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Sample records for mediate protective tb

  1. Only a Subset of Phosphoantigen-responsive γ9δ2 T cells Mediate Protective TB Immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles Thomas; Abate, Getahun; Blazevic, Azra; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis-BCG induce potent expansions of human memory Vγ9+Vδ2+ T cells capable of IFN-γ production, cytolytic activity and mycobacterial growth inhibition. Certain phosphoantigens expressed by mycobacteria can stimulate γ9δ2 T cell expansions, suggesting that purified or synthetic forms of these phosphoantigens may be useful alone or as components of new vaccines or immunotherapeutics. However, we show that while mycobacteria-activated γ9δ2 T cells potently inhibit intracellular mycobacterial growth, phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells fail to inhibit mycobacteria, although both develop similar effector cytokine and cytolytic functional capacities. γ9δ2 T cells receiving TLR-mediated co-stimulation during phosphoantigen activation also failed to inhibit mycobacterial growth. We hypothesized that mycobacteria express antigens, other than the previously identified phosphoantigens, that induce protective subsets of γ9δ2 T cells. Testing this hypothesis, we compared the TCR sequence diversity of γ9δ2 T cells expanded with BCG-infected versus phosphoantigen-treated DC. BCG-stimulated γ9δ2 T cells displayed a more restricted TCR diversity than phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells. In addition, only a subset of phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells functionally responded to mycobacteria-infected DC. Furthermore, differential inhibitory functions of BCG- and phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells were confirmed at the clonal level and were not due to differences in TCR avidity. Our results demonstrate that BCG infection can activate and expand protective subsets of phosphoantigen responsive γ9δ2 T cells, and provide the first indication that γ9δ2 T cells can develop pathogen specificity similar to αβ T cells. Specific targeting of protective γ9δ2 T cell subsets will be important for future tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:18802050

  2. Latently and uninfected healthcare workers exposed to TB make protective antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wang, Xing-Xing; Wang, Bin; Fu, Lei; Liu, Guan; Lu, Yu; Cao, Min; Huang, Hairong; Javid, Babak

    2017-05-09

    The role of Igs in natural protection against infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of TB, is controversial. Although passive immunization with mAbs generated against mycobacterial antigens has shown protective efficacy in murine models of infection, studies in B cell-depleted animals only showed modest phenotypes. We do not know if humans make protective antibody responses. Here, we investigated whether healthcare workers in a Beijing TB hospital-who, although exposed to suprainfectious doses of pathogenic Mtb, remain healthy-make antibody responses that are effective in protecting against infection by Mtb. We tested antibodies isolated from 48 healthcare workers and compared these with 12 patients with active TB. We found that antibodies from 7 of 48 healthcare workers but none from active TB patients showed moderate protection against Mtb in an aerosol mouse challenge model. Intriguingly, three of seven healthcare workers who made protective antibody responses had no evidence of prior TB infection by IFN-γ release assay. There was also good correlation between protection observed in vivo and neutralization of Mtb in an in vitro human whole-blood assay. Antibodies mediating protection were directed against the surface of Mtb and depended on both immune complexes and CD4+ T cells for efficacy. Our results indicate that certain individuals make protective antibodies against Mtb and challenge paradigms about the nature of an effective immune response to TB.

  3. 46 CFR 36.05-10 - Protection of personnel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of personnel-TB/ALL. 36.05-10 Section 36.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CARGOES Cargo Tanks § 36.05-10 Protection of personnel—TB/ALL. (a) Decks, bulkheads, or other structures shall...

  4. 46 CFR 36.05-10 - Protection of personnel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of personnel-TB/ALL. 36.05-10 Section 36.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CARGOES Cargo Tanks § 36.05-10 Protection of personnel—TB/ALL. (a) Decks, bulkheads, or other structures shall...

  5. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  6. 46 CFR 39.2011 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.2011 Section 39.2011 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS Equipment and Installation § 39.2011 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo tank...

  7. 46 CFR 39.2011 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.2011 Section 39.2011 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS VAPOR CONTROL SYSTEMS Equipment and Installation § 39.2011 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo tank...

  8. Incorporating lanthanide cations with cadmium selenide nanocrystals: a strategy to sensitize and protect Tb(III).

    PubMed

    Chengelis, Demetra A; Yingling, Adrienne M; Badger, Paul D; Shade, Chad M; Petoud, Stéphane

    2005-12-07

    The electronic structure of CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals has been used to sensitize Tb3+ in solution by incorporation of Tb3+ cations into the nanocrystals during synthesis. Doping of luminescent Tb3+ metal ions in semiconductor nanocrystals utilizes the positive attributes of both species' photophysical properties, resulting in a final product with long luminescence lifetimes, sharp emission bands, high absorptivities, and strong resistance to decomposition. This strategy also helps protect the lanthanide cations from nonradiative deactivation from C-H, N-H, and O-H oscillators of solvent molecules or traditional organic lanthanide ligands, leading to long Tb3+ luminescence lifetimes. This new type of nanomaterial synergistically combines the photophysical properties of nanocrystals and Tb3+.

  9. Changes in cell-mediated immune response after lung resection surgery for MDR-TB patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Hong, Sunghee; Eum, Seok-Yong; Lee, In Hee; Shin, Donk Ok; Cho, Jang Eun; Cho, Sungae; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2011-07-01

    The immune responses of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients undergoing lung resection surgery were investigated in order to understand the mechanism of strong immune suppression in MDR-TB. We examined changes in cell-mediated immune response (CMI) of a total of sixteen MDR-TB patients, three of them extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients, after the removal of the heavily diseased lung section. The IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins (Mtb-CFP), one of the most important CMI to defend TB, showed a statistically significant elevation in 2-4 months after operation when compared to the preoperative CMI in patients who were converted into AFB negative and cured in two years' follow-up, suggesting that the recovery of CMI may be one of the key factors in the successful treatment of MDR-TB. Interestingly, IL-10 response to Mtb-CFP was also elevated in 2-4 months after surgery in cured patients although both proliferative response and PBMC composition were not significantly changed. Infection with first- or second-line drugs resistant Mtb reduces the efficiency of chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB to about 50%. Thus, this study suggests that chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB may be more effective when combined with accompanying therapy that increases CMI, includes lung resection surgery.

  10. 'Sustaining the DOTS': stakeholders' experience of a social protection intervention for TB in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Alobu, Isaac; Mustapha, Gidado; Onazi, Olajumoke; Oshi, Daniel C

    2017-03-01

    Social protection for TB patients can lower patient costs and improve adherence. The aim of this study was to explore patients' and health workers' experiences of a social protection intervention for TB in order to inform a more patient-centred approach for the Nigeria National TB Programme strategy. This was a qualitative study consisting of 103 in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions with patients who received the intervention, and 10 key informant interviews with health workers. A thematic content analysis of the interviews was performed. Of those who completed the interviews, 53 (51.5%) were male, and 69 (67.0%) were below 40 years. Most of the participants received care and support from their families but delayed access to TB services due to lack of funds for transportation, nutritional supplementation and non-TB drugs. The intervention had a high level of acceptability and uptake; particularly clear benefits emerged for most patients who used the social protection funds to purchase food and supplements, other drugs, transportation and additional personal necessities. Some patients assert that the financial incentive package increased their awareness of timing of their follow-up visits. In addition, health workers observed increased enthusiasm to treatment and improvement in adherence among participants. Patients and health workers reported positive experiences with the financial incentives provided for TB treatment.

  11. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Alarmin IL-33 elicits potent TB-specific cell-mediated responses

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Siefert, Rebekah J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still remains a major public health issue despite the current available vaccine for TB, Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG). An effective vaccine against TB remains a top priority in the fight against this pandemic bacterial infection. Adequate protection against TB is associated with the development of TH1-type and CD8+ T cell responses. One alarmin cytokine, interleukin 33 (IL-33), has now been implicated in the development of both CD4+ TH1 and CD8+ T cell immunity. In this study, we determined whether the administration of IL-33 as an adjuvant, encoded in a DNA plasmid, could enhance the immunogenicity of a TB DNA vaccine. We report that the co-immunization of IL-33 with a DNA vaccine expressing the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen 85B (Ag85B) induced robust Ag85B-specific IFNγ responses by ELISpot compared to Ag85B alone. Furthermore, these enhanced responses were characterized by higher frequencies of Ag85B-specific, multifunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Vaccination with IL-33 also increased the ability of the Ag85B-specific CD8+ T cells to undergo degranulation and to secrete IFNγ and TNFα cytokines. These finding highlights IL-33 as a promising adjuvant to significantly improve the immunogenicity of TB DNA vaccines and support further study of this effective vaccine strategy against TB. PMID:26091147

  13. CXCR5⁺ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Slight, Samantha R; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A; Randall, Troy D; Khader, Shabaana A

    2013-02-01

    One third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy.

  14. A review of M. bovis BCG protection against TB in cattle and other animals species.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Feliciano Milian; Escalera, Ana María Anaya; Torres, Ruth M Gallegos

    2003-04-30

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) causes severe economic losses in livestock due to low production, animal deaths and condemnation of carcasses. It is also an important constraint in international trade of animals and animal products. A scientific committee in Great Britain in 1997 concluded that the development of a cattle vaccine would be the best option for long-term control of TB. However, vaccination of cattle currently is not accepted because the vaccine interferes with the skin reaction to the tuberculin test in the field. Efficacy of M. bovis BCG in protecting bovine and other animal species against tuberculous infection has received much study. Vaccination of cattle prevents the spread of the disease in populations by reducing the number and size of the lesions, and the load of bacteria (rather than by preventing infection). We review the literature about the efficacy of BCG in protecting cattle and other animal species against infection with field strains of M. bovis and discusses its potential use in programs of TB control in high-prevalence populations.

  15. Parenteral adenoviral boost enhances BCG induced protection, but not long term survival in a murine model of bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Daryan A; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Webb, Paul R; Wooff, Esen E; Bachy, Véronique S; Hogarth, Philip J

    2016-07-25

    Boosting BCG using heterologous prime-boost represents a promising strategy for improved tuberculosis (TB) vaccines, and adenovirus (Ad) delivery is established as an efficacious boosting vehicle. Although studies demonstrate that intranasal administration of Ad boost to BCG offers optimal protection, this is not currently possible in cattle. Using Ad vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigen TB10.4 (BCG/Ad-TB10.4), we demonstrate, parenteral boost of BCG immunised mice to induce specific CD8(+) IFN-γ producing T cells via synergistic priming of new epitopes. This induces significant improvement in pulmonary protection against Mycobacterium bovis over that provided by BCG when assessed in a standard 4week challenge model. However, in a stringent, year-long survival study, BCG/Ad-TB10.4 did not improve outcome over BCG, which we suggest may be due to the lack of additional memory cells (IL-2(+)) induced by boosting. These data indicate BCG-prime/parenteral-Ad-TB10.4-boost to be a promising candidate, but also highlight the need for further understanding of the mechanisms of T cell priming and associated memory using Ad delivery systems. That we were able to generate significant improvement in pulmonary protection above BCG with parenteral, rather than mucosal administration of boost vaccine is critical; suggesting that the generation of effective mucosal immunity is possible, without the risks and challenges of mucosal administration, but that further work to specifically enhance sustained protective immunity is required.

  16. Essential Elements of Child Protection Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsky, Allan Edward

    This study investigated the effectiveness of the process of mediation in child protection (CP) and the essential aspects which may contribute to developing more effective working relationships with child welfare families. The study focused on neutrality, one of the primary aspects of CP mediation. Interviews were conducted with 17 adult family…

  17. Social franchising of TB care through private GPs in Myanmar: an assessment of treatment results, access, equity and financial protection.

    PubMed

    Lönnroth, Knut; Aung, Tin; Maung, Win; Kluge, Hans; Uplekar, Mukund

    2007-05-01

    This article assesses whether social franchising of tuberculosis (TB) services in Myanmar has succeeded in providing quality treatment while ensuring equity in access and financial protection for poor patients. Newly diagnosed TB patients receiving treatment from private general practitioners (GPs) belonging to the franchise were identified. They were interviewed about social conditions, health seeking and health care costs at the time of starting treatment and again after 6 months follow-up. Routine data were used to ascertain clinical outcomes as well as to monitor trends in case notification. The franchisees contributed 2097 (21%) of the total 9951 total new sputum smear-positive pulmonary cases notified to the national TB programme in the study townships. The treatment success rate for new smear-positive cases was 84%, close to the World Health Organization target of 85% and similar to the treatment success of 81% in the national TB programme in Myanmar. People from the lower socio-economic groups represented 68% of the TB patients who access care in the franchise. Financial burden related to direct and indirect health care costs for tuberculosis was high, especially among the poor. Patients belonging to lower socio-economic groups incurred on average costs equivalent to 68% of annual per capita household income, with a median of 28%. However, 83% of all costs were incurred before starting treatment in the franchise, while 'shopping' for care. During treatment in the franchise, the cost of care was relatively low, corresponding to a median proportion of annual per capita income of 3% for people from lower socio-economic groups. This study shows that highly subsidized TB care delivered through a social franchise scheme in the private sector in Myanmar helped reach the poor with quality services, while partly protecting them from high health care expenditure. Extended outreach to others parts of the private sector may reduce diagnostic delay and patient costs

  18. Dopant-mediated structural and magnetic properties of TbMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vinit; McDannald, A.; Staruch, M.; Ramprasad, R.; Jain, M.

    2015-07-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of the doped terbium manganites (Tb,A)MnO3 (A = Gd, Dy, and Ho) have been investigated using first-principles calculations and further confirmed by subsequent experimental studies. Both computational and experimental studies suggest that compared to the parent material, namely, TbMnO3 (with a magnetic moment of 9.7 μ B for Tb3+) Dy- and Ho-ion substituted TbMnO3 results in an increase in the magnetic susceptibility at low fields ( ≤ 10.6 μ B for Dy3+ and Ho3+). The observed spiral-spin AFM order in TbMnO3 is stable with respect to the dopant substitutions, which modify the Mn-O-Mn bond angles and lead to stronger the ferromagnetic component of the magnetic moment. Given the fact that magnetic ordering in TbMnO3 causes the ferroelectricity, this is an important step in the field of the magnetically driven ferroelectricity in the class of magnetoelectric multiferroics, which traditionally have low magnetic moments due to the predominantly antiferromagnetic order. In addition, the present study reveals important insights on the phenomenological coupling mechanism in detail, which is essential in order to design new materials with enhanced magneto-electric effects at higher temperatures.

  19. High Frequency of CD4+ T Cells Specific for the TB10.4 Protein Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Majlessi, Laleh; Simsova, Marcela; Morova, Jana; Rojas, Marie-Jesus; Nouzé, Clémence; Brodin, Priscille; Sebo, Peter; Leclerc, Claude

    2006-01-01

    TB10.4 is a newly identified antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recognized by human and murine T cells upon mycobacterial infection. Here, we show that immunization with Mycobacterium bovis BCG induces a strong, genetically controlled, Th1 immune response against TB10.4 in mice. BALB/c and C57BL/6 strains behave as high and low responders to TB10.4 protein, respectively. The TB10.4:74-88 peptide was identified as an immunodominant CD4+ T-cell epitope for H-2d mice. Since recent results, as well as the present study, have raised interest in TB10.4 as a subunit vaccine, we analyzed immune responses induced by this antigen delivered by a new vector, the adenylate cyclase (CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis. CyaA is able to target dendritic cells and to deliver CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell epitopes to the major histocompatibility complex class II/I molecule presentation pathways, triggering specific Th1 or cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Several CyaA harboring either the entire TB10.4 protein or various subfragments containing the TB10.4:20-28 CTL epitope were shown to induce TB10.4-specific Th1 CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. However, none of the recombinant CyaA, injected in the absence of adjuvant, was able to induce protection against M. tuberculosis infection. In contrast, TB10.4 protein administered with a cocktail of strong adjuvants that triggered a strong Th1 CD4+ T-cell response induced significant protection against M. tuberculosis challenge. These results confirm the potential value of the TB10.4 protein as a candidate vaccine and show that the presence of high frequencies of CD4+ T cells specific to this strong immunogen correlates with protection against M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:16714570

  20. RNAi-mediated plant protection against aphids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Dao; Liu, Zong-Cai; Huang, Si-Liang; Chen, Zhi-Qin; Sun, Yong-Wei; Duan, Peng-Fei; Ma, You-Zhi; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-06-01

    Aphids (Aphididae) are major agricultural pests that cause significant yield losses of crop plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring harmful plant viruses. Expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests through plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi). Thus, as a potential alternative and effective strategy for insect pest management in agricultural practice, plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control has received close attention in recent years. In this review, the mechanism of RNAi in insects and the so far explored effective RNAi target genes in aphids, their potential applications in the development of transgenic plants for aphid control and the major challenges in this regard are reviewed, and the future prospects of using plant-mediated RNAi for aphid control are discussed. This review is intended to be a helpful insight into the generation of aphid-resistant plants through plant-mediated RNAi strategy. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. TB Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  2. Bio-mediated route for the synthesis of shape tunable Y₂O₃: Tb³⁺ nanoparticles: Photoluminescence and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Prasannakumar, J B; Vidya, Y S; Anantharaju, K S; Ramgopal, G; Nagabhushana, H; Sharma, S C; Daruka Prasad, B; Prashantha, S C; Basavaraj, R B; Rajanaik, H; Lingaraju, K; Prabhakara, K R; Nagaswarupa, H P

    2015-01-01

    The study reports green mediated combustion route for the synthesis of Tb(3+) ion activated Y2O3 nanophosphors using Aloe Vera gel as fuel. The concentration of Tb(3+) plays a key role in controlling the morphology of Y2O3 nanostructures. The formation of different morphologies of Y2O3: Tb(3+) nanophosphors were characterized by PXRD, SEM, TEM and HRTEM. PXRD data and Rietveld analysis evident the formation of single phase Y2O3 with cubic crystal structure. The influence of Tb(3+) ion concentration on structural morphology, UV-visible absorption and PL emission were investigated systematically. The PL emission of Y2O3: Tb(3+) (1-11 mol%) nanophosphors were studied in detail under 271 and 304nm excitation wavelengths. The CIE coordinates lies well within green region and correlated color temperature values were found to be 6221 and 5562K under different excitations. Thus, the present phosphor can serve as an excellent candidate for LEDs. Further, prismatic Y2O3: Tb(3+) (3 mol%) nanophosphor showed significant antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas desmolyticum and Staphylococcus aureus. The present study successfully demonstrates Y2O3: Tb(3+) nanophosphors can be used for display applications as well as in medical applications for controlling pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Innate and Adaptive Cytotoxic Lymphocytes and Prognostic Markers of Host Responses to Bovine TB

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cell mediated immunity (CMI) is essential for protection against TB in cattle, as in human disease. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of the bovine CMI responses to TB have been characterized during efforts to develop vaccines for cattle. These studies have identified similarities in mechanisms ...

  4. Intradermal immunization improves protective efficacy of a novel TB vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Susan L; Bertholet, Sylvie; Kahn, Maria; Zharkikh, Irina; Ireton, Gregory C; Vedvick, Thomas S; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2009-05-18

    We have developed the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) fusion protein (ID83), which contains the three Mtb proteins Rv1813, Rv3620 and Rv2608. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of ID83 in combination with several emulsion-formulated toll-like receptor agonists. The ID83 subunit vaccines containing synthetic TLR4 or TLR9 agonists generated a T helper-1 immune response and protected mice against challenge with Mtb regardless of route. The ID83 vaccine formulated with gardiquimod (a TLR7 agonist) also resulted in a protective response when administered intradermally, whereas the same vaccine given subcutaneously failed to provide protection. This highlights the need to explore different routes of immunization based on the adjuvant formulations used.

  5. RNAi-mediated crop protection against insects.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-07-01

    Downregulation of the expression of specific genes through RNA interference (RNAi), has been widely used for genetic research in insects. The method has relied on the injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is not possible for practical applications in crop protection. By contrast, specific suppression of gene expression in nematodes is possible through feeding with dsRNA. This approach was thought to be unfeasible in insects, but recent results have shown that dsRNA fed as a diet component can be effective in downregulating targeted genes. More significantly, expression of dsRNA directed against suitable insect target genes in transgenic plants has been shown to give protection against pests, opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops.

  6. Identifying predictors of interferon-γ release assay results in pediatric latent tuberculosis: a protective role of bacillus Calmette-Guerin?: a pTB-NET collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Basu Roy, Robindra; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Altet-Gómez, Neus; Tsolia, Maria; Ruga, Ezia; Velizarova, Svetlana; Kampmann, Beate

    2012-08-15

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays are widely used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in adults, but their performance in children remains incompletely evaluated to date. To investigate factors influencing results of IFN-γ release assays in children using a large European data set. The Pediatric Tuberculosis Network European Trials group pooled and analyzed data from five sites across Europe comprising 1,128 children who were all investigated for latent tuberculosis infection by tuberculin skin test and at least one IFN-γ release assay. Multivariate analyses examined age, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination status, and sex as predictor variables of results. Subgroup analyses included children who were household contacts. A total of 1,093 children had a QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and 382 had a T-SPOT.TB IFN-γ release assay. Age was positively correlated with a positive blood result (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: odds ratio [OR], 1.08 per year increasing age [P < 0.0001]; T-SPOT.TB: OR, 1.14 per year increasing age [P < 0.001]). A positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube result was shown by 5.5% of children with a tuberculin skin test result less than 5 mm, by 14.8% if less than 10 mm, and by 20.2% if less than 15 mm. Prior BCG vaccination was associated with a negative IFN-γ release assay result (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: OR, 0.41 [P < 0.001]; T-SPOT.TB: OR, 0.41 [P < 0.001]). Young age was a predictor of indeterminate IFN-γ release assay results, but indeterminate rates were low (3.6% in children < 5 yr, 1% in children > 5 yr). Our data show that BCG vaccination may be effective in protecting children against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To restrict use of IFN-γ release assays to children with positive skin tests risks underestimating latent infection.

  7. Sendai Virus Mucosal Vaccination Establishes Lung-Resident Memory CD8 T Cell Immunity and Boosts BCG-Primed Protection against TB in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhidong; Wong, Ka-Wing; Zhao, Hui-Min; Wen, Han-Li; Ji, Ping; Ma, Hui; Wu, Kang; Lu, Shui-Hua; Li, Feng; Li, Zhong-Ming; Shu, Tsugumine; Xu, Jian-Qing; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2017-03-22

    Accumulating evidence has shown the protective role of CD8(+) T cells in vaccine-induced immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) despite controversy over their role in natural immunity. However, the current vaccine BCG is unable to induce sufficient CD8(+) T cell responses, especially in the lung. Sendai virus, a respiratory RNA virus, is here engineered firstly as a novel recombinant anti-TB vaccine (SeV85AB) that encodes Mtb immuno-dominant antigens, Ag85A and Ag85B. A single mucosal vaccination elicited potent antigen-specific T cell responses and a degree of protection against Mtb challenge similar to the effect of BCG in mice. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells abrogated the protective immunity afforded by SeV85AB vaccination. Interestingly, only SeV85AB vaccination induced high levels of lung-resident memory CD8(+) T (TRM) cells, and this led to a rapid and strong recall of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses against Mtb challenge infection. Furthermore, when used in a BCG prime-SeV85AB boost strategy, SeV85AB vaccine significantly enhanced protection above that seen after BCG vaccination alone. Our findings suggest that CD8(+) TRM cells that arise in lungs responding to this mucosal vaccination might help to protect against TB, and SeV85AB holds notable promise to improve BCG's protective efficacy in a prime-boost immunization regimen.

  8. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and clinical studies to better understand the national history of TB and the development of drug resistance. NIAID also provides resources and animal models to investigators worldwide to facilitate biomedical research ...

  9. Nitric oxide protects endothelium from cadmium mediated leakiness.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shunmugam; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Priya, M Krishna; Swaminathan, Akila; Siamwala, Jamila H; Sinha, Swaraj; Veeriah, Vimal; Sonar, Punam; Jadhav, Vivek; Jaffar Ali, B M; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium targets the vascular endothelium causing endothelial dysfunction and leakiness of endothelial barrier. Nitric oxide plays a major role in mediating endothelial functions including angiogenesis, migration and permeability. The present study investigates the nitric oxide effects on cadmium induced endothelial leakiness. Results of ex vivo and in vitro permeability assays showed that even a sub-lethal dose of cadmium chloride (1 µM) was sufficient to induce leakiness of endothelial cells. Cadmium drastically altered the actin polymerisation pattern and membrane tension of these cells compared to controls. Addition of nitric oxide donor Spermine NONOate (SP) significantly blunted cadmium-mediated effects and recover endothelial cells integrity. Cadmium-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane leakiness are associated with the low nitric oxide availability and high reactive oxygen species generation. In brief, we show the protective role of nitric oxide against cadmium-mediated endothelial leakiness. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  10. A possible mechanism in DHEA-mediated protection against osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Jun; Tang, Lu-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Xin-Die; Ding, Qian-Hai; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its ester form, DHEA-S, are the most abundant steroids in human plasma. Our previous studies showed that DHEA protects against osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this paper was to explore the possible mechanisms that underlie DHEA-mediated protection against OA. We tested the expression of β-catenin, it was increased significantly in OA. Rabbit cartilage was treated with various concentrations of DHEA in both IL-1β-induced rabbit chondrocytes and in rabbit cartilage from the anterior cruciate ligament transaction-induced OA model. We found DHEA decreased the expression of β-catenin. Then we further activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by β-catenin transfection and inactivated it by the inhibitor Dickkopf1 in chondrocytes to reveal its role in the pathogenesis of OA. It turns out the protective effect of DHEA was significantly decreased when Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated, while inactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling enhanced the effects of DHEA. Therefore, we hypothesize that DHEA probably exerted its chondroprotective effect by regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in DHEA-mediated protection against OA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  12. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  13. Trypanosoma musculi Infection in Mice Critically Relies on Mannose Receptor-Mediated Arginase Induction by a TbKHC1 Kinesin H Chain Homolog.

    PubMed

    Nzoumbou-Boko, Romaric; De Muylder, Géraldine; Semballa, Silla; Lecordier, Laurence; Dauchy, Fréderic-Antoine; Gobert, Alain P; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel; Barnabé, Christian; Courtois, Pierrette; Daulouède, Sylvie; Beschin, Alain; Pays, Etienne; Vincendeau, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Arginase activity induction in macrophages is an escape mechanism developed by parasites to cope with the host's immune defense and benefit from increased host-derived growth factor production. We report that arginase expression and activity were induced in macrophages during mouse infection by Trypanosoma musculi, a natural parasite of this host. This induction was reproduced in vitro by excreted/secreted factors of the parasite. A mAb directed to TbKHC1, an orphan kinesin H chain from Trypanosoma brucei, inhibited T. musculi excreted/secreted factor-mediated arginase induction. Anti-TbKHC1 Ab also inhibited T. musculi growth, both in vitro and in vivo. Induction of arginase activity and parasite growth involved C-type lectin receptors, because mannose injection decreased arginase activity induction and parasite load in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, the parasite load was reduced in mice lacking mannose receptor C-type 1. The T. musculi KHC1 homolog showed high similarity with TbKHC1. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of homologs of this gene in other trypanosomes, including pathogens for humans and animals. Host metabolism dysregulation represents an effective parasite mechanism to hamper the host immune response and modify host molecule production to favor parasite invasion and growth. Thus, this orphan kinesin plays an important role in promoting trypanosome infection, and its neutralization or the lock of its partner host molecules offers promising approaches to increasing resistance to infection and new developments in vaccination against trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Testing for TB Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  15. [Immunotherapy for MDR-TB (multi-drug resistant tuberculosis)--its feasibility].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, I

    1999-06-01

    MDR-TB is known to be man-made-disease. Inappropriate treatment of tuberculosis is responsible for the development of MDR-TB. MDR-TB is often accompanied with the immunosuppression of the host. Given that we are unable to develop another potent anti-TB drug in near future, immunotherapy directed at combating immunosuppression and enhancing the host's own immune response is an attractive approach to supplement conventional chemotherapy for MDR-TB. Patients with AIDS and patients with abnormalities of macrophage function have frequent problems with TB. This is suggesting that the host defenses involved in protection against mycobacteria include T-cell and monocyte/macrophage functions. That is cell-mediated immunity. Diverse cytokines are known to play an important role in anti-TB cell-mediated immunity, including IL-2, IL-12, IL-18 and IFN-gamma. Various animal experiments are indicating that administration of these cytokine (s) did recover the suppressed immunity and rescued the host from death by tuberculous infection. However, we have to keep it in mind that the results obtained from animal model of mycobacterial infection on the study of pathogenesis and immune responses in TB is not always applicable to the understanding of human TB. Clinical trial of inhalation therapy with IFN-gamma showed some improvement for drug-resistant TB. Cytokine treatment, however, often gave some deleterious side effects such as high fever, malaise, general edema and even the death of the host. Clinical trials with M. vaccae have been extensively conducted by UK group. The mechanisms underlying its possible therapeutic action remain to be clarified, but when administered at an appropriate dose, it has been shown to elicit a strong Th1 immune response. From the practical view point of immunotherapy for TB, surrogate markers of disease eradication and protective immunity are urgently required. Such markers would facilitate clinical trials by providing early evidence that test

  16. Specific and nonspecific mediation of protective immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, L; Frenkel, J K

    1987-01-01

    We studied the specificity of protection conferred by Toxoplasma gondii immune lymphocytes and their supernatants on infected hamster kidney cells, using Besnoitia jellisoni immune lymphocytes as a nonspecific control. The intracellular growth of the organisms was measured by [3H]uracil incorporation, and inhibition of multiplication was used as a measurement of immunity. Although the immune lymphocytes restricted principally the multiplication of homologous organisms, partial protection, expressed against the heterologous organism, was found. This was true for either parasite with intact lymphocytes or their supernatants. Exposure of immune lymphocytes to antigen for 18 to 24 h and treatment of kidney cells with supernatant fluids for 18 to 24 h were required for maximal protection. The specific protective mediator in supernatants of immune lymphocytes was characterized by dialysis as having a molecular weight between 3,000 and 12,000 and was found in the 3,000 to 5,000 peak after Sephadex G-50 chromatography. Nonspecific protective activity was greater than 12,000 by dialysis; it chromatographed in the excluded peak, measuring over 43,000, and was destroyed by exposure to pH 2. In vitro production of lymphokines from toxoplasma immune lymphocytes was first detected 7 to 10 days after vaccination of hamsters. At about the same time, hamsters began to resist challenge infection with the pathogenic RH strain of T. gondii and were able to prevent its multiplication in lungs, liver, spleen, and the subcutaneous infection site. The expression of tissue immunity and the production of toxoplasma-immune lymphokines appear to be time-related events. PMID:3557619

  17. Ferromagnetic response of multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3} films mediated by epitaxial strain and chemical pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, J.; Morán, O.; Astudillo, A.; Bolaños, G.; Arnache, O.

    2014-05-07

    High quality Tb{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.3) films have been grown under different values of compressive/tensile strain using (001)-oriented SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO substrates. The films were grown by means of rf sputtering at substrate temperature of 800  °C. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that films are single phase, preferentially oriented in the (111) and (122) directions for films deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} and MgO substrates, respectively. Although the TbMnO{sub 3} target shows antiferromagnetic order, the films deposited on both substrates show weak ferromagnetic phase at low temperature coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase. The introduction of Al in the films clearly enhances their ferromagnetic behavior, improving the magnetic performance of this material. Indeed, M(H) measurements at 5 K show a well-defined hysteresis for films grown on both substrates. However, a stronger magnetic signal (larger values of remanence and coercive field) is observed for films deposited on MgO substrates. The chemical pressure generated by Al doping together with the substrate-induced strain seem to modify the subtle competition between magnetic interactions in the system. It is speculated that such modification could lead to a non-collinear magnetic state that may be tuned by strain modifications. This may be performed by varying the thickness of the films and/or considering other substrate materials.

  18. TB vaccine development and the End TB Strategy: importance and current status.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-04-01

    TB is now the leading, global cause of death due to a single infectious microbe. To achieve the End TB vision of reducing TB by 90% by 2035 we will need new interventions. The objectives of this manuscript are to summarize the status of the clinical TB vaccine pipeline; to assess the challenges facing the TB development field; and to discuss some of the key strategies being embraced by the field to overcome these challenges. Currently, 8 of the 13 vaccines in clinical development are subunit vaccines; 6 of these contain or express either Ag85A or Ag85B proteins. A major challenge to TB vaccine development is the lack of diversity in both the antigens included in TB vaccines, and the immune responses elicited by TB vaccine candidates. Both will need to be expanded to maximise the potential for developing a successful candidate by 2025. Current research efforts are focused on broadening both antigen selection and the range of vaccine-mediated immune responses. Previous and ongoing TB vaccine efficacy trials have built capacity, generated high quality data on TB incidence and prevalence, and provided insight into immune correlates of risk of TB disease. These gains will enable the design of better TB vaccines and, importantly, move these vaccines into efficacy trials more rapidly and at a lower cost than was possible for previous TB vaccine candidates.

  19. Mast Cell Proteases as Protective and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are the most abundant class of proteins produced by mast cells. Many of these are stored in membrane-enclosed intracellular granules until liberated by degranulating stimuli, which include cross-linking of high affinity IgE receptor FcεRI by IgE bound to multivalent allergen. Understanding and separating the functions of the proteases is important because expression differs among mast cells in different tissue locations. Differences between laboratory animals and humans in protease expression also influence the degree of confidence with which results obtained in animal models of mast cell function can be extrapolated to humans. The inflammatory potential of mast cell proteases was the first aspect of their biology to be explored and has received the most attention, in part because some of them—notably tryptases and chymases—are biomarkers of local and systemic mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis. Although some of the proteases indeed augment allergic inflammation and are potential targets for inhibition to treat asthma and related allergic disorders, they are protective and even anti-inflammatory in some settings. For example, mast cell tryptases may protect from serious bacterial lung infections and may limit the “rubor” component of inflammation caused by vasodilating neuropeptides in the skin. Chymases help to maintain intestinal barrier function and to expel parasitic worms, and may support blood pressure during anaphylaxis by generating angiotensin II. In other life-or-death examples, carboxypeptidase A3 and other mast cell peptidases limit systemic toxicity of endogenous peptides like endothelin and neurotensin during septic peritonitis, and inactivate venom-associated peptides. On the other hand, mast cell peptidase-mediated destruction of protective cytokines, like IL-6, can enhance mortality from sepsis. Peptidases released from mast cells also influence non-mast cell proteases, such as by activating matrix metalloproteinase cascades

  20. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Clinical Trials Tuberculosis (TB) Causes ...

  1. Recombinant BCG Expressing ESX-1 of Mycobacterium marinum Combines Low Virulence with Cytosolic Immune Signaling and Improved TB Protection.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Matthias I; Sayes, Fadel; Shin, Sung Jae; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Orgeur, Mickael; Canetti, Robin; Honoré, Nadine; Simeone, Roxane; van der Werf, Tjip S; Bitter, Wilbert; Cho, Sang-Nae; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2017-03-14

    Recent insights into the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of human tuberculosis, is recognized by cytosolic nucleotide sensors have opened new avenues for rational vaccine design. The only licensed anti-tuberculosis vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, provides limited protection. A feature of BCG is the partial deletion of the ESX-1 type VII secretion system, which governs phagosomal rupture and cytosolic pattern recognition, key intracellular phenotypes linked to increased immune signaling. Here, by heterologously expressing the esx-1 region of Mycobacterium marinum in BCG, we engineered a low-virulence, ESX-1-proficient, recombinant BCG (BCG::ESX-1(Mmar)) that induces the cGas/STING/TBK1/IRF-3/type I interferon axis and enhances AIM2 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity, resulting in both higher proportions of CD8(+) T cell effectors against mycobacterial antigens shared with BCG and polyfunctional CD4(+) Th1 cells specific to ESX-1 antigens. Importantly, independent mouse vaccination models show that BCG::ESX-1(Mmar) confers superior protection relative to parental BCG against challenges with highly virulent M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  3. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  4. Immunity to TB and targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2012-02-01

    For centuries the treatment of TB has presented an enormous challenge to global health. In the 20th century, the treatment of TB patients with long-term multidrug therapy gave hope that TB could be controlled and cured; however, contrary to these expectations and coinciding with the emergence of AIDS, the world has witnessed a rampant increase in hard-to-treat cases of TB, along with the emergence of highly virulent and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Unfortunately, these bacteria are now circulating around the world, and there are few effective drugs to treat them. As a result, the prospects for improved treatment and control of TB in the 21st century have worsened and we urgently need to identify new therapies that deal with this problem. The potential use of immunotherapy for TB is now of greater consideration than ever before, as immunotherapy could potentially overcome the problem of drug resistance. TB immunotherapy targets the already existing host anti-TB immune response and aims to enhance killing of the bacilli. For this purpose, several approaches have been used: the use of anti-Mycobacteria antibodies; enhancing the Th1 protective responses by using mycobacterial antigens or increasing Th1 cytokines; interfering with the inflammatory process and targeting of immunosuppressive pathways and targeting the cell activation/proliferation pathways. This article reviews our current understanding of TB immunity and targets for immunotherapy that could be used in combination with current TB chemotherapy.

  5. Early eradication of persistent Salmonella infection primes antibody-mediated protective immunity to recurrent infection.

    PubMed

    Johanns, Tanner M; Law, Calvin Y; Kalekar, Lokeshchandra A; O'Donnell, Hope; Ertelt, James M; Rowe, Jared H; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-04-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic, persistent infection caused by host-specific strains of Salmonella. Although the use of antibiotics has reduced the complications associated with primary infection, recurrent infection remains an important cause of ongoing human morbidity and mortality. Herein, we investigated the impacts of antibiotic eradication of primary infection on protection against secondary recurrent infection. Using a murine model of persistent Salmonella infection, we demonstrate protection against recurrent infection is sustained despite early eradication of primary infection. In this model, protection is not mediated by CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells because depletion of these cells either alone or in combination prior to rechallenge does not abrogate protection. Instead, infection followed by antibiotic-mediated clearance primes robust levels of Salmonella-specific antibody that can adoptively transfer protection to naïve mice. Thus, eradication of persistent Salmonella infection primes antibody-mediated protective immunity to recurrent infection.

  6. Innovative clinical trial designs to rationalize TB vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R D; Hatherill, M; Tait, D; Snowden, M; Churchyard, G; Hanekom, W; Evans, T; Ginsberg, A M

    2015-05-01

    A recent trial of a leading tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidate in 3000 South African infants failed to show protection over that from BCG alone, and highlights the difficulties in clinical development of TB vaccines. Progression of vaccine candidates to efficacy trials against TB disease rests on demonstration of safety and immunogenicity in target populations and protection against challenge in preclinical models, but immunologic correlates of protection are unknown, and animal models may not be predictive of results in humans. Even in populations most heavily affected by TB the sample sizes required for Phase 2b efficacy trials using TB disease as an endpoint are in the thousands. Novel clinical trial models have been developed to evaluate candidate TB vaccines in selected populations using biologically relevant outcomes and innovative statistical approaches. Such proof of concept studies can be used to more rationally select vaccine candidates for advancement to large scale trials against TB disease.

  7. Exercise mediated protection of diabetic heart through modulation of microRNA mediated molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Lew, Jason Kar Sheng; Pearson, James T; Schwenke, Daryl O; Katare, Rajesh

    2017-01-13

    Hyperglycaemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance collectively impact on the myocardium of people with diabetes, triggering molecular, structural and myocardial abnormalities. These have been suggested to aggravate oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, myocardial lipotoxicity and impaired myocardial substrate utilization. As a consequence, this leads to the development of a spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, which may include but not limited to coronary endothelial dysfunction, and left ventricular remodelling and dysfunction. Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is the term used to describe the presence of heart disease specifically in diabetic patients. Despite significant advances in medical research and long clinical history of anti-diabetic medications, the risk of heart failure in people with diabetes never declines. Interestingly, sustainable and long-term exercise regimen has emerged as an effective synergistic therapy to combat the cardiovascular complications in people with diabetes, although the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying this protection remain unclear. This review provides an overview of the underlying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia- and insulin resistance-mediated DHD with a detailed discussion on the role of different intensities of exercise in mitigating these molecular alterations in diabetic heart. In particular, we provide the possible role of exercise on microRNAs, the key molecular regulators of several pathophysiological processes.

  8. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  9. Modeling the ecology of symbiont-mediated protection against parasites.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Marek; Vorburger, Christoph

    2012-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that many maternally transmitted symbionts protect their hosts against parasites, thus ensuring their own persistence. Despite the protection they provide, such symbionts are typically found in only a fraction of the host population. This suggests that symbiont-conferred resistance is costly or that the maternal inheritance of symbionts is not perfect. To investigate these hypotheses and other properties of this complex ecological system, we develop a mathematical model based on the example of bacterial endosymbionts that protect aphids against parasitoid wasps. Simulations show that in the absence of more complex effects, a very fine balance between the costs of harboring symbionts and the strength of protection they provide is required to maintain coexistence of protected and unprotected hosts. These constraints are significantly relaxed and coexistence becomes a common outcome if deployment of symbiont-provided defenses upon a parasite attack entails an additional (induced) cost. Transmission rates of symbionts also affect coexistence, which is more frequently observed under high (but not perfect) fidelity of vertical transfer and low rates of horizontal transfer. Finally, we show that the prevalence of defensive symbionts has a strong influence on the population dynamics of hosts and parasites: population sizes are stable if and only if protected hosts dominate.

  10. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  11. Large magnetoelectric effect in mechanically mediated structure of TbFe{sub 2}, Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}, and nonmagnetic flakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, K.; Wang, Y. G.; Wu, W.; Pan, D. A.

    2011-03-28

    Magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been studied in a structure of a magnetostrictive TbFe{sub 2} alloy, two piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) ceramics, and two nonmagnetic flakes. The ME coupling originates from the magnetic-mechanical-electric transform of the magnetostrictive effect in TbFe{sub 2} and the piezoelectric effect in PZT by end bonding, instead of interface bonding. Large ME coefficients of 10.5 and 9.9 V cm{sup -1} Oe{sup -1} were obtained at the first planar acoustic and third bending resonance frequencies, which are larger than that of conventional layered TbFe{sub 2}/PZT composites. The results show that the large ME coupling can be achieved without interface coupling.

  12. Questions and Answers about TB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  13. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in tuberculosis: a two-edged sword in TB pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Etna, Marilena Paola; Giacomini, Elena; Severa, Martina; Coccia, Eliana Marina

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge in tuberculosis (TB) is to improve current vaccination and therapeutic strategies and this requires a fine understanding of the mechanisms that mediate protection and pathogenesis. We need to discern how the host perceives Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, what are the danger signals that activate the immune system and, in turn, how the immune response controls the life-cycle of Mtb. Cytokines, because of their nature of soluble mediators, represent key elements in mediating and tuning these complex processes. In this review, we provide an overview of recent studies on cytokines expression and function in active (mainly human) TB. Understanding of the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory networks is crucial to refine our knowledge on the immune responses directed against Mtb. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  15. Protective pathways against colitis mediated by appendicitis and appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvappa, R; Luo, A S; Palmer, C; Grimm, M C

    2011-01-01

    Appendicitis followed by appendectomy (AA) at a young age protects against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using a novel murine appendicitis model, we showed that AA protected against subsequent experimental colitis. To delineate genes/pathways involved in this protection, AA was performed and samples harvested from the most distal colon. RNA was extracted from four individual colonic samples per group (AA group and double-laparotomy control group) and each sample microarray analysed followed by gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA). The gene-expression study was validated by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) of 14 selected genes across the immunological spectrum. Distal colonic expression of 266 gene-sets was up-regulated significantly in AA group samples (false discovery rates < 1%; P-value < 0·001). Time–course RT–PCR experiments involving the 14 genes displayed down-regulation over 28 days. The IBD-associated genes tnfsf10, SLC22A5, C3, ccr5, irgm, ptger4 and ccl20 were modulated in AA mice 3 days after surgery. Many key immunological and cellular function-associated gene-sets involved in the protective effect of AA in experimental colitis were identified. The down-regulation of 14 selected genes over 28 days after surgery indicates activation, repression or de-repression of these genes leading to downstream AA-conferred anti-colitis protection. Further analysis of these genes, profiles and biological pathways may assist in developing better therapeutic strategies in the management of intractable IBD. PMID:21707591

  16. The Role of Lipid Competition for Endosymbiont-Mediated Protection against Parasitoid Wasps in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schüpfer, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insects commonly harbor facultative bacterial endosymbionts, such as Wolbachia and Spiroplasma species, that are vertically transmitted from mothers to their offspring. These endosymbiontic bacteria increase their propagation by manipulating host reproduction or by protecting their hosts against natural enemies. While an increasing number of studies have reported endosymbiont-mediated protection, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this protection. Here, we analyze the mechanisms underlying protection from parasitoid wasps in Drosophila melanogaster mediated by its facultative endosymbiont Spiroplasma poulsonii. Our results indicate that S. poulsonii exerts protection against two distantly related wasp species, Leptopilina boulardi and Asobara tabida. S. poulsonii-mediated protection against parasitoid wasps takes place at the pupal stage and is not associated with an increased cellular immune response. In this work, we provide three important observations that support the notion that S. poulsonii bacteria and wasp larvae compete for host lipids and that this competition underlies symbiont-mediated protection. First, lipid quantification shows that both S. poulsonii and parasitoid wasps deplete D. melanogaster hemolymph lipids. Second, the depletion of hemolymphatic lipids using the Lpp RNA interference (Lpp RNAi) construct reduces wasp success in larvae that are not infected with S. poulsonii and blocks S. poulsonii growth. Third, we show that the growth of S. poulsonii bacteria is not affected by the presence of the wasps, indicating that when S. poulsonii is present, larval wasps will develop in a lipid-depleted environment. We propose that competition for host lipids may be relevant to endosymbiont-mediated protection in other systems and could explain the broad spectrum of protection provided. PMID:27406568

  17. Vaccine Mediated Protection Against Zika Virus-Induced Congenital Disease.

    PubMed

    Richner, Justin M; Jagger, Brett W; Shan, Chao; Fontes, Camila R; Dowd, Kimberly A; Cao, Bin; Himansu, Sunny; Caine, Elizabeth A; Nunes, Bruno T D; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Muruato, Antonio E; Foreman, Bryant M; Luo, Huanle; Wang, Tian; Barrett, Alan D; Weaver, Scott C; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Rossi, Shannan L; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Mysorekar, Indira U; Pierson, Theodore C; Shi, Pei-Yong; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-07-13

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) and its association with congenital malformations has prompted the rapid development of vaccines. Although efficacy with multiple viral vaccine platforms has been established in animals, no study has addressed protection during pregnancy. We tested in mice two vaccine platforms, a lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated modified mRNA vaccine encoding ZIKV prM and E genes and a live-attenuated ZIKV strain encoding an NS1 protein without glycosylation, for their ability to protect against transmission to the fetus. Vaccinated dams challenged with a heterologous ZIKV strain at embryo day 6 (E6) and evaluated at E13 showed markedly diminished levels of viral RNA in maternal, placental, and fetal tissues, which resulted in protection against placental damage and fetal demise. As modified mRNA and live-attenuated vaccine platforms can restrict in utero transmission of ZIKV in mice, their further development in humans to prevent congenital ZIKV syndrome is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Somatostatin protects human retinal pericytes from inflammation mediated by microglia.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Aurora; Arroba, Ana I; Beltramo, Elena; Valverde, Angela M; Porta, Massimo

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is usually considered a microvascular disease. However, involvement of the neuroretina in the early stages of DR has recently gained major credit. Inflammatory processes, leading to glial activation and neuronal apoptosis, develop early in the retina of diabetic subjects. Pericytes constitute a link between the vascular and the neural retina, play a central role in blood-retinal barrier maintenance, and may influence neuroinflammation. Somatostatin (SST) is a potent neuroprotective factor, which is down-regulated during early DR. In this paper, we have investigated the effects of the inflammatory signals triggered by the activation of microglia on inflammation and apoptosis/survival pathways in pericytes. Microglia cells (Bv-2) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or SST. Human retinal pericytes (HRP) were exposed to conditioned media (CM) collected from Bv-2 cells in physiological conditions and in the settings described above. A panel of inflammation, apoptosis and survival mediators was analyzed. HRP treated with LPS-CM showed a significant increase of pro-inflammatory (iNos and TNFα) and pro-apoptotic mediators (FasL, active caspase-8, tBid and Bax), and a concomitant decrease in pro-survival factors (BclxL and pAkt). SST added to LPS was able to counteract these effects in all conditions. In conclusion, SST is able to modulate apoptosis/survival pathways in HRP during microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate a crosstalk between microglia and retinal pericytes, evidencing a possible defensive role of microglia in the early phases of DR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial Herd Protection Mediated by Antagonistic Interaction in Polymicrobial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Megan J. Q.; Liang, Xiaoye; Smart, Matt; Tang, Le; Moore, Richard; Ingalls, Brian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In host and natural environments, microbes often exist in complex multispecies communities. The molecular mechanisms through which such communities develop and persist, despite significant antagonistic interactions between species, are not well understood. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a lethal weapon commonly employed by Gram-negative bacteria to inhibit neighboring species through the delivery of toxic effectors. It is well established that intraspecies protection is conferred by immunity proteins that neutralize effector toxicities. In contrast, the mechanisms for interspecies protection are not clear. Here we use two T6SS-active antagonistic bacterial species, Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio cholerae, to demonstrate that interspecies protection is dependent on effectors. A. hydrophila and V. cholerae do not share conserved immunity genes but could coexist equally in a mixture. However, mutants lacking the T6SS or effectors were effectively eliminated by the competing wild-type strain. Time-lapse microscopic analyses showed that mutually lethal interactions drive the segregation of mixed species into distinct single-species clusters by eliminating interspersed single cells. Cluster formation provides herd protection by abolishing lethal interactions inside each cluster and restricting the interactions to the boundary. Using an agent-based modeling approach, we simulated the antagonistic interactions of two hypothetical species. The resulting simulations recapitulated our experimental observations. These results provide mechanistic insights regarding the general role of microbial weapons in determining the structures of complex multispecies communities. IMPORTANCE Investigating the warfare of microbes allows us to better understand the ecological relationships in complex microbial communities such as the human microbiota. Here we use the T6SS, a deadly bacterial weapon, as a model to demonstrate the importance of lethal interactions in

  20. Social Differentiation of Sun-Protection Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Cognitive Factors.

    PubMed

    Bocquier, Aurélie; Fressard, Lisa; Legleye, Stéphane; Verger, Pierre; Peretti-Watel, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Adherence to sun-protection guidelines in developed countries is low, especially among people of low SES. Mechanisms underlying this social differentiation are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the social differentiation of sun-protection behaviors and of two cognitive factors (knowledge about both sun health and behavioral risk factors for cancer) and to determine if these cognitive factors mediate the association between SES and sun-protection behaviors. Data came from the 2010 Baromètre Cancer survey (analyzed in 2014), a random cross-sectional telephone survey conducted among the French general population (n=3,359 individuals aged 15-75 years). First, bivariate associations between a composite individual SES indicator (based on education level, occupation, and income) and both sun-protection behaviors and cognitive factors were tested with chi-square tests and ANOVA. Then, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test the mediating role of cognitive factors with a multiple mediation model including four latent variables. In bivariate analyses, the individual SES indicator was positively associated with sun-protection behaviors and both cognitive factors. Multiple mediation analyses showed that both cognitive factors partially mediated the effect of individual SES on sun-protection behaviors. The overall proportion of mediated effects was 48%. The direct effect of SES remained significant. These results suggest that interventions aimed at modifying the knowledge and perceptions of people of low SES might help to reduce social differentiation of sun-protection behaviors. Further qualitative research is needed to better understand these cognitive factors and develop suitable prevention messages. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Fc-mediated antibody function in protective immunity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K

    2014-05-01

    The importance of Fc-mediated effector function in protective immunity to HIV-1 (hereafter referred to simply as HIV) is becoming increasingly apparent. A large of number of studies in natural infection cohorts, spanning the last 26 years, have associated Fc-mediated effector function, particularly antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, with a favourable clinical course. These studies strongly suggest a role for Fc-mediated effector function in the post-infection control of viraemia. More recently, studies in both humans and non-human primates (NHPs) also implicate Fc-mediated effector function in blocking HIV acquisition. Accordingly, this review will discuss the results supporting a role of Fc-mediated effector function in both blocking acquisition and post-infection control of viraemia. Parallel studies in NHPs and humans will be compared for common themes. Context for this discussion will be provided by summarizing the temporal emergence of key host and virological events over the course of an untreated HIV infection framing where, when and how Fc-mediated effector function might be protective. A hypothesis that Fc-mediated effector function protects primarily in the early stages of both acquisition and post-infection control of viraemia will be developed.

  2. Resveratrol inhibits estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis through induction of NRF2-mediated protective pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupendra; Shoulson, Rivka; Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta; Bhat, Nimee K.; Dim, Daniel C.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of estrogens in the etiology of breast cancer is widely recognized. Estrogen-induced oxidative stress has been implicated in this carcinogenic process. Resveratrol (Res), a natural antioxidant phytoestrogen has chemopreventive effects against a variety of illnesses including cancer. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mechanism(s) of Res-mediated protection against estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. Female August Copenhagen Irish rats were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2), Res and Res + E2 for 8 months. Cotreatment of rats with Res and E2 inhibited E2-mediated proliferative changes in mammary tissues and significantly increased tumor latency and reduced E2-induced breast tumor development. Resveratrol treatment alone or in combination with E2 significantly upregulated expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in mammary tissues. Expression of NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes NQO1, SOD3 and OGG1 that are involved in protection against oxidative DNA damage was increased in Res- and Res + E2-treated mammary tissues. Resveratrol also prevented E2-mediated inhibition of detoxification genes AOX1 and FMO1. Inhibition of E2-mediated alterations in NRF2 promoter methylation and expression of NRF2 targeting miR-93 after Res treatment indicated Res-mediated epigenetic regulation of NRF2 during E2-induced breast carcinogenesis. Resveratrol treatment also induced apoptosis and inhibited E2-mediated increase in DNA damage in mammary tissues. Increased apoptosis and decreased DNA damage, cell migration, colony and mammosphere formation in Res- and Res + E2-treated MCF-10A cells suggested a protective role of Res against E2-induced mammary carcinogenesis. Small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of NRF2 inhibited Res-mediated preventive effects on the colony and mammosphere formation. Taken together, these results suggest that Res inhibits E2-induced breast carcinogenesis via induction of NRF2-mediated protective

  3. Infection-Mediated Priming of Phagocytes Protects against Lethal Secondary Aspergillus fumigatus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Savers, Amélie; Rasid, Orhan; Parlato, Marianna; Brock, Matthias; Jouvion, Gregory; Ryffel, Bernhard; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Eberl, Gerard; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytes restrict the germination of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and prevent the establishment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in immunecompetent mice. Here we report that immunecompetent mice recovering from a primary A. fumigatus challenge are protected against a secondary lethal challenge. Using RAGγc knock-out mice we show that this protection is independent of T, B and NK cells. In protected mice, lung phagocytes are recruited more rapidly and are more efficient in conidial phagocytosis and killing. Protection was also associated with an enhanced expression of CXCR2 and Dectin-1 on bone marrow phagocytes. We also show that protective lung cytokine and chemokine responses are induced more rapidly and with enhanced dynamics in protected mice. Our findings support the hypothesis that following a first encounter with a non-lethal dose of A. fumigatus conidia, the innate immune system is primed and can mediate protection against a secondary lethal infection. PMID:27078879

  4. Eosinophils mediate protective immunity against secondary nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G; Gagliardo, Lucille F; Ruyechan, Maura C; Luber, Kierstin L; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Appleton, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are versatile cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, influence metabolism and tissue repair, and contribute to allergic lung disease. Within the context of immunity to parasitic worm infections, eosinophils are prominent yet highly varied in function. We have shown previously that when mice undergo primary infection with the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis, eosinophils play an important immune regulatory role that promotes larval growth and survival in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to address the function of eosinophils in secondary infection with T. spiralis. By infecting eosinophil-ablated mice, we found that eosinophils are dispensable for immunity that clears adult worms or controls fecundity in secondary infection. In contrast, eosinophil ablation had a pronounced effect on secondary infection of skeletal muscle by migratory newborn larvae. Restoring eosinophils to previously infected, ablated mice caused them to limit muscle larvae burdens. Passive immunization of naive, ablated mice with sera or Ig from infected donors, together with transfer of eosinophils, served to limit the number of newborn larvae that migrated in tissue and colonized skeletal muscle. Results from these in vivo studies are consistent with earlier findings that eosinophils bind to larvae in the presence of Abs in vitro. Although our previous findings showed that eosinophils protect the parasite in primary infection, these new data show that eosinophils protect the host in secondary infection.

  5. Eosinophils mediate protective immunity against secondary nematode infection1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Luber, Kierstin L.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are versatile cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, influence metabolism and tissue repair, and contribute to allergic lung disease. Within the context of immunity to parasitic worm infections, eosinophils are prominent yet highly varied in function. We have shown previously that when mice undergo primary infection with the parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis, eosinophils play an important, immune regulatory role that promotes larval growth and survival in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to address the function of eosinophils in secondary infection with T. spiralis. By infecting eosinophil-ablated mice, we found that eosinophils are dispensable for immunity that clears adult worms or controls fecundity in secondary infection. In contrast, eosinophil ablation had a pronounced effect on secondary infection of skeletal muscle by migratory newborn larvae. Restoring eosinophils to previously infected, ablated mice caused them to limit muscle larvae burdens. Passive immunization of naïve, ablated mice with sera or immunoglobulin from infected donors, together with transfer of eosinophils, served to limit the number of newborn larvae that migrated in tissue and colonized skeletal muscle. Results from these in vivo studies are consistent with earlier findings that eosinophils bind to larvae in the presences of antibodies in vitro. Although our previous findings showed that eosinophils protect the parasite in primary infection, these new data show that eosinophils protect the host in secondary infection. PMID:25429065

  6. Oxidative stress correlates with Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Wolbachia-Drosophila associations.

    PubMed

    Wong, Zhee Sheen; Brownlie, Jeremy C; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-05-01

    Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection in insect hosts and is being developed as a potential biocontrol agent to reduce the spread of insect-vectored viruses. Definition of the molecular mechanism that generates protection is important for understanding the tripartite interaction between host insect, Wolbachia, and virus. Elevated oxidative stress was previously reported for a mosquito line experimentally infected with Wolbachia, suggesting that oxidative stress is important for Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection. However, Wolbachia experimentally introduced into mosquitoes impacts a range of host fitness traits, some of which are unrelated to antiviral protection. To explore whether elevated oxidative stress is associated with antiviral protection in Wolbachia-infected insects, we analyzed oxidative stress of five Wolbachia-infected Drosophila lines. In flies infected with protective Wolbachia strains, hydrogen peroxide concentrations were 1.25- to 2-fold higher than those in paired fly lines cured of Wolbachia infection. In contrast, there was no difference in the hydrogen peroxide concentrations in flies infected with nonprotective Wolbachia strains compared to flies cured of Wolbachia infection. Using a Drosophila mutant that produces increased levels of hydrogen peroxide, we investigated whether flies with high levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species had altered responses to virus infection and found that flies with high levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide were less susceptible to virus-induced mortality. Taken together, these results suggest that elevated oxidative stress correlates with Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in natural Drosophila hosts.

  7. Stability of efferent-mediated protection against acoustic overexposure with long maintenance under barbiturate anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rajan, R

    1996-01-01

    When anaesthetized animals are maintained over a long period, crossed-cochlear suppressive and enhancement-in-noise effects mediated by the olivocochlear bundle (OCB), as well as some OCB neuronal responses, show time-dependent variations. The present study determined if there were any such changes in OCB-mediated crossed-cochlear protection against compound action potential (CAP) threshold losses caused by a standard loud sound exposure at 11 kHz, presented under conditions either not evoking OCB-mediated protection (i.e. monaural exposure) or evoking protection (binaural exposure). Maintaining animals for periods up to approximately 30 h from initial anaesthetization resulted in non-significant changes in pre-exposure CAP thresholds. There were also only small changes over select frequency ranges in threshold losses caused by the monaural or binaural loud sound, after a single exposure as well as when the testing of OCB function was extended to examine effects after dual successive exposures, the latter result being determined by application of a previously described additivity model. The features of OCB-mediated protection also showed good stability over the long maintenance. These results are discussed as providing further circumstantial evidence that protection is mediated by a different OCB subcomponent to that/those responsible for other OCB-mediated crossed-cochlear effects. In general, the results show that the barbiturate anaesthetic used here does not significantly modulate the crossed-cochlear OCB effect of protection, even though it has been shown elsewhere to significantly depress other crossed-cochlear OCB effects.

  8. IL-17A-Mediated Protection against Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Suryawanshi, Amol; Cao, Zhiyi; Sampson, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a very painful and vision impairing infection of the cornea that is difficult to treat. Although past studies have indicated a critical role of neutrophils and macrophages in AK, the relative contribution of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-17A, that is essential for migration, activation and function of these cells into the cornea is poorly defined. Moreover, the role of the adaptive immune response, particularly the contribution of CD4+ T cell subsets, Th17 and Treg cells, in AK is yet to be understood. In this report, using a mouse corneal intrastromal injection-induced AK model, we show that Acanthamoeba infection induces a strong CD4+ T effector and regulatory T cell response in the cornea as well as local draining lymph nodes (dLN). We also demonstrate that corneal Acanthamoeba infection induces IL-17A expression and that IL-17A is critical for host protection against severe AK pathology. Accordingly, IL-17A neutralization in Acanthamoeba-infected wild-type mice or Acanthamoeba infection of mice lacking IL-17A resulted in a significantly increased corneal AK pathology, increased migration of inflammatory cells at the site of inflammation and a significant increase in the effector CD4+ T cell response in dLN. Thus, in sharp contrast to other corneal infections such as herpes and P. aeruginosa keratitis where IL-17A exacerbates corneal pathology and inflammation, findings presented in this manuscript suggest that IL-17A production after Acanthamoeba infection plays an important role in host protection against invading parasites. PMID:25505284

  9. IL-17A-mediated protection against Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Amol; Cao, Zhiyi; Sampson, James F; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-15

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a very painful and vision-impairing infection of the cornea that is difficult to treat. Although past studies have indicated a critical role of neutrophils and macrophages in AK, the relative contribution of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-17A, that is essential for migration, activation, and function of these cells into the cornea is poorly defined. Moreover, the role of the adaptive immune response, particularly the contribution of CD4(+) T cell subsets, Th17 and regulatory T cells , in AK is yet to be understood. In this report, using a mouse corneal intrastromal injection-induced AK model, we show that Acanthamoeba infection induces a strong CD4(+) T effector and regulatory T cell response in the cornea and local draining lymph nodes. We also demonstrate that corneal Acanthamoeba infection induces IL-17A expression and that IL-17A is critical for host protection against severe AK pathology. Accordingly, IL-17A neutralization in Acanthamoeba-infected wild-type mice or Acanthamoeba infection of mice lacking IL-17A resulted in a significantly increased corneal AK pathology, increased migration of inflammatory cells at the site of inflammation, and a significant increase in the effector CD4(+) T cell response in draining lymph nodes. Thus, in sharp contrast with other corneal infections such as herpes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis where IL-17A exacerbates corneal pathology and inflammation, the findings presented in this article suggest that IL-17A production after Acanthamoeba infection plays an important role in host protection against invading parasites.

  10. Antibody-Mediated Protection Against SHIV Challenge Includes Systemic Clearance of Distal Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Ghneim, Khader; Sok, Devin; Bosche, William J.; Li, Yuan; Chipriano, Elizabeth; Berkemeier, Brian; Oswald, Kelli; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Jimenez, Jessica; Mondesir, Jade; Lee, Benjamin; Giglio, Patricia; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Abbink, Peter; Colantonio, Arnaud; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G.; Li, Wenjun; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can protect rhesus monkeys against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. However, the site of antibody interception of virus and the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection remain unclear. We administered a fully protective dose of the bNAb PGT121 to rhesus monkeys and challenged them intravaginally with SHIV-SF162P3. In PGT121 treated animals, we detected low levels of viral RNA and viral DNA in distal tissues for several days following challenge. Viral RNA positive tissues showed transcriptomic changes indicative of innate immune activation, and cells from these tissues initiated infection following adoptive transfer into naïve hosts. These data demonstrate that bNAb mediated protection against a mucosal virus challenge can involve clearance of infectious virus in distal tissues. PMID:27540005

  11. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  12. Protective capacities of certain spices against peroxynitrite-mediated biomolecular damage.

    PubMed

    Ho, Su-Chen; Tsai, Tzung-Hsun; Tsai, Po-Jung; Lin, Chih-Cheng

    2008-03-01

    Peroxynitrite, a potent cytotoxic agent, can damage a variety of biomolecules such as proteins, lipids, and DNA, and is considered as one of the major pathological causes of several diseases. Therefore, it would appear likely that interception of peroxynitrite by certain dietary compounds may represent one mechanism by which such foods may exert their beneficial action in vivo. A number of researchers have speculated that certain spices, rich in phenolics, may, conceivably, act as potential protectors against the actions of peroxynitrite. Eight culinary spices including cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, nutmeg, paprika, rosemary and turmeric were selected for study purposes. Further, the protective effects of methanol extracts of such spices against peroxynitrite-mediated damage to proteins, lipids and DNA were evaluated as determined by these extracts' ability to attenuate the formation of, respectively, nitrotyrosine in albumin, thiobarbiturate acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in liposome and strand breakages for plasmid DNA. All of the tested spices exerted some level of protective ability against peroxynitrite-mediated biomolecular damage. Amongst them, cloves deserve special attention due to their outstanding protective abilities against two of three forms of peroxynitrite-mediated biomolecular damage. Additionally, the phenolic content of certain spices appears to correlate well with such spices' protective effect against peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration and lipid peroxidation. Such an observation indicates that phenolics present in the spices contributed to such spice-elicited protection against peroxynitrite toxicity.

  13. Amygdala FAAH and anandamide: mediating protection and recovery from stress.

    PubMed

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Hill, Matthew N; McEwen, Bruce S; Holmes, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    A long-standing literature linking endocannabinoids (ECBs) to stress, fear, and anxiety has led to growing interest in developing novel anxiolytics targeting the ECB system. Following rapid on-demand biosynthesis and degradation upon neuronal activation, the ECB N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA) is actively degraded by the serine hydrolase enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Exposure to stress rapidly mobilizes FAAH to deplete the signaling pool of AEA and increase neuronal excitability in a key anxiety-mediating region--the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Gene deletion or pharmacological inhibition of FAAH prevents stress-induced reductions in AEA and associated increases in BLA dendritic hypertrophy and anxiety-like behavior. Additionally, inhibition of FAAH facilitates long-term fear extinction and rescues deficient fear extinction in rodent models by enhancing AEA-CB1 (cannabinoid type 1) receptor signaling and synaptic plasticity in the BLA. These preclinical findings propose restoring deficient BLA AEA levels by pharmacologically inhibiting FAAH as a mechanism to therapeutically mitigate the effects of traumatic stress.

  14. UVR8 mediated plant protective responses under low UV-B radiation leading to photosynthetic acclimation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Agrawal, S B; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-08-01

    The UV-B photoreceptor UVR8 regulates the expression of several genes leading to acclimation responses in plants. Direct role of UVR8 in maintaining the photosynthesis is not defined but it is known to increase the expression of some chloroplastic proteins like SIG5 and ELIP. It provides indirect protection to photosynthesis by regulating the synthesis of secondary metabolites and photomorphogenesis. Signaling cascades controlled by UVR8 mediate many protective responses thus promotes plant acclimation against stress and secures its survival.

  15. Nrf2 Protects Against TWEAK-mediated Skeletal Muscle Wasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sawaf, Othman; Fragoulis, Athanassios; Rosen, Christian; Kan, Yuet Wai; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Pufe, Thomas; Wruck, Christoph Jan

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle (SM) regeneration after injury is impaired by excessive inflammation. Particularly, the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a potent inducer of skeletal muscle wasting and fibrosis. In this study we investigated the role of Nrf2, a major regulator of oxidative stress defence, in SM ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and TWEAK induced atrophy. We explored the time-dependent expression of TWEAK after I/R in SM of Nrf2-wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Nrf2-KO mice expressed significant higher levels of TWEAK as compared to WT mice. Consequently, Nrf2-KO mice present an insufficient regeneration as compared to Nrf2-WT mice. Moreover, TWEAK stimulation activates Nrf2 in the mouse myoblast cell line C2C12. This Nrf2 activation inhibits TWEAK induced atrophy in C2C12 differentiated myotubes. In summary, we show that Nrf2 protects SM from TWEAK-induced cell death in vitro and that Nrf2-deficient mice therefore have poorer muscle regeneration.

  16. Gut Microbiota Mediates Protection Against Enteropathy Induced by Indomethacin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xue; Nakatsu, Geicho; Jin, Ye; Wong, Sunny; Yu, Jun; Lau, James Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause significant small bowel injuries. The role of gut microbiota in this NSAID-induced enteropathy is poorly understood. We studied the dynamic changes in gut microbiota following indomethacin administration in mice, and investigated the effects of these adaptive changes on subsequent NSAID-induced enteropathy. The changes in gut microbiota were studied using 16S rRNA sequencing, and the effects of such changes were investigated using antibiotics and a faecal transplantation model. After indomethacin treatment, significant adaptive changes in gut microbiota were observed, including increased abundance of Firmicutes and decreased abundance in that of Bacteroidetes. Depletion of gut microbiota with antibiotics led to a higher mortality (P = 0.0021) in mice compared to controls. Mice pre-transplanted with adaptively changed microbiota showed less small bowel injury and lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines when exposed to indomethacin. In summary, this study identifies adaptive changes in the gut microbiota upon indomethacin administration, which can in turn ameliorate further NSAID-induced injury. The heightened mortality with antibiotic depletion of the adaptively changed microbiota suggests its important role in protecting against such injury. This study provides insight for future efforts to target the microbiota as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:28067296

  17. Nerve growth factor protects against aluminum-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, Takao; Satoh, Eiko; Okada, Morihiro; Takadera, Tsuneo; Sahara, Masako

    2002-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effect of two salts of aluminum (Al), aluminum maltolate (Almal) and aluminum chloride (AlCl(3)), on the cell viability of PC12 cells in the absence and presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). A 72-h exposure of PC12 cells to Almal (300 microM) resulted in a marked increase of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from the cells and a decrease of 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) activity. These results indicate that Almal induces a decrease in the cell viability. Under the same conditions, Almal also caused DNA ladder formation and chromatin condensation. In contrast, AlCl(3) did not showed an increased LDH release and a decreased MTT activity in the concentration range of the salt tested (0.1-1 mM). The extent of LDH release and MTT activity decrease induced by Almal treatment closely depended on the amount of Almal incorporated into the cells. An increase in the fluorescence intensity of 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, di(acetoxymethyl ester) (C-DCDHF-DA) which was loaded into the cell by Almal treatment and its prevention by pyrrolodine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant, suggested that Almal-induced cell death partly proceeds via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. NGF effectively inhibited the increase of LDH release and the decrease of MTT activity, as well as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. However, NGF did not inhibit the increase of C-DCDHF-DA fluorescence in the cells induced by Almal treatment. From these results, it is suggested that ROS production associated with accumulation of Al is one possible important factor in the onset of Al neurotoxicity via apoptotic cell death and that NGF protects against cell degeneration associated with Al accumulation, but independently of ROS production.

  18. Resveratrol protects adult cardiomyocytes against oxidative stress mediated cell injury.

    PubMed

    Movahed, A; Yu, L; Thandapilly, S J; Louis, X L; Netticadan, T

    2012-11-15

    Recent studies from our laboratory have showed that resveratrol, a polyphenol found predominantly in grapes rendered strong cardioprotection in animal models of heart disease. The cardioprotection which was observed was primarily associated with the ability of resveratrol to reduce oxidative stress in these models. The aim of the current study was to corroborate the role of resveratrol as an inhibitor of oxidative stress and explore the underlying mechanisms of its action in heart disease. For this purpose, we used a cell model of oxidative stress, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) exposed adult rat cardiomyocytes, which was treated with and without resveratrol (30 μM); cardiomyocytes which were not exposed to resveratrol served as controls. Cell injury, cell death and oxidative stress measurements as well as the activities of the major endogenous antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were carried out in control and H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes, treated with and without resveratrol. Pharmacological blockade using specific blockers of the antioxidant enzymes were used to confirm their role in mediating resveratrol action in H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes. The status of H(2)O(2) and antioxidant enzymes in serum samples from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) treated with and without resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg body weight) was also examined. Our results showed significant cell injury and death in H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes which was prevented upon resveratrol treatment. SOD and CAT activities were decreased in H(2)O(2) exposed adult rat cardiomyocytes; treatment with resveratrol significantly prevented this reduction. However, GPx activity was not altered in the H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes in comparison to controls. Pharmacological blockade of SOD and/or CAT prevented the beneficial effect of resveratrol. In SHR, H(2)O(2) levels were increased, but CAT activity was decreased, while SOD remained unchanged

  19. Mediation in Child Protection Cases: An Alternative to the Adversary System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Sally E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses two concerns regarding adverse effects of increased litigation in child protection cases: (1) fallout from the adversarial process on agencies' work with families; and (2) dissonance between the approaches of social workers and lawyers to decision-making about families. Recommends mediation to prevent less serious cases from going to…

  20. Attitudes Toward Wildlife Species Protection: Assessing Moderating and Mediating Effects in the Value-Attitude Relationship

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Tarrant; Alan D. Bright; H. Ken Cordell

    1997-01-01

    Framed in the cognitive hierarchy approach, we examine (1) the mediating effect of general environmental atritudes and (2) the moderating effect of factual wildlife knowledge on the relationship berween values and specific wildlife attitudes (wildlife species protection). These relationships are assessed across four wildlife constituent groups: (I) consumptive users...

  1. Parental Mediation Regarding Children's Smartphone Use: Role of Protection Motivation and Parenting Style.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoori; Choi, Inho; Yum, Jung-Yoon; Jeong, Se-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Parental mediation is a type of behavior that could protect children against the negative uses and effects of smartphones. Based on protection motivation theory, this research (a) predicted parental mediation based on parents' threat and efficacy perceptions and (b) predicted threat and efficacy perceptions based on parenting styles and parents' addiction to smartphone use. An online survey of 448 parents of fourth to sixth graders was conducted. Results showed that both restrictive and active parental mediation were predicted by perceived severity, response efficacy, and self-efficacy. With regard to parenting styles, (a) authoritative parenting was positively related to perceived severity as well as response- and self-efficacy, whereas (b) permissive parenting was negatively related to self-efficacy. In addition, parents' addiction was a negative predictor of perceived severity, but a positive predictor of perceived susceptibility.

  2. Th1 and Th17 Cells in Tuberculosis: Protection, Pathology, and Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lyadova, I V; Panteleev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection ranges from a complete pathogen clearance through asymptomatic latent infection (LTBI) to active tuberculosis (TB) disease. It is now understood that LTBI and active TB represent a continuous spectrum of states with different degrees of pathogen "activity," host pathology, and immune reactivity. Therefore, it is important to differentiate LTBI and active TB and identify active TB stages. CD4(+) T cells play critical role during Mtb infection by mediating protection, contributing to inflammation, and regulating immune response. Th1 and Th17 cells are the main effector CD4(+) T cells during TB. Th1 cells have been shown to contribute to TB protection by secreting IFN-γ and activating antimycobacterial action in macrophages. Th17 induce neutrophilic inflammation, mediate tissue damage, and thus have been implicated in TB pathology. In recent years new findings have accumulated that alter our view on the role of Th1 and Th17 cells during Mtb infection. This review discusses these new results and how they can be implemented for TB diagnosis and monitoring.

  3. TB Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protein Derivative; PPD; Mantoux; Latent Tuberculosis Infection Test; Interferon-gamma Release Assays; IGRA; T-Spot®.TB; QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT- ... Tube (QFT-GIT) Formal name: Tuberculin Skin Test; Interferon Gamma Release Assays Related tests: AFB Testing ; Bacterial Sputum Culture ; Adenosine ...

  4. TB Is Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    The reemergence of tuberculosis, particularly of new drug-resistant strains, points up the need for well-coordinated school health programs. Immigration effects, growing populations of HIV-infected persons, and relaxed screening procedures are partly responsible for TB's reemergence. Two sidebars offer advice on coping with TB at school and…

  5. TB Is Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    The reemergence of tuberculosis, particularly of new drug-resistant strains, points up the need for well-coordinated school health programs. Immigration effects, growing populations of HIV-infected persons, and relaxed screening procedures are partly responsible for TB's reemergence. Two sidebars offer advice on coping with TB at school and…

  6. Hispidin produced from Phellinus linteus protects against peroxynitrite-mediated DNA damage and hydroxyl radical generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Lina; Huang, Zhaoyi; Su, Hongming

    2012-09-30

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of many chronic diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. One such mediator of oxidative stress is peroxynitrite, which is highly toxic to cultured neurons and astrocytes, and has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of various types of neuronal diseases. Therefore, searching for natural compounds with peroxynitrite-scavenging activity might be an effective therapy for peroxynitrite-mediated cytotoxicity. Hispidin, a phenolic compound from Phellinus linteus (a medicinal mushroom), has been shown to possess strong antioxidant, anticancer, and antidiabetic properties. However, the astrocyte protective efficacy of hispidin has been not examined. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the astrocyte protective effect of hispidin is associated with inhibition of peroxynitrite-induced DNA damage, a critical event leading to peroxynitrite-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results showed that peroxynitrite can cause DNA damage in φX-174 plasmid DNA and rat primary astrocytes. The presence of hispidin (10-20 μg/ml) was found to significantly inhibit peroxynitrite-induced DNA damage and cytotoxicity. EPR spectroscopy demonstrated that the formation of DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO-OH) from peroxynitrite, and that hispidin potently diminished the adduct signal in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that hispidin can protect against peroxynitrite-mediated cytotoxicity, DNA damage and hydroxyl radical formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconceptualizing Decisional Balance In an Adolescent Sun Protection Intervention: Mediating Effects and Theoretical Interpretations

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Marc A.; Norman, Gregory J.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Sallis, James F.; Patrick, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The Transtheoretical model (TTM) integrates principles of operant learning, such as stimulus control and reinforcement, and psychological factors, such as decisional balance. Understanding interrelationships between decisions, behavior, and consequences from multiple theoretical perspectives can advance theory and inform development of more effective interventions. This analysis examined the mediating effects of a special case of the decisional balance construct where the pros of competing behaviors (i.e. sun protection vs. exposure) were measured rather than the pros and cons of the same behavior. Participants included 819 adolescents (10-16 yrs old, 53.5% girls, 58.4% Caucasian) randomized to a 24-month expert system intervention (Sunsmart) or a physical activity and nutrition comparison group. Self-report measures included sun protection behaviors, pros for protection, and pros for exposure. Mediation analysis using latent growth curve models found both the treatment-to-mediator and mediator-to-behavior paths significant for decisional balance, producing an indirect effect of .323 (p < .01) and good model fit (CFI=.973, RMSEA=.055). Multiple strategies for conceptualizing and measuring decisional balance appear to be valid. Results are interpreted from the TTM and operant perspectives. PMID:19290714

  8. Rapid evolution of microbe-mediated protection against pathogens in a worm host

    PubMed Central

    King, Kayla C; Brockhurst, Michael A; Vasieva, Olga; Paterson, Steve; Betts, Alex; Ford, Suzanne A; Frost, Crystal L; Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Haldenby, Sam; Hurst, Gregory DD

    2016-01-01

    Microbes can defend their host against virulent infections, but direct evidence for the adaptive origin of microbe-mediated protection is lacking. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, we demonstrate that mildly pathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis) living in worms (Caenorhabditis elegans) rapidly evolved to defend their animal hosts against infection by a more virulent pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus), crossing the parasitism–mutualism continuum. Host protection evolved in all six, independently selected populations in response to within-host bacterial interactions and without direct selection for host health. Microbe-mediated protection was also effective against a broad spectrum of pathogenic S. aureus isolates. Genomic analysis implied that the mechanistic basis for E. faecalis-mediated protection was through increased production of antimicrobial superoxide, which was confirmed by biochemical assays. Our results indicate that microbes living within a host may make the evolutionary transition to mutualism in response to pathogen attack, and that microbiome evolution warrants consideration as a driver of infection outcome. PMID:26978164

  9. Rapid evolution of microbe-mediated protection against pathogens in a worm host.

    PubMed

    King, Kayla C; Brockhurst, Michael A; Vasieva, Olga; Paterson, Steve; Betts, Alex; Ford, Suzanne A; Frost, Crystal L; Horsburgh, Malcolm J; Haldenby, Sam; Hurst, Gregory Dd

    2016-08-01

    Microbes can defend their host against virulent infections, but direct evidence for the adaptive origin of microbe-mediated protection is lacking. Using experimental evolution of a novel, tripartite interaction, we demonstrate that mildly pathogenic bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis) living in worms (Caenorhabditis elegans) rapidly evolved to defend their animal hosts against infection by a more virulent pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus), crossing the parasitism-mutualism continuum. Host protection evolved in all six, independently selected populations in response to within-host bacterial interactions and without direct selection for host health. Microbe-mediated protection was also effective against a broad spectrum of pathogenic S. aureus isolates. Genomic analysis implied that the mechanistic basis for E. faecalis-mediated protection was through increased production of antimicrobial superoxide, which was confirmed by biochemical assays. Our results indicate that microbes living within a host may make the evolutionary transition to mutualism in response to pathogen attack, and that microbiome evolution warrants consideration as a driver of infection outcome.

  10. Insulin Protects Cardiac Myocytes from Doxorubicin Toxicity by Sp1-Mediated Transactivation of Survivin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Beom Seob; Oh, Jaewon; Kang, Sung Ku; Park, Sungha; Lee, Sang-Hak; Choi, Donghoon; Chung, Ji Hyung; Chung, Youn Wook; Kang, Seok-Min

    2015-01-01

    Insulin inhibits ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Survivin is a key regulator of anti-apoptosis against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Insulin increases survivin expression in cardiac myocytes to mediate cytoprotection. However, the mechanism by which survivin mediates the protective effect of insulin against doxorubicin-associated injury remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated that pretreatment of H9c2 cardiac myocytes with insulin resulted in a significant decrease in doxorubicin-induced apoptotic cell death by reducing cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Doxorubicin-induced reduction of survivin mRNA and protein levels was also significantly perturbed by insulin pretreatment. Reducing survivin expression with survivin siRNA abrogated insulin-mediated inhibition of caspase-3 activation, suggesting that insulin signals to survivin inhibited caspase-3 activation. Interestingly, pretreatment of H9c2 cells with insulin or MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, inhibited doxorubicin-induced degradation of the transcription factor Sp1. ChIP assay showed that pretreatment with insulin inhibited doxorubicin-stimulated Sp1 dissociation from the survivin promoter. Finally using pharmacological inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, we showed that insulin-mediated activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway prevented doxorubicin-induced proteasome-mediated degradation of Sp1. Taken together, insulin pretreatment confers a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by promoting Sp1-mediated transactivation of survivin to inhibit apoptosis. Our study is the first to define a role for survivin in cellular protection by insulin against doxorubicin-associated injury and show that Sp1 is a critical factor in the transcriptional regulation of survivin. PMID:26271039

  11. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Protects Escherichia coli from Rapid Antimicrobial-Mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hongfei; Wang, Dai; Xue, Yunxin; Zhang, Zhi; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to antimicrobial lethality was examined by treating Escherichia coli with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an antioxidant solvent frequently used in antimicrobial studies. DMSO inhibited killing by ampicillin, kanamycin, and two quinolones and had little effect on MICs. DMSO-mediated protection correlated with decreased ROS accumulation and provided evidence for ROS-mediated programmed cell death. These data support the contribution of ROS to antimicrobial lethality and suggest caution when using DMSO-dissolved antimicrobials for short-time killing assays. PMID:27246776

  12. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-11-22

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4(+) T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8(+) T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. BCG remains the only licensed vaccine against TB. Parenterally administered BCG has variable efficacy against pulmonary TB, and thus, improved prevention strategies and a more refined understanding of correlates of vaccine protection are required. Induction of memory T cells has been shown to be essential for protective TB vaccines. Mimicking the natural infection route by mucosal vaccination has been known to generate superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the

  13. S100A8/A9 Proteins Mediate Neutrophilic Inflammation and Lung Pathology during Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Torres, Diana; Slight, Samantha; Mehra, Smriti; McKenna, Kyle C.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Tessier, Phillipe; Roth, Johannes; Selman, Moisés; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Cumming, Bridgette; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Steyn, Adrie J. C.; Babu, Subash; Kaushal, Deepak; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Vogl, Thomas; Rangel-Moreno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas. However, the immune factors that drive the formation of a protective granuloma during latent TB, and the factors that drive the formation of inflammatory granulomas during active TB, are not well defined. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the underlying immune mechanisms involved in formation of inflammatory granulomas seen during active TB. Methods: The immune mediators involved in inflammatory granuloma formation during TB were assessed using human samples and experimental models of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, using molecular and immunologic techniques. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that in human patients with active TB and in nonhuman primate models of M. tuberculosis infection, neutrophils producing S100 proteins are dominant within the inflammatory lung granulomas seen during active TB. Using the mouse model of TB, we demonstrate that the exacerbated lung inflammation seen as a result of neutrophilic accumulation is dependent on S100A8/A9 proteins. S100A8/A9 proteins promote neutrophil accumulation by inducing production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and influencing leukocyte trafficking. Importantly, serum levels of S100A8/A9 proteins along with neutrophil-associated chemokines, such as keratinocyte chemoattractant, can be used as potential surrogate biomarkers to assess lung inflammation and disease severity in human TB. Conclusions: Our results thus show a major pathologic role for S100A8/A9 proteins in mediating neutrophil accumulation and inflammation associated with TB. Thus, targeting specific molecules, such as S100A8/A9 proteins, has the potential to decrease lung tissue damage without impacting protective immunity against TB. PMID:24047412

  14. Erythropoietin-mediated tissue protection: reducing collateral damage from the primary injury response.

    PubMed

    Brines, M; Cerami, A

    2008-11-01

    In its classic hormonal role, erythropoietin (EPO) is produced by the kidney and regulates the number of erythrocytes within the circulation to provide adequate tissue oxygenation. EPO also mediates other effects directed towards optimizing oxygen delivery to tissues, e.g. modulating regional blood flow and reducing blood loss by promoting thrombosis within damaged vessels. Over the past 15 years, many unexpected nonhaematopoietic functions of EPO have been identified. In these more recently appreciated nonhormonal roles, locally-produced EPO signals through a different receptor isoform and is a major molecular component of the injury response, in which it counteracts the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acutely, EPO prevents programmed cell death and reduces the development of secondary, pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced injury. Within a longer time frame, EPO provides trophic support to enable regeneration and healing. As the region immediately surrounding damage is typically relatively deficient in endogenous EPO, administration of recombinant EPO can provide increased tissue protection. However, effective use of EPO as therapy for tissue injury requires higher doses than for haematopoiesis, potentially triggering serious adverse effects. The identification of a tissue-protective receptor isoform has facilitated the engineering of nonhaematopoietic, tissue-protective EPO derivatives, e.g. carbamyl EPO, that avoid these complications. Recently, regions within the EPO molecule mediating tissue protection have been identified and this has enabled the development of potent tissue-protective peptides, including some mimicking EPO's tertiary structure but unrelated in primary sequence.

  15. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  16. Protective effect of vitamin C against the ethanol mediated toxic effects on human brain glial cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Paniagua, Manuel; Madrid, Antonio; Martín, Antonio

    2003-10-01

    It is now known that chronic consumption of excessive amounts of alcohol is a major source of social and medical problems. Ethanol-mediated glial cell activation may lead to neuron damage in many ways, including the formation of free radicals and production of pro-inflammatory molecules. Vitamin C (vit-C) is an essential dietary nutrient required as a co-factor for many enzymes and a very efficient antioxidant, protecting cells against free radical-mediated damage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of vit-C on glial cell activation and viability against ethanol-mediated toxicity. Human brain astrocyte cells (HA) were exposed to ethanol (0, 50, and 350 mmol/L) for 24 h. We found that glial cells incubated with different concentrations of vit-C increase their vit-C in a dose-dependent manner. HA incubated with 0, 50 or 350 mmol/L of ethanol for up to 24 h showed toxic effects that were proportional to the levels of ethanol in the medium, HA showed increased levels of heat shock protein (Hsp70). However, cells enriched with vit-C before being exposed to ethanol, were better protected against the alcohol-mediated toxicity than non-supplemented cells, and showed significantly lower concentrations of Hsp70. Ethanol also caused increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which were reduced by vit-C. In summary, HA supplemented with vit-C were significantly more resistant to the ethanol-mediated toxic effects.

  17. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  18. The Effect of Preventive, Therapeutic and Protective Exercises on Hippocampal Memory Mediators in Stressed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Hosseini, Nasrin; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise plays a significant role in learning and memory. The present study focuses on the hippocampal corticosterone (CORT), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), glucose, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in preventive, therapeutic, and protective exercises in stressful conditions. Methods Forty male rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control group and the preventive, therapeutic, and protective exercise groups. The treadmill running was applied at a speed of 20–21m/min and a chronic stress of 6 hours/day for 21 days. Subsequently, the variables were measured in the hippocampus. Results The findings revealed that the hippocampal CORT levels in the preventive exercise group had a significant enhancement compared to the control group. In the protective and particularly the therapeutic exercise groups, the hippocampal CORT levels declined. Furthermore, the hippocampal BDNF levels in the preventive and the therapeutic exercise groups indicated significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in comparison with the control group. In the preventive exercise group, however, the hippocampal glucose level turned out to be substantially higher than that in the control group. Conclusion It appears that the therapeutic exercise group had the best exercise protocols for improving the hippocampal memory mediators in the stress conditions. By contrast, the preventive exercise group could not improve these mediators that had been altered by stress. It is suggested that exercise time, compared to stress, can be considered as a crucial factor in the responsiveness of memory mediators. PMID:27904422

  19. Free radical scavenging, DNA protection, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation mediated by uric acid.

    PubMed

    Stinefelt, Beth; Leonard, Stephen S; Blemings, Kenneth P; Shi, Xianglin; Klandorf, Hillar

    2005-01-01

    Uric acid (UA) has been proposed to be the dominant antioxidant in birds. The objective of this study was to investigate the quenching effect of varying concentrations of UA, including those found in avian plasma, on specific reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to determine the ability of UA to protect DNA and cellular membranes from ROS-mediated damage. Hydroxyl (OH) and superoxide (O2-) radicals were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) and their presence was reduced following addition of UA (p <0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner. UA inhibited hydroxyl-mediated DNA damage, indicated by the presence of more precise, dense bands of lambda Hind III DNA after agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining (p <0.05). Lipid peroxidation of silica-exposed RAW 264.7 cell membranes was diminished (p <0.02) after addition of UA to the cell incubation mixture. These studies demonstrate that UA scavenges hydroxyl and superoxide radicals and protects against DNA damage and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate specific antioxidant protection that UA may afford birds against ROS-mediated damage.

  20. Abdominal adiposity is not a mediator of the protective effect of Mediterranean diet on colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasanelli, Francesca; Zugna, Daniela; Giraudo, Maria Teresa; Krogh, Vittorio; Grioni, Sara; Panico, Salvatore; Mattiello, Amalia; Masala, Giovanna; Caini, Saverio; Tumino, Rosario; Frasca, Graziella; Sciannameo, Veronica; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta

    2017-05-15

    Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) has a preventive effect on colorectal cancer (CRC). Several biological mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain this effect, but the involvement of clinical mediators has not been experimentally proven. We examined the role of abdominal adiposity (i.e., waist-to-hip ratio, WHR) as a potential mediator of the relationship between the MD and CRC in the Italian centres of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We evaluated the effect of the Italian Mediterranean Index (IMI) on WHR and of WHR on CRC risk. We then estimated the natural indirect effect (NIE, mediated by WHR) and the pure direct effect (PDE, unmediated) of IMI on CRC risk using mediation analyses, considering age, sex, education, physical activity, smoking and EPIC centre as confounders. Increased IMI was associated with significantly decreased odds of high WHR (odds ratio [OR] for an IMI of 6-11 vs. 0-1: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81-0.97). There was a positive relationship between WHR and CRC (hazard ratio [HR] for high vs. low WHR: 1.34, 95%CI: 1.09-1.66). The total effect of IMI was protective on CRC risk and was mainly explained by the PDE (HR for an IMI of 6-11 vs. 0-1: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.31-0.83), whereas the NIE was 1.00 (95%CI: 0.94-1.10). In this Mediterranean cohort, the protective effect of the MD on the development of CRC was not mediated by abdominal adiposity. Since this is the first study to investigate the mediating effect of abdominal obesity, other studies are needed to replicate this result. © 2017 UICC.

  1. HLA-A11-mediated protection from NK cell-mediated lysis: role of HLA-A11-presented peptides.

    PubMed

    Gavioli, R; Zhang, Q J; Masucci, M G

    1996-08-01

    The capacity of MHC class I to protect target cells from NK is well established, but the mechanism by which these molecules influence NK recognition and the physical properties associated with this function remain poorly defined. We have examined this issue using as a model the HLA-A11 allele. HLA-A11 expression correlated with reduced susceptibility to NK and interferon-activated cytotoxicity in transfected sublines of the A11-defective Burkitt's lymphoma WW2-BL and the HLA class I A,B-null C1R cell line. Protection was also achieved by transfection of HLA-A11 in the peptide processing mutant T2 cells line (T2/A11), despite a very low expression of the transfected product at the cell surface. Induction of surface HLA-A11 by culture of T2/A11 cells at 26 degrees C or in the presence of beta 2m did not affect lysis, whereas NK sensitivity was restored by culture in the presence of HLA-All-binding synthetic peptides derived from viral or cellular proteins. Acid treatment rendered T2/A11 and C1R/A11 cells sensitive to lysis, but protection was restored after preincubation with peptide preparations derived from surface stripping of T2/A11 cells. Similar peptide preparations from T2 cells had no effect. The results suggest that NK protection is mediated by HLA-A11 molecules carrying a particular set of peptides that are translocated to the site of MHC class I assembly in the ER in a TAP-independent fashion.

  2. Adolescent pain catastrophizing mediates the relationship between protective parental responses to pain and disability over time.

    PubMed

    Welkom, Josie S; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Guite, Jessica W

    2013-06-01

    Examine whether the relation between protective parenting responses to pain and functional disability is mediated by pain catastrophizing in adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and their parents over time. Adolescents aged 11-18 years and their parents reported on parental protective responses to pain (PPRP), pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), and Functional Disability Inventory (FDI) before Time 1 (T1) and 2 months after Time 2 (T2) an initial interdisciplinary pain clinic evaluation. PCS was a significant mediator of the PPRP-FDI relationship at T1 and T2 for the adolescents and T2 for their parents. A decrease in PPRP over time was associated with T2 PCS, which in turn was associated with T2 FDI for adolescents and their parents. Parental protectiveness is associated with disability indirectly through pain catastrophizing at the initial visit and follow-up. Decreases in parent protectiveness, potentially initiated through the initial evaluation, were related to lower levels of disability at follow-up through pain catastrophizing.

  3. Apical Organelle Secretion by Toxoplasma Controls Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Mediates Long-Term Protection.

    PubMed

    Sloves, Pierre-Julien; Mouveaux, Thomas; Ait-Yahia, Saliha; Vorng, Han; Everaere, Laetitia; Sangare, Lamba Omar; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2015-11-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have unique apical rhoptry and microneme secretory organelles that are crucial for host infection, although their role in protection against Toxoplasma gondii infection is not thoroughly understood. Here, we report a novel function of the endolysosomal T. gondii sortilin-like receptor (TgSORTLR), which mediates trafficking to functional apical organelles and their subsequent secretion of virulence factors that are critical to the induction of sterile immunity against parasite reinfection. We further demonstrate that the T. gondii armadillo repeats-only protein (TgARO) mutant, which is deficient only in apical secretion of rhoptries, is also critical in mounting protective immunity. The lack of TgSORTLR and TgARO proteins completely inhibited T-helper 1-dependent adaptive immunity and compromised the function of natural killer T-cell-mediated innate immunity. Our findings reveal an essential role for apical secretion in promoting sterile protection against T. gondii and provide strong evidence for rhoptry-regulated discharge of antigens as a key effector for inducing protective immunity.

  4. Prominent role of exopeptidase DPP III in estrogen-mediated protection against hyperoxia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sobočanec, Sandra; Filić, Vedrana; Matovina, Mihaela; Majhen, Dragomira; Šafranko, Željka Mačak; Hadžija, Marijana Popović; Krsnik, Željka; Kurilj, Andrea Gudan; Šarić, Ana; Abramić, Marija; Balog, Tihomir

    2016-01-01

    A number of age-related diseases have a low incidence in females, which is attributed to a protective effect of sex hormones. For instance, the female sex hormone estrogen (E2) has a well established cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress, which strongly contributes to ageing. However, the mechanism by which E2 exerts its protective activity remains elusive. In this study we address the question whether the E2-induced protective effect against hyperoxia is mediated by the Nrf-2/Keap-1 signaling pathway. In particular, we investigate the E2-induced expression and cellular distribution of DPP III monozinc exopeptidase, a member of the Nrf-2/Keap-1 pathway, upon hyperoxia treatment. We find that DPP III accumulates in the nucleus in response to hyperoxia. Further, we show that combined induction of hyperoxia and E2 administration have an additive effect on the nuclear accumulation of DPP III. The level of nuclear accumulation of DPP III is comparable to nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2 in healthy female mice exposed to hyperoxia. In ovariectomized females exposed to hyperoxia, supplementation of E2 induced upregulation of DPP III, Ho-1, Sirt-1 and downregulation of Ppar-γ. While other cytoprotective mechanisms cannot be excluded, these findings demonstrate a prominent role of DPP III, along with Sirt-1, in the E2-mediated protection against hyperoxia. PMID:26774752

  5. Host Nonresponsiveness Does not Interfere With Vaccine-Mediated Protection Against Gastric Helicobacter Infection.

    PubMed

    Harbour, Stacey N; Mitchell, Hazel M; Sutton, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis results from the inflammation induced by chronic infection. CBA mice are nonresponsive to gastric Helicobacter infection, providing a useful model for examining host regulation of Helicobacter-induced gastritis. We examined whether gastric Helicobacter nonresponsiveness impacts upon vaccine efficacy and whether immune-mediated protection could occur in the absence of inflammation. Mice were vaccinated prior to challenge with Helicobacter felis or H. pylori. Gastritis and H. felis colonization was evaluated histologically. H. pylori colonization was quantified by colony-forming assay. Immunizations protected CBA mice against challenge with either H. felis or H. pylori. Protection against H. felis was marked by a loss of nonresponsiveness and development of an atrophic gastritis with mucus metaplasia. However, vaccine-induced protection against H. pylori was only associated with cell infiltration into the gastric mucosa. Nonresponsiveness to gastric Helicobacter infection did not interfere with vaccination-induced protection. Vaccine-induced protective immunity against H. pylori was linked with the induction of cellular infiltration, but importantly not atrophic gastritis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Role of the hypothalamus in mediating protective effects of dietary restriction during aging

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Penny A.; Moreno, Cesar L.; Kim, Esther S.; Marcellino, Bridget K.; Mobbs, Charles V.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) can extend lifespan and reduce disease burden across a wide range of animals and yeast but the mechanisms mediating these remarkably protective effects remain to be elucidated despite extensive efforts. Although it has generally been assumed that protective effects of DR are cell-autonomous, there is considerable evidence that many whole-body responses to nutritional state, including DR, are regulated by nutrient-sensing neurons. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that nutrient sensing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus hierarchically regulate the protective responses of dietary restriction. We describe multiple peripheral responses that are hierarchically regulated by the hypothalamus and we present evidence for non-cell autonomous signaling of dietary restriction gathered from a diverse range of models including invertebrates, mammalian cell culture, and rodent studies. PMID:23262258

  7. Identification of the heart as the critical site of adenosine mediated embryo protection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the mechanisms that protect the developing embryo from intrauterine stress is limited. Recently, adenosine has been demonstrated to play a critical role in protecting the embryo against hypoxia via adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs), which are expressed in the heart, nervous system, and other sites during development. However, the sites of A1AR action that mediate embryo protection are not known. To determine if the heart is a key site of adenosine-mediated embryo protection, A1ARs were selectively deleted in the embryonic heart using a Cre-LoxP system in which the alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter drives Cre-recombinase expression and excision of the A1AR gene from cardiomyocytes. Results With increasing exposure of maternal hypoxia (10% O2) from 48-96 hours beginning at embryonic day (E) 8.5, embryo viability decreased in the cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos. 48 hours of hypoxia reduced embryonic viability by 49% in embryos exposed from E10.5-12.5 but no effect on viability was observed in younger embryos exposed to hypoxia from E8.5-10.5. After 72 hours of hypoxia, 57.8% of the cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos were either dead or re-absorbed compared to 13.7% of control littermates and after 96 hours 81.6% of cardiac-A1AR deleted embryos were dead or re-absorbed. After 72 hours of hypoxia, cardiac size was reduced significantly more in the cardiac-A1AR deleted hearts compared to controls. Gene expression analysis revealed clusters of genes that are regulated by both hypoxia and A1AR expression. Conclusions These data identify the embryonic heart as the critical site where adenosine acts to protect the embryo against hypoxia. As such these studies identify a previously unrecognized mechanism of embryo protection. PMID:20509906

  8. Asef mediates HGF protective effects against LPS-induced lung injury and endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Mutlu, Gokhan; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A

    2015-03-01

    Increased vascular endothelial permeability and inflammation are major pathological mechanisms of pulmonary edema and its life-threatening complication, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We have previously described potent protective effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) against thrombin-induced hyperpermeability and identified the Rac pathway as a key mechanism of HGF-mediated endothelial barrier protection. However, anti-inflammatory effects of HGF are less understood. This study examined effects of HGF on the pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) inflammatory activation and barrier dysfunction caused by the gram-negative bacterial pathogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We tested involvement of the novel Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in the HGF anti-inflammatory effects. HGF protected the pulmonary EC monolayer against LPS-induced hyperpermeability, disruption of monolayer integrity, activation of NF-kB signaling, expression of adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and production of IL-8. These effects were critically dependent on Asef. Small-interfering RNA-induced downregulation of Asef attenuated HGF protective effects against LPS-induced EC barrier failure. Protective effects of HGF against LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular leak were also diminished in Asef knockout mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate potent anti-inflammatory effects by HGF and delineate a key role of Asef in the mediation of the HGF barrier protective and anti-inflammatory effects. Modulation of Asef activity may have important implications in therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of sepsis and acute lung injury/ARDS-induced gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  9. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation. PMID:26745377

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation.

  12. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  13. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  14. c-FLIP Protects Eosinophils from TNF-α-Mediated Cell Death In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gordy, Claire; Liang, Jie; Pua, Heather; He, You-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the signals that regulate eosinophil survival and death is critical to developing new treatments for asthma, atopy, and gastrointestinal disease. Previous studies suggest that TNF-α stimulation protects eosinophils from apoptosis, and this TNF-α-mediated protection is mediated by the upregulation of an unknown protein by NF-κB. Here, we show for the first time that eosinophils express the caspase 8-inhibitory protein c-FLIP, and c-FLIP expression is upregulated upon TNF-α stimulation. Considering that c-FLIP expression is regulated by NF-κB, we hypothesized that c-FLIP might serve as the “molecular switch” that converts TNFRI activation to a pro-survival signal in eosinophils. Indeed, we found that one c-FLIP isoform, c-FLIPL, is required for mouse eosinophil survival in the presence of TNF-α both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, our results suggest c-FLIP as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of eosinophil-mediated disease. PMID:25333625

  15. Protection from mitochondrial complex II inhibition in vitro and in vivo by Nrf2-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Marcus J; Jakel, Rebekah J; Johnson, Delinda A; Chan, Kaimin; Kan, Yuet Wai; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-04

    Complex II inhibitors 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) and malonate cause striatal damage reminiscent of Huntington's disease and have been shown to involve oxidative stress in their pathogenesis. Because nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent transcriptional activation by means of the antioxidant response element is known to coordinate the up-regulation of cytoprotective genes involved in combating oxidative stress, we investigated the significance of Nrf2 in complex II-induced toxicity. We found that Nrf2-deficient cells and Nrf2 knockout mice are significantly more vulnerable to malonate and 3NP and demonstrate increased antioxidant response element (ARE)-regulated transcription mediated by astrocytes. Furthermore, ARE preactivation by means of intrastriatal transplantation of Nrf2-overexpressing astrocytes before lesioning conferred dramatic protection against complex II inhibition. These observations implicate Nrf2 as an essential inducible factor in the protection against complex II inhibitor-mediated neurotoxicity. These data also introduce Nrf2-mediated ARE transcription as a potential target of preventative therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease.

  16. Regulatory T cells participate in CD39-mediated protection from renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; McRae, Jennifer L; Robson, Simon C; Cowan, Peter J; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Polhill, Tania; Wang, Yiping; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Unwin, Robert J; Harris, David C H; Dwyer, Karen M; Alexander, Stephen I

    2012-09-01

    CD39 is an ecto-enzyme that degrades extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP, and is highly expressed on by the vasculature and circulating cells including Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. To study the role of purinergic regulation in renal disease, we used the adriamycin nephropathy (AN) mouse model of chronic renal injury, using human CD39-transgenic (hCD39Tg) and wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice. Effects of CD39 expression by Treg cells were assessed in AN by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) CD25(+) and CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells isolated from hCD39Tg and WT mice. hCD39Tg mice were protected from renal injury in AN with decreased urinary protein and serum creatinine, and significantly less renal injury compared with WT mice. While WT CD25(+) and hCD39Tg CD25(-) T cells conferred some protection against AN, hCD39Tg CD25(+) Treg cells offered greater protection. In vitro studies showed direct pro-apoptotic effects of ATP on renal tubular cells. In conclusion, hCD39 expressed by circulating leukocytes and intrinsic renal cells limits innate AN injury. Specifically, CD39 expression by Treg cells contributes to its protective role in renal injury. These findings suggest that extracellular nucleotides mediate AN kidney injury and that CD39, expressed by Treg cells and other cells, is protective in this model.

  17. Role of Fc in Antibody-Mediated Protection from Ricin Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Seth. H.; Das, Anushka; Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A.; Corti, Miriam; Berry, Jody

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the role of the antibody (Ab) Fc region in mediating protection from ricin toxicity. We compared the in vitro and in vivo effects of intact Ig and of Fab fragments derived from two different neutralizing Ab preparations, one monoclonal, the other polyclonal. Consistent results were obtained from each, showing little difference between Ig and Fab in terms of antigen binding and in vitro neutralization, but with relatively large differences in protection of animals. We also studied whether importing Ab into the cell by Fc receptors enhanced the intracellular neutralization of ricin toxin. We found that the imported Ab was found in the ER and Golgi, a compartment traversed by ricin, as it traffics through the cell, but intracellular Ab did not contribute to the neutralization of ricin. These results indicate that the Fc region of antibody is important for in vivo protection, although the mechanism of enhanced protection by intact Ig does not appear to operate at the single cell level. When using xenogeneic antibodies, the diminished immunogenicity of Fab/F(ab’)2 preparations should be balanced against possible loss of protective efficacy. PMID:24811206

  18. Role of Fc in antibody-mediated protection from ricin toxin.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Seth H; Das, Anushka; Song, Kejing; Maresh, Grace A; Corti, Miriam; Berry, Jody

    2014-05-07

    We have studied the role of the antibody (Ab) Fc region in mediating protection from ricin toxicity. We compared the in vitro and in vivo effects of intact Ig and of Fab fragments derived from two different neutralizing Ab preparations, one monoclonal, the other polyclonal. Consistent results were obtained from each, showing little difference between Ig and Fab in terms of antigen binding and in vitro neutralization, but with relatively large differences in protection of animals. We also studied whether importing Ab into the cell by Fc receptors enhanced the intracellular neutralization of ricin toxin. We found that the imported Ab was found in the ER and Golgi, a compartment traversed by ricin, as it traffics through the cell, but intracellular Ab did not contribute to the neutralization of ricin. These results indicate that the Fc region of antibody is important for in vivo protection, although the mechanism of enhanced protection by intact Ig does not appear to operate at the single cell level. When using xenogeneic antibodies, the diminished immunogenicity of Fab/F(ab')2 preparations should be balanced against possible loss of protective efficacy.

  19. IL-11 Is Required for A1 Adenosine Receptor–Mediated Protection against Ischemic AKI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yun; Kim, Mihwa; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Greene, Robert W.; D’Agati, Vivette D.

    2013-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptor activation ameliorates ischemic AKI through the induction of renal proximal tubular sphingosine kinase-1. However, systemic adverse effects may limit A1 adenosine receptor–based therapy for ischemic AKI, indicating a need to identify alternative therapeutic targets within this pathway. Here, we evaluated the function of renal proximal tubular IL-11, a clinically approved hematopoietic cytokine, in A1 adenosine receptor–mediated induction of sphingosine kinase-1 and renal protection. Treatment of human proximal tubule epithelial (HK-2) cells with a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), induced the expression of IL-11 mRNA and protein in an extracellular signal–regulated kinase–dependent manner, and administration of CCPA in mice induced renal synthesis of IL-11. Pretreatment with CCPA protected against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in wild-type mice, but not in IL-11 receptor–deficient mice. Administration of an IL-11–neutralizing antibody abolished the renal protection provided by CCPA. Similarly, CCPA did not induce renal IL-11 expression or protect against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice lacking the renal proximal tubular A1 adenosine receptor. Finally, treatment with CCPA induced sphingosine kinase-1 in HK-2 cells and wild-type mice, but not in IL-11 receptor–deficient or renal proximal tubule A1 adenosine receptor–deficient mice. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of renal proximal tubule IL-11 is a critical intermediary in A1 adenosine receptor–mediated renal protection that warrants investigation as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic AKI. PMID:23813214

  20. Troxerutin protects the mouse liver against oxidative stress-mediated injury induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-feng; Fan, Shao-hua; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2009-09-09

    Troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of rutin, has been well-demonstrated to exert hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we attempted to explore whether the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms were involved in troxerutin-mediated protection from D-gal-induced liver injury. The effects of troxerutin on liver lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and the expression of inflammatory mediator were investigated in D-gal-treated mice. The results showed that troxerutin largely attenuated the D-gal-induced TBARS content increase and also markedly renewed the activities of Cu, Zn-SOD, CAT, and GPx in the livers of D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, troxerutin inhibited the upregulation of the expression of NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, and COX-2 induced by D-gal. D-Gal-induced tissue architecture changes and serum ALT and AST increases were effectively suppressed by troxerutin. In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse liver from D-gal-induced injury by attenuating lipid peroxidation, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and suppressing inflammatory response. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of troxerutin in the protection of the liver.

  1. Protective effects of phyllanthus emblica leaf extract on sodium arsenite-mediated adverse effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Sadia; Ahsan, Nazmul; Kato, Masashi; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Rashid, Abdur; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). 'Control' mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated 'SA' and 'SA+PLE' were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity.

  2. TB in Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Gil, César; Caro, Godofredo; Aylas, Rula; Castro, César; Lema, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article analyzes the factors associated with vulnerability of the Ashaninka, the most populous indigenous Peruvian Amazonian people, to tuberculosis (TB). By applying a human rights-based analytical framework that assesses public policy against human rights standards and principles, and by offering a step-by-step framework for a full assessment of compliance, it provides evidence of the relationship between the incidence of TB among the Ashaninka and Peru’s poor level of compliance with its human rights obligations. The article argues that one of the main reasons for the historical vulnerability of the Ashaninka to diseases such as TB is a lack of political will on the part of the national government to increase public health spending, ensure that resources reach the most vulnerable population, and adopt and invest in a culturally appropriate health system. PMID:27780999

  3. Next-Generation Insect-Resistant Plants: RNAi-Mediated Crop Protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiang; Khan, Sher Afzal; Heckel, David G; Bock, Ralph

    2017-09-01

    Plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) shows great potential in crop protection. It relies on plants stably expressing double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that target essential genes in pest insects. Practical application of this strategy is challenging because producing sufficient amounts of stable dsRNA in plants has proven to be difficult to achieve with conventional transgenesis. In addition, many insects do not respond to exogenously applied dsRNAs, either degrading them or failing to import them into the cytoplasm. We summarize recent progress in RNAi-mediated insect pest control and discuss factors determining its efficacy. Expressing dsRNA in chloroplasts overcomes many of the difficulties previously encountered. We also highlight remaining challenges and discuss the environmental and biosafety issues involved in the use of this technology in agriculture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss • • May spread TB bacteria to others • • Needs treatment to treat TB disease Additional Information 1. American Thoracic Society (ATS) and CDC. Diagnostic standards and classification of tuberculosis in adults and children. (PDF) Am J Respir ...

  5. Affordable TB treatments. South.

    PubMed

    1998-07-03

    This short article reports the proceedings of a session of the World Health Organization (WHO) on tuberculosis (TB) prevention and management. 15 million persons are infected with both TB and HIV; 11 million of these people are in sub-Saharan Africa. Current TB management relies on finding cases and treating them. According to Paul Nunn of WHO, the role of preventive therapy is unclear. Jensa Bell, of Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, reported on the cost effectiveness of prevention with isoniazid (INH) in sub-Saharan Africa. Direct medical costs of the drug for 6 months are CHF171/year of life saved. When social costs of TB and prevention of secondary cases are included, INH prophylaxis saves money; initial investment is CHF34.50/person treated, while cost averted is CHF36.24/person treated. Mary Mulindwa, of the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Kampala, Uganda, studied reasons for nonadherence to TB preventive regimens in a clinical trial. Major reasons included the following: 1) transport difficulties; 2) caring for a sick family member; 3) change of address without informing the home visitor; and 4) stigma of being seen with a health worker. Richard Chaisson, of the CP-CRA004/ACTG177 study group, reported results from a trial comparing prevention with INH for 12 months to rifampin plus pyrazinamide (R/P) for 2 months in 1600 tuberculin-positive, HIV-positive people without active disease in the US, Mexico, Brazil, and Haiti. "Effective therapy" with INH was equal to at least 6 months of continuous adherence; 67% of patients met this standard. 80% of R/P patients were adherent. Over 3 years, there were 26 confirmed cases of TB in the INH group and 19 in the R/P group; these results are equivalent. However, Chaisson noted that the cost and feasibility of R/P treatment in resource-poor settings should be considered.

  6. The protective effect of salicylic acid on lysozyme against riboflavin-mediated photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Hongbao; Cheng, Lingli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Mei; Wang, Shi-Long

    2011-06-01

    As a metabolite of aspirin in vivo, salicylic acid was proved to protect lysozyme from riboflavin-mediated photooxidation in this study. The antioxidative properties of salicylic acid were further studied by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm. It can quench the triplet state of riboflavin via electron transfer from salicylic acid to the triplet state of riboflavin with a reaction constant of 2.25 × 10 9 M -1 s -1. Mechanism of antioxidant activities of salicylic acid on lysozyme oxidation was discussed. Salicylic acid can serve as a potential antioxidant to quench the triplet state of riboflavin and reduce oxidative pressure.

  7. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) in leishmaniasis. I. TNF alpha mediates host protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Parkinson, C; Millott, S; Severn, A; Carrier, M

    1990-01-01

    Genetically resistant CBA mice developed significantly larger lesions to Leishmania major infection when they were injected with rabbit anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific antibodies compared to control mice injected with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. BALB/c mice recovered from a previous infection following prophylactic sublethal irradiation also developed exacerbated lesions when treated with the anti-TNF antibody. Injection of TNF into the lesion of infected CBA mice significantly reduced the lesion development. Furthermore, TNF activates macrophages to kill Leishmania in vitro. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in mediating host-protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:2335376

  8. Role of Eosinophils and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Interleukin-25-Mediated Protection from Amebic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Zannatun; Watanabe, Koji; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Buonomo, Erica L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a cause of diarrhea in infants in low-income countries. Previously, it was shown that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was associated with increased risk of E. histolytica diarrhea in children. Interleukin-25 (IL-25) is a cytokine that is produced by intestinal epithelial cells that has a role in maintenance of gut barrier function and inhibition of TNF-α production. IL-25 expression was decreased in humans and in the mouse model of amebic colitis. Repletion of IL-25 blocked E. histolytica infection and barrier disruption in mice, increased gut eosinophils, and suppressed colonic TNF-α. Depletion of eosinophils with anti-Siglec-F antibody prevented IL-25-mediated protection. In contrast, depletion of TNF-α resulted in resistance to amebic infection. We concluded that IL-25 provides protection from amebiasis, which is dependent upon intestinal eosinophils and suppression of TNF-α. PMID:28246365

  9. Direct palladium-mediated on-resin disulfide formation from Allocam protected peptides.

    PubMed

    Kondasinghe, Thilini D; Saraha, Hasina Y; Odeesho, Samantha B; Stockdill, Jennifer L

    2017-04-05

    The synthesis of disulfide-containing polypeptides represents a long-standing challenge in peptide chemistry, and broadly applicable methods for the construction of disulfides are in constant demand. Few strategies exist for on-resin formation of disulfides directly from their protected counterparts. We present herein a novel strategy for the on-resin construction of disulfides directly from Allocam-protected cysteines. Our palladium-mediated approach is mild and uses readily available reagents, requiring no special equipment. No reduced peptide intermediates or S-allylated products are observed, and no residual palladium can be detected in the final products. The utility of this method is demonstrated through the synthesis of the C-carboxy analog of oxytocin.

  10. Bacopa monnieri-Induced Protective Autophagy Inhibits Benzo[a]pyrene-Mediated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Durgesh Nandini; Naik, Prajna Paramita; Nayak, Aditi; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Sinha, Niharika; Bhutia, Sujit K

    2016-11-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is capable of inducing oxidative stress and cellular injuries leading to cell death and associates with a significant risk of cancer development. Prevention of B[a]P-induced cellular toxicity with herbal compound through regulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress might protect cell death and have therapeutic benefit to human health. In this study, we demonstrated the cytoprotective role of Bacopa monnieri (BM) against B[a]P-induced apoptosis through autophagy induction. Pretreatment with BM rescued the reduction in cell viability in B[a]P-treated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cells indicating the cytoprotective potential of BM against B[a]P. Moreover, BM was found to inhibit B[a]P-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced apoptosis activation in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, BM was found to preserve mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibited release of cytochrome c in B[a]P-treated HaCaT cells. Bacopa monnieri induced protective autophagy; we knocked down Beclin-1, and data showed that BM was unable to protect from B[a]P-induced mitochondrial ROS-mediated apoptosis in Beclin-1-deficient HaCaT cells. Moreover, we established that B[a]P-induced damaged mitochondria were found to colocalize and degraded within autolysosomes in order to protect HaCaT cells from mitochondrial injury. In conclusion, B[a]P-induced apoptosis was rescued by BM treatment and provided cytoprotection through Beclin-1-dependent autophagy activation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Toxin-Mediated Paracellular Transport of Antitoxin Antibodies Facilitates Protection against Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.; Hernandez, L. D.; Lipari, P.; Flattery, A.; Chen, S.-C.; Kramer, S.; Polishook, J. D.; Racine, F.; Cape, H.; Kelly, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    The exotoxins TcdA and TcdB are the major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile. Circulating neutralizing antitoxin antibodies are protective in C. difficile infection (CDI), as demonstrated, in part, by the protective effects of actoxumab and bezlotoxumab, which bind to and neutralize TcdA and TcdB, respectively. The question of how systemic IgG antibodies neutralize toxins in the gut lumen remains unresolved, although it has been suggested that the Fc receptor FcRn may be involved in active antibody transport across the gut epithelium. In this study, we demonstrated that genetic ablation of FcRn and excess irrelevant human IgG have no impact on actoxumab-bezlotoxumab-mediated protection in murine and hamster models of CDI, suggesting that Fc-dependent transport of antibodies across the gut wall is not required for efficacy. Tissue distribution studies in hamsters suggest, rather, that the transport of antibodies depends on toxin-induced damage to the gut lining. In an in vitro two-dimensional culture system that mimics the architecture of the intestinal mucosal epithelium, toxins on the apical side of epithelial cell monolayers are neutralized by basolateral antibodies, and antibody transport across the cell layer is dramatically increased upon addition of toxin to the apical side. Similar data were obtained with F(ab′)2 fragments, which lack an Fc domain, consistent with FcRn-independent paracellular, rather than transcellular, transport of antibodies. Kinetic studies show that initial damage caused by apical toxin is required for efficient neutralization by basolateral antibodies. These data may represent a general mechanism of humoral response-mediated protection against enteric pathogens. PMID:25385797

  12. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J.

    2015-01-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.—Takyar, S., Zhang, Y., Haslip, M., Jin L., Shan P., Zhang, X., Lee, P. J. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury. PMID:26655705

  13. Wolbachia-Mediated Antiviral Protection in Drosophila Larvae and Adults following Oral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L.; Arnold, Pieter A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations. PMID:26407882

  14. Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila larvae and adults following oral infection.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, Aleksej L; Arnold, Pieter A; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-12-01

    Understanding viral dynamics in arthropods is of great importance when designing models to describe how viral spread can influence arthropod populations. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spp., which is present in up to 40% of all insect species, has the ability to alter viral dynamics in both Drosophila spp. and mosquitoes, a feature that in mosquitoes may be utilized to limit spread of important arboviruses. To understand the potential effect of Wolbachia on viral dynamics in nature, it is important to consider the impact of natural routes of virus infection on Wolbachia antiviral effects. Using adult Drosophila strains, we show here that Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that have previously been shown to confer antiviral protection following systemic viral infection also confer protection against virus-induced mortality following oral exposure to Drosophila C virus in adults. Interestingly, a different pattern was observed when the same fly lines were challenged with the virus when still larvae. Analysis of the four Drosophila-Wolbachia associations that were protective in adults indicated that only the w1118-wMelPop association conferred protection in larvae following oral delivery of the virus. Analysis of Wolbachia density using quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a high Wolbachia density was congruent with antiviral protection in both adults and larvae. This study indicates that Wolbachia-mediated protection may vary between larval and adult stages of a given Wolbachia-host combination and that the variations in susceptibility by life stage correspond with Wolbachia density. The differences in the outcome of virus infection are likely to influence viral dynamics in Wolbachia-infected insect populations in nature and could also have important implications for the transmission of arboviruses in mosquito populations. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Selenium-mediated protection in reversing the sensitivity of bacterium to the bactericidal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonglei; Tan, Jun; Shao, Lei; Dong, Xiaojing; Ye, Richard D; Chen, Daijie

    2017-05-01

    Inducing production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important criterion to distinguish the bactericidal antibiotics from bacteriostatic antibiotics. Selenoenzymes were generally recognized to be a powerful antioxidant capable of scavenging free radicals, protecting the cells from the harmful effects of ROS. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the selenium (Se)-mediated protection in reversing antibiotic sensitivity and the role of selenoenzymes in alleviating the negative effects of oxidative stress. The cellular antioxidant activity of Se-enriched bacteria was analyzed, as well as intracellular ROS production and elimination when Se-enriched bacteria in the presence of various antibiotics. Compared to complete inhibition of the parental strain by bactericidal antibiotics, it only exhibited slight and reversible inhibition of Se-enriched Escherichia coli ATCC25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 at the same conditions, which indicated that intracellular selenium provided substantial protection against antibiotics. ROS generation caused by bactericidal antibiotics was confirmed by fluorescence spectrophotometry using 2', 7'-dichloro- uorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) as substrate. The time course experiments of pretreatment with selenium showed significant decrease of ROS level at 2h. In summary, the present study provides experimental evidence supporting selenoenzymes has good scavenging effect to ROS and can protect bacteria from oxidative stress injury induced by bactericidal antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Eosinophils and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Interleukin-25-Mediated Protection from Amebic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Noor, Zannatun; Watanabe, Koji; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M; Burgess, Stacey L; Buonomo, Erica L; Cowardin, Carrie A; Petri, William A

    2017-02-28

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a cause of diarrhea in infants in low-income countries. Previously, it was shown that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was associated with increased risk of E. histolytica diarrhea in children. Interleukin-25 (IL-25) is a cytokine that is produced by intestinal epithelial cells that has a role in maintenance of gut barrier function and inhibition of TNF-α production. IL-25 expression was decreased in humans and in the mouse model of amebic colitis. Repletion of IL-25 blocked E. histolytica infection and barrier disruption in mice, increased gut eosinophils, and suppressed colonic TNF-α. Depletion of eosinophils with anti-Siglec-F antibody prevented IL-25-mediated protection. In contrast, depletion of TNF-α resulted in resistance to amebic infection. We concluded that IL-25 provides protection from amebiasis, which is dependent upon intestinal eosinophils and suppression of TNF-α.IMPORTANCE The intestinal epithelial barrier is important for protection from intestinal amebiasis. We discovered that the intestinal epithelial cytokine IL-25 was suppressed during amebic colitis in humans and that protection could be restored in the mouse model by IL-25 administration. IL-25 acted via eosinophils and suppressed TNF-α. This work illustrates a previously unrecognized pathway of innate mucosal immune response. Copyright © 2017 Noor et al.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  18. Mediation Analysis of Decisional Balance, Sun Avoidance, and Sunscreen Use in the Precontemplation and Preparation Stages for Sun Protection

    PubMed Central

    Velicer, Wayne F.; Redding, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mediation analyses of sun protection were conducted testing structural equation models using longitudinal data with three waves. An effect was said to be mediated if the standardized path between processes of change, decisional balance, and sun protection outcomes were significant. Design Longitudinal models of sun protection using data from individuals in the precontemplation (N=964) and preparation (N =463) stages who participated of an expert system intervention. Main Outcome Measures Nine processes of change for sun protection, decisional balance constructs of sun protection (pros and cons), sun avoidance behavior, and sunscreen use. Results With the exception of two processes in the preparation stage, processes of change predicted the pros (r= .126 to .614), and the pros predicted the outcomes (r= .181 to .272). Three models with the cons as mediator in the preparation stage, and none in the precontemplation stage, showed a mediated relationship between processes and outcomes. Conclusion In general, mediation analyses found both the process of change-to-pros and pros-to-behavior paths significant for both precontemplation and preparation stages, and for both sun avoidance and sunscreen use outcomes. Findings provide support for the importance of assessing the role of underlying risk cognitions in improving sun protection adherence. PMID:26040293

  19. Mediation analysis of decisional balance, sun avoidance and sunscreen use in the precontemplation and preparation stages for sun protection.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rivas, Marimer; Velicer, Wayne F; Redding, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Mediation analyses of sun protection were conducted testing structural equation models using longitudinal data with three waves. An effect was said to be mediated if the standardised path between processes of change, decisional balance and sun protection outcomes was significant. Longitudinal models of sun protection using data from individuals in the precontemplation (N = 964) and preparation (N = 463) stages who participated of an expert system intervention. Nine processes of change for sun protection, decisional balance constructs of sun protection (pros and cons), sun avoidance behaviour and sunscreen use. With the exception of two processes in the preparation stage, processes of change predicted the pros (r = .126-.614), and the pros predicted the outcomes (r = .181-.272). Three models with the cons as mediator in the preparation stage, and none in the precontemplation stage, showed a mediated relationship between processes and outcomes. In general, mediation analyses found both the process of change-to-pros and pros-to-behaviour paths significant for both precontemplation and preparation stages, and for both sun avoidance and sunscreen use outcomes. Findings provide support for the importance of assessing the role of underlying risk cognitions in improving sun protection adherence.

  20. Neonatal Fc receptor expression in dendritic cells mediates protective immunity against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B; Arthur, Janelle C; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D; Odze, Robert D; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-12

    Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system that we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8(+) T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DCs) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8(+) T cells that drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DCs activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC), as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12, both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn-IgG IC interaction in murine and human DCs. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance.

  1. Protective effect of diphenyl diselenide against peroxynitrite-mediated endothelial cell death: a comparison with ebselen.

    PubMed

    de Bem, Andreza Fabro; Fiuza, Bianca; Calcerrada, Pablo; Brito, Paula M; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Dinis, Teresa C P; Trujillo, Madia; Rocha, João B T; Radi, Rafael; Almeida, Leonor M

    2013-05-31

    Excess production of superoxide (O₂(-)) and nitric oxide (NO) in blood vessel walls may occur early in atherogenesis leading to the formation of peroxynitrite, a strong oxidant and nitrating agent. This study was designed to determine the effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)₂, a synthetic organoselenium compound, in comparison with ebselen, on peroxynitrite-mediated endothelial damage. Experimental results showed that pre-incubation of BAEC (24 h) with low concentrations of (PhSe)₂ (0.5 and 1 μM) protected the cells from peroxynitrite-dependent apoptosis and protein tyrosine nitration. The intracellular levels of GSH were almost completely depleted by peroxynitrite and, although the compounds did not restore its normal levels, (PhSe)₂ per se significantly increased GSH in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, (PhSe)₂, which was about two times more active as a GPx mimic than ebselen, induced a significantly higher increase in both cellular GPx expression and activity. Taking into account the kinetics of the reaction between peroxynitrite and (PhSe)₂, our data indicate that (PhSe)₂ protects BAEC against peroxynitrite-mediated cell damage not by a direct reaction, but rather by increasing cellular GPx expression as a consequence of enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf-2, which together with the increase in intracellular GSH, may work catalytically to reduce peroxynitrite to nitrite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Organ-Protective Effects of Red Wine Extract, Resveratrol, in Oxidative Stress-Mediated Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol extracted from red wine, possesses potential antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, including the reduction of free radicals and proinflammatory mediators overproduction, the alteration of the expression of adhesion molecules, and the inhibition of neutrophil function. A growing body of evidence indicates that resveratrol plays an important role in reducing organ damage following ischemia- and hemorrhage-induced reperfusion injury. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in decreasing the formation and reaction of reactive oxygen species and pro-nflammatory cytokines, as well as the mediation of a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, including the nitric oxide synthase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, deacetylase sirtuin 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha, hemeoxygenase-1, and estrogen receptor-related pathways. Reperfusion injury is a complex pathophysiological process that involves multiple factors and pathways. The resveratrol is an effective reactive oxygen species scavenger that exhibits an antioxidative property. In this review, the organ-protective effects of resveratrol in oxidative stress-related reperfusion injury will be discussed. PMID:26161238

  3. TB & HIV: the deadly intersection.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, D S

    1999-05-01

    About 2 billion people worldwide are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). TB is the leading cause of premature death in less industrialized countries, and 8 million more people become infected every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared TB a global emergency in 1993 and launched a series of prevention and vaccination programs. In spite of effective drug therapy and a vaccine, tuberculosis remains a major public health problem. The TB and HIV epidemics are closely intertwined, and the risk of TB disease progression is 100 times greater in HIV-positive individuals. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected people worldwide, and virologic evidence suggests that the host immune response to TB may enhance HIV replication and accelerate the progression of HIV infection. The interaction between the two diseases was the subject of a conference called TB & HIV: Applying Advances to the Clinic, Public Health, and the World. Charts and tables show reported TB cases in the U.S., trends in TB cases among foreign-born persons in the U.S., and the country of origin for foreign-born persons with TB in the U.S. Several poster sessions from the conference are summarized. Strategies for dealing with the TB epidemic are outlined.

  4. Decay-accelerating factor protects human tumor cells from complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, N K; Walter, E I; Smith-Mensah, W H; Ratnoff, W D; Tykocinski, M L; Medof, M E

    1988-01-01

    The disialoganglioside GD2 is expressed on a wide spectrum of human tumor types, including neuroblastomas and melanomas. Upon binding of 3F8, a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for GD2, neuroblastomas and some melanomas are sensitive to killing by human complement, whereas some melanomas are not. To investigate the mechanism underlying these differences in complement mediated cytotoxicity, complement-insensitive melanoma cell lines were compared with respect to expression of the decay-accelerating factor (DAF), a membrane regulatory protein that protects blood cells from autologous complement attack. While DAF was undetectable among neuroblastomas, it was present in complement-insensitive melanomas. When the function of DAF was blocked by anti-DAF MAb, C3 uptake and complement-mediated lysis of the insensitive melanoma lines were markedly enhanced. F(ab')2 fragments were as effective in enhancing lysis as intact anti-DAF MAb. The DAF-negative and DAF-positive melanoma cell lines were comparably resistant to passive lysis by cobra venom factor-treated serum. The data suggest that in some tumors, DAF activity accounts for their resistance to complement-mediated killing. The ability to render these cells complement-sensitive by blocking DAF function may have implications for immunotherapy. PMID:2450893

  5. Hepcidin-mediated iron sequestration protects against bacterial dissemination during pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Kathryn R.; Zhang, Zhimin; Bettina, Alexandra M.; Cagnina, R. Elaine; Stefanova, Debora; Burdick, Marie D.; Vaulont, Sophie; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative pneumonia is a dangerous illness, and bacterial dissemination to the bloodstream during the infection is strongly associated with death. Antibiotic resistance among the causative pathogens has resulted in diminishing treatment options against this infection. Hepcidin is the master regulator of extracellular iron availability in vertebrates, but its role in the context of host defense is undefined. We hypothesized that hepcidin-mediated depletion of extracellular iron during Gram-negative pneumonia protects the host by limiting dissemination of bacteria to the bloodstream. During experimental pneumonia, hepcidin was induced in the liver in an IL-6–dependent manner and mediated a rapid decline in plasma iron. In contrast, hepcidin-deficient mice developed a paradoxical increase in plasma iron during infection associated with profound susceptibility to bacteremia. Incubation of bacteria with iron-supplemented plasma enhanced bacterial growth in vitro, and systemic administration of iron to WT mice similarly promoted increased susceptibility to bloodstream infection. Finally, treatment with a hepcidin analogue restored hypoferremia in hepcidin-deficient hosts, mediated bacterial control, and improved outcomes. These data show hepcidin induction during pneumonia to be essential to preventing bacterial dissemination by limiting extracellular iron availability. Hepcidin agonists may represent an effective therapy for Gram-negative infections in patients with impaired hepcidin production or signaling. PMID:28352667

  6. Astrocyte Mediated Protection of Fetal Cerebral Cortical Neurons from Rotenone and Paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Rathinam, Mary Latha; Watts, Lora Talley; Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Riar, Amanjot Kaur; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Henderson, George.I.

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultures of fetal rat cortical neurons and astrocytes were used to test the hypothesis that astrocyte-mediated control of neuronal glutathione (GSH) is a potent factor in neuroprotection against rotenone and paraquat. In neurons, rotenone (0.025 to 1μM) for 4 and 24 h decreased viability as did paraquat (2 to 100μM). Rotenone (30nM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 24% and 30%, while ROS were increased by 56%. Paraquat (30μM) decreased neuronal viability and GSH by 36% and 70%, while ROS were increased by 23%. When neurons were co-cultured with astrocytes, their GSH increased 1.5 fold and 5 fold at 12 and 24 h. Co-culturing with astrocytes blocked neuronal death and damage by rotenone and paraquat. Astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection was dependent on the activity of components of the γ-glutamyl cycle. These studies illustrate the importance of astrocyte-mediated glutathione homeostasis for protection of neurons from rotenone and paraquat and the role of the γ-glutamyl cycle in this neuroprotection PMID:22301167

  7. Growth Hormone Mediates Its Protective Effect in Hepatic Apoptosis through Hnf6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kewei; Wang, Minhua; Gannon, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Growth hormone (GH) not only supports hepatic metabolism but also protects against hepatocyte cell death. Hnf6 (or Oc1) belonging to the Onecut family of hepatocyte transcription factors known to regulate differentiated hepatic function, is a GH-responsive gene. We evaluate if GH mediates Hnf6 activity to attenuate hepatic apoptotic injury. Methods We used an animal model of hepatic apoptosis by bile duct ligation (BDL) with Hnf6 -/- (KO) mice in which hepatic Hnf6 was conditionally inactivated. GH was administered to adult wild type WT and KO mice for the 7 days of BDL to enhance Hnf6 expression. In vitro, primary hepatocytes derived from KO and WT liver were treated with LPS and hepatocyte apoptosis was assessed with and without GH treatment. Results In WT mice, GH treatment enhanced Hnf6 expression during BDL, inhibited Caspase -3, -8 and -9 responses and diminished hepatic apoptotic and fibrotic injury. GH-mediated upregulation of Hnf6 expression and parallel suppression of apoptosis and fibrosis in WT BDL liver were abrogated in KO mice. LPS activated apoptosis and suppressed Hnf6 expression in primary hepatocytes. GH/LPS co-treatment enhanced Hnf6 expression with corresponding attenuation of apoptosis in WT-derived hepatocytes, but not in KO hepatocytes. ChiP-on-ChiP and electromobility shift assays of KO and WT liver nuclear extracts identified Ciap1 (or Birc2) as an Hnf6-bound target gene. Ciap1 expression patterns closely follow Hnf6 expression in the liver and in hepatocytes. Conclusion GH broad protective actions on hepatocytes during liver injury are effected through Hnf6, with Hnf6 transcriptional activation of Ciap1 as an underlying molecular mediator. PMID:27936029

  8. Berberine Protects against Neuronal Damage via Suppression of Glia-Mediated Inflammation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chao Yu; Wang, Liang-Fei; Wu, Chun-Hu; Ke, Chia-Hua; Chen, Szu-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) triggers a series of neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to evolution of neuronal injury. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects and anti-inflammatory actions of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, in both in vitro and in vivo TBI models. Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were injected with berberine (10 mg·kg−1) or vehicle 10 min after injury. In addition to behavioral studies and histology analysis, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and brain water content were determined. Expression of PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling and inflammatory mediators were also analyzed. The protective effect of berberine was also investigated in cultured neurons either subjected to stretch injury or exposed to conditioned media with activated microglia. Berberine significantly attenuated functional deficits and brain damage associated with TBI up to day 28 post-injury. Berberine also reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, BBB permeability, and brain edema at day 1 post-injury. These changes coincided with a marked reduction in leukocyte infiltration, microglial activation, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, and expression of inflammatory mediators. Berberine had no effect on Akt or Erk 1/2 phosphorylation. In mixed glial cultures, berberine reduced TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling. Berberine also attenuated neuronal death induced by microglial conditioned media; however, it did not directly protect cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Moreover, administration of berberine at 3 h post-injury also reduced TBI-induced neuronal damage, apoptosis and inflammation in vivo. Berberine reduces TBI-induced brain damage by limiting the production of inflammatory mediators by glial cells, rather than by a direct neuroprotective effect. PMID:25546475

  9. Immune TB Antibody Phage Display Library as a Tool To Study B Cell Immunity in TB Infections.

    PubMed

    Hamidon, Nurul Hamizah; Suraiya, Siti; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Lim, Theam Soon

    2017-09-07

    B cells and in particular antibodies has always played second fiddle to cellular immunity in regard to tuberculosis (TB). However, recent studies has helped position humoral immunity especially antibodies back into the foray in relation to TB immunity. Therefore, the ability to correlate the natural antibody responses of infected individuals toward TB antigens would help strengthen this concept. Phage display is an intriguing approach that can be utilized to study antibody-mediated responses against a particular infection via harvesting the B cell repertoire from infected individuals. The development of disease-specific antibody libraries or immune libraries is useful to better understand antibody-mediated immune responses against specific disease antigens. This study describes the generation of an immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library derived from TB-infected individuals. The immune library with an estimated diversity of 10(9) independent clones was then applied for the identification of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-crystalline as a model antigen. Biopanning of the library isolated three monoclonal antibodies with unique gene usage. This strengthens the role of antibodies in TB immunity in addition to the role played by cellular immunity. The developed library can be applied against other TB antigens and aid antibody-derived TB immunity studies in the future.

  10. C-reactive protein mediates protection from lipopolysaccharide through interactions with Fc gamma R.

    PubMed

    Mold, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Wilfredo; Rodic-Polic, Bojana; Du Clos, Terry W

    2002-12-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a component of the acute phase response to infection, inflammation, and trauma. A major activity of acute phase proteins is to limit the inflammatory response. It has been demonstrated that CRP protects mice from lethal doses of LPS. In the mouse, CRP binds to the regulatory receptor, FcgammaRIIb, and to the gamma-chain-associated receptor, FcgammaRI. The goal ofthis study was to determine whether FcgammaRs are necessary for the protective effect of CRP. The ability of CRP to protect mice from a lethal dose of LPS was confirmed using injections of 500 and 250 micro g of CRP at 0 and 12 h. CRP treatment of FcgammaRIIb-deficient mice increased mortality after LPS challenge and increased serum levels of TNF and IL-12 in response to LPS. CRP did not protect FcR gamma-chain-deficient mice from LPS-induced mortality. Treatment of normal mice, but not gamma-chain-deficient mice, with CRP increased IL-10 levels following LPS injection. In vitro, in the presence of LPS, CRP enhanced IL-10 synthesis and inhibited IL-12 synthesis by bone marrow macrophages from normal, but not gamma-chain-deficient mice. The protective effect of CRP appears to be mediated by binding to FcgammaRI and FcgammaRII resulting in enhanced secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the down-regulation of IL-12. These results suggest that CRP can alter the cytokine profile of mouse macrophages by acting through FcgammaR leading to a down-regulation of the inflammatory response.

  11. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one person to another. ... HIV) infection affect TB? The HIV, or the AIDS virus, helps TB germs make you sick because ...

  12. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF PHYLLANTHUS EMBLICA LEAF EXTRACT ON SODIUM ARSENITE-MEDIATED ADVERSE EFFECTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    SAYED, SADIA; AHSAN, NAZMUL; KATO, MASASHI; OHGAMI, NOBUTAKA; RASHID, ABDUR; AKHAND, ANWARUL AZIM

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Groundwater contamination of arsenic is the major cause of a serious health hazard in Bangladesh. No specific treatment is yet available to manage the large number of individuals exposed to arsenic. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian gooseberry or Amla) leaf extract (PLE) on arsenic-mediated toxicity in experimental mice. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into three different groups (n=6/group). ‘Control’ mice received arsenic free water together with normal feed. Mice in the remaining two groups designated ‘SA’ and ‘SA+PLE’ were exposed to sodium arsenite (SA, 10 µg/g body weight/day) through drinking water in addition to receiving normal feed and PLE-supplemented feed, respectively. The weight gain of SA-exposed mice was decreased compared with the controls; however, this decrease in body weight gain was prevented when the feed was supplemented with PLE. A secondary effect of arsenic was enlargement of the liver, kidney and spleen of SA-group mice. Deposition of arsenic in those organs was demonstrated by ICP-MS. When PLE was supplemented in the feed the enlargement of the organs was minimized; however, the deposition of arsenic was not significantly reduced. These results indicated that PLE may not block arsenic deposition in tissue directly but rather may play a protective role to reduce arsenic-induced toxicity. Therefore, co-administration of PLE in arsenic-exposed animals might have a future therapeutic application for protecting against arsenic-mediated toxicity. PMID:25797979

  13. Thrombomodulin Contributes to Gamma Tocotrienol-Mediated Lethality Protection and Hematopoietic Cell Recovery in Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Shao, Lijian; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Zhou, Daohong; Boerma, Marjan; Weiler, Hartmut; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of recombinant thrombomodulin (TM) confers radiation protection partly by accelerating hematopoietic recovery. The uniquely potent radioprotector gamma tocotrienol (GT3), in addition to being a strong antioxidant, inhibits the enzyme hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and thereby likely modulates the expression of TM. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the exceptional radioprotective properties of GT3 partly depends on the presence of endothelial TM. In vitro studies confirmed that ionizing radiation suppresses endothelial TM (about 40% at 4 hr after 5 Gy γ-irradiation) and that GT3 induces TM expression (about 2 fold at the mRNA level after 5 μM GT3 treatment for 4 hr). In vivo survival studies showed that GT3 was significantly more effective as a radioprotector in TM wild type (TM+/+) mice than in mice with low TM function (TMPro/-). After exposure to 9 Gy TBI, GT3 pre-treatment conferred 85% survival in TM+/+ mice compared to only 50% in TMPro/-. Thus, GT3-mediated radiation lethality protection is partly dependent on endothelial TM. Significant post-TBI recovery of hematopoietic cells, particularly leukocytes, was observed in TM+/+ mice (p = 0.003), but not in TMPro/- mice, despite the fact that GT3 induced higher levels of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in TMPro/- mice (p = 0.0001). These data demonstrate a critical, G-CSF-independent, role for endothelial TM in GT3-mediated lethality protection and hematopoietic recovery after exposure to TBI and may point to new strategies to enhance the efficacy of current medical countermeasures in radiological/nuclear emergencies. PMID:25860286

  14. Drug Transporter-Mediated Protection of Cancer Stem Cells From Ionophore Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Rumpold, Holger; Gastl, Guenther; Sopper, Sieghart; Wolf, Dominik

    2015-09-01

    Ionophore antibiotics were reported to selectively kill cancer stem cells and to overcome multidrug resistance, but mechanistic studies of the significance of drug transporters for treatment with these compounds are lacking. We applied chemosensitivity testing of well-characterized human cancer cell lines to elaborate on whether drug transporters are involved in protection from the cytotoxic effects of the ionophore antibiotics salinomycin and nigericin. Our experiments demonstrated that ionophore antibiotics were ineffective against both stem-like ovarian cancer side population cells (expressing either ABCB1 or ABCG2) and K562/Dox-H1 cells, which constitute a genetically defined model system for ABCB1 expression. Considering that cancer stem cells often express high levels of drug transporters, we deduced from our results that ionophore antibiotics are less suited to cancer stem cell-targeted treatment than previously thought. Ionophore antibiotics such as salinomycin have repeatedly been shown to target cancer stem and progenitor cells from various tumor entities. Meanwhile, cancer stem cell (CSC)-selective toxicity of ionophore antibiotics seems to be a commonly accepted concept that is about to encourage their clinical testing. This study provides data that challenge the concept of targeted elimination of CSC by ionophore antibiotics. Stem-like ovarian cancer side population (SP) cells expressing high levels of ABC drug transporters are shown to largely resist the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin and nigericin. Furthermore, using a small interfering RNA-based knockdown model specific for ABCB1, this study demonstrates that ABC drug transporters are indeed causally involved in mediating protection from ionophore antibiotics. Considering that it is a hallmark of CSCs to exhibit drug resistance conferred by ABC drug transporters, it must be deduced from these results that CSCs may also be protected from ionophore antibiotics by means of drug-transporter mediated

  15. Drug Transporter-Mediated Protection of Cancer Stem Cells From Ionophore Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zeimet, Alain G.; Rumpold, Holger; Gastl, Guenther; Sopper, Sieghart; Wolf, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Ionophore antibiotics were reported to selectively kill cancer stem cells and to overcome multidrug resistance, but mechanistic studies of the significance of drug transporters for treatment with these compounds are lacking. We applied chemosensitivity testing of well-characterized human cancer cell lines to elaborate on whether drug transporters are involved in protection from the cytotoxic effects of the ionophore antibiotics salinomycin and nigericin. Our experiments demonstrated that ionophore antibiotics were ineffective against both stem-like ovarian cancer side population cells (expressing either ABCB1 or ABCG2) and K562/Dox-H1 cells, which constitute a genetically defined model system for ABCB1 expression. Considering that cancer stem cells often express high levels of drug transporters, we deduced from our results that ionophore antibiotics are less suited to cancer stem cell-targeted treatment than previously thought. Significance Ionophore antibiotics such as salinomycin have repeatedly been shown to target cancer stem and progenitor cells from various tumor entities. Meanwhile, cancer stem cell (CSC)-selective toxicity of ionophore antibiotics seems to be a commonly accepted concept that is about to encourage their clinical testing. This study provides data that challenge the concept of targeted elimination of CSC by ionophore antibiotics. Stem-like ovarian cancer side population (SP) cells expressing high levels of ABC drug transporters are shown to largely resist the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin and nigericin. Furthermore, using a small interfering RNA-based knockdown model specific for ABCB1, this study demonstrates that ABC drug transporters are indeed causally involved in mediating protection from ionophore antibiotics. Considering that it is a hallmark of CSCs to exhibit drug resistance conferred by ABC drug transporters, it must be deduced from these results that CSCs may also be protected from ionophore antibiotics by means of drug

  16. TB or not TB?: a case of isolated testicular TB with scrotal involvement.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, A; Davenport, C; Gibbons, N; McConkey, S

    2009-06-01

    Despite the genitourinary tract being the most common site affected by extrapulmonary TB, isolated testicular TB remains a rare clinical entity. In patients with co-morbidities such as hepatic impairment, treatment proves a challenge, as first-line hepatotoxic pharmaceuticals are contraindicated. Here, we report a case of isolated testicular TB with scrotal involvement, on a background of hepatic dysfunction.

  17. Basophil-mediated protection against gastrointestinal helminths requires IgE-induced cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christian; Turqueti-Neves, Adriana; Hartmann, Susanne; Yu, Philipp; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Voehringer, David

    2014-01-01

    Basophils orchestrate protection against reinfections with gastrointestinal helminths and ticks, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated the role of Fc receptors on basophils, the antibody isotypes IgG1 and IgE, and basophil-derived IL-4/IL-13 during challenge infections with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras, we found that activating Fc receptors on basophils were required for protective immunity but not for regulation of basophil homeostasis. Furthermore, rapid worm expulsion was impaired in IgE-deficient but not in IgG1-deficient mice. Basophils promoted the recruitment of other effector cells into the small intestine and induced expression of the antihelminthic proteins resistin-like molecule β and mucin 5ac. Selective deletion of IL-4/IL-13 in basophils resulted in impaired worm expulsion. Collectively, our results indicate that IgE-mediated activation of basophils and the release of basophil-derived IL-4/IL-13 are critical steps in protective immunity against helminths. Therefore, development of effective vaccines against helminths should consider boosting the IL-4/IgE/basophil axis of the immune system. PMID:25404305

  18. Anti-pathogen protection versus survival costs mediated by an ectosymbiont in an ant host

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Matthias; Grasse, Anna V.; Tragust, Simon; Cremer, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The fitness effects of symbionts on their hosts can be context-dependent, with usually benign symbionts causing detrimental effects when their hosts are stressed, or typically parasitic symbionts providing protection towards their hosts (e.g. against pathogen infection). Here, we studied the novel association between the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus and its fungal ectosymbiont Laboulbenia formicarum for potential costs and benefits. We tested ants with different Laboulbenia levels for their survival and immunity under resource limitation and exposure to the obligate killing entomopathogen Metarhizium brunneum. While survival of L. neglectus workers under starvation was significantly decreased with increasing Laboulbenia levels, host survival under Metarhizium exposure increased with higher levels of the ectosymbiont, suggesting a symbiont-mediated anti-pathogen protection, which seems to be driven mechanistically by both improved sanitary behaviours and an upregulated immune system. Ants with high Laboulbenia levels showed significantly longer self-grooming and elevated expression of immune genes relevant for wound repair and antifungal responses (β-1,3-glucan binding protein, Prophenoloxidase), compared with ants carrying low Laboulbenia levels. This suggests that the ectosymbiont Laboulbenia formicarum weakens its ant host by either direct resource exploitation or the costs of an upregulated behavioural and immunological response, which, however, provides a prophylactic protection upon later exposure to pathogens. PMID:25473011

  19. An endothelial TLR4-VEGFR2 pathway mediates lung protection against oxidant-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Zhang, Yi; Haslip, Maria; Jin, Lei; Shan, Peiying; Zhang, Xuchen; Lee, Patty J

    2016-03-01

    TLR4 deficiency causes hypersusceptibility to oxidant-induced injury. We investigated the role of TLR4 in lung protection, using used bone marrow chimeras; cell-specific transgenic modeling; and lentiviral delivery in vivo to knock down or express TLR4 in various lung compartments; and lung-specific VEGF transgenic mice to investigate the effect of TLR4 on VEGF-mediated protection. C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 100% oxygen in an enclosed chamber and assessed for survival and lung injury. Primary endothelial cells were stimulated with recombinant VEGF and exposed to hyperoxia or hydrogen peroxide. Endothelium-specific expression of human TLR4 (as opposed to its expression in epithelium or immune cells) increased the survival of TLR4-deficent mice in hyperoxia by 24 h and decreased LDH release and lung cell apoptosis after 72 h of exposure by 30%. TLR4 expression was necessary and sufficient for the protective effect of VEGF in the lungs and in primary endothelial cells in culture. TLR4 knockdown inhibited VEGF signaling through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), Akt, and ERK pathways in lungs and primary endothelial cells and decreased the availability of VEGFR2 at the cell surface. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism through which TLR4, an innate pattern receptor, interacts with an endothelial survival pathway.

  20. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ji; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Xiaolei; Wu, Mingchun; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Xiaonan; Huo, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular Cu/Zn SOD (SOD1) and SOD2 activities; western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were performed to investigate SOD2 protein expression; MTT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), release and cell morphology were used to evaluate cell injury degree, and apoptotic rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression were taken to assess apoptosis; mitochondrial superoxide production, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated by reagent kits. Results. Amifostine increased SOD2 activity and expression, decreased cell injury and apoptosis, reduced mitochondrial superoxide production and intracellular ROS generation, and restored intracellular GSH and CAT levels in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. SOD2-siRNA, however, significantly reversed the amifostine-induced cytoprotective and antioxidative actions. Conclusion. SOD2 mediates amifostine-induced protection in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. PMID:26770652

  1. Immunization with heat-killed Francisella tularensis LVS elicits protective antibody-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Christy L; Clinton, Shawn R; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Marion, Tony N; Bina, Xiaowen R; Bina, James E; Whitt, Michael A; Miller, Mark A

    2007-11-01

    Francisella tularensis (FT) has been classified by the CDC as a category A pathogen because of its high virulence and the high mortality rate associated with infection via the aerosol route. Because there is no licensed vaccine available for FT, development of prophylactic and therapeutic regimens for the prevention/treatment of infection is a high priority. In this report, heat-killed FT live vaccine strain (HKLVS) was employed as a vaccine immunogen, either alone or in combination with an adjuvant, and was found to elicit protective immunity against high-dose FT live vaccine strain (FTLVS) challenge. FT-specific antibodies produced in response to immunization with HKLVS alone were subsequently found to completely protect naive mice against high-dose FT challenge in both infection-interference and passive immunization experiments. Additional passive immunization trials employing serum collected from mice immunized with a heat-killed preparation of an O-antigen-deficient transposon mutant of FTLVS (HKLVS-OAg(neg)) yielded similar results. These findings demonstrated that FT-specific antibodies alone can confer immunity against high-dose FTLVS challenge, and they reveal that antibody-mediated protection is not dependent upon production of LPS-specific antibodies.

  2. Similar cation channels mediate protection from cerebellar exitotoxicity by exercise and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Shani; Ofek, Keren; Barbash, Shahar; Meiri, Hanoch; Kovalev, Eugenia; Greenberg, David Samuel; Soreq, Hermona; Shoham, Shai

    2012-03-01

    Exercise and inherited factors both affect recovery from stroke and head injury, but the underlying mechanisms and interconnections between them are yet unknown. Here, we report that similar cation channels mediate the protective effect of exercise and specific genetic background in a kainate injection model of cerebellar stroke. Microinjection to the cerebellum of the glutamatergic agonist, kainate, creates glutamatergic excito\\xE2\\x80\\x90toxicity characteristic of focal stroke, head injury or alcoholism. Inherited protection and prior exercise were both accompanied by higher cerebellar expression levels of the Kir6.1 ATP-dependent potassium channel in adjacent Bergmann glia, and voltage-gated KVbeta2 and cyclic nucleotide-gated cation HCN1 channels in basket cells. Sedentary FVB/N and exercised C57BL/6 mice both expressed higher levels of these cation channels compared to sedentary C57BL/6 mice, and were both found to be less sensitive to glutamate toxicity. Moreover, blocking ATP-dependent potassium channels with Glibenclamide enhanced kainate-induced cell death in cerebellar slices from the resilient sedentary FVB/N mice. Furthermore, exercise increased the number of acetylcholinesterase-positive fibres in the molecular layer, reduced cerebellar cytokine levels and suppressed serum acetylcholinesterase activity, suggesting anti-inflammatory protection by enhanced cholinergic signalling. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that routine exercise and specific genetic backgrounds confer protection from cerebellar glutamatergic damages by similar molecular mechanisms, including elevated expression of cation channels. In addition, our findings highlight the involvement of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in insult-inducible cerebellar processes. These mechanisms are likely to play similar roles in other brain regions and injuries as well, opening new venues for targeted research efforts.

  3. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DMT liposome-adjuvanted tuberculosis subunit CTT3H vaccine.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xindong; Tian, Maopeng; Li, Jianrong; Tan, Songwei; Yuan, Xuefeng; Yu, Qi; Jing, Yukai; Zhang, Zhiping; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-01-01

    Different strategies have been proposed for the development of protein subunit vaccine candidates for tuberculosis (TB), which shows better safety than other types of candidates and the currently used Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. In order to develop more effective protein subunits depending on the mechanism of cell-mediated immunity against TB, a polyprotein CTT3H, based on 5 immunodominant antigens (CFP10, TB10.4, TB8.4, Rv3615c, and HBHA) with CD8(+) epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was constructed in this study. We vaccinated C57BL/6 mice with a TB subunit CTT3H protein in an adjuvant of dimethyldioctadecylammonium/monophosphoryl lipid A/trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (DDA/MPL/TDB, DMT) liposome to investigate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine. Our results demonstrated that DMT liposome-adjuvanted CTT3H vaccine not only induced an antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 response, but also raised the number of PPD- and CTT3H-specific IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T cells and elicited strong CTL responses against TB10.4, which provided more effective protection against a 60 CFU M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge than PBS control and DMT adjuvant alone. Our findings indicate that DMT-liposome is an effective adjuvant to stimulate CD8(+) T cell responses and the DMT-adjuvanted subunit CTT3H vaccine is a promising candidate for the next generation of TB vaccine.

  4. Experimental Studies on Cholera Immunization II. Evidence for Protective Antitoxic Immunity Mediated by Serum Antibodies as Well as Local Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J.; Andersson, Å.; Wallerstrom, G.; Ouchterlony, Ö.

    1972-01-01

    By use of the ileal loop technique, the resistance to challenge with cholera enterotoxin was compared between unimmunized rabbits and rabbits immunized with toxin or toxoids. It was shown that subcutaneous as well as intraintestinal immunization induced protective immunity, the toxin being a better immunogen than Formalin-induced toxoid and much better than heat-induced toxoid. The relation between protection and serum antitoxin titer was poor, e.g., protection was seen in the absence of demonstrable serum antibodies. However, intravenous administration of antitoxic antiserum conferred some protection, suggesting that local as well as serum-mediated antitoxic immunity is operating in the host defence against cholera. PMID:4637602

  5. CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial homeostasis in radioadaptive protection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Cuihong; Qin, Lili; Shi, Yan; Candas, Demet; Fan, Ming; Lu, Chung-Ling; Vaughan, Andrew T. M.; Shen, Rulong; Wu, Larry S.; Liu, Rui; Li, Robert F.; Murley, Jeffrey S.; Gayle, Woloschak; Grdina, David J.; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells are able to sense environmental oxidative and genotoxic conditions such as the environmental low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) present naturally on earth surface. The stressed cells then can induce a so-called radioadaptive response with an enhanced cellular homeostasis and repair capacity against subsequent similar genotoxic conditions such as a high dose radiation. MnSOD, a primary mitochondrial antioxidant in mammals, has long been known to play a crucial role in the radioadaptive protection through detoxifying O2·- generated by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Contrasted to the well-studied mechanisms of SOD2 gene regulation, the mechanisms underlying post-translational regulation of MnSOD for radioprotection remain to be defined. Herein, we demonstrate that Cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) serves as the messenger to deliver the stress signal to mitochondria to boost mitochondrial homeostasis in human skin keratinocytes under LDIR adaptive radioprotection. Cyclin D1/CDK4 is found to relocate to mitochondria at the same time as MnSOD enzymatic activation peaks without significant changes of total MnSOD protein level. The mitochondrial-localized CDK4 directly phosphorylates MnSOD at Serine 106 (S106), causing enhanced MnSOD enzymatic activity and mitochondrial respiration. Expression of mitochondria-targeted dominant negative CDK4 or the MnSOD-S106A mutant reverses LDIR-induced mitochondrial enhancement and adaptive protection. The CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial metabolism boost are also detected in skin tissues of mice receiving in vivo whole body LDIR. These results demonstrate a unique CDK4-mediated mitochondrial communication that allows cells to sense environmental genotoxic stress and boost mitochondrial homeostasis via enhancing phosphorylation and activation of MnSOD. PMID:25578653

  6. Protection by Salidroside against Bone Loss via Inhibition of Oxidative Stress and Bone-Resorbing Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi; Fan, Jing; Li, Dan; Chen, Jian-Zong; Shi, Tian-Yao; Hu, Hui-Min; Wei, Bo-Yuan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pivotal pathogenic factor for bone loss in mouse model. Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside extracted from Rhodiola rosea L, exhibits potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we used an in vitro oxidative stress model induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in MC3T3-E1 cells and a murine ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis model to investigate the protective effects of salidroside on bone loss and the related mechanisms. We demonstrated that salidroside caused a significant (P<0.05) elevation of cell survival, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and activity, calcium deposition, and the transcriptional expression of Alp, Col1a1 and Osteocalcin (Ocn) in the presence of H2O2. Moreover, salidroside decreased the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and osteoclast differentiation inducing factors such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and IL-6 induced by H2O2. In vivo studies further demonstrated that salidroside supplementation for 3 months caused a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) and an increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in blood of ovariectomized mouse (P<0.05), it also improved trabecular bone microarchitecture and bone mineral density in the fourth lumbar vertebra and distal femur. Our study indicated that the protection provided by salidroside in alleviating bone loss was mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the release of bone-resorbing mediators and oxidative damage to bone-forming cells, suggesting that salidroside can be used as an effective remedy in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:23437352

  7. Protection by salidroside against bone loss via inhibition of oxidative stress and bone-resorbing mediators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Kang; Yang, Liu; Meng, Guo-Lin; Yuan, Zhi; Fan, Jing; Li, Dan; Chen, Jian-Zong; Shi, Tian-Yao; Hu, Hui-Min; Wei, Bo-Yuan; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Liu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pivotal pathogenic factor for bone loss in mouse model. Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside extracted from Rhodiola rosea L, exhibits potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we used an in vitro oxidative stress model induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in MC3T3-E1 cells and a murine ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis model to investigate the protective effects of salidroside on bone loss and the related mechanisms. We demonstrated that salidroside caused a significant (P<0.05) elevation of cell survival, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and activity, calcium deposition, and the transcriptional expression of Alp, Col1a1 and Osteocalcin (Ocn) in the presence of H(2)O(2). Moreover, salidroside decreased the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and osteoclast differentiation inducing factors such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and IL-6 induced by H(2)O(2). In vivo studies further demonstrated that salidroside supplementation for 3 months caused a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) and an increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in blood of ovariectomized mouse (P<0.05), it also improved trabecular bone microarchitecture and bone mineral density in the fourth lumbar vertebra and distal femur. Our study indicated that the protection provided by salidroside in alleviating bone loss was mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of the release of bone-resorbing mediators and oxidative damage to bone-forming cells, suggesting that salidroside can be used as an effective remedy in the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis.

  8. CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial homeostasis in radioadaptive protection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cuihong; Qin, Lili; Shi, Yan; Candas, Demet; Fan, Ming; Lu, Chung-Ling; Vaughan, Andrew T M; Shen, Rulong; Wu, Larry S; Liu, Rui; Li, Robert F; Murley, Jeffrey S; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian cells are able to sense environmental oxidative and genotoxic conditions such as the environmental low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) present naturally on the earth's surface. The stressed cells then can induce a so-called radioadaptive response with an enhanced cellular homeostasis and repair capacity against subsequent similar genotoxic conditions such as a high dose radiation. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a primary mitochondrial antioxidant in mammals, has long been known to play a crucial role in radioadaptive protection by detoxifying O2(•-) generated by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast to the well-studied mechanisms of SOD2 gene regulation, the mechanisms underlying posttranslational regulation of MnSOD for radioprotection remain to be defined. Herein, we demonstrate that cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) serves as the messenger to deliver the stress signal to mitochondria to boost mitochondrial homeostasis in human skin keratinocytes under LDIR-adaptive radioprotection. Cyclin D1/CDK4 relocates to mitochondria at the same time as MnSOD enzymatic activation peaks without significant changes in total MnSOD protein level. The mitochondrial-localized CDK4 directly phosphorylates MnSOD at serine-106 (S106), causing enhanced MnSOD enzymatic activity and mitochondrial respiration. Expression of mitochondria-targeted dominant negative CDK4 or the MnSOD-S106 mutant reverses LDIR-induced mitochondrial enhancement and adaptive protection. The CDK4-mediated MnSOD activation and mitochondrial metabolism boost are also detected in skin tissues of mice receiving in vivo whole-body LDIR. These results demonstrate a unique CDK4-mediated mitochondrial communication that allows cells to sense environmental genotoxic stress and boost mitochondrial homeostasis by enhancing phosphorylation and activation of MnSOD.

  9. Mechanism of H2S-mediated protection against oxidative stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Alexander; Seregina, Tatyana; Nagornykh, Maxim; Luhachack, Lyly G; Korolkova, Natalya; Lopes, Liubov Errais; Kotova, Vera; Zavilgelsky, Gennady; Shakulov, Rustem; Shatalin, Konstantin; Nudler, Evgeny

    2017-06-06

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) renders bacteria highly resistant to oxidative stress, but its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we report that 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) is the major source of endogenous H2S in Escherichia coli Cellular resistance to H2O2 strongly depends on the activity of mstA, a gene that encodes 3MST. Deletion of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) renders ∆mstA cells hypersensitive to H2O2 Conversely, induction of chromosomal mstA from a strong pLtetO-1 promoter (P tet -mstA) renders ∆fur cells fully resistant to H2O2 Furthermore, the endogenous level of H2S is reduced in ∆fur or ∆sodA ∆sodB cells but restored after the addition of an iron chelator dipyridyl. Using a highly sensitive reporter of the global response to DNA damage (SOS) and the TUNEL assay, we show that 3MST-derived H2S protects chromosomal DNA from oxidative damage. We also show that the induction of the CysB regulon in response to oxidative stress depends on 3MST, whereas the CysB-regulated l-cystine transporter, TcyP, plays the principle role in the 3MST-mediated generation of H2S. These findings led us to propose a model to explain the interplay between l-cysteine metabolism, H2S production, and oxidative stress, in which 3MST protects E. coli against oxidative stress via l-cysteine utilization and H2S-mediated sequestration of free iron necessary for the genotoxic Fenton reaction.

  10. B cells are not essential for Lactobacillus-mediated protection against lethal pneumovirus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E.; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown previously that priming of respiratory mucosa with live Lactobacillus species promotes robust and prolonged survival from an otherwise lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a property known as heterologous immunity. Lactobacillus-priming results in a moderate reduction in virus recovery and a dramatic reduction in virus-induced proinflammatory cytokine production; the precise mechanisms underlying these findings remain to be elucidated. As B cells have been shown to promote heterologous immunity against respiratory virus pathogens under similar conditions, here we explore the role of B cells in Lactobacillus-mediated protection against acute pneumovirus infection. We found that Lactobacillus-primed mice feature elevated levels of airway immunoglobulins IgG, IgA and IgM and lung tissues with dense, B cell (B220+) enriched peribronchial and perivascular infiltrates with germinal centers consistent with descriptions of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. No B cells were detected in lung tissue of Lactobacillus-primed B-cell deficient μMT mice or Jh mice, and Lactobacillus-primed μMT mice had no characteristic infiltrates or airway immunoglobulins. Nonetheless, we observed diminished virus recovery and profound suppression of virus-induced proinflammatory cytokines CCL2, IFN-gamma, and CXCL10 in both wild-type and Lactobacillus-primed μMT mice. Furthermore, L. plantarum-primed, B-cell deficient μMT and Jh mice were fully protected from an otherwise lethal PVM infection, as were their respective wild-types. We conclude that B cells are dispensable for Lactobacillus-mediated heterologous immunity and were not crucial for promoting survival in response to an otherwise lethal pneumovirus infection. PMID:24748495

  11. Antibody-mediated immunity against tuberculosis: implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Achkar, Jacqueline M; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-03-13

    There is an urgent need for new and better vaccines against tuberculosis (TB). Current vaccine design strategies are generally focused on the enhancement of cell-mediated immunity. Antibody-based approaches are not being considered, mostly due to the paradigm that humoral immunity plays little role in the protection against intracellular pathogens. Here, we reappraise and update the increasing evidence for antibody-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, discuss the complexity of antibody responses to mycobacteria, and address mechanism of protection. Based on these findings and discussions, we challenge the common belief that immunity against M. tuberculosis relies solely on cellular defense mechanisms, and posit that induction of antibody-mediated immunity should be included in TB vaccine development strategies.

  12. Myeloid HIF-1 is protective in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastritis.

    PubMed

    Matak, Pavle; Heinis, Mylène; Mathieu, Jacques R R; Corriden, Ross; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Delga, Stéphanie; Mounier, Rémi; Rouquette, Alexandre; Raymond, Josette; Lamarque, Dominique; Emile, Jean-François; Nizet, Victor; Touati, Eliette; Peyssonnaux, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection triggers chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa that may progress to gastric cancer. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the central mediators of cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels (hypoxia), but they have emerged recently as major transcriptional regulators of immunity and inflammation. No studies have investigated whether H. pylori affects HIF signaling in immune cells and a potential role for HIF in H. pylori-mediated gastritis. HIF-1 and HIF-2 expression was examined in human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Subsequent experiments were performed in naive and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages from wild-type (WT) and myeloid HIF-1α-null mice (HIF-1(Δmyel)). WT and HIF-1(Δmyel) mice were inoculated with H. pylori by oral gavage and sacrificed 6 mo postinfection. HIF-1 was specifically expressed in macrophages of human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Macrophage HIF-1 strongly contributed to the induction of proinflammatory genes (IL-6, IL-1β) and inducible NO synthase in response to H. pylori. HIF-2 expression and markers of M2 macrophage differentiation were decreased in response to H. pylori. HIF-1(Δmyel) mice inoculated with H. pylori for 6 mo presented with a similar bacterial colonization than WT mice but, surprisingly, a global increase of inflammation, leading to a worsening of the gastritis, measured by an increased epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, myeloid HIF-1 is protective in H. pylori-mediated gastritis, pointing to the complex counterbalancing roles of innate immune and inflammatory phenotypes in driving this pathology.

  13. Unmasking of a Protective TNFR1 Mediated Signal in the Collagen Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Skipp, Cheryll; Raman, Thiagarajan; Valuck, Robert J.; Watkins, Herschel; Palmer, Brent E.; Scheinman, Robert I.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TNFR1 plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we explore the relative importance of TNFR1 signaling in the hematopoietic tissue compartment for disease progression. METHODS: DBA/1 mice were lethally irradiated and rescued with bone marrow derived from either DBA/1 or TNFR1−/− animals. The mice were then input into the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model and disease progression characterized. RESULTS: Surprisingly, TNFR1−/− transplant mice input into the CIA model develop increased disease as compared to controls. This could not be attributed to either an increased primary response to collagen or to the contribution of a non-DBA genetic background. Histological markers of advanced disease were evident in TNFR1−/− transplant mice shortly after initiation of the immune response to collagen and long before clinical evidence of disease. Serum TNFα was undetectable while serum IL-12p40 levels were increased in TNFR1−/− transplant mice at the end point of the study. CONCLUSION: These data raise the intriguing possibility of the existence of an anti-inflammatory TNFR1 mediated circuit in the hematopoietic compartment. This circuit bears a resemblance to emerging data delineating a switch in TNFα function observed in the resolution of bacterial infections. These data suggest that TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-resistant tissues contributes to disease progression while TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-sensitive tissues can contribute to protection from disease. We thus put forward the hypothesis that the degree of responce to TNFα blockade in RA is dependent, in part, on the relative genetic strengths of these two pathways. PMID:19180511

  14. L-carnitine protects against carboplatin-mediated renal injury: AMPK- and PPARα-dependent inactivation of NFAT3.

    PubMed

    Sue, Yuh-Mou; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Yang, Nian-Jie; Chou, Ying; Juan, Shu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that carboplatin induces inflammation and apoptosis in renal tubular cells (RTCs) through the activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells-3 (NFAT3) protein by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that the ROS-mediated activation of NFAT3 is prevented by N-acetyl cysteine and heme oxygenase-1 treatment. In the current study, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of the protective effect of L-carnitine on carboplatin-mediated renal injury. Balb/c mice and RTCs were used as model systems. Carboplatin-induced apoptosis in RTCs was examined using terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. We evaluated the effects of the overexpression of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) protein, the knockdown of PPARα gene, and the blockade of AMPK activation and PPARα to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of L-carnitine on carboplatin-mediated renal injury. Carboplatin reduced the nuclear translocation, phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator responsive element transactivational activity of PPARα. These carboplatin-mediated effects were prevented by L-carnitine through a mechanism dependent on AMPK phosphorylation and subsequent PPARα activation. The activation of PPARα induced cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) synthase expression that formed a positive feedback loop to further activate PPARα. The coimmunoprecipitation of the nuclear factor (NF) κB proteins increased following the induction of PPARα by L-carnitine, which reduced NFκB transactivational activity and cytokine expression. The in vivo study showed that the inactivation of AMPK suppressed the protective effect of L-carnitine in carboplatin-treated mice, indicating that AMPK phosphorylation is required for PPARα activation in the L-carnitine-mediated protection of RTC apoptosis caused by carboplatin. The results of our study provide molecular evidence that L

  15. Notch protection against apoptosis in T-ALL cells mediated by GIMAP5.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Nicholas; Zeef, Leo; Portillo, Virginia; Boros, Joanna; Hoyle, Sarah; van Doesburg, Jaap C L; Buckle, Anne-Marie

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of Notch signalling in the development of T cell acute lymphoblasic leukaemia (T-ALL). Over-expression of Notch3 and gain of function mutations in the Notch1 gene have been reported. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of Notch signalling on apoptosis in human T-ALL cell lines and to identify targets of Notch signalling that may mediate this effect. Functional studies showed that inhibition of Notch signalling using gamma secretase inhibitors promoted glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in cells carrying gain of function mutations in Notch1. Moreover, ectopic expression of constitutively activated Notch provided protection against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, indicating that signalling via Notch may also contribute to the development of T-ALL by conferring resistance to apoptosis. Microarray analysis revealed that GIMAP5, a gene coding for an anti-apoptotic intracellular protein, is upregulated by Notch in T-ALL cell lines. Knockdown of GIMAP5 expression using siRNA promoted glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in T-ALL cells carrying gain of function mutations in Notch1 and in T-ALL cells engineered to express ectopic constitutively activated Notch indicating that Notch signalling protects T-ALL cells from apoptosis by upregulating the expression of GIMAP5.

  16. Protective effect of Cissus quadrangularis on neutrophil mediated tissue injury induced by aspirin in rats.

    PubMed

    Jainu, Mallika; Mohan, K Vijai; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2006-04-06

    Cissus quadrangularis (family: Vitaceae) is well known for the treatment of gastric disorders in traditional medicine, owing to its rich source of carotenoids, triterpenoids and ascorbic acid, and has received considerable attention regarding its role in human nutrition. In the search of new potential antiulcer agents, the present study evaluated the ethanol extract of Cissus quadrangularis (CQE) against the gastric toxicity induced by aspirin in rats. The optimum protective dose of 500 mg/kg of extract was selected by the pretreatment of gastric ulcers with different doses of CQE (250, 500 and 750 mg/kg) for 7 days which showed ulcer protection by 40, 71.2 and 72.6%, respectively, as compared to ranitidine (RTD) (30 mg/kg) by 71.9% in the aspirin model. In addition, results have shown that administration of aspirin increases lipid peroxidation status, xanthine oxidase (XO), myeloperoxidase and decrease in selenium-glutathione peroxidase activities in the gastric mucosa, resulting in mucosal damage at both cellular and subcellular level. Pretreatment with CQE ameliorated the observed effect significantly in the gastric mucosa of ulcerated rats. These findings suggest that the gastroprotective activity of CQE could be mediated possibly through its antioxidant effect as well as by the attenuation of the oxidative mechanism and neutrophil infiltration.

  17. MRG15-mediated tethering of PALB2 to unperturbed chromatin protects active genes from genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Bleuyard, Jean-Yves; Fournier, Marjorie; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Couturier, Anthony M.; Katou, Yuki; Ralf, Christine; Hester, Svenja S.; Dominguez, Daniel; Rhodes, Daniela; Humphrey, Timothy C.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The partner and localiser of BRCA2 (PALB2) plays important roles in the maintenance of genome integrity and protection against cancer. Although PALB2 is commonly described as a repair factor recruited to sites of DNA breaks, recent studies provide evidence that PALB2 also associates with unperturbed chromatin. Here, we investigated the previously poorly described role of chromatin-associated PALB2 in undamaged cells. We found that PALB2 associates with active genes through its major binding partner, MRG15, which recognizes histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 36 (H3K36me3) by the SETD2 methyltransferase. Missense mutations that ablate PALB2 binding to MRG15 confer elevated sensitivity to the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin (CPT) and increased levels of aberrant metaphase chromosomes and DNA stress in gene bodies, which were suppressed by preventing DNA replication. Remarkably, the level of PALB2 at genic regions was frequently decreased, rather than increased, upon CPT treatment. We propose that the steady-state presence of PALB2 at active genes, mediated through the SETD2/H3K36me3/MRG15 axis, ensures an immediate response to DNA stress and therefore effective protection of these regions during DNA replication. This study provides a conceptual advance in demonstrating that the constitutive chromatin association of repair factors plays a key role in the maintenance of genome stability and furthers our understanding of why PALB2 defects lead to human genome instability syndromes. PMID:28673974

  18. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIA-BLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  19. Oxygen radical-mediated injury of myocytes-protection by propranolol.

    PubMed

    Mak, I T; Kramer, J H; Freedman, A M; Tse, S Y; Weglicki, W B

    1990-06-01

    UIe effects of propranolol and atenolol on free radical mediated injury in myocytes were examined. Freshly isolated adult canine myocytes were incubated with a superoxide generating (from dihydroxyfumarate) and Fe-catalyzed free radical system. Exposure of the myocytes to free radicals for 20 min resulted in more than a 5-fold increase in thiobarbituric acid reactant (peroxide) formation and elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity released into the media compared to controls. Ultrastructurally, severe sarcolemmal damage, mitochondrial and myofibril derangements were evident. At 40 min, cellular viability (trypan blue exclusion) in the samples exposed to free radicals decreased to about one-third of controls; concomitantly, major losses in total cellular phospholipids occurred. When the cells were pretreated with 200 microM propranolol before the addition of free radicals, both peroxide formation and increased LDH release were inhibited; in agreement, complete ultrastructural preservation was observed. In addition, the subsequent losses in cellular viability and phospholipids were prevented. For comparison, the more water soluble beta-blocker, atenolol at 200 microM was shown ineffective in providing significant protection against the induced injury. The results suggest that propranolol may provide antiperoxidative protection to myocytes when elevated levels of free radicals are present.

  20. The transrepression arm of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is protective in mutant huntingtin-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, S; Breda, C; Smalley, J L; Butterworth, M; Farrow, S N; Giorgini, F; Cohen, G M

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) occurs following the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and orchestrates an intricate balance between its prosurvival and apoptotic arms to restore cellular homeostasis and integrity. However, in certain neurodegenerative diseases, the apoptotic arm of the UPR is enhanced, resulting in excessive neuronal cell death and disease progression, both of which can be overcome by modulating the UPR. Here, we describe a novel crosstalk between glucocorticoid receptor signaling and the apoptotic arm of the UPR, thus highlighting the potential of glucocorticoid therapy in treating neurodegenerative diseases. Several glucocorticoids, but not mineralocorticoids, selectively antagonize ER stress-induced apoptosis in a manner that is downstream of and/or independent of the conventional UPR pathways. Using GRT10, a novel selective pharmacological modulator of glucocorticoid signaling, we describe the importance of the transrepression arm of the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we also observe the protective effects of glucocorticoids in vivo in a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease (HD), wherein treatment with different glucocorticoids diminished rhabdomere loss and conferred neuroprotection. Finally, we find that growth differentiation factor 15 has an important role downstream of glucocorticoid signaling in antagonizing ER stress-induced apoptosis in cells, as well as in preventing HD-mediated neurodegeneration in flies. Thus, our studies demonstrate that this novel crosstalk has the potential to be effectively exploited in alleviating several neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25656655

  1. Resveratrol Protects Against Pathological Preterm Birth by Suppression of Macrophage-Mediated Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Hitomi; Taguchi, Ayumi; Kawana, Kei; Yamashita, Aki; Inoue, Eri; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Fujimoto, Asaha; Inoue, Tomoko; Sato, Masakazu; Nishida, Haruka; Nagasaka, Kazunori; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Hoya, Mari; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Yamashita, Takahiro; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in spontaneous preterm birth. Resveratrol has strong anti-inflammatory effects, but its effect on preterm birth in vivo is unknown. We investigated whether resveratrol protects against preterm birth in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced preterm mouse model. Twelve-day-old pregnant mice were fed 20 to 40 mg/kg resveratrol daily. On day 15, 10 μg of LPS was injected into uterine cervices. Resveratrol administration significantly decreased the rate of preterm birth. Resveratrol administration abolished LPS-induced elevation of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL) 1β but not IL-6 levels. The TNF-α messenger RNA levels were decreased in the cervices of resveratrol-administered mice compared with controls. Resveratrol treatment suppressed the elevation in TNF-α and IL-1β levels in LPS-exposed peritoneal macrophages. Further resveratrol treatment eradicated the proinflammatory cytokine-mediated elevation in cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in peritoneal macrophages. Resveratrol may protect against pathological preterm birth by suppression of elevated proinflammatory cytokines and consequent elevation of COX-2 in macrophages.

  2. Erythropoietin-mediated protection in kidney transplantation: nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives improve function without increasing risk of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Willem G; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2014-03-01

    The protective, nonerythropoietic effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have become evident in preclinical models in renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury and kidney transplantation. However, four recently published clinical trials using high-dose EPO treatment following renal transplantation did not reveal any protective effect for short-term renal function and even reported an increased risk of thrombosis. This review focusses on the current status of protective pathways mediated by EPO, the safety concerns using high EPO dosage and discusses the discrepancies between pre-clinical and clinical studies. The protective effects are mediated by binding of EPO to a heteromeric receptor complex consisting of two β-common receptors and two EPO receptors. An important role for the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is proposed. EPO-mediated cytoprotection still has enormous potential. However, only nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may induce protection without increasing the risk of cardiovascular events. In preclinical models, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives, such as carbamoylated EPO and ARA290, have been tested. These EPO derivatives improve renal function and do not affect erythropoiesis. Therefore, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may be able to render EPO-mediated cytoprotection useful and beneficial for clinical transplantation.

  3. Digoxin-Mediated Upregulation of RGS2 Protein Protects against Cardiac Injury.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Benita; Parra, Sergio; Atkins, Kevin B; Karaj, Behirda; Neubig, Richard R

    2016-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins have emerged as novel drug targets since their discovery almost two decades ago. RGS2 has received particular interest in cardiovascular research due to its role in regulating Gqsignaling in the heart and vascular smooth muscle. RGS2(-/-)mice are hypertensive, prone to heart failure, and display accelerated kidney fibrosis. RGS2 is rapidly degraded through the proteasome, and human mutations leading to accelerated RGS2 protein degradation correlate with hypertension. Hence, stabilizing RGS2 protein expression could be a novel route in treating cardiovascular disease. We previously identified cardiotonic steroids, including digoxin, as selective stabilizers of RGS2 protein in vitro. In the current study we investigated the functional effects of digoxin-mediated RGS2 protein stabilization in vivo. Using freshly isolated myocytes from wild-type and RGS2(-/-)mice treated with vehicle or low-dose digoxin (2µg/kg/day for 7 days) we demonstrated that agonist-induced cAMP levels and cardiomyocyte contractility was inhibited by digoxin in wild-type but not in RGS2(-/-)mice. This inhibition was accompanied by an increase in RGS2 protein levels in cardiomyocytes as well as in whole heart tissue. Furthermore, digoxin had protective effects in a model of cardiac injury in wild-type mice and this protection was lost in RGS2(-/-)mice. Digoxin is the oldest known therapy for heart failure; however, beyond its activity at the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, the exact mechanism of action is not known. The current study adds a novel mechanism, whereby through stabilizing RGS2 protein levels digoxin could exert its protective effects in the failing heart.

  4. Immune cell-mediated protection of the mammary gland and the infant during breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-05-01

    Breastfeeding has been regarded first and foremost as a means of nutrition for infants, providing essential components for their unique growth and developmental requirements. However, breast milk is also rich in immunologic factors, highlighting its importance as a mediator of protection. In accordance with its evolutionary origin, the mammary gland offers via the breastfeeding route continuation of the maternal to infant immunologic support established in utero. At birth, the infant's immune system is immature, and although it was exposed to the maternal microbial flora during pregnancy, it experiences an abrupt change in its microbial environment during and after birth, which is challenging and renders the infant highly susceptible to infection. Active and passive immunity protects the infant via breast milk, which is rich in immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lysozyme, cytokines, and numerous other immunologic factors, including maternal leukocytes. Breast milk leukocytes provide active immunity and promote development of immunocompetence in the infant. Additionally, it has been speculated that they play a role in the protection of the mammary gland from infection. Leukocytes are thought to exert these functions via phagocytosis, secretion of antimicrobial factors and/or antigen presentation in both the mammary gland and the gastrointestinal tract of the infant, and also in other infant tissues, where they are transported via the systemic circulation. Recently, it has been demonstrated that breast milk leukocytes respond dynamically to maternal as well as infant infections, and are fewer in nonexclusively compared with exclusively breastfeeding dyads, further emphasizing their importance for both the mother and infant. This review summarizes the current knowledge of human milk leukocytes and factors influencing them, and presents recent novel findings supporting their potential as a diagnostic marker for infections of the lactating breast and of the breastfed infant.

  5. Zeaxanthin induces Nrf2-mediated phase II enzymes in protection of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zou, X; Gao, J; Zheng, Y; Wang, X; Chen, C; Cao, K; Xu, J; Li, Y; Lu, W; Liu, J; Feng, Z

    2014-01-01

    Zeaxanthin (Zea) is a major carotenoid pigment contained in human retina, and its daily supplementation associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration. Despite known property of Zea as an antioxidant, its underlying molecular mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. In this study, we aim to study the regulation mechanism of Zea on phase II detoxification enzymes. In normal human retinal pigment epithelium cells, Zea promoted the nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and induced mRNA and protein expression of phase II enzymes, the induction was suppressed by specific knockdown of Nrf2. Zea also effectively protected against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Glutathione (GSH) as the most important antioxidant was also induced by Zea through Nrf2 activation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas the protective effects of Zea were decimated by inhibition of GSH synthesis. Finally, Zea activated the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathway, whereas only PI3K/Akt activation correlated with phase II enzymes induction and Zea protection. In further in vivo analyses, Zea showed effects of inducing phase II enzymes and increased GSH content, which contributed to the reduced lipid and protein peroxidation in the retina as well as the liver, heart, and serum of the Sprague–Dawley rats. For the first time, Zea is presented as a phase II enzymes inducer instead of being an antioxidant. By activating Nrf2-mediated phase II enzymes, Zea could enhance anti-oxidative capacity and prevent cell death both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24810054

  6. Immune Cell–Mediated Protection of the Mammary Gland and the Infant during Breastfeeding1234

    PubMed Central

    Hassiotou, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been regarded first and foremost as a means of nutrition for infants, providing essential components for their unique growth and developmental requirements. However, breast milk is also rich in immunologic factors, highlighting its importance as a mediator of protection. In accordance with its evolutionary origin, the mammary gland offers via the breastfeeding route continuation of the maternal to infant immunologic support established in utero. At birth, the infant’s immune system is immature, and although it was exposed to the maternal microbial flora during pregnancy, it experiences an abrupt change in its microbial environment during and after birth, which is challenging and renders the infant highly susceptible to infection. Active and passive immunity protects the infant via breast milk, which is rich in immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lysozyme, cytokines, and numerous other immunologic factors, including maternal leukocytes. Breast milk leukocytes provide active immunity and promote development of immunocompetence in the infant. Additionally, it has been speculated that they play a role in the protection of the mammary gland from infection. Leukocytes are thought to exert these functions via phagocytosis, secretion of antimicrobial factors and/or antigen presentation in both the mammary gland and the gastrointestinal tract of the infant, and also in other infant tissues, where they are transported via the systemic circulation. Recently, it has been demonstrated that breast milk leukocytes respond dynamically to maternal as well as infant infections, and are fewer in nonexclusively compared with exclusively breastfeeding dyads, further emphasizing their importance for both the mother and infant. This review summarizes the current knowledge of human milk leukocytes and factors influencing them, and presents recent novel findings supporting their potential as a diagnostic marker for infections of the lactating breast and of the breastfed

  7. Digoxin-Mediated Upregulation of RGS2 Protein Protects against Cardiac Injury

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Sergio; Atkins, Kevin B.; Karaj, Behirda; Neubig, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins have emerged as novel drug targets since their discovery almost two decades ago. RGS2 has received particular interest in cardiovascular research due to its role in regulating Gq signaling in the heart and vascular smooth muscle. RGS2−/− mice are hypertensive, prone to heart failure, and display accelerated kidney fibrosis. RGS2 is rapidly degraded through the proteasome, and human mutations leading to accelerated RGS2 protein degradation correlate with hypertension. Hence, stabilizing RGS2 protein expression could be a novel route in treating cardiovascular disease. We previously identified cardiotonic steroids, including digoxin, as selective stabilizers of RGS2 protein in vitro. In the current study we investigated the functional effects of digoxin-mediated RGS2 protein stabilization in vivo. Using freshly isolated myocytes from wild-type and RGS2−/− mice treated with vehicle or low-dose digoxin (2 µg/kg/day for 7 days) we demonstrated that agonist-induced cAMP levels and cardiomyocyte contractility was inhibited by digoxin in wild-type but not in RGS2−/− mice. This inhibition was accompanied by an increase in RGS2 protein levels in cardiomyocytes as well as in whole heart tissue. Furthermore, digoxin had protective effects in a model of cardiac injury in wild-type mice and this protection was lost in RGS2−/− mice. Digoxin is the oldest known therapy for heart failure; however, beyond its activity at the Na+/K+-ATPase, the exact mechanism of action is not known. The current study adds a novel mechanism, whereby through stabilizing RGS2 protein levels digoxin could exert its protective effects in the failing heart. PMID:26941169

  8. The exopolysaccharide alginate protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from IFN-gamma-mediated macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Leid, Jeff G; Willson, Carey J; Shirtliff, Mark E; Hassett, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R; Jeffers, Alyssa K

    2005-12-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilms and cause chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is well documented. Numerous studies have revealed that P. aeruginosa biofilms are highly refractory to antibiotics. However, dramatically fewer studies have addressed P. aeruginosa biofilm resistance to the host's immune system. In planktonic, unattached (nonbiofilm) P. aeruginosa, the exopolysaccharide alginate provides protection against a variety of host factors yet the role of alginate in protection of biofilm bacteria is unclear. To address this issue, we tested wild-type strains PAO1, PA14, the mucoid cystic fibrosis isolate, FRD1 (mucA22+), and the respective isogenic mutants which lacked the ability to produce alginate, for their susceptibility to human leukocytes in the presence and absence of IFN-gamma. Human leukocytes, in the presence of recombinant human IFN-gamma, killed biofilm bacteria lacking alginate after a 4-h challenge at 37 degrees C. Bacterial killing was dependent on the presence of IFN-gamma. Killing of the alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was mediated through mononuclear cell phagocytosis since treatment with cytochalasin B, which prevents actin polymerization, inhibited leukocyte-specific bacterial killing. By direct microscopic observation, phagocytosis of alginate-negative biofilm bacteria was significantly increased in the presence of IFN-gamma vs all other treatments. Addition of exogenous, purified alginate to the alginate-negative biofilms restored resistance to human leukocyte killing. Our results suggest that although alginate may not play a significant role in bacterial attachment, biofilm development, and formation, it may play an important role in protecting mucoid P. aeruginosa biofilm bacteria from the human immune system.

  9. Using hierarchical linear growth models to evaluate protective mechanisms that mediate science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Secker, Clare Elaine

    The study of students at risk is a major topic of science education policy and discussion. Much research has focused on describing conditions and problems associated with the statistical risk of low science achievement among individuals who are members of groups characterized by problems such as poverty and social disadvantage. But outcomes attributed to these factors do not explain the nature and extent of mechanisms that account for differences in performance among individuals at risk. There is ample theoretical and empirical evidence that demographic differences should be conceptualized as social contexts, or collections of variables, that alter the psychological significance and social demands of life events, and affect subsequent relationships between risk and resilience. The hierarchical linear growth models used in this dissertation provide greater specification of the role of social context and the protective effects of attitude, expectations, parenting practices, peer influences, and learning opportunities on science achievement. While the individual influences of these protective factors on science achievement were small, their cumulative effect was substantial. Meta-analysis conducted on the effects associated with psychological and environmental processes that mediate risk mechanisms in sixteen social contexts revealed twenty-two significant differences between groups of students. Positive attitudes, high expectations, and more intense science course-taking had positive effects on achievement of all students, although these factors were not equally protective in all social contexts. In general, effects associated with authoritative parenting and peer influences were negative, regardless of social context. An evaluation comparing the performance and stability of hierarchical linear growth models with traditional repeated measures models is included as well.

  10. Aerosol immunisation for TB: matching route of vaccination to route of infection.

    PubMed

    Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; McShane, Helen

    2015-03-01

    TB remains a very significant global health burden. There is an urgent need for better tools for TB control, which include an effective vaccine. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the currently licensed vaccine, confers highly variable protection against pulmonary TB, the main source of TB transmission. Replacing BCG completely or boosting BCG with another vaccine are the two current strategies for TB vaccine development. Delivering a vaccine by aerosol represents a way to match the route of vaccination to the route of infection. This route of immunisation offers not only the scientific advantage of delivering the vaccine directly to the respiratory mucosa, but also practical and logistical advantages. This review summarises the state of current TB vaccine candidates in the pipeline, reviews current progress in aerosol administration of vaccines in general and evaluates the potential for TB vaccine candidates to be administered by the aerosol route.

  11. [Management of tuberculosis (TB) cases from view points of public health].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ken; Motomiya, Masakichi

    2011-08-01

    Tuberculosis control law was enacted in 1951 and has been the basis for the management of TB cases over the long post-war period. This law has legalized the use of public founds for the treatment of TB patients for the first time and has provided the authentic basis for mandatory hospitalization, routine health examination, vaccination, notification and registration of TB cases. However, this law was abrogated in 2001 and was joined to the comprehensive infectious diseases control law, in order to facilitate a prophylactic measure against TB infection and to protect human rights of TB patients. Concurrently the medical care system and the formalities connected to hospitalization treatment of TB patients were reviewed. The purpose of the present overview is to explain how TB cases are managed under the newly-enacted law.

  12. Aerosol immunisation for TB: matching route of vaccination to route of infection

    PubMed Central

    Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; McShane, Helen

    2015-01-01

    TB remains a very significant global health burden. There is an urgent need for better tools for TB control, which include an effective vaccine. Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), the currently licensed vaccine, confers highly variable protection against pulmonary TB, the main source of TB transmission. Replacing BCG completely or boosting BCG with another vaccine are the two current strategies for TB vaccine development. Delivering a vaccine by aerosol represents a way to match the route of vaccination to the route of infection. This route of immunisation offers not only the scientific advantage of delivering the vaccine directly to the respiratory mucosa, but also practical and logistical advantages. This review summarises the state of current TB vaccine candidates in the pipeline, reviews current progress in aerosol administration of vaccines in general and evaluates the potential for TB vaccine candidates to be administered by the aerosol route. PMID:25636950

  13. A functional whole blood assay to measure viability of mycobacteria, using reporter-gene tagged BCG or M.Tb (BCGlux/M.Tb lux).

    PubMed

    Newton, Sandra; Martineau, Adrian; Kampmann, Beate

    2011-09-14

    Functional assays have long played a key role in measuring of immunogenicity of a given vaccine. This is conventionally expressed as serum bactericidal titers. Studies of serum bactericidal titers in response to childhood vaccines have enabled us to develop and validate cut-off levels for protective immune responses and such cut-offs are in routine use. No such assays have been taken forward into the routine assessment of vaccines that induce primarily cell-mediated immunity in the form of effector T cell responses, such as TB vaccines. In the animal model, the performance of a given vaccine candidate is routinely evaluated in standardized bactericidal assays, and all current novel TB-vaccine candidates have been subjected to this step in their evaluation prior to phase 1 human trials. The assessment of immunogenicity and therefore likelihood of protective efficacy of novel anti-TB vaccines should ideally undergo a similar step-wise evaluation in the human models now, including measurements in bactericidal assays. Bactericidal assays in the context of tuberculosis vaccine research are already well established in the animal models, where they are applied to screen potentially promising vaccine candidates. Reduction of bacterial load in various organs functions as the main read-out of immunogenicity. However, no such assays have been incorporated into clinical trials for novel anti-TB vaccines to date. Although there is still uncertainty about the exact mechanisms that lead to killing of mycobacteria inside human macrophages, the interaction of macrophages and T cells with mycobacteria is clearly required. The assay described in this paper represents a novel generation of bactericidal assays that enables studies of such key cellular components with all other cellular and humoral factors present in whole blood without making assumptions about their relative individual contribution. The assay described by our group uses small volumes of whole blood and has already been

  14. A new tool for tuberculosis vaccine screening: Ex vivo Mycobacterial Growth Inhibition Assay indicates BCG-mediated protection in a murine model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zelmer, Andrea; Tanner, Rachel; Stylianou, Elena; Damelang, Timon; Morris, Sheldon; Izzo, Angelo; Williams, Ann; Sharpe, Sally; Pepponi, Ilaria; Walker, Barry; Hokey, David A; McShane, Helen; Brennan, Michael; Fletcher, Helen

    2016-08-12

    In the absence of a validated animal model and/or an immune correlate which predict vaccine-mediated protection, large-scale clinical trials are currently the only option to prove efficacy of new tuberculosis candidate vaccines. Tools to facilitate testing of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are therefore urgently needed. We present here an optimized ex vivo mycobacterial growth inhibition assay (MGIA) using a murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection model. This assay assesses the combined ability of host immune cells to inhibit mycobacterial growth in response to vaccination. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and growth inhibition of mycobacteria by splenocytes was assessed. Mice were also challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman, and bacterial burden was assessed in lungs and spleen. Using the growth inhibition assay, we find a reduction in BCG CFU of 0.3-0.8 log10 after co-culture with murine splenocytes from BCG vaccinated versus naïve C57BL/6 mice. BCG vaccination in our hands led to a reduction in bacterial burden after challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis of approx. 0.7 log10 CFU in lung and approx. 1 log10 CFU in spleen. This effect was also seen when using Mycobacterium smegmatis as the target of growth inhibition. An increase in mycobacterial numbers was found when splenocytes from interferon gamma-deficient mice were used, compared to wild type controls, indicating that immune mechanisms may also be investigated using this assay. We believe that the ex vivo mycobacterial growth inhibition assay could be a useful tool to help assess vaccine efficacy in future, alongside other established methods. It could also be a valuable tool for determination of underlying immune mechanisms.

  15. Gang Membership, School Violence, and the Mediating Effects of Risk and Protective Behaviors in California High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Joey Nuñez, Jr.; Gilreath, Tamika D.; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2014-01-01

    There is insufficient empirical evidence exploring associations between gang membership and school violence behaviors. Using a sample of 272,863 high school students, this study employs a structural equation model to examine how school risk and protective behaviors and attitudes mediate effects of gang members' involvement with school violence…

  16. Gang Membership, School Violence, and the Mediating Effects of Risk and Protective Behaviors in California High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Joey Nuñez, Jr.; Gilreath, Tamika D.; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2014-01-01

    There is insufficient empirical evidence exploring associations between gang membership and school violence behaviors. Using a sample of 272,863 high school students, this study employs a structural equation model to examine how school risk and protective behaviors and attitudes mediate effects of gang members' involvement with school violence…

  17. Mediation of improvements in sun protective and skin self-examination behaviours: results from the healthy text study.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jannah; Finch, Linda; Soyer, H Peter; Marshall, Alison L; Baade, Peter; Youl, Philippa; Janda, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is on the rise, especially in Caucasian populations exposed to high ultraviolet radiation such as in Australia. This paper examined the psychological components facilitating change in skin cancer prevention or early detection behaviours following a text message intervention. The Queensland-based participants were 18 to 42 years old, from the Healthy Text study (N = 546). Overall, 512 (94%) participants completed the 12-month follow-up questionnaires. Following the social cognitive model, potential mediators of skin self-examination (SSE) and sun protection behaviour change were examined using stepwise logistic regression models. At 12-month follow-up, odds of performing an SSE in the past 12 months were mediated by baseline confidence in finding time to check skin (an outcome expectation), with a change in odds ratio of 11.9% in the SSE group versus the control group when including the mediator. Odds of greater than average sun protective habits index at 12-month follow-up were mediated by (a) an attempt to get a suntan at baseline (an outcome expectation) and (b) baseline sun protective habits index, with a change in odds ratio of 10.0% and 11.8%, respectively in the SSE group versus the control group. Few of the suspected mediation pathways were confirmed with the exception of outcome expectations and past behaviours. Future intervention programmes could use alternative theoretical models to elucidate how improvements in health behaviours can optimally be facilitated. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Inhibition of Cx43 mediates protective effects on hypoxic/reoxygenated human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Nunzio; Calabrese, Giovanna; Zappalà, Agata; Parenti, Carmela; Forte, Stefano; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Vanella, Luca; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Cardile, Venera; Parenti, Rosalba

    2017-10-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), a special population of glial cells, are able to synthesise several trophic factors exerting a neuroprotective action and promoting growth and functional recovery in both in vitro and in vivo models. In the present work, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of OEC-conditioned medium (OEC-CM) on two different human neuron-like cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma cell lines), under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, we also focused our attention on the role of connexins (Cxs) in the neuroprotective processes. Our results confirmed OEC-CM mediated neuroprotection as shown by cell adherence, proliferation and cellular viability analyses. Reduced connexin 43 (Cx43) levels in OEC-CM compared to unconditioned cells in hypoxic conditions prompted us to investigate the role of Cx43-Gap junctions (GJs) and Cx43-hemichannels (HCs) in hypoxic/reoxygenation injury using carbenoxolone (non-selective GJ inhibitor), ioxynil octanoato (selective Cx43-GJ inhibitor) and Gap19 (selective Cx43-HC inhibitor). We found that Cx43-GJ and Cx43-HC inhibitors are able to protect SH-SY5Y and allow to these cultures to overcome the injury. Our findings support the hypothesis that both OEC-CM and the inhibition of Cx43-GJs and Cx43-HCs offer a neuroprotective effect by reducing Cx43-mediated cell-to-cell and cell-to-extracellular environment communications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Meghan M.; Morrison, James H.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Rinkoski, Tommy A.; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Papke, Louisa M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Matchett, William E.; Turkowski, Kari L.; Poeschla, Eric M.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  20. C1 inhibitor-mediated myocardial protection from chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinrong; Guo, Furong; Chen, Cheng; Yu, Xiaoman; Hu, Ke; Li, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment for chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-induced cardiovascular injuries has yet to be determined. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effect and mechanism of a C1 inhibitor in CIH in the myocardium. The present study used a rat model of CIH in which complement regulatory protein, known as C1 inhibitor (C1INH), was administered to the rats in the intervention groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. The expression of proteins associated with the apoptotic pathway, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were detected by western blot analysis. The expression of complement C3 protein and RNA were also analyzed. C1INH was observed to improve the cardiac function in rats with CIH. Myocardial myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was significantly decreased in the C1INH intervention group compared with the CIH control group, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly attenuated (P<0.05). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were decreased and those of Bax were increased in the CIH group compared with the normal control group, but the protein expression levels of Bcl-2 were increased and those of Bax were decreased in the C1INH intervention group, as compared with the CIH group. Furthermore, the CIH-induced expression and synthesis of complement C3 in the myocardium were also reduced in the C1INH intervention group. C1INH, in addition to inhibiting complement activation and inflammation, preserved cardiac function in CIH-mediated myocardial cell injury through an anti-apoptotic mechanism. PMID:27698713

  1. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  2. A reappraisal of humoral immunity based on mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2006-01-01

    Sometime in the mid to late twentieth century the study of antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) entered the doldrums, as many immunologists believed that the function of AMI was well understood, and was no longer deserving of intensive investigation. However, beginning in the 1990s studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) revealed new functions for antibodies, including direct antimicrobial effects and their ability to modify host inflammatory and cellular responses. Furthermore, the demonstration that mAbs to several intracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens were protective issued a serious challenge to the paradigm that host defense against such microbes was strictly governed by cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Hence, a new view of AMI is emerging. This view is based on the concept that a major function of antibody (Ab) is to amplify or subdue the inflammatory response to a microbe. In this regard, the "damage-response framework" of microbial pathogenesis provides a new conceptual viewpoint for understanding mechanisms of AMI. According to this view, the ability of an Ab to affect the outcome of a host-microbe interaction is a function of its capacity to modify the damage ensuing from such an interaction. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the efficacy of an Ab cannot be defined either by immunoglobulin or epitope characteristics alone, but rather by a complex function of Ab variables, such as specificity, isotype, and amount, host variables, such as genetic background and immune status, and microbial variables, such as inoculum, mechanisms of avoiding host immune surveillance and pathogenic strategy. Consequently, far from being understood, recent findings in AMI imply a system with unfathomable complexity and the field is poised for a long overdue renaissance.

  3. Tissue-Protective Effects of NKG2A in Immune-Mediated Clearance of Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeBerge, Matthew P.; Ruby, Jessica A.; Liu, Jun; Schneider, Mark J.; Wang, Yan; Hahn, Young S.; Enelow, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection triggers a CD8+ T cell response that aids in virus clearance, but also expresses effector functions that may result in tissue injury. CD8+ T cells express a variety of activating and inhibiting ligands, though regulation of the expression of inhibitory receptors is not well understood. The ligand for the inhibitory receptor, NKG2A, is the non-classical MHC-I molecule Qa1b, which may also serve as a putative restricting element for the T cell receptors of purported regulatory CD8+ T cells. We have previously shown that Qa1b-null mice suffer considerably enhanced immunopathologic lung injury in the context of CD8+ T cell-mediated clearance of influenza infection, as well as evidence in a non-viral system that failure to ligate NKG2A on CD8+ effector T cells may represent an important component of this process. In this report, we examine the requirements for induction of NKG2A expression, and show that NKG2A expression by CD8+ T cells occurs as a result of migration from the MLN to the inflammatory lung environment, irrespective of peripheral antigen recognition. Further, we confirmed that NKG2A is a mediator in limiting immunopathology in virus infection using mice with a targeted deletion of NKG2A, and infecting the mutants with two different viruses, influenza and adenovirus. In neither infection is virus clearance altered. In influenza infection, the enhanced lung injury was associated with increased chemoattractant production, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, and significantly enhanced alveolar hemorrhage. The primary mechanism of enhanced injury was the loss of negative regulation of CD8+ T cell effector function. A similar effect was observed in the livers of mutant mice infected intravenously with adenovirus. These results demonstrate the immunoregulatory role of CD8+ NKG2A expression in virus infection, which negatively regulates T cell effector functions and contributes to protection of tissue integrity during virus clearance

  4. Tissue-protective effects of NKG2A in immune-mediated clearance of virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ely, Kenneth H; Matsuoka, Mitsuo; DeBerge, Matthew P; Ruby, Jessica A; Liu, Jun; Schneider, Mark J; Wang, Yan; Hahn, Young S; Enelow, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection triggers a CD8(+) T cell response that aids in virus clearance, but also expresses effector functions that may result in tissue injury. CD8(+) T cells express a variety of activating and inhibiting ligands, though regulation of the expression of inhibitory receptors is not well understood. The ligand for the inhibitory receptor, NKG2A, is the non-classical MHC-I molecule Qa1(b), which may also serve as a putative restricting element for the T cell receptors of purported regulatory CD8(+) T cells. We have previously shown that Qa1(b)-null mice suffer considerably enhanced immunopathologic lung injury in the context of CD8(+) T cell-mediated clearance of influenza infection, as well as evidence in a non-viral system that failure to ligate NKG2A on CD8(+) effector T cells may represent an important component of this process. In this report, we examine the requirements for induction of NKG2A expression, and show that NKG2A expression by CD8(+) T cells occurs as a result of migration from the MLN to the inflammatory lung environment, irrespective of peripheral antigen recognition. Further, we confirmed that NKG2A is a mediator in limiting immunopathology in virus infection using mice with a targeted deletion of NKG2A, and infecting the mutants with two different viruses, influenza and adenovirus. In neither infection is virus clearance altered. In influenza infection, the enhanced lung injury was associated with increased chemoattractant production, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, and significantly enhanced alveolar hemorrhage. The primary mechanism of enhanced injury was the loss of negative regulation of CD8(+) T cell effector function. A similar effect was observed in the livers of mutant mice infected intravenously with adenovirus. These results demonstrate the immunoregulatory role of CD8(+) NKG2A expression in virus infection, which negatively regulates T cell effector functions and contributes to protection of tissue integrity during

  5. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated protection against bile acid-induced apoptosis in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Webster, C R; Anwer, M S

    1998-05-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to modulate apoptosis. To evaluate the role of cAMP in bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we studied the effect of agents that increase cAMP on the induction of apoptosis by glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) in cultured rat hepatocytes. GCDC induced apoptosis in 26.5%+/-1.1% of hepatocytes within 2 hours. Twenty-minute pretreatment of hepatocytes with 100 micromol/L 8-(4-chlorothiophenyl) cAMP (CP-cAMP) resulted in a reduction in the amount of apoptosis to 35.2%+/-3.8% of that seen in hepatocytes treated with GCDC alone. Other agents that increase intracellular cAMP, including dibutyryl cAMP (100 micromol/L), glucagon (200 nmol/L), and a combination of forskolin (20 micromol/L) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (20 micromol/L), also inhibited GCDC-induced apoptosis to a similar extent. Pretreatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720, prevented the protective effect of CP-cAMP and inhibited CP-cAMP-induced activation of PKA activity. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), wortmannin (50 nmol/L), or Ly 294002 (20 micromol/L) also prevented the cytoprotective effect of cAMP. PI3K assays confirmed that wortmannin (50 nmol/L) inhibited PI3K activity, while CP-cAMP had no effect on the activity of this lipid kinase. GCDC increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, but had no effect on stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) activity in hepatocytes. cAMP decreased basal and GCDC-induced MAPK activity and increased SAPK activity. The MAPK kinase inhibitor, PD 98059, inhibited both GCDC-mediated MAPK activation and GCDC-induced apoptosis. 1) agents that increase intracellular cAMP protect against hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids; 2) activation of MAPK by GCDC may be involved in bile acid-induced apoptosis; and 3) cAMP-mediated cytoprotection against bile acid-induced apoptosis appears to involve PKA, MAPK, and PI3K.

  6. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  7. Identification of resolvin D2 receptor mediating resolution of infections and organ protection

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Nan; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous mechanisms that orchestrate resolution of acute inflammation are essential in host defense and the return to homeostasis. Resolvin (Rv)D2 is a potent immunoresolvent biosynthesized during active resolution that stereoselectively stimulates resolution of acute inflammation. Here, using an unbiased G protein–coupled receptor-β-arrestin–based screening and functional sensing systems, we identified a receptor for RvD2, namely GPR18, that is expressed on human leukocytes, including polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), monocytes, and macrophages (MΦ). In human MΦ, RvD2-stimulated intracellular cyclic AMP was dependent on GPR18. RvD2-stimulated phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and apoptotic PMN (efferocytosis) were enhanced with GPR18 overexpression and significantly reduced by shRNA knockdown. Specific binding of RvD2 to recombinant GPR18 was confirmed using a synthetic 3H-labeled-RvD2. Scatchard analysis gave a Kd of ∼10 nM consistent with RvD2 bioactive concentration range. In both E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus infections, RvD2 limited PMN infiltration, enhanced phagocyte clearance of bacteria, and accelerated resolution. These actions were lost in GPR18-deficient mice. During PMN-mediated second organ injury, RvD2’s protective actions were also significantly diminished in GPR18-deficient mice. Together, these results provide evidence for a novel RvD2–GPR18 resolution axis that stimulates human and mouse phagocyte functions to control bacterial infections and promote organ protection. PMID:26195725

  8. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-mediated low oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Emilce; Werner, Peter; Casper, Diana

    2008-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) selectively die in Parkinson’s disease (PD), but it is unclear how and why this occurs. Recent findings implicate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and two of its four receptors, namely EP1 and EP2, as mediators of degenerative and protective events in situations of acute and chronic neuronal death. EP1 activation can exacerbate excitotoxic damage in stroke models and our recent study showed that EP1 activation may explain the selective sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to oxidative stress. Conversely, EP2 activation may be neuroprotective, although toxic effects have also been demonstrated. Here we investigated if and how EP2 activation might alter the survival of dopaminergic neurons following selective low-level oxidative injury evoked by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in primary neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic rat midbrain. We found that cultured dopaminergic neurons displayed EP2 receptors. Butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, significantly reduced 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. EP2 receptors are coupled to stimulatory G-proteins (Gs), which activate adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP synthesis, which then activates protein kinase A (PKA). Both dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin reduced dopaminergic cell loss after 6-OHDA exposure. Conversely, KT5720 and H-89, two structurally distinct high-affinity PKA inhibitors, abolished the protective effect of butaprost, implicating cAMP-dependent PKA activity in the neuroprotection by EP2 activation. Finally, we show that melanized dopaminergic neurons in the human SN express EP2. This pathway warrants consideration as a neuroprotective strategy for PD. PMID:18597941

  9. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-mediated low oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Emilce; Werner, Peter; Casper, Diana

    2008-08-15

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) selectively die in Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is unclear how and why this occurs. Recent findings implicate prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and two of its four receptors, namely EP1 and EP2, as mediators of degenerative and protective events in situations of acute and chronic neuronal death. EP1 activation can exacerbate excitotoxic damage in stroke models and our recent study showed that EP1 activation may explain the selective sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to oxidative stress. Conversely, EP2 activation may be neuroprotective, although toxic effects have also been demonstrated. Here we investigated if and how EP2 activation might alter the survival of dopaminergic neurons following selective low-level oxidative injury evoked by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in primary neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic rat midbrain. We found that cultured dopaminergic neurons displayed EP2 receptors. Butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, significantly reduced 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. EP2 receptors are coupled to stimulatory G-proteins (Gs), which activate adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP synthesis, which then activates protein kinase A (PKA). Both dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin reduced dopaminergic cell loss after 6-OHDA exposure. Conversely, KT5720 and H-89, two structurally distinct high-affinity PKA inhibitors, abolished the protective effect of butaprost, implicating cAMP-dependent PKA activity in the neuroprotection by EP2 activation. Finally, we show that melanized dopaminergic neurons in the human SN express EP2. This pathway warrants consideration as a neuroprotective strategy for PD.

  10. Sphingosine kinase 2 mediates cerebral preconditioning and protects mouse brain against ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Lai Ming; Wei, Ying; Qin, Tao; Wang, Yumei; Smith, Charles; Waeber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Cerebral preconditioning provides insights into endogenous mechanisms that protect the brain from ischemic injury. Hypoxia and the anesthetic isoflurane are powerful preconditioning agents. Recent data show that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor stimulation improves outcome in rodent models of stroke. Endogenous S1P levels are controlled by the expression and activity of sphingosine kinases (SPK). We hypothesize that SPK up-regulation mediates preconditioning induced by isoflurane and hypoxia and reduces ischemic injury. Methods Male wild-type C57BL/J, SPK1−/− and SPK2−/− mice were exposed to isoflurane (IsoPC) or hypoxia preconditioning (HPC) before transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volume and neurological outcome were measured 24 hours later. SPK inhibitors (SKI-II and ABC294640) were used to test the involvement of SPK2. Expressions of SPK1, SPK2 and HIF1α were determined. Primary cultures of mouse cortical neurons were exposed to isoflurane before glutamate- or hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Results IsoPC and HPC significantly reduced infarct volume and improved neurological outcome in wild-type and SPK1−/− mice, but not in SPK2−/− mice. Pretreatment with SKI-II or ABC294640 abolished the IsoPC-induced tolerance. Western blot showed a rapid and sustained increase in SPK2 level, whereas SPK1 level was similar between preconditioned mice and controls. HIF1α was up-regulated in wild-type IsoPC mice, but not in SPK2−/−. IsoPC protected primary neurons against cell death, which was abolished in ABC294640-treated cells. Conclusions Applying genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that neuronal SPK2 isoform plays an important role in cerebral preconditioning. PMID:21980199

  11. RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, Diego; Bastide, Amandine; Radford, Helois; Verity, Nicholas; Molloy, Colin; Martin, Maria Guerra; Moreno, Julie A.; Steinert, Joern R; Smith, Tim; Dinsdale, David; Willis, Anne E.; Mallucci, Giovanna R.

    2014-01-01

    In the healthy adult brain synapses are continuously remodelled through a process of elimination and formation known as structural plasticity1. Reduction in synapse number is a consistent early feature of neurodegenerative diseases2, 3, suggesting deficient compensatory mechanisms. While much is known about toxic processes leading to synaptic dysfunction and loss in these disorders2,3, how synaptic regeneration is affected is unknown. In hibernating mammals, cooling induces loss of synaptic contacts, which are reformed on rewarming, a form of structural plasticity4, 5. We have found that similar changes occur in artificially cooled laboratory rodents. Cooling and hibernation also induce a number cold-shock proteins in the brain, including the RNA binding protein, RBM36. The relationship of such proteins to structural plasticity is unknown. Here we show that synapse regeneration is impaired in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, in association with the failure to induce RBM3. In both prion-infected and 5×FAD (Alzheimer-type) mice7, the capacity to regenerate synapses after cooling declined in parallel with the loss of induction of RBM3. Enhanced expression of RBM3 in the hippocampus prevented this deficit and restored the capacity for synapse reassembly after cooling. Further, RBM3 over-expression, achieved either by boosting endogenous levels through hypothermia prior to the loss of the RBM3 response, or by lentiviral delivery, resulted in sustained synaptic protection in 5×FAD mice and throughout the course of prion disease, preventing behavioural deficits and neuronal loss and significantly prolonging survival. In contrast, knockdown of RBM3 exacerbated synapse loss in both models and accelerated disease and prevented the neuroprotective effects of cooling. Thus, deficient synapse regeneration, mediated at least in part by failure of the RBM3 stress response, contributes to synapse loss throughout the course of neurodegenerative disease. The data support

  12. Enhanced stability of tristetraprolin mRNA protects mice against immune-mediated inflammatory pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Patial, Sonika; Curtis, Alan D.; Lai, Wi S.; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Hill, Georgette D.; Flake, Gordon P.; Mannie, Mark D.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an inducible, tandem zinc-finger mRNA binding protein that binds to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements (AREs) in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of specific mRNAs, such as that encoding TNF, and increases their rates of deadenylation and turnover. Stabilization of Tnf mRNA and other cytokine transcripts in TTP-deficient mice results in the development of a profound, chronic inflammatory syndrome characterized by polyarticular arthritis, dermatitis, myeloid hyperplasia, and autoimmunity. To address the hypothesis that increasing endogenous levels of TTP in an intact animal might be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, we generated a mouse model (TTPΔARE) in which a 136-base instability motif in the 3′UTR of TTP mRNA was deleted in the endogenous genetic locus. These mice appeared normal, but cultured fibroblasts and macrophages derived from them exhibited increased stability of the otherwise highly labile TTP mRNA. This resulted in increased TTP protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages and increased levels of TTP protein in mouse tissues. TTPΔARE mice were protected from collagen antibody-induced arthritis, exhibited significantly reduced inflammation in imiquimod-induced dermatitis, and were resistant to induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, presumably by dampening the excessive production of proinflammatory mediators in all cases. These data suggest that increased systemic levels of TTP, secondary to increased stability of its mRNA throughout the body, can be protective against inflammatory disease in certain models and might be viewed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases. PMID:26831084

  13. INHIBITION OF SOLUBLE EPOXIDE HYDROLASE DOES NOT PROTECT AGAINST ENDOTOXIN-MEDIATED HEPATIC INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Fife, Kimberly L.; Liu, YingMei; Schmelzer, Kara R.; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Kim, In-Hae; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2009-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are derived from cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed epoxygenation of arachidonic acid and have emerged as important mediators of numerous biological effects. The major elimination pathway for EETs is through soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) catalyzed metabolism to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). Based on previous studies showing that EETs have anti-inflammatory effects, we hypothesized that chronic inhibition of sEH would attenuate a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in vivo. Continuous dosing of the sEH inhibitors 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA), a polyethylene glycol ester of AUDA (AUDA-PEG), and 1-adamantan-1-yl-3-(5-(2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethoxy)pentyl)urea (AEPU) resulted in robust exposure to the inhibitor and target engagement, as evidenced by significant increases in plasma EET/DHET ratios following six days of inhibitor treatment. However, sEH inhibitor treatment was not associated with an attenuation of LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression in the liver and AUDA did not protect from LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, Ephx2 −/− mice that lack sEH expression and have significantly increased plasma EET/DHET ratios were not protected from LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression or neutrophil accumulation in the liver. LPS did have an effect on sEH expression and function, as evident from a significant downregulation of Ephx2 mRNA and a significant shift in plasma EET/DHET ratios four hours after LPS treatment. In conclusion, there was no evidence that increasing EET levels in vivo could modulate an LPS-induced inflammatory response in the liver. However, LPS did have significant effects on plasma eicosanoid levels and hepatic Ephx2 expression, suggesting that in vivo EET levels are modulated in response to an inflammatory signal. PMID:18815352

  14. Refined live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis vaccines mediate homologous and heterologous serogroup protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Sharon M; Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F; Galen, James E; Levine, Myron M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa.

  15. Refined Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Enteritidis Vaccines Mediate Homologous and Heterologous Serogroup Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlein, Patrick; Simon, Raphael; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections constitute a major health problem among infants and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa; these infections also occur in infants and the elderly in developed countries. We genetically engineered a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain of multilocus sequence type 313, the predominant genotype circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. We evaluated the capacities of S. Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ΔguaBA ΔclpX live oral vaccines to protect mice against a highly lethal challenge dose of the homologous serovar and determined protection against other group B and D serovars circulating in sub-Saharan Africa. The vaccines S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 were immunogenic and protected BALB/c mice against 10,000 50% lethal doses (LD50) of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis, respectively. S. Typhimurium CVD 1931 protected mice against the group B serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Stanleyville (91% vaccine efficacy), and S. Enteritidis CVD 1944 protected mice against the group D serovar Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin (85% vaccine efficacy). High rates of survival were observed when mice were infected 12 weeks postimmunization, indicating that the vaccines elicited long-lived protective immunity. Whereas CVD 1931 did not protect against S. Enteritidis R11, CVD 1944 did mediate protection against S. Typhimurium D65 (81% efficacy). These findings suggest that a bivalent (S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis) vaccine would provide broad protection against the majority of invasive NTS infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26351285

  16. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Juan P.; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Niemann, Moritz; Barrett, Michael P.; Vial, Henri; Mäser, Pascal; Roditi, Isabel; Schneider, André; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug action or targeting. PMID

  17. The protective role of prosocial behaviors on antisocial behaviors: the mediating effects of deviant peer affiliation.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gustavo; Mestre, Maria Vicenta; McGinley, Meredith M; Tur-Porcar, Ana; Samper, Paula; Opal, Deanna

    2014-06-01

    Prosocial behaviors, actions intended to help others, may serve a protective function against association with deviant peers and subsequent delinquent and antisocial behaviors. The present study examined the relations among specific types of prosocial behaviors, deviant peer affiliation, and delinquent and aggressive behaviors. Six hundred and sixty-six adolescents (46% girls; M age = 15.33, SD = .47) from Valencia, Spain completed questionnaires of prosocial behaviors, affiliation with deviant peers, antisocial behaviors, and aggression. Results showed that antisocial behaviors were negatively related only to specific forms of prosocial behaviors. Further analyses showed that deviant peer affiliation mediated the relations between compliant prosocial behavior and delinquency and aggression. Although altruism was not directly related to delinquency and aggression, it was indirectly linked to the behaviors via deviant peer affiliation. Discussion focuses on the relevance of specific forms of prosocial behaviors to antisocial behaviors and the risk of deviant peers for prosocial youth. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes protects from autoimmune mediated neurological disability.

    PubMed

    Hindinger, Claudia; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Hinton, David R; Phares, Timothy W; Parra, Gabriel I; Hussain, Shabbir; Savarin, Carine; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal degeneration are determinants of progressive neurological disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cells resident within the central nervous system (CNS) are active participants in development, progression and subsequent control of autoimmune disease; however, their individual contributions are not well understood. Astrocytes, the most abundant CNS cell type, are highly sensitive to environmental cues and are implicated in both detrimental and protective outcomes during autoimmune demyelination. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in transgenic mice expressing signaling defective dominant-negative interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptors on astrocytes to determine the influence of inflammation on astrocyte activity. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes did not influence disease incidence, onset, initial progression of symptoms, blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity or the composition of the acute CNS inflammatory response. Nevertheless, increased demyelination at peak acute disease in the absence of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes correlated with sustained clinical symptoms. Following peak disease, diminished clinical remission, increased mortality and sustained astrocyte activation within the gray matter demonstrate a critical role of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes in neuroprotection. Diminished disease remission was associated with escalating demyelination, axonal degeneration and sustained inflammation. The CNS infiltrating leukocyte composition was not altered; however, decreased IL-10 and IL-27 correlated with sustained disease. These data indicate that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting CNS autoimmune disease dependent upon a neuroprotective signaling pathway mediated by engagement of IFN-γ receptors.

  19. IFN-γ Signaling to Astrocytes Protects from Autoimmune Mediated Neurological Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hindinger, Claudia; Bergmann, Cornelia C.; Hinton, David R.; Phares, Timothy W.; Parra, Gabriel I.; Hussain, Shabbir; Savarin, Carine; Atkinson, Roscoe D.; Stohlman, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal degeneration are determinants of progressive neurological disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cells resident within the central nervous system (CNS) are active participants in development, progression and subsequent control of autoimmune disease; however, their individual contributions are not well understood. Astrocytes, the most abundant CNS cell type, are highly sensitive to environmental cues and are implicated in both detrimental and protective outcomes during autoimmune demyelination. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in transgenic mice expressing signaling defective dominant-negative interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptors on astrocytes to determine the influence of inflammation on astrocyte activity. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes did not influence disease incidence, onset, initial progression of symptoms, blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity or the composition of the acute CNS inflammatory response. Nevertheless, increased demyelination at peak acute disease in the absence of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes correlated with sustained clinical symptoms. Following peak disease, diminished clinical remission, increased mortality and sustained astrocyte activation within the gray matter demonstrate a critical role of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes in neuroprotection. Diminished disease remission was associated with escalating demyelination, axonal degeneration and sustained inflammation. The CNS infiltrating leukocyte composition was not altered; however, decreased IL-10 and IL-27 correlated with sustained disease. These data indicate that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting CNS autoimmune disease dependent upon a neuroprotective signaling pathway mediated by engagement of IFN-γ receptors. PMID:22848713

  20. Protection of membrane cholesterol by sphingomyelin against free radical-mediated oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sargis, Robert M; Subbaiah, Papasani V.

    2006-01-01

    Although the free radical-mediated oxidation of free cholesterol (FC) is critical in the generation of regulatory sterols and in atherogenesis, the physiological regulation of this process is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), a major phospholipid of cell membranes, which is closely associated with FC, protects FC against oxidation, because of its unique structure, and affinity to the sterol. We employed phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes containing varying amounts of SM, and either radioactive FC or a fluorescent analog, dehydroergosterol (DHE), and determined the oxidative decay of the sterol in presence of 2,2′ azo bis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH). Incorporation of 25 mol% of SM in the liposomes inhibited the oxidation of FC or DHE by up to 50%. This inhibition was specific for SM among phospholipids, and was abolished by sphingomyelinase treatment. SM was not degraded during the oxidation reaction, and its effect was not dependent upon the nature of the oxidizing agent, because it also inhibited sterol oxidation by FeSO4/ascorbate, and by cholesterol oxidase. These studies show that SM plays a physiological role in the regulation of cholesterol oxidation by free radicals. PMID:16785023

  1. Verbascoside isolated from Tectona grandis mediates gastric protection in rats via inhibiting proton pump activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Shukla, Nivedita; Singh, Pratibha; Sharma, Rolee; Rajendran, S M; Maurya, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2010-10-01

    Evidences have suggested that Tectona grandis (TG) attenuates gastric mucosal injury; however its mechanism has not yet been established. The aim of present study was to evaluate the gastroprotective mechanism of ethanolic extract of TG (E-EtOH), butanolic fraction (Fr-Bu) and to identify its active constituents. Anti-ulcer activities were evaluated against cold restraint (CRU) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models and further confirmed through H(+) K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity. Cytoprotective activity was evaluated in alcohol (AL) induced gastric ulcer model and further through PGE(2) level. E-EtOH and Fr-Bu attenuated ulcer formation in CRU. Moreover E-EtOH and Fr-Bu displayed potent anti-secretory activity as evident through reduced free acidity and pepsin activity in PL, confirmed further by in vitro inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity. In addition cytoprotective potential of E-EtOH and Fr-Bu were apparent with protection in AL model, increased PGE(2) content and enhanced mucin level in PL. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-Bu yielded terpenoides and a phenolic glycoside, verbascoside. The anti-secretory mechanism of verbascoside mediated apparently through inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase with corresponding decrease in plasma gastrin level, is novel to our finding. Gastroprotection elicited by TG might be through proton pump inhibition and consequent augmentation of the defensive mechanism.

  2. Renal damage mediated by oxidative stress: a hypothesis of protective effects of red wine.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Rivera, Gonzalo

    2002-08-01

    Over the last decade, oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of seemingly unrelated renal diseases. Epidemiological studies have documented an association of moderate wine consumption with a decreased risk of cardiovascular and neurological diseases; however, similar studies in the kidney are still lacking. The kidney is an organ highly vulnerable to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), likely due to the abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the composition of renal lipids. ROS are involved in the pathogenic mechanism of conditions such as glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The health benefits of moderate consumption of red wine can be partly attributed to its antioxidant properties. Indeed, the kidney antioxidant defense system is enhanced after chronic exposure to moderate amounts of wine, a response arising from the combined effects of ethanol and the nonalcoholic components, mainly polyphenols. Polyphenols behave as potent ROS scavengers and metal chelators; ethanol, in turn, modulates the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Therefore, a hypothesis that red wine causes a decreased vulnerability of the kidney to the oxidative challenges could be proposed. This view is partly supported by direct evidences indicating that wine and antioxidants isolated from red wine, as well as other antioxidants, significantly attenuate or prevent the oxidative damage to the kidney. The present hypothesis paper provides a collective body of evidence suggesting a protective role of moderate wine consumption against the production and progression of renal diseases, based on the existing concepts on the pathophysiology of kidney injury mediated by oxidative stress.

  3. Renal peroxidative changes mediated by oxalate: the protective role of fucoidan.

    PubMed

    Veena, Coothan Kandaswamy; Josephine, Anthony; Preetha, Sreenivasan P; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan; Sundarapandiyan, Rajaguru

    2006-10-04

    Oxalate, one of the major constituents of renal stones is known to induce free radicals which damage the renal membrane. Damaged epithelia might act as nidi for stone formation aggravating calcium oxalate precipitation during hyperoxaluria. In the present study, the beneficial effects of fucoidan on oxalate-induced free radical injury were investigated. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Hyperoxaluria was induced in two groups by administration of 0.75% ethylene glycol in drinking water for 28 days and one of them was treated with fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.wt subcutaneously commencing from the 8th day of induction. A control and drug control (fucoidan alone) was also included in the study. The extent of renal injury in hyperoxaluria was evident from the increased activities of alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, beta-glucuronidase, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in urine. There was a positive correlation between plasma malondialdehyde levels and renal membrane damage indicating a striking relation between free radical formation and cellular injury. Increased protein carbonyl and decreased thiols further exemplified the oxidative milieu prevailing during hyperoxaluria. Decreased renal membrane ATPases accentuated the renal membrane damage induced by oxalate. Renal microscopic analysis showed abnormal findings in histology as an evidence of oxalate damage. The above biochemical and histopathological discrepancies were abrogated with fucoidan administration, indicating its protective role in oxalate mediated peroxidative injury.

  4. TrkB-mediated protection against circadian sensitivity to noise trauma in the murine cochlea.

    PubMed

    Meltser, Inna; Cederroth, Christopher R; Basinou, Vasiliki; Savelyev, Sergey; Lundkvist, Gabriella S; Canlon, Barbara

    2014-03-17

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a debilitating sensory impairment affecting 10%-15% of the population, caused primarily through damage to the sensory hair cells or to the auditory neurons. Once lost, these never regenerate [1], and no effective drugs are available [2, 3]. Emerging evidence points toward an important contribution of synaptic ribbons in the long-term coupling of the inner hair cell and afferent neuron synapse to maintain hearing [4]. Here we show in nocturnal mice that night noise overexposure triggers permanent hearing loss, whereas mice overexposed during the day recover to normal auditory thresholds. In view of this time-dependent sensitivity, we identified a self-sustained circadian rhythm in the isolated cochlea, as evidenced by circadian expression of clock genes and ample PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE oscillations, originating mainly from the primary auditory neurons and hair cells. The transcripts of the otoprotecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showed higher levels in response to day noise versus night noise, suggesting that BDNF-mediated signaling regulates noise sensitivity throughout the day. Administration of a selective BDNF receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase type B (TrkB), in the night protected the inner hair cell's synaptic ribbons and subsequent full recovery of hearing thresholds after night noise overexposure. The TrkB agonist shifted the phase and boosted the amplitude of circadian rhythms in the isolated cochlea. These findings highlight the coupling of circadian rhythmicity and the TrkB receptor for the successful prevention and treatment of NIHL.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the protection of dietary restriction against renal senescence in aged F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-juan; Cai, Guang-yan; Ning, Yi-chun; Cui, Jing; Hong, Quan; Bai, Xue-yuan; Xu, Xiao-meng; Bu, Ru; Sun, Xue-feng; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2016-01-01

    Renal aging is always accompanied by increased oxidative stress. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) can be up-regulated by 50% dietary restriction (DR) for 7-day and can block mitochondrial oxidative stress. H2S production exerts a critical role in yeast, worm, and fruit fly models of DR-mediated longevity. In this study, we found that renal aging could be attenuated by 30% DR for 6-month (DR-6M) and life-long (DR-LL), but not for 6-week (DR-6W). The expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CGL) and cystathionine-β- synthase (CBS) were improved by DR-6M and DR-LL. Endogenous H2S production shared the same trend with CBS and CGL, while glutathione (GSH) didn’t. When comparing efficiencies of DR for different durations, more evident production of H2S was found in DR-6M and DR-LL than in DR-6W. Finally the level of oxidative stress was improved by DR-6M and DR-LL rather than by DR-6W. It concluded that aged rats had the ability to produce enough H2S on 30% DR interventions protecting against renal aging, and the effect of DR for long-term were more significant than that of DR for short-term. PMID:27456368

  6. Protective Effect of Zingiber officinale Against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites Tumour by Regulating Inflammatory Mediator and Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rubila, Sundararaj; Ranganathan, Thottiam Vasudevan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate Zingiber officinale paste against Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA)-induced tumours in Swiss albino mice. Experimental animals received Z. officinale paste (low dose 100 mg/kg bw and high dose 500 mg/kg bw) orally for eight alternative days. Treatment with Z. officinale paste showed significant increase in haemoglobin level and decrease in aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) level. Z. officinale paste reduced the inflammatory mediators and cytokine levels, such as inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), tumour necrosis factor level (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Treatment with Z. officinale paste also significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme level, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione transferase (GST), and decreased the lipid peroxidation. Treatment also increased the vitamin C and E levels in treated animals compared with the DLA-bearing host. Histopathological studies also confirmed the protective influence of Z. officinale paste against DLA. The present study suggested that Z. officinale paste could be used as natural spice and a potent antitumour agent.

  7. Does placental MDSC-mediated modulation of arginine levels help protect the foetus from auxotrophic pathogens?

    PubMed

    Ismail, Abdul Qader Tahir

    2017-05-02

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are immunosuppressive precursors of dendritic cells, macrophages and granulocytes. MDSCs normally quickly differentiate, but have elevated levels in chronic infection and cancer, where they help tumours evade the immune system through induction of T-cell dysfunction. MDSC levels are also raised in pregnancy, and in the neonate. During pregnancy they may help to prevent maternal rejection of the semiallogenic foetus. In the immediate postnatal period they may aid in allowing tolerance of gut microbiological colonisation and non-pathological environmental antigens. MDSC immunosuppression involves reduction of arginine levels, which leads to downregulation of T-cell receptor (TCR) and cell proliferation. Arginine is also involved in replication, and virulence of a variety of viruses and bacteria, including Hepatitis D, HIV-1, Herpes simplex, Adenovirus, Staphylococci, Neisseria gonorrhoea, Escherichia coli, and Streptococci. Given the above it could be hypothesised that MDSC-mediated reduction in levels during pregnancy and the perinatal period is not just a by-product of T-cell immunosuppression, but potentially a primitive part of the innate immune system. Increased arginase activity would therefore serve a dual purpose, inhibiting the adaptive immune system whilst also providing a degree of protection against infection by arginine auxotrophic pathogens.

  8. Cystatin C protects neuronal cells against mutant copper-zinc superoxide dismutase-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, S; Hayakawa, T; Wakasugi, K; Yamanaka, K

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and progressive loss of motor neurons. Cystatin C (CysC), an endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is a major protein component of Bunina bodies observed in the spinal motor neurons of sporadic ALS and is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of ALS patients. Despite prominent deposition of CysC in ALS, the roles of CysC in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we identified the neuroprotective activity of CysC against ALS-linked mutant Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1)-mediated toxicity. We found that exogenously added CysC protected neuronal cells including primary cultured motor neurons. Moreover, the neuroprotective property of CysC was dependent on the coordinated activation of two distinct pathways: autophagy induction through AMPK-mTOR pathway and inhibition of cathepsin B. Furthermore, exogenously added CysC was transduced into the cells and aggregated in the cytosol under oxidative stress conditions, implying a relationship between the neuroprotective activity of CysC and Bunina body formation. These data suggest CysC is an endogenous neuroprotective agent and targeting CysC in motor neurons may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS. PMID:25356866

  9. Protective effect of rutin on humoral and cell mediated immunity in rat model.

    PubMed

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Saluja, Ajay K

    2017-08-01

    Diet and dietary intake can persuade the development, safeguard and proper functioning of immune system. Ruin, an important bioflavonoid, is abundantly found in various foodstuffs. Rutin has been acknowledged for its protective and beneficial effects on various aspects of the biological system. The present study was aimed to examine the effect of rutin on the regulation of the immune response in experimental animal models. Effect of rutin of cellular immunity was determined by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, carbon clearance assay, leucocyte mobilization test, and cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression, whereas humoral immunity was analyzed by the haemagglutinating antibody (HA) titre assay. Rutin (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) evoked a significant increase in antibody titre in the haemagglutination test, increased immunoglobulin levels, and enhanced the delayed type hypersensitivity reaction induced by sheep red blood cells. It also significantly restored the functioning of leucocytes in cyclophosphamide treated rats and augmented phagocytic index in the carbon clearance assay. The outcomes from the present study indicate that rutin possesses sufficient potential for increasing immune activity by cellular and humoral mediated mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Intracellular and intercellular transport of many germ cell mRNAs is mediated by the DNA- and RNA-binding protein, testis-brain-RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP).

    PubMed

    Hecht, N B

    2000-06-01

    Functions ranging from RNA transport and translational regulation to DNA rearrangement and repair have been proposed for the DNA- and RNA-binding protein, testis-brain-RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP). TB-RBP is primarily in the nuclei of male germ cells during meiosis and in the cytoplasm of male cells after metaphase I of meiosis. Based on its shift in subcellular locations as germ cells differentiate and its binding to microtubules and microfilaments, a model is presented proposing an involvement of TB-RBP in mRNA transport from nucleus to cytoplasm and in the sharing of mRNAs transcribed from the sex chromosomes by movement through intercellular bridges of germ cells.

  11. Differences in IgG responses against infection phase related Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) specific antigens in individuals exposed or not to Mtb correlate with control of TB infection and progression.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Mariateresa; Arroyo, Leonar; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Franken, Kees Lmc; Geluk, Annemieke; Barrera, Luis F; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurs in only 3-10% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infected individuals, suggesting that natural immunity can contain Mtb infection, although this remains poorly understood. Next to T-cells, a potentially protective role for B-cells and antibodies has emerged recently. However, the Mtb antigens involved remain ill-defined. Here, we investigated in a TB-endemic setting IgG levels against 15 Mtb antigens, representing various phases of Mtb infection and known to be potent human T-cell antigens. IgG levels against ESAT6/CFP10, Rv0440, Rv0867c, Rv1737c, Rv2029c, Rv2215, Rv2389c, Rv3616c and Mtb purified protein derivative (PPD) were higher in TB patients than in endemic and non-endemic controls. The only exception was Rv1733c that was preferentially recognized by antibodies from endemic controls compared to TB patients and non-endemic controls, suggesting a potential correlation with control of TB infection and progression. In patients, IgG levels against Ag85B and Rv2029c correlated with Mtb loads, while immunoglobulins against Rv0440 differed between genders. Our results support the potential role of certain Mtb antigen-(Rv1733c) specific antibodies in the control of TB infection and progression, while other Mtb antigen-specific antibodies correlate with TB disease activity and bacillary loads. The findings for Rv1733c agree with previous T-cell results and have implications for including antibody-mediated immunity in designing new strategies to control TB. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein-mediated efficient synergistic "antenna effect" in a ternary system in D₂O medium.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Shyamal Kr; Samanta, Swarna Kamal; Mukherjee, Manini; Ghosh, Sanjib

    2012-08-16

    A ternary system consisting of a protein, catechin (either + or - epimer), and Tb(III) in suitable aqueous buffer medium at physiological pH (= 6.8) has been shown to exhibit highly efficient "antenna effect". Steady state and time-resolved emission studies of each component in the binary complexes (protein with Tb(III) and (+)- or (-)-catechin with Tb(III)) and the ternary systems along with the molecular docking studies reveal that the efficient sensitization could be ascribed to the effective shielding of microenvironment of Tb(III) from O-H oscillator and increased Tb-C (+/-) interaction in the ternary systems in aqueous medium. The ternary system exhibits protein-mediated efficient antenna effect in D(2)O medium due to synergistic ET from both the lowest ππ* triplet state of Trp residue in protein and that of catechin apart from protection of the Tb(III) environment from matrix vibration. The simple system consisting of (+)- or (-)-catechin and Tb(III) in D(2)O buffer at pH 6.8 has been prescribed to be a useful biosensor.

  13. ATP protects, by way of receptor-mediated mechanisms, against hypoxia-induced injury in renal proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    Kribben, Andreas; Feldkamp, Thorsten; Horbelt, Markus; Lange, Bettina; Pietruck, Frank; Herget-Rosenthal, Stefan; Heemann, Uwe; Philipp, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We examined the effect of ATP on hypoxia-induced injury in freshly isolated rat renal proximal tubules and compared it with the effects of stable ATP analogues and ATP degradation products. Extracellular ATP significantly reduced hypoxia-induced structural cell damage (lactate dehydrogenase release). P(2)-receptor agonistic ATP analogues, including 2'-methylthio-ATP (2-Me-S-ATP), were also protective. In contrast, the P(1)-agonistic degradation products AMP and adenosine were not protective. Hypoxia-induced functional cell damage (loss of cellular potassium) was not changed by ATP or 2-Me-S-ATP. We therefore conclude that the protective property of ATP is not based on an effect of the degradation products or on a direct effect on cellular energy metabolism. The data indicate that the protective effect of ATP is mediated by P(2) receptors.

  14. Murine model of TB meningitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Umesh Datta; Abbas, Ali; Kashyap, Raj Pal Singh; Gupta, Pushpa

    2016-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are the most severe forms of extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) due to high levels of mortality and neurological morbidity. Limited studies are available on CNS-TB animal-model development, despite the steady rise in cerebral-TB cases in India over the past decade. This study describes the development of a murine model of CNS-TB using a clinical strain (C3) isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of CNS-TB patients. Groups of mice were infected intravenously with an MTB C3 strain isolated from the CSF of CNS-TB patients in order to mimic the dynamics of actual infection. Brain and lung tissue were evaluated for bacterial burden, as well as histopathology and surrogate markers of TB infection at 30- and 50-days post-infection. Mice infected intravenously with MTB C3 strains showed progressive development of CNS disease, with high bacillary burden in the lungs during the initial stage (30days), which eventually disseminated to the brain at a later stage (50days). All C3-infected mice showed elevated levels of mycobacterial antigens and antibodies, as well as increased T cell adenosine deaminase activity in brain homogenates, which explicitly correlated with mycobacterial load in the brain and chronic brain pathology. High mortality rates (60%) were associated with mice infected with the C3 strain as compared to those of controls. Our findings demonstrated the design of a novel murine model of CNS-TB using a C3 strain and that replicated events of EPTB dissemination. This model will promote efforts to understand the pathogenesis CNS-TB infection for development of improved therapeutic interventions in the future. Copyright © 2016.

  15. Mps1 kinase-dependent Sgo2 centromere localisation mediates cohesin protection in mouse oocyte meiosis I.

    PubMed

    El Yakoubi, Warif; Buffin, Eulalie; Cladière, Damien; Gryaznova, Yulia; Berenguer, Inés; Touati, Sandra A; Gómez, Rocío; Suja, José A; van Deursen, Jan M; Wassmann, Katja

    2017-09-25

    A key feature of meiosis is the step-wise removal of cohesin, the protein complex holding sister chromatids together, first from arms in meiosis I and then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Centromeric cohesin is protected by Sgo2 from Separase-mediated cleavage, in order to maintain sister chromatids together until their separation in meiosis II. Failures in step-wise cohesin removal result in aneuploid gametes, preventing the generation of healthy embryos. Here, we report that kinase activities of Bub1 and Mps1 are required for Sgo2 localisation to the centromere region. Mps1 inhibitor-treated oocytes are defective in centromeric cohesin protection, whereas oocytes devoid of Bub1 kinase activity, which cannot phosphorylate H2A at T121, are not perturbed in cohesin protection as long as Mps1 is functional. Mps1 and Bub1 kinase activities localise Sgo2 in meiosis I preferentially to the centromere and pericentromere respectively, indicating that Sgo2 at the centromere is required for protection.In meiosis I centromeric cohesin is protected by Sgo2 from Separase-mediated cleavage ensuring that sister chromatids are kept together until their separation in meiosis II. Here the authors demonstrate that Bub1 and Mps1 kinase activities are required for Sgo2 localisation to the centromere region.

  16. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  17. Protection mediated by chemokine CXCL10 in BALB/c mice infected by Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Webertty Mayk Eufrásio; Viana, Sayonara de Melo; Alves, Dorotheia Teixeira; Guerra, Priscila Valera; Coêlho, Zirlane Castelo Branco; Barbosa, Helene Santos; Teixeira, Maria Jania

    2017-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania infantum is characterised by the loss of the ability of the host to generate an effective immune response. Chemokines have a direct involvement in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis, causing a rapid change in the expression of these molecules during infection by Leishmania. Herein, it was investigated the role of CXCL10 in controlling infection by L. infantum. RAW 264.7 macrophages were infected with L. infantum in vitro and treated or not with CXCL10 (25, 50 and 100 ng/mL). Parasite load, as well as nitric oxide (NO), IL-4 and IL-10 production were assessed at 24 and 48 h after infection. In vivo, BALB/c mice were infected and treated or not with CXCL10 (5 μg/kg) at one, three and seven days of infection. Parasite load, IFN-g, IL-4, TGF-β and IL-10 were evaluated one, seven and 23 days post treatment. In vitro, CXCL10 reduced parasitic load, not dependent on NO, and inhibited IL-10 and IL-4 secretion. In vivo, CXCL10 was able to reduce the parasite load in both liver and spleen, four weeks after infection, representing a higher decrease in the number of parasites in these organs, also induced IFN-γ at day 23 after treatment, correlating with the decrease in parasite load, and reduced IL-10 and TGF-β. This study suggests a partial protective role of CXCL10 against L. infantum, mediated by IFN-g, not dependent on NO, and with suppression of IL-10 and TGF-β. These data may provide information for the development of new approaches for future therapeutic interventions for VL.

  18. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    SciTech Connect

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Schrott, Lisa; Caldito, Gloria

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  19. Protection mediated by chemokine CXCL10 in BALB/c mice infected by Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Webertty Mayk Eufrásio; Viana, Sayonara de Melo; Alves, Dorotheia Teixeira; Guerra, Priscila Valera; Coêlho, Zirlane Castelo Branco; Barbosa, Helene Santos; Teixeira, Maria Jania

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania infantum is characterised by the loss of the ability of the host to generate an effective immune response. Chemokines have a direct involvement in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis, causing a rapid change in the expression of these molecules during infection by Leishmania. OBJECTIVES Herein, it was investigated the role of CXCL10 in controlling infection by L. infantum. METHODS RAW 264.7 macrophages were infected with L. infantum in vitro and treated or not with CXCL10 (25, 50 and 100 ng/mL). Parasite load, as well as nitric oxide (NO), IL-4 and IL-10 production were assessed at 24 and 48 h after infection. In vivo, BALB/c mice were infected and treated or not with CXCL10 (5 μg/kg) at one, three and seven days of infection. Parasite load, IFN-g, IL-4, TGF-β and IL-10 were evaluated one, seven and 23 days post treatment. FINDINGS In vitro, CXCL10 reduced parasitic load, not dependent on NO, and inhibited IL-10 and IL-4 secretion. In vivo, CXCL10 was able to reduce the parasite load in both liver and spleen, four weeks after infection, representing a higher decrease in the number of parasites in these organs, also induced IFN-γ at day 23 after treatment, correlating with the decrease in parasite load, and reduced IL-10 and TGF-β. MAIN CONCLUSIONS This study suggests a partial protective role of CXCL10 against L. infantum, mediated by IFN-g, not dependent on NO, and with suppression of IL-10 and TGF-β. These data may provide information for the development of new approaches for future therapeutic interventions for VL. PMID:28767981

  20. The Bordetella pertussis Bps Polysaccharide Enhances Lung Colonization by Conferring Protection from Complement-mediated Killing

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Tridib; Johnson, John B.; Kock, Nancy D.; Parks, Griffith D.; Deora, Rajendar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bordetella pertussis is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes whooping cough or pertussis. Pertussis is the leading vaccine preventable disease that is resurging in the USA and other parts of the developed world. There is an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which B. pertussis evades killing and clearance by the complement system, a first line of host innate immune defense. The present study examined the role of the Bps polysaccharide to resist complement activity in vitro and in the mouse respiratory tract. The isogenic bps mutant strain containing a large non polar in-frame deletion of the bpsA-D locus was more sensitive to serum and complement mediated killing than the WT strain. As determined by western blotting, flow cytometry and electron microscopic studies, the heightened sensitivity of the mutant strain was due to enhanced deposition of complement proteins and the formation of membrane attack complex, the end product of complement activation. Bps was sufficient to confer complement resistance as evidenced by a Bps-expressing E. coli being protected by serum killing. Additionally, western blotting and flow cytometry assays revealed that Bps inhibited the deposition of complement proteins independent of other B. pertussis factors. The bps mutant strain colonized the lungs of complement-deficient mice at higher levels than that observed in C57Bl/6 mice. These results reveal a previously unknown interaction between Bps and the complement system in controlling B. pertussis colonization of the respiratory tract. These findings also make Bps a potential target for the prevention and therapy of whooping cough. PMID:24438122

  1. Ursolic Acid Mediates Hepatic Protection through Enhancing of anti-aging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, Shadi; Bakhtiari, Nuredin; Jalalvand, Elham-Moslemee

    2017-05-30

    Age-associated loss of liver function has been recognized for decades. But, the mechanism driving liver regeneration and its decline with age remains elusive. Hence, to support of our previous studies about anti-aging effects of Ursolic Acid (UA), a compound which extensively present in apple peels. The aim of this study is to address whether UA might alter sensors of the cell metabolic state such as SIRT1, SIRT6, PGC-1β and Klotho proteins. To evaluate the effect of UA on hepatic indicated proteins, mice were administrated with UA twice daily for 7 days. The involvements of these proteins in the UA-mediated effect harmony hepatic protection were investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy technique. Our findings clearly illustrated that UA enhanced SIRT1 (~ 5 ± 0.2 folds) and SIRT6 (~ 8 ± 0.5 folds) proteins levels in hepatic, p<0.001. In addition, the data showed that UA increased PGC-1β (~ 7 ± 0.4 folds) protein overexpression, p<0.001. Moreover, we showed that UA up-regulated Klotho (~ 3.5 ± 0.2 folds) protein in order to improve hepatic performance, p<0.01. Our results suggest that UA through increasing of SIRT1 up-regulation ameliorate reverse cholesterol transport, fatty acid use and oxidative stress defense. In addition, it seems that UA by enhancing of SIRT6 expression promotes cholesterol homeostasis through repressing of SREBP1 and SREBP2. Reciprocally, UA might be involved in VLDL synthesis and exportation through PGC-1β up-regulation. Finally, UA might be as key regulators of mineral homeostasis and bile acid/cholesterol metabolism, by inducing of Klotho overexpression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Rupatadine Protects against Pulmonary Fibrosis by Attenuating PAF-Mediated Senescence in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiao-xi; Wang, Xiao-xing; Li, Ke; Wang, Zi-yan; Li, Zhe; Lv, Qi; Fu, Xiao-ming; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A similar immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and allergic disorders. We investigated the potential therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of rupatadine, a dual antagonist of histamine and platelet-activation factor (PAF), in bleomycin- (BLM-) and silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The indicated dosages of rupatadine were administered in rodents with bleomycin or silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The tissue injury, fibrosis, inflammatory cells and cytokines, and lung function were examined to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of rupatadine. The anti-fibrosis effect of rupatadine was compared with an H1 or PAF receptor antagonist, and efforts were made to reveal rupatadine’s anti-fibrotic mechanism. Rupatadine promoted the resolution of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner, as indicated by the reductions in inflammation score, collagen deposition and epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, and infiltration or expression of inflammatory cells or cytokines in the fibrotic lung tissue. Thus, rupatadine treatment improved the declined lung function and significantly decreased animal death. Moreover, rupatadine was able not only to attenuate silica-induced silicosis but also to produce a superior therapeutic efficacy compared to pirfenidone, histamine H1 antagonist loratadine, or PAF antagonist CV-3988. The anti-fibrotic action of rupatadine might relate to its attenuation of BLM- or PAF-induced premature senescence because rupatadine treatment protected against the in vivo and in vitro activation of the p53/p21-dependent senescence pathway. Our studies indicate that rupatadine promotes the resolution of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating the PAF-mediated senescence response. Rupatadine holds promise as a novel drug to treat the devastating disease of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23869224

  3. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated alternative activation of microglia is protective after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Stirling, David P; Cummins, Karen; Mishra, Manoj; Teo, Wulin; Yong, V Wee; Stys, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Improving neurological outcome after spinal cord injury is a major clinical challenge because axons, once severed, do not regenerate but 'dieback' from the lesion site. Although microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the brain and spinal cord respond rapidly to spinal cord injury, their role in subsequent injury or repair remains unclear. To assess the role of microglia in spinal cord white matter injury we used time-lapse two-photon and spectral confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-labelled microglia, yellow fluorescent protein-labelled axons, and Nile Red-labelled myelin of living murine spinal cord and revealed dynamic changes in white matter elements after laser-induced spinal cord injury in real time. Importantly, our model of acute axonal injury closely mimics the axonopathy described in well-characterized clinically relevant models of spinal cord injury including contusive-, compressive- and transection-based models. Time-lapse recordings revealed that microglia were associated with some acute pathophysiological changes in axons and myelin acutely after laser-induced spinal cord injury. These pathophysiological changes included myelin and axonal spheroid formation, spectral shifts in Nile Red emission spectra in axonal endbulbs detected with spectral microscopy, and 'bystander' degeneration of axons that survived the initial injury, but then succumbed to secondary degeneration. Surprisingly, modulation of microglial-mediated release of neurotoxic molecules failed to protect axons and myelin. In contrast, sterile stimulation of microglia with the specific toll-like receptor 2 agonist Pam2CSK4 robustly increased the microglial response to ablation, reduced secondary degeneration of central myelinated fibres, and induced an alternative (mixed M1:M2) microglial activation profile. Conversely, Tlr2 knock out: Thy1 yellow fluorescent protein double transgenic mice experienced greater axonal dieback than littermate controls. Thus, promoting an alternative

  4. Nanoparticles modulate surfactant protein A and D mediated protection against influenza A infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Zofi; Kendall, Michaela; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Tetley, Teresa D.; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard W.; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological and toxicological studies have indicated that respiratory infections are exacerbated following enhanced exposure to airborne particulates. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and SP-D form an important part of the innate immune response in the lung and can interact with nanoparticles to modulate the cellular uptake of these particles. We hypothesize that this interaction will also affect the ability of these proteins to combat infections. TT1, A549 and differentiated THP-1 cells, representing the predominant cell types found in the alveolus namely alveolar type I (ATI) epithelial cells, ATII cells and macrophages, were used to examine the effect of two model nanoparticles, 100 nm amine modified (A-PS) and unmodified polystyrene (U-PS), on the ability of SP-A and SP-D to neutralize influenza A infections in vitro. Pre-incubation of low concentrations of U-PS with SP-A resulted in a reduction of SP-A anti-influenza activity in A549 cells, whereas at higher concentrations there was an increase in SP-A antiviral activity. This differential pattern of U-PS concentration on surfactant protein mediated protection against IAV was also shown with SP-D in TT1 cells. On the other hand, low concentrations of A-PS particles resulted in a reduction of SP-A activity in TT1 cells and a reduction in SP-D activity in A549 cells. These results indicate that nanoparticles can modulate the ability of SP-A and SP-D to combat viral challenges. Furthermore, the nanoparticle concentration, surface chemistry and cell type under investigation are important factors in determining the extent of these modulations. PMID:25533100

  5. Factors Associated with Mortality among Patients on TB Treatment in the Southern Region of Zimbabwe, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sandy, Charles; Masuka, Nyasha; Hazangwe, Patrick; Choto, Regis C.; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Nkomo, Brilliant; Sibanda, Edwin; Mugurungi, Owen; Siziba, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background. In 2013, the tuberculosis (TB) mortality rate was highest in southern Zimbabwe at 16%. We therefore sought to determine factors associated with mortality among registered TB patients in this region. Methodology. This was a retrospective record review of registered patients receiving anti-TB treatment in 2013. Results. Of 1,971 registered TB patients, 1,653 (84%) were new cases compared with 314 (16%) retreatment cases. There were 1,538 (78%) TB/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, of whom 1,399 (91%) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with median pre-ART CD4 count of 133 cells/uL (IQR, 46–282). Overall, 428 (22%) TB patients died. Factors associated with increased mortality included being ≥65 years old [adjusted relative risk (ARR) = 2.48 (95% CI 1.35–4.55)], a retreatment TB case [ARR = 1.34 (95% CI, 1.10–1.63)], and being HIV-positive [ARR = 1.87 (95% CI, 1.44–2.42)] whilst ART initiation was protective [ARR = 0.25 (95% CI, 0.22–0.29)]. Cumulative mortality rates were 10%, 14%, and 21% at one, two, and six months, respectively, after starting TB treatment. Conclusion. There was high mortality especially in the first two months of anti-TB treatment, with risk factors being recurrent TB and being HIV-infected, despite a high uptake of ART. PMID:28352474

  6. Factors Associated with Mortality among Patients on TB Treatment in the Southern Region of Zimbabwe, 2013.

    PubMed

    Takarinda, Kudakwashe C; Sandy, Charles; Masuka, Nyasha; Hazangwe, Patrick; Choto, Regis C; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Nkomo, Brilliant; Sibanda, Edwin; Mugurungi, Owen; Harries, Anthony D; Siziba, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background. In 2013, the tuberculosis (TB) mortality rate was highest in southern Zimbabwe at 16%. We therefore sought to determine factors associated with mortality among registered TB patients in this region. Methodology. This was a retrospective record review of registered patients receiving anti-TB treatment in 2013. Results. Of 1,971 registered TB patients, 1,653 (84%) were new cases compared with 314 (16%) retreatment cases. There were 1,538 (78%) TB/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, of whom 1,399 (91%) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with median pre-ART CD4 count of 133 cells/uL (IQR, 46-282). Overall, 428 (22%) TB patients died. Factors associated with increased mortality included being ≥65 years old [adjusted relative risk (ARR) = 2.48 (95% CI 1.35-4.55)], a retreatment TB case [ARR = 1.34 (95% CI, 1.10-1.63)], and being HIV-positive [ARR = 1.87 (95% CI, 1.44-2.42)] whilst ART initiation was protective [ARR = 0.25 (95% CI, 0.22-0.29)]. Cumulative mortality rates were 10%, 14%, and 21% at one, two, and six months, respectively, after starting TB treatment. Conclusion. There was high mortality especially in the first two months of anti-TB treatment, with risk factors being recurrent TB and being HIV-infected, despite a high uptake of ART.

  7. SIRT3 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-mediated cell death by activating NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Juan; Fu, Yu-Cai; Yu, Wei; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-11

    Oxidative stress-mediated cell death in cardiomyocytes reportedly plays an important role in many cardiac pathologies. Our previous report demonstrated that mitochondrial SIRT3 plays an essential role in mediating cell survival in cardiac myocytes, and that resveratrol protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by activating SIRT3. However, the exact mechanism by which SIRT3 prevents oxidative stress remains unknown. Here, we show that exposure of H9c2 cells to 50 μM H(2)O(2) for 6h caused a significant increase in cell death and the down-regulation of SIRT3. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated NF-κB activation was involved in this SIRT3 down-regulation. The SIRT3 activator, resveratrol, which is considered an important antioxidant, protected against H(2)O(2)-induced cell death, whereas the SIRT inhibitor, nicotinamide, enhanced cell death. Moreover, resveratrol negatively regulated H(2)O(2)-induced NF-κB activation, whereas nicotinamide enhanced H(2)O(2)-induced NF-κB activation. We also found that SOD2, Bcl-2 and Bax, the downstream genes of NF-κB, were involved in this pathological process. These results suggest that SIRT3 protects cardiomyocytes exposed to oxidative stress from apoptosis via a mechanism that may involve the NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mouse CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells are protected from autologous complement mediated injury by Crry and CD59

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Nacion, Kristine; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Self cells depend on surface complement regulators to protect them from autologous complement-mediated attack. CD4+CD25+foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells are critical in maintaining immune homeostasis, however, which complement regulators are expressed on them and how they are protected from autologous complement attack remains unknown. We report here that mouse Treg cells express virtually no DAF or CR1. Instead, all of them express Crry and approximately half of them express CD59. Both Crry-/- and CD59-/- Treg cells exhibit greater complement mediated injury than WT Treg cells. These results clarify the status of cell surface complement regulators on mouse Treg cells and indicate that both Crry and CD59 are required to protect Treg cells from autologous complement-mediated injury. Additionally, these data also argue that different from previous assumption, at least in mice, CD4+CD25+foxp3+ Treg cells are not homogenous and could be further divided into subgroups based on CD59 expression. PMID:19281793

  9. Mouse CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells are protected from autologous complement mediated injury by Crry and CD59.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Nacion, Kristine; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2009-04-24

    Self cells depend on surface complement regulators to protect them from autologous complement mediated attack. CD4(+)CD25(+)foxp3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells are critical in maintaining immune homeostasis, however, which complement regulators are expressed on them and how they are protected from autologous complement attack remains unknown. We report here that mouse Treg cells express virtually no DAF or CR1. Instead, all of them express Crry and approximately half of them express CD59. Both Crry(-/-) and CD59(-/-) Treg cells exhibit greater complement mediated injury than WT Treg cells. These results clarify the status of cell surface complement regulators on mouse Treg cells and indicate that both Crry and CD59 are required to protect Treg cells from autologous complement mediated injury. Additionally, these data also argue that different from previous assumption, at least in mice, CD4(+)CD25(+)foxp3(+) Treg cells are not homogenous and could be further divided into subgroups based on CD59 expression.

  10. Staying on Track with TB Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... TB. • You are taking your TB medicine the right way. • Usually, after you have been on the TB medicine for several weeks, your doctor will be able to tell when you are no longer passing TB germs to others. • A healthcare worker may speak with them about their chances of ...

  11. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Structural Fire Protection for Tank Vessels Contracted for On or After January 1, 1963 § 32.57-5 Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace a... structural and integrity qualities equivalent to steel at the end of the applicable fire exposure....

  12. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Structural Fire Protection for Tank Vessels Contracted for On or After January 1, 1963 § 32.57-5 Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace a... structural and integrity qualities equivalent to steel at the end of the applicable fire exposure....

  13. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Structural Fire Protection for Tank Vessels Contracted for On or After January 1, 1963 § 32.57-5 Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace a... structural and integrity qualities equivalent to steel at the end of the applicable fire exposure....

  14. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Structural Fire Protection for Tank Vessels Contracted for On or After January 1, 1963 § 32.57-5 Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace a... structural and integrity qualities equivalent to steel at the end of the applicable fire exposure....

  15. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Structural Fire Protection for Tank Vessels Contracted for On or After January 1, 1963 § 32.57-5 Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace a... structural and integrity qualities equivalent to steel at the end of the applicable fire exposure....

  16. Effect of endogenous androgens on 17beta-estradiol-mediated protection after spinal cord injury in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kachadroka, Supatra; Hall, Alicia M; Niedzielko, Tracy L; Chongthammakun, Sukumal; Floyd, Candace L

    2010-03-01

    Several groups have recently shown that 17beta-estradiol is protective in spinal cord injury (SCI). Testosterone can be aromatized to 17beta-estradiol and may increase estrogen-mediated protection. Alternatively, testosterone has been shown to increase excitotoxicity in models of central nervous system (CNS) injury. These experiments test the hypothesis that endogenous testosterone in male rats alters 17beta-estradiol-mediated protection by evaluating a delayed administration over a clinically relevant dose range and manipulating testicular-derived testosterone. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were either gonadectomized or left gonad-intact prior to SCI. SCI was produced by a midthoracic crush injury. At 30 min post SCI, animals received a subcutaneous pellet of 0.0, 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 mg of 17beta-estradiol, released over 21 days. Hindlimb locomotion was analyzed weekly in the open field. Spinal cords were collected and analyzed for cell death, expression of Bcl-family proteins, and white-matter sparing. Post-SCI administration of the 0.5- or 5.0-mg pellet improved hindlimb locomotion, reduced urinary bladder size, increased neuronal survival, reduced apoptosis, improved the Bax/Bcl-xL protein ratio, and increased white-matter sparing. In the absence of endogenous testicular-derived androgens, SCI induced greater apoptosis, yet 17beta-estradiol administration reduced apoptosis to the same extent in gonadectomized and gonad-intact male rats. These data suggest that delayed post-SCI administration of a clinically relevant dose of 17beta-estradiol is protective in male rats, and endogenous androgens do not alter estrogen-mediated protection. These data suggest that 17beta-estradiol is an effective therapeutic intervention for reducing secondary damage after SCI in males, which could be readily translated to clinical trials.

  17. Cell mediated immune response after challenge in Omp25 liposome immunized mice contributes to protection against virulent Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Goel, Divya; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2013-02-06

    Brucellosis is a disease affecting various domestic and wild life species, and is caused by a bacterium Brucella. Keeping in view the serious economic and medical consequences of brucellosis, efforts have been made to prevent the infection through the use of vaccines. Cell-mediated immune responses [CMI] involving interferon gamma and cytotoxic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are required for removal of intracellular Brucella. Omp25 has been reported to be involved in virulence of Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella ovis. In our previous study, we have shown the protective efficacy of recombinant Omp25, when administered intradermally. In this study, the recombinant Omp25 was formulated in PC-PE liposomes and PLGA microparticles, to enhance the protective immunity generated by it. Significant protection was seen with prime and booster liposome immunization in Balb/c mice against virulent B. abortus 544 as it was comparable to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. However, microparticle prime and booster immunization failed to give better protection when compared to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. This difference can be attributed to the stimulation of cell mediated immune response in PC-PE liposome immunized mice even after challenge which converted to cytotoxicity seen in CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. However, in PLGA microparticle immunized mice, cell mediated immunity was not generated after challenge as observed by decreased cytotoxicity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. Our study emphasizes on the importance of liposome encapsulating Omp25 immunization in conferring protection against B. abortus 544 challenge in Balb/c mice with a single dose immunization regimen.

  18. TB infection prevention and control experiences of South African nurses - a phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa is characterised by one of the highest levels of TB/HIV co-infection and growing multidrug-resistant TB worldwide. Hospitals play a central role in the management of TB. We investigated nurses' experiences of factors influencing TB infection prevention and control (IPC) practices to identify risks associated with potential nosocomial transmission. Methods The qualitative study employed a phenomenological approach, using semi-structured interviews with a quota sample of 20 nurses in a large tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. The data was subjected to thematic analysis. Results Nurses expressed concerns about the possible risk of TB transmission to both patients and staff. Factors influencing TB-IPC, and increasing the potential risk of nosocomial transmission, emerged in interconnected overarching themes. Influences related to the healthcare system included suboptimal IPC provision such as the lack of isolation facilities and personal protective equipment, and the lack of a TB-IPC policy. Further influences included inadequate TB training for staff and patients, communication barriers owing to cultural and linguistic differences between staff and patients, the excessive workload of nurses, and a sense of duty of care. Influences related to wider contextual conditions included TB concerns and stigma, and the role of traditional healers. Influences related to patient behaviour included late uptake of hospital care owing to poverty and the use of traditional medicine, and poor adherence to IPC measures by patients, family members and carers. Conclusions Several interconnected influences related to the healthcare system, wider contextual conditions and patient behavior could increase the potential risk of nosocomial TB transmission at hospital level. There is an urgent need for the implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive contextually appropriate TB IPC policy with the setting and

  19. Preventing Nosocomial MDR-TB Transmission in sub Saharan Africa: Where Are We at?

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Sonia S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In sub Saharan Africa, the cocktail of many advanced HIV-infected susceptible hosts, poor TB treatment success rates, a lack of airborne infection control, limited drug-resistance testing (DST) have resulted in HIV-infected individuals being disproportionately represented in Multi drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases. The prevailing application of the WHO re-treatment protocol indiscriminately to all re-treatment cases sets the stage for an increase in mortality and MDR-TB nosocomial transmission. Method: A comprehensive search was performed of the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register and Medline database including the bibliographies of the retrieved reference. Findings: The TB diagnosis paradigm which for decades relied on smear sputum and culture is likely to change with the advent of the point-of-care diagnostic, Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Until the new DST infrastructure is available, along with clinical trials for both, current and new approaches to retreatment TB in areas heavily affected by HIV and TB, there are cost effective administrative, environmental, and protective measures that may be immediately instituted. Conclusion: The severe lack of infection control practices in sub Saharan Africa may jeopardise the recent strides in MDR-TB management. Cost effective infection control measures must be immediately implemented, otherwise the development of further drug resistance may offset recent strides in MDR-TB management. Indiscriminate use of the WHO standardized retreatment protocol can lead to nosocomial transmission of MDR-TB by: -Precluding early diagnosis and prompt separation of patients who experienced treatment failure category and thereby more likely to have MDR-TB. -Leaving patients from the treatment failure category in health establishments on ineffective standard retreatment regimen until the DST results are known. -Targeting only patients who have had prior TB therapy, new severely debilitated TB patients having

  20. TB infection prevention and control experiences of South African nurses--a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Sissolak, Dagmar; Marais, Frederick; Mehtar, Shaheen

    2011-04-25

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa is characterised by one of the highest levels of TB/HIV co-infection and growing multidrug-resistant TB worldwide. Hospitals play a central role in the management of TB. We investigated nurses' experiences of factors influencing TB infection prevention and control (IPC) practices to identify risks associated with potential nosocomial transmission. The qualitative study employed a phenomenological approach, using semi-structured interviews with a quota sample of 20 nurses in a large tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. The data was subjected to thematic analysis. Nurses expressed concerns about the possible risk of TB transmission to both patients and staff. Factors influencing TB-IPC, and increasing the potential risk of nosocomial transmission, emerged in interconnected overarching themes. Influences related to the healthcare system included suboptimal IPC provision such as the lack of isolation facilities and personal protective equipment, and the lack of a TB-IPC policy. Further influences included inadequate TB training for staff and patients, communication barriers owing to cultural and linguistic differences between staff and patients, the excessive workload of nurses, and a sense of duty of care. Influences related to wider contextual conditions included TB concerns and stigma, and the role of traditional healers. Influences related to patient behaviour included late uptake of hospital care owing to poverty and the use of traditional medicine, and poor adherence to IPC measures by patients, family members and carers. Several interconnected influences related to the healthcare system, wider contextual conditions and patient behavior could increase the potential risk of nosocomial TB transmission at hospital level. There is an urgent need for the implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive contextually appropriate TB IPC policy with the setting and auditing of standards for IPC provision and

  1. Predictive Effects of Good Self-Control and Poor Regulation on Alcohol-Related Outcomes: Do Protective Behavioral Strategies Mediate?

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Matthew R.; Kite, Benjamin A.; Henson, James M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined whether use of protective behavioral strategies mediated the relationship between self-control constructs and alcohol-related outcomes. According to the two-mode model of self-control, good self-control (planfulness; measured with Future Time Perspective, Problem Solving, and Self-Reinforcement) and poor regulation (impulsivity; measured with Present Time Perspective, Poor Delay of Gratification, Distractibility) are theorized to be relatively independent constructs rather than opposite ends of a single continuum. The analytic sample consisted of 278 college student drinkers (68% women) who responded to a battery of surveys at a single time point. Using a structural equation model based on the two-mode model of self-control, we found that good self-control predicted increased use of three types of protective behavioral strategies (Manner of Drinking, Limiting/Stopping Drinking, and Serious Harm Reduction). Poor regulation was unrelated to use of protective behavioral strategies, but had direct effects on alcohol use and alcohol problems. Further, protective behavioral strategies mediated the relationship between good self-control and alcohol use. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22663345

  2. Breast cancer prevention: lessons to be learned from mechanisms of early pregnancy-mediated breast cancer protection.

    PubMed

    Meier-Abt, Fabienne; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Rochlitz, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy at early, but not late age, has a strong and life-long protective effect against breast cancer. The expected overall increase in breast cancer incidence demands the development of a pharmaceutical mimicry of early-age pregnancy-mediated protection. Recently, converging results from rodent models and women on molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effect of early-age pregnancy have opened the door for translational studies on pharmacologic prevention against breast cancer. In particular, alterations in Wnt and TGFβ signaling in mammary stem/progenitor cells reveal new potential targets for preventive interventions, and thus might help to significantly reduce the incidence of breast cancer in the future. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Optimism and the brain: trait optimism mediates the protective role of the orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume against anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yifan; Iordan, Alexandru D.; Moore, Matthew; Dolcos, Florin

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence identifies trait optimism and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as personality and brain factors influencing anxiety, but the nature of their relationships remains unclear. Here, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of trait optimism and of increased OFC volume against symptoms of anxiety were investigated in 61 healthy subjects, who completed measures of trait optimism and anxiety, and underwent structural scanning using magnetic resonance imaging. First, the OFC gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with increased optimism, which in turn was associated with reduced anxiety. Second, trait optimism mediated the relation between the left OFC volume and anxiety, thus demonstrating that increased GMV in this brain region protects against symptoms of anxiety through increased optimism. These results provide novel evidence about the brain–personality mechanisms protecting against anxiety symptoms in healthy functioning, and identify potential targets for preventive and therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing susceptibility and increasing resilience against emotional disturbances. PMID:26371336

  4. Endothelin-2-Mediated Protection of Mutant Photoreceptors in Inherited Photoreceptor Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bramall, Alexa N.; Szego, Michael J.; Pacione, Laura R.; Chang, Inik; Diez, Eduardo; D'Orleans-Juste, Pedro; Stewart, Duncan J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; McInnes, Roderick R.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the Endothelin-2 (Edn2) mRNA is greatly increased in the photoreceptors (PRs) of mouse models of inherited PR degeneration (IPD). To examine the role of Edn2 in mutant PR survival, we generated Edn2−/− mice carrying homozygous Pde6brd1 alleles or the Tg(RHO P347S) transgene. In the Edn2−/− background, PR survival increased 110% in Pde6brd1/rd1 mice at post-natal (PN) day 15, and 60% in Tg(RHO P347S) mice at PN40. In contrast, PR survival was not increased in retinal explants of Pde6brd1/rd1; Edn2−/− mice. This finding, together with systemic abnormalities in Edn2−/− mice, suggested that the increased survival of mutant PRs in the Edn2−/− background resulted at least partly from the systemic EDN2 loss of function. To examine directly the role of EDN2 in mutant PRs, we used a scAAV5-Edn2 cDNA vector to restore Edn2 expression in Pde6brd1/rd1; Edn2−/− PRs and observed an 18% increase in PR survival at PN14. Importantly, PR survival was also increased after injection of scAAV5-Edn2 into Pde6brd1/rd1 retinas, by 31% at PN15. Together, these findings suggest that increased Edn2 expression is protective to mutant PRs. To begin to elucidate Edn2-mediated mechanisms that contribute to PR survival, we used microarray analysis and identified a cohort of 20 genes with >4-fold increased expression in Tg(RHO P347S) retinas, including Fgf2. Notably, increased expression of the FGF2 protein in Tg(RHO P347S) PRs was ablated in Tg(RHO P347S); Edn2−/− retinas. Our findings indicate that the increased expression of PR Edn2 increases PR survival, and suggest that the Edn2-dependent increase in PR expression of FGF2 may contribute to the augmented survival. PMID:23469133

  5. Protective effect of pomegranate-derived products on UVB-mediated damage in human reconstituted skin.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Farrukh; Zaid, Mohammad Abu; Khan, Naghma; Dreher, Mark; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UVB (290-320 nm) component, is the primary cause of many adverse biological effects including photoageing and skin cancer. UVB radiation causes DNA damage, protein oxidation and induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Photochemoprevention via the use of botanical antioxidants in affording protection to human skin against UVB damage is receiving increasing attention. Pomegranate, from the tree Punica granatum, contains anthocyanins and hydrolysable tannins and possesses strong antioxidant and anti-tumor-promoting properties. In this study, we determined the effect of pomegranate-derived products--POMx juice, POMx extract and pomegranate oil (POMo)--against UVB-mediated damage using reconstituted human skin (EpiDerm(TM) FT-200). EpiDerm was treated with POMx juice (1-2 microl/0.1 ml/well), POMx extract (5-10 microg/0.1 ml/well) and POMo (1-2 microl/0.1 ml/well) for 1 h prior to UVB (60 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation and was harvested 12 h post-UVB to assess protein oxidation, markers of DNA damage and photoageing by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Pretreatment of Epiderm with pomegranate-derived products resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced (i) cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), (ii) 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), (iii) protein oxidation and (iv) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression. We also found that pretreatment of Epiderm with pomegranate-derived products resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced (i) collagenase (MMP-1), (ii) gelatinase (MMP-2, MMP-9), (iii) stromelysin (MMP-3), (iv) marilysin (MMP-7), (v) elastase (MMP-12) and (vi) tropoelastin. Gelatin zymography revealed that pomegranate-derived products inhibited UVB-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. Pomegranate-derived products also caused a decrease in UVB-induced protein expression of c-Fos and phosphorylation of c-Jun. Collectively, these results suggest that all three pomegranate-derived products may be useful

  6. T cells play an essential role in anti-F1 mediated rapid protection against bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Levy, Yinon; Flashner, Yehuda; Tidhar, Avital; Zauberman, Ayelet; Aftalion, Moshe; Lazar, Shirley; Gur, David; Shafferman, Avigdor; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2011-09-16

    Plague, which is initiated by Yersinia pestis infection, is a fatal disease that progresses rapidly and leads to high mortality rates if not treated. Antibiotics are an effective plague therapy, but antibiotic-resistant Y. pestis strains have been reported and therefore alternative countermeasures are needed. In the present study, we assessed the potential of an F1 plus LcrV-based vaccine to provide protection shortly pre- or post-exposure to a lethal Y. pestis infection. Mice vaccinated up to one day before or even several hours after subcutaneous challenge were effectively protected. Mice immunized one or three days pre-challenge were protected even though their anti-F1 and anti-LcrV titers were below detection levels at the day of challenge. Moreover, using B-cell deficient μMT mice, we found that rapidly induced protective immunity requires the integrity of the humoral immune system. Analysis of the individual contributions of vaccine components to protection revealed that rF1 is responsible for the observed rapid antibody-mediated immunity. Applying anti-F1 passive therapy in the mouse model of bubonic plague demonstrated that anti-F1 F(ab')(2) can delay mortality, but it cannot provide long-lasting protection, as do intact anti-F1 molecules. Fc-dependent immune components, such as the complement system and (to a lesser extent) neutrophils, were found to contribute to mouse survival. Interestingly, T cells but not B cells were found to be essential for the recovery of infected animals following passive anti-F1 mediated therapy. These data extend our understanding of the immune mechanisms required for the development of a rapid and effective post-exposure therapy against plague. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Surfactant mediated hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} @ GdPO{sub 4} core shell nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Khajuria, Heena; Ladol, Jigmet; Khajuria, Sonika; Shah, Mohd Syed; Sheikh, H.N.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Core shell nanorods were synthesised by surfactant assisted hydrothermal method. • Morphology of core shell nanorods resembles those of core nanorods indicating coating of shell on cores. • More uniform and non-aggregated core shell nanorods were prepared in presence of surfactants. • Surfactant assisted prepared core shell nanorods show intense emission as compared to uncoated core nanorods. - Abstract: Core shell GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} @ GdPO{sub 4} nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal route in the presence of different surfactants [cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)]. The nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The X-ray diffraction results indicate good crystallinity and effective doping in core and core shell nanorods. SEM and TEM micrographs show that all of the as prepared gadolinium phosphate products have rod like shape. The compositional analysis of GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} core was done by EDS. The emission intensity of the GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} @ GdPO{sub 4} core shell increased significantly with respect to those of GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} core nanorods. The effect of surfactant on the uniformity, thickness and luminescence of the core shell nanorods was investigated.

  8. Erythropoietin-mediated protection of insect brain neurons involves JAK and STAT but not PI3K transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Miljus, N; Heibeck, S; Jarrar, M; Micke, M; Ostrowski, D; Ehrenreich, H; Heinrich, R

    2014-01-31

    The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) initiates adaptive cellular responses to both moderate environmental challenges and tissue damaging insults in various non-hematopoietic mammalian tissues including the nervous system. Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative functions of Epo in mammals are mediated through receptor-associated Janus kinase 2 and intracellular signaling cascades that modify the transcription of Epo-regulated genes. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) represent key components of two important Epo-induced transduction pathways. Our previous study on insects revealed neuroprotective and regenerative functions of recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) similar to those in mammalian nervous tissues. Here we demonstrate that rhEpo effectively rescues primary cultured locust brain neurons from apoptotic cell death induced by hypoxia or the chemical compound H-7. The Janus kinase inhibitor AG-490 and the STAT inhibitor sc-355797 abolished protective effects of rhEpo on locust brain neurons. In contrast, inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 had no effect on rhEpo-mediated neuroprotection. The results indicate that rhEpo mediates the protection of locust brain neurons through interference with apoptotic pathways by the activation of a Janus kinase-associated receptor and STAT transcription factor(s). The involvement of similar transduction pathways in mammals and insects for the mediation of neuroprotection and support of neural regeneration by Epo indicates that an Epo/Epo receptor-like signaling system with high structural and functional similarity exists in both groups of animals. Epo-like signaling involved in tissue protection appears to be an ancient beneficial function shared by vertebrates and invertebrates.

  9. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18 h or 1 h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18 h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6 h after APAP; however, 1 h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2 h) however late JNK activation (6 h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18 h or 1 h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18 h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. - Highlights: • 18 h allopurinol pretreatment protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • 1 h allopurinol pretreatment does not protect from APAP

  10. Utilization of cholera toxin B as a mucosal adjuvant elicits antibody-mediated protection against S. pneumoniae infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiedinger, Kari; Pinho, Daniel; Bitsaktsis, Constantine

    2017-01-01

    Backgound: The introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines have been valuable tools for combating invasive pneumococcal infection in children and healthy adults. Despite the available vaccination strategies, pneumococcal pneumonia and associated diseases continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly in individuals with chronic disease and ageing populations. Next-generation pneumococcal vaccines will need to be highly immunogenic across patient populations providing both mucosal and systemic protective immunity. Mucosal immunization is an effective strategy for stimulating the immune response at the site of pathogen entry while increasing systemic immunity. In this study we utilized intranasal immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), in combination with the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B (CTB), to characterize the immune components providing protection against S. pneumoniae challenge. Methods: Mice were immunized intranasally with CTB and PspA individually, and in combination, followed by lethal bacterial challenge with S. pneumoniae, strain A66.1. Animals were monitored for survival and tested for lung bacterial burden, cytokine production as well as S. pneumoniae-specific antibody titer in mouse sera. The primary immunological contributor to the observed protection was confirmed by cytokine neutralization and serum passive transfer. Results: The combination of CTB and PspA provided complete protection against bacterial challenge, which coincided with a significant decrease in lung bacterial burden. Increases in the T-helper (Th) 1 cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 were observed in the lung 24 h post-challenge while decreases in proinflammatory mediators IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also recorded at the same time point. The adjuvanted PspA immunization induced significant titers of S. pneumoniae-specific antibody in the serum of mice prior to infection. Serum

  11. Limitations on human rights: are they justifiable to reduce the burden of TB in the era of MDR- and XDR-TB?

    PubMed

    Boggio, Andrea; Zignol, Matteo; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Nunn, Paul; Pinet, Geneviève; Raviglione, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis, in all its forms, poses a serious, demonstrable threat to the health of countless individuals as well as to health as a public good. MDR-TB and, in particular, the emergence of XDR-TB, have re-opened the debate on the importance, and nature, of treatment supervision for basic TB control and the management of drug-resistant TB. Enforcing compulsory measures regarding TB patients raises questions of respect for human rights. Yet, international law provides for rights-limiting principles, which would justify enforcing compulsory measures against TB patients who refuse to have diagnostic procedures or who refuse to be monitored and treated once disease is confirmed. This article analyzes under what circumstances compulsory measures for TB patients may be enforced under international law. Compulsory measures for TB patients may, in fact, be justified on legal grounds provided that these measures are foreseen in the law, that they are used as a last resort, and that safeguards are in place to protect affected individuals. The deadly nature of the disease, its epidemiology, the high case fatality rate, and the speed at which the disease leads to death when associated with HIV are proven.

  12. USP7 Enforces Heterochromatinization of p53 Target Promoters by Protecting SUV39H1 from MDM2-Mediated Degradation.

    PubMed

    Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Qiao, Rui F; Yao, Shen; Manfredi, James J; Gu, Wei; Aaronson, Stuart A

    2016-03-22

    The H3K9me3 repressive histone conformation of p53 target promoters is abrogated in response to p53 activation by MDM2-mediated SUV39H1 degradation. Here, we present evidence that the USP7 deubiquitinase protects SUV39H1 from MDM2-mediated ubiquitination in the absence of p53 stimulus. USP7 occupies p53 target promoters in unstressed conditions, a process that is abrogated with p53 activation associated with loss of the H3K9me3 mark on these same promoters. Mechanistically, USP7 forms a trimeric complex with MDM2 and SUV39H1, independent of DNA, and modulates MDM2-dependent SUV39H1 ubiquitination. Furthermore, we show that this protective function of USP7 on SUV39H1 is independent of p53. Finally, USP7 blocking cooperates with p53 in inducing apoptosis by enhancing p53 promoter occupancy and dependent transactivation of target genes. These results uncover a layer of the p53 transcriptional program mediated by USP7, which restrains relaxation of local chromatin conformation at p53 target promoters. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical disruption of skin during poxvirus immunization is critical for the generation of highly protective T cell-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Luzheng; Zhong, Qiong; Tian, Tian; Dubin, Krista; Athale, Shruti K.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory Paragraph Variola major infection (Smallpox) claimed hundreds of millions lives before it was eradicated by a simple vaccination strategy: epicutaneous application of the related orthopoxvirus Vaccinia virus (VACV) to superficially injured skin (skin scarification, s.s.)1. However, the remarkable success of this strategy was attributed to the immunogenicity of VACV rather than the unique vaccine delivery mode. We now demonstrate that VACV immunization via s.s., but not conventional injection routes, is essential to the generation of superior T cell-mediated immune responses that provide complete protection against subsequent challenges, independent of neutralizing antibodies. Skin-resident effector memory T cells (TEM) provide complete protection against cutaneous challenge, while protection against lethal respiratory challenge requires both respiratory mucosal TEM and central memory T cells (TCM). Vaccination with recombinant VACV (rVACV) expressing a tumor antigen was protective against tumor challenge only if delivered via s.s. route, but not by hypodermic injection. Finally, the clinically safer non-replicative Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) also generated far superior protective immunity when delivered via s.s route compared to intramuscular injection used in MVA clinical trials. Thus, delivering rVACV -based vaccines, including MVA vaccines, through physically disrupted epidermis represents a uniquely powerful strategy with clear-cut advantages over conventional vaccination via hypodermic injection. PMID:20081864

  14. Protection against acetaminophen-induced liver injury by allopurinol is dependent on aldehyde oxidase-mediated liver preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; McGill, Mitchell R; Lebofsky, Margitta; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes severe and occasionally fatal liver injury. Numerous drugs that attenuate APAP toxicity have been described. However these compounds frequently protect by cytochrome P450 inhibition, thereby preventing the initiating step of toxicity. We have previously shown that pretreatment with allopurinol can effectively protect against APAP toxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the current study, C3HeB/FeJ mice were administered allopurinol 18h or 1h prior to an APAP overdose. Administration of allopurinol 18h prior to APAP overdose resulted in an 88% reduction in liver injury (serum ALT) 6h after APAP; however, 1h pretreatment offered no protection. APAP-cysteine adducts and glutathione depletion kinetics were similar with or without allopurinol pretreatment. The phosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of c-jun-N-terminal-kinase (JNK) have been implicated in the progression of APAP toxicity. In our study we showed equivalent early JNK activation (2h) however late JNK activation (6h) was attenuated in allopurinol treated mice, which suggests that later JNK activation is more critical for the toxicity. Additional mice were administered oxypurinol (primary metabolite of allopurinol) 18h or 1h pre-APAP, but neither treatment protected. This finding implicated an aldehyde oxidase (AO)-mediated metabolism of allopurinol, so mice were treated with hydralazine to inhibit AO prior to allopurinol/APAP administration, which eliminated the protective effects of allopurinol. We evaluated potential targets of AO-mediated preconditioning and found increased hepatic metallothionein 18h post-allopurinol. These data show metabolism of allopurinol occurring independent of P450 isoenzymes preconditions the liver and renders the animal less susceptible to an APAP overdose. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective role of p21(Waf1/Cip1) against prostaglandin A2-mediated apoptosis of human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gorospe, M; Wang, X; Guyton, K Z; Holbrook, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) suppresses tumor growth in vivo, is potently antiproliferative in vitro, and is a model drug for the study of the mammalian stress response. Our previous studies using breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells suggested that p21(Waf1/Cip1) induction enabled cells to survive PGA2 exposure. Indeed, the marked sensitivity of human colorectal carcinoma RKO cells to the cytotoxicity of PGA2 is known to be associated with a lack of a PGA2-mediated increase in p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression, inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, and growth arrest. To determine if cell death following exposure to PGA2 could be prevented by forcing the expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) in RKO cells, we utilized an adenoviral vector-based expression system. We demonstrate that ectopic expression of p21(Waf1/Cip1) largely rescued RKO cells from PGA2-induced apoptotic cell death, directly implicating p21(Waf1/Cip1) as a determinant of the cellular outcome (survival versus death) following exposure to PGA2. To discern whether p21(Waf1/Cip1)-mediated protection operates through the implementation of cellular growth arrest, other growth-inhibitory treatments were studied for the ability to attenuate PGA2-induced cell death. Neither serum depletion nor suramin (a growth factor receptor antagonist) protected RKO cells against PGA2 cytotoxicity, and neither induced p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression. Mimosine, however, enhanced p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression, completely inhibited RKO cell proliferation, and exerted marked protection against a subsequent PGA2 challenge. Taken together, our results directly demonstrate a protective role for p21(Waf1/Cip1) during PGA2 cellular stress and provide strong evidence that the implementation of cellular growth arrest contributes to this protective influence. PMID:8943319

  16. TB deaths reach historic levels. International (global).

    PubMed

    More tuberculosis (TB)-related deaths occurred in 1995 than in any other year in history (almost 3 million, vs. 2.1 million for the TB epidemic around 1990). In the next 50 years, as many as 500 million people may develop TB if current rates continue. More and more of these people will develop multidrug resistant TB. TB affects all social groups. It is the leading fatal infection in youth and adults. HIV positive people are more likely to die from TB than any other condition. More women die from TB than all causes of maternal mortality combined. Almost 50% of the world's refugees may have TB. All people are at risk of TB since TB bacteria, which enter the air via coughing or sneezing, can be suspended in the air for hours. Increased air travel and migration have brought TB back to industrialized countries. Multi-drug resistant TB has emerged in New York City, London, Milan, Paris, Atlanta, Chicago, and cities in developing countries. Governments of industrialized and developing countries have been slow to understand the effects of multi-drug resistant TB for public health. During the 1970s and 1980s, TB was greatly neglected resulting in the current multi-drug resistant TB epidemic. Policy makers have not applied the tools discovered by scientists to help eliminate TB. The World Health Organization recommends directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) to fight TB. DOTS can increase the number of cured TB patients two-fold. It can cure almost 95% of TB patients with medicines costing less than $11 in some areas of the world. Yet DOTS is being used to cure only 10% of all TB patients in the world. If it were used in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, South Africa, and Zaire, about 75% of all TB cases would be cured. In DOTS, health workers, not the TB patient, are responsible for curing the TB patient. Poor patient compliance is responsible for the current TB epidemic because TB patients remain

  17. Ligand binding to the AMP-activated protein kinase active site mediates protection of the activation loop from dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini G; McCartney, Rhonda R; Schmidt, Martin C

    2013-01-04

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved signaling molecule in a pathway that maintains adenosine triphosphate homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested that low energy adenylate ligands bound to one or more sites in the γ subunit of AMPK promote the formation of an active, phosphatase-resistant conformation. We propose an alternative model in which the kinase domain association with the heterotrimer core results in activation of the kinase catalytic activity, whereas low energy adenylate ligands bound in the kinase active site promote phosphatase resistance. Purified Snf1 α subunit with a conservative, single amino acid substitution in the kinase domain is protected from dephosphorylation by adenosine diphosphate in the complete absence of the β and γ subunits. Staurosporine, a compound known to bind to the active site of many protein kinases, mediates strong protection from dephosphorylation to yeast and mammalian AMPK enzymes. The analog-sensitive Snf1-I132G protein but not wild type Snf1 exhibits protection from dephosphorylation when bound by the adenosine analog 2NM-PP1 in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ligand binding to the Snf1 active site can mediate phosphatase resistance. Finally, Snf1 kinase with an amino acid substitution at the interface of the kinase domain and the heterotrimer core exhibits normal regulation of phosphorylation in vivo but greatly reduced Snf1 kinase activity, supporting a model in which kinase domain association with the heterotrimer core is needed for kinase activation.

  18. Litigation as TB Rights Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities. Taking inspiration from right to health PIL cases (PILs), lawyers in a New Delhi-based rights organization used desk research, fact-findings, and the Right To Information Act to build a TB PIL for the Delhi High Court, Sanjai Sharma v. NCT of Delhi and Others (2015). The case argues that inadequate implementation of government TB schemes violates the Constitutional rights to life, health, food, and equality. Although PILs face substantial challenges, this paper concludes that litigation can be a crucial advocacy and accountability tool for people living with TB and their allies. PMID:27781000

  19. WHO's End TB Strategy: From stopping to ending the global TB epidemic.

    PubMed

    Uplekar, Mukund; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The 67th World Health Assembly of 2014 adopted the "End TB Strategy" with a vision of making the world free of tuberculosis (TB) and with the goal of ending the global TB epidemic by the year 2035. World Health Organization's "End TB Strategy" captures this holistic response in its four principles and three pillars. The three high-level indicators of the "End TB Strategy" - reductions in TB deaths, reductions in the TB incidence rate and the percentage of TB patients and their households experiencing catastrophic costs - are relevant to all countries. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Neutralizing IgG at the portal of infection mediates protection against vaginal simian/human immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Shattock, Robin J

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans.

  1. Cross Protective Mucosal Immunity Mediated by Memory Th17 Cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Yongli; Li, Wenchao; Tian, Ying; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Ni, Xin; Shen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong Th17 responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4+ T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by IL-17A blockade. Transfer of memory CD4+ T cells from IL-17A knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells played a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells. PMID:27118490

  2. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector mediates postexposure protection against Sudan Ebola hemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M; Williams, Kinola J N; Geisbert, Joan B; Leung, Anders; Feldmann, Friederike; Hensley, Lisa E; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing homologous filoviral glycoproteins can completely protect rhesus monkeys against Marburg virus when administered after exposure and can partially protect macaques after challenge with Zaire ebolavirus. Here, we administered a VSV vector expressing the Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV) glycoprotein to four rhesus macaques shortly after exposure to SEBOV. All four animals survived SEBOV challenge, while a control animal that received a nonspecific vector developed fulminant SEBOV hemorrhagic fever and succumbed. This is the first demonstration of complete postexposure protection against an Ebola virus in nonhuman primates and provides further evidence that postexposure vaccination may have utility in treating exposures to filoviruses.

  3. Glycyrrhizin Protects against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Injury via Alleviating Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Min; Yagai, Tomoki; Chai, Yingying; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Xie, Cen; Cheng, Xuefang; Zhang, Jun; Che, Yuan; Li, Feiyan; Wu, Yuzheng; Brocker, Chad N.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug-induced acute liver failure in Western countries. Glycyrrhizin (GL), a potent hepatoprotective constituent extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine liquorice, has potential clinical use in treating APAP-induced liver failure. The present study determined the hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of action of GL and its active metabolite glycyrrhetinic acid (GA). Various administration routes and pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analyses were used to differentiate the effects of GL and GA on APAP toxicity in mice. Mice deficient in cytochrome P450 2E1 enzyme (CYP2E1) or receptor interacting protein 3 (RIPK3) and their relative wild-type littermates were subjected to histologic and biochemical analyses to determine the potential mechanisms. Hepatocyte death mediated by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)/caspase was analyzed by use of human liver-derived LO2 cells. The pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics analysis using various administration routes revealed that GL but not GA potently attenuated APAP-induced liver injury. The protective effect of GL was found only with intraperitoneal and intravenous administration and not with gastric administration. CYP2E1-mediated metabolic activation and RIPK3-mediated necroptosis were unrelated to GL’s protective effect. However, GL inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis via interference with TNFα-induced apoptotic hepatocyte death. These results demonstrate that GL rapidly attenuates APAP-induced liver injury by directly inhibiting TNFα-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. The protective effect against APAP-induced liver toxicity by GL in mice suggests the therapeutic potential of GL for the treatment of APAP overdose. PMID:26965985

  4. Interleukin-19 contributes as a protective factor in experimental Th2-mediated colitis.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Matsuo, Yukiko; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Miki, Mariko; Azuma, Naoki; Teramoto, Midori; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Izawa, Takeshi; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease results from chronic dysregulation of the mucosal immune system and aberrant activation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-19 is a member of the IL-10 family, and IL-10 plays an important role in inflammatory bowel disease. We have previously shown that IL-19 knockout mice are more susceptible to innate-mediated colitis. Next, we ask whether IL-19 contributes to T cells-mediated colitis. Here, we investigated the role of IL-19 in a mouse model of Th2 cell-mediated colitis. Inflammatory responses in IL-19-deficient mice were assessed using a Th2-mediated colitis induced by oxazolone. The colitis was evaluated by analyzing the body weight loss and histology of the colon. Lymph node cells were cultured in vitro to determine cytokine production. IL-19 knockout mice exacerbated oxazolone-induced colitis by stimulating the transport of inflammatory cells into the colon, and by increasing IgE production and the number of circulating eosinophil. The exacerbation of oxazolone-induced colonic inflammation following IL-19 knockout mice was accompanied by an increased production of IL-4 and IL-9, but no changes in the expression of IL-5 and IL-13 in lymph node cells. IL-19 plays an anti-inflammatory role in the Th2-mediated colitis model, suggesting that IL-19 may represent a potential therapeutic target for reducing colonic inflammation.

  5. Vaccine Protection against Bacillus cereus-Mediated Respiratory Anthrax-Like Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, So-Young; Maier, Hannah; Schroeder, Jay; Richter, G. Stefan; Elli, Derek; Musser, James M.; Quenee, Lauriane E.; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus strains harboring a pXO1-like virulence plasmid cause respiratory anthrax-like disease in humans, particularly in welders. We developed mouse models for intraperitoneal as well as aerosol challenge with spores of B. cereus G9241, harboring pBCXO1 and pBC218 virulence plasmids. Compared to wild-type B. cereus G9241, spores with a deletion of the pBCXO1-carried protective antigen gene (pagA1) were severely attenuated, whereas spores with a deletion of the pBC218-carried protective antigen homologue (pagA2) were not. Anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) immunization raised antibodies that bound and neutralized the pagA1-encoded protective antigen (PA1) but not the PA2 orthologue encoded by pagA2. AVA immunization protected mice against a lethal challenge with spores from B. cereus G9241 or B. cereus Elc4, a strain that had been isolated from a fatal case of anthrax-like disease. As the pathogenesis of B. cereus anthrax-like disease in mice is dependent on pagA1 and PA-neutralizing antibodies provide protection, AVA immunization may also protect humans from respiratory anthrax-like death. PMID:23319564

  6. TB vaccines in clinical development.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Ann M; Ruhwald, Morten; Mearns, Helen; McShane, Helen

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on TB Vaccines in Clinical Development, and Clinical Research: Data and Findings. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. [August 2016, Vol 99, Supp S1, S1-S30].

  7. Dihydromyricetin protects against liver ischemia/reperfusion induced apoptosis via activation of FOXO3a-mediated autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Huifeng; Qin, Weijia; Chen, Jianwei; Guo, Dengfang; Lin, Jianyu; Chi, Xiaobing; Jiang, Zhelong; Yang, Hejun; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury is characterized by defective liver autophagy accompanied by alterations to the endogenous defense system. Dihydromyricetin (DHM) is a natural flavonoid that demonstrates a wide range of physiological functions, and has been implicated as a regulator of autophagy. This study investigates the protective effects of DHM pretreatment on liver injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and elucidates the potential mechanism of DHM-mediated protection. Mice were subjected to 60 minutes of ischemia followed by 5 hours of reperfusion. DHM (100 mg/kg bw/day) or the vehicle was administered daily by gavage 7 days before ischemia and immediately before reperfusion. In this study, DHM markedly decreased serum aminotransferase activity and inhibited liver I/R -stimulated apoptosis. Moreover, DHM exerted hepatoprotective effects by upregulating mRNA levels of various essential autophagy-related genes including ATG5, ATG12, BECN1, and LC3. Autophagy inhibitor chloroquine or Atg5 knockdown blocked DHM -mediated elevation in liver function. Specifically, DHM significantly increased FOXO3a expression, and enhanced FOXO3a nuclear translocation and Ser588 phosphorylation modification. Importantly, the inhibition of FOXO3a with FOXO3a-siRNA in mice decreased DHM-induced autophagy-related genes and diminished the protective effects of DHM against liver I/R injury. In summary, these findings identify DHM as a novel hepatoprotective small molecule by elevating FOXO3a expression and nuclear translocation, stimulating autophagy-related genes and suppressing liver I/R-induced apoptosis, suggesting FOXO3a may have therapeutic value in liver cell protection in liver I/R injury. PMID:27793014

  8. The specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 protects hepatocytes from lipotoxic and hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Rius, Bibiana; Duran-Güell, Marta; Flores-Costa, Roger; López-Vicario, Cristina; Lopategi, Aritz; Alcaraz-Quiles, José; Casulleras, Mireia; Lozano, Juan José; Titos, Esther; Clària, Joan

    2017-08-02

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) are hallmarks of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome associated with obesity. The specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 (MaR1) preserves tissue homeostasis by exerting cytoprotective actions, dampening inflammation, and expediting its timely resolution. Here, we explored whether MaR1 protects liver cells from lipotoxic and hypoxia-induced ER stress. Mice were rendered obese by high-fat diet feeding, and experiments were performed in primary hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and precision-cut liver slices (PCLSs). Palmitate-induced lipotoxicity increased ER stress and altered autophagy in hepatocytes, effects that were prevented by MaR1. MaR1 protected hepatocytes against lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis by activating the UPR prosurvival mechanisms and preventing the excessive up-regulation of proapoptotic pathways. Protective MaR1 effects were also seen in hepatocytes challenged with hypoxia and TNF-α-induced cell death. High-throughput microRNA (miRNA) sequencing revealed that MaR1 actions were associated with specific miRNA signatures targeting both protein folding and apoptosis. MaR1 also prevented lipotoxic-triggered ER stress and hypoxia-induced inflammation in PCLSs and enhanced Kupffer cell phagocytic capacity. Together, these findings describe the ability of MaR1 to oppose ER stress in liver cells under conditions frequently encountered in NAFLD.-Rius, B., Duran-Güell, M., Flores-Costa, R., López-Vicario, C., Lopategi, A., Alcaraz-Quiles, J., Casulleras, M., Lozano, J. J., Titos, E., Clària, J. The specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 protects hepatocytes from lipotoxic and hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. © FASEB.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Astrocytes from ROS-Induced Damage through Inhibition of Mitochondria-Mediated Cell Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; He, Mao-Tao; Chang, Yue; Mehta, Suresh L.; He, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species to protect neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether CoQ10 was capable of protecting astrocytes from reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage. For this purpose, ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation was used as a tool to induce ROS stress to cultured astrocytes. The cells were treated with 10 and 25 μg/ml of CoQ10 for 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation and maintained for 24 h post UVB exposure. Cell viability was assessed by MTT conversion assay. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by respirometer. While superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes, levels of cytochrome C (cyto-c), cleaved caspase-9, and caspase-8 were detected using Western blotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and this damaging effect was associated with superoxide accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization, mitochondrial respiration suppression, cyto-c release, and the activation of both caspase-9 and -8. Treatment with CoQ10 at two different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, inhibition of cyto-c release, suppression of caspase-9. Furthermore, CoQ10 enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. It is concluded that CoQ10 may protect astrocytes through suppression of oxidative stress, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction, blockade of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway, and enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25552930

  10. Critical role of IFN-gamma in CFA-mediated protection of NOD mice from diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshiko; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Kato, Takako; Kanagawa, Edith M; Kanagawa, Osami

    2009-11-01

    IFN-gamma signaling-deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop diabetes with similar kinetics to those of wild-type NOD mice. However, the immunization of IFN-gamma signaling-deficient NOD mice with CFA failed to induce long-term protection, whereas wild-type NOD mice receiving CFA remained diabetes-free. CFA also failed to protect IFN-gamma receptor-deficient (IFN-gammaR(-/-)) NOD mice from the autoimmune rejection of transplanted islets, as it does in diabetic NOD mice, and from disease transfer by spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice. These data clearly show that the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma is necessary for the CFA-mediated protection of NOD mice from diabetes. There is no difference in the T(h)1/T(h)17 balance between IFN-gammaR(-/-) NOD and wild-type NOD mice. There is also no difference in the total numbers and percentages of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lymph node CD4(+) T-cell populations between IFN-gammaR(-/-) NOD and wild-type NOD mice. However, pathogenic T cells lacking IFN-gammaR are resistant to the suppressive effect of Treg cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, it is likely that CFA-mediated protection against diabetes development depends on a change in the balance between Treg cells and pathogenic T cells, and IFN-gamma signaling seems to control the susceptibility of pathogenic T cells to the inhibitory activity of Treg cells.

  11. Metformin Protects Kidney Cells From Insulin-Mediated Genotoxicity In Vitro and in Male Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats.

    PubMed

    Othman, Eman Maher; Oli, R G; Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Kreissl, Michael C; Stopper, Helga

    2016-02-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is thought to enhance cancer risk. A possible mechanism is induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage by insulin, Here, the effect of a combination of metformin with insulin was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The rationales for this were the reported antioxidative properties of metformin and the aim to gain further insights into the mechanisms responsible for protecting the genome from insulin-mediated oxidative stress and damage. The comet assay, a micronucleus frequency test, and a mammalian gene mutation assay were used to evaluate the DNA damage produced by insulin alone or in combination with metformin. For analysis of antioxidant activity, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial disturbances, the cell-free ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, the superoxide-sensitive dye dihydroethidium, and the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive dye 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazol-carbocyanine iodide were applied. Accumulation of p53 and pAKT were analyzed. As an in vivo model, hyperinsulinemic Zucker diabetic fatty rats, additionally exposed to insulin during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, were treated with metformin. In the rat kidney samples, dihydroethidium staining, p53 and pAKT analysis, and quantification of the oxidized DNA base 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were performed. Metformin did not show intrinsic antioxidant activity in the cell-free assay, but protected cultured cells from insulin-mediated oxidative stress, DNA damage, and mutation. Treatment of the rats with metformin protected their kidneys from oxidative stress and genomic damage induced by hyperinsulinemia. Metformin may protect patients from genomic damage induced by elevated insulin levels. This may support efforts to reduce the elevated cancer risk that is associated with hyperinsulinemia.

  12. Protective effect of prion protein via the N-terminal region in mediating a protective effect on paraquat-induced oxidative injury in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Dupiereux, Ingrid; Falisse-Poirrier, Nandini; Zorzi, Willy; Watt, Nicole T; Thellin, Olivier; Zorzi, Danièle; Pierard, Olivier; Hooper, Nigel M; Heinen, Ernst; Elmoualij, Benaïssa

    2008-02-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by a posttranslational, conformational change in the cellular isoform of the prion protein (PrP(C)) into an infectious, disease-associated form (PrP(Sc)). Increasing evidence supports a role for PrP(C) in the cellular response to oxidative stress. We investigated the effect of oxidative stress mediated by paraquat exposure on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. A loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequent reduction in ATP production were demonstrated in untransfected SH-SY5Y cells, an effect that was ameliorated by the expression of PrP(C). Cells expressing either PrP-DeltaOct, which lacks the octapeptide repeats, or PrP-DA, in which the N-terminus is tethered to the membrane, showed increased sensitivity to paraquat compared with cells expressing wild-type PrP(C) as shown by reduced viability, loss of their membrane integrity, and reduced mitochondrial bioenergetic measurements. Exposure of prion-infected mouse SMB15S cells to paraquat resulted in a reduction in viability to levels similar to those seen in the untransfected SH-SY5Y cells. However, "curing" the cells with pentosan sulfate restored the viability to the level observed in the SH-SY5Y cells expressing PrP(C). These data would indicate that the molecular mechanism promoting cellular resistance to oxidative stress had been compromised in the infected SMB15S cells, which could be reinstated upon curing. Our study supports the hypothesis that PrP(C) expression protects cells against paraquat-induced oxidative injury, demonstrates the significance of the N-terminal region of the protein in mediating this protective effect, and also shows that the biochemical consequences of prion infection may be reversed with therapeutic intervention. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Distinct Mechanisms Underlying Resveratrol-Mediated Protection from Types of Cellular Stress in C6 Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Means, John C; Gerdes, Bryan C; Koulen, Peter

    2017-07-14

    The polyphenolic phytostilbene, trans-resveratrol, is found in high amounts in several types and tissues of plants, including grapes, and has been proposed to have beneficial effects in the central nervous system due to its activity as an antioxidant. The objective of the present study was to identify the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of resveratrol under conditions of oxidative stress or DNA damage, induced by the extracellularly applied oxidant, tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide, or UV-irradiation, respectively. In C6 glioma cells, a model system for glial cell biology and pharmacology, resveratrol was protective against both types of insult. Prevention of tau protein cleavage and of the formation of neurofibrillary tangles were identified as mechanisms of action of resveratrol-mediated protection in both paradigms of cellular damage. However, depending on the type of insult, resveratrol exerted its protective activity differentially: under conditions of chemically induced oxidative stress, inhibition of caspase activity, while with DNA damage, resveratrol regulated tau phosphorylation at Ser(422). Results advance our understanding of resveratrol's complex impact on cellular signaling pathway and contribute to the notion of resveratrol's role as a pleiotropic therapeutic agent.

  14. Protective effects of arachidonic acid against palmitic acid-mediated lipotoxicity in HIT-T15 cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Sik; Kim, Chi Hyun; Kim, Ki Young; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2012-05-01

    Saturated fatty acids have been considered major contributing factors in type 2 diabetes, whereas unsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects for preventing the development of diabetes. However, the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in pancreatic β cells have not been reported. Here, we examined the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on palmitic acid (PA)-mediated lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells. AA prevented the PA-induced lipotoxicity as indicated by cell viability, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential, whereas eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a non-metabolizable AA, had little effect on PA-induced lipotoxicity. In parallel with its protective effects against PA-induced lipotoxicity, AA restored impaired insulin expression and secretion induced by PA. AA but not ETYA increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) in the presence of PA compared with PA alone, and xanthohumol, a diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) inhibitor, reversed AA-induced protection from PA. Taken together, our results suggest that AA protects against PA-induced lipotoxicity in clonal HIT-T15 pancreatic β cells, and the protective effects may be associated with TG accumulation, possibly through sequestration of lipotoxic PA into TG.

  15. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway.

    PubMed

    Poole, Emma; Lau, Jonathan C H; Sinclair, John

    2015-08-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34(+) progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34(+) progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway.

  16. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T.; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R.; Hughes, William S.; Lee, David J.; Alderwick, Luke J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, Elizabeth R.; Lovering, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital — ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  17. Rap1 mediates protective effects of iloprost against ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Birukova, Anna A.; Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) has been shown to attenuate vascular constriction, hyperpermeability, inflammation, and acute lung injury. However, molecular mechanisms of PGI2 protective effects on pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) are not well understood. We tested a role of cAMP-activated Epac-Rap1 pathway in the barrier protective effects of PGI2 analog iloprost in the murine model of ventilator-induced lung injury. Mice were treated with iloprost (2 μg/kg) after onset of high tidal volume ventilation (30 ml/kg, 4 h). Bronchoalveolar lavage, histological analysis, and measurements of Evans blue accumulation were performed. In vitro, microvascular EC barrier function was assessed by morphological analysis of agonist-induced gap formation and monitoring of Rho pathway activation and EC permeability. Iloprost reduced bronchoalveolar lavage protein content, neutrophil accumulation, capillary filtration coefficient, and Evans blue albumin extravasation caused by high tidal volume ventilation. Small-interfering RNA-based Rap1 knockdown inhibited protective effects of iloprost. In vitro, iloprost increased barrier properties of lung microvascular endothelium and alleviated thrombin-induced EC barrier disruption. In line with in vivo results, Rap1 depletion attenuated protective effects of iloprost in the thrombin model of EC permeability. These data describe for the first time protective effects for Rap1-dependent signaling against ventilator-induced lung injury and pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:19850733

  18. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R; Hughes, William S; Lee, David J; Alderwick, Luke J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Sockett, Elizabeth R; Lovering, Andrew L

    2015-12-02

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital - ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle.

  19. Reactive oxygen species as mediators of cardiac injury and protection: the relevance to anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Kevin, Leo G; Novalija, Enis; Stowe, David F

    2005-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are central to cardiac ischemic and reperfusion injury. They contribute to myocardial stunning, infarction and apoptosis, and possibly to the genesis of arrhythmias. Multiple laboratory studies and clinical trials have evaluated the use of scavengers of ROS to protect the heart from the effects of ischemia and reperfusion. Generally, studies in animal models have shown such effects. Clinical trials have also shown protective effects of scavengers, but whether this protection confers meaningful clinical benefits is uncertain. Several IV anesthetic drugs act as ROS scavengers. In contrast, volatile anesthetics have recently been demonstrated to generate ROS in the heart, most likely because of inhibitory effects on cardiac mitochondria. ROS are involved in the signaling cascade for cardioprotection induced by brief exposure to a volatile anesthetic (termed "anesthetic preconditioning"). ROS, therefore, although injurious in large quantities, can have a paradoxical protective effect within the heart. In this review we provide background information on ROS formation and elimination relevant to anesthetic and adjuvant drugs with particular reference to the heart. The sources of ROS, the means by which they induce cardiac injury or activate protective signaling pathways, the results of clinical studies evaluating ROS scavengers, and the effects of anesthetic drugs on ROS are each discussed.

  20. TB in Children in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facilitator Guide Introduction to TB Genotyping Core Curriculum Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Correctional Facilities, United States, 1993- ... Investigation of Contacts of Persons with Infectious TB Epidemiology of Pediatric Tuberculosis in the United States Targeted ...

  1. TB control: challenges and opportunities for India.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Daftary, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Srinath

    2016-03-01

    India's TB control programme has treated over 19 million patients, but the incidence of TB continues to be high. TB is a major killer and drug-resistant TB is a growing threat. There are several likely reasons, including social conditions and co-morbidities that fuel the TB epidemic: under-investment by the government, weak programme implementation and management, suboptimal quality of care in the private sector, and insufficient advocacy around TB. Fortunately, India possesses the technical know-how, competence and resources to address these challenges. The End TB Strategy by WHO offers India an excellent blueprint to advance the agenda of TB control. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Epitope-focused peptide immunogens in human use adjuvants protect rabbits from experimental inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Feldman, Daniel; Yu, Fen; Cease, Kemp B

    2015-01-09

    Anthrax represents a formidable bioterrorism threat for which new, optimized vaccines are required. We previously demonstrated that epitope-focused multiple antigenic peptides or a recombinant protein in Freund's adjuvant can elicit Ab against the loop neutralizing determinant (LND), a cryptic linear neutralizing epitope in the 2ß2-2ß3 loop of protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis, which mediated protection of rabbits from inhalation challenge with B. anthracis Ames strain. However, demonstration of efficacy using human-use adjuvants is required before proceeding with further development of an LND vaccine for testing in non-human primates and humans. To optimize the LND immunogen, we first evaluated the protective efficacy and immune correlates associated with immunization of rabbits with mixtures containing two molecular variants of multiple antigenic peptides in Freunds adjuvant, termed BT-LND(2) and TB-LND(2). TB-LND(2) was then further evaluated for protective efficacy in rabbits employing human-use adjuvants. Immunization of rabbits with TB-LND(2) in human-use adjuvants elicited protection from Ames strain spore challenge which was statistically indistinguishable from that elicited through immunization with protective antigen. All TB-LND(2) rabbits with any detectable serum neutralization prior to challenge were protected from aerosolized spore exposure. Remarkably, rabbits immunized with TB-LND(2) in Alhydrogel/CpG had significant anamnestic increases in post-challenge LND-specific Ab and neutralization titers despite little evidence of spore germination in these rabbits. An LND-specific epitope-focused vaccine may complement PA-based vaccines and may represent a complementary stand-alone vaccine for anthrax. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. AAV-mediated in vivo functional selection of tissue-protective factors against ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ruozi, Giulia; Bortolotti, Francesca; Falcione, Antonella; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Ukovich, Laura; Macedo, Antero; Zentilin, Lorena; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan; Baldini, Giovanna; Zweyer, Marina; Barazzoni, Rocco; Graziani, Andrea; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Functional screening of expression libraries in vivo would offer the possibility of identifying novel biotherapeutics without a priori knowledge of their biochemical function. Here we describe a procedure for the functional selection of tissue-protective factors based on the in vivo delivery of arrayed cDNA libraries from the mouse secretome using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Application of this technique, which we call FunSel, in the context of acute ischaemia, revealed that the peptide ghrelin protects skeletal muscle and heart from ischaemic damage. When delivered to the heart using an AAV9 vector, ghrelin markedly reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function over time. This protective activity associates with the capacity of ghrelin to sustain autophagy and remove dysfunctional mitochondria after myocardial infarction. Our findings describe an innovative tool to identify biological therapeutics and reveal a novel role of ghrelin as an inducer of myoprotective autophagy. PMID:26066847

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 mediated memorial and revivable protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on brain injury.

    PubMed

    Le, Li-Li; Li, Xue-Yi; Meng, Dan; Liang, Qiu-Jun; Wang, Xin-Hong; Li, Ning; Quan, Jing; Xiang, Meng; Jiang, Mei; Sun, Jian; Chen, Si-Feng

    2013-12-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has short-term benefits for stroke patients. However, if IPC protective effect is memorial and the role of the intracellular protective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is not known. Ischemic preconditioning and the corresponding sham control were achieved by blocking the blood flow of the left internal carotid artery for 20 min and 2 second, respectively, in rats. Both IPC and sham-operated animals were divided into three groups and treated with PBS, the HO-1 inducer hemin, and the HO-1 inhibitor Znpp. Three weeks after IPC, brain ischemia-reperfusion injury was achieved by left middle cerebral artery obstruction for 45 min followed by 24-h reperfusion. 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and neurological dysfunction scoring showed IPC significantly reduced brain infarct area and improved neurological function occurred 3 weeks after IPC. Hemin treatment promoted whereas ZnPP blocked the benefits of IPC. Immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting showed that the expression of HO-1 was higher in the border zone than in the necrotic core zone. The memorial IPC protection is independent of adenosine receptor A1R and A2aR expressions. We found for the first time that the protective effect of IPC can be remembered to protect brain injury occurred after acute response disappear. The results indicate that interventional treatment can achieve protective effect for future cerebral injury not only through interventional treatment itself but also through the memorial and revivable IPC, eliminating the concern that temporary ischemia caused by interventional treatment may leave harmful effect in the brain. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. C-Phycocyanin Confers Protection against Oxalate-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Shukkur M.; Boppana, Nithin B.; Asokan, Devarajan; Sekaran, Shamala D.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Li, Chunying; Gopal, Kaliappan; Bakar, Sazaly A.; Karthik, Harve S.; Ebrahim, Abdul S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP) could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL), an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2). Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis. PMID:24691130

  6. Protective effect of HDL on NADPH oxidase-derived super oxide anion mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Su-Ying; Tamilselvi, Shanmugam; Shen, Chia-Yao; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Chun, Li-Chin; Cheng, Li-Yi; Ou, Hsiu-Chung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death of death in Taiwan. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death. Coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs when plaque builds up in the coronary arteries to cause the ischemic heart disease which will enhance myocardial remodeling and also induce myocardial hypoxia. High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to have cardio-protective effects. Under hypoxic conditions (1%O2 for 24hr), in H9c2 cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) is induced which leads to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction. Therefore, the present study described the protective effect of HDL on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte damage. We investigated the NADPH oxidase-produced ROS-related signaling pathways and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes under hypoxia conditions. Results showed that the ROS mediated cardiac damage might occur via AT1 and PKC activation. Furthermore, hypoxia downregulated the survival protein (p-AKTser473) and anti-apoptotic protein (BCL2), whereas pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and caspase 3 were upregulated. These detrimental effects by ROS and apoptosis were prevented by HDL pretreatment. Our findings revealed the underlying molecular mechanism by which HDL suppresses the hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Further, we elucidated the role of HDL on preventing hypoxia induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis is mediated through the inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS.

  7. C-phycocyanin confers protection against oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Boppana, Nithin B; Devarajan, Asokan; Asokan, Devarajan; Sekaran, Shamala D; Shankar, Esaki M; Li, Chunying; Gopal, Kaliappan; Bakar, Sazaly A; Karthik, Harve S; Ebrahim, Abdul S

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate toxicity is mediated through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via a process that is partly dependent on mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we investigated whether C-phycocyanin (CP) could protect against oxidative stress-mediated intracellular damage triggered by oxalate in MDCK cells. DCFDA, a fluorescence-based probe and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL), an oxidative stress marker were used to investigate the effect of CP on oxalate-induced ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). The role of CP against oxalate-induced oxidative stress was studied by the evaluation of mitochondrial membrane potential by JC1 fluorescein staining, quantification of ATP synthesis and stress-induced MAP kinases (JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2). Our results revealed that oxalate-induced cells show markedly increased ROS levels and HEL protein expression that were significantly decreased following pre-treatment with CP. Further, JC1 staining showed that CP pre-treatment conferred significant protection from mitochondrial membrane permeability and increased ATP production in CP-treated cells than oxalate-alone-treated cells. In addition, CP treated cells significantly decreased the expression of phosphorylated JNK/SAPK and ERK1/2 as compared to oxalate-alone-treated cells. We concluded that CP could be used as a potential free radical-scavenging therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-associated diseases including urolithiasis.

  8. Melatonin Mediates Protective Effects against Kainic Acid-Induced Neuronal Death through Safeguarding ER Stress and Mitochondrial Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Feixiao; Shi, Cai; Chen, Qingjie; Hang, Weijian; Xia, Liangtao; Wu, Yue; Tao, Sophia Z.; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Anbing; Chen, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal death is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. Melatonin is known to protect hippocampal neurons from KA-induced apoptosis, but the exact mechanisms underlying melatonin protective effects against neuronal mitochondria disorder and ER stress remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the sheltering roles of melatonin during KA-induced apoptosis by focusing on mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress mediated signal pathways. KA causes mitochondrial dynamic disorder and dysfunction through calpain activation, leading to neuronal apoptosis. Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM and calpain inhibitor calpeptin can significantly restore mitochondrial morphology and function. ER stress can also be induced by KA treatment. ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuates ER stress-mediated apoptosis and mitochondrial disorder. It is worth noting that calpain activation was also inhibited under PBA administration. Thus, we concluded that melatonin effectively inhibits KA-induced calpain upregulation/activation and mitochondrial deterioration by alleviating Ca2+ overload and ER stress. PMID:28293167

  9. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels. PMID:26537450

  10. Blocking by anti-idiotypic antibodies of monoclonal antibody-mediated protection against lethal Semliki Forest virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Oosterlaken, T A; Harmsen, M; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1990-02-01

    Semliki Forest virus-(SEV) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), produced after fusion of spleen cells from BALB/c mice and myeloma cell line P3-X63-AG8. 653 or SP2/0, were used for anti-idiotypic immunization of female BALB/c mice. Two intracutaneous immunizations (2 x 40 micrograms per animal), 3 weeks apart, with keyhole limpet haemocyanin-conjugated MoAbs mixed with the saponin Quil A were sufficient to induce high levels of anti-idiotypic antibodies in the circulation of these mice with the capacity to block specifically in vitro MoAb-mediated virus neutralization. Anti-idiotypic antibodies against SFV-neutralizing MoAbs, either passively transferred or actively acquired by immunization, are also able to abrogate (specifically) passive immunity, mediated by critical protective doses of MoAb, in mice against infection with a lethal strain of SFV. Furthermore we confirmed by intervention with anti-idiotypic serum in vivo that an SFV-neutralizing MoAb exerts its greatest protective effect during the first 2 days of infection.

  11. Is TB in Your Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Joanne; Elwell, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Points out the importance of effective health education to fight against tuberculosis (TB) which is the number one fatal infectious disease around the world. Describes a science curriculum on tuberculosis that includes information on the facts about tuberculosis, a forum on tuberculosis, and evaluation. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  12. Is TB in Your Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Joanne; Elwell, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Points out the importance of effective health education to fight against tuberculosis (TB) which is the number one fatal infectious disease around the world. Describes a science curriculum on tuberculosis that includes information on the facts about tuberculosis, a forum on tuberculosis, and evaluation. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  13. Potential Protective Effects of Ursolic Acid against Gamma Irradiation-Induced Damage Are Mediated through the Modulation of Diverse Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sim, Meng-Kwoon; Loke, Weng Keong; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Tang, Feng Ru; Sethi, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the possible protective effects of ursolic acid (UA) against gamma radiation induced damage both in vitro as well as in vivo. It was observed that the exposure to gamma radiation dose- and time-dependently caused a significant decrease in the cell viability, while the treatment of UA attenuated this cytotoxicity. The production of free radicals including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO increased significantly post-irradiation and further induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage in cells. These deleterious effects could also be effectively blocked by UA treatment. In addition, UA also reversed gamma irradiation induced inflammatory responses, as indicated by the decreased production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β. NF-κB signaling pathway has been reported to be a key mediator involved in gamma radiation-induced cellular damage. Our results further demonstrated that gamma radiation dose- and time-dependently enhanced NF-κB DNA binding activity, which was significantly attenuated upon UA treatment. The post-irradiation increase in the expression of both phospho-p65, and phospho-IκBα was also blocked by UA. Moreover, the treatment of UA was found to significantly prolong overall survival in mice exposed to whole body gamma irradiation, and reduce the excessive inflammatory responses. Given its radioprotective efficacy as described here, UA as an antioxidant and NF-κB pathway blocker, may function as an important pharmacological agent in protecting against gamma irradiation-induced injury. PMID:28670276

  14. Framework of behavioral indicators for outcome evaluation of TB health promotion: a Delphi study of TB suspects and Tb patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health promotion for prevention and control of Tuberculosis (TB) is implemented worldwide because of its importance, but few reports have evaluated its impact on behavior due to a lack of standard outcome indicators. The objective of this study was to establish a framework of behavioral indicators for outcome evaluation of TB health promotion among TB suspects and patients. Methods A two-round modified Delphi method involving sixteen TB control experts was used to establish a framework of behavioral indicators for outcome evaluation of TB health promotion targeted at TB suspects and patients. Results Sixteen of seventeen invited experts in TB control (authority score of 0.91 on a 1.0 scale) participated in round 1 survey. All sixteen experts also participated in a second round survey. After two rounds of surveys and several iterations among the experts, there was consensus on a framework of indicators for measuring outcomes of TB health promotion for TB suspects and patients. For TB suspects, the experts reached consensus on 2 domains (“Healthcare seeking behavior” and “Transmission prevention”), 3 subdomains (“Seeking care after onset of TB symptoms”, “Pathways of seeking care” and “Interpersonal contact etiquette”), and 8 indicators (including among others, “Length of patient delay”). For TB patients, consensus was reached on 3 domains (“Adherence to treatment”, “Healthy lifestyle” and “Transmission prevention”), 8 subdomains (including among others, “Adherence to their medication”), and 14 indicators (including “Percentage of patients who adhered to their medication”). Operational definitions and data sources were provided for each indicator. Conclusions The findings of this study provide the basis for debate among international experts on a framework for achieving global consensus on outcome indicators for TB health promotion interventions targeted at TB patients and suspects. Such consensus will help to

  15. SNMIB/Apollo protects leading-strand telomeres against NHEJ-mediated repair

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Yung C; Akhter, Shamima; Gu, Peili; Ye, Jing; Poulet, Anaïs; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Bailey, Susan M; Gilson, Eric; Legerski, Randy J; Chang, Sandy

    2010-01-01

    Progressive telomere attrition or deficiency of the protective shelterin complex elicits a DNA damage response as a result of a cell's inability to distinguish dysfunctional telomeric ends from DNA double-strand breaks. SNMIB/Apollo is a shelterin-associated protein and a member of the SMN1/PSO2 nuclease family that localizes to telomeres through its interaction with TRF2. Here, we generated SNMIB/Apollo knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) to probe the function of SNMIB/Apollo at mammalian telomeres. SNMIB/Apollo null MEFs exhibit an increased incidence of G2 chromatid-type fusions involving telomeres created by leading-strand DNA synthesis, reflective of a failure to protect these telomeres after DNA replication. Mutations within SNMIB/Apollo's conserved nuclease domain failed to suppress this phenotype, suggesting that its nuclease activity is required to protect leading-strand telomeres. SNMIB/Apollo−/−ATM−/− MEFs display robust telomere fusions when Trf2 is depleted, indicating that ATM is dispensable for repair of uncapped telomeres in this setting. Our data implicate the 5′–3′ exonuclease function of SNM1B/Apollo in the generation of 3′ single-stranded overhangs at newly replicated leading-strand telomeres to protect them from engaging the non-homologous end-joining pathway. PMID:20551906

  16. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  17. Heat shock protein 75 (TRAP1) antagonizes reactive oxygen species generation and protects cells from granzyme M-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Zhang, Qixiang; Fan, Zusen

    2007-07-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate immunity against virally infected or transformed cells as the first defense line. Granzyme M (GzmM) is an orphan granzyme that is constitutively highly expressed in NK cells and is consistent with NK cell-mediated cytolysis. We recently demonstrated that GzmM induces caspase-dependent apoptosis with DNA fragmentation through direct cleavage of inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD). However, the molecular mechanisms for GzmM-induced apoptosis are unclear. We found GzmM causes mitochondrial swelling and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, GzmM initiates reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytochrome c release. Heat shock protein 75 (HSP75, also known as TRAP1) acts as an antagonist of ROS and protects cells from GzmM-mediated apoptosis. GzmM cleaves TRAP1 and abolishes its antagonistic function to ROS, resulting in ROS accumulation. Silencing TRAP1 through RNA interference increases ROS accumulation, whereas TRAP1 overexpression attenuates ROS production. ROS accumulation is in accordance with the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and enhances GzmM-mediated apoptosis.

  18. Renal Handling of Circulating and Renal-Synthesized Hepcidin and Its Protective Effects against Hemoglobin-Mediated Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Wetzels, Jack F M; Verweij, Vivienne G M; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Pertijs, Jeanne C L M; van der Wijst, Jenny; Thévenod, Frank; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-09-01

    Urinary hepcidin may have protective effects against AKI. However, renal handling and the potential protective mechanisms of hepcidin are not fully understood. By measuring hepcidin levels in plasma and urine using mass spectrometry and the kidney using immunohistochemistry after intraperitoneal administration of human hepcidin-25 (hhep25) in C57Bl/6N mice, we showed that circulating hepcidin is filtered by the glomerulus and degraded to smaller isoforms detected in urine but not plasma. Moreover, hepcidin colocalized with the endocytic receptor megalin in proximal tubules, and compared with wild-type mice, megalin-deficient mice showed higher urinary excretion of injected hhep25 and no hepcidin staining in proximal tubules that lack megalin. This indicates that hepcidin is reaborbed in the proximal tubules by megalin dependent endocytosis. Administration of hhep25 concomitant with or 4 hours after a single intravenous dose of hemoglobin abolished hemoglobin-induced upregulation of urinary kidney injury markers (NGAL and KIM-1) and renal Interleukin-6 and Ngal mRNA observed 24 hours after administration but did not affect renal ferroportin expression at this point. Notably, coadministration of hhep25 and hemoglobin but not administration of either alone greatly increased renal mRNA expression of hepcidin-encoding Hamp1 and hepcidin staining in distal tubules. These findings suggest a role for locally synthesized hepcidin in renal protection. Our observations did not support a role for ferroportin in hhep25-mediated protection against hemoglobin-induced early injury, but other mechanisms of cellular iron handling may be involved. In conclusion, our data suggest that both systemically delivered and locally produced hepcidin protect against hemoglobin-induced AKI.

  19. Vaccination with TAT-antigen fusion protein induces protective, CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Katharina; Brosch, Sven; Butsch, Florian; Tada, Yayoi; Shibagaki, Naotaka; Udey, Mark C; von Stebut, Esther

    2010-11-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, healing is mediated by IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Thus, an efficacious vaccine should induce Th1 and Tc1 cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with exogenous proteins primarily induce strong CD4-dependent immunity; induction of CD8 responses has proven to be difficult. We evaluated the immunogenicity of fusion proteins comprising the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT and the Leishmania antigen LACK (Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated C kinase), as TAT-fusion proteins facilitate major histocompatibility complex class I-dependent antigen presentation. In vitro, TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs induced stronger proliferation of Leishmania-specific CD8(+) T cells compared with DCs incubated with LACK alone. Vaccination with TAT-LACK-pulsed DCs or fusion proteins plus adjuvant in vivo significantly improved disease outcome in Leishmania major-infected mice and was superior to vaccination with DCs treated with LACK alone. Vaccination with DC+TAT-LACK resulted in stronger proliferation of CD8(+) T cells when compared with immunization with DC+LACK. Upon depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, TAT-LACK-mediated protection was lost. TAT-LACK-pulsed IL-12p40-deficient DCs did not promote protection in vivo. In summary, these data show that TAT-fusion proteins are superior in activating Leishmania-specific Tc1 cells when compared with antigen alone and suggest that IL-12-dependent preferential induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cells promotes significant protection against this important human pathogen.

  20. Apelin protects against liver X receptor-mediated steatosis through AMPK and PPARα in human and mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Kang, Saeromi; Park, Soo-Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most commonly occurring chronic liver disease, and hepatic steatosis, a condition defined as extensive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, is associated with liver dysfunction and metabolic diseases, such as, obesity and type II diabetes. Apelin is an adipokine that acts on a G protein-coupled receptor named APJ, and has been established to play pivotal roles in various physiological conditions. However, the function of apelin in hepatocytes has not been fully investigated. In order to assess the functional roles of apelin and APJ in hepatocytes, we used an in vitro model of liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated hepatocellular steatosis. In Hep3B human hepatoma cells, T0901317 (a specific LXR activator) induced lipid accumulation and this was inhibited by apelin. T0901317 also induced the expression of SREBP-1c, a key transcription factor for lipogenesis. Apelin not only inhibited SREBP-1c induction at the mRNA and protein levels but also induced lipolytic PPARα expression. Furthermore, these protective effects of apelin were inhibited by apelin F13A (a specific APJ antagonist). Furthermore, silencing of APJ by siRNA transfection also inhibited the actions of apelin. Specific inhibitors of cellular signaling components showed inhibition of lipid accumulation by apelin was mediated through Gi/o proteins, AMPK, and SREBP-1c suppression during the early stage and through AMPK, ERKs, and PPARα induction during the late stage. In addition, the protective effect of apelin was confirmed in mouse primary hepatocytes. Our observations suggest apelin-APJ signaling in hepatocytes functions to protect against lipid accumulation in liver through two signaling pathways, that is, via AMPK activation and PPARα induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protection of protease-activated receptor 2 mediated vasodilatation against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conditions of cardiovascular dysfunction, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) agonists maintain vasodilatation activity, which has been attributed to increased cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase and calcium-activated potassium channel (SK3.1) activities. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist mediated vasodilatation is unknown under conditions of dysfunction caused by angiotensin II. The main purpose of our study was to determine whether PAR2-induced vasodilatation of resistance arteries was attenuated by prolonged angiotensin II treatment in mice. We compared the vasodilatation of resistance-type arteries (mesenteric) from angiotensin II-treated PAR2 wild-type mice (WT) induced by PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) to the responses obtained in controls (saline treatment). We also investigated arterial vasodilatation in angiotensin II-treated PAR2 deficient (PAR2-/-) mice. Results 2fly-induced relaxations of untreated arteries from angiotensin II-treated WT were not different than saline-treated WT. Treatment of arteries with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and SK3.1 inhibitor (L-NAME + TRAM-34) blocked 2fly in angiotensin II-treated WT. Protein and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 were increased, and cyclooxygenase activity increased the sensitivity of arteries to 2fly in only angiotensin II-treated WT. These protective vasodilatation mechanisms were selective for 2fly compared with acetylcholine- and nitroprusside-induced relaxations which were attenuated by angiotensin II; PAR2-/- were protected against this attenuation of nitroprusside. Conclusions PAR2-mediated vasodilatation of resistance type arteries is protected against the negative effects of angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice. In conditions of endothelial dysfunction, angiotensin II induction of cyclooxygenases increases sensitivity to PAR2 agonist and the preserved vasodilatation mechanism involves activation of SK3.1. PMID:21955547

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DMT liposome-adjuvanted tuberculosis subunit CTT3H vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xindong; Tian, Maopeng; Li, Jianrong; Tan, Songwei; Yuan, Xuefeng; Yu, Qi; Jing, Yukai; Zhang, Zhiping; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-01-01

    Different strategies have been proposed for the development of protein subunit vaccine candidates for tuberculosis (TB), which shows better safety than other types of candidates and the currently used Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. In order to develop more effective protein subunits depending on the mechanism of cell-mediated immunity against TB, a polyprotein CTT3H, based on 5 immunodominant antigens (CFP10, TB10.4, TB8.4, Rv3615c, and HBHA) with CD8+ epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was constructed in this study. We vaccinated C57BL/6 mice with a TB subunit CTT3H protein in an adjuvant of dimethyldioctadecylammonium/monophosphoryl lipid A/trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (DDA/MPL/TDB, DMT) liposome to investigate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine. Our results demonstrated that DMT liposome-adjuvanted CTT3H vaccine not only induced an antigen-specific CD4+ Th1 response, but also raised the number of PPD- and CTT3H-specific IFN-γ+ CD8+ T cells and elicited strong CTL responses against TB10.4, which provided more effective protection against a 60 CFU M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge than PBS control and DMT adjuvant alone. Our findings indicate that DMT-liposome is an effective adjuvant to stimulate CD8+ T cell responses and the DMT-adjuvanted subunit CTT3H vaccine is a promising candidate for the next generation of TB vaccine. PMID:25905680

  3. Enhanced Protection against Ebola Virus Mediated by an Improved Adenovirus-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kaylie N.; Croyle, Maria A.; Strong, James E.; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP). The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP) and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP). Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the previous generation

  4. Immigrant screening for TB: a missed opportunity to improve TB control in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lalvani, Ajit; Pareek, Manish

    2012-03-01

    Tuberculosis in the United Kingdom and other high-income countries is primarily a disease of the foreign-born arising from the synergy of migration from high TB burden regions and the reactivation of remotely acquired latent TB infection. UK immigrant screening policy primarily aims to identify active, rather than latent, TB although mounting evidence indicates that implementing latent TB screening for new entrants from intermediate and high incidence countries could cost-effectively reduce TB incidence in the UK.

  5. Vaccination with a recombinant fragment of collagen adhesin provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus-mediated septic death.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, I M; Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Höök, M; Tarkowski, A

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Morbidity and mortality due to infections such as sepsis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and invasive endocarditis remain high despite the use of antibiotics. The emergence of antibiotic resistant super bugs mandates that alternative strategies for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus infections are developed. We investigated the ability of vaccination with a recombinant fragment of the S. aureus collagen adhesin to protect mice against sepsis-induced death. Actively immunized NMRI mice were intravenously inoculated with the S. aureus clinical isolate strain Phillips. 14 d after inoculation, mortality in the collagen adhesin-vaccinated group was only 13%, compared with 87% in the control antigen immunized group (P < 0.001). To determine if the protective effect was antibody mediated, we passively immunized naive mice with collagen adhesin-specific antibodies. Similar to the active immunization strategy, passive transfer of collagen adhesin-specific antibodies protected mice against sepsis-induced death. In vitro experiments indicated that S. aureus opsonized with sera from collagen adhesin immunized mice promoted phagocytic uptake and enhanced intracellular killing compared with bacteria opsonized with sera from control animals. These results indicate that the collagen adhesin is a viable target in the development of immunotherapeutics against S. aureus. PMID:9637697

  6. Dexamethasone protection of rat intestinal epithelial cells against oxidant injury is mediated by induction of heat shock protein 72.

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, S; Musch, M W; Retsky, J; Madonna, M B; Straus, D; Chang, E B

    1998-01-01

    Although the therapeutic actions of glucocorticoids are largely attributed to their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects, they have been implicated in enhancing tissue and cellular protection. In this study, we demonstrate that dexamethasone significantly enhances viability of IEC-18 rat small intestinal cells against oxidant-induced stress in a dose-dependent fashion. This protective action is mediated by induction of hsp72, the major inducible heat shock protein in intestinal epithelial cells. Dexamethasone stimulates a time- and dose-dependent response in hsp72 protein expression that parallels its effects on cell viability. Furthermore, the induction of hsp72 is tissue dependent, as nonintestinal epithelioid HeLa cells show differential induction of hsp72 expression in response to the same dexamethasone treatment. Antisense hsp72 cDNA transfection of IEC-18 cells abolishes the dexamethasone-induced hsp72 response, without significantly affecting constitutive expression of its homologue, hsc73. Dexamethasone treatment also significantly induces hsp72 protein expression in rat intestinal mucosal cells in vivo. These data demonstrate that glucocorticoids protect intestinal epithelial cells against oxidant-induced stress by inducing hsp72. PMID:9819372

  7. Gut microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster interacts with Wolbachia but does not contribute to Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yixin H; Seleznev, Andrei; Flores, Heather A; Woolfit, Megan; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-01

    Animals experience near constant infection with microorganisms. A significant proportion of these microbiota reside in the alimentary tract. There is a growing appreciation for the roles gut microbiota play in host biology. The gut microbiota of insects, for example, have been shown to help the host overcome pathogen infection either through direct competition or indirectly by stimulating host immunity. These defenses may also be supplemented by coinfecting maternally inherited microbes such as Wolbachia. The presence of Wolbachia in a host can delay and/or reduce death caused by RNA viruses. Whether the gut microbiota of the host interacts with Wolbachia, or vice versa, the precise role of Wolbachia in antiviral protection is not known. In this study, we used 16S rDNA sequencing to characterise changes in gut microbiota composition in Drosophila melanogaster associated with Wolbachia infection and antibiotic treatment. We subsequently tested whether changes in gut composition via antibiotic treatment altered Wolbachia-mediated antiviral properties. We found that both antibiotics and Wolbachia significantly reduced the biodiversity of the gut microbiota without changing the total microbial load. We also showed that changing the gut microbiota composition with antibiotic treatment enhanced Wolbachia density but did not confer greater antiviral protection against Drosophila C virus to the host. We concluded there are significant interactions between Wolbachia and gut microbiota, but changing gut microbiota composition is not likely to be a means through which Wolbachia conveys antiviral protection to its host.

  8. Optimism and the brain: trait optimism mediates the protective role of the orbitofrontal cortex gray matter volume against anxiety.

    PubMed

    Dolcos, Sanda; Hu, Yifan; Iordan, Alexandru D; Moore, Matthew; Dolcos, Florin

    2016-02-01

    Converging evidence identifies trait optimism and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as personality and brain factors influencing anxiety, but the nature of their relationships remains unclear. Here, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of trait optimism and of increased OFC volume against symptoms of anxiety were investigated in 61 healthy subjects, who completed measures of trait optimism and anxiety, and underwent structural scanning using magnetic resonance imaging. First, the OFC gray matter volume (GMV) was associated with increased optimism, which in turn was associated with reduced anxiety. Second, trait optimism mediated the relation between the left OFC volume and anxiety, thus demonstrating that increased GMV in this brain region protects against symptoms of anxiety through increased optimism. These results provide novel evidence about the brain-personality mechanisms protecting against anxiety symptoms in healthy functioning, and identify potential targets for preventive and therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing susceptibility and increasing resilience against emotional disturbances. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The Evolutionarily Conserved Mediator Subunit MDT-15/MED15 Links Protective Innate Immune Responses and Xenobiotic Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Deborah L.; Conery, Annie L.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses. PMID:24875643

  10. TB Anywhere Is TB Everywhere: The Intersection of U.S. Immigration Enforcement Policy and TB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    U.S. Customs and Immigration, borders, detention facility, immigration policies, public health, Alternatives to Detention 15. NUMBER OF PAGES...EVERYWHERE: THE INTERSECTION OF U.S. IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT POLICY AND TB Reed David Little Detention and Deportation Officer, Alternatives to...of Detention ..................................................................73 2. Issues with Alternatives to Detention

  11. Vaccine and serum-mediated protection against brucella infection of mouse placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Bosseray, N.

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant mice inoculated i.p. or i.v. with virulent Brucella abortus Strain 544 displayed strong infection, evidenced by brucella enumeration in placentas and dams' spleens. Vaccination 1 month before pregnancy decreased frequency of placental colonization and number of brucella per infected placenta and per spleen. Protein-bound cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) fractions extracted from brucella protected mice as well as H38 killed and B19 attenuated living vaccines. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fraction was comparatively less active. Immune serum injected i.v., either 24 h before or just after i.v. challenge of 15-day pregnant mice effectively transferred resistance to placental colonization. Anti LPS, anti PG and anti killed brucella sera protected mice as well as vaccination one month before pregnancy. The immunity transferred persisted for at least 3 days. PMID:6419766

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor in T cells mediates protection from autoimmunity in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Jan Broder; Kursawe, Nina; Solano, María Emilia; Patas, Kostas; Wehrmann, Sabine; Heckmann, Nina; Lühder, Fred; Reichardt, Holger M.; Arck, Petra Clara; Gold, Stefan M.

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy is one of the strongest inducers of immunological tolerance. Disease activity of many autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) is temporarily suppressed by pregnancy, but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the endocrine regulation of conventional and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during reproduction. In vitro, we found the pregnancy hormone progesterone to robustly increase Treg frequencies via promiscuous binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in T cells. In vivo, T-cell–specific GR deletion in pregnant animals undergoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, resulted in a reduced Treg increase and a selective loss of pregnancy-induced protection, whereas reproductive success was unaffected. Our data imply that steroid hormones can shift the immunological balance in favor of Tregs via differential engagement of the GR in T cells. This newly defined mechanism confers protection from autoimmunity during pregnancy and represents a potential target for future therapy. PMID:28049829

  13. Immunological mechanisms underlying protection mediated by RTS,S: a review of the available data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The RTS,S/AS candidate malaria vaccine has demonstrated efficacy against a variety of endpoints in Phase IIa and Phase IIb trials over more than a decade. A multi-country phase III trial of RTS,S/AS01 is now underway with submission as early as 2012, if vaccine safety and efficacy are confirmed. The immunologic basis for how the vaccine protects against both infection and disease remains uncertain. It is, therefore, timely to review the information currently available about the vaccine with regard to how it impacts the human-Plasmodium falciparum host-pathogen relationship. In this article, what is known about mechanisms involved in partial protection against malaria induced by RTS,S is reviewed. PMID:20042088

  14. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  15. Suicidal inactivation of methemoglobin by generation of thiyl radical: insight into NAC mediated protection in RBC.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S N; Trivedi, V

    2013-07-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) improves antioxidant potentials of RBCs to provide protection against oxidative stress induced hemolysis. The antioxidant mechanism of NAC to reduce oxidative stress in RBC, studied through inactivation of pro-oxidant MetHb. NAC causes irreversible inactivation of the MetHb in an H2O2 dependent manner, and the inactivation follows the pseudo- first- order kinetics. The kinetic constants are ki = 8.5μM, kinact = 0.706 min(-1) and t1/2 = 0.9 min. Spectroscopic studies indicate that MetHb accepts NAC as a substrate and oxidizes through a single electron transfer mechanism to the NACox. The single e- oxidation product of NAC has been identified as the 5, 5'- dimethyl-1- pyrroline N- oxide (DMPO) adduct of the sulfur centered radical (a(N) = 15.2 G and a(H)=16.78 G). Binding studies indicate that NACox interacts at the heme moiety and NAC oxidation through MetHb is essential for NAC binding. Heme-NAC adduct dissociated from MetHb and identified (m/z 1011.19) as 2:1 ratio of NAC/heme in the adduct. TEMPO and PBN treatment reduces NAC binding to MetHb and protects against inactivation confirms the role of thiyl radical in the inactivation process. Furthermore, scavenging thiyl radicals by TEMPO abolish the protective effect of NAC in hemolysis. Current work highlights antioxidant mechanism of NAC through NAC thiyl radical generation, and MetHb inactivation to exhibit protection in RBC against oxidative stress induced hemolysis.

  16. The Mutualistic Side of Wolbachia–Isopod Interactions: Wolbachia Mediated Protection Against Pathogenic Intracellular Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Braquart-Varnier, Christine; Altinli, Mine; Pigeault, Romain; Chevalier, Frédéric D.; Grève, Pierre; Bouchon, Didier; Sicard, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia is a vertically transmitted endosymbiont whose radiative success is mainly related to various host reproductive manipulations that led to consider this symbiont as a conflictual reproductive parasite. However, lately, some Wolbachia have been shown to act as beneficial symbionts by protecting hosts against a broad range of parasites. Still, this protection has been mostly demonstrated in artificial Wolbachia-host associations between partners that did not co-evolved together. Here, we tested in two terrestrial isopod species Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellio dilatatus whether resident Wolbachia (native or non-native) could confer protection during infections with Listeria ivanovii and Salmonella typhimurium and also during a transinfection with a Wolbachia strain that kills the recipient host (i.e., wVulC in P. dilatatus). Survival analyses showed that (i) A. vulgare lines hosting their native Wolbachia (wVulC) always exhibited higher survival than asymbiotic ones when infected with pathogenic bacteria (ii) P. dilatatus lines hosting their native wDil Wolbachia strain survived the S. typhimurium infection better, while lines hosting non-native wCon Wolbachia strain survived the L. ivanovii and also the transinfection with wVulC from A. vulgare better. By studying L. ivanovii and S. typhimurium loads in the hemolymph of the different host-Wolbachia systems, we showed that (i) the difference in survival between lines after L. ivanovii infections were not linked to the difference between their pathogenic bacterial loads, and (ii) the difference in survival after S. typhimurium infections corresponds to lower loads of pathogenic bacteria. Overall, our results demonstrate a beneficial effect of Wolbachia on survival of terrestrial isopods when infected with pathogenic intracellular bacteria. This protective effect may rely on different mechanisms depending on the resident symbiont and the invasive bacteria interacting together within the hosts. PMID:26733946

  17. Antioxidant-mediated protective effect of potato peel extract in erythrocytes against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nandita; Rajini, P S

    2008-05-28

    Potato peels are waste by-product of the potato processing industry. They are reportedly rich in polyphenols. Our earlier studies have shown that extracts derived from potato peel (PPE) possess strong antioxidant activity in chemical and biological model systems in vitro, attributable to its polyphenolic content. The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of PPE to protect erythrocytes against oxidative damage, in vitro. The protection rendered by PPE in erythrocytes was studied in terms of resistance to oxidative damage, morphological alterations as well as membrane structural alterations. The total polyphenolic content in PPE was found to be 3.93 mg/g powder. The major phenolic acids present in PPE were predominantly: gallic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and protocatechuic acid. We chose the experimental prooxidant system: FeSO(4) and ascorbic acid to induce lipid peroxidation in rat RBCs and human RBC membranes. PPE was found to inhibit lipid peroxidation with similar effectiveness in both the systems (about 80-85% inhibition by PPE at 2.5 mg/ml). While PPE per se did not cause any morphological alteration in the erythrocytes, under the experimental conditions, PPE significantly inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced morphological alterations in rat RBCs as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Further, PPE was found to offer significant protection to human erythrocyte membrane proteins from oxidative damage induced by ferrous-ascorbate. In conclusion, our results indicate that PPE is capable of protecting erythrocytes against oxidative damage probably by acting as a strong antioxidant.

  18. Antioxidant mediated protective effect of Parthenium hysterophorus against oxidative damage using in vitro models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parthenium hysterophorus L. (Asteraceae) is a common weed occurring throughout the globe. In traditional medicine its decoction has been used for treatment of many infectious and degenerative diseases. This work was therefore designed to assess the phytochemical constitution of P. hysterophorus flower and root extracts and to evaluate their reducing power, radical scavenging activity as well as protective efficacy against membrane lipid damage. Methods Dried flower and root samples were sequentially extracted with non-polar and polar solvents using Soxhlet apparatus. The phytochemical screening was done using standard chemical methods and thin layer chromatography. Total phenolic content was determined spectrophotometrically. Reducing power and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity assays were used to measure antioxidant activity. Protection against membrane damage was evaluated by inhibition of lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) in rat kidney homogenate. Results Flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids and cardiac glycosides were present in all the extract. The total phenol contents in flower and root extracts were found to be in the range 86.69-320.17 mg propyl gallate equivalent (PGE)/g and 55.47-253.84 mg PGE/g, respectively. Comparatively better reducing power was observed in hexane fractions of flower (0.405) and root (0.282). Benzene extract of flower and ethyl acetate fraction of root accounted for appreciable hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (75-77%). Maximum protection against membrane lipid peroxidative damage among flower and root extracts was provided by ethanol (55.26%) and ethyl acetate (48.95%) fractions, respectively. Total phenolic content showed positive correlations with reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition (LPOI) % in floral extracts as well as with hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and LPOI % in root extracts. Conclusion Study established that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus extracts have considerable antioxidant

  19. Phospholipid scramblase 1 mediates type i interferon-induced protection against staphylococcal α-toxin.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Miroslaw; Yarovinsky, Timur O

    2012-01-19

    The opportunistic gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Staphylococcal α-toxin, a prototypical pore-forming toxin, is a major virulence factor of S. aureus clinical isolates, and lung epithelial cells are highly sensitive to α-toxin's cytolytic activity. Type I interferon (IFN) signaling activated in response to S. aureus increases pulmonary cell resistance to α-toxin, but the underlying mechanisms are uncharacterized. We show that IFNα protects human lung epithelial cells from α-toxin-induced intracellular ATP depletion and cell death by reducing extracellular ATP leakage. This effect depends on protein palmitoylation and induction of phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1). IFNα-induced PLSCR1 associates with the cytoskeleton after exposure to α-toxin, and cellular depletion of PLSCR1 negates IFN-induced protection from α-toxin. PLSCR1-deficient mice display enhanced sensitivity to inhaled α-toxin and an α-toxin-producing S. aureus strain. These results uncover PLSCR1 activity as part of an innate protective mechanism to a bacterial pore-forming toxin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phospholipid scramblase 1 mediates type I interferon-induced protection against staphylococcal α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lizak, Miroslaw; Yarovinsky, Timur O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The opportunistic gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Staphylococcal α-toxin, a prototypical pore-forming toxin, is a major virulence factor of S. aureus clinical isolates and lung epithelial cells are highly sensitive to α-toxin's cytolytic activity. Type I interferon (IFN) signaling activated in response to S. aureus increases pulmonary cell resistance to α-toxin but the underlying mechanisms are uncharacterized. We show that IFNα protects human lung epithelial cells from α-toxin-induced intracellular ATP depletion and cell death by reducing extracellular ATP leakage. This effect depends on protein palmitoylation and induction of phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1). IFNα-induced PLSCR1 associates with the cytoskeleton after exposure to α-toxin and cellular depletion of PLSCR1 negates IFN-induced protection from α-toxin. PLSCR1-deficient mice display enhanced sensitivity to inhaled α-toxin and an α-toxin-producing S. aureus strain. These results uncover PLSCR1 activity as part of an innate protective mechanism to a bacterial pore-forming toxin. PMID:22264514

  1. Carnitine supplementation has protective and detrimental effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are genetically mediated.

    PubMed

    Franken, Jaco; Bauer, Florian F

    2010-05-01

    l-Carnitine plays a well-documented role in eukaryotic energy homeostasis by acting as a shuttling molecule for activated acyl residues across intracellular membranes. This activity, supported by carnitine acyl-transferases and transporters, is referred to as the carnitine shuttle. However, several pleiotropic and often beneficial effects of carnitine in humans have been reported that appear to be unrelated to shuttling activity, but little conclusive evidence regarding molecular mechanisms exists. We have recently demonstrated a role of carnitine, independent of the carnitine shuttle, in yeast stress protection. Here, we show that carnitine specifically protects against oxidative stress caused by H(2)O(2) and the superoxide-generating agent menadione. Surprisingly, carnitine has a detrimental effect on survival when combined with thiol-modifying agents. Central elements of the oxidative stress response, specifically the transcription factors Yap1p and Skn7p, are shown to be required for carnitine's protective effect, but several downstream effectors are dispensable. A DNA microarray-based analysis identifies Cyc3p, a cytochrome c heme lyase, as being important for carnitine's impact during oxidative stress. These findings establish a direct genetic link to a carnitine-related phenotype that is independent of the shuttle system and suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae should provide a useful model for further elucidation of carnitine's physiological roles.

  2. Endophytic Fungi Piriformospora indica Mediated Protection of Host from Arsenic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Shayan; Shukla, Jagriti; Kushwaha, Aparna S.; Mandrah, Kapil; Shankar, Jai; Arjaria, Nidhi; Saxena, Prem N.; Narayan, Ram; Roy, Somendu K.; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    Complex intercellular interaction is a common theme in plant-pathogen/symbiont relationship. Cellular physiology of both the partners is affected by abiotic stress. However, little is known about the degree of protection each offers to the other from different types of environmental stress. Our current study focused on the changes in response to toxic arsenic in the presence of an endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica that colonizes the paddy roots. The primary impact of arsenic was observed in the form of hyper-colonization of fungus in the host root and resulted in the recovery of its overall biomass, root damage, and chlorophyll due to arsenic toxicity. Further, fungal colonization leads to balance the redox status of the cell by adjusting the antioxidative enzyme system which in turn protects photosynthetic machinery of the plant from arsenic stress. We observed that fungus has ability to immobilize soluble arsenic and interestingly, it was also observed that fungal colonization restricts most of arsenic in the colonized root while a small fraction of it translocated to shoot of colonized plants. Our study suggests that P. indica protects the paddy (Oryza sativa) from arsenic toxicity by three different mechanisms viz. reducing the availability of free arsenic in the plant environment, bio-transformation of the toxic arsenic salts into insoluble particulate matter and modulating the antioxidative system of the host cell. PMID:28539916

  3. Protective effects of nonionic tri-block copolymers on bile acid-mediated epithelial barrier disruption.

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, A.; Fink, D.; Musch, M.; Valuckaite, V.; Zabornia, O.; Grubjesic, S.; Firestone, M. A.; Matthews, J. B.; Alverdy, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    Translocation of bacteria and other luminal factors from the intestine following surgical injury can be a major driver of critical illness. Bile acids have been shown to play a key role in the loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function during states of host stress. Experiments to study the ability of nonionic block copolymers to abrogate barrier failure in response to bile acid exposure are described. In vitro experiments were performed with the bile salt sodium deoxycholate on Caco-2 enterocyte monolayers using transepithelial electrical resistance to assay barrier function. A bisphenol A coupled triblock polyethylene glycol (PEG), PEG 15-20, was shown to prevent sodium deoxycholate-induced barrier failure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lactate dehydrogenase, and caspase 3-based cell death detection assays demonstrated that bile acid-induced apoptosis and necrosis were prevented with PEG 15-20. Immunofluorescence microscopic visualization of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented significant changes in tight junction organization induced by bile acid exposure. Preliminary transepithelial electrical resistance-based studies examining structure-function correlates of polymer protection against bile acid damage were performed with a small library of PEG-based copolymers. Polymer properties associated with optimal protection against bile acid-induced barrier disruption were PEG-based compounds with a molecular weight greater than 10 kd and amphiphilicity. The data demonstrate that PEG-based copolymer architecture is an important determinant that confers protection against bile acid injury of intestinal epithelia.

  4. Heat Stress Affects Facultative Symbiont-Mediated Protection from a Parasitoid Wasp

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Eleanor R.

    2016-01-01

    Many insects carry facultative bacterial symbionts, which provide benefits including resistance to natural enemies and abiotic stresses. Little is known about how these beneficial phenotypes are affected when biotic or abiotic threats occur simultaneously. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) can host several well-characterized symbiont species. The symbiont known as X-type can protect against both parasitoid wasps and heat stress. Here, we used three pea aphid genotypes that were naturally infected with X-type and the symbiont Spiroplasma sp. We compared aphids coinfected with these two symbionts with those cured from X-type and infected with only Spiroplasma to investigate the ability of X-type to confer benefits to the host when two threats are experienced simultaneously. Our aim is to explore how robust symbiont protection may be outside a benign laboratory environment. Aphids were subjected to heat shock either before or after attack by parasitoid wasps. Under a benign temperature regime, the aphids carrying X-type tended to be better protected from the parasitoid than those cured. When the aphids experienced a heat shock before being parasitized aphids carrying X-type were more susceptible than those cured. Regardless of infection with the symbiont, the aphids benefitted from being heat shocked after parasitization. The results demonstrate how resistance to parasitoid wasps can be strongly environment-dependent and that a beneficial phenotype conferred by a symbiont under controlled conditions in the laboratory does not necessarily equate to a consistently useful effect in natural populations. PMID:27875577

  5. Airway Memory CD4+ T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S.; David, Chella S.; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoV), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4+ T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4+ T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was interferon-γ-dependent and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes may have broad applicability in the context of new CoV and other respiratory virus outbreaks. PMID:27287409

  6. Airway Memory CD4(+) T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S; David, Chella S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-21

    Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs)-SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4(+) T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4(+) T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was dependent on interferon-γ and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV- and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4(+) T cells targeting conserved epitopes might have broad applicability in the context of new CoVs and other respiratory virus outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent advances in testing for latent TB.

    PubMed

    Schluger, Neil W; Burzynski, Joseph

    2010-12-01

    After more than a century of relying on skin testing for the diagnosis of latent TB infection, clinicians now have access to blood-based diagnostics in the form of interferon γ release assays (IGRAs). These tests are generally associated with higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of latent TB infection. This article reviews the indications for testing and treatment of latent TB infection in the overall context of a TB control program and describes how IGRAs might be used in specific clinical settings and populations, including people having close contact with an active case of TB, the foreign born, and health-care workers.

  9. Experimental immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice: cyclosporin A fails to protect against AA

    SciTech Connect

    Knospe, W.H.; Steinberg, D.; Gratwohl, A.; Speck, B.

    1984-07-01

    Immunologically mediated aplastic anemia (AA) in mice was induced by the i.v. injection of 10(7) lymph node cells (LNC) from H-2k identical but Mls mismatched CBA/J donor mice into previously irradiated (600 rad total body gamma) C3H/HeJ mice. Cyclosporin A (CsA), 25 mg/kg, was administered subcutaneously from day -1 to day 30. Control mice included C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad alone, C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad plus CsA as above, and C3H/HeJ mice which received 600 rad total body irradiation followed by 10(7) LNC from CBA/J donors. CsA failed to prevent lethal AA. These results suggest that the pathogenetic mechanisms operating in immunologically mediated AA differ from the mechanisms operating in rodents transplanted with allogeneically mismatched marrow or spleen cells which develop graft-versus-host disease. The results are consistent with a non-T cell-dependent mechanism causing the AA.

  10. Macrophage-mediated GDNF Delivery Protects Against Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration: A Therapeutic Strategy for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Biju, KC; Zhou, Qing; Li, Guiming; Imam, Syed Z; Roberts, James L; Morgan, William W; Clark, Robert A; Li, Senlin

    2010-01-01

    Glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has emerged as the most potent neuroprotective agent tested in experimental models for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, its use is hindered by difficulties in delivery to the brain due to the presence of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In order to circumvent this problem, we took advantage of the fact that bone marrow stem cell–derived macrophages are able to pass the BBB and home to sites of neuronal degeneration. Here, we report the development of a method for brain delivery of GDNF by genetically modified macrophages. Bone marrow stem cells were transduced ex vivo with lentivirus expressing a GDNF gene driven by a synthetic macrophage-specific promoter and then transplanted into recipient mice. Eight weeks after transplantation, the mice were injected with the neurotoxin, MPTP, for 7 days to induce dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Macrophage-mediated GDNF treatment dramatically ameliorated MPTP-induced degeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons of the substantia nigra and TH+ terminals in the striatum, stimulated axon regeneration, and reversed hypoactivity in the open field test. These results indicate that macrophage-mediated GDNF delivery is a promising strategy for developing a neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:20531393

  11. CD11b is protective in complement-mediated immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessy J; Chaves, Lee D; Chang, Anthony; Jacob, Alexander; Ritchie, Maria; Quigg, Richard J

    2015-05-01

    In chronic serum sickness, glomerular immune complexes form, yet C57BL/6 mice do not develop glomerulonephritis unless complement factor H (CfH) is absent, indicating the relevance of complement regulation. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b) and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes, and CfH on platelets, can bind immune complexes. Here we induced immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in CfH(-/-) mice chimeric for wild-type, CfH(-/-), CD11b(-/-), or FcRγ(-/-) bone marrow stem cells. Glomerulonephritis was worse in CD11b(-/-) chimeras compared with all others, whereas disease in FcRγ(-/-) and wild-type chimeras was comparable. Disease tracked strongly with humoral immune responses, but not glomerular immune complex deposits. Interstitial inflammation with M1 macrophages strongly correlated with glomerulonephritis scores. CD11b(-/-) chimeras had significantly more M1 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells. The renal dendritic cell populations originating from bone marrow-derived CD11c(+) cells were similar in all experimental groups. CD11b(+) cells bearing colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor were present in kidneys, including CD11b(-/-) chimeras; these cells correlated negatively with glomerulonephritis scores. Thus, experimental immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages and CD4(+) T cells in kidneys and functional renal insufficiency. Hence, CD11b on mononuclear cells is instrumental in generating an anti-inflammatory response in the inflamed kidney.

  12. The Potential Protective Effects of Polyphenols in Asbestos-Mediated Inflammation and Carcinogenesis of Mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuto, Monica; Mattera, Rosanna; Taffera, Gloria; Giganti, Maria Gabriella; Lido, Paolo; Masuelli, Laura; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor of the serous membranes linked to exposure to asbestos. A chronic inflammatory response orchestrated by mesothelial cells contributes to the development and progression of MM. The evidence that: (a) multiple signaling pathways are aberrantly activated in MM cells; (b) asbestos mediated-chronic inflammation has a key role in MM carcinogenesis; (c) the deregulation of the immune system might favor the development of MM; and (d) a drug might have a better efficacy when injected into a serous cavity thus bypassing biotransformation and reaching an effective dose has prompted investigations to evaluate the effects of polyphenols for the therapy and prevention of MM. Dietary polyphenols are able to inhibit cancer cell growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways, reducing inflammation, and modulating immune response. The ability of polyphenols to modulate the production of pro-inflammatory molecules by targeting signaling pathways or ROS might represent a key mechanism to prevent and/or to contrast the development of MM. In this review, we will report the current knowledge on the ability of polyphenols to modulate the immune system and production of mediators of inflammation, thus revealing an important tool in preventing and/or counteracting the growth of MM. PMID:27171110

  13. The Potential Protective Effects of Polyphenols in Asbestos-Mediated Inflammation and Carcinogenesis of Mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Benvenuto, Monica; Mattera, Rosanna; Taffera, Gloria; Giganti, Maria Gabriella; Lido, Paolo; Masuelli, Laura; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2016-05-09

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor of the serous membranes linked to exposure to asbestos. A chronic inflammatory response orchestrated by mesothelial cells contributes to the development and progression of MM. The evidence that: (a) multiple signaling pathways are aberrantly activated in MM cells; (b) asbestos mediated-chronic inflammation has a key role in MM carcinogenesis; (c) the deregulation of the immune system might favor the development of MM; and (d) a drug might have a better efficacy when injected into a serous cavity thus bypassing biotransformation and reaching an effective dose has prompted investigations to evaluate the effects of polyphenols for the therapy and prevention of MM. Dietary polyphenols are able to inhibit cancer cell growth by targeting multiple signaling pathways, reducing inflammation, and modulating immune response. The ability of polyphenols to modulate the production of pro-inflammatory molecules by targeting signaling pathways or ROS might represent a key mechanism to prevent and/or to contrast the development of MM. In this review, we will report the current knowledge on the ability of polyphenols to modulate the immune system and production of mediators of inflammation, thus revealing an important tool in preventing and/or counteracting the growth of MM.

  14. Novel plant virus-based vaccine induces protective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated antiviral immunity through dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Patrick; Denis, Jérôme; Lapointe, Réjean; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Currently used vaccines protect mainly through the production of neutralizing antibodies. However, antibodies confer little or no protection for a majority of chronic viral infections that require active involvement of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Virus-like particles (VLPs) have been shown to be efficient inducers of cell-mediated immune responses, but administration of an adjuvant is generally required. We recently reported the generation of a novel VLP system exploiting the self-assembly property of the papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) coat protein. We show here that uptake of PapMV-like particles by murine splenic dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo leads to their maturation, suggesting that they possess intrinsic adjuvant-like properties. DCs pulsed with PapMV-like particles displaying the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) p33 immunodominant CTL epitope (PapMV-p33) efficiently process and cross-present the viral epitope to p33-specific transgenic T cells. Importantly, the CTL epitope is also properly processed and presented in vivo, since immunization of p33-specific T-cell receptor transgenic mice with PapMV-p33 induces the activation of large numbers of specific CTLs. C57BL/6 mice immunized with PapMV-p33 VLPs in the absence of adjuvant develop p33-specific effector CTLs that rapidly expand following LCMV challenge and protect vaccinated mice against LCMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this novel plant virus-based vaccination platform in inducing DC maturation leading to protective CTL responses.

  15. Inactivated Influenza Vaccine That Provides Rapid, Innate-Immune-System-Mediated Protection and Subsequent Long-Term Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chinn Yi; Mifsud, Edin J.; Edenborough, Kathryn M.; Sekiya, Toshiki; Tan, Amabel C. L.; Mercuri, Francesca; Rockman, Steve; Chen, Weisan; Turner, Stephen J.; Doherty, Peter C.; Kelso, Anne; Brown, Lorena E.; Jackson, David C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The continual threat to global health posed by influenza has led to increased efforts to improve the effectiveness of influenza vaccines for use in epidemics and pandemics. We show in this study that formulation of a low dose of inactivated detergent-split influenza vaccine with a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) agonist-based lipopeptide adjuvant (R4Pam2Cys) provides (i) immediate, antigen-independent immunity mediated by the innate immune system and (ii) significant enhancement of antigen-dependent immunity which exhibits an increased breadth of effector function. Intranasal administration of mice with vaccine formulated with R4Pam2Cys but not vaccine alone provides protection against both homologous and serologically distinct (heterologous) viral strains within a day of administration. Vaccination in the presence of R4Pam2Cys subsequently also induces high levels of systemic IgM, IgG1, and IgG2b antibodies and pulmonary IgA antibodies that inhibit hemagglutination (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) activities of homologous but not heterologous virus. Improved primary virus nucleoprotein (NP)-specific CD8+ T cell responses are also induced by the use of R4Pam2Cys and are associated with robust recall responses to provide heterologous protection. These protective effects are demonstrated in wild-type and antibody-deficient animals but not in those depleted of CD8+ T cells. Using a contact-dependent virus transmission model, we also found that heterologous virus transmission from vaccinated mice to naive mice is significantly reduced. These results demonstrate the potential of adding a TLR2 agonist to an existing seasonal influenza vaccine to improve its utility by inducing immediate short-term nonspecific antiviral protection and also antigen-specific responses to provide homologous and heterologous immunity. PMID:26507227

  16. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration.

  17. Schisandrol B Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Inhibition of CYP-Mediated Bioactivation and Regulation of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI–GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  18. B. subtilis GS67 protects C. elegans from Gram-positive pathogens via fengycin-mediated microbial antagonism.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Igor; Yim, Joshua J; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-11-17

    Studies on Caenorhabditis elegans have provided detailed insight into host-pathogen interactions. Usually, the E. coli strain OP50 is used as food source for laboratory studies, but recent work has shown that a variety of bacteria have dramatic effects on C. elegans physiology, including immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which different bacteria impact worm resistance to pathogens are poorly understood. Although pathogen-specific immune priming is often discussed as a mechanism underlying such observations, interspecies microbial antagonism might represent an alternative mode of action. Here, we use several natural Bacillus strains to study their effects on nematode survival upon pathogen challenge. We show that B. subtilis GS67 persists in the C. elegans intestine and increases worm resistance to Gram-positive pathogens, suggesting that direct inhibition of pathogens might be the primary protective mechanism. Indeed, chemical and genetic analyses identified the lipopeptide fengycin as the major inhibitory molecule produced by B. subtilis GS67. Specifically, a fengycin-defective mutant of B. subtilis GS67 lost inhibitory activity against pathogens and was unable to protect C. elegans from infections. Furthermore, we found that purified fengycin cures infected worms in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it acts as an antibiotic. Our results reveal a molecular mechanism for commensal-mediated C. elegans protection and highlight the importance of interspecies microbial antagonism for the outcome of animal-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, our work strengthens C. elegans as an in vivo model to reveal protective mechanisms of commensal bacteria, including those relevant to mammalian hosts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma-Mediated Gut Protection After Hemorrhagic Shock is Lessened in Syndecan-1-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Ban, Kechen; Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Witkov, Richard B; Park, Pyong Woo; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2015-11-01

    We have shown in a rodent model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) that fresh frozen plasma (FFP) reduces lung inflammation and injury that are correlated with restitution of syndecan-1. As the gut is believed to contribute to distant organ injury and inflammation after shock, the current study sought to determine if the protective effects of plasma would extend to the gut and to elucidate the contribution of syndecan-1 to this protective effect. We also examined the potential role of TNFα, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-17, both intestinal sheddases of syndecan-1. Wild-type (WT) and syndecan-1 (KO) mice were subjected to HS followed by resuscitation with lactated Ringer's (LR) or FFP and compared with shock alone and shams. Small bowel and blood were obtained after 3  h for analysis of mucosal injury and inflammation and TNFα and ADAM-17 protein expression and activity. After HS, gut injury and inflammation were significantly increased compared with shams. Resuscitation with LR decreased both injury and inflammation that were further lessened by FFP. KO mice displayed worsened gut injury and inflammation after HS compared with WT mice, and LR and FFP equivalently inhibited injury and inflammation. Both systemic and intestinal TNFα and ADAM-17 followed similar trends, with increases after HS, reduction by LR, and a further decrease by FFP in WT but not KO mice. In conclusion, FFP decreased gut injury and inflammation after hemorrhagic shock, an effect that was abrogated in syndecan-1 mice. Plasma also decreased TNFα and ADAM-17, representing a potential mechanistic link to its protection via syndecan-1.

  20. NMR Structures and Interactions of Temporin-1Tl and Temporin-1Tb with Lipopolysaccharide Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Anirban; Saravanan, Rathi; Mohanram, Harini; Mangoni, Maria L.; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-01-01

    Temporins are a group of closely related short antimicrobial peptides from frog skin. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, plays important roles in the activity of temporins. Earlier studies have found that LPS induces oligomerization of temporin-1Tb (TB) thus preventing its translocation across the outer membrane and, as a result, reduces its activity on Gram-negative bacteria. On the other hand, temporin-1Tl (TL) exhibits higher activity, presumably because of lack of such oligomerization. A synergistic mechanism was proposed, involving TL and TB in overcoming the LPS-mediated barrier. Here, to gain insights into interactions of TL and TB within LPS, we investigated the structures and interactions of TL, TB, and TL+TB in LPS micelles, using NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. In the context of LPS, TL assumes a novel antiparallel dimeric helical structure sustained by intimate packing between aromatic-aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic residues. By contrast, independent TB has populations of helical and aggregated conformations in LPS. The LPS-induced aggregated states of TB are largely destabilized in the presence of TL. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies have delineated residues of TL and TB in close contact with LPS and enhanced interactions of these two peptides with LPS, when combined together. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and 31P NMR have pointed out the proximity of TL and TB in LPS and conformational changes of LPS, respectively. Importantly, these results provide the first structural insights into the mode of action and synergism of antimicrobial peptides at the level of the LPS-outer membrane. PMID:21586570

  1. Mechanisms of PEDF-mediated protection against reactive oxygen species damage in diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Elahy, Mina; Baindur-Hudson, Swati; Cruzat, Vinicius F; Newsholme, Philip; Dass, Crispin R

    2014-09-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a pluripotent glycoprotein belonging to the serpin family. PEDF can stimulate several physiological processes such as angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and survival. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), which is the major cause of blindness in young diabetic adults. PEDF plays a protective role in DR and there is accumulating evidence of the neuroprotective effect of PEDF. In this paper, we review the role of PEDF and the mechanisms involved in its antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties.

  2. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors protect against prion and Aβ mediated synapse degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An early event in the neuropathology of prion and Alzheimer's diseases is the loss of synapses and a corresponding reduction in the level of synaptophysin, a pre-synaptic membrane protein essential for neurotransmission. The molecular mechanisms involved in synapse degeneration in these diseases are poorly understood. In this study the process of synapse degeneration was investigated by measuring the synaptophysin content of cultured neurones incubated with the prion derived peptide (PrP82-146) or with Aβ1-42, a peptide thought to trigger pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. A pharmacological approach was used to screen cell signalling pathways involved in synapse degeneration. Results Pre-treatment with phospholipase A2 inhibitors (AACOCF3, MAFP and aristolochic acids) protected against synapse degeneration in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurones incubated with PrP82-146 or Aβ1-42. Synapse degeneration was also observed following the addition of a specific phospholipase A2 activating peptide (PLAP) and the addition of PrP82-146 or Aβ1-42 activated cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 within synapses. Activation of phospholipase A2 is the first step in the generation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and PAF receptor antagonists (ginkgolide B, Hexa-PAF and CV6029) protected against synapse degeneration induced by PrP82-146, Aβ1-42 and PLAP. PAF facilitated the production of prostaglandin E2, which also caused synapse degeneration and pre-treatment with the prostanoid E receptor antagonist AH13205 protected against PrP82-146, Aβ1-42 and PAF induced synapse degeneration. Conclusions Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PrP82-146 and Aβ1-42trigger abnormal activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 resident within synapses, resulting in elevated levels of PAF and prostaglandin E2that cause synapse degeneration. Inhibitors of this pathway that can cross the blood brain barrier may protect against the synapse degeneration seen during

  3. The Protective Role of Antioxidants in the Defence against ROS/RNS-Mediated Environmental Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Poljšak, Borut; Fink, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can result from exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ionising and nonionising radiation, ultraviolet radiation, elevated concentrations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, cigarette smoke, asbestos, particulate matter, pesticides, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and many other compounds present in the environment. It appears that increased oxidative/nitrosative stress is often neglected mechanism by which environmental pollutants affect human health. Oxidation of and oxidative damage to cellular components and biomolecules have been suggested to be involved in the aetiology of several chronic diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and aging. Several studies have demonstrated that the human body can alleviate oxidative stress using exogenous antioxidants. However, not all dietary antioxidant supplements display protective effects, for example, β-carotene for lung cancer prevention in smokers or tocopherols for photooxidative stress. In this review, we explore the increases in oxidative stress caused by exposure to environmental pollutants and the protective effects of antioxidants. PMID:25140198

  4. Wolbachia-mediated protection against viruses in the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Cattel, J; Martinez, J; Jiggins, F; Mouton, L; Gibert, P

    2016-10-01

    The maternally inherited bacterium Wolbachia is well known for spreading in natural populations by manipulating the reproduction of its arthropod hosts, but can also have mutualist effects that increase host fitness. In mosquitoes and Drosophila some Wolbachia strains can lead to an increase in survival of virus-infected insects, and in most cases this is associated with reduced accumulation of the virus in host tissues. We investigated if the Wolbachia strain wSuz, which naturally infects Drosophila suzukii, is able to confer protection against Drosophila C virus and Flock House virus in different host genetic backgrounds. We found that this strain can increase host survival upon infection with these two viruses. In some cases this effect was associated with lower viral titres, suggesting that it confers resistance to the viruses rather than allowing the flies to tolerate infection. Our results indicate that, in D. suzukii, the antiviral protection provided by Wolbachia is not correlated to its density as found in other Drosophila species. This study demonstrates a phenotypic effect induced by wSuz on its native host which could explain its maintenance in natural populations of D. suzukii. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  5. The role of lactoferrin binding protein B in mediating protection against human lactoferricin.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Livingstone, Margaret; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria that inhabit the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts of mammals encounter an iron-deficient environment because of iron sequestration by the host iron-binding proteins transferrin and lactoferrin. Lactoferrin is also present in high concentrations at sites of inflammation where the cationic, antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin is produced by proteolysis of lactoferrin. Several Gram-negative pathogens express a lactoferrin receptor that enables the bacteria to use lactoferrin as an iron source. The receptor is composed of an integral membrane protein, lactoferrin binding protein A (LbpA), and a membrane-bound lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB). LbpA is essential for growth with lactoferrin as the sole iron source, whereas the role of LbpB in iron acquisition is not yet known. In this study, we demonstrate that LbpB from 2 different species is capable of providing protection against the killing activity of a human lactoferrin-derived peptide. We investigated the prevalence of lactoferrin receptors in bacteria and examined their sequence diversity. We propose that the protection against the cationic antimicrobial human lactoferrin-derived peptide is associated with clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the C-terminal lobe of LbpB that is a common feature of this protein.

  6. Immunological mechanisms involved in probiotic-mediated protection against Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Yang, G; Meng, F; Yang, W; Hu, J; Ye, L; Shi, C; Wang, C

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a group of chronic, incurable inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract that cause severe diarrhoea, intestinal inflammation, pain, fatigue and weight loss. In this study, we first developed a model of Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis and then evaluated the protective effects of selected probiotics on inflammation. The results showed that administration of a combination of probiotics including Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 and Lactobacillus plantarum A significantly increased the production of CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the spleen (3.62% vs phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-treated control, P<0.01) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). In addition, the presence of probiotics significantly up-regulated the development of CD4(+)/CD25(+)/Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in MLNs by approximately 2.07% compared to the effect observed in the PBS-treated control (P<0.01) and down-regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-17, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, by 0.11, 0.11 and 0.15%, respectively, compared to the effect observed in the PBS-treated control (P<0.01).These effects conferred protection against colitis, as shown by histopathological analyses.

  7. The biosynthesis of ascorbate protects isolated rat hepatocytes from cumene hydroperoxide-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tom S; Shangari, Nandita; Wilson, John X; Chan, Helen; Butterworth, Roger F; O'Brien, Peter J

    2005-04-01

    Most animals synthesize ascorbate. It is an essential enzymatic cofactor for the synthesis of a variety of biological molecules and also a powerful antioxidant. There is, however, little direct evidence supporting an antioxidant role for endogenously produced ascorbate. Recently, we demonstrated that incubation of rat hepatocytes with 1-bromoheptane or phorone simultaneously depleted glutathione (GSH) and triggered rapid ascorbate synthesis. The present study investigates the hypothesis that endogenous ascorbate synthesis can confer protection against oxidative stress. Rat and guinea pig hepatocytes were depleted of GSH with 1-bromoheptane and subsequently treated with the oxidative stressor cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the presence or absence of the ascorbate synthesis inhibitor sorbinil. In rat hepatocytes, ascorbate content increased linearly (from 15.1 to 35.8 nmol/10(6) cells) over a 105-min incubation. Prior depletion of GSH increased CHP-induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, and cell death in rat and guinea pig hepatocytes. Inhibiting ascorbate synthesis, however, further elevated ROS production (2-fold), lipid peroxidation (1.5-fold), and cell death (2-fold) in rat hepatocytes only. This is the first time that endogenous ascorbate synthesis has been shown to decrease cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress. Protection by endogenously produced ascorbate may therefore need to be addressed when extrapolating data to humans from experiments using rodents capable of synthesizing ascorbate.

  8. Selective protection of the cerebellum against intracerebroventricular LPS is mediated by local melatonin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pinato, Luciana; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Franco, Daiane G; Campos, Leila M G; Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Markus, Regina P

    2015-03-01

    Although melatonin is mainly produced by the pineal gland, an increasing number of extra-pineal sites of melatonin synthesis have been described. We previously demonstrated the existence of bidirectional communication between the pineal gland and the immune system that drives a switch in melatonin production from the pineal gland to peripheral organs during the mounting of an innate immune response. In the present study, we show that acute neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected directly into the lateral ventricles of adult rats reduces the nocturnal peak of melatonin in the plasma and induces its synthesis in the cerebellum, though not in the cortex or hippocampus. This increase in cerebellar melatonin content requires the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which positively regulates the expression of the key enzyme for melatonin synthesis, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT). Interestingly, LPS treatment led to neuronal death in the hippocampus and cortex, but not in the cerebellum. This privileged protection of cerebellar cells was abrogated when G-protein-coupled melatonin receptors were blocked by the melatonin antagonist luzindole, suggesting that the local production of melatonin protects cerebellar neurons from LPS toxicity. This is the first demonstration of a switch between pineal and extra-pineal melatonin production in the central nervous system following a neuroinflammatory response. These results have direct implications concerning the differential susceptibility of specific brain areas to neuronal death.

  9. Genotype specificity among hosts, pathogens, and beneficial microbes influences the strength of symbiont‐mediated protection

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Benjamin J.; Hrček, Jan; McLean, Ailsa H. C.; Godfray, H. Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    The microbial symbionts of eukaryotes influence disease resistance in many host‐parasite systems. Symbionts show substantial variation in both genotype and phenotype, but it is unclear how natural selection maintains this variation. It is also unknown whether variable symbiont genotypes show specificity with the genotypes of hosts or parasites in natural populations. Genotype by genotype interactions are a necessary condition for coevolution between interacting species. Uncovering the patterns of genetic specificity among hosts, symbionts, and parasites is therefore critical for determining the role that symbionts play in host‐parasite coevolution. Here, we show that the strength of protection conferred against a fungal pathogen by a vertically transmitted symbiont of an aphid is influenced by both host‐symbiont and symbiont‐pathogen genotype by genotype interactions. Further, we show that certain symbiont phylogenetic clades have evolved to provide stronger protection against particular pathogen genotypes. However, we found no evidence of reciprocal adaptation of co‐occurring host and symbiont lineages. Our results suggest that genetic variation among symbiont strains may be maintained by antagonistic coevolution with their host and/or their host's parasites. PMID:28252804

  10. Co-Fe-Tb (202)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Co-Fe-Tb (202)' with the content:

  11. B-Fe-Tb (148)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'B-Fe-Tb (148)' with the content:

  12. CD11b is protective in complement-mediated immune complex glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessy J; Chaves, Lee D; Chang, Anthony; Jacob, Alexander; Ritchie, Maria; Quigg, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    In chronic serum sickness, glomerular immune complexes form, yet C57BL/6 mice do not develop glomerulonephritis unless complement factor H (CfH) is absent, indicating the relevance of complement regulation. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b) and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes, and CfH on platelets, can bind immune complexes. Here we induced immune complex–mediated glomerulonephritis in CfH−/− mice chimeric for wild-type, CfH−/−, CD11b−/−, or FcRγ−/− bone marrow stem cells. Glomerulonephritis was worse in CD11b−/− chimeras compared with all others, whereas disease in FcRγ−/− and wild-type chimeras was comparable. Disease tracked strongly with humoral immune responses, but not glomerular immune complex deposits. Interstitial inflammation with M1 macrophages strongly correlated with glomerulonephritis scores. CD11b−/− chimeras had significantly more M1 macrophages and CD4+ T cells. The renal dendritic cell populations originating from bone marrow–derived CD11c+ cells were similar in all experimental groups. CD11b+ cells bearing colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor were present in kidneys, including CD11b−/− chimeras; these cells correlated negatively with glomerulonephritis scores. Thus, experimental immune complex–mediated glomerulonephritis is associated with accumulation of M1 macrophages and CD4+ T cells in kidneys and functional renal insufficiency. Hence, CD11b on mononuclear cells is instrumental in generating an anti-inflammatory response in the inflamed kidney. PMID:25565310

  13. SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake protects human intestinal epithelial cells against Giardia duodenalis-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda C H; Huang, Ching-Ying; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Sayer, Heather; Turner, Jerrold R; Buret, Andre G

    2008-07-01

    Infection with Giardia duodenalis is one of the most common causes of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. Mechanisms of pathogenesis and host response in giardiasis remain incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that exposure to G. duodenalis products induce apoptosis in enterocytes. We recently discovered that sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter (SGLT)-1-mediated glucose uptake modulates enterocytic cell death induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The aim of this study was to examine whether enhanced epithelial SGLT-1 activity may constitute a novel mechanism of host defense against G. duodenalis-induced apoptosis. SGLT-1-transfected Caco-2 cells were exposed to G. duodenalis products in low (5mM) or high (25mM) glucose media. In low glucose environments, G. duodenalis-induced caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in these cells. These apoptotic phenomena were abolished in the presence of high glucose. A soluble proteolytic fraction of G. duodenalis was found to upregulate SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in association with increased apical SGLT-1 expression on epithelial cells. Kinetic analysis showed that this phenomenon resulted from an increase in the maximal rate of sugar transport (V(max)) by SGLT-1, with no change in the affinity constant (K(m)). The addition of phloridzin (a competitive inhibitor for glucose binding to SGLT-1) abolished the anti-apoptotic effects exerted by high glucose. Together, the findings indicate that SGLT-1-dependent glucose uptake may represent a novel epithelial cell rescue mechanism against G. duodenalis-induced apoptosis.

  14. Akt1 promotes stimuli-induced endothelial-barrier protection through FoxO-mediated tight-junction protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Artham, Sandeep; Sabbineni, Harika; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Hay, Nissim; Adams, Ralf H; Byzova, Tatiana V; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2016-10-01

    Vascular permeability regulated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through endothelial-barrier junctions is essential for inflammation. Mechanisms regulating vascular permeability remain elusive. Although 'Akt' and 'Src' have been implicated in the endothelial-barrier regulation, it is puzzling how both agents that protect and disrupt the endothelial-barrier activate these kinases to reciprocally regulate vascular permeability. To delineate the role of Akt1 in endothelial-barrier regulation, we created endothelial-specific, tamoxifen-inducible Akt1 knockout mice and stable ShRNA-mediated Akt1 knockdown in human microvascular endothelial cells. Akt1 loss leads to decreased basal and angiopoietin1-induced endothelial-barrier resistance, and enhanced VEGF-induced endothelial-barrier breakdown. Endothelial Akt1 deficiency resulted in enhanced VEGF-induced vascular leakage in mice ears, which was rescued upon re-expression with Adeno-myrAkt1. Furthermore, co-treatment with angiopoietin1 reversed VEGF-induced vascular leakage in an Akt1-dependent manner. Mechanistically, our study revealed that while VEGF-induced short-term vascular permeability is independent of Akt1, its recovery is reliant on Akt1 and FoxO-mediated claudin expression. Pharmacological inhibition of FoxO transcription factors rescued the defective endothelial barrier due to Akt1 deficiency. Here we provide novel insights on the endothelial-barrier protective role of VEGF in the long term and the importance of Akt1-FoxO signaling on tight-junction stabilization and prevention of vascular leakage through claudin expression.

  15. Mediating delta-opioid-initiated heart protection via the beta2-adrenergic receptor: role of the intrinsic cardiac adrenergic cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-He; Wang, Hui-Qun; Roeske, William R; Birnbaum, Yochai; Wu, Yewen; Yang, Ning-Ping; Lin, Yu; Ye, Yumei; McAdoo, David J; Hughes, Michael G; Lick, Scott D; Boor, Paul J; Lui, Charles Y; Uretsky, Barry F

    2007-07-01

    Stimulation of cardiac beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)-AR) or delta-opioid receptor (DOR) exerts a similar degree of cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia in experimental models. We hypothesized that delta-opioid-initiated cardioprotection is mediated by the intrinsic cardiac adrenergic (ICA) cell via enhanced epinephrine release. Using immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization methods, we detected in situ tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA and TH immunoreactivity that was colocalized with DOR immunoreactivity in ICA cells in human and rat hearts. Western blot analysis detected DOR protein in ICA cells isolated from rat ventricular myocytes. The physiology of DOR expression was examined by determining changes of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) transients in isolated rat ICA cells using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Exposing the selective delta-opioid agonist D-[Pen(2,5)]enkephalin (DPDPE) to ICA cells increased [Ca(2+)](i) transients in a concentration-dependent manner. Such an effect was abolished by the Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine. HPLC-electrochemical detection demonstrated a 2.4-fold increase in epinephrine release from ICA cells following DPDPE application. The significance of the ICA cell and its epinephrine release in delta-opioid-initiated cardioprotection was demonstrated in the rat myocardial infarction model and ICA cell-ventricular myocyte coculture. DPDPE administered before coronary artery occlusion or simulated ischemia-reperfusion reduced left ventricular infarct size by 54 +/- 15% or myocyte death by 26 +/- 4%, respectively. beta(2)-AR blockade markedly attenuated delta-opioid-initiated infarct size-limiting effect and abolished delta-opioid-initiated myocyte survival protection in rat ICA cell-myocyte coculture. Furthermore, delta-opioid agonist exerted no myocyte survival protection in the absence of cocultured ICA cells during ischemia-reperfusion. We conclude that delta-opioid-initiated myocardial infarct size

  16. Protective action of nipradilol mediated through S-nitrosylation of Keap1 and HO-1 induction in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kamiya, Marie; Takadera, Tsuneo; Arai, Kunizo; Sugitani, Kayo; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Kato, Satoru

    2012-12-01

    Nipradilol (Nip), which has α1- and β-adrenoceptor antagonist and nitric oxide (NO)-donating properties, has clinically been used as an anti-glaucomatous agent in Japan. NO mediates cellular signaling pathways that regulate physiological functions. The major signaling mechanisms mediated by NO are cGMP-dependent signaling and protein S-nitrosylation-dependent signalings. Nip has been described as having neuroprotective effects through cGMP-dependent pathway in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, the effect seems to be partial. On the other hand, whether Nip can prevent cell death through S-nitrosylation is not yet clarified. In this study, we therefore focused on the neuroprotective mechanism of Nip through S-nitrosylation. Nip showed a dramatic neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced death of RGC-5 cells. However, denitro-nipradilol, which does not have NO-donating properties, was not protective against oxidative stress. Furthermore, an NO scavenger significantly reversed the protective action of Nip against oxidative stress. In addition, we demonstrated that α1- or β-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin or timolol) did not show any neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress in RGC-5 cells. We also demonstrated that Nip induced the expression of the NO-dependent antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). S-nitrosylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein by Nip was shown to contribute to the translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 to the nucleus, and triggered transcriptional activation of HO-1. Furthermore, RGC death and levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) were increased after optic nerve injury in vivo. Pretreatment with Nip significantly suppressed RGC death and accumulation of 4HNE after injury through an HO-1 activity-dependent mechanism. These data demonstrate a novel neuroprotective action of Nip against oxidative stress-induced RGC death in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Epoxypukalide Induces Proliferation and Protects against Cytokine-Mediated Apoptosis in Primary Cultures of Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Acosta, José Francisco; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; Díaz-Marrero, Ana R.; Cueto, Mercedes; Perdomo, Germán; Cózar-Castellano, Irene

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgency to find new treatments for the devastating epidemic of diabetes. Pancreatic β-cells viability and function are impaired in the two most common forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Regeneration of pancreatic β-cells has been proposed as a potential therapy for diabetes. In a preliminary study, we screened a collection of marine products for β-cell proliferation. One unique compound (epoxypukalide) showed capability to induce β-cell replication in the cell line INS1 832/13 and in primary rat cell cultures. Epoxypukalide was used to study β-cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine incorporation and BrdU incorporation followed by BrdU/insulin staining in primary cultures of rat islets. AKT and ERK1/2 signalling pathways were analyzed. Cell cycle activators, cyclin D2 and cyclin E, were detected by western-blot. Apoptosis was studied by TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3. β-cell function was measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Epoxypukalide induced 2.5-fold increase in β-cell proliferation; this effect was mediated by activation of ERK1/2 signalling pathway and upregulation of the cell cycle activators, cyclin D2 and cyclin E. Interestingly, epoxypukalide showed protection from basal (40% lower versus control) and cytokine-induced apoptosis (80% lower versus control). Finally, epoxypukalide did not impair β-cell function when measured by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In conclusion, epoxypukalide induces β-cell proliferation and protects against basal and cytokine-mediated β-cell death in primary cultures of rat islets. These findings may be translated into new treatments for diabetes. PMID:23300997

  18. Protective effect of an egg yolk-derived immunoglobulin (IgY) against Prevotella intermedia-mediated gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y-Y; Zhen, Y-H; Wang, D; Zhu, J; Sun, D-X; Liu, X-T; Wang, H-X; Liu, Y; Long, Y-Y; Shu, X-H

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the effects of an egg yolk-derived immunoglobulin (IgY) specific to Prevotella intermedia in vitro and in vivo. An IgY specific to P. intermedia was produced by immunizing hens with formaldehyde-inactivated P. intermedia and showed high titres when subjected to an ELISA. The obtained IgY inhibited the growth of P. intermedia in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations from 1 to 20 mg ml(-1) in Center for Disease Control and Prevention liquid medium. Forty rats were challenged with P. intermedia on gingivae and then randomly divided into four groups, which were syringed respectively with phosphate-buffered saline, 1 mg ml(-1) of tinidazole, 20 mg ml(-1) of nonspecific IgY and 20 mg ml(-1) of the IgY specific to P. intermedia at a dosage of 300 μl per day. Gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), counts of white blood cell (WBC) and histopathological slide of the gums were measured after treatment for 15 days. The gingivitis rats treated with the IgY specific to P. intermedia showed significantly decreased GI, PI, BOP and WBC (P < 0·05). Gum histopathology of the treated rats demonstrated a superior protective effect of the specific IgY on P. intermedia-mediated gingivitis. A new immunoglobulin specific to P. intermedia was developed from egg yolk. This specific IgY can dose-dependently inhibit the growth of P. intermedia and protect rats from gingivitis induced by P. intermedia. The new IgY has potential for the treatment of P. intermedia-mediated gingivitis. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Mulberrofuran G Protects Ischemic Injury-induced Cell Death via Inhibition of NOX4-mediated ROS Generation and ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungeun; Kwon, Jaeyoung; Kim, Dong-Woo; Lee, Hak Ju; Lee, Dongho; Mar, Woongchon

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of mulberrofuran G (MG) in in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia. MG was isolated from the root bark of Morus bombycis. MG inhibited nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) enzyme activity and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced NOX4 protein expression in SH-SY5Y cells. MG inhibited the expression of activated caspase-3 and caspase-9 and cleaved poly adenine dinucleotide phosphate-ribose polymerase in OGD/R-induced SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, MG protected OGD/R-induced neuronal cell death and inhibited OGD/R-induced reactive oxygen species generation in SH-SY5Y cells. In in vivo model, MG-treated groups (0.2, 1, and 5 mg/kg) reduced the infarct volume in middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion-induced ischemic rats. The MG-treated groups also reduced NOX4 protein expression in middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion-induced ischemic rats. Furthermore, protein expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein/binding immunoglobulin protein, phosphorylated IRE1α, X-box-binding protein 1, and cytosine enhancer binding protein homologous protein, mediators of endoplasmic reticulum stress, were inhibited in MG-treated groups. Taken together, MG showed protective effect in in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral ischemia through inhibition of NOX4-mediated reactive oxygen species generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. This finding will give an insight that inhibition of NOX enzyme activity and NOX4 protein expression could be a new potential therapeutic strategy for cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A review of the literature on the economics of vaccination against TB.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hong-Anh T; Vu, Hoa D; Rozenbaum, Mark H; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Postma, Maarten J

    2012-03-01

    The BCG vaccine was introduced in 1921 and remains the only licensed vaccine for the prevention of TB worldwide. Despite its extensive use, the BCG vaccine lacks the ability to fully control the TB-endemic and -pandemic situations. The BCG vaccine is most effective in preventing pediatric TB, in particular, miliary TB and tuberculous meningitis. However, it has a limited effect in preventing pulmonary TB, which occurs more frequently in adults. BCG vaccination has now been implemented in more than 157 countries worldwide. For various countries, the benefits of vaccination are only limited and potentially not cost effective. The International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases had set the criteria for discontinuation of BCG vaccination in 1994. This decision, however, was not based on economic considerations. Many developed countries have met the criteria set by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and stopped universal BCG vaccination. For developing countries, the BCG vaccine is still an effective intervention in protecting young children from TB infection. A lot of effort has been spent on R&D of new TB vaccines, the first of which are expected to be available within 5-7 years from now. Novel TB vaccines are expected to be better and more effective than the current BCG vaccine and should provide a viable strategy in controlling TB morbidity and mortality. In this review, the aim is to explore economic evaluations that have been carried out for vaccination against TB worldwide. In addition to epidemiological evidence, economic evidence can play a crucial role in supporting the governments of countries in making proper public health decisions on BCG vaccination policies, in particular, to implement, continue, or discontinue.

  1. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD.

  2. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD. PMID:27057276

  3. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 Protects Cells against Lipotoxicity-Mediated Apoptosis in Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Tamaki; Kume, Shinji; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Kuwagata, Shogo; Araki, Hisazumi; Takeda, Naoko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Araki, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Saturated fatty acid (SFA)-related lipotoxicity is a pathogenesis of diabetes-related renal proximal tubular epithelial cell (PTEC) damage, closely associated with a progressive decline in renal function. This study was designed to identify a free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism-related enzyme that can protect PTECs from SFA-related lipotoxicity. Among several enzymes involved in FFA metabolism, we identified stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), whose expression level significantly decreased in the kidneys of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice, compared with non-diabetic mice. SCD1 is an enzyme that desaturates SFAs, converting them to monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), leading to the formation of neutral lipid droplets. In culture, retrovirus-mediated overexpression of SCD1 or MUFA treatment significantly ameliorated SFA-induced apoptosis in PTECs by enhancing intracellular lipid droplet formation. In contrast, siRNA against SCD1 exacerbated the apoptosis. Both overexpression of SCD1 and MUFA treatment reduced SFA-induced apoptosis via reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured PTECs. Thus, HFD-induced decrease in renal SCD1 expression may play a pathogenic role in lipotoxicity-induced renal injury, and enhancing SCD1-mediated desaturation of SFA and subsequent formation of neutral lipid droplets may become a promising therapeutic target to reduce SFA-induced lipotoxicity. The present study provides a novel insight into lipotoxicity in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27834856

  4. Fixed drug eruption: the dark side of activation of intraepidermal CD8+ T cells uniquely specialized to mediate protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Shiohara, Tetsuo; Mizukawa, Yoshiko

    2012-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is generally regarded as representing the mild end of drug-induced dermatitis, but the clinical importance of recognizing this disease as an abortive, localized variant of toxic epidermal necrolysis has received increasing attention in recent years. FDE often presents with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations indistinguishable from those of other skin diseases, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome /toxic epidermal necrolysis, cellulitis, paronychia, lichen planus, and parapsoriasis en plaques. These unusual forms of FDE are likely to be overlooked unless the possibility of a drug etiology is routinely considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with these diseases. Clinical awareness and recognition of these unique forms are essential for avoiding a misdiagnosis. Intraepidermal CD8+ T cells resident in the FDE lesions that have the capacity to rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ are likely to have a key role in mediating localized epidermal injury, while they may represent a T cell subset uniquely specialized to mediate protective immunity against various pathogens. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. CD98hc (SLC3A2) Loss Protects Against Ras-Driven Tumorigenesis by Modulating Integrin-Mediated Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Estrach, Soline; Lee, Sin-Ae; Boulter, Etienne; Pisano, Sabrina; Errante, Aurélia; Tissot, Floriane S.; Cailleteau, Laurence; Pons, Catherine; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Féral, Chloé C.

    2016-01-01

    CD98hc (SLC3A2) is the heavy chain component of the dimeric transmembrane glycoprotein CD98, which comprises the large neutral amino acid transporter LAT1 (SLC7A5) in cells. Overexpression of CD98hc occurs widely in cancer cells, and is associated with poor prognosis clinically, but its exact contributions to tumorigenesis are uncertain. In this study, we showed that that genetic deficiency of CD98hc protects against Ras-driven skin carcinogenesis. Deleting CD98hc after tumor induction was also sufficient to cause regression of existing tumors. Investigations into the basis for these effects defined two new functions of CD98hc that contribute to epithelial cancer beyond an intrinsic effect on CD98hc on tumor cell proliferation. First, CD98hc increased the stiffness of the tumor microenvironment. Second, CD98hc amplified the capacity of cells to respond to matrix rigidity, an essential factor in tumor development. Mechanistically, CD98hc mediated this stiffness-sensing by increasing Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, resulting in increased transcription mediated by YAP/TAZ, a nuclear relay for mechanical signals. Our results suggest that CD98hc contributes to carcinogenesis by amplifying a positive feedback loop which increases both extracellular matrix stiffness and resulting cellular responses. This work supports a rationale to explore the use of CD98hc inhibitors as cancer therapeutics, PMID:25267066

  6. Helical apolipoproteins stabilize ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 by protecting it from thiol protease-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Reijiro; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2002-06-21

    ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 was increased by apolipoprotein A-I without an increase of its message in THP-1 cells. The pulse label study demonstrated that apoA-I retarded degradation of ABCA1. Similar changes were demonstrated by apoA-II, but the effect of high density lipoprotein was almost negligible on the basis of equivalent protein concentration. Thiol protease inhibitors (leupeptin and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-norleucinal (ALLN)) increased ABCA1 and slowed its decay in the cells, whereas none of the proteosome-specific inhibitor lactacystin, other protease inhibitors, or the lysosomal inhibitor NH(4)Cl showed such effects. The effects of apoA-I and ALLN were additive for the increase of ABCA1, and the apoA-I-mediated cellular lipid release was enhanced by ALLN. The data suggest that ABCA1 is rapidly degraded by a thiol protease(s) in the cells unless helical apolipoproteins in their lipid-free form stabilize ABCA1 by protecting it from protease-mediated degradation.

  7. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-04-14

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress.

  8. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress. PMID:27077813

  9. Arg354 in the catalytic centre of bovine liver catalase is protected from methylglyoxal-mediated glycation.

    PubMed

    Scheckhuber, Christian Q

    2015-12-30

    In addition to controlled post-translational modifications proteins can be modified with highly reactive compounds. Usually this leads to a compromised functionality of the protein. Methylglyoxal is one of the most common agents that attack arginine residues. Methylglyoxal is also regarded as a pro-oxidant that affects cellular redox homeostasis by contributing to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Antioxidant enzymes like catalase are required to protect the cell from oxidative damage. These enzymes are also targets for methylglyoxal-mediated modification which could severely affect their catalytic activity in breaking down reactive oxygen species to less reactive or inert compounds. Here, bovine liver catalase was incubated with high levels of methylglyoxal to induce its glycation. This treatment did not lead to a pronounced reduction of enzymatic activity. Subsequently methylglyoxal-mediated arginine modifications (hydroimidazolone and dihydroxyimidazolidine) were quantitatively analysed by sensitive nano high performance liquid chromatography/electron spray ionisation/tandem mass spectrometry. Whereas several arginine residues displayed low to moderate levels of glycation (e.g., Arg93, Arg365, Arg444) Arg354 in the active centre of catalase was never found to be modified. Bovine liver catalase is able to tolerate very high levels of the modifying α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal so that its essential enzymatic function is not impaired.

  10. Does the How Mediate the Why? A Multiple Replication Examination of Drinking Motives, Alcohol Protective Behavioral Strategies, and Alcohol Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Adrian J.; Prince, Mark A.; Pearson, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study attempted to assess the evidence of use of protective behavioral strategies (PBS) as a mediator in the relationship between drinking motives and alcohol outcomes. Specifically, to understand various statistical approaches in modeling this proposed mediation model (e.g., drinking motives to PBS use to alcohol outcomes), we tried to replicate models based on earlier research. Method: To maximize the robustness of our replication attempts, we conducted each replication attempt across two distinct data sets whenever possible. Participants were recruited from psychology department research pools at a large southeastern U.S. university (Sample 1; n = 774) and a large southwestern U.S. university (Sample 2; n = 594). We matched the original articles’ analytic procedures as closely as possible including overall analysis approach, measurement of variables, and inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results: Consistent with previous studies, we found that PBS use may be a mechanism through which both positively reinforcing (i.e., social and enhancement) motives and coping motives relate to alcohol outcomes (e.g., alcohol-related consequences). Specifically, students who tend to drink for these specific motives appear to use fewer PBS, which may place them at risk for heavier, more problematic drinking. Conclusions: Our results suggest that when drinking motives are examined separately, they demonstrate differential relationships with PBS use and alcohol outcomes. Overall, it is clear that PBS use plays a role in the drinking motives–alcohol outcomes relationship, but this role varies by type of motive. PMID:26562595

  11. Nobiletin Induces Protective Autophagy Accompanied by ER-Stress Mediated Apoptosis in Human Gastric Cancer SNU-16 Cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Yong; Cho, Somi Kim

    2016-07-14

    Nobiletin, a major component of citrus fruits, is a polymethoxyflavone derivative that exhibits anticancer activity against several forms of cancer, including SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells. To explore the nobiletin-induced cell death mechanism, we examined the changes in protein expression caused by nobiletin in human gastric cancer SNU-16 cells by means of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE), followed by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analysis. Seventeen of 20 selected protein spots were successfully identified, including nine upregulated and eight downregulated proteins. In nobiletin-treated SNU-16 cells the glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) mRNA level was induced most significantly among six proteins related to cell survival and death. Western blot analysis was used to confirm the expression of GRP78 protein. We detected increases in the levels of the ER-stress related proteins inositol requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1-α), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4), and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP), as well as GRP78, in response to nobiletin in SNU-16 cells. Furthermore, the ER stress-mediated apoptotic protein caspase-4 was proteolytically activated by nobiletin. Pretreatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, strongly augmented apoptosis in SNU-16 cells, as evidenced by decreased cell viability, an increased number of sub-G1 phase cells and increased levels of cleaved PARP. Our results suggest that nobiletin-induced apoptosis in SNU-16 cells is mediated by pathways involving intracellular ER stress-mediated protective autophagy. Thus, the combination of nobiletin and an autophagy inhibitor could be a promising treatment for gastric cancer patients.

  12. Interferon Control of the Sterol Metabolic Network: Bidirectional Molecular Circuitry-Mediating Host Protection

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kevin A.; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The sterol metabolic network is emerging center stage in inflammation and immunity. Historically, observational clinical studies show that hypocholesterolemia is a common side effect of interferon (IFN) treatment. More recently, comprehensive systems-wide investigations of the macrophage IFN response reveal a direct molecular link between cholesterol metabolism and infection. Upon infection, flux through the sterol metabolic network is acutely moderated by the IFN response at multiple regulatory levels. The precise mechanisms by which IFN regulates the mevalonate-sterol pathway—the spine of the network—are beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the multifactorial mechanisms by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. We also consider bidirectional communications resulting in sterol metabolism regulation of immunity. Finally, we deliberate on how this fundamental interaction functions as an integral element of host protective responses to infection and harmful inflammation. PMID:28066443

  13. Interferon Control of the Sterol Metabolic Network: Bidirectional Molecular Circuitry-Mediating Host Protection.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin A; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The sterol metabolic network is emerging center stage in inflammation and immunity. Historically, observational clinical studies show that hypocholesterolemia is a common side effect of interferon (IFN) treatment. More recently, comprehensive systems-wide investigations of the macrophage IFN response reveal a direct molecular link between cholesterol metabolism and infection. Upon infection, flux through the sterol metabolic network is acutely moderated by the IFN response at multiple regulatory levels. The precise mechanisms by which IFN regulates the mevalonate-sterol pathway-the spine of the network-are beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the multifactorial mechanisms by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. We also consider bidirectional communications resulting in sterol metabolism regulation of immunity. Finally, we deliberate on how this fundamental interaction functions as an integral element of host protective responses to infection and harmful inflammation.

  14. PGC-1α Mediated Peripheral Nerve Protection of Tongxinluo in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaopei; Feng, Hua; Xu, Xia; Li, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of Tongxinluo (Txl), a Chinese herbal compound, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods and Results. Diabetic rat model was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Txl ultrafine powder treatment for 16 weeks from the baseline significantly reversed the impairment of motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV), mechanical hyperalgesia, and nerve structure. We further proved that Tongxinluo upregulates PGC-1α and its downstream factors including COX IV and SOD, which were involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Conclusion. Our study indicates that the protective effect of Txl in diabetic neuropathy may be attributed to the induction of PGC-1α and its downstream targets. This finding may further illustrate the pleiotropic effect of the medicine. PMID:27504136

  15. IL-22 Restrains Tapeworm-Mediated Protection against Experimental Colitis via Regulation of IL-25 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Fernando, Maria R.; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L.; Matisz, Chelsea E.; Wang, Arthur; McKay, Derek M.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22, an immune cell-derived cytokine whose receptor expression is restricted to non-immune cells (e.g. epithelial cells), can be anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Mice infected with the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta are protected from dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis. Here we assessed expulsion of H. diminuta, the concomitant immune response and the outcome of DNBS-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and IL-22 deficient mice (IL-22-/-) ± infection. Interleukin-22-/- mice had a mildly impaired ability to expel the worm and this correlated with reduced or delayed induction of TH2 immunity as measured by splenic and mesenteric lymph node production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and intestinal Muc-2 mRNA and goblet cell hyperplasia; in contrast, IL-25 increased in the small intestine of IL-22-/- mice 8 and 12 days post-infection compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that H. diminuta directly evoked epithelial production of IL-25 that was inhibited by recombinant IL-22. Also, IL-10 and markers of regulatory T cells were increased in IL-22-/- mice that displayed less DNBS (3 mg, ir. 72h)-induced colitis. Wild-type mice infected with H. diminuta were protected from colitis, as were infected IL-22-/- mice and the latter to a degree that they were almost indistinguishable from control, non-DNBS treated mice. Finally, treatment with anti-IL-25 antibodies exaggerated DNBS-induced colitis in IL-22-/- mice and blocked the anti-colitic effect of infection with H. diminuta. Thus, IL-22 is identified as an endogenous brake on helminth-elicited TH2 immunity, reducing the efficacy of expulsion of H. diminuta and limiting the effectiveness of the anti-colitic events mobilized following infection with H. diminuta in a non-permissive host. PMID:27055194

  16. RIPK1 protects from TNF-α-mediated liver damage during hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Filliol, Aveline; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Le Seyec, Jacques; Farooq, Muhammad; Genet, Valentine; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Bertin, John; Gough, Peter J; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu JM; Samson, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Cell death of hepatocytes is a prominent characteristic in the pathogenesis of liver disease, while hepatolysis is a starting point of inflammation in hepatitis and loss of hepatic function. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte cell death, the role of the cytokines of hepatic microenvironment and the involvement of intracellular kinases, remain unclear. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a key cytokine involved in cell death or survival pathways and the role of RIPK1 has been associated to the TNF-α-dependent signaling pathway. We took advantage of two different deficient mouse lines, the RIPK1 kinase dead knock-in mice (Ripk1K45A) and the conditional knockout mice lacking RIPK1 only in liver parenchymal cells (Ripk1LPC-KO), to characterize the role of RIPK1 and TNF-α in hepatitis induced by concanavalin A (ConA). Our results show that RIPK1 is dispensable for liver homeostasis under steady-state conditions but in contrast, RIPK1 kinase activity contributes to caspase-independent cell death induction following ConA injection and RIPK1 also serves as a scaffold, protecting hepatocytes from massive apoptotic cell death in this model. In the Ripk1LPC-KO mice challenged with ConA, TNF-α triggers apoptosis, responsible for the observed severe hepatitis. Mechanism potentially involves both TNF-independent canonical NF-κB activation, as well as TNF-dependent, but canonical NF-κB-independent mechanisms. In conclusion, our results suggest that RIPK1 kinase activity is a pertinent therapeutic target to protect liver against excessive cell death in liver diseases. PMID:27831558

  17. Synaptic activity protects neurons against calcium-mediated oxidation and contraction of mitochondria during excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Depp, Constanze; Bas-Orth, Carlos; Schroeder, Lisa; Hellwig, Andrea; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-10-07

    Excitotoxicity triggered by extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) has been implicated in many neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke. Mitochondrial calcium overload leading to mitochondrial dysfunction represents an early event in excitotoxicity. Neurons are rendered resistant to excitotoxicity by previous periods of synaptic activity that activates a nuclear calcium-driven neuroprotective gene program. This process, termed acquired neuroprotection, involves transcriptional repression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter leading to a reduction in excitotoxcity-associated mitochondrial calcium load. As mitochondrial calcium and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be linked, we monitored excitotoxicity-associated changes in the mitochondrial redox status using the ratiometric glutathione redox potential indicator, Grx1-roGFP2, targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. Aim of this study was to investigate if suppression of oxidative stress underlies mitoprotection afforded by synaptic activity. We found that synaptic activity protects primary rat hippocampal neurons against acute excitotoxicity-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and mitochondrial contraction associated with it. Downregulation of the mitochondrial uniporter by genetic means mimics the protective effect of synaptic activity on mitochondrial redox status. These findings indicate that oxidative stress acts downstream of mitochondrial calcium overload in excitotoxicity. Innovation and conclusion: We established mito-Grx1-roGFP2 as a reliable and sensitive tool to monitor rapid redox changes in mitochondria during excitotoxicity. Our results highlight the importance of developing means of blocking mitochondrial calcium overload for therapeutic targeting of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. IL-22 Restrains Tapeworm-Mediated Protection against Experimental Colitis via Regulation of IL-25 Expression.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Fernando, Maria R; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L; Matisz, Chelsea E; Wang, Arthur; McKay, Derek M

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22, an immune cell-derived cytokine whose receptor expression is restricted to non-immune cells (e.g. epithelial cells), can be anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Mice infected with the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta are protected from dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis. Here we assessed expulsion of H. diminuta, the concomitant immune response and the outcome of DNBS-induced colitis in wild-type (WT) and IL-22 deficient mice (IL-22-/-) ± infection. Interleukin-22-/- mice had a mildly impaired ability to expel the worm and this correlated with reduced or delayed induction of TH2 immunity as measured by splenic and mesenteric lymph node production of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and intestinal Muc-2 mRNA and goblet cell hyperplasia; in contrast, IL-25 increased in the small intestine of IL-22-/- mice 8 and 12 days post-infection compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that H. diminuta directly evoked epithelial production of IL-25 that was inhibited by recombinant IL-22. Also, IL-10 and markers of regulatory T cells were increased in IL-22-/- mice that displayed less DNBS (3 mg, ir. 72h)-induced colitis. Wild-type mice infected with H. diminuta were protected from colitis, as were infected IL-22-/- mice and the latter to a degree that they were almost indistinguishable from control, non-DNBS treated mice. Finally, treatment with anti-IL-25 antibodies exaggerated DNBS-induced colitis in IL-22-/- mice and blocked the anti-colitic effect of infection with H. diminuta. Thus, IL-22 is identified as an endogenous brake on helminth-elicited TH2 immunity, reducing the efficacy of expulsion of H. diminuta and limiting the effectiveness of the anti-colitic events mobilized following infection with H. diminuta in a non-permissive host.

  19. TALEN-Mediated Knockout of CCR5 Confers Protection Against Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingjie; Li, Juan; Shi, Xuanling; Jia, Wenxu; Wen, Yi; Hu, Xiongbing; Zhuang, Fengfeng; Xi, Jianzhong; Zhang, Linqi

    2017-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) represents a valuable tool for genomic engineering due to its single-nucleotide precision, high nuclease activity, and low cytotoxicity. We report here systematic design and characterization of 28 novel TALENs targeting multiple regions of CCR5 gene (CCR5-TALEN) which encodes the co-receptor critical for entry of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). By systemic characterization of these CCR5-TALENs, we have identified one (CCR5-TALEN-515) with higher nuclease activity, specificity, and lower cytotoxicity compared with zinc-finger nuclease (CCR5-ZFN) currently undergoing clinical trials. Sequence analysis of target cell line GHOST-CCR5-CXCR4 and human primary CD4 T cells showed that the double-strand breaks at the TALEN targeted sites resulted in truncated or nonfunctional CCR5 proteins thereby conferring protection against HIV-1 infection in vitro. None of the CCR5-TALENs had detectable levels of off-target nuclease activity against the homologous region in CCR2 although substantial level was identified for CCR5-ZFN in the primary CD4 T cells. Our results suggest that the CCR5-TALENs identified here are highly functional nucleases that produce protective genetic alterations to human CCR5. Application of these TALENs directly to the primary CD4 T cells and CD34 hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) of infected individuals could help to create an immune system resistant to HIV-1 infection, recapitulating the success of "Berlin patient" and serving as an essential first step towards a "functional" cure of AIDS.

  20. Polyphenol oxidase-mediated protection against oxidative stress is not associated with enhanced photosynthetic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Boeckx, Tinne; Webster, Richard; Winters, Ana L.; Webb, K. Judith; Gay, Alan; Kingston-Smith, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyse the oxidation of monophenols and/or o-diphenols to highly reactive o-quinones, which in turn interact with oxygen and proteins to form reactive oxygen species (ROS) and typical brown-pigmented complexes. Hence PPOs can affect local levels of oxygen and ROS. Although the currently known substrates are located in the vacuole, the enzyme is targeted to the thylakoid lumen, suggesting a role for PPOs in photosynthesis. The current study was designed to investigate the potential involvement of PPOs in the photosynthetic response to oxidative stress. Methods Photosynthesis (A, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, qN, qP, NPQ) was measured in leaves of a wild-type and a low-PPO mutant of red clover (Trifolium pratense ‘Milvus’) under control conditions and under a stress treatment designed to induce photooxidative stress: cold/high light (2 °C/580 µmol m2 s–1) or 0–10 µm methyl viologen. Foliar protein content and oxidation state were also determined. Key Results Photosynthetic performance, and chlorophyll and protein content during 4 d of cold/high light stress and 3 d of subsequent recovery under control growth conditions showed similar susceptibility to stress in both lines. However, more extensive oxidative damage to protein in mutants than wild-types was observed after treatment of attached leaves with methyl viologen. In addition, PPO activity could be associated with an increased capacity to dissipate excess energy, but only at relatively low methyl viologen doses. Conclusions The presence of PPO activity in leaves did not correspond to a direct role for the enzyme in the regulation or protection of photosynthesis under cold stress. However, an indication that PPO could be involved in cellular protection against low-level oxidative stress requires further investigation. PMID:26041733

  1. Dynamics of symbiont-mediated antibiotic production reveal efficient long-term protection for beewolf offspring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insects have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to defend themselves and their offspring against antagonists. One of these strategies involves the utilization of antimicrobial compounds provided by symbiotic bacteria to protect the host or its nutritional resources from pathogens and parasites. In the symbiosis of the solitary digger wasp, Philanthus triangulum (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), the bacterial symbiont ‘Candidatus Streptomyces philanthi’ defends the developing larvae against pathogens by producing a mixture of at least nine antimicrobial substances on the cocoon surface. This antibiotic cocktail inhibits the growth of a broad range of detrimental fungi and bacteria, thereby significantly enhancing the offspring’s survival probability. Results Here we show that the production of antimicrobial compounds by the beewolf symbionts is confined to the first two weeks after cocoon spinning, leading to a high concentration of piericidins and streptochlorin on the cocoon surface. Expression profiling of housekeeping, sporulation, and antibiotic biosynthesis genes indicates that antibiotic production coincides with morphological differentiation that enables the symbionts to survive the nutrient-limited conditions on the beewolf cocoon. The antibiotic substances remain stable on the cocoon surface for the entire duration of the beewolf’s hibernation period, demonstrating that the compounds are resistant against environmental influences. Conclusions The antibiotic production by the beewolf symbionts serves as a reliable protection for the wasp offspring against pathogenic microorganisms during the long and unpredictable developmental phase in the subterranean brood cells. Thus, the beewolf-Streptomyces symbiosis provides one of the rare examples of antibiotics serving as an efficient defense in the natural environment and may aid in devising new strategies for the utilization of antibiotic combination therapies in human medicine against increasingly

  2. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Actions of Vitamin D in Combating TB/HIV

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Anna K.; Martineau, Adrian R.; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) disease activation is now believed to arise due to a lack of inflammatory homeostatic control at either end of the spectrum of inflammation: either due to immunosuppression (decreased antimicrobial activity) or due to immune activation (excess/aberrant inflammation). Vitamin D metabolites can increase antimicrobial activity in innate immune cells, which, in the context of HIV-1 coinfection, have insufficient T cell-mediated help to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. Moreover, maintaining vitamin D sufficiency prior to MTB infection enhances the innate antimicrobial response to T cell-mediated interferon-γ. Conversely, vitamin D can act to inhibit expression and secretion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators and matrix degrading enzymes driving immunopathology during active TB and antiretroviral- (ARV-) mediated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Adjunct vitamin D therapy during treatment of active TB may therefore reduce lung pathology and TB morbidity, accelerate resolution of cavitation and thereby decrease the chance of transmission, improve lung function following therapy, prevent relapse, and prevent IRIS in those initiating ARVs. Future clinical trials of vitamin D for TB prevention and treatment must be designed to detect the most appropriate primary endpoint, which in some cases should be anti-inflammatory and not antimicrobial. PMID:25101194

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation mediates protection from kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury through α7nAChR+ splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chikara; Sung, Sun-sang J.; Moscalu, Stefan; Jankowski, Jakub; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and immune systems interact in complex ways to maintain homeostasis and respond to stress or injury, and rapid nerve conduction can provide instantaneous input for modulating inflammation. The inflammatory reflex referred to as the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway regulates innate and adaptive immunity, and modulation of this reflex by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in various inflammatory disease models, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Effectiveness of VNS in these models necessitates the integration of neural signals and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on splenic macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), which promotes the release of proinflammatory molecules. Stimulation of vagal afferents or efferents in mice 24 hours before IRI markedly attenuated acute kidney injury (AKI) and decreased plasma TNF. Furthermore, this protection was abolished in animals in which splenectomy was performed 7 days before VNS and IRI. In mice lacking α7nAChR, prior VNS did not prevent IRI. Conversely, adoptive transfer of VNS-conditioned α7nAChR splenocytes conferred protection to recipient mice subjected to IRI. Together, these results demonstrate that VNS-mediated attenuation of AKI and systemic inflammation depends on α7nAChR-positive splenocytes. PMID:27088805

  4. The influence of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α on protective immunity mediated by antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma; Price, David A; Dahm-Vicker, Michaela; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Klenerman, Paul; Gallimore, Awen

    2003-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), a member of the CC-chemokine subfamily, is known to induce chemotaxis of a variety of cell types in vivo. Although the role of MIP-1α in inflammatory responses generated following primary infection of mice with many different pathogens has been characterized, the influence of this chemokine on the generation of antigen-specific T-cell responses in vivo is less well understood. This is important, as virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL) play a crucial role in defence against viral infections, both acutely and in the long term. In this study, we compared the ability of wild-type and MIP-1α-deficient (MIP-1α−/−) mice to mount CTL responses specific for the immunodominant epitope derived from influenza nucleoprotein (NP366–374). Influenza-specific CTL responses were compared with respect to frequency, cytotoxic activity and ability to clear subsequent infections with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the influenza NP. The results indicate that antiviral CTL generated in MIP-1α−/− mice are slightly impaired in their ability to protect against a subsequent infection. However, impaired in vivo CTL-mediated antiviral protection was found to be associated with reduced cytotoxicity rather than with a failure of the CTL to migrate to peripheral sites of infection. PMID:12709019

  5. Expression of the CHOP-inducible carbonic anhydrase CAVI-b is required for BDNF-mediated protection from hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Tori A; Abel, Allyssa; Demme, Chris; Sherman, Teresa; Pan, Pei-wen; Halterman, Marc W; Parkkila, Seppo; Nehrke, Keith

    2014-01-16

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) comprise a family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. CAs contribute to a myriad of physiological processes, including pH regulation, anion transport and water balance. To date, 16 known members of the mammalian alpha-CA family have been identified. Given that the catalytic family members share identical reaction chemistry, their physiologic roles are influenced greatly by their tissue and sub-cellular locations. CAVI is the lone secreted CA and exists in both saliva and the gastrointestinal mucosa. An alternative, stress-inducible isoform of CAVI (CAVI-b) has been shown to be expressed from a cryptic promoter that is activated by the CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Homologous Protein (CHOP). The CAVI-b isoform is not secreted and is currently of unknown physiological function. Here we use neuronal models, including a model derived using Car6 and CHOP gene ablations, to delineate a role for CAVI-b in ischemic protection. Our results demonstrate that CAVI-b expression, which is increased through CHOP-signaling in response to unfolded protein stress, is also increased by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). While enforced expression of CAVI-b is not sufficient to protect against ischemia, CHOP regulation of CAVI-b is necessary for adaptive changes mediated by BDNF that reduce subsequent ischemic damage. These results suggest that CAVI-b comprises a necessary component of a larger adaptive signaling pathway downstream of CHOP.

  6. DJ-1-Mediated protective effect of protocatechuic aldehyde against oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Wei; Yamane, Takuya; Maita, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Shizuma; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Pu, Xiao-Ping; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    DJ-1 was identified as a causal gene for a familial form of early onset Parkinson's disease (PD), park 7. DJ-1 plays roles in transcriptional regulation and the anti-oxidative stress reaction. In this study, we found that protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL), a traditional Chinese medicine compound, bound to DJ-1 in vitro and that PAL protected SH-SY5Y cells but not DJ-1-knockdown SH-SY5Y cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death, indicating that the protective effect of PAL is mediated by DJ-1. Furthermore, PAL inhibited production of reactive oxygen species and the inhibition was abated in DJ-1-knockdown cells. PAL increased and decreased phosphorylation of AKT and PTEN, respectively, in SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting that the AKT pathway is one of the specific signaling pathways in PAL-induced neuroprotection. Moreover, PAL prevented superfluous oxidation of cysteine 106 of DJ-1, an essential amino acid for DJ-1's function. The present study demonstrates that PAL has potential neuroprotective effects through DJ-1.

  7. AAV8-Mediated In Vivo Overexpression of miR-155 Enhances the Protective Capacity of Genetically Attenuated Malarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hentzschel, Franziska; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Börner, Kathleen; Heiss, Kirsten; Knapp, Bettina; Sattler, Julia M; Kaderali, Lars; Castoldi, Mirco; Bindman, Julia G; Malato, Yann; Willenbring, Holger; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Grimm, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, caused by protozoan Plasmodium parasites, remains a prevalent infectious human disease due to the lack of an efficient and safe vaccine. This is directly related to the persisting gaps in our understanding of the parasite's interactions with the infected host, especially during the clinically silent yet essential liver stage of Plasmodium development. Previously, we and others showed that genetically attenuated parasites (GAP) that arrest in the liver induce sterile immunity, but only upon multiple administrations. Here, we comprehensively studied hepatic gene and miRNA expression in GAP-injected mice, and found both a broad activation of IFNγ-associated pathways and a significant increase of murine microRNA-155 (miR-155), that was especially pronounced in non-parenchymal cells including liver-resident macrophages (Kupffer cells). Remarkably, ectopic upregulation of this miRNA in the liver of mice using robust hepatotropic adeno-associated virus 8 (AAV8) vectors enhanced GAP's protective capacity substantially. In turn, this AAV8-mediated miR-155 expression permitted a reduction of GAP injections needed to achieve complete protection against infectious parasite challenge from previously three to only one. Our study highlights a crucial role of mammalian miRNAs in Plasmodium liver infection in vivo and concurrently implies their great potential as future immune-augmenting agents in improved vaccination regimes against malaria and other diseases. PMID:25189739

  8. CD44 is a macrophage binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis that mediates macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Heikens, Mirjam; Pals, Steven T.; Neut, Ronald van der; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Cell migration and phagocytosis are both important for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are critically dependent on the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Since CD44 is an adhesion molecule involved in inflammatory responses and is connected to the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the role of CD44 in both these processes. Macrophage (Mφ) recruitment into M. tuberculosis–infected lungs and delayed-type hypersensitivity sites was impaired in CD44-deficient (CD44–/–) mice. In addition, the number of T lymphocytes and the concentration of the protective key cytokine IFN-γ were reduced in the lungs of infected CD44–/– mice. The production of IFN-γ by splenocytes of CD44–/– mice was profoundly increased upon antigen-specific stimulation. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that soluble CD44 can directly bind to virulent M. tuberculosis. Mycobacteria also interacted with Mφ-associated CD44, as reflected by reduced binding and internalization of bacilli by CD44–/– Mφs. This suggests that CD44 is a receptor on Mφs for binding of M. tuberculosis. CD44–/– mice displayed a decreased survival and an enhanced mycobacterial outgrowth in lungs and liver during pulmonary tuberculosis. In summary, we have identified CD44 as a new Mφ binding site for M. tuberculosis that mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, Mφ recruitment, and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:12618522

  9. Paracaspase MALT1 deficiency protects mice from autoimmune-mediated demyelination.

    PubMed

    Mc Guire, Conor; Wieghofer, Peter; Elton, Lynn; Muylaert, David; Prinz, Marco; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert

    2013-03-15

    The paracaspase MALT 1 is a major player in lymphocyte activation and proliferation. MALT1 mediates Ag-induced signaling to the transcription factor NF-κB by functioning both as a scaffold protein and cysteine protease. We studied the role of MALT1 in the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. MALT1-knockout mice did not develop any clinical symptoms of EAE. In addition, lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration into the spinal cord was absent in MALT1-knockout mice, as were demyelination and proinflammatory gene expression. Adoptive transfer experiments showed that MALT1 deficiency in splenocytes is sufficient for EAE resistance. Moreover, autoreactive T cell activation was severely impaired in MALT1-deficient T cells, suggesting the inability of MALT1-deficient effector T cells to induce demyelinating inflammation in the CNS. Finally, the MALT1 substrates A20 and CYLD were completely processed in wild-type T cells during EAE, which was partially impaired in MALT1-deficient T cells, suggesting a contribution of MALT1 proteolytic activity in T cell activation and EAE development. Together, our data indicate that MALT1 may be an interesting therapeutic target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  10. Promotion of CHIP-mediated p53 degradation protects the heart from ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Naito, Atsuhiko T; Okada, Sho; Minamino, Tohru; Iwanaga, Koji; Liu, Mei-Lan; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Sahara, Naruhiko; Mizoroki, Tatsuya; Takashima, Akihiko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Nagai, Toshio; Shiojima, Ichiro; Komuro, Issei

    2010-06-11

    The number of patients with coronary heart disease, including myocardial infarction, is increasing and novel therapeutic strategy is awaited. Tumor suppressor protein p53 accumulates in the myocardium after myocardial infarction, causes apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and plays an important role in the progression into heart failure. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of p53 accumulation in the heart after myocardial infarction and tested whether anti-p53 approach would be effective against myocardial infarction. Through expression screening, we found that CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein) is an endogenous p53 antagonist in the heart. CHIP suppressed p53 level by ubiquitinating and inducing proteasomal degradation. CHIP transcription was downregulated after hypoxic stress and restoration of CHIP protein level prevented p53 accumulation after hypoxic stress. CHIP overexpression in vivo prevented p53 accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis after myocardial infarction. Promotion of CHIP function by heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG), also prevented p53 accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. CHIP-mediated p53 degradation was at least one of the cardioprotective effects of 17-AAG. We found that downregulation of CHIP level by hypoxia was responsible for p53 accumulation in the heart after myocardial infarction. Decreasing the amount of p53 prevented myocardial apoptosis and ameliorated ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. We conclude that anti-p53 approach would be effective to treat myocardial infarction.

  11. UV-B photoreceptor-mediated protection of the photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Allorent, Guillaume; Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Chappuis, Richard; Kuntz, Marcel; Truong, Thuy B.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Life on earth is dependent on the photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical energy. However, absorption of excess sunlight can damage the photosynthetic machinery and limit photosynthetic activity, thereby affecting growth and productivity. Photosynthetic light harvesting can be down-regulated by nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). A major component of NPQ is qE (energy-dependent nonphotochemical quenching), which allows dissipation of light energy as heat. Photodamage peaks in the UV-B part of the spectrum, but whether and how UV-B induces qE are unknown. Plants are responsive to UV-B via the UVR8 photoreceptor. Here, we report in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that UVR8 induces accumulation of specific members of the light-harvesting complex (LHC) superfamily that contribute to qE, in particular LHC Stress-Related 1 (LHCSR1) and Photosystem II Subunit S (PSBS). The capacity for qE is strongly induced by UV-B, although the patterns of qE-related proteins accumulating in response to UV-B or to high light are clearly different. The competence for qE induced by acclimation to UV-B markedly contributes to photoprotection upon subsequent exposure to high light. Our study reveals an anterograde link between photoreceptor-mediated signaling in the nucleocytosolic compartment and the photoprotective regulation of photosynthetic activity in the chloroplast. PMID:27930292

  12. Fungal-mediated multitrophic interactions--do grass endophytes in diet protect voles from predators?

    PubMed

    Saari, Susanna; Sundell, Janne; Huitu, Otso; Helander, Marjo; Ketoja, Elise; Ylönen, Hannu; Saikkonen, Kari

    2010-03-24

    Plant-associated micro-organisms such as mycotoxin-producing endophytes commonly have direct negative effects on herbivores. These effects may be carried over to natural enemies of the herbivores, but this has been rarely explored. We examined how feeding on Neotyphodium endophyte infected (E+) and endophyte free (E-) meadow ryegrass (Scherodonus pratensis) affects body mass, population size and mobility of sibling voles (Microtus levis), and whether the diet mediates the vulnerability of voles to least weasel (Mustela nivalis nivalis) predation. Because least weasels are known to be olfactory hunters, we also examined whether they are able to distinguish olfactory cues of voles fed on E+ and E- diets. Neither body mass of voles nor population size differed between diets. However, contrary to our prediction, least weasels preyed more often on voles fed with E- grass than on voles fed with E+ grass. The mobility of voles fed on E+ grass was reduced compared to voles fed on E- grass, but this effect was unrelated to risk of predation. Least weasels appeared unable to distinguish between excrement odours of voles between the two treatments. Our results suggest that consumption of endophytic grass is not directly deleterious to sibling voles. What's more, consumption of endophytes appears to be advantageous to voles by reducing risk of mammalian predation. Our study is thus the first to demonstrate an effect of plant-associated microbial symbionts on herbivore-predator interactions in vertebrate communities.

  13. Epithelial Proinflammatory Response and Curcumin-Mediated Protection from Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Schaefers, Matthew M.; Breshears, Laura M.; Anderson, Michele J.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Grill, Alex E.; Panyam, Jayanth; Southern, Peter J.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus initiates infections and produces virulence factors, including superantigens (SAgs), at mucosal surfaces. The SAg, Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1) induces cytokine secretion from epithelial cells, antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes, and causes toxic shock syndrome (TSS). This study investigated the mechanism of TSST-1-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from human vaginal epithelial cells (HVECs) and determined if curcumin, an anti-inflammatory agent, could reduce TSST-1-mediated pathology in a rabbit vaginal model of TSS. TSST-1 caused a significant increase in NF-κB-dependent transcription in HVECs that was associated with increased expression of TNF- α, MIP-3α, IL-6 and IL-8. Curcumin, an antagonist of NF-κB-dependent transcription, inhibited IL-8 production from ex vivo porcine vaginal explants at nontoxic doses. In a rabbit model of TSS, co-administration of curcumin with TSST-1 intravaginally reduced lethality by 60% relative to 100% lethality in rabbits receiving TSST-1 alone. In addition, TNF-α was undetectable from serum or vaginal tissue of curcumin treated rabbits that survived. These data suggest that the inflammatory response induced at the mucosal surface by TSST-1 is NF-κB dependent. In addition, the ability of curcumin to prevent TSS in vivo by co-administration with TSST-1 intravaginally suggests that the vaginal mucosal proinflammatory response to TSST-1 is important in the progression of mTSS. PMID:22431984

  14. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  15. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  16. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, P.; Allaman, I.; Rothenfusser, K.; Fiumelli, H.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  17. UV-B photoreceptor-mediated protection of the photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Allorent, Guillaume; Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Chappuis, Richard; Kuntz, Marcel; Truong, Thuy B; Niyogi, Krishna K; Ulm, Roman; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2016-12-20

    Life on earth is dependent on the photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical energy. However, absorption of excess sunlight can damage the photosynthetic machinery and limit photosynthetic activity, thereby affecting growth and productivity. Photosynthetic light harvesting can be down-regulated by nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). A major component of NPQ is qE (energy-dependent nonphotochemical quenching), which allows dissipation of light energy as heat. Photodamage peaks in the UV-B part of the spectrum, but whether and how UV-B induces qE are unknown. Plants are responsive to UV-B via the UVR8 photoreceptor. Here, we report in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that UVR8 induces accumulation of specific members of the light-harvesting complex (LHC) superfamily that contribute to qE, in particular LHC Stress-Related 1 (LHCSR1) and Photosystem II Subunit S (PSBS). The capacity for qE is strongly induced by UV-B, although the patterns of qE-related proteins accumulating in response to UV-B or to high light are clearly different. The competence for qE induced by acclimation to UV-B markedly contributes to photoprotection upon subsequent exposure to high light. Our study reveals an anterograde link between photoreceptor-mediated signaling in the nucleocytosolic compartment and the photoprotective regulation of photosynthetic activity in the chloroplast.

  18. Promiscuous methionyl-tRNA synthetase mediates adaptive mistranslation to protect cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yang, Won Suk; Hong, Jeena; Kang, Taehee; Oh, Young Sun; Kim, Kyung Rok; Han, Byung Woo; Hwang, Byung Joon; Kang, Beom Sik; Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) acylate transfer (t)RNAs with amino acids. Charging tRNAs with the right amino acids is the first step in translation; therefore, the accurate and error-free functioning of ARSs is an essential prerequisite for translational fidelity. A recent study found that methionine (Met) can be incorporated into non-Met residues of proteins through methionylation of non-cognate tRNAs under conditions of oxidative stress. However, it was not understood how this mis-methionylation is achieved. Here, we report that methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MRS) is phosphorylated at Ser209 and Ser825 by extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) under conditions of stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that this phosphorylated MRS shows increased affinity for non-cognate tRNAs with lower affinity for tRNAMet, leading to an increase in Met residues in cellular proteins. The expression of a mutant MRS containing the substitutions S209D and S825D, mimicking dual phosphorylation, reduced ROS levels and cell death. This controlled inaccuracy of MRS seems to serve as a defense mechanism against ROS-mediated damage at the cost of translational fidelity. PMID:25097229

  19. The novel DNA glycosylase, NEIL1, protects mammalian cells from radiation-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, Thomas A; Zaika, Elena; Fernandes, Andrea S; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Miller, Holly; Grollman, Arthur P

    2003-05-13

    DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species generates miscoding and blocking lesions that may lead to mutations or cell death. Base excision repair (BER) constitutes a universal mechanism for removing oxidatively damaged bases and restoring the integrity of genomic DNA. In Escherichia coli, the DNA glycosylases Nei, Fpg, and Nth initiate BER of oxidative lesions; OGG1 and NTH1 proteins fulfill a similar function in mammalian cells. Three human genes, designated NEIL1, NEIL2 and NEIL3, encode proteins that contain sequence homologies to Nei and Fpg. We have cloned the corresponding mouse genes and have overexpressed and purified mNeil1, a DNA glycosylase that efficiently removes a wide spectrum of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions. These lesions include the two cis-thymineglycol(Tg) stereoisomers, guanine- and adenine-derived formamidopyrimidines, and 5,6-dihydrouracil. Two of these lesions, fapyA and 5S,6R thymine glycol, are not excised by mOgg1 or mNth1. We have also used RNA interference technology to establish embryonic stem cell lines deficient in Neil1 protein and showed them to be sensitive to low levels of gamma-irradiation. The results of these studies suggest that Neil1 is an essential component of base excision repair in mammalian cells; its presence may contribute to the redundant repair capacity observed in Ogg1 -/- and Nth1 -/- mice.

  20. Inhibition of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling protects from mitochondria-mediated kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ising, Christina; Koehler, Sybille; Brähler, Sebastian; Merkwirth, Carsten; Höhne, Martin; Baris, Olivier R; Hagmann, Henning; Kann, Martin; Fabretti, Francesca; Dafinger, Claudia; Bloch, Wilhelm; Schermer, Bernhard; Linkermann, Andreas; Brüning, Jens C; Kurschat, Christine E; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Langer, Thomas; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and alterations in energy metabolism have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function and requires the prohibitin ring complex subunit prohibitin-2 (PHB2) at the mitochondrial inner membrane. Here, we provide a link between PHB2 deficiency and hyperactive insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Deletion of PHB2 in podocytes of mice, terminally differentiated cells at the kidney filtration barrier, caused progressive proteinuria, kidney failure, and death of the animals and resulted in hyperphosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), a known mediator of the mTOR signaling pathway. Inhibition of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling system through genetic deletion of the insulin receptor alone or in combination with the IGF-1 receptor or treatment with rapamycin prevented hyperphosphorylation of S6RP without affecting the mitochondrial structural defect, alleviated renal disease, and delayed the onset of kidney failure in PHB2-deficient animals. Evidently, perturbation of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling contributes to tissue damage in mitochondrial disease, which may allow therapeutic intervention against a wide spectrum of diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  1. Protective roles of B and T lymphocyte attenuator in NKT cell-mediated experimental hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Arifumi; Watanabe, Norihiko; Oya, Yoshihiro; Owada, Takayoshi; Ikeda, Kei; Suto, Akira; Kagami, Shin-ichiro; Hirose, Koichi; Kanari, Hiroko; Kawashima, Saki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Taniguchi, Masaru; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Although B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) was originally identified as an inhibitory coreceptor selectively expressed on Th1 cells and B cells, recent studies have revealed that BTLA is expressed on a variety of cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and NK cells, and modulates their functions. However, the role of BTLA in the regulation of NKT cell function remains unknown. In this study, we found that BTLA was expressed on NKT cells at the levels similar to those on T cells and that BTLA-deficient (BTLA(-/-)) NKT cells produced larger amounts of IL-4 and IFN-gamma upon alpha-glactosylceramide stimulation as compared with wild-type (WT) NKT cells. In vivo, BTLA(-/-) mice produced larger amounts of IL-4 and IFN-gamma upon Con A injection and were more susceptible to Con A-induced hepatitis than WT mice. In addition, the augmentation of Con A-induced hepatitis in BTLA(-/-) mice was not observed in BTLA/NKT-double deficient mice. Moreover, NKT(-/-) mice reconstituted with BTLA(-/-) NKT cells were significantly more susceptible to Con A-induced hepatitis as compared with NKT (-/-) mice reconstituted with WT NKT cells. These results suggest that BTLA functions as the inhibitory coreceptor of NKT cells and plays a critical role in the prevention of NKT cell-mediated liver injury.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 could mediate the protective effects of hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning against hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Sun, Xue-Jun; Liu, Ji; Kang, Zhi-Min; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2011-10-01

    1. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) has been shown to play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis when the liver undergoes sublethal stress, such as ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of HO-1 in hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) preconditioning against liver injury after I/R. 2. A total hepatic ischaemia (30 min) and reperfusion (60 min) injury model in rats was used in the present study. Preconditioned groups were exposed to HBO 24 h prior to the induction of I/R injury. Other groups were injected with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) intraperitoneally 1 h before I/R to inhibit HO-1 activity. At the end of the reperfusion period, blood and liver samples were collected for the analysis of liver injury markers, morphological changes, and HO-1 expression and activity in the liver. 3. In untreated rats, I/R induced an increase in hepatic injury markers, such as plasma transaminases, inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β), and tissue malondialdehyde. However, HBO preconditioning attenuated the I/R-induced increases in these hepatic injury markers, and prevented both the necrosis and apoptosis of hepatocytes induced by I/R injury. Furthermore, HBO preconditioning significantly increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in the liver. In rats in which HO-1 activity had been inhibited with ZnPP pretreatment, the protective effects of HBO preconditioning against I/R injury were abolished. 4. In conclusion, HBO preconditioning can protect the liver against I/R injury and it appears that this effect might be mediated by the induction of HO-1.

  3. 17β-ESTRADIOL MEDIATED PROTECTION AGAINST VASCULAR LEAK FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK: ROLE OF ESTROGEN RECEPTORS AND APOPTOTIC SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Ed W.; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A.; Smythe, W. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a clinical complication associated with hemorrhagic shock (HS) and occurs mainly due to the disruption of the adherens junctional complex. The objective of this study was to understand the role of 17β-estradiol in HS-induced hyperpermeability particularly focusing on estrogen receptors. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, HS was induced by withdrawing blood to reduce the mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 40 mmHg for 1 hour followed by 1 hour of resuscitation. to 90 mmHg. The study groups were; 17β-estradiol, tamoxifen, fulvestrant plus 17β-estradiol, propyl pyrazole triol plus 17β-estradiol, and diarylpropionitrite plus 17β-estradiol. Intravital microscopy was utilized to study changes in mesenteric post-capillary venules. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species formation was studied in vivo utilizing dihydrorhodamine 123. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) was studied using the fluorescent cationic probe JC- 1. The mesenteric microvasculature was analyzed for cytochrome c levels by ELISA and caspase-3 activity by a fluorometric assay. Our results demonstrated that 17β-estradiol attenuated HS-induced hyperpermeability. Fulvestrant reversed this protective effect (p<0.05). Tamoxifen 5 mg/kg attenuated HS-induced hyperpermeability where as 10 mg/kg induced permeability (p<0.05). Both α and β estrogen receptor agonists inhibited HS-induced hyperpermeability (p<0.05). 17β-Estradiol decreased HS-induced ROS formation and restored MTP. 17β-Estradiol decreased both cytosolic cytochrome c level and activation of caspase-3 (p<0.05). These findings suggest that 17β-estradiol protects the microvasculature following HS and that this protection may be mediated through the α and β estrogen receptors. PMID:20160663

  4. IL-33-Mediated Expansion of Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Protects from Progressive Glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Jan-Hendrik; Becker, Martina; Kopp, Kerstin; Düster, Mathis; Brix, Silke R; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Kluth, Luis A; Gnirck, Ann-Christin; Attar, Madena; Krohn, Sonja; Fehse, Boris; Stahl, Rolf A K; Panzer, Ulf; Turner, Jan-Eric

    2017-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have an important role in the immune system's response to different forms of infectious and noninfectious pathologies. In particular, IL-5- and IL-13-producing type 2 ILCs (ILC2s) have been implicated in repair mechanisms that restore tissue integrity after injury. However, the presence of renal ILCs in humans has not been reported. In this study, we show that ILC populations are present in the healthy human kidney. A detailed characterization of kidney-residing ILC populations revealed that IL-33 receptor-positive ILC2s are a major ILC subtype in the kidney of humans and mice. Short-term IL-33 treatment in mice led to sustained expansion of IL-33 receptor-positive kidney ILC2s and ameliorated adriamycin-induced glomerulosclerosis. Furthermore, the expansion of ILC2s modulated the inflammatory response in the diseased kidney in favor of an anti-inflammatory milieu with a reduction of pathogenic myeloid cell infiltration and a marked accumulation of eosinophils that was required for tissue protection. In summary, kidney-residing ILC2s can be effectively expanded in the mouse kidney by IL-33 treatment and are central regulators of renal repair mechanisms. The presence of ILC2s in the human kidney tissue identifies these cells as attractive therapeutic targets for CKD in humans. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  5. Intraspecific facilitation by allelochemical mediated grazing protection within a toxigenic dinoflagellate population.

    PubMed

    John, Uwe; Tillmann, Urban; Hülskötter, Jennifer; Alpermann, Tilman J; Wohlrab, Sylke; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2015-01-07

    Dinoflagellates are a major cause of harmful algal blooms (HABs), with consequences for coastal marine ecosystem functioning and services. Alexandrium fundyense (previously Alexandrium tamarense) is one of the most abundant and widespread toxigenic species in the temperate Northern and Southern Hemisphere and produces paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins as well as lytic allelochemical substances. These bioactive compounds may support the success of A. fundyense and its ability to form blooms. Here we investigate the impact of grazing on monoclonal and mixed set-ups of highly (Alex2) and moderately (Alex4) allelochemically active A. fundyense strains and a non-allelochemically active conspecific (Alex5) by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Polykrikos kofoidii. While Alex4 and particularly Alex5 were strongly grazed by P. kofoidii when offered alone, both strains grew well in the mixed assemblages (Alex4 + Alex5 and Alex2 + Alex5). Hence, the allelochemical active strains facilitated growth of the non-active strain by protecting the population as a whole against grazing. Based on our results, we argue that facilitation among clonal lineages within a species may partly explain the high genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Alexandrium populations. Populations of Alexandrium may comprise multiple cooperative traits that act in concert with intraspecific facilitation, and hence promote the success of this notorious HAB species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. The Protective Effect of Gangliosides on Lead (Pb)-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mediated by Autophagic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hongtao; Wang, Lan; He, Junhong; Wang, Zhufeng

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant and can affect intelligence development and the learning ability and memory of children. Therefore, necessary measures should be taken to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from Pb toxicity. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids that are constituents of mammalian cell membranes and are more abundantly expressed in the CNS. Studies have shown that gangliosides constitute a useful tool in the attempt to promote functional recovery of CNS and can reverse Pb-induced impairments of synaptic plasticity in rats. However, the detailed mechanisms have yet to be fully understood. In our present study, we tried to investigate the role of gangliosides in Pb-induced injury in hippocampus neurons and to further confirm the detailed mechanism. Our results show that Pb-induced injuries in the spatial reference memory were associated with a reduction of cell viability and cell apoptosis, and treatment with gangliosides markedly ameliorated the Pb-induced injury by inhibition of apoptosis action. Gangliosides further attenuated Pb-induced the abnormal autophagic process by regulation of mTOR pathways. In summary, our study establishes the efficacy of gangliosides as neuroprotective agents and provides a strong rationale for further studies on the underlying mechanisms of their neuroprotective functions. PMID:27023584

  7. Tempol protects blood proteins and lipids against peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Bani-Ahmad, Mohammad A; Jaradat, Ahmad Q

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by excessive production of various free radicals and reactive species among which, peroxynitrite is most frequently produced in several pathological conditions. Peroxynitrite is the product of the superoxide anion reaction with nitric oxide, which is reported to take place in the intravascular compartment. Several studies have reported that peroxynitrite targets red blood cells, platelets and plasma proteins, and induces various forms of oxidative damage. This in vitro study was designed to further characterize the types of oxidative damage induced in platelets and plasma proteins by peroxynitrite. This study also determined the ability of tempol to protect blood plasma and platelets against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage. The ability of various concentrations of tempol (25, 50, 75, and 100 µM) to antagonize peroxynitrite-induced oxidation was evaluated by measuring the levels of protein carbonyl groups and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances in experimental groups. Exposure of platelets and plasma to 100 µM peroxynitrite resulted in an increased levels of carbonyl groups and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Tempol significantly inhibited carbonyl group formation in plasma and platelet proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, tempol significantly reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in both plasma and platelet samples (P < 0.05). Thus, tempol has antioxidative properties against peroxynitrite-induced oxidative damage in blood plasma and platelets. PMID:25107897

  8. Alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated protection against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, NancyEllen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2003-11-01

    The alpha(7)-selective nicotinic partial agonist 3-[2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene]anabaseine (DMXB) was examined for its ability to modulate ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat neurons. Primary cultures of hippocampal neurons were established from Long-Evans, embryonic day (E)-18 rat fetuses and maintained for 7 days. Ethanol (0-150 mM), DMXB (0-56 microM), or both were subsequently co-applied to cultures. Ethanol was added two additional times to the cultures to compensate for evaporation. After 5 days, neuronal viability was assessed with the MTT cell proliferation assay. Results demonstrated that ethanol reduces neuronal viability in a concentration-dependent fashion and that DMXB protects against this ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, also in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results support the suggestion that nicotinic partial agonists may be useful in treating binge drinking-induced neurotoxicity and may provide clues as to why heavy drinkers are usually smokers.

  9. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  10. Protective role of C-phycocyanin against secondary changes during sodium selenite mediated cataractogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rasiah Pratheepa; Anbarasu, Kumarasamy

    2014-04-01

    Age related cataract is the leading cause of blindness associated with accumulation of oxidative stress in the eye lens. The present investigation reveals the rational of the beneficial effects of the natural compound C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is beneficial when administered to rat pups to protect against the secondary effects of sodium selenite induced cataractogenesis. A single subcutaneous dose of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg body weight) on the 10th day of postpartum is adequate to induce cataract in rat pups. Serum biochemical parameters, such as the level of electrolytes, mean activities of anti-oxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione were observed to be significantly altered during selenite induced cataractogenic process. Histopathological examination revealed signs of degradation of normal cell architecture in the liver, kidney and eye lens. Interestingly, the deleterious effects of sodium selenite toxicity were restored with the simultaneous treatment with C-PC. The results suggest that an administration of 200 mg/kg body weight of C-PC has the ability to prevent/alter the secondary changes reflected in the serum biochemical and histological modifications in rats exposed to sodium selenite. These results complement the beneficial role of C-PC of cyanobacterial origin as a efficacious anti-cataractogenic agent against sodium selenite toxicity.

  11. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:26354865

  12. Quercetin induces mitochondrial mediated apoptosis and protective autophagy in human glioblastoma U373MG cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonji; Moon, Jeong Yong; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Cho, Somi Kim

    2013-01-01

    Quercetin is a dietary flavonoid with known antitumor effects against several types of cancers by promoting apoptotic cell death and inducing cell cycle arrest. However, U373MG malignant glioma cells expressing mutant p53 are resistant to a 24 h quercetin treatment. In this study, the anticancer effect of quercetin was reevaluated in U373MG cells, and quercetin was found to be significantly effective in inhibiting proliferation of U373MG cells in a concentration-dependent manner after 48 and 72 h of incubation. Quercetin induced U373MG cell death through apoptosis, as evidenced by the increased number of cells in the sub-G1 phase, the appearance of fragmented nuclei, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, proteolytic activation of caspase-3 and caspase-7, an increase in caspase-3 and 9 activities, and degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein. Furthermore, quercetin activated JNK and increased the expression of p53, which translocated to the mitochondria and simultaneously led to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. We also found that quercetin induced autophagy. Pretreatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, strongly augmented apoptosis in U373MG cells, indicating that quercetin induced protective autopagy in U373MG cells.

  13. Quercetin Induces Mitochondrial Mediated Apoptosis and Protective Autophagy in Human Glioblastoma U373MG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeong Yong; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Cho, Somi Kim

    2013-01-01

    Quercetin is a dietary flavonoid with known antitumor effects against several types of cancers by promoting apoptotic cell death and inducing cell cycle arrest. However, U373MG malignant glioma cells expressing mutant p53 are resistant to a 24 h quercetin treatment. In this study, the anticancer effect of quercetin was reevaluated in U373MG cells, and quercetin was found to be significantly effective in inhibiting proliferation of U373MG cells in a concentration-dependent manner after 48 and 72 h of incubation. Quercetin induced U373MG cell death through apoptosis, as evidenced by the increased number of cells in the sub-G1 phase, the appearance of fragmented nuclei, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, proteolytic activation of caspase-3 and caspase-7, an increase in caspase-3 and 9 activities, and degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein. Furthermore, quercetin activated JNK and increased the expression of p53, which translocated to the mitochondria and simultaneously led to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. We also found that quercetin induced autophagy. Pretreatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, strongly augmented apoptosis in U373MG cells, indicating that quercetin induced protective autopagy in U373MG cells. PMID:24379902

  14. IL-23-mediated mononuclear phagocyte crosstalk protects mice from Citrobacter rodentium-induced colon immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Aychek, Tegest; Mildner, Alexander; Yona, Simon; Kim, Ki-Wook; Lampl, Nardy; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Boon, Louis; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Cua, Daniel J; Jung, Steffen

    2015-03-12

    Gut homeostasis and mucosal immune defense rely on the differential contributions of dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. Here we show that colonic CX3CR1(+) mononuclear phagocytes are critical inducers of the innate response to Citrobacter rodentium infection. Specifically, the absence of IL-23 expression in macrophages or CD11b(+) DC results in the impairment of IL-22 production and in acute lethality. Highlighting immunopathology as a death cause, infected animals are rescued by the neutralization of IL-12 or IFNγ. Moreover, mice are also protected when the CD103(+) CD11b(-) DC compartment is rendered deficient for IL-12 production. We show that IL-12 production by colonic CD103(+) CD11b(-) DC is repressed by IL-23. Collectively, in addition to its role in inducing IL-22 production, macrophage-derived or CD103(-) CD11b(+) DC-derived IL-23 is required to negatively control the otherwise deleterious production of IL-12 by CD103(+) CD11b(-) DC. Impairment of this critical mononuclear phagocyte crosstalk results in the generation of IFNγ-producing former TH17 cells and fatal immunopathology.

  15. The Protective Effect of Gangliosides on Lead (Pb)-Induced Neurotoxicity Is Mediated by Autophagic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongtao; Wang, Lan; He, Junhong; Wang, Zhufeng

    2016-03-25

    Lead (Pb) is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant and can affect intelligence development and the learning ability and memory of children. Therefore, necessary measures should be taken to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from Pb toxicity. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids that are constituents of mammalian cell membranes and are more abundantly expressed in the CNS. Studies have shown that gangliosides constitute a useful tool in the attempt to promote functional recovery of CNS and can reverse Pb-induced impairments of synaptic plasticity in rats. However, the detailed mechanisms have yet to be fully understood. In our present study, we tried to investigate the role of gangliosides in Pb-induced injury in hippocampus neurons and to further confirm the detailed mechanism. Our results show that Pb-induced injuries in the spatial reference memory were associated with a reduction of cell viability and cell apoptosis, and treatment with gangliosides markedly ameliorated the Pb-induced injury by inhibition of apoptosis action. Gangliosides further attenuated Pb-induced the abnormal autophagic process by regulation of mTOR pathways. In summary, our study establishes the efficacy of gangliosides as neuroprotective agents and provides a strong rationale for further studies on the underlying mechanisms of their neuroprotective functions.

  16. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Protects Escherichia coli from Tellurite-Mediated Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Juan M.; Arenas, Felipe A.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2011-01-01

    The tellurium oxyanion tellurite induces oxidative stress in most microorganisms. In Escherichia coli, tellurite exposure results in high levels of oxidized proteins and membrane lipid peroxides, inactivation of oxidation-sensitive enzymes and reduced glutathione content. In this work, we show that tellurite-exposed E. coli exhibits transcriptional activation of the zwf gene, encoding glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), which in turn results in augmented synthesis of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). Increased zwf transcription under tellurite stress results mainly from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and not from a depletion of cellular glutathione. In addition, the observed increase of G6PDH activity was paralleled by accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), suggesting a metabolic flux shift toward the pentose phosphate shunt. Upon zwf overexpression, bacterial cells also show increased levels of antioxidant molecules (NADPH, GSH), better-protected oxidation-sensitive enzymes and decreased amounts of oxidized proteins and membrane lipids. These results suggest that by increasing NADPH content, G6PDH plays an important role in E. coli survival under tellurite stress. PMID:21984934

  17. A possibly sigma-1 receptor mediated role of dimethyltryptamine in tissue protection, regeneration, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Szabo, Attila; Winkelman, Michael J; Luna, Luis E; McKenna, Dennis J

    2013-09-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is classified as a naturally occurring serotonergic hallucinogen of plant origin. It has also been found in animal tissues and regarded as an endogenous trace amine transmitter. The vast majority of research on DMT has targeted its psychotropic/psychedelic properties with less focus on its effects beyond the nervous system. The recent discovery that DMT is an endogenous ligand of the sigma-1 receptor may shed light on yet undiscovered physiological mechanisms of DMT activity and reveal some of its putative biological functions. A three-step active uptake process of DMT from peripheral sources to neurons underscores a presumed physiological significance of this endogenous hallucinogen. In this paper, we overview the literature on the effects of sigma-1 receptor ligands on cellular bioenergetics, the role of serotonin, and serotoninergic analogues in immunoregulation and the data regarding gene expression of the DMT synthesizing enzyme indolethylamine-N-methyltransferase in carcinogenesis. We conclude that the function of DMT may extend central nervous activity and involve a more universal role in cellular protective mechanisms. Suggestions are offered for future directions of indole alkaloid research in the general medical field. We provide converging evidence that while DMT is a substance which produces powerful psychedelic experiences, it is better understood not as a hallucinogenic drug of abuse, but rather an agent of significant adaptive mechanisms that can also serve as a promising tool in the development of future medical therapies.

  18. Clausena anisata-mediated protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Bach, Tran-The; Hai, Do-Van; Quang, Bui-Hong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Joongku; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-04-01

    Clausena anisata (Willd.) Hook.f. ex Benth. (CA), which is widely used in traditional medicine, reportedly exerts antitumor, anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effects of CA in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered treatments for 3 days by oral gavage. On day 3, the mice were instilled intranasally with LPS or PBS followed 3 h later by oral CA (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administration. In vitro, CA decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. CA also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2. In vivo, CA administration significantly reduced inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-1β, as well as reactive oxygen species production in the BALF. CA also effectively reduced airway inflammation in mouse lung tissue of an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, in addition to decreasing inhibitor κB (IκB) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings demonstrated that CA inhibited inflammatory responses in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, CA is a potential candidate for development as an adjunctive treatment for inflammatory disorders, such as ALI.

  19. DR3 signaling protects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity mediated by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Lu, WanHua; Finlay, Sarah; Twohig, Jason P; Wang, Eddie C Y; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Bradley, John R

    2012-04-01

    The expression of death receptor 3 (DR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, is up-regulated in human tubular epithelial cells (TECs) during renal injury, but its function in this setting remains unknown. We used cisplatin to induce renal injury in wild-type (DR3(+/+)) or congenitally deficient DR3(-/-) mice to examine the in vivo role of DR3. Cisplatin induced the expression of DR3, its ligand, TNF-like ligand 1A (TL1A), and TNF in TECs, as observed in human renal injury. Cisplatin increased apoptotic death of DR3(-/-) TECs by twofold compared with DR3(+/+) TECs, whereas it reduced the number of tubules expressing phospho-NF-κBp65(Ser276) by 50% at 72 hours. Similar degrees of induction of DR3, TL1A, and TNF, and changes in apoptosis and phospho-NF-κBp65(Ser276), were obtained in mouse kidney organ cultures treated with cisplatin for 3 hours, suggesting a direct effect on TECs. TNF was implicated in mediating cisplatin-induced tubular damage given that the in vivo co-administration of GM6001, an inhibitor of TNF maturation and release, significantly reduced TNF production and tubular damage. Moreover, TNF exacerbated, whereas TL1A reduced, cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the DR3(+/+) mouse proximal tubule cell line, TKPTS. Our data demonstrate that cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is mitigated by DR3 signaling, suggesting that this occurs by antagonizing pro-apoptotic signals induced by TNF. Therefore, activating DR3 may be beneficial in reducing acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protecting against ischaemic stroke in rats by heat shock protein 20-mediated exercise.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Min; Chang, Cheng-Kuei; Chang, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Yu-Chih; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Lin, Jia-Wei

    2015-12-01

    Exercise preconditioning (EP(+) ) has been widely accepted as a being of safe and effective preventive measure for stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether EP(+) improves outcomes of ischaemic stroke by promoting neuronal and glial expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 20. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (288 in number) were used to investigate the contribution of HSP20-containing neurons and HSP20-containing glial cells in the exercise-mediated neuroprotection in the stroke condition using middle cerebral artery occlusion. Exercise preconditioning, in addition to increasing the numbers of both the HSP20-containg neurons (88 ± 8 vs. 43 ± 4; n = 8 each group; P < 0·05) and the HSP20-containg astrocytes (102 ± 10 vs. 56 ± 5; n = 8; P < 0·05) significantly attenuated stroke-induced brain infarct (140 ± 9 vs. 341 ± 20 mm(3) ; n = 8 per group; P < 0·01), neuronal apoptosis (20 ± 5 vs. 87 ± 7; n = 8 per group; n = 8; P < 0·01), glial apoptosis (29 ± 5 vs. 101 ± 4; n = 8; P < 0·01), and neurological deficits (6·6 ± 0·3 vs. 11·7 ± 0·8; n = 8 per group; P < 0·01). Reducing the numbers of both HSP20-containing neurons and HSP20-contaiing glia by intracerebral injection of pSUPER small interfering RNAί expressing HSP20 significantly reversed the beneficial effects of EP(+) in attenuating stroke-induced cerebral infarct, neuronal and glial apoptosis, and neurological deficits. The numbers of both the HSP20-containing neurons and the HSP20-containing glia inversely correlated with the outcomes of ischaemic stroke. In addition, preischaemic treadmill exercise improves outcomes of ischaemic stroke by increasing the numbers of both the HSP20-containing neurons and the HSP20-containing glia. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Effect of hydrogen passivation on the photoluminescence of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatryb, G.; Klak, M. M.; Wojcik, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Mascher, P.; Podhorodecki, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, silicon-rich silicon oxide films containing terbium were prepared by means of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of hydrogen passivation on defects-mediated non-radiative recombination of excited Tb3+ ions was investigated by photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence decay measurements. Passivation was found to have no effect on shape and spectral position of the excitation spectra. In contrast, a gradual increase in photoluminescence intensity and photoluminescence decay time was observed upon passivation for the main 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ions. This observation was attributed to passivation of non-radiative recombination defects centers with hydrogen. It was found that the number of emitted photons increases upon passivation as a result of two effects: (1) longer Tb3+ lifetime in the 5D4 excited state and (2) optical activation of new Tb3+ emitters. The obtained results were discussed and compared with other experimental reports.

  2. Beclin-1-mediated autophagy protects spinal cord neurons against mechanical injury-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Lin, Jian-Hua; Muharram, Akram; Liu, Wen-Ge

    2014-06-01

    Apoptosis has been widely reported to be involved in the pathogenesis associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, autophagy has also been implicated in various neuronal damage models. However, the role of autophagy in SCI is still controversial and its interrelationship with apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we used an in vitro SCI model to observe a time-dependent induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Mechanical injury induced autophagy markers such as LC3 lipidation, LC3II/LC3I conversion, and Beclin-1 expression. Injured neurons showed decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis. To elucidate the effect of autophagy on apoptosis, the mechanically-injured neurons were treated with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and 3-methyl adenine (3-MA), which are known to regulate autophagy positively and negatively, respectively. Rapamycin-treated neurons showed the highest level of cell viability and lowest level of apoptosis among the injured neurons and those treated with 3-MA showed the reciprocal effect. Notably, rapamycin-treated neurons exhibited slightly reduced Bax expression and significantly increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, by plasmid transfection, we showed that Beclin-1-overexpressing neuronal cells responded to mechanical injury with greater LC3II/LC3I conversion and cell viability, lower levels of apoptosis, higher Bcl-2 expression, and unaltered Bax expression as compared to vector control cells. Beclin-1-knockdown neurons showed almost the opposite effects. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy may serve as a protection against apoptosis in mechanically-injured spinal cord neurons. Targeting mTOR and/or enhancing Beclin-1 expression might be alternative therapeutic strategies for SCI.

  3. Resveratrol protects against polychlorinated biphenyl-mediated impairment of glucose homeostasis in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicki A.; English, Victoria; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Pearson, Kevin J.; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant polyphenol that exhibits several favorable effects on glucose homeostasis in adipocytes. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that are ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) impair glucose homeostasis in mice. PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis was associated with augmented expression of inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue, a site for accumulation of lipophilic PCBs. This study determined if RSV protects against PCB-77 induced impairment of glucose disposal in vitro and in vivo, and if these beneficial effects are associated with enhanced nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling in adipose tissue. PCB-77 increased oxidative stress and abolished insulin stimulated 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects were restored by RSV, which resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), the downstream target of Nrf2 signaling. We quantified glucose and insulin tolerance and components of Nrf2 and insulin signaling cascades in adipose tissue of male C57BL/6 mice administered vehicle or PCB-77 (50 mg/kg) and fed a diet with or without resVida® (0.1%, or 160 mg/kg/day). PCB-77 impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, and these effects were reversed by RSV. PCB-77 induced reductions in insulin signaling in adipose tissue were also abolished by RSV, which increased NQO1 expression. These results demonstrate that coplanar PCB-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis in mice can be prevented by RSV, potentially through stimulation of Nrf2 signaling and enhanced insulin stimulated glucose disposal in adipose tissue. PMID:24231106

  4. Podophyllum hexandrum-Mediated Survival Protection and Restoration of Other Cellular Injuries in Lethally Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Gupta, Manju Lata; Gupta, Vanita; Verma, Savita; Suri, Krishna Avtar; Devi, Memita; Sharma, Punita; Khan, Ehsan Ahmed; Alam, M. Sarwar

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at the development of a safe and effective formulation to counter the effects of lethal irradiation. The sub-fraction (G-001M), prepared from Podophyllum hexandrum has rendered high degree of survival (>90%) at a dose of 6 mg kg−1 body weight (intramuscular) in lethally irradiated mice. Therapeutic dose of G-001M, at about 20 times lower concentration than its LD100, has revealed a DRF of 1.62. Comet assay studies in peripheral blood leukocytes have reflected that, treatment of G-001M before irradiation has significantly reduced DNA tail length (P < .001) and DNA damage score (P < .001), as compared to radiation-only group. Spleen cell counts in irradiated animals had declined drastically at the very first day of exposure, and the fall continued till the 5th day (P < .001). In the treated irradiated groups, there was a steep reduction in the counts initially, but this phase did not prolong. More than 60% decline in thymocytes of irradiated group animals was registered at 5 h of irradiation when compared with controls, and the fall progressed further downwards with the similar pace till 5th day of exposure (P < .001). At later intervals, thymus was found fully regressed. In G-001M pre-treated irradiated groups also, thymocytes decreased till the 5th day but thereafter rejuvenated and within 30 days of treatment the values were close to normal. Current studies have explicitly indicated that, G-001M in very small doses has not only rendered high survivability in lethally irradiated mice, but also protected their cellular DNA, besides supporting fast replenishment of the immune system. PMID:19553386

  5. Protection of hydroquinone-induced apoptosis by downregulation of Fau is mediated by NQO1.

    PubMed

    Siew, E L; Chan, K M; Williams, G T; Ross, D; Inayat-Hussain, S H

    2012-10-15

    The Fau gene (Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV)-associated ubiquitously expressed gene) was identified as a potential tumor suppressor gene using a forward genetics approach. Downregulation of Fau by overexpression of its reverse sequence has been shown to inhibit apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents. To address a potential role of Fau in benzene toxicity, we investigated the apoptotic effects of hydroquinone (HQ), a major benzene metabolite, in W7.2 mouse thymoma cells transfected with either a plasmid construct expressing the antisense sequence of Fau (rfau) or the empty vector (pcDNA3.1) as a control. HQ induced apoptosis via increased production of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage, measured using dihydroethidine (HE) staining and alkaline Comet assay, respectively, in W7.2 pcDNA3.1 cells. In contrast, when Fau was downregulated by the antisense sequence in W7.2 rfau cells, HQ treatment did not cause DNA damage and oxidative stress and these cells were markedly more resistant to HQ-induced apoptosis. Further investigation revealed that there was an upregulation of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a detoxification enzyme for benzene-derived quinones, in W7.2 rfau cells. Compromising cellular NQO1 by use of a specific mechanism-based inhibitor (MAC 220) and NQO1 siRNA resensitized W7.2 rfau cells to HQ-induced apoptosis. Silencing of Fau in W7.2 wild-type cells resulted in increased levels of NQO1, confirming that downregulation of Fau results in NQO1 upregulation which protects against HQ-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss of neurosteroid-mediated protection following stress during fetal life.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Jonathan J; Cumberland, Angela L; Shaw, Julia C; Bennett, Greer A; Kelleher, Meredith A; Walker, David W; Palliser, Hannah K

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of neurosteroids during late gestation protect the fetal brain from hypoxia/ischaemia and promote neurodevelopment. Suppression of allopregnanolone production during pregnancy leads to the onset of seizure-like activity and potentiates hypoxia-induced brain injury. Markers of myelination are reduced and astrocyte activation is increased. The placenta has a key role in maintaining allopregnanolone concentrations in the fetal circulation and brain during gestation and levels decline markedly after both normal and preterm birth. This leads to the preterm neonate developing in a neurosteroid deficient environment between delivery and term equivalence. The expression of 5α-reductases is also lower in the fetus prior to term. These deficiencies in neurosteroid exposure may contribute to the increase in incidence of the adverse patterns of behaviour seen in children that are born preterm. Repeated exposure to glucocorticoid stimulation suppresses 5α-reductase expression and allopregnanolone levels in the fetus and results in reduced myelination. Both fetal growth restriction and prenatal maternal stress lead to increased cortisol concentrations in the maternal and fetal circulation. Prenatal stress results in reduced expression of key GABAA receptor subunits that normally heighten neurosteroid sensitivity. These stressors also result in altered placental allopregnanolone metabolism pathways. These findings suggest that reduced neurosteroid production and action in the perinatal period may contribute to some of the adverse neurodevelopmental and behavioural outcomes that result from these pregnancy compromises. Studies examining perinatal steroid supplementation therapy with non-metabolisable neurosteroid analogues to improve these outcomes are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. C6 knock-out Mice Are Protected from Thrombophilia Mediated by Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Carrera-Marín Ana; Zurina, Romay-Penabad; Elizabeth, Papalardo; Elba, Reyes-Maldonado; Ethel, Garcia-Latorre; Gracie, Vargas; Tuya, Shilagard; Silvia, Pierangeli

    2013-01-01

    Background Complement activation plays a role in pathogenesis of the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), but the involvement of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC) is unknown. Here we studied the effects of human polyclonal antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies on thrombosis and tissue factor (TF) up-regulation in C6 deficient (C6-/-) mice. Methods C6-/- or the wild-type (C3H/HeJ) C6+/+ mice were injected twice with IgG-APS (n=2) or IgM-APS (n=1) isolated from APS patients or with the corresponding control Igs (IgG-NHS or IgM-NHS). Then, the size of induced thrombi in the femoral vein were determined 72 hours after the first injection. Tissue factor was determined in homogenates of carotid arteries and in peritoneal macrophages. Results Thrombus sizes were significantly larger in C6+/+ treated with IgG-APS1 or with IgG-APS2 or with IgM-APS when compared with C6+/+ mice treated with IgG-NHS or with IgM-NHS, respectively. The sizes of thrombi were significantly smaller in the C6-/- mice injected with IgG-APS1, IgG-APS2 or IgM-APS (p<0.001), compared to their C6+/+ counterparts showing an important abrogation of thrombus formation in mice lacking C6. The TF expression and activity in the C6-/- mice treated with IgG-APS were diminished when compared to C6+/+ treated with the same immunoglobulins. All mice injected with IgG-APS and IgM-APS had medium-high titers of aCL and aβ2GPI antibodies. Conclusions These data indicate that the C6 component of the complement system mediates aPL-thrombogenic effects, underscoring an important pathogenic mechanism and indicating the possibility of inhibiting complement to ameliorate APS-related manifestations. PMID:22933620

  8. N-Acetylcysteine protects against trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity by attenuating oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2013-11-15

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to induce autoimmunity both in humans and animal models. However, mechanisms underlying TCE-mediated autoimmunity remain largely unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory in MRL +/+ mice suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity by supplementing with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, 250 mg/kg/day through drinking water). TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum levels of anti-nuclear, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies. TCE exposure also led to significant induction of anti-malondiadelhyde (MDA)- and anti-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adduct antibodies which were associated with increased ANA in the sera along with increased MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in the livers and kidneys, and increases in protein oxidation (carbonylation) in the sera, livers and kidneys, suggesting an overall increase in oxidative stress. Moreover, TCE exposure also resulted in increased release of IL-17 from splenocytes and increases in IL-17 mRNA expression. Remarkably, NAC supplementation attenuated not only the TCE-induced oxidative stress, IL-17 release and mRNA expression, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies in the sera. These results provide further support to a role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmune response. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for preventive and/or therapeutic strategies. - Highlights: • TCE led to increased autoantibodies, supporting its potential to induce autoimmunity. • TCE exposure led to increases in lipid perioxidation and protein carbonyls. • TCE exposure resulted in

  9. Potential impact of internet addiction and protective psychosocial factors onto depression among Hong Kong Chinese adolescents - direct, mediation and moderation effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anise M S; Li, Jibin; Lau, Joseph T F; Mo, Phoenix K H; Lau, Mason M C

    2016-10-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is a risk factor while some psychosocial factors can be protective against depression among adolescents. Mechanisms of IA onto depression in terms of mediations and moderations involving protective factors are unknown and were investigated in this study. A representative cross-sectional study was conducted among Hong Kong Chinese secondary school students (n=9518). Among males and females, prevalence of depression at moderate or severe level (CES-D≥21) was 38.36% and 46.13%, and that of IA (CIAS>63) was 17.64% and 14.01%, respectively. Adjusted for socio-demographics, depression was positively associated with IA [males: adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=4.22, 95% CI=3.61-4.94; females: AOR=4.79, 95% CI=3.91-5.87] and negatively associated with psychosocial factors including self-esteem, positive affect, family support, and self-efficacy (males: AOR=0.76-0.94; females: AOR=0.72-0.92, p<.05). The positive association between IA and depression was partially mediated by the protective psychosocial factors (mainly self-esteem) across sexes. Through significant moderations, IA also reduced magnitude of protective effects of self-efficacy and family support among males and that of positive affect among both sexes against depression. The high IA prevalence contributes to increased risk of prevalent depression through its direct effect, mediation (reduced level of protective factors) and moderation (reduced magnitude of protective effects) effects. Understanding to mechanisms between IA and depression through protective factors is enhanced. Screening and interventions for IA and depression are warranted, and should cultivate protective factors, and unlink negative impact of IA onto levels and effects of protective factors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Estrogen receptor-alpha mediates estrogen protection from angiotensin II-induced hypertension in conscious female mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Pamidimukkala, Jaya; Lubahn, Dennis B; Hay, Meredith

    2007-04-01

    It has been shown that the female sex hormones have a protective role in the development of angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) the estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) is involved in the protective effects of estrogen against ANG II-induced hypertension and 2) central ERs are involved. Blood pressure (BP) was measured in female mice with the use of telemetry implants. ANG II (800 ng.kg(-1).min(-1)) was administered subcutaneously via an osmotic pump. Baseline BP in the intact, ovariectomized (OVX) wild-type (WT) and ERalpha knockout (ERalphaKO) mice was similar; however, the increase in BP induced by ANG II was greater in OVX WT (23.0 +/- 1.0 mmHg) and ERalphaKO mice (23.8 +/- 2.5 mmHg) than in intact WT mice (10.1 +/- 4.5 mmHg). In OVX WT mice, central infusion of 17beta-estradiol (E(2); 30 microg.kg(-1).day(-1)) attenuated the pressor effect of ANG II (7.0 +/- 0.4 mmHg), and this protective effect of E(2) was prevented by coadministration of ICI-182,780 (ICI; 1.5 microg.kg(-1).day(-1), 18.8 +/- 1.5 mmHg), a nonselective ER antagonist. Furthermore, central, but not peripheral, infusions of ICI augmented the pressor effects of ANG II in intact WT