejection is considered and the role of immunological monitoring in allograft transplantation is reviewed. PMID:6344730

  13. Gene Therapy in Corneal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Yureeda; Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed organ transplantation. Immune privilege of the cornea is widely recognized, partly because of the relatively favorable outcome of corneal grafts. The first-time recipient of corneal allografts in an avascular, low-risk setting can expect a 90% success rate without systemic immunosuppressive agents and histocompatibility matching. However, immunologic rejection remains the major cause of graft failure, particularly in patients with a high risk for rejection. Corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for the prevention and treatment of immune rejection. However, current pharmacological measures are limited in their side-effect profiles, repeated application, lack of targeted response, and short duration of action. Experimental ocular gene therapy may thus present new horizons in immunomodulation. From efficient viral vectors to sustainable alternative splicing, we discuss the progress of gene therapy in promoting graft survival and postulate further avenues for gene-mediated prevention of allogeneic graft rejection. PMID:24138037

  14. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  15. Artery Wall Assessment Helps Predict Kidney Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Salido, Eduardo; Pitti, Sergio; Rufino, Margarita; González-Posada, José Manuel; Torres, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney transplant recipients have high cardiovascular risk, and vascular inflammation may play an important role. We explored whether the inflammatory state in the vessel wall was related to carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) and patient survival following kidney transplantation. Methods In this prospective observational cohort study we measured c-IMT and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in the inferior epigastric artery in 115 kidney transplant candidates. Another c-IMT measurement was done 1-year post-transplantation in 107. By stepwise multiple regression analysis we explored factors associated with baseline c-IMT and their changes over time. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was constructed to identify risk factors for mortality. Results A worse cardiovascular profile (older age, smoker, diabetic, carotid plaque, systolic blood pressure and vascular calcification) and higher VCAM-1 levels were found in patients in the highest baseline c-IMT tertile, who also had a worse survival. Factors independently related to baseline c-IMT were age (β=0.369, P<0.0001), fasting glucose (β=0.168, P=0.045), smoking (β=0.228, P=0.003) and VCAM-1 levels (β=0.244, P=0.002). Independent factors associated with c-IMT measurement 1-year post-transplantation were baseline c-IMT (β=-0.677, P<0.0001), post-transplant diabetes (β=0.225, P=0.003) and triglycerides (β=0.302, P=0.023). Vascular VCAM-1 levels were associated with increased risk of mortality in bivariate and multivariate Cox regression. Notably, nearly 50% of patients showed an increase or maintenance of high c-IMT 1 year post-transplantation and these patients experienced a higher mortality (13 versus 3.5%; P=0.021). Conclusion A worse cardiovascular profile and a higher vascular VCAM-1 protein levels at time of KT are related to subclinical atheromatosis. This could lead to a higher post-transplant mortality. Pre-transplant c IMT, post-transplant diabetes and

  16. Plasma exchange conditioning for ABO-incompatible renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Winters, J L; Gloor, J M; Pineda, A A; Stegall, M D; Moore, S B

    2004-01-01

    The supply of deceased donor kidneys is inadequate to meet demand. To expand the pool of potential donors, ABO-incompatible transplants from living donors have been performed. We present the Mayo Clinic experience with such transplants. Enrollment was open to patients when the only available potential living kidney donor was ABO-incompatible. Conditioning consisted of plasma exchanges followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. Splenectomy was performed at the time of transplant surgery. Post-transplant immunosuppression consisted of anti-T lymphocyte antibody, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Isoagglutinin titers and scores were determined before and after each plasma exchange. Transplant outcomes were determined. Twenty-six ABO-incompatible transplants were performed. No hyperacute rejection occurred. Mean patient follow-up was 400 days. Patient and graft survivals at last follow-up were 92 and 85%, respectively. Antibody-mediated rejection occurred in 46% and was apparently reversed in 83% by plasma exchange and increased immunosuppression. The initial plasma exchange reduced immediate spin and AHG hemagglutination reactivity scores by 53.5 and 34.6%, respectively. Over the course of the pretransplant plasma exchanges, the immediate spin and AHG hemagglutination reactivity scores decreased by 96.4 and 68.5%, respectively. At 3 and 12 months, the immediate spin and AHG hemagglutinin reactivity scores and titers were less than those at baseline but greater than or equal to those on the day of transplantation. Despite an increase in scores and titers, antibody-mediated rejection was not present. Pre-transplant plasma exchange conditioning combined with other immunosuppressives can be used to prepare patients for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from living donors, but antibody-mediated rejection post-transplant is a common occurrence and allograft survival may be reduced. Controlled clinical trials are needed to identify the optimum

  17. Tobacco smoking and solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Chris; Armstrong, Matthew J; Neuberger, James

    2012-11-27

    Smoking, both by donors and by recipients, has a major impact on outcomes after organ transplantation. Recipients of smokers' organs are at greater risk of death (lungs hazard ratio [HR], 1.36; heart HR, 1.8; and liver HR, 1.25), extended intensive care stays, and greater need for ventilation. Kidney function is significantly worse at 1 year after transplantation in recipients of grafts from smokers compared with nonsmokers. Clinicians must balance the use of such higher-risk organs with the consequences on waiting list mortality if the donor pool is reduced further by exclusion of such donors. Smoking by kidney transplant recipients significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular events (29.2% vs. 15.4%), renal fibrosis, rejection, and malignancy (HR, 2.56). Furthermore, liver recipients who smoke have higher rates of hepatic artery thrombosis, biliary complications, and malignancy (13% vs. 2%). Heart recipients with a smoking history have increased risk of developing coronary atherosclerosis (21.2% vs. 12.3%), graft dysfunction, and loss after transplantation. Self-reporting of smoking is commonplace but unreliable, which limits its use as a tool for selection of transplant candidates. Despite effective counseling and pharmacotherapy, recidivism rates after transplantation remain high (10-40%). Transplant services need to be more proactive in educating and implementing effective smoking cessation strategies to reduce rates of recidivism and the posttransplantation complications associated with smoking. The adverse impact of smoking by the recipient supports the requirement for a 6-month period of abstinence in lung recipients and cessation before other solid organs.

  18. Vitamin D: a new player in kidney transplantation?

    PubMed

    Ponticelli, Claudio; Sala, Gabriele

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin D is a hormone with pleiotropic effects. It mainly regulates calcium and phosphate metabolism through interactions with FGF23 and its receptor klotho. In addition, it has been shown that Vitamin D also regulates the immune response and has protective effects from cardiovascular disease, cancer and infections. Most renal transplant recipients have overt Vitamin D deficiency, a condition that may be associated with a decline in graft function and other complications. After kidney transplantation, elevated levels of FGF23 may predict increased risks of death and allograft loss. Theoretically, an optimal Vitamin D supplementation might favor operational tolerance and protect transplant recipients from the triad cardiovascular disease-cancer-infection. However, more solid data are needed to confirm this and to set the optimal level of serum Vitamin D supplementation in order to attain the best clinical outcome.

  19. American Society of Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... DONOR PROGRAM ILDA Webinar Series FQAPI Webinar Series Business of Transplantation Webinar Series Fellows Webinar Series Other Webinars AST/AJT Journal Club Publications Podcasts Conference Recordings Transplant Nephrology Core ...

  20. Corneal transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000243.htm Corneal transplant - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a corneal transplant. Most of the tissue of your cornea (the ...

  1. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  2. ABO incompatible renal transplantation following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Snell, G I; Davis, A K; Menahem, S; Kotecha, S; Whitford, H M; Levvey, B J; Paraskeva, M; Webb, A; Westall, G W; Walker, R G

    2016-11-01

    We present management strategies utilised for the first case of an urgent live-donor ABO incompatible B blood group renal transplant, in a patient with a prior A blood group lung transplant for cystic fibrosis. Three years on, renal function is excellent and stable, whilst lung function has improved.

  3. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  4. Depression and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Elderon, Larkin; Whooley, Mary A

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one out of every five patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) suffers from major depressive disorder (MDD). Both MDD and depressive symptoms are risk factors for CVD incidence, severity and outcomes. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between MDD and CVD, particularly focusing on health behaviors. Investigators have also made considerable strides in the diagnosis and treatment of depression among patients with CVD. At the same time, many research questions remain. In what settings is depression screening most effective for patients with CVD? What is the optimal screening frequency? Which therapies are safe and effective? How can we better integrate the care of mental health conditions with that of CVD? How do we motivate depressed patients to change health behaviors? What technological tools can we use to improve care for depression? Gaining a more thorough understanding of the links between MDD and heart disease, and how best to diagnose and treat depression among these patients, has the potential to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality from CVD.

  5. Renal transplantation in the Roma ethnicity-do all patients have equal chance for transplantation?

    PubMed

    Basic-Jukic, N; Novosel, D; Juric, I; Kes, P

    2013-11-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities exist in access to kidney transplantation worldwide. The Roma people are often socially deprived, uneducated, and unemployed. We investigated all dialysis centers in Croatia to determine number of Roma people on dialysis as well as their access and reasons for eventual failure to enter the waiting list. There are 9463 registered Roma people in Croatia, however, the estimated number reaches 40,000. Twenty-five Roma patients required renal replacement therapy, giving a prevalence of 830 per million people (pmp), compared with 959 pmp among the general population. Average age at the start of dialysis was 29 vs 67 years; waiting time to kidney transplantation was 48.9 vs 53.5 months; mean age at the time of transplantation was 33.18 vs 48.01 years in Roma versus the general population respectively. One patient received a kidney allograft from a living unrelated spousal donor, and all others from deceased individuals. Patients were followed for 51.5 months (range, 6-240). The most frequent post-transplant complications were urinary tract infections. One patient lost a graft due to severe acute rejection caused by noncompliance. Two young patients were also noncompliant with immunosuppressive medications. One patient died with a functioning graft at 20 years after transplantation due to cardiovascular disease. Among 14 Roma patients currently been treated with hemodialysis in Croatia, 10 are old with clinical contraindications for transplantation; 1 is on the waiting list; 1 left hospitalization for pretransplant evaluation twice; 1 refused evaluation; and 1 is currently being evaluated for the waiting list. The Roma people have excellent access to renal transplantation in Croatia. Many of them refuse evaluation. More efforts should be invested in their education to improve compliance and their post-transplant outcomes.

  6. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doney, Kristine C; Mielcarek, Marco; Stewart, F Marc; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used to treat a single disease with multiorgan involvement or 2 separate diseases, the first requiring SOT and the second often a possible complication of SOT. Results of such serial transplants have been reported sporadically in the literature, usually as single case studies. Thirteen autologous and 27 allogeneic HCTs after SOT published previously are summarized. A more detailed review is provided for an additional 16 patients transplanted at a single institution, 8 of whom had autologous and 8 of whom had allogeneic HCT after SOT. Five of 8 autologous transplant recipients are alive a median of 4.6 years after HCT. Four of 8 allogeneic HCT recipients are alive a median of 8.7 years after HCT. In carefully selected patients, HCT after SOT is feasible and associated with a low incidence of either solid organ or hematopoietic cell rejection.

  7. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Krone, Wilhelm; Berthold, Heiner K

    2009-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently vitamin D deficiency has been identified as a potential risk factor for many diseases not traditionally associated with vitamin D, such as cancer and CVD. This review discusses the evidence suggesting an association between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and CVD and the possible mechanisms mediating it. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with CVD risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis such as intima-media thickness and coronary calcification as well as with cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke as well as congestive heart failure. It could be suggested that vitamin D deficiency contributes to the development of CVD through its association with risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension. However, direct effects of vitamin D on the cardiovascular system may also be involved. Vitamin D receptors are expressed in a variety of tissues, including cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells and vitamin D has been shown to affect inflammation and cell proliferation and differentiation. While much evidence supports a potential antiatherosclerotic effect of vitamin D, prospective, placebo-controlled randomized as well as mechanistic studies are needed to confirm this association. Since vitamin D deficiency is easy to screen for and treat, the confirmation of such an association could have important implications for both, patient care and health policy.

  8. Treg induction, migration, and function in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Bryna E.; Nakayama, Yumi; Xu, Jiangnan; Brinkman, C. Colin; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Treg are important in maintaining immune homeostasis and in regulating a variety of immune responses, making them attractive targets for modulating immune-related diseases. Success in using induction or transfer of Treg in mice to mediate transplant tolerance suggests Treg-based therapies as mechanisms of long-term drug free transplant tolerance in human patients. While more work is needed, critical analyses suggest that key factors in Treg induction, migration, and function are important areas to concentrate investigative efforts and therapeutic development. Elucidation of basic biology will aid in translating data gleaned from mice to humans so that Treg therapies become reality for patients. PMID:23125426

  9. HA-ving lymphatics improves lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maltzman, Jonathan S.; Reed, Hasina Outtz; Kahn, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Lung allografts are prone to rejection, even though recipients undergo aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. Lymphatic vessels serve as conduits for immune cell trafficking and have been implicated in the mediation of allograft rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Cui et al. provide compelling evidence that lymphatic vessel formation improves lung allograft survival in a murine transplant model. Moreover, their data suggest a potential mechanism for the beneficial effects of lymphatics that does not involve immune cell or antigen transport. Together, the results of this study provide new insight into the role of lymphatic vessels in transplant tolerance. PMID:26524589

  10. [General recommendations for medical treatment after heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Guidon, A; Reverdin, S; Yarol, N; Yerly, P; Tozzi, P; Meyer, P; Hullin, R

    2014-05-28

    Heart transplantation remains the treatment of choice in selected patients with severe heart failure (HF) despite optimal medical therapy. Since long-term survival after HTX is improving, there is a growing need for evidence-based strategies that reduce long-term mortality resulting from both immunological and non-immunological risk. This manuscript summarizes recommendations for treatment of transplant vasculopathy, malignancy after transplantation, and prevention of corticosteroid induced bone disease. Based on actual understanding of cardiovascular risk factors in the population, preservation of renal function, prevention and treatment of hyperlipidemia and diabetes, as well as blood pressure control play an important role in the long-term follow-up after heart transplantation.

  11. Neoplastic disease after liver transplantation: Focus on de novo neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Burra, Patrizia; Rodriguez-Castro, Kryssia I

    2015-01-01

    De novo neoplasms account for almost 30% of deaths 10 years after liver transplantation and are the most common cause of mortality in patients surviving at least 1 year after transplant. The risk of malignancy is two to four times higher in transplant recipients than in an age- and sex-matched population, and cancer is expected to surpass cardiovascular complications as the primary cause of death in transplanted patients within the next 2 decades. Since exposure to immunosuppression is associated with an increased frequency of developing neoplasm, long-term immunosuppression should be therefore minimized. Promising results in the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence have been reported with the use of mTOR inhibitors including everolimus and sirolimus and the ongoing open-label prospective randomized controlled SILVER. Study will provide more information on whether sirolimus-containing vs mTOR-inhibitor-free immunosuppression is more efficacious in reducing HCC recurrence. PMID:26269665

  12. Modulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin.

    PubMed

    Abel, E Dale; Sweeney, Gary

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that individuals with the metabolic syndrome have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and much effort has been expended to elicit the underlying mechanisms. Various studies have proposed that excessive or deficient physiological effects mediated by leptin make an important contribution, yet many paradoxical observations often preclude a clear definition of the role of leptin. This review article will briefly discuss principal and most recent evidence on direct and indirect regulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin, focusing on cardiac structural and functional as well as vascular effects.

  13. Exosomes and Cardiovascular Protection.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean M; Takov, Kaloyan; Yellon, Derek M

    2017-02-01

    Most, if not all, cells of the cardiovascular system secrete small, lipid bilayer vesicles called exosomes. Despite technical challenges in their purification and analysis, exosomes from various sources have been shown to be powerfully cardioprotective. Indeed, it is possible that much of the so-called "paracrine" benefit in cardiovascular function obtained by stem cell therapy can be replicated by the injection of exosomes produced by stem cells. However, exosomes purified from plasma appear to be just as capable of activating cardioprotective pathways. We discuss the potential roles of endogenous exosomes in the cardiovascular system, how this is perturbed in cardiovascular disease, and evaluate their potential as therapeutic agents to protect the heart.

  14. [Psoriasis and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Torres, Tiago; Sales, Rita; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Selores, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic and systemic inflammatory disease associated with several comorbidities, such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome, but also with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, like myocardial infarction or stroke. The chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis has been suggested to be a contributing and potentially independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular comorbidities and precocious atherosclerosis. Aiming at alerting clinicians to the need of screening and monitoring cardiovascular diseases and its risk factors in psoriatic patients, this review will focus on the range of cardiometabolic comorbidities and increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with psoriasis.

  15. Long Term Outcomes after Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long term outcomes after liver transplantation are major determinants of quality of life and of the value of this heroic treatment. As short term outcomes are excellent, our community is turning to take a harder look at long term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review these outcomes, and highlight proposed treatments, as well as pressing topics needing to be studied. A systemic review of the English literature was carried in PubMed, covering all papers addressing long term outcomes in pediatric liver transplant from 2000-2013. Late outcomes after pediatric liver transplant affect the liver graft in the form of chronic liver dysfunction. The causes include rejection particularly humoral rejection, but also de novo autoimmune hepatitis, and recurrent disease. The metabolic syndrome is a major factor in long term cardiovascular complication risk. Secondary infections, kidney dysfunction and malignancy remain a reality of those patients. There is growing evidence of late cognitive and executive function delays affecting daily life productivity as well as likely adherence. Finally, despite a good health status, quality of life measures are comparable to those of children with chronic diseases. Long term outcomes are the new frontier in pediatric liver transplantation. Much is needed to improve graft survival, but also to avoid systemic morbidities from long term immunosuppression. Quality of life is a new inclusive measure that will require interventions and innovative approaches respectful not only on the patients but also of their social circle. PMID:24511516

  16. Metabolic complications in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; Omonte Guzmán, Edith; Amo Trillo, Víctor; Rodrigo López, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia according to the most widely accepted definitions now used, is one of the most common post-transplant complications, with a prevalence of 44%-58%. The MS, together with the immunosuppression, is considered the main risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in transplant recipients, which in turn accounts for 19%-42% of all deaths unrelated to the graft. The presence of MS represents a relative risk for the development of CVD and death of 1.78. On the other hand, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), considered as the manifestation of the MS in the liver, is now the second leading reason for liver transplantation in the United States after hepatitis C and alcohol. NAFLD has a high rate of recurrence in the liver graft and a direct relation with the worsening of other metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance or diabetes mellitus. Consequently, it is vitally important to identify and treat as soon as possible such modifiable factors as hypertension, overweight, hyperlipidaemia or diabetes in transplanted patients to thus minimise the impact on patient survival. Additionally, steroid-free regimens are favoured, with minimal immunosuppression to limit the possible effects on the development of the MS. PMID:27605877

  17. Epigenomics in hematopoietic transplantation: novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Engel, Nicole; Rank, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a high risk but curative treatment option for leukemia, myelodysplasia and other hematological malignancies. After high dose radio- or chemo-therapy, recipient's hematopoiesis is replaced by a new immunosystem and residual malignant cells are eliminated by the graft-versus-leukemia reaction. The benefit of this immunological effect is limited by the most frequent complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: graft-versus-host disease. In addition to their well-known anti-tumor activity, epigenetic drugs mediate immunotolerance without reducing alloreactivity or even enhance graft-versus-leukemia effect without inducing graft-versus-host disease by regulating cytokine release, increasing the circulating number of regulatory T cells and interacting with natural killer cells. We focus on the use of epigenetic drugs in the allogeneic transplantation setting in relation to their anti-tumor and immunomodulatory potential.

  18. Current status of pediatric renal transplant pathology.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jan U

    2017-03-01

    Histopathology is still an indispensable tool for the diagnosis of kidney transplant dysfunction in adult and pediatric patients. This review presents consolidated knowledge, recent developments and future prospects on the biopsy procedure, the diagnostic work-up, classification schemes, the histopathology of rejection, including antibody-mediated forms, ABO-incompatible transplants, protocol biopsies, recurrent and de novo disease, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder, infectious complications and drug-induced toxicity. It is acknowledged that frequently the correct diagnosis can only be reached in consensus with clinical, serological, immunogenetical, bacteriological and virological findings. This review shall enhance the understanding of the pediatric nephrologist for the thought processes of nephropathologists with the aim to facilitate teamwork between these specialist groups for the benefit of the patient.

  19. Ceruloplasmin and cardiovascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, P. L.; Mazumder, B.; Ehrenwald, E.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Transition metal ion-mediated oxidation is a commonly used model system for studies of the chemical, structural, and functional modifications of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The physiological relevance of studies using free metal ions is unclear and has led to an exploration of free metal ion-independent mechanisms of oxidation. We and others have investigated the role of human ceruloplasmin (Cp) in oxidative processes because it the principal copper-containing protein in serum. There is an abundance of epidemiological data that suggests that serum Cp may be an important risk factor predicting myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. Biochemical studies have shown that Cp is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro. The pro-oxidant activity of Cp requires an intact structure, and a single copper atom at the surface of the protein, near His(426), is required for LDL oxidation. Under conditions where inhibitory protein (such as albumin) is present, LDL oxidation by Cp is optimal in the presence of superoxide, which reduces the surface copper atom of Cp. Cultured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells also oxidize LDL in the presence of Cp. Superoxide release by these cells is a critical factor regulating the rate of oxidation. Cultured monocytic cells, when activated by zymosan, can oxidize LDL, but these cells are unique in their secretion of Cp. Inhibitor studies using Cp-specific antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides show that Cp is a major contributor to LDL oxidation by these cells. The role of Cp in lipoprotein oxidation and atherosclerotic lesion progression in vivo has not been directly assessed and is an important area for future studies.

  20. PPAR-γ in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Sheng Zhong; Ivashchenko, Christine Y.; Usher, Michael G.; Mortensen, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), an essential transcriptional mediator of adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis, is increasingly recognized as a key player in inflammatory cells and in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, and atherosclerosis. PPAR-γ agonists, the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), increase insulin sensitivity, lower blood glucose, decrease circulating free fatty acids and triglycerides, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammatory markers, and reduce atherosclerosis in insulin-resistant patients and animal models. Human genetic studies on PPAR-γ have revealed that functional changes in this nuclear receptor are associated with CVD. Recent controversial clinical studies raise the question of deleterious action of PPAR-γ agonists on the cardiovascular system. These complex interactions of metabolic responsive factors and cardiovascular disease promise to be important areas of focus for the future. PMID:18288291

  1. Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewska, Anna; Nowakowski, Adam; Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff WM; Gilad, Assaf A; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification. PMID:26366076

  2. Obesity and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Rahul M; Zawada, Edward T

    2004-06-01

    There is a worldwide epidemic of obesity, and an increasing number of patients who are obese are presenting for solid-organ transplantation. Obesity increases the risk for delayed graft function and local wound complications after technically successful kidney transplantation. Obese patients are more likely to have comorbid factors leading to premature death with a functioning kidney transplant. We suggest the use of World Health Organization criteria when reporting the impact of obesity on recipients of solid-organ transplants. Prospective multicenter studies are indicated to evaluate long-term outcomes in obese patients who successfully receive a kidney transplant. Rigorous efforts should be made to optimize weight before and after solid-organ transplantation by a judicious combination of diet, exercise, minimization of steroid therapy, surgery, and psychological therapies.

  3. Transplantation psychoneuroimmunology: building hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Klapheke, M M

    2000-06-01

    The research findings of psychoneuroimmunology have not yet been fully applied to the field of transplantation psychiatry. Though much study has been devoted to the impact of psychiatric disease on the immunosuppressed state and disease progression in HIV-related illness, little has yet been written on the immunology implications of psychiatric disturbances in the immunosuppressed post-transplant patient. Utilizing Medline literature searches to review relevant research data in psychoneuroimmunology and transplantation immunology, the author formulates and examines four transplantation psychoneuroimmunology hypotheses involving the potential impact of depression on post-transplant organ rejection, cancer, coronary artery disease, and infections. The author concludes that though major questions remain, it appears reasonable to include the impact of depression, and possibly other psychological states, among factors that may affect the net state of immunosuppression in transplant patients.

  4. Lung transplant infection.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Sergio R; Maselli, Diego J; Fernandez, Juan F; Levine, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become an accepted therapeutic procedure for the treatment of end-stage pulmonary parenchymal and vascular disease. Despite improved survival rates over the decades, lung transplant recipients have lower survival rates than other solid organ transplant recipients. The morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation is largely due to infection- and rejection-related complications. This article will review the common infections that develop in the lung transplant recipient, including the general risk factors for infection in this population, and the most frequent bacterial, viral, fungal and other less frequent opportunistic infections. The epidemiology, diagnosis, prophylaxis, treatment and outcomes for the different microbial pathogens will be reviewed. The effects of infection on lung transplant rejection will also be discussed.

  5. Cuba's kidney transplantation program.

    PubMed

    Mármol, Alexander; Pérez, Alexis; Pérez de Prado, Juan C; Fernández-Vega, Silvia; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Arce, Sergio

    2010-10-01

    The first kidney transplant in Cuba was performed on 24 February 1970, using a cadaveric donor. In 1979, living donor kidney transplantation began between first-degree relatives. A total of 2775 patients are enrolled in renal replacement therapy in 47 hospitals across the country, 1440 of whom are awaiting kidney transplantation. Organs for the kidney program are procured in 63 accredited hospitals equipped for multidisciplinary management of brain death. Accordingly, over 90% of transplanted kidneys are from cadaveric donors. Identification of potential recipients is carried out through a national, computerized program that affords all patients the same opportunity regardless of distance from a transplant center, and selection of the most suitable candidate is based primarily on HLA compatibility. KEYWORDS Chronic renal failure, kidney transplantation.

  6. Transplant immunology for non-immunologist.

    PubMed

    Heeger, Peter S; Dinavahi, Rajani

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage kidney, heart, lung, and liver disease. Short-term outcomes in solid-organ transplantation are excellent, but long-term outcomes remain suboptimal. Advances in immune suppression and human leukocyte antigen matching techniques have reduced the acute rejection rate to <10%. Chronic allograft injury remains problematic and is in part immune-mediated. This injury is orchestrated by a complex adaptive and innate immune system that has evolved to protect the organism from infection, but, in the context of transplantation, could result in allograft rejection. Such chronic injury is partially mediated by anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies. Severe rejections have largely been avoided by the development of tissue-typing techniques and crossmatch testing, which are discussed in detail. Further advances in the understanding of T- and B-cell immunology have led to the development of new immunomodulatory therapies directed at prolonging allograft survival, including those that decrease antibody production as well as those that remove antibodies from circulation. Further application of these immunomodulatory therapies has allowed expansion of the donor pool in some cases by permitting ABO-incompatible transplantation and transplantation in patients with preformed antibodies. Although vast improvements have been made in allograft survival, patients must remain on lifetime immunosuppression. Withdrawal of immunosuppression almost always ultimately leads to allograft rejection. The ultimate dream of transplant biologists is the induction of tolerance, where immune function remains intact but the allograft is not rejected in the face of withdrawn immunosuppression. This, however, has remained a significant challenge in human studies.

  7. Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Yeshawant B.; Harner, Marvin H.; Musgrave, James E.; Lawson, Russell K.; Campbell, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-one children received 38 kidney transplants from 22 live and 16 cadaver donors. Among the 31 patients, 25 received one transplant each, 5 received two transplants each and 1 received three transplants. Peritoneal or hemodialysis (or both) was carried out in 22 patients, with an average dialytic maintenance of 12 weeks before transplantation. Posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone and azathioprine. Antilymphocyte globulin was administered to 33 recipients as adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy. At present, 23 patients have functioning allografts, 3 are on hemodialysis and 5 are dead. Of 22 live kidney transplants, 18 are presently functioning two months to 14 years after transplantation with an average of 36 months. Of 16 cadaver kidney transplants, 5 are presently functioning 9 to 57 months after transplantation with an average of 32 months. Actuarial live donor allograft survival for one year was 76 percent, for two years was 66 percent and for three years was 64 percent. Cadaver allograft survival was 50 percent, 40 percent and 40 percent, respectively. Complications were urologic and infection related. Of nine recipients with sustained hypertension, in six the condition was due to chronic rejection, while in one it was due to recurrence of the original disease in the allograft. Linear growth was measured in 15 children who were less than 14 years of age at the time of transplantation and in whom allografts survived more than one year. Maximum average linear growth velocity occurred during the first year after transplantation. Our experience indicates pediatric renal transplantation can be successfully used in the treatment of terminal renal failure. PMID:1098288

  8. U.S. Transplantation Data

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. Sign up to be an organ donor. Technology for transplantation UNOS developed the online database system, ... more Learn how organ transplantation works See the impact transplantation makes Give now Contact 700 N. 4th ...

  9. Update in liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W. W.; Bain, V. G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent developments in liver transplantation with particular emphasis on issues relevant to patient care before and after transplantation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Preference was given to recent studies with well-designed cohort methods and large numbers of study subjects. Data on natural history are summarized from large databases in Canada and the United States. Due to the nature of the subjects involved, most treatment studies are open studies or consecutive series rather than randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Substantial advances in liver transplantation have established it as an effective treatment for most end-stage liver diseases, with 1-year survival rates higher than 85% in many centres. Early referral by family physicians and careful patient selection by transplant centres remain crucial to continued success. Managing these patients requires special care from family physicians because of post-transplantation immunosuppression, increased risk of opportunistic infection, and transplantation-associated medical problems. Other unresolved issues include recurrence of disease (hepatitis B and C, and malignancy) and an ongoing shortage of organs. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplantation is an effective form of therapy for end-stage liver disease, improving both patients' likelihood of survival and their quality of life. Because medical care of liver transplant patients is so complex, coordinated efforts between primary care physicians and transplant teams are crucial. PMID:10349068

  10. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  11. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Combination with Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring for the Preoperative Cardiac Evaluation of Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Moon; Kong, Yu-Gyeong

    2017-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the best treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma, liver cirrhosis, fulminant liver failure, and end-stage liver diseases. Even though advances in surgical techniques and perioperative care have improved postoperative outcomes, perioperative cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality following liver transplantation. Ischemic coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiomyopathy are the most common cardiovascular diseases and could be negative predictors of postoperative outcomes in liver transplant recipients. Therefore, comprehensive cardiovascular evaluations are required to assess perioperative risks and prevent concomitant cardiovascular complications that would preclude good outcomes in liver transplant recipients. The two major types of cardiac computed tomography are the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). CCTA in combination with the CACS is a validated noninvasive alternative to coronary angiography for diagnosing and grading the severity of CAD. A CACS > 400 is associated with significant CAD and a known important predictor of posttransplant cardiovascular complications in liver transplant recipients. In this review article, we discuss the usefulness, advantages, and disadvantages of CCTA combined with CACS as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for preoperative cardiac evaluation and for maximizing the perioperative outcomes of liver transplant recipients. PMID:28164120

  12. Liver Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Handouts Liver transplant (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Liver Transplantation updates ... ENCYCLOPEDIA Liver transplant Liver transplant - slideshow Related Health Topics Cirrhosis Hepatitis Liver Diseases Organ Transplantation National Institutes ...

  13. Bone marrow transplant – children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - children - discharge; Stem cell transplant - children - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant -children - discharge; Reduced intensity, non-myeloablative transplant - children - discharge; Mini transplant - children - discharge; Allogenic ...

  14. Exercise-induced stem cell activation and its implication for cardiovascular and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Brixius, Klara; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    A number of publications have provided evidence that exercise and physical activity are linked to the activation, mobilization, and differentiation of various types of stem cells. Exercise may improve organ regeneration and function. This review summarizes mechanisms by which exercise contributes to stem cell-induced regeneration in the cardiovascular and the skeletal muscle system. In addition, it discusses whether exercise may improve and support stem cell transplantation in situations of cardiovascular disease or muscular dystrophy.

  15. Therapeutic Strategies for Oxidative Stress-Related Cardiovascular Diseases: Removal of Excess Reactive Oxygen Species in Adult Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunyun; Yun, Jisoo; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    Accumulating evidence indicates that acute and chronic uncontrolled overproduction of oxidative stress-related factors including reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Moreover ROS mediate various signaling pathways underlying vascular inflammation in ischemic tissues. With respect to stem cell-based therapy, several studies clearly indicate that modulating antioxidant production at cellular levels enhances stem/progenitor cell functionalities, including proliferation, long-term survival in ischemic tissues, and complete differentiation of transplanted cells into mature vascular cells. Recently emerging therapeutic strategies involving adult stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), for treating ischemic CVDs have highlighted the need to control intracellular ROS production, because it critically affects the replicative senescence of ex vivo expanded therapeutic cells. Better understanding of the complexity of cellular ROS in stem cell biology might improve cell survival in ischemic tissues and enhance the regenerative potentials of transplanted stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we will discuss the nature and sources of ROS, drug-based therapeutic strategies for scavenging ROS, and EPC based therapeutic strategies for treating oxidative stress-related CVDs. Furthermore, we will discuss whether primed EPCs pretreated with natural ROS-scavenging compounds are crucial and promising therapeutic strategies for vascular repair.

  16. Therapeutic Strategies for Oxidative Stress-Related Cardiovascular Diseases: Removal of Excess Reactive Oxygen Species in Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jisoo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that acute and chronic uncontrolled overproduction of oxidative stress-related factors including reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Moreover ROS mediate various signaling pathways underlying vascular inflammation in ischemic tissues. With respect to stem cell-based therapy, several studies clearly indicate that modulating antioxidant production at cellular levels enhances stem/progenitor cell functionalities, including proliferation, long-term survival in ischemic tissues, and complete differentiation of transplanted cells into mature vascular cells. Recently emerging therapeutic strategies involving adult stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), for treating ischemic CVDs have highlighted the need to control intracellular ROS production, because it critically affects the replicative senescence of ex vivo expanded therapeutic cells. Better understanding of the complexity of cellular ROS in stem cell biology might improve cell survival in ischemic tissues and enhance the regenerative potentials of transplanted stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we will discuss the nature and sources of ROS, drug-based therapeutic strategies for scavenging ROS, and EPC based therapeutic strategies for treating oxidative stress-related CVDs. Furthermore, we will discuss whether primed EPCs pretreated with natural ROS-scavenging compounds are crucial and promising therapeutic strategies for vascular repair. PMID:27668035

  17. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  18. PPAR Agonists and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna C.; Thomas, Merlin C.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors that play important roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis. To the extent that PPAR agonists improve diabetic dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, these agents have been considered to reduce cardiovascular risk. However, data from murine models suggests that PPAR agonists also have independent anti-atherosclerotic actions, including the suppression of vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Many of these potentially anti-atherosclerotic effects are thought to be mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-kB, STAT, and activator protein-1 dependent pathways. In recent clinical trials, PPARα agonists have been shown to be effective in the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, while their cardiovascular benefit in patients with established cardiovascular disease remains equivocal. However, the use of PPARγ agonists, and more recently dual PPARα/γ coagonists, has been associated with an excess in cardiovascular events, possibly reflecting unrecognised fluid retention with potent agonists of the PPARγ receptor. Newer pan agonists, which retain their anti-atherosclerotic activity without weight gain, may provide one solution to this problem. However, the complex biologic effects of the PPARs may mean that only vascular targeted agents or pure transrepressors will realise the goal of preventing atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:18288280

  19. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  20. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  1. Bioethics of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well--to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation--rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate.

  2. Cardiovascular dysfunction in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Fede, Giuseppe; Privitera, Graziella; Tomaselli, Tania; Spadaro, Luisa; Purrello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hyperdynamic syndrome is a well-known clinical condition found in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, characterized by increased heart rate and cardiac output, and reduced systemic vascular resistance and arterial blood pressure. The leading cause of hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhotic patients is peripheral and splanchnic vasodilatation, due to an increased production/activity of vasodilator factors and decreased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors. The term “cirrhotic cardiomyopathy” describes impaired contractile responsiveness to stress, diastolic dysfunction and electrophysiological abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis without known cardiac disease. Underlying circulatory and cardiac dysfunctions are the main determinant in the development of hepatorenal syndrome in advanced cirrhosis. Moreover, the clinical consequences of cirrhosis-related cardiovascular dysfunction are evident during and after liver transplantation, and after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion. Cardiovascular complications following these procedures are common, with pulmonary edema being the most common complication. Other complications include overt heart failure, arrhythmia, pulmonary hypertension, pericardial effusion, and cardiac thrombus formation. This review discusses the circulatory and cardiovascular dysfunctions in cirrhosis, examining the pathophysiologic and clinical implications in light of the most recent published literature. PMID:25608575

  3. Left Ventricle Hypertrophy, Dilatation and Ejection Fraction Changes Before and After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tayebi-Khosroshahi, Hamid; Abbasnezhad, Mohsen; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Bakhshandeh, Masumeh; Chaichi, Parastoo

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) are at risk of complications in different organs including cardiovascular system. Renal transplantation is the best choice in these patients which diminishes these complications. It is observed that after renal transplantation, cardiac parameters have appropriate improvement. Current study evaluates echocardiographic findings in renal transplant recipients before and after kidney transplantation. Methods In an analytic cross sectional study, 30 patients (50% male, mean age of 45.57 ± 13.32 years) with ESRD who underwent renal transplantation were studied. All patients had echocardiographic studies after the last dialysis before and 6 months after transplantation. Echocardiographic study was done by Color Doppler two dimension methods and left ventricle ejection fraction was measured by Simpson method. All echocardiograms before and after transplantation were interpreted by the same cardiologist. Results Mean left ventricle ejection fraction before and after renal transplantation was 53.83±10.14% and 57.33±4.49%, respectively (P = 0.09). Left ventricle hypertrophy, mitral regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation existed in 46.7%, 76.7% and 33.3% respectively, which was improved in 30%, 50% and 33.3% after renal transplantation. Conclusion According to the results of current study it is suggested that renal transplantation could improve left ventricle parameters in patients with end stage renal disease.

  4. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Ramya; Downing, Christopher; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers represent a major cause of morbidity after organ transplantation. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are the most common cutaneous malignancies seen in this population, with a 65–100 fold greater incidence in organ transplant recipients compared to the general population. In recent years, human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta genus have been implicated in the pathogenesis of post-transplant SCCs. The underlying mechanism of carcinogenesis has been attributed to the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV. Specific immunosuppressive medications, such as the calcineurin inhibitors and azathioprine, are associated with a higher incidence of post-transplant SCCs compared to other immunosuppressive agents. Compared to other immunosuppressives, mTOR inhibitors and mycophenolate mofetil have been associated with a decreased risk of developing post-transplant non-melanoma skin cancers. As a result, they may represent ideal immunosuppressive medications in organ transplant recipients. Treatment options for post-transplant SCCs include surgical excision, Mohs micrographic surgery, systemic retinoid therapy, adjunct topical therapy, electrodessication and curettage, and radiation therapy. This review will discuss the epidemiology, risk factors, and management options of post-transplant SCCs. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of beta-HPV mediated carcinogenesis will be discussed. PMID:26239556

  5. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  6. [Uterus transplantation. Current situation].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, T; Piver, P; Mesnard, C; Marquet, P; Pichon, N; Guillaudeau, A; Drouet, M; Gardet, E; Laskar, M; Essig, M; Aubard, Y

    2012-11-01

    Except adoption, absolute uterine factor infertility lacks solution in case of motherhood desire. Gestational surrogacy is still not approved in France. Over the last decade, uterus transplantation experimentation made advances. Data from animal research, progress in immunosuppressive treatment and knowledge about pregnancy after transplantation provide a scenario in which a human allotransplantation project can become reality.

  7. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. Transplanted islet cells, however, can take over the work of the destroyed cells. The beta cells in these islets will begin to make and release insulin. Researchers hope islet transplantation will help people with ...

  8. Hair transplantation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Manoj

    2008-01-01

    Techniques in hair transplantation have evolved recently which make results look more natural. Hair restoration is one of the most exciting and innovative surgical fields in aesthetic surgery today. A precise appreciation of anatomy has allowed the use of follicular unit grafts. With better methods of harvesting and implantation, hair transplantation results represent a blend of art and science. PMID:20174544

  9. Pancreatitis following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J A; Demetrius, A J; Gavaler, J S; Makowka, L; Starzl, T E; Van Thiel, D H

    1988-06-01

    Since 1981, when the liver transplantation program was initiated at the University of Pittsburgh, we have been impressed with the prevalence of pancreatitis occurring following liver transplantation in patients transplanted for hepatitis B-related liver disease. To either confirm this clinical impression or refute it, the records of the 27 HbsAg+ patients and those of an additional 24 HbsAg- but HbcAb and/or HbsAb+ patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation were reviewed to determine the prevalence of clinical pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia (biochemical pancreatitis) following liver transplantation (OLTx). Post-OLTx hyperamylasemia occurred significantly more frequently in HbsAg+ patients (6/27) than it did in the HbsAg- patients (0/24) (P less than 0.05). More importantly, clinical pancreatitis occurred in 14% (4/27) of the HbsAg+ patients and 0% (0/24) of the HbsAg- patients. Interestingly, in each case, the pancreatitis was associated with the occurrence of acute hepatitis B infection of the allograft. Based upon these data, we conclude that pancreatitis occurring after liver transplantation is more common in patients transplanted for active viral liver disease caused by hepatitis B than in those with inactive viral liver disease. These observations suggest that pancreatitis occurring in, at least some cases following liver transplantation for viral liver disease, may result from hepatitis B virus infection of the pancreas.

  10. Cyclic GMP signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Emily J.; Kass, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates a wide spectrum of physiologic processes in multiple cell types within the cardiovascular system. Dysfunctional signaling at any step of the cascade--- cGMP synthesis, effector activation, or catabolism--- have been implicated in numerous cardiovascular diseases, ranging from hypertension to atherosclerosis to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. In this review, we outline each step of the cGMP signaling cascade and discuss its regulation and physiologic effects within the cardiovascular system. In addition, we illustrate how cGMP signaling becomes dysregulated in specific cardiovascular disease states. The ubiquitous role cGMP plays in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology presents great opportunities for pharmacologic modulation of the cGMP signal in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We detail the various therapeutic interventional strategies that have been developed or are in development, summarizing relevant preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:19306895

  11. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  12. Hand transplant surgery.

    PubMed

    Nassimizadeh, M; Nassimizadeh, A K; Power, D

    2014-11-01

    In September 1998 the world's first hand transplant was performed in Lyon, France. A new era in reconstructive surgery had begun. This case highlighted the potential for composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA). While CTA is not a new technique, it unifies the principles of reconstructive microsurgery and transplant surgery, achieving the goals of absolute correction of a defect with anatomically and physiologically identical tissue with none of the issues of donor site morbidity associated with autologous tissue transfer. The adoption of this technique for non-life threatening conditions to improve quality of life has generated a number of new ethical considerations. Additionally, the prominence of transplanted hands has led to much discussion around the issue of body identity and psychological assessment of potential recipients. This is fundamental to any hand transplantation programme. With the advent of hand transplantation dawning in the UK, we review the many ethical considerations that contribute to this new frontier.

  13. Hand transplant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nassimizadeh, AK; Power, D

    2014-01-01

    In September 1998 the world’s first hand transplant was performed in Lyon, France. A new era in reconstructive surgery had begun. This case highlighted the potential for composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA). While CTA is not a new technique, it unifies the principles of reconstructive microsurgery and transplant surgery, achieving the goals of absolute correction of a defect with anatomically and physiologically identical tissue with none of the issues of donor site morbidity associated with autologous tissue transfer. The adoption of this technique for non-life threatening conditions to improve quality of life has generated a number of new ethical considerations. Additionally, the prominence of transplanted hands has led to much discussion around the issue of body identity and psychological assessment of potential recipients. This is fundamental to any hand transplantation programme. With the advent of hand transplantation dawning in the UK, we review the many ethical considerations that contribute to this new frontier. PMID:25350176

  14. Cardiac imaging for the assessment of patients being evaluated for kidney or liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Kalindi; Appis, Andrew; Doukky, Rami

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac risk assessment prior to kidney and liver transplantation is controversial. Given the paucity of available organs, selecting appropriate recipients with favorable short- and long-term cardiovascular risk profile is crucial. Using noninvasive cardiac imaging tools to guide cardiovascular risk assessment and management can also be challenging and controversial. In this article, we address the burden of coronary artery disease among kidney and liver transplant candidates and review the literature pertaining to the diagnostic accuracy and the prognostic value of noninvasive cardiac imaging techniques in this population.

  15. Polycaprolactone nanowire surfaces as interfaces for cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczak, Victoria

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading killer of people worldwide. Current treatments include organ transplants, surgery, metabolic products and mechanical/synthetic implants. Of these, mechanical and synthetic implants are the most promising. However, rejection of cardiovascular implants continues to be a problem, eliciting a need for understanding the mechanisms behind tissue-material interaction. Recently, bioartificial implants, consisting of synthetic tissue engineering scaffolds and cells, have shown great promise for cardiovascular repair. An ideal cardiovascular implant surface must be capable of adhering cells and providing appropriate physiological responses while the native tissue integrates with the scaffold. However, the success of these implants is not only dependent on tissue integration but also hemocompatibility (interaction of material with blood components), a property that depends on the surface of the material. A thorough understanding of the interaction of cardiovascular cells and whole blood and its components with the material surface is essential in order to have a successful application which promotes healing as well as native tissue integration and regeneration. The purpose of this research is to study polymeric nanowire surfaces as potential interfaces for cardiovascular applications by investigating cellular response as well as hemocompatibility.

  16. Cardiovascular modeling and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a novel approach to modeling and diagnosing the cardiovascular system is introduced. A model exhibits a subset of the dynamics of the cardiovascular behavior of an individual by using a recurrent artificial neural network. Potentially, a model will be incorporated into a cardiovascular diagnostic system. This approach is unique in that each cardiovascular model is developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled variables and the variables of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis. This approach also exploits sensor fusion to optimize the utilization of biomedical sensors. The advantage of sensor fusion has been demonstrated in applications including control and diagnostics of mechanical and chemical processes.

  17. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  18. Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Christof; Klose, Kristin; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    Regenerative medicine encompasses "tissue engineering" - the in vitro fabrication of tissues and/or organs using scaffold material and viable cells - and "cell therapy" - the transplantation or manipulation of cells in diseased tissue in vivo. In the cardiovascular system, tissue engineering strategies are being pursued for the development of viable replacement blood vessels, heart valves, patch material, cardiac pacemakers and contractile myocardium. Anecdotal clinical applications of such vessels, valves and patches have been described, but information on systematic studies of the performance of such implants is not available, yet. Cell therapy for cardiovascular regeneration, however, has been performed in large series of patients, and numerous clinical studies have produced sometimes conflicting results. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical experience with cell therapy for diseases of the cardiovascular system, and to analyse possible factors that may influence its outcome.

  19. Rodent Studies of Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoukas, Artin A.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in blood pressure can occur for two reasons: 1) A decrease in cardiac output resulting from the altered contractility of the heart or through changes in venous filling pressure via the Frank Starling mechanism or; 2) A change in systemic vascular resistance. The observed changes in cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight cannot be entirely explained through changes in contractility or heart rate alone. Therefore, alterations in filling pressure mediated through changes in systemic venous capacitance and arterial resistance function may be important determinants of cardiac output and blood pressure after long term space flight. Our laboratory and previous studies have shown the importance of veno-constriction mediated by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system on overall circulatory homeostasis and in the regulation of cardiac output. Our proposed experiments test the overall hypothesis that alterations in venous capacitance function and arterial resistance by the carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex system are an important determinant of the cardiac output and blood pressure response seen in astronauts after returning to earth from long term exposure to microgravity. This hypothesis is important to our overall understanding of circulatory adjustments made during long term space flight. It also provides a framework for investigating counter measures to reduce the incidence of orthostatic hypotension caused by an attenuation of cardiac output. We continue to use hind limb unweighted (HLU) rat model to simulate the patho physiological effects as they relate to cardiovascular deconditioning in microgravity. We have used this model to address the hypothesis that microgravity induced cardiovascular deconditioning results in impaired vascular responses and that these impaired vascular responses result from abnormal alpha-1 AR signaling. The impaired vascular reactivity results in attenuated blood pressure and cardiac output responses to an

  20. Trending Cardiovascular Nutrition Controversies.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Andrew M; Morris, Pamela B; Barnard, Neal; Esselstyn, Caldwell B; Ros, Emilio; Agatston, Arthur; Devries, Stephen; O'Keefe, James; Miller, Michael; Ornish, Dean; Williams, Kim; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2017-03-07

    The potential cardiovascular benefits of several trending foods and dietary patterns are still incompletely understood, and nutritional science continues to evolve. However, in the meantime, a number of controversial dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have received significant media exposure and are mired by hype. This review addresses some of the more popular foods and dietary patterns that are promoted for cardiovascular health to provide clinicians with accurate information for patient discussions in the clinical setting.

  1. Violence and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira F.; Sapra, Katherine J.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Context Violence, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, has been associated with physical health outcomes including cardiovascular disease. However, the consistency of the existing literature has not been evaluated. Evidence acquisition In 2013, the authors conducted a PubMed and Web of Science review of peer reviewed articles published prior to August 2013 on the relation between violence exposure, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, and cardiovascular outcomes. To meet inclusion criteria, articles had to present estimates for the relation between violence exposure and cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, blood pressure, stroke, coronary disease, or myocardial infarction) adjusted for demographic factors. Articles focusing on violence from TV, video games, natural disasters, terrorism, or war were excluded. Evidence synthesis The initial search yielded 2,273 articles; after removing duplicates and applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 articles were selected for review. A consistent positive relation was noted on the association between violence experienced during childhood and cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood (i.e., hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction). Associations across genders with varying types of violence exposure were also noted. By contrast, findings were mixed on the relation between adult violence exposure and cardiovascular outcome. Conclusions Despite varying definitions of violence exposure and cardiovascular endpoints, a consistent relation exists between childhood violence exposure, largely assessed retrospectively, and cardiovascular endpoints. Findings are mixed for the adult violence–cardiovascular health relation. The cross-sectional nature of most adult studies and the reliance of self-reported outcomes can potentially be attributed to the lack of findings among adult violence exposure studies. PMID:25599905

  2. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  3. [Vitamin D and cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Otto

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is without any doubt multifactorial, and it is generally accepted, that conventional risk factors determined only about 80% of cardiovascular risk. There is accumulating evidence that vitamin D exerts important pathophysiological effects on cardiovascular system. Low vitamin D was associated with increased cardiovascular risk in several reports. This review summarizes recent epidemiological evidence and possible pathophysiological mechanism for a role of low vitamin D in cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, available data concerning vitamin D supplementation are depicted.

  4. ADMA, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Wolzt, Michael; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2008-12-15

    The endogenous competitive nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an emerging risk marker for future cardiovascular events. Elevated ADMA concentrations have been described in patients with an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Recently, various studies investigated the independent role of ADMA as a cardiovascular risk predictor in several patient cohorts. In addition, ADMA might not only be a risk marker but also a causative factor for cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the literature on the relationship between ADMA, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

  5. Intestinal and multivisceral transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Sérgio Paiva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; de Almeida, Samira Scalso; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation has shown exceptional growth over the past 10 years. At the end of the 1990’s, intestinal transplantation moved out of the experimental realm to become a routine practice in treating patients with severe complications related to total parenteral nutrition and intestinal failure. In the last years, several centers reported an increasing improvement in survival outcomes (about 80%), during the first 12 months after surgery, but long-term survival is still a challenge. Several advances led to clinical application of transplants. Immunosuppression involved in intestinal and multivisceral transplantation was the biggest gain for this procedure in the past decade due to tacrolimus, and new inducing drugs, mono- and polyclonal anti-lymphocyte antibodies. Despite the advancement of rigid immunosuppression protocols, rejection is still very frequent in the first 12 months, and can result in long-term graft loss. The future of intestinal transplantation and multivisceral transplantation appears promising. The major challenge is early recognition of acute rejection in order to prevent graft loss, opportunistic infections associated to complications, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease and graft versus host disease; and consequently, improve results in the long run. PMID:25993080

  6. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  7. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension. PMID:27652829

  8. A Descriptive Analysis of 1251 Solid Organ Transplant Visits to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Unterman, Sarah; Zimmerman, Michael; Tyo, Carissa; Sterk, Ethan; Gehm, Lisa; Edison, Marcia; Benedetti, Enrico; Orsay, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background As solid organ transplants become more common, recipients present more frequently to the emergency department (ED) for care. Methods We performed a retrospective medical record review of ED visits of all patients who received an organ transplant at our medical center from 2000–2004, and included all visits following the patients’ transplant surgery through December 2005 or until failed graft, lost to follow up, or death. Clinically relevant demographic variables, confounding and outcome variables were recorded. Kidney, liver and combined kidney with other organ transplant recipients were included. Results Five hundred ninety-three patients received kidney (395), liver (161), or combined renal (37) organ transplants during the study period, resulting in 1,251 ED visits. This represents 3.15 ED visits/patient followed over a mean of 30.8 months. Abdominal pain/gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (31.3%) and infectious complaints (16.7%) were the most common presentations. The most common ED discharge diagnoses were fever/infection (36%), GI/Genitourinary (GU) pathology (20.4%) and dehydration (15%). Renal transplant recipients were diagnosed with infectious processes most often, despite time elapsed from transplant. Liver transplant patients had diagnoses of fever/infection most often in their first 30 days post transplant. Thereafter they were more likely to develop GI/GU pathology. After the first year of transplantation, cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal pathology become more common in all transplant organ groups. Of the 1,251 ED visits, 762 (60.9%) resulted in hospitalization. Chief complaints of abdominal pain/GI symptoms, infectious complaints, cardiovascular and neurologic symptoms, and abnormal laboratory studies were significantly likely to result in hospitalization. Conclusions This study demonstrates a significant utilization of the ED by transplant recipients, presenting with a wide variety of symptoms and diagnoses, and with a high

  9. Patient selection for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Aye, Lydia; Martin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Improved outcomes in liver transplant recipients reflect advances in surgical technique, post-operative care, immunosuppression as well as better selection of potential candidates. The pre-transplant evaluation is a multidisciplinary process intended to recognize and treat important comorbid conditions that may impair outcomes during the peri- and post-transplant periods. Important psychosocial issues should also be ascertained and tackled early during the pre-transplant evaluation with an overarching intention to improve the success of liver transplantation.

  10. [Infections after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kern, W V; Wagner, D; Hirsch, H H

    2005-06-01

    Early postoperative infections after transplantation vary according to the transplanted organ. During the subsequent course opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus reactivation, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, invasive pneumococcal infection and mould infections predominate. Reactivated tuberculous infection appears to become more prevalent. Some of the opportunistic infections are preventable by chemoprophylaxis; others can be managed very effectively by monitoring and early preemptive therapy. Physicians caring for patients after organ transplantation need to early consider in the differential diagnosis rare pathogens which are often overlooked with standard diagnostic procedures.

  11. [Chronic transplant nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Campistol Plana, J M

    2008-01-01

    In 2007 there were important scientific contributions in the field of kidney transplant and specifically in chronic transplant nephropathy (interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy). A new nomenclature and classification of chronic kidney disease was probably the most important contribution in this entity. Use of the C4d stain has allowed the concepts of glomerulopathy to be updated and to reveal the frequency of this entity and its impact in kidney transplant. Finally, two experimental studies provide new perspectives on the treatment of chronic kidney disease such as the use of statins or the use of pyridoxamine to block glycation end products.

  12. Islet transplantation: immunological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Inverardi, Luca; Kenyon, Norma S; Ricordi, Camillo

    2003-10-01

    Clinical trials of islet transplantation are showing remarkable success, but they require administration of chronic immunosuppression, and are underscoring the large gap that exists between the number of human donors available and the number of patients that could benefit from the procedure. Recent progress has been made in the definition of key immunological mechanisms that are involved in determining islet transplant outcome. Clinical and preclinical studies, and studies in small animal model systems, will all eventually contribute to the definition of efficient and safe protocols for islet transplantation. If the use of xenografts is successful, it might represent a solution to the shortage of human organs.

  13. Kidney Transplant in a 26-Year-Old Nigerian Patient with Sickle Cell Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, U. H.; Wachukwu, C.; Emem-Chioma, P.; Wokoma, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is a common complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It has variable presentation, ranging from hyposthenuria to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Management of ESRD in SCD patients is froth with multiple challenges which has potential to impact negatively the outcome of the patient. Kidney transplant is the preferred renal replacement therapy in these patients. The objective of this case study is to report kidney transplant in a Nigerian young man with sickle cell nephropathy and to highlight the outcome and the challenges to kidney transplant in this patient. The index case is a 26-years-old sickle cell disease patient with ESRD complicated with cardiovascular, pulmonary, immunological, and infective challenges. These conditions were controlled, and the patient had a successful live-related kidney transplant. Kidney transplant is a viable option for sickle cell disease patients with ESRD. PMID:24555134

  14. The Evaluation and Therapeutic Management of Hypertension in the Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Beje; Weir, Matthew R

    2015-11-01

    Organ transplantation is the therapeutic option of choice in the appropriate patient with end-organ disease. A major comorbidity after the transplant is the development of hypertension which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in this population even when there is a functioning graft. It is essential to evaluate post-transplant hypertension not only in the office setting but at home and at night as well. Hence, the use of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in both diagnosis and long-term care of this patient population is paramount. Factors involved in uncontrolled hypertension include the donor, recipient, and those specific to the transplant such as immunosuppressive drug exposure. The major offending immunosuppressive agents belong to the calcineurin inhibitor class. The therapy of post-transplant hypertension involves pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions that should be tailored to the specific patient and type of transplant. There is clearly a need for more definitive data and quality studies in both the renal and non-renal transplant populations.

  15. Kidney Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Start Here Kidney Transplant (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Kidney Transplant (National Kidney Foundation) Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation (National Institute of Diabetes ...

  16. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  17. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2013-07-27

    Nephrotic-range proteinuria has been known for years to be associated with poor renal outcome. Newer evidence indicates that early (1-3 months after transplantation) low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria (1) provide information on the graft in terms of donor characteristics and ischemia/reperfusion injury, (2) may occur before the development of donor-specific antibodies, (3) predict the development of diabetes and cardiovascular events, and (4) are associated with reduced long-term graft and patient survivals. Low-grade proteinuria and microalbuminuria are also predictive of diabetes, cardiovascular morbidity, and death in nontransplanted populations, which may help us to understand the pathophysiology of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria in renal transplantation. The impact of immunosuppressive medications, including mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, on graft survival is still discussed, and the effect on proteinuria is crucial to the debate. The fact that chronic allograft rejection may exist as early as 3 months after renal transplantation indicates that optimal management of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria should occur very early after transplantation to improve long-term renal function and the overall outcome of renal transplant recipients. The presence of low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria early after transplantation must be taken into account to choose adequate immunosuppressive and antihypertensive medications. Limited information exists regarding the benefit of therapeutic interventions to reduce low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria. Whether renin angiotensin blockade results in optimal nephroprotection in patients with low-grade proteinuria or microalbuminuria is not proven, especially in the absence of chronic allograft nephropathy. Observational studies and randomized clinical trials yield conflicting results. Finally, randomized clinical trials are urgently needed.

  18. Nutrition and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Berciano, Silvia; Ordovás, José M

    2014-09-01

    A multitude of studies have been published on the relationship between cardiovascular disease risk and a variety of nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns. Despite the well-accepted notion that diet has a significant influence on the development and prevention of cardiovascular disease, the foods considered healthy and harmful have varied over the years. This review aims to summarize the current scientific evidence on the cardioprotective effect of those foods and nutrients that have been considered healthy as well as those that have been deemed unhealthy at any given time in history. For this purpose, we reviewed the most recent literature using as keywords foods and nutrients (ie, meat, omega-3) and cardiovascular disease-related terms (ie, cardiovascular diseases, stroke). Emphasis has been placed on meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. In general, there is a paucity of intervention studies with a high level of evidence supporting the benefits of healthy foods (ie, fruits and vegetables), whereas the evidence supporting the case against those foods considered less healthy (ie, saturated fat) seems to be weakened by most recent evidence. In summary, most of the evidence supporting the benefits and harms of specific foods and nutrients is based on observational epidemiological studies. The outcome of randomized clinical trials reveals a more confusing picture with most studies providing very small effects in one direction or another; the strongest evidence comes from dietary patterns. The current status of the relationship between diet and cardiovascular disease risk calls for more tailored recommendations based on genomic technologies.

  19. Regulatory T cells: first steps of clinical application in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    van der Net, Jeroen B; Bushell, Andrew; Wood, Kathryn J; Harden, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ failure. To prevent rejection of the transplanted organ continuous treatment with immunosuppressive medication is needed. Immunosuppression may be harmful to the transplant recipient, increasing the risk of cancer, infections and cardiovascular disease. To improve transplant and patient survival, there is a need for an immune-modulatory regimen that is not only potent in preventing rejection of the transplanted organ, but has less side effects compared to current immunosuppressive regimens. Increasingly, transplantation research focusses on regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy to achieve this aim, in which Treg are used as a strategy to allow reduction of immunosuppression. Currently, the first clinical trials are underway investigating the safety and feasibility of Treg therapy in renal transplantation. This review gives an overview of the rationale of using Treg therapy in transplantation, previous experience with Treg therapy in humans, and the expected safety, potential efficacy and cost-effectiveness of Treg therapy in solid organ transplantation.

  20. Effects of Cigarette Smoking on Transplant Survival: Extending or Shortening It?

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feifei; Fan, Ping; Nie, Golay D.; Liu, Huazhen; Liang, Chun-Ling; Yu, Wanlin; Dai, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) regulates both innate and adaptive immunity and causes numerous diseases, including cardiovascular, respiratory, and autoimmune diseases, allergies, cancers, and transplant rejection. Therefore, smoking poses a serious challenge to the healthcare system worldwide. Epidemiological studies have always shown that CS is one of the major risk factors for transplant rejection, even though smoking plays redundant roles in regulating immune responses. The complex roles for smoking in immunoregulation are likely due to molecular and functional diversities of cigarette smoke components, including carbon monoxide (CO) and nicotine. Especially, CO has been shown to induce immune tolerance. Although CS has been shown to impact transplantation by causing complications and subsequent rejection, it is overlooked whether CS interferes with transplant tolerance. We have previously demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure reverses long-term allograft survival induced by costimulatory blockade. Given that CS impacts both adaptive and innate immunity and that it hinders long-term transplant survival, our perspective is that CS impacts transplant tolerance. Here, we review impacts of CS on major immune cells that are critical for transplant outcomes and propose the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on alloimmunity and transplant survival. Further investigations are warranted to fully understand why CS exerts deleterious rather than beneficial effects on transplant survival even if some of its components are immunosuppressive. PMID:28239383

  1. Results of renal re-transplant in Spain (1990–2002)

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Luis; Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Andrés, Amado; Rengel, Manuel; Escuin, Fernando; Ortega, Francisco; Romero, Rafael; Díaz, Joan M.; Beneyto, Isabel; Morales, José Mariá

    2010-01-01

    Background. Renal re-transplants are increasing in number, due to many first renal transplant patients coming back to dialysis treatment. There are controversial opinions about the evolution of these re-transplanted patients. The aim of our study is to analyse the prognosis of patients and grafts under a renal re-transplant. Methods. This was a retrospective study of 579 renal re-transplants realized in 15 Spanish different centres in the years 1990, 1994, 1998 and 2002 including all renal re-transplants realized in the above-mentioned centres during the same periods. Results. During the follow-up period, 8.81% of patients died. The actuarial patient survival was 85% at 10 years and 80% at 15 years. Principal reasons of death were the same as normal for the renal transplanted patient: cardiovascular (30.77%), infectious (13.46%) and neoplastic (13.46%). During the period of follow-up, 28.6% of the grafts were lost. The actuarial graft survival was 75% at 10 years and 58% at 15 years. Causes of graft loss are very similar to those described in literature. Conclusion. Renal re-transplant is a kind of substitute renal treatment with excellent clinical results that allow to take it as a first-order modality of treatment when the first renal transplant has failed. PMID:20508863

  2. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration. PMID:27302713

  3. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Cheol

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration.

  4. Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation: A Global Initiative to Develop a Core Outcome Set for Trials in Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Allison; Budde, Klemens; Gill, John; Josephson, Michelle A.; Marson, Lorna; Pruett, Timothy L.; Reese, Peter P.; Rosenbloom, David; Rostaing, Lionel; Warrens, Anthony N.; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C.; Crowe, Sally; Harris, Tess; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden; Tugwell, Peter; Van Biesen, Wim; Wheeler, David C.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Evangelidis, Nicole; Sautenet, Benedicte; Howell, Martin; Chapman, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although advances in treatment have dramatically improved short-term graft survival and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients, long-term graft outcomes have not substantially improved. Transplant recipients also have a considerably increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infection, which all contribute to appreciable morbidity and premature mortality. Many trials in kidney transplantation are short-term, frequently use unvalidated surrogate endpoints, outcomes of uncertain relevance to patients and clinicians, and do not consistently measure and report key outcomes like death, graft loss, graft function, and adverse effects of therapy. This diminishes the value of trials in supporting treatment decisions that require individual-level multiple tradeoffs between graft survival and the risk of side effects, adverse events, and mortality. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Transplantation initiative aims to develop a core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation that is based on the shared priorities of all stakeholders. Methods This will include a systematic review to identify outcomes reported in randomized trials, a Delphi survey with an international multistakeholder panel (patients, caregivers, clinicians, researchers, policy makers, members from industry) to develop a consensus-based prioritized list of outcome domains and a consensus workshop to review and finalize the core outcome set for trials in kidney transplantation. Conclusions Developing and implementing a core outcome set to be reported, at a minimum, in all kidney transplantation trials will improve the transparency, quality, and relevance of research; to enable kidney transplant recipients and their clinicians to make better-informed treatment decisions for improved patient outcomes. PMID:27500269

  5. Survey of Canadian Kidney Transplant Specialists on the Management of Morbid Obesity and the Transplant Waiting List

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gabriel; Soucisse, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with increased surgical complications and long-term cardiovascular mortality. Studies of access in kidney transplantation have found a bias against obese patients on the wait-listing. Objective: To determine the current state of clinical practice for the management of obesity in kidney transplantation. Design: A survey in two versions, PDF and traditional paper, composed of categorical questions. Setting: A pan-Canadian survey of transplant nephrologists and surgeons. Methods: The survey PDF was distributed electronically to the Kidney Group of the Canadian Society of Transplantation. A shorter, hardcopy version was distributed subsequently at a national transplant meeting. Results: There were 47 responses, including almost every Canadian adult transplant program. Most (81%) reported the use of a body mass index limit for access to the waiting list. However, only 40% reported a strict enforcement. There were several instances of intra-hospital disagreements regarding the use of a policy, among the centers with multiple responses. The body mass index limit was most commonly 40 kg/m2 (62%), followed by 35 kg/m2 (36%). Despite the body mass index limit, few centers (30%) reported having a weight management program. The reported experience with bariatric surgery was small, though nearly all replied that they would refer to a bariatric specialist in the future. Limitations: This national survey provides a broad assessment of clinical practice. The distinction between an official policy and informal clinical tendencies is difficult. The results cannot be used to support any specific limit or policy. Conclusions: This survey found that the body mass index limit for access to the kidney transplant waiting list was common in Canada. Several inconsistencies suggest a lack of official policy. To achieve equity in access, clear guidelines for obesity should be established and enforced. Bariatric surgery has the promise of rapid weight loss

  6. Obstetric and neonatal outcome of pregnancies fathered by males on immunosuppression after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morken, N-H; Diaz-Garcia, C; Reisaeter, A V; Foss, A; Leivestad, T; Geiran, O; Hervás, D; Brännström, M

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs may influence spermatogenesis, but little is known about outcome of pregnancies fathered by transplanted males. We estimated risk of adverse outcomes in pregnancies (with data after the first trimester) fathered by males that had undergone organ transplantation and were treated with immunosuppression. A population-based study, linking data from the Norwegian transplant registry and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway during 1967-2009 was designed. All Norwegian men undergoing solid organ transplantation were included. Odds ratios for major malformations, preeclampsia, preterm delivery (<37 weeks) and small-for-gestational-age were obtained using logistic regression. A total of 2463 transplanted males, fathering babies of 4614 deliveries before and 474 deliveries after transplantation were identified. The risk of preeclampsia was increased (AOR: 7.4, 95% CI: 1.1-51.4,) after transplantation compared to prior to transplantation. No increased risk was found for congenital malformations or other outcomes when compared with pregnancies before transplantation or with the general population (2 511 506 births). Our results indicate an increased risk of preeclampsia mediated through the transplanted and immunosuppressed father. Importantly, no increased risk was found for other adverse obstetric outcomes or malformations, which may reassure male transplant recipients planning to father children.

  7. Liver transplantation: Current status and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C; Taner, Timucin

    2016-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the field of liver transplantation over the past two decades. This progress, however, also brings up the next set of challenges: First, organ shortage remains a major limitation, and accounts for a large proportion of wait list mortality. While living donation has successfully increased the total number of liver transplants done in Asian countries, the total number of such transplants has been stagnant in the western hemisphere. As such, there has been a significant effort over the past decade to increase the existing deceased donor pool. This effort has resulted in a greater use of liver allografts following donation after cardiac death (DCD) along with marginal and extended criteria donors. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of liver allografts procured after circulatory arrest has not only resulted in better selection and management of DCD donors, but has also helped in the development of mechanical perfusion strategies. Early outcomes demonstrating the clinical applicability of both hypothermic and normothermic perfusion and its potential to impact patient survival and allograft function have generated much interest. Second, long-term outcomes of liver transplant recipients have not improved significantly, as recipients continue to succumb to complications of long-term immunosuppression, such as infection, malignancy and renal failure. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that chronic immune-mediated injury to the liver may also impact graft function. PMID:27182155

  8. Graft vasculopathy in clinical hand transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, C L; Ouseph, R; Blair, B; Kutz, J E; Tsai, T M; Scheker, L R; Tien, H Y; Moreno, R; Ozyurekoglu, T; Banegas, R; Murphy, E; Burns, C B; Zaring, R; Cook, D F; Marvin, M R

    2012-04-01

    Allogeneic hand transplantation is now a clinical reality. While results have been encouraging, acute rejection rates are higher than in their solid-organ counterparts. In contrast, chronic rejections, as defined by vasculopathy and/or fibrosis and atrophy of skin and other tissues, as well as antibody mediated rejection, have not been reported in a compliant hand transplant recipient. Monitoring vascularized composite allograft (VCA) hand recipients for rejection has routinely involved punch skin biopsies, vascular imaging and graft appearance. Our program, which has transplanted a total of 6 hand recipients, has experience which challenges these precepts. We present evidence that the vessels, both arteries and veins may also be a primary target of rejection in the hand. Two of our recipients developed severe intimal hyperplasia and vasculopathy early post-transplant. An analysis of events and our four other patients has shown that the standard techniques used for surveillance of rejection (i.e. punch skin biopsies, DSA and conventional vascular imaging studies) are inadequate for detecting the early stages of vasculopathy. In response, we have initiated studies using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to evaluate the vessel wall thickness. These findings suggest that vasculopathy should be a focus of frequent monitoring in VCA of the hand.

  9. Transplantable liver production plan

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Organ grafts developed in the xenogeneic pig scaffold are expected to resolve most issues of donor safety and ethical concerns about living-donor liver transplantation in Japan. We have been working on so-called “Yamaton” projects to develop transplantable organs using genetically engineered pigs. Our goal is to produce chimeric livers with human parenchyma in such pigs. The Yamaton-Liver project demonstrated the proof of concept by showing that rat–mouse chimeric livers could develop in mice and be successfully transplanted into syngeneic or allogeneic rats. Under conventional immunosuppression, the transplanted livers showed long-term function and protection against rejection. Because chimeric liver grafts have xenogeneic components, additional strategies, such as humanization of pig genes, induction of hematopoietic chimeras in donors, and replacement of pig endothelial cells with human ones, might be required in clinical use. Our projects still need to overcome various hurdles but can bring huge benefits to patients in the future. PMID:23896578

  10. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  11. Experimental uterus transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Liza; Enskog, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Today, most causes of infertility are successfully treated. Yet there is still a subgroup of female infertility affecting around 4%, which so far is untreatable because of an absolute uterine factor. To acquire motherhood, these women are today referred to either adoption or surrogacy. Research in the field of uterus transplantation has been evaluated in different animal models for decades and has presently reached a human clinical application as a possible treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. Organ transplantation is no longer reserved to those with a life-threatening disease and neither is organ transplantation together with concurrent immunosuppression prohibiting pregnancy. Uterus transplantation involves four parties - recipient, donor, partner of recipient and future child - and is a subject of ethical controversies.

  12. Art, surgery and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Roy Calne (1930-) has elegantly cultivated the science and art of transplantation. Throughout his medical and artistic career his eyes have remained fully open not only to science and scientific advances but to any new developments that would enhance his art of painting as applied to his patients, colleagues, events and surgical operations related to transplantation. Calne contributed to and developed a new field through art in the understanding of the lives of his patients, the working of his colleagues and the application of surgical principles to the specialty in which he labours, surgical transplantation. The application of "Art, Surgery and Transplantation" should in many ways be the fountain of information and support for those seeking this way of therapy.

  13. Textbooks, Transitions, and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Leroy G.; Passi, Sneh Lata

    1972-01-01

    Three popular textbooks were analyzed for level of cognitive processes used, and implications were drawn regarding supplementary activities if the English primary school model is to be transplanted" in America. (MM)

  14. After the Transplant: Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risks Cancer Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Medications After transplants, the focus for patients transitions from ... a donor organ to learning how to manage medications and their side effects as part of daily ...

  15. Talking about Kidney Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan; Swift, Julia

    1990-01-01

    Described is a project in which information about the moral issues surrounding tissue transplants was obtained and videotaped for classroom use. Moral positions and possible educational strategies are discussed. Examples of student statements are presented. (CW)

  16. Liver transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100090.htm Liver transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The liver is in the right upper abdomen. The liver ...

  17. After the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Groups Patient Resources Newsroom Minorities AFTER THE TRANSPLANT Medications Staying Healthy Recovery Resources Lifestyle Changes Pregnancy Cancer PEDIATRIC Addressing Children's Needs Coping With Anxiety Helping Your Child Adjust Camps Resources LIVING DONATION ...

  18. Before the Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Groups Patient Resources Newsroom Minorities AFTER THE TRANSPLANT Medications Staying Healthy Recovery Resources Lifestyle Changes Pregnancy Cancer PEDIATRIC Addressing Children's Needs Coping With Anxiety Helping Your Child Adjust Camps Resources LIVING DONATION ...

  19. Kidney transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100087.htm Kidney transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  20. Heart transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100086.htm Heart transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  1. Corneal transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100082.htm Corneal transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  2. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-12-01

    Soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity at both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3 ¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3 ¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.

  3. The Evolving Roles of Memory Immune Cells in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C

    2015-10-01

    Memory cells are the products of immune responses but also exert significant impact on subsequent immunity and immune tolerance, thus placing them in a unique position in transplant research. Memory cells are heterogeneous, including not only memory T cells but also memory B cells and innate memory cells. Memory cells are a critical component of protective immunity against invading pathogens, especially in immunosuppressed patients, but they also mediate graft loss and tolerance resistance. Recent studies suggest that some memory cells unexpectedly act as regulatory cells, promoting rather than hindering transplant survival. This functional diversity makes therapeutic targeting of memory cells a challenging task in transplantation. In this article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of memory cells, focusing on diversity of memory cells and mechanisms involved in their induction and functions. We also provide a broad overview on the challenges and opportunities in targeting memory cells in the induction of transplant tolerance.

  4. Isoagglutinin adsorption in ABO-incompatible transplantation.

    PubMed

    Genberg, Helena; Kumlien, Gunilla; Wennberg, Lars; Tydén, Gunnar

    2010-10-01

    As the demand for kidney transplantation is constantly growing methods to expand the donor pool have become increasingly important. ABO-incompatibility has hitherto been regarded as an absolute contraindication to living donor donation. However, as ABO-incompatibility has accounted for the majority of living donor exclusions, efforts have been made to overcome this immunologic barrier. Successful desensitization protocols thus far, have combined plasmapheresis for antibody removal with splenectomy to reduce the antibody producing B-cell pool, in addition to quadruple immunosuppression. Although good graft function has been achieved, the high risks involved have been deterrent. We have developed a protocol for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation based on antigen-specific immunoadsorption and rituximab, in combination with standard maintenance immunosuppression (tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids). We hypothesized that the anti-A/B antibodies could be effectively eliminated and good graft function achieved, without the complications of coagulopathy and transfusion reactions associated with plasmapheresis. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the substitution of splenectomy with a single dose of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab would further reduce surgical risk as well as the risk of infectious complications. In 2001 the program for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation was started at our center. To date 50 ABO-incompatible kidney transplantations have been performed according to the protocol based on antigen-specific immunoadsorption and rituximab. Safety and efficacy of the protocol has been evaluated in several studies, all showing that the antigen-specific immunoadsorption is well tolerated and without any serious side effects. Patient and graft survival as well as kidney function have been comparable to that of ABO-compatible living donor kidney transplantation and the incidence of antibody-mediated rejection 0%. We conclude that AB0

  5. Pregnancy and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; McKay, Dianne B

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of experience with child bearing in women with kidney transplants, these pregnancies remain high risk with an increased prevalence of hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Infertility, common in women with end-stage renal disease, is rapidly restored after transplant although pregnancy rates appear lower in transplant recipients than the general public. Many unanswered questions exist, some old questions such as what is the optimal timing of pregnancy after transplant, whether breast feeding is safe, the long-term impact if any on the offspring, and whether pregnancy negatively affects the kidney graft; and some new questions such as whether to modify immunosuppression in a patient taking a mycophenolic acid-containing drug, whether kidney donation has a deleterious impact on future pregnancies, whether to use erythropoietin-stimulating agents, and the role of BK virus. Counseling about contraception and pregnancy after transplant should be initiated during the pretransplant evaluation process. It is important because of the rapid restoration of fertility that occurs after transplant as well as the many risks and unanswered questions that remain.

  6. Frailty and Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Exterkate, Leonie; Slegtenhorst, Bendix R; Kelm, Matthias; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M; Quante, Markus; Uehara, Hirofumi; El Khal, Abdala; Tullius, Stefan G

    2016-04-01

    Consequences of aging are gaining clinical relevance. In transplantation, aging and immunosenescence impact treatment and outcomes. The impact of aging, however, will critically depend on distinguishing healthy, chronological aging from biological aging that may result into frailty. Approximately 15% of individuals older than 65 years are frail, and it is expected that this condition will gain more clinical relevance with an expected increase to greater than 20% over the next 5 years. Clearly, frailty impacts various general aspects of health care and organ transplantation in particular including patient selection, waitlist management and treatment after transplantation. In general, frailty has been characterized by a compromised physiological reserve and an augmented vulnerability. In comparison to healthy aging, inflammatory markers and cytokines are increased in frail older adults. Thus, modifications of the immune response, in addition to physical limitations and changes of metabolism, are likely to impact outcomes after transplantation. Here, we provide a risk assessment of frailty at the time of transplant evaluation and review effects on outcomes and recovery after transplantation. Moreover, we summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology of frailty and consequences on immune responses and metabolism.

  7. Umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hong Hoe; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2012-07-01

    Since the first umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) in 1998, cord blood (CB) has now become one of the most commonly used sources of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation. CBT has advantages of easy procurement, no risk to donor, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability and immune tolerance allowing successful transplantation despite human leukocyte antigen disparity. Several studies have shown that the number of cells transplanted is the most important factor for engraftment in CBT, and it limits the wide use of CB in adult patients. New strategies for facilitating engraftment and reducing transplantation-related mortality are ongoing in the field of CBT and include the use of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, double-unit CBT, ex vivo expansion of CB, and co-transplantation of CB and mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, the results of two international studies with large sample sizes showed that CB is an acceptable alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for adult recipients who lack human leukocyte antigen-matched adult donors. Along with the intensive researches, development in banking process of CB will amplify the use of CB and offer the chance for cure in more patients.

  8. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  9. Cardiovascular adaptation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Richard; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-01-01

    Millions of athletes train for and participate in competitive athletics each year. Many of these athletes will present to a cardiovascular specialist with signs or symptoms that might indicate heart disease and these athletes/patients will ask for advice on their ability to continue to train and compete safely. By virtue of their training, athletes׳ hearts may undergo significant structural and electrical change, presenting a special challenge for the cardiovascular specialist. It is important to understand normal adaptive changes in order to separate normal physiology from pathology.

  10. [Sugar and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Gómez Morales, Luis; Beltrán Romero, Luis Matías; García Puig, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the Spanish population and may be a relationship between the prevalence of these and excessive sugar consumption. In recent years, researchers have focused on the properties of these nutrients. Although there are many studies examining this association, the results are not unanimous. In any case there is sufficient basis for designing public health strategies in order to reduce the consumption of sugary drinks as part of a healthy lifestyle. Therefore, the question we address is: sugar intake in abundant amounts, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease? We use as the focus of the discussion SAFO analysis model.

  11. Myeloperoxidase and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2005-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a leukocyte-derived enzyme that catalyzes the formation of a number of reactive oxidant species. In addition to being an integral component of the innate immune response, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage during inflammation. MPO-catalyzed reactions have been attributed to potentially proatherogenic biological activities throughout the evolution of cardiovascular disease, including during initiation, propagation, and acute complication phases of the atherosclerotic process. As a result, MPO and its downstream inflammatory pathways represent attractive targets for both prognostication and therapeutic intervention in the prophylaxis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  12. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  13. Cardiovascular bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bull, Joseph L

    2005-01-01

    Gas bubbles can form in the cardiovascular system as a result of patho-physiological conditions or can be intentionally introduced for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The dynamic behavior of these bubbles is caused by a variety of mechanisms, such as inertia, pressure, interfacial tension, viscosity, and gravity. We review recent advances in the fundamental mechanics and applications of cardiovascular bubbles, including air embolism, ultrasound contrast agents, targeted microbubbles for drug delivery and molecular imaging, cavitation-induced tissue erosion for ultrasonic surgery, microbubble-induced angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, and gas embolotherapy.

  14. Emerging role of neurotensin in regulation of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2015-09-05

    There is increasing evidence in support of an important role played by neurotensin (NT), a tridecapeptide originally found in bovine hypothalamus, in regulation of cardiovascular system. Elevated systemic levels of NT may contribute to pathogenesis of acute circulatory disoders, and predict the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in population-based studies. Within cardiovascular system, NT-containing neural fibers are found in close contact with atrial and ventricular cardiac myocytes, cardiac conduction system, intracardiac ganglia, as well as coronary vessels in humans and various animal species. The density of NT-immunoreactive innervation is reduced in cardiac disease. NT produces a variety of cardiovascular actions including effects on heart rate, myocardial contractility, systemic blood pressure, coronary vascular tone, venous smooth muscle tone, and regional blood flow in gastrointestinal tract, cutaneous and adipose tissue. NT could trigger cardiovascular reflexes by stimulating primary visceral afferents synaptically connected with preganglionic sympathetic neurons at the spinal cord. Structural determinants of biological activity of NT reside primarily in the C-terminal portion of its molecule which is responsible for receptor activation. NT effects are mediated via activation of NT receptors, or produced indirectly via stimulation of release of various endogenous neuromodulators/neurotransmitters such as histamine, catecholamines and prostaglandins. Three subtypes of NT receptor (NTS1, NTS2 and NTS3) have been shown to be expressed in the myocardium. NTS1, a high-affinity NT binding site coupled to phospholipase C-inositoltrisphosphate transduction pathway, is thought to mediate NT-induced cardiovascular responses.

  15. HDL Cholesterol Efflux Predicts Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; Freark de Boer, Jan; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are involved in the protection against cardiovascular disease by promoting cholesterol efflux, in which accumulated cholesterol is removed from macrophage foam cells. We investigated whether HDL cholesterol efflux capacity is associated with cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and graft failure in a cohort of renal transplant recipients (n=495, median follow-up 7.0 years). Cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline was quantified using incubation of human macrophage foam cells with apolipoprotein B–depleted plasma. Baseline efflux capacity was not different in deceased patients and survivors (P=0.60 or P=0.50 for cardiovascular or all-cause mortality, respectively), whereas recipients developing graft failure had lower efflux capacity than those with functioning grafts (P<0.001). Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated a lower risk for graft failure (P=0.004) but not cardiovascular (P=0.30) or all-cause mortality (P=0.31) with increasing gender-stratified tertiles of efflux capacity. Cox regression analyses adjusted for age and gender showed that efflux capacity was not associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.67 to 1.19; P=0.43). Furthermore, the association between efflux capacity and all-cause mortality (HR, .79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.98; P=0.031) disappeared after further adjustment for potential confounders. However, efflux capacity at baseline significantly predicted graft failure (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.64; P<0.001) independent of apolipoprotein A-I, HDL cholesterol, or creatinine clearance. In conclusion, this prospective study shows that cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophage foam cells is not associated with cardiovascular or all-cause mortality but is a strong predictor of graft failure independent of plasma HDL cholesterol levels in renal transplant recipients. PMID:26319244

  16. Renal transplantation in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Najarian, J S; Frey, D J; Matas, A J; Gillingham, K J; So, S S; Cook, M; Chavers, B; Mauer, S M; Nevins, T E

    1990-01-01

    The timing of renal transplantation in infants is controversial. Between 1965 and 1989, 79 transplants in 75 infants less than 2 years old were performed: 23 who were 12 months or younger, 52 who were older than 12 months; 63 donors were living related, 1 was living unrelated, and 15 were cadaver donors; 75 were primary transplants and 4 were retransplants. Infants were considered for transplantation when they were on, or about to begin, dialysis. All had intra-abdominal transplants with arterial anastomosis to the distal aorta. Sixty-four per cent are alive with functioning grafts. The most frequent etiologies of renal failure were hypoplasia (32%) and obstructive uropathy (20%); oxalosis was the etiology in 11%. Since 1983 patient survival has been 95% and 91% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival has been 86% and 73% at 1 and 5 years. For cyclosporine immunosuppressed patients, patient survival is 100% at 1 and 5 years; graft survival is 96% and 82% at 1 and 5 years. There was no difference in outcome between infants who were 12 months or younger versus those who were aged 12 to 24 months; similarly there was no difference between infants and older children. Sixteen (21%) patients died: 5 after operation from coagulopathy (1) and infection (4); and 11 late from postsplenectomy sepsis (4), recurrent oxalosis (3), infection (2), and other causes (2). Routine splenectomy is no longer done. There has not been a death from infection in patients transplanted since 1983. Rejection was the most common cause of graft loss (in 15 patients); other causes included death (with function) (7), recurrent oxalosis (3), and technical complications (3). Overall 52% of patients have not had a rejection episode; mean creatinine level in patients with functioning grafts is 0.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dL. Common postoperative problems include fever, atelectasis, and ileus. At the time of their transplants, the infants were small for age; but with a successful transplant, their growth, head

  17. Transfusion problems associated with transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have reviewed the role of blood transfusions in renal and marrow graft recipients. Striking contrasts are evident: while transfusions may promote successful kidney grafting, any transfusions before initiation of the transplant conditioning regimen may jeopardize the treatment of severe aplastic anemia by marrow transplantation. Researchers have suggested guidelines for the transfusion support of transplant candidates before transplantation and for marrow graft recipients after transplantation. It is important to recognize that after conditioning for marrow transplantation, all patients will be profoundly pancytopenic for a limited period of time, and intensive transfusion support is vital to patient survival.

  18. Soy, soy phytoestrogens and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Thomas B

    2002-03-01

    Dietary soy protein has been shown to have several beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. The best-documented effect is on plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations, with reductions of approximately 10% in LDL cholesterol concentrations (somewhat greater for individuals with high pretreatment LDL cholesterol concentrations) and small increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations. Dietary soy protein improves flow-mediated arterial dilation of postmenopausal women but worsens that of men. Soy isoflavone extracts improve systemic arterial compliance, an indicator of atherosclerosis extent. Complete soy protein but not alcohol-washed soy protein reduces atherosclerosis of postmenopausal monkeys. No definite experimental evidence exists currently to establish that the cardiovascular benefits of soy protein are accounted for by its isoflavones.

  19. Mental stress and human cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray

    2017-03-01

    The London physician and neuroanatomist Thomas Willis in the 17th century correctly attributed the source of emotions to the brain, not the heart as believed in antiquity. Contemporary research documents the phenomenon of "triggered" heart disease, when the autonomic nervous system control of the heart by the brain goes awry, producing heart disease of sudden onset, precipitated by acute emotional upheaval. This can take the form of, variously, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sudden death. Chronic psychological distress also can have adverse cardiovascular consequences, in the causal linkage of depressive illness to heart disease, and in the probable causation of atherosclerosis and hypertension by chronic mental stress. In patients with essential hypertension, stress biomarkers are present. The sympathetic nervous system is the usual mediator between these acute and chronic psychological substrates and cardiovascular disease.

  20. Diagnosis and management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Roy O; Bangalore, Sripal; Lavelle, Michael P; Pellikka, Patricia A; Sidhu, Mandeep S; Boden, William E; Asif, Arif

    2016-12-28

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, likely reflecting the presence of traditional risk factors. A greater distinguishing feature of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in CKD is the severity of the disease, which is reflective of an increase in inflammatory mediators and vascular calcification secondary to hyperparathyroidism of renal origin that are unique to patients with CKD. Additional components of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease that are prominent in patients with CKD include microvascular disease and myocardial fibrosis. Therapeutic interventions that minimize cardiovascular events related to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD, as determined by well-designed clinical trials, are limited to statins. Data are lacking regarding other available therapeutic measures primarily due to exclusion of patients with CKD from major trials studying cardiovascular disease. Data from well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to guide clinicians who care for this high-risk population in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease to improve clinical outcomes.

  1. Dysglycemia after renal transplantation: Definition, pathogenesis, outcomes and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Langsford, David; Dwyer, Karen

    2015-08-25

    New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is major complication following renal transplantation. It commonly develops within 3-6 mo post-transplantation. The development of NODAT is associated with significant increase in risk of major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. Other dysglycemic states, such as impaired glucose tolerance are also associated with increasing risk of cardiovascular events. The pathogenesis of these dysglycemic states is complex. Older recipient age is a consistent major risk factor and the impact of calcineurin inhibitors and glucocorticoids has been well described. Glucocorticoids likely cause insulin resistance and calcineurin inhibitors likely cause β-cell toxicity. The impact of transplantation in incretin hormones remains to be clarified. The oral glucose tolerance test remains the best diagnostic test but other tests may be validated as screening tests. Possibly, NODAT can be prevented by administering insulin early in patients identified as high risk for NODAT. Once NODAT has been diagnosed altering immunosuppression may be acceptable, but creates the difficulty of balancing immunological with metabolic risk. With regard to hypoglycemic use, metformin may be the best option. Further research is needed to better understand the pathogenesis, identify high risk patients and to improve management options given the significant increased risk of major cardiovascular events and death.

  2. Epigenetics and cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), this group of multifactorial disorders remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. CVD is associated with multiple genetic and modifiable risk factors; however, known environmental and genetic influences can only...

  3. Photonics in cardiovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-10-01

    The use of photonics technology is bringing new capabilities and insights to cardiovascular medicine. Intracoronary imaging and sensing, laser ablation and optical pacing are just some of the functions being explored to help diagnose and treat conditions of the heart and arteries.

  4. Pharmacogenetics of cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie A; Humma, Larisa M

    2002-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics is a field aimed at understanding the genetic contribution to inter-patient variability in drug efficacy and toxicity. Treatment of cardiovascular disease is, in most cases, guided by evidence from well-controlled clinical trials. Given the solid scientific basis for the treatment of most cardiovascular diseases, it is common for patients with a given disease to be treated in essentially the same manner. Thus, the clinical trials have been very informative about treating large groups of patients with a given disease, but are slightly less informative about the treatment of individual patients. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics have the potential of taking the information derived from large clinical trials and further refining it to select the drugs with the greatest likelihood for benefit, and least likelihood for harm, in individual patients, based on their genetic make-up. In this paper, the current literature on cardiovascular pharmacogenetics is emphasised, and how the use of pharmacogenetic/pharmacogenomic information may be particularly useful in the future in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases is also highlighted.

  5. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, C. David

    1988-01-01

    Reviews epidemiological studies of cardiovascular diseases especially coronary heart disease (CHD), to document their major public health importance, changes in mortality during this century, and international comparisons of trends. Finds major risk factors for CHD are determined in large part by psychosocial and behavioral mechanisms. Asserts…

  6. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [Cardiovascular prevention: begin young].

    PubMed

    Visseren, Frank L J

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular disease is rare in the young. Nevertheless, the foundations for atherosclerotic disease in later life are laid early by a harmful lifestyle including overweight and smoking. Adolescents who are overweight or have the metabolic syndrome are at increased cardiovascular risk later in life.

  8. Corticosteroid minimization in renal transplantation: Careful patient selection enables feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Vlachopanos, Georgios; Bridson, Julie M; Sharma, Ajay; Halawa, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the benefits and harms of corticosteroid (CS) minimization following renal transplantation. METHODS CS minimization attempts to improve cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia), to enhance growth in children, to ameliorate bone disease and to lead to better compliance with immunosuppressive agents. Nevertheless, any benefit must be carefully weighed against the reduction in net immunosuppression and the potential harm to renal allograft function and survival. RESULTS Complete CS avoidance or very early withdrawal (i.e., no CS after post-transplant day 7) seems to be associated with better outcomes in comparison with later withdrawal. However, an increased incidence of CS-sensitive acute rejection has been observed with all CS minimization strategies. Among the prerequisites for the safe application of CS minimization protocols are the administration of induction immunosuppression and the inclusion of calcineurin inhibitors in maintenance immunosuppression regimens. CONCLUSION Transplant recipients at low immunological risk (primary transplant, low panel reactive antibodies) are thought as optimal candidates for CS minimization. CS avoidance may also be undesirable in patients at risk for glomerulonephritis recurrence or with severe delayed graft function and prolonged cold ischemia time. Thus, CS minimization is not yet ready for implementation in the majority of transplant recipients. PMID:28058228

  9. Antidiabetic therapy in post kidney transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Werzowa, Johannes; Säemann, Marcus; Haidinger, Michael; Krebs, Michael; Hecking, Manfred

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after kidney transplantation that affects up to 40% of kidney transplant recipients. By pathogenesis, PTDM is a diabetes form of its own, and may be characterised by a sudden, drug-induced deficiency in insulin secretion rather than worsening of insulin resistance over time. In the context of deteriorating allograft function leading to a re-occurrence of chronic kidney disease after transplantation, pharmacological interventions in PTDM patients deserve special attention. In the present review, we aim at presenting the current evidence regarding efficacy and safety of the modern antidiabetic armamentarium. Specifically, we focus on incretin-based therapies and insulin treatment, besides metformin and glitazones, and discuss their respective advantages and pitfalls. Although recent pilot trials are available in both prediabetes and PTDM, further studies are warranted to elucidate the ideal timing of various antidiabetics as well as its long-term impact on safety, glucose metabolism and cardiovascular outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

  10. The innate immune system and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Conrad A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Sacks, Steven H

    2013-10-01

    The sensitive and broadly reactive character of the innate immune system makes it liable to activation by stress factors other than infection. Thermal and metabolic stresses experienced during the transplantation procedure are sufficient to trigger the innate immune response and also augment adaptive immunity in the presence of foreign antigen on the donor organ. The resulting inflammatory and immune reactions combine to form a potent effector response that can lead to graft rejection. Here we examine the evidence that the complement and toll-like receptor systems are central to these pathways of injury and present a formidable barrier to transplantation. We review extensive information about the effector mechanisms that are mediated by these pathways, and bring together what is known about the damage-associated molecular patterns that initiate this sequence of events. Finally, we refer to two ongoing therapeutic trials that are evaluating the validity of these concepts in man.

  11. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  12. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  13. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  14. Low lymphocyte count and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Núñez, J; Miñana, G; Bodí, V; Núñez, E; Sanchis, J; Husser, O; Llàcer, A

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation plays a crucial pathophysiological role in the entire continuum of the atherosclerotic process, from its initiation, progression, and plaque destabilization leading ultimately to an acute coronary event. Furthermore, once the clinical event has occurred, inflammation also influences the left ventricular remodelling process. Under the same paradigm, there is evidence that lymphocytes play an important role in the modulation of the inflammatory response at every level of the atherosclerotic process. Low lymphocyte count (LLC) is a common finding during the systemic inflammatory response, and clinical and animal studies suggest that LCC plays a putative role in accelerated atherosclerosis. For instance, there is recent evidence that LLC is associated with worse outcomes in patients with heart failure, chronic ischemic heart disease and acute coronary syndromes. Further indirect evidence supports the pathologic role of LLC related to the fact that 1) lymphopenia--due to a decreased count of lymphocyte T cells--normally occurs as a part of the human ageing process, and 2) increased incidence of cardiovascular events has been reported in conditions where lymphopenia is common, such as renal transplant recipients, human immunodeficiency virus infection, survivors of nuclear disasters and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the present article is to review: a) the pathophysiological mechanisms that have been proposed for the observed association between LLC and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), b) the available evidence regarding the diagnostic and prognostic role attributable to LLC in patients with CVD, and; c) the potential therapeutic implications of these findings.

  15. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  16. [Cardiovascular system and aging].

    PubMed

    Saner, H

    2005-12-01

    Aging is one of the most important cardiovascular risk factors. Age-related morphologic changes in large resistance vessels include an intima-media-thickening and increased deposition of matrix substance, ultimately leading to a reduced compliance and an increased stiffness of the vessels. Aging of the heart is mainly characterized by an increase of the left ventricular mass in relation to the chamber volume and a decrease of diastolic function. There is some controversy in regard to the question if these changes in the vessel wall are the consequence of aging or if a decrease in physical activity is a major contributor of this process. With age the cardiovascular profile is changing. Whereas smoking is less prominent, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus are more often encountered. Primary and secondary prevention through cardiovascular risk factor management is also very important in the aging population due to the increased risk of acute vascular complications with age. Preventive measures have to include life style factor interventions as well as optimized drug therapy. There is no scientific evidence that vascular aging can be prevented by administration of supplements such as antioxidant vitamins. Aspirin is effective for cardiovascular prevention up to a higher age. Betablockers and ACE-inhibitors are generally underused in older patients after myocardial infarctions. Statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular complications up to an age of 80 years. Myocardial infarction in elderly patients is often characterized by atypical symptoms and may be even silent. Interventional therapy in elderly patients is as successful as in younger patients but has an increased complication rate. Ambulatory cardiac rehabilitation in elderly patients leads to significant improvements of physical capacity, well-being and quality of life and may help to prevent social isolation.

  17. Cardiovascular risk assessment and treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jennifer R; Manzi, Susan

    2009-08-01

    With improved treatment modalities and survival rates, patients with systemic lupus erythematosus live longer and their co-morbidities have become more apparent. Of great concern is cardiovascular disease, which has become a leading cause of death. Lupus patients prematurely develop atherosclerosis, which likely arises from an interaction among traditional cardiovascular risk factors, factors specific to lupus itself and inflammatory mediators. Despite these findings, lupus patients are not always adequately evaluated for traditional risk factors, many of which are treatable and reversible. We propose that lupus patients be assessed and managed regarding cardiovascular risk factors in the same manner as patients with known cardiovascular disease. As a result, preventive cardiology should be considered an essential component of the care for patients with lupus.

  18. Telomere length and cardiovascular aging: the means to the ends?

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Tim; Rietzschel, Ernst R; De Buyzere, Marc L; Van Criekinge, Wim; Bekaert, Sofie

    2011-04-01

    Epidemiologic and other evidence clearly indicates that peripheral blood leukocyte telomere length, a systemic marker for biological aging, can be useful as a cardiovascular aging biomarker. Although telomere biology might yield new insights into the underlying molecular biology of vascular aging and even radically improve current cardiovascular risk stratification, the specific nature of the association between telomere length and cardiovascular disease still remains to be elucidated. Here, we review several candidate hypotheses and critically review supporting and contesting scientific evidence for the underlying theories. For each hypothesis, we discuss the potential implications. We conclude that the most promising theory is based on an acceleration of the telomere attrition rate due to cardiovascular aging related factors, possibly complemented by telomere mediated hematopoietic senescence.

  19. The impact of mast cells on cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Eva; Kuiper, Johan; Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells comprise an innate immune cell population, which accumulates in tissues proximal to the outside environment and, upon activation, augments the progression of immunological reactions through the release and diffusion of either pre-formed or newly generated mediators. The released products of mast cells include histamine, proteases, as well as a variety of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which act on the surrounding microenvironment thereby shaping the immune responses triggered in various diseased states. Mast cells have also been detected in the arterial wall and are implicated in the onset and progression of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Notably, modulation of distinct mast cell actions using genetic and pharmacological approaches highlights the crucial role of this cell type in cardiovascular syndromes. The acquired evidence renders mast cells and their mediators as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in a broad spectrum of pathophysiological conditions related to cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Transgenerational Epigenetics: The Role of Maternal Effects in Cardiovascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dao H.

    2014-01-01

    Transgenerational epigenetics, the study of non-genetic transfer of information from one generation to the next, has gained much attention in the past few decades due to the fact that, in many instances, epigenetic processes outweigh direct genetic processes in the manifestation of aberrant phenotypes across several generations. Maternal effects, or the influences of maternal environment, phenotype, and/or genotype on offsprings’ phenotypes, independently of the offsprings’ genotypes, are a subcategory of transgenerational epigenetics. Due to the intimate role of the mother during early development in animals, there is much interest in investigating the means by which maternal effects can shape the individual. Maternal effects are responsible for cellular organization, determination of the body axis, initiation and maturation of organ systems, and physiological performance of a wide variety of species and biological systems. The cardiovascular system is the first to become functional and can significantly influence the development of other organ systems. Thus, it is important to elucidate the role of maternal effects in cardiovascular development, and to understand its impact on adult cardiovascular health. Topics to be addressed include: (1) how and when do maternal effects change the developmental trajectory of the cardiovascular system to permanently alter the adult’s cardiovascular phenotype, (2) what molecular mechanisms have been associated with maternally induced cardiovascular phenotypes, and (3) what are the evolutionary implications of maternally mediated changes in cardiovascular phenotype? PMID:24813463

  1. Cardiac transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Zuberbuhler, J R; Fricker, F J; Griffith, B P

    1989-05-01

    Heart transplantation is becoming an accepted treatment for children with irreversible and profoundly disabling cardiomyopathy. The risk is much higher when there is underlying congenital heart disease, and even moderately elevated pulmonary vascular resistance is a contraindication to orthotopic heart transplantation. Heterotopic or heart-lung transplantation may be considered in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance. In a few centers, heart transplantation is being performed as an alternative to palliative surgical procedures in children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Chronic immune suppression is necessary in all patients postoperatively. Cyclosporine and prednisone are the mainstays of therapy, and azathioprine is often added to the regimen. ATG is used prophylactically in the immediate postoperative period and acute rejection episodes are treated with pulses of prednisone, ATG, or OKT3. Infection continues to be a major problem, and the chronic long-term effects of both rejection and the drugs used to treat it, especially cyclosporine, are also very important. Coronary artery disease and lymphoproliferative disease are causes of death, and hypertension and decreased renal function are present in almost all survivors. The shortage of donor hearts is becoming a progressively more important problem and may affect selection criteria in the future. On the positive side, most children can return to age-appropriate activities following transplantation and they seem to tolerate their chronic illness and its attendant repeated invasive procedures surprisingly well.

  2. Overview of marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references.

  3. Marrow transplantation for leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1981-07-01

    Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

  4. Face transplantation: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Face transplantation is a complex vascular composite allotransplantation (VCA) surgery. It involves multiple types of tissue, such as bone, muscles, blood vessels, nerves to be transferred from the donor to the recipient as one unit. VCAs were added to the definition of organs covered by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule and National Organ Transplant Act. Prior to harvest of the face from the donor, a tracheostomy is usually performed. The osteotomies and dissection of the midface bony skeleton may involve severe hemorrhagic blood loss often requiring transfusion of blood products. A silicon face mask created from the facial impression is used to reconstruct the face and preserve the donor’s dignity. The recipient airway management most commonly used is primary intubation of an existing tracheostoma with a flexometallic endotracheal tube. The recipient surgery usually averages to 19-20 h. Since the face is a very vascular organ, there is usually massive bleeding, both in the dissection phase as well as in the reperfusion phase. Prior to reperfusion, often, after one sided anastomosis of the graft, the contralateral side is allowed to bleed to get rid of the preservation solution and other additives. Intraoperative product replacement should be guided by laboratory values and point of care testing for coagulation and hemostasis. In face transplantation, bolus doses of pressors or pressor infusions have been used intraoperatively in several patients to manage hypotension. This article reviews the anesthetic considerations for management for face transplantation, and some of the perioperative challenges faced. PMID:28058213

  5. Ethics of fetal tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanders, L M; Giudice, L; Raffin, T A

    1993-09-01

    Now that the Clinton Administration has overturned the ban on federal funding for fetal tissue transplantation, old ethical issues renew their relevance and new ethical issues arise. Is fetal tissue transplantation necessary and beneficial? Are fetal rights violated by the use of fetal tissue in research? Is there a moral danger that the potential of fetal tissue donation will encourage elective abortions? Should pregnant women be allowed to designate specific fetal transplant recipients? What criteria should be used to select fetal tissue transplants? Whose consent should be required for the use of fetal tissue for transplantation? We review the current state of clinical research with fetal tissue transplantation, the legal history of fetal tissue research, the major arguments against the use of fetal tissue for transplantation, and the new postmoratorium ethical dilemmas. We include recommendations for guidelines to govern the medical treatment of fetal tissue in transplantation.

  6. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  7. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both ...

  8. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Directors. View all news articles Organ Procurement & Transplantation Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health ... Privacy Policy Questions? Contact Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network United Network for Organ Sharing Post Office Box ...

  9. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants A ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  10. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  11. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Key Considerations Before and After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yuval A.; Berg, Carl L.

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common etiology of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is on trajectory to become the leading indication for liver transplantation in the USA and much of the world. Patients with NAFLD cirrhosis awaiting liver transplant face unique challenges and increased risk for waiting list stagnation and dropout due to burdensome comorbidities including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. Thus far, patients transplanted for NAFLD cirrhosis have excellent mid- and long-term patient and graft survival, but concerns regarding short-term morbidity and mortality continue to exist. Post-liver transplantation, NAFLD occurs as both a recurrent and de novo manifestation, each with unique outcomes. NAFLD in the donor population is of concern given the growing demand for liver transplantation and mounting pressure to expand the donor pool. This review addresses key issues surrounding NAFLD as an indication for transplantation, including its increasing prevalence, unique patient demographics, outcomes related to liver transplantation, development of post-liver transplantation NAFLD, and NAFLD in the liver donor population. It also highlights exciting areas where further research is needed, such as the role of bariatric surgery and preconditioning of marginal donor grafts. PMID:26815171

  12. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-04-02

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  13. A Prospective Study of Renal Transplant Recipients: A Fall in Insulin Secretion Underpins Dysglycemia After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Langsford, David; Obeyesekere, Varuni; Vogrin, Sara; Teng, Jessie; MacIsaac, Richard J.; Ward, Glenn; Alford, Frank; Dwyer, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dysglycemia (encompassing impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus) arising after renal transplantation is common and confers a significant cardiovascular mortality risk. Nonetheless, the pathophysiology of posttransplant dysglycemia is not well described. The aim of this study was to prospectively and comprehensively assess glucose handling in renal transplant recipients from before to 12 months after transplantation to determine the underpinning pathophysiology. Materials and Methods Intravenous and oral glucose tolerance testing was conducted before and at 3 and 12 months posttransplantation. An intravenous glucose tolerance test was also performed on day 7 posttransplantation. We followed up 16 transplant recipients for 3 months and 14 recipients for 12 months. Insulin secretion, resistance and a disposition index (DI (IV)), a measure of β cell responsiveness in the context of prevailing insulin resistance, were also determined. Results At 12 months, 50% of renal transplant recipients had dysglycemia. Dysglycemia was associated with a dramatic fall in DI (IV) and this loss in β cell function was evident as early as 3 months posttransplantation (23.5 pretransplant; 6.4 at 3 months and 12.2 at 12 months posttransplant). Differences in the β cell response to oral glucose challenge were evident pretransplant in those destined to develop dysglycemia posttransplant (2-hour blood glucose level 5.6 mmol/L versus 6.8 mmol/L; P < 0.01). Conclusions Dysglycemia after renal transplantation is common, and the loss of insulin secretion is a major contributor. Subclinical differences in glucose handling are evident pretransplant in those destined to develop dysglycemia potentially heralding a susceptible β cell which under the stressors associated with transplantation fails. PMID:27826600

  14. The Role of Humoral Alloreactivity in Liver Transplantation: Lessons Learned and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    More than ten years after the initial description of the humoral theory of transplantation by Dr. Paul I. Terasaki, the significance of humoral alloimmunity in liver transplantation has yet to be clearly defined. The liver allograft has an inherent tolerogenic capacity which confers its resistance to cell-mediated as well as antibody-mediated rejection. Nevertheless, the protection against alloimmunity is not complete, and antibody-mediated tissue injury can occur in the liver graft under specific circumstances. In this article the evidence on the clinicopathologic effects of donor-specific alloantibodies in liver transplantation will be examined and interpreted in parallel with lessons learned from renal transplantation. The unique anatomic and immunologic features of the liver will be reviewed to gain new insights into the complex interactions between humoral immune system and the liver allograft. PMID:28164136

  15. Donor selection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased scrutiny on the quality in health care with particular emphasis on institutional heart transplant survival outcomes. An important aspect of successful transplantation is appropriate donor selection. We review the current guidelines as well as areas of controversy in the selection of appropriate hearts as donor organs to ensure optimal outcomes. This decision is paramount to the success of a transplant program as well as recipient survival and graft function post-transplant. PMID:25132976

  16. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  17. [Liver transplantation and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Goarin, A-C; Homer, L

    2010-11-01

    Management during their sexual life of patients with a liver transplantation is a more or less common situation depending centers. Based on literature review, a focus on management of recipient women was conducted, from contraception to pregnancy, describing the complications related to the status of transplant recipient, but also those that may be related to immunosuppressive agents. If fertility and access to contraception are only slightly modified by graft, complications related to graft or immunosuppressive drugs can affect the pregnancy. On the maternal side, hypertension and preeclampsia are more common, as well as renal dysfunction, iatrogenic diabetes and bacterial or viral infections, acute rejection and graft loss do not appear to be influenced by pregnancy. The fetus is also exposed to risks such as induced prematurity and IUGR. Pregnancy in recipients of hepatic grafts therefore requires joint follow-up by transplant specialist and perinatologist, which leads in most cases to successful outcome for mother and child.

  18. Renal transplantation in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2011-07-01

    Patients with established renal failure, living in developing countries, face many obstacles including lack of access to transplantation centers, quality and safety issues, and exploittation associated with transplant tourism. This review aims to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation performed in developing countries and to recommend some solutions. The lack of suitable legislation and infrastructure has prevented growth of deceased donor programs; so, living donors have continued to be the major source of transplantable kidneys. Transplant tourism and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection, which cause major morbidity and mortality. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving the results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool, making transplant tourism unnecessary and granting various governments the moral courage to fight unacceptable practices. A private-public partnership underpinned by transparency, public audit and accountability is a prerequisite for effective transplant services in the developing world. Finally, lack of dialysis facilities coupled with better outcomes in patients spending <6 months on dialysis prior to transplantation favor pre-emptive transplantation in developing countries.

  19. History of Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of transplantation has seen the development of increasingly potent immunosuppressive agents, progressively better methods of tissue and organ preservation, refinements in histocompatibility matching, and numerous innovations in surgical techniques. Such efforts in combination ultimately made it possible to successfully engraft all of the organs and bone marrow cells in humans. At a more fundamental level, however, the transplantation enterprise hinged on two seminal turning points. The first was the recognition by Billingham, Brent, and Medawar in 1953 that it was possible to induce chimerism-associated neonatal tolerance deliberately. This discovery escalated over the next 15 years to the first successful bone marrow transplantations in humans in 1968. The second turning point was the demonstration during the early 1960s that canine and human organ allografts could self-induce tolerance with the aid of immunosuppression. By the end of 1962, however, it had been incorrectly concluded that turning points one and two involved different immune mechanisms. The error was not corrected until well into the 1990s. In this historical account, the vast literature that sprang up during the intervening 30 years has been summarized. Although admirably documenting empiric progress in clinical transplantation, its failure to explain organ allograft acceptance predestined organ recipients to lifetime immunosuppression and precluded fundamental changes in the treatment policies. After it was discovered in 1992 that long-surviving organ transplant recipients had persistent microchimerism, it was possible to see the mechanistic commonality of organ and bone marrow transplantation. A clarifying central principle of immunology could then be synthesized with which to guide efforts to induce tolerance systematically to human tissues and perhaps ultimately to xenografts. PMID:10833242

  20. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as

  1. Cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews recent flight and ground-based studies of cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight. Prominent features of microgravity exposure include loss of gravitational pressures, relatively low venous pressures, headward fluid shifts, plasma volume loss, and postflight orthostatic intolerance and reduced exercise capacity. Many of these short-term responses to microgravity extend themselves during long-duration microgravity exposure and may be explained by altered pressures (blood and tissue) and fluid balance in local tissues nourished by the cardiovascular system. In this regard, it is particularly noteworthy that tissues of the lower body (e.g., foot) are well adapted to local hypertension on Earth, whereas tissues of the upper body (e.g., head) are not as well adapted to increase in local blood pressure. For these and other reasons, countermeasures for long-duration flight should include reestablishment of higher, Earth-like blood pressures in the lower body.

  2. Cardiovascular instrumentation for spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schappell, R. T.; Polhemus, J. T.; Ganiaris, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The observation mechanisms dealing with pressure, flow, morphology, temperature, etc. are discussed. The approach taken in the performance of this study was to (1) review ground and space-flight data on cardiovascular function, including earlier related ground-based and space-flight animal studies, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and recent bed-rest studies, (2) review cardiovascular measurement parameters required to assess individual performance and physiological alternations during space flight, (3) perform an instrumentation survey including a literature search as well as personal contact with the applicable investigators, (4) assess instrumentation applicability with respect to the established criteria, and (5) recommend future research and development activity. It is concluded that, for the most part, the required instrumentation technology is available but that mission-peculiar criteria will require modifications to adapt the applicable instrumentation to a space-flight configuration.

  3. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine. PMID:26170595

  4. Slow breathing and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chaddha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women worldwide. Much emphasis has been placed on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. While depression and anxiety increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease also increases the risk of developing anxiety and depression. Thus, promoting optimal mental health may be important for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Like lowering blood pressure, lipids, and body weight, lowering anger and hostility and improving depression and anxiety may also be an important intervention in preventive cardiology. As we strive to further improve cardiovascular outcomes, the next bridge to cross may be one of offering patients nonpharmacologic means for combating daily mental stress and promoting mental health, such as yoga and pranayama. Indeed, the best preventive cardiovascular medicine may be a blend of both Western and Eastern medicine.

  5. Obesity and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Armstrong, John; Hurton, Scott; Molinari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of overweight and obese patients (OPs) waiting for a liver transplant continues to increase. Despite the significant advances occurred in bariatric medicine, obesity is still considered a relative contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The main aim of this review is to appraise the literature on the outcomes of OPs undergoing LT, treatments that might reduce their weight before, during or after surgery, and discuss some of the controversies and limitations of the current knowledge with the intent of highlighting areas where future research is needed. PMID:26421262

  6. Cardiovascular Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Phoon, Colin K.L.; Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The mouse is the mammalian model of choice for investigating cardiovascular biology, given our ability to manipulate it by genetic, pharmacologic, mechanical, and environmental means. Imaging is an important approach to phenotyping both function and structure of cardiac and vascular components. This review details commonly used imaging approaches, with a focus on echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging and brief overviews of other imaging modalities. We also briefly outline emerging imaging approaches but caution that reliability and validity data may be lacking. PMID:26928662

  7. Allogeneic transplantation strategies including haploidentical transplantation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy. Despite antenatal counseling and neonatal screening programs implemented in higher income countries, SCD is still associated with multiple morbidities and early mortality. To date, the only curative approach to SCD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but this therapy is not yet established worldwide. The registries of the European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) and the Centre for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) account, respectively, for 611 and 627 patients receiving transplantations for SCD. Most of these patients were transplanted with grafts from an HLA-identical sibling donor. The main obstacles to increasing the number of transplantations are a lack of awareness on the part of physicians and families, the absence of reliable prognostic factors for severity, and the perceived risk that transplantation complications may outweigh the benefits of early transplantation. Results show that more than 90% of patients having undergone an HLA-identical sibling transplantation after myeloablative conditioning are cured, with very limited complications. Major improvement is expected from the use of new reduced-toxicity conditioning regimens and the use of alternative donors, including unrelated cord blood transplantations and related haploidentical bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantations.

  8. Adventures in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-07-14

    This article, derived from an invited Distinguished Scientist lecture presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in 2007, reviews 4 themes (adventures) in clinical cardiovascular research carried out over a period of 58 years. It begins with the author's introduction to cardiovascular hemodynamics during a medical school elective in 1951. The 4 adventures include valvular heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, heart failure (HF), and myocardial ischemia. In each of these adventures, the author describes briefly what was known when he entered each field, followed by the author's contribution to the field (the adventure), and ends with comments about the current status of the field. Of particular interest are the changes in the technologies used in clinical cardiovascular research over the past half century, commencing with pressure tracings in left heart chambers with the use of needle puncture in the operating room to genetic technologies designed to understand differences between drugs that inhibit platelet activation. The article ends with some general comments on conducting research and the rewards that can come with this activity.

  9. The implication of protein malnutrition on cardiovascular control systems in rats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda C.; de Menezes, Rodrigo C.; Chianca, Deoclécio A.

    2015-01-01

    The malnutrition in early life is associated with metabolic changes and cardiovascular impairment in adulthood. Deficient protein intake-mediated hypertension has been observed in clinical and experimental studies. In rats, protein malnutrition also increases the blood pressure and enhances heart rate and sympathetic activity. In this review, we discuss the effects of post-weaning protein malnutrition on the resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate and their variabilities, cardiovascular reflexes sensitivity, cardiac autonomic balance, sympathetic and renin-angiotensin activities and neural plasticity during adult life. These insights reveal an interesting prospect on the autonomic modulation underlying the cardiovascular imbalance and provide relevant information on preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26388783

  10. Angiopoietin-2 Blockade Promotes Survival of Corneal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwei; Li, Guangyu; Sessa, Roberto; Kang, Gyeong Jin; Shi, Meng; Ge, Shaokui; Gong, Anna Jiang; Wen, Ying; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Chen, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Corneal transplantation remains the last hope for vision restoration, and lymphangiogenesis (LG) is a primary mediator of transplant rejection. This study was to investigate the specific role of angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in transplantation-associated LG and graft rejection. Methods Orthotopic corneal transplantation was performed between fully mismatched C57BL/6 (donor) and BALB/c (recipient) mice to assess the effects of Ang-2 blockade via neutralizing antibody. Grafts were evaluated in vivo by ophthalmic slit-lamp biomicroscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) up to 8 weeks after surgery. Additionally, whole-mount corneas were analyzed for lymphatic and blood vessels and macrophages by immunofluorescent microscopy, and draining lymph nodes were assessed for donor-derived cells by flow cytometry. Results Anti-Ang-2 treatment significantly suppressed LG and graft rejection. In this study, we achieved 75% suppression of LG and 80% graft survival. Our approach also inhibited donor-derived cell trafficking to draining lymph nodes and affected macrophage morphologic phenotypes in the grafted corneas. Additionally, Ang-2 blockade also reduced central corneal thickening, a parameter strongly associated with graft rejection. Conclusions Ang-2 is critically involved in corneal transplant rejection and anti-Ang-2 treatment significantly improves the outcomes of corneal grafts. Moreover, we have shown that anterior segment OCT offers a new tool to monitor murine corneal grafts in vivo. This study not only reveals new mechanisms for transplant rejection, but also offers a novel strategy to treat it. PMID:28061513

  11. Experimental models of renal disease and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Rebecca C

    2010-11-26

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death among patients with end stage renal failure. Animal models have played a crucial role in teasing apart the complex pathological processes involved. This review discusses the principles of using animal models, the history of their use in the study of renal hypertension, the controversies arising from experimental models of non-hypertensive uraemic cardiomyopathy and the lessons learned from these models, and highlights important areas of future research in this field, including de novo cardiomyopathy secondary to renal transplantation.

  12. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  13. Stem cells in cardiovascular regeneration: from preservation of endogenous repair to future cardiovascular therapies.

    PubMed

    Templin, Christian; Kränkel, Nicolle; Lüscher, Thomas F; Landmesser, Ulf

    2011-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries. This review summarizes current pre-clinical and clinical evidence for the potential role and mechanisms of action of stem and progenitor cells in vascular and cardiac repair and regeneration. Apart from cell transplantation strategies, approaches to maintain stem cell niche function and targeting mobilization/recruitment of specific stem/progenitor cell populations may aid in preserving vascular and cardiac function. Moreover, with the use of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, the field of regenerative medicine is entering a new era. Potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct reprogrammed cells as well as recent developments in tissue engineering are discussed.

  14. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation: Outcomes and advances

    PubMed Central

    Said, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. In the last decade it has become the third most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Increasing prevalence of NAFLD in the general population also poses a risk to organ donation, as allograft steatosis can be associated with non-function of the graft. Post-transplant survival is comparable between NAFLD and non-NAFLD causes of liver disease, although long term outcomes beyond 10 year are lacking. NAFLD can recur in the allograft frequently although thus far post transplant survival has not been impacted. De novo NAFLD can also occur in the allograft of patients transplanted for non-NAFLD liver disease. Predictors for NAFLD post-transplant recurrence include obesity, hyperlipidemia and diabetes as well as steroid dose after liver transplantation. A polymorphism in PNPLA3 that mediates triglyceride hydrolysis and is linked to pre-transplant risk of obesity and NAFLD has also been linked to post transplant NAFLD risk. Although immunosuppression side effects potentiate obesity and the metabolic syndrome, studies of immunosuppression modulation and trials of specific immunosuppression regimens post-transplant are lacking in this patient population. Based on pre-transplant data, sustained weight loss through diet and exercise is the most effective therapy for NAFLD. Other agents occasionally utilized in NAFLD prior to transplantation include vitamin E and insulin-sensitizing agents. Studies of these therapies are lacking in the post-transplant population. A multimodality and multidisciplinary approach to treatment should be utilized in management of post-transplant NAFLD. PMID:24409043

  15. Promethazine affects autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms minimally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. E.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Promethazine hydrochloride, Phenergan, is a phenothiazine derivative with antihistaminic (H1), sedative, antiemetic, anticholinergic, and antimotion sickness properties. These properties have made promethazine a candidate for use in environments such as microgravity, which provoke emesis and motion sickness. Recently, we evaluated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses during two Space Shuttle missions 18 to 20 hr after the 50 mg intramuscular administration of promethazine. Because the effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms in general and baroreflex function in particular were not known, we were unable to exclude a possible influence of promethazine on our results. Our purpose was to determine the ground-based effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular control. Because of promethazine's antihistaminic and anticholinergic properties, we expected that a 50-mg intramuscular injection of promethazine would affect sympathetically and vagally mediated cardiovascular mechanisms. Eight healthy young subjects, five men and three women, were studied at rest in recumbency. All reported drowsiness as a result of the promethazine injection; most also reported nervous excitation, dry mouth, and fatigue. Three subjects had significant reactions: two reported excessive anxiety and one reported dizziness. Measurements were performed immediately prior to injection and 3.1 +/- 0.1 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 hr postinjection. We found no significant effect of promethazine on resting mean R-R interval, arterial pressure, R-R interval power spectra, carotid baroreflex function, and venous plasma catecholamine levels.

  16. T cell senescence and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee Tae; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system, commonly termed "immunosenescence," contribute to deterioration of the immune response and fundamentally impact the health and survival of elderly individuals. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. Senescent T cells have the ability to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic mediators; thus, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that senescent T cells also have pathogenic potential in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction, underscoring the detrimental roles of these cells in various chronic inflammatory responses. Given that cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, there is great interest in understanding the contribution of age-related immunological changes to its pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss general features of age-related alterations in T cell immunity and the possible roles of senescent T cells in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Cardiovascular symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Kolck, Ulrich W; Haenisch, Britta; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, mast cell activation disease (MCAD) has been considered as just one rare (neoplastic) disease, mastocytosis, focused on the mast cell (MC) mediators tryptase and histamine and the suggestive, blatant symptoms of flushing and anaphylaxis. Recently another form of MCAD, the MC activation syndrome, has been recognized featuring inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplasia and likely much more heterogeneously clonal and far more prevalent than mastocytosis. Increasing expertise and appreciation has been established for the truly very large menagerie of MC mediators and their complex patterns of release, engendering complex, nebulous presentations of chronic and acute illness best characterized as multisystem polymorbidity of generally inflammatory ± allergic theme. We describe the pathogenesis of MCAD with a particular focus on clinical cardiovascular symptoms and the therapeutic options for MC mediator-induced cardiovascular symptoms.

  18. Altered phosphodiesterase 3-mediated cAMP hydrolysis contributes to a hypermotile phenotype in obese JCR:LA-cp rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for diabetes-associated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Netherton, Stuart J; Jimmo, Sandra L; Palmer, Daniel; Tilley, Douglas G; Dunkerley, Heather A; Raymond, Daniel R; Russell, James C; Absher, P Marlene; Sage, E Helene; Vernon, Robert B; Maurice, Donald H

    2002-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Of the many animal models used in the study of non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes, the JCR:LA-cp rat is unique in that it develops insulin resistance in the presence of obesity and manifests both peripheral and coronary vasculopathies. In this animal model, arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from homozygous obese (cp/cp) rats, but not from age-matched healthy (+/+ or + /cp, collectively defined +/?) littermates, display an " activated" phenotype in vitro and in vivo and have an elevated level of cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. In this report, we confirm that cp/cp rat aortic VSMCs have an elevated level of PDE3 activity and show that only particulate PDE3 (PDE3B) activity is elevated. In marked contrast to results obtained in + /? VSMCs, simultaneous activation of adenylyl cyclase and inhibition of PDE3 activity in cp/cp VSMCs synergistically increased cAMP. Although PDE3 inhibition did not potentiate the antimigratory effects of forskolin on +/? VSMCs, PDE3 inhibition did markedly potentiate the forskolin-induced inhibition of migration of cp/cp-derived VSMCs. Although PDE3 activity was elevated in cp/cp rat aortic VSMCs, levels of expression of cytosolic PDE3 (PDE3A) and PDE3B in +/? and cp/cp VSMCs, as well as activation of these enzymes following activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling cascade, were not different. Our data are consistent with an increased role for PDE3 in regulating cAMP-dependent signaling in cp/cp VSMCs and identify PDE3 as a cellular activity potentially responsible for the phenotype of cp/cp VSMCs.

  19. Extracellular Vesicles as Therapeutic Tools in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Audrey; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Le Lay, Soazig

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes, are small vesicles secreted from a wide variety of cells. Whereas MVs are particles released by the outward budding of the plasma membrane, exosomes are derived from endocytic compartments. Secretion of EVs can be enhanced by specific stimuli, and increased plasma circulating levels of EVs have been correlated with pathophysiological situations. MVs, already present in the blood of healthy individuals, are considerably elevated in several cardiovascular diseases associated with inflammation, suggesting that they can mediate deleterious effects such as endothelial dysfunction or thrombosis. Nonetheless, very recent studies also demonstrate that MVs may act as biological information vectors transferring proteins or genetic material to maintain cell homeostasis, favor cell repair, or even promote angiogenesis. Additionally, exosomes have also been shown to have pro-angiogenic and cardio-protective properties. These beneficial effects, therefore, reveal the potential therapeutical use of EVs in the field of cardiovascular medicine and regenerative therapy. In this review, we will provide an update of cellular processes modulated by EVs of specific interest in the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies. A special focus will be made on the morphogen sonic hedgehog (Shh) associated with EVs (EVsShh+), which have been shown to mediate many pro-angiogenic effects. In addition to offer a potential source of cardiovascular markers, therapeutical potential of EVs reveal exciting opportunities to deliver specific agents by non-immunogenic means to cardiovascular system. PMID:25136343

  20. ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morath, Christian; Zeier, Martin; Döhler, Bernd; Opelz, Gerhard; Süsal, Caner

    2017-01-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation has long been considered a contraindication to successful kidney transplantation. During the last 25 years, increasing organ shortage enforced the development of strategies to overcome the ABO antibody barrier. In the meantime, ABOi kidney transplantation has become a routine procedure with death-censored graft survival rates comparable to the rates in compatible transplantations. Desensitization is usually achieved by apheresis and B cell-depleting therapies that are accompanied by powerful immunosuppression. Anti-A/B antibodies are aimed to be below a certain threshold at the time of ABOi kidney transplantation and during the first 2 weeks after surgery. Thereafter, even a rebound of anti-A/B antibodies does not appear to harm the kidney transplant, a phenomenon that is called accommodation, but is poorly understood. There is still concern, however, that infectious complications such as viral disease, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and severe urinary tract infections are increased after ABOi transplantations. Recent data from the Collaborative Transplant Study show that during the first year after kidney transplantation, one additional patient death from an infectious complication occurs in 100 ABOi kidney transplant recipients. Herein, we review the recent evidence on ABOi kidney transplantation with a focus on desensitization strategies and respective outcomes. PMID:28321223

  1. ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morath, Christian; Zeier, Martin; Döhler, Bernd; Opelz, Gerhard; Süsal, Caner

    2017-01-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation has long been considered a contraindication to successful kidney transplantation. During the last 25 years, increasing organ shortage enforced the development of strategies to overcome the ABO antibody barrier. In the meantime, ABOi kidney transplantation has become a routine procedure with death-censored graft survival rates comparable to the rates in compatible transplantations. Desensitization is usually achieved by apheresis and B cell-depleting therapies that are accompanied by powerful immunosuppression. Anti-A/B antibodies are aimed to be below a certain threshold at the time of ABOi kidney transplantation and during the first 2 weeks after surgery. Thereafter, even a rebound of anti-A/B antibodies does not appear to harm the kidney transplant, a phenomenon that is called accommodation, but is poorly understood. There is still concern, however, that infectious complications such as viral disease, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and severe urinary tract infections are increased after ABOi transplantations. Recent data from the Collaborative Transplant Study show that during the first year after kidney transplantation, one additional patient death from an infectious complication occurs in 100 ABOi kidney transplant recipients. Herein, we review the recent evidence on ABOi kidney transplantation with a focus on desensitization strategies and respective outcomes.

  2. Facial transplantation: A concise update

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Pulido, Fernando; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gacto-Sanchez, Purificacion; Hernandez-Guisado, Jose-Maria; Lagares-Borrego, Araceli; Narros-Gimenez, Rocio; Gonzalez-Padilla, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Update on clinical results obtained by the first worldwide facial transplantation teams as well as review of the literature concerning the main surgical, immunological, ethical, and follow-up aspects described on facial transplanted patients. Study design: MEDLINE search of articles published on “face transplantation” until March 2012. Results: Eighteen clinical cases were studied. The mean patient age was 37.5 years, with a higher prevalence of men. Main surgical indication was gunshot injuries (6 patients). All patients had previously undergone multiple conventional surgical reconstructive procedures which had failed. Altogether 8 transplant teams belonging to 4 countries participated. Thirteen partial face transplantations and 5 full face transplantations have been performed. Allografts are varied according to face anatomical components and the amount of skin, muscle, bone, and other tissues included, though all were grafted successfully and remained viable without significant postoperative surgical complications. The patient with the longest follow-up was 5 years. Two patients died 2 and 27 months after transplantation. Conclusions: Clinical experience has demonstrated the feasibility of facial transplantation as a valuable reconstructive option, but it still remains considered as an experimental procedure with unresolved issues to settle down. Results show that from a clinical, technical, and immunological standpoint, facial transplantation has achieved functional, aesthetic, and social rehabilitation in severely facial disfigured patients. Key words:Face transplantation, composite tissue transplantation, face allograft, facial reconstruction, outcomes and complications of face transplantation. PMID:23229268

  3. Transplantation Outcomes in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Bergstralh, Eric J.; Monico, Carla G; Lieske, John C.; Herges, Regina M.; Langman, Craig B.; Hoppe, Bernd; Milliner, Dawn S

    2010-01-01

    Optimal transplantation strategies are uncertain in primary hyperoxaluria (PH) due to potential for recurrent oxalosis. Outcomes of different transplantation approaches were compared using life table methods to determine kidney graft survival among 203 patients in the International Primary Hyperoxaluria Registry. From 1976–2009, 84 kidney alone (K) and combined kidney and liver (K+L) transplants were performed in 58 patients. Among 58 first kidney transplants (32 K, 26 K+L), 1, 3, and 5 year kidney graft survival was 82%, 68%, and 49%. Renal graft loss occurred in 26 first transplants due to oxalosis in 10, chronic allograft nephropathy in 6, rejection in 5, and other causes in 5. Delay in PH diagnosis until after transplant favored early graft loss (p=0.07). K+L had better kidney graft outcomes than K with death censored graft survival 95% vs. 56% at 3yrs (p=.011). Among 29 year 2000–09 first transplants (24 K+L), 84% were functioning at 3 years compared to 55% of earlier transplants (p=0.05). At 6.8 years after transplantation, 46 of 58 patients are living (43 with functioning grafts). Outcomes of transplantation in PH have improved over time, with recent K+L transplantation highly successful. Recurrent oxalosis accounted for a minority of kidney graft losses. PMID:20849551

  4. Transplantation outcomes in primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Bergstralh, E J; Monico, C G; Lieske, J C; Herges, R M; Langman, C B; Hoppe, B; Milliner, D S

    2010-11-01

    Optimal transplantation strategies are uncertain in primary hyperoxaluria (PH) due to potential for recurrent oxalosis. Outcomes of different transplantation approaches were compared using life-table methods to determine kidney graft survival among 203 patients in the International Primary Hyperoxaluria Registry. From 1976-2009, 84 kidney alone (K) and combined kidney and liver (K + L) transplants were performed in 58 patients. Among 58 first kidney transplants (32 K, 26 K + L), 1-, 3- and 5-year kidney graft survival was 82%, 68% and 49%. Renal graft loss occurred in 26 first transplants due to oxalosis in ten, chronic allograft nephropathy in six, rejection in five and other causes in five. Delay in PH diagnosis until after transplant favored early graft loss (p = 0.07). K + L had better kidney graft outcomes than K with death-censored graft survival 95% versus 56% at 3 years (p = 0.011). Among 29 year 2000-09 first transplants (24 K + L), 84% were functioning at 3 years compared to 55% of earlier transplants (p = 0.05). At 6.8 years after transplantation, 46 of 58 patients are living (43 with functioning grafts). Outcomes of transplantation in PH have improved over time, with recent K + L transplantation highly successful. Recurrent oxalosis accounted for a minority of kidney graft losses.

  5. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus