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Sample records for mediate random switching

  1. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  2. A random Q-switched fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies have been performed on random lasers in which multiple-scattering feedback is used to generate coherent emission. Q-switching and mode-locking are well-known routes for achieving high peak power output in conventional lasers. However, in random lasers, the ubiquitous random cavities that are formed by multiple scattering inhibit energy storage, making Q-switching impossible. In this paper, widespread Rayleigh scattering arising from the intrinsic micro-scale refractive-index irregularities of fiber cores is used to form random cavities along the fiber. The Q-factor of the cavity is rapidly increased by stimulated Brillouin scattering just after the spontaneous emission is enhanced by random cavity resonances, resulting in random Q-switched pulses with high brightness and high peak power. This report is the first observation of high-brightness random Q-switched laser emission and is expected to stimulate new areas of scientific research and applications, including encryption, remote three-dimensional random imaging and the simulation of stellar lasing. PMID:25797520

  3. Random Telegraph Switching in Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. C.; Wybourne, M. N.; Goodnick, S. M.

    1996-03-01

    We have investigated non equilibrium transport through quantum point contacts. At low source- drain bias the devices display well defined quantized conductance plateaus. At higher biases (> 6 mV) regions of instability in the differential conductance are observed. These regions are associated with the onset of conduction when the chemical potential on one side of the contact is lifted above the bottom of the next one-dimensional subband. Time dependent measurements of these regions reveal random telegraph switching (RTS) in the conductance.^1 The RTS has been studied as a function of source-drain bias, gate bias, and temperature. We believe the conductance switching is due to random fluctuations in the height of the barrier forming the point contact. We will discuss possible mechanisms for the barrier height fluctuations. ^1J.C. Smith, C. Berven, M.N. Wybourne and S.M. Goodnick. ``Conductance Instabilities in Quantum Point Contact'' In press, Surface Science. This work was supported in part by the Office of Naval Research N00014-93-1-0618.

  4. Coherent-state quantum key distribution without random basis switching

    SciTech Connect

    Weedbrook, Christian; Lance, Andrew M.; Bowen, Warwick P.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2006-02-15

    The random switching of measurement bases is commonly assumed to be a necessary step of quantum key distribution protocols. In this paper we present a no-switching protocol and show that switching is not required for coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution. Further, this protocol achieves higher information rates and a simpler experimental setup compared to previous protocols that rely on switching. We propose an optimal eavesdropping attack against this protocol, assuming individual Gaussian attacks. Finally, we investigate and compare the no-switching protocol applied to the original Bennett-Brassard 1984 scheme.

  5. Effects of regular switching between languages during random number generation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Böhm, Jessica

    2005-04-01

    Random number generation is a task that engages working memory and executive processes within the domain of number representation. In the present study we address the role of language in number processing by switching languages during random number generation (numbers 1-9), using German (L1) and English (L2), and alternating L1/L2. Results indicate large correspondence between performance in L1 and L2. In contrast to nonswitching performance, randomization with alternating languages showed a significant increase of omitted responses, whereas the random sequences were less stereotyped, showing significantly less repetition avoidance and cycling behavior. During an intentional switch between languages, errors in language sequence appeared in 23% of responses on the average, independently of the quality of randomization but associated with a clear persistence of L2. These results indicate that random number generation is more closely linked to auditory-phonological representation of numerals than to visual arabic notation. PMID:15974362

  6. Effects of regular switching between languages during random number generation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Böhm, Jessica

    2005-04-01

    Random number generation is a task that engages working memory and executive processes within the domain of number representation. In the present study we address the role of language in number processing by switching languages during random number generation (numbers 1-9), using German (L1) and English (L2), and alternating L1/L2. Results indicate large correspondence between performance in L1 and L2. In contrast to nonswitching performance, randomization with alternating languages showed a significant increase of omitted responses, whereas the random sequences were less stereotyped, showing significantly less repetition avoidance and cycling behavior. During an intentional switch between languages, errors in language sequence appeared in 23% of responses on the average, independently of the quality of randomization but associated with a clear persistence of L2. These results indicate that random number generation is more closely linked to auditory-phonological representation of numerals than to visual arabic notation.

  7. DNA-mediated excitonic upconversion FRET switching

    SciTech Connect

    Kellis, Donald L.; Rehn, Sarah M.; Cannon, Brittany L.; Davis, Paul H.; Graugnard, Elton; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Knowlton, William B.

    2015-11-17

    Excitonics is a rapidly expanding field of nanophotonics in which the harvesting of photons, ensuing creation and transport of excitons via Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET), and subsequent charge separation or photon emission has led to the demonstration of excitonic wires, switches, Boolean logic and light harvesting antennas for many applications. FRET funnels excitons down an energy gradient resulting in energy loss with each step along the pathway. Conversely, excitonic energy up conversion via up conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), although currently inefficient, serves as an energy ratchet to boost the exciton energy. Although FRET-based up conversion has been demonstrated, it suffers from low FRET efficiency and lacks the ability to modulate the FRET. We have engineered an up conversion FRET-based switch by combining lanthanide-doped UCNPs and fluorophores that demonstrates excitonic energy up conversion by nearly a factor of 2, an excited state donor to acceptor FRET efficiency of nearly 25%, and an acceptor fluorophore quantum efficiency that is close to unity. These findings offer a promising path for energy up conversion in nanophotonic applications including artificial light harvesting, excitonic circuits, photovoltaics, nanomedicine, and optoelectronics.

  8. DNA-mediated excitonic upconversion FRET switching

    DOE PAGES

    Kellis, Donald L.; Rehn, Sarah M.; Cannon, Brittany L.; Davis, Paul H.; Graugnard, Elton; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Knowlton, William B.

    2015-11-17

    Excitonics is a rapidly expanding field of nanophotonics in which the harvesting of photons, ensuing creation and transport of excitons via Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET), and subsequent charge separation or photon emission has led to the demonstration of excitonic wires, switches, Boolean logic and light harvesting antennas for many applications. FRET funnels excitons down an energy gradient resulting in energy loss with each step along the pathway. Conversely, excitonic energy up conversion via up conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), although currently inefficient, serves as an energy ratchet to boost the exciton energy. Although FRET-based up conversion has been demonstrated, it suffersmore » from low FRET efficiency and lacks the ability to modulate the FRET. We have engineered an up conversion FRET-based switch by combining lanthanide-doped UCNPs and fluorophores that demonstrates excitonic energy up conversion by nearly a factor of 2, an excited state donor to acceptor FRET efficiency of nearly 25%, and an acceptor fluorophore quantum efficiency that is close to unity. These findings offer a promising path for energy up conversion in nanophotonic applications including artificial light harvesting, excitonic circuits, photovoltaics, nanomedicine, and optoelectronics.« less

  9. DNA-mediated excitonic upconversion FRET switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellis, Donald L.; Rehn, Sarah M.; Cannon, Brittany L.; Davis, Paul H.; Graugnard, Elton; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Knowlton, William B.

    2015-11-01

    Excitonics is a rapidly expanding field of nanophotonics in which the harvesting of photons, ensuing creation and transport of excitons via Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET), and subsequent charge separation or photon emission has led to the demonstration of excitonic wires, switches, Boolean logic and light harvesting antennas for many applications. FRET funnels excitons down an energy gradient resulting in energy loss with each step along the pathway. Conversely, excitonic energy upconversion via upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), although currently inefficient, serves as an energy ratchet to boost the exciton energy. Although FRET-based upconversion has been demonstrated, it suffers from low FRET efficiency and lacks the ability to modulate the FRET. We have engineered an upconversion FRET-based switch by combining lanthanide-doped UCNPs and fluorophores that demonstrates excitonic energy upconversion by nearly a factor of 2, an excited state donor to acceptor FRET efficiency of nearly 25%, and an acceptor fluorophore quantum efficiency that is close to unity. These findings offer a promising path for energy upconversion in nanophotonic applications including artificial light harvesting, excitonic circuits, photovoltaics, nanomedicine, and optoelectronics.

  10. Complementary resistive switching behavior for conductive bridge random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao-Xuan; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Kai-Huang; Wang, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Lo, Ikai; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a structure of Pt/Cu18Si12O70/TiN has been investigated. By co-sputtering the Cu and SiO2 targets in the switching layer, we can measure the operation mechanism of complementary resistive switching (CRS). This differs from conventional conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) that tends to use Cu electrodes rather than Cu18Si12O70. By changing the voltage and compliance current, we can control device operating characteristics. Because Cu distributes differently in the device depending on this setting, the operating end can be located at either the top or bottom electrode. Device current-voltage (I-V) curves are used to demonstrate that the CRS in the CBRAM device is a double-electrode operation.

  11. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  12. Towards developing a compact model for magnetization switching in straintronics magnetic random access memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Erementchouk, Mikhail; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2016-08-01

    Strain-mediated magnetization switching in a magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) by exploiting a combination of piezoelectricity and magnetostriction has been proposed as an energy efficient alternative to spin transfer torque (STT) and field induced magnetization switching methods in MTJ-based magnetic random access memories (MRAM). Theoretical studies have shown the inherent advantages of strain-assisted switching, and the dynamic response of the magnetization has been modeled using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. However, an attempt to use LLG for simulating dynamics of individual elements in large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAM leads to extremely time-consuming calculations. Hence, a compact analytical solution, predicting the flipping delay of the magnetization vector in the nanomagnet under stress, combined with a liberal approximation of the LLG dynamics in the straintronics MTJ, can lead to a simplified model of the device suited for fast large-scale simulations of multi-megabyte straintronics MRAMs. In this work, a tensor-based approach is developed to study the dynamic behavior of the stressed nanomagnet. First, using the developed method, the effect of stress on the switching behavior of the magnetization is investigated to realize the margins between the underdamped and overdamped regimes. The latter helps the designer realize the oscillatory behavior of the magnetization when settling along the minor axis, and the dependency of oscillations on the stress level and the damping factor. Next, a theoretical model to predict the flipping delay of the magnetization vector is developed and tested against LLG-based numerical simulations to confirm the accuracy of findings. Lastly, the obtained delay is incorporated into the approximate solutions of the LLG dynamics, in order to create a compact model to liberally and quickly simulate the magnetization dynamics of the MTJ under stress. Using the developed delay equation, the

  13. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching mechanisms oriented to resistive random-access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Wu, Jun-Jie; Tang, Yu-Hua

    2013-03-01

    With the progress of the semiconductor industry, the resistive random-access memory (RAM) has drawn increasing attention. The discovery of the memristor has brought much attention to this study. Research has focused on the resistive switching characteristics of different materials and the analysis of resistive switching mechanisms. We discuss the resistive switching mechanisms of different materials in this paper and analyze the differences of those mechanisms from the view point of circuitry to establish their respective circuit models. Finally, simulations are presented. We give the prospect of using different materials in resistive RAM on account of their resistive switching mechanisms, which are applied to explain their resistive switchings.

  14. Microstructural transitions in resistive random access memory composed of molybdenum oxide with copper during switching cycles.

    PubMed

    Arita, Masashi; Ohno, Yuuki; Murakami, Yosuke; Takamizawa, Keisuke; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2016-08-21

    The switching operation of a Cu/MoOx/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device was investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where the TiN surface was slightly oxidized (ox-TiN). The relationship between the switching properties and the dynamics of the ReRAM microstructure was confirmed experimentally. The growth and/or shrinkage of the conductive filament (CF) can be classified into two set modes and two reset modes. These switching modes depend on the device's switching history, factors such as the amount of Cu inclusions in the MoOx layer and the CF geometry. High currents are needed to produce an observable change in the CF. However, sharp and stable switching behaviour can be achieved without requiring such a major change. The local region around the CF is thought to contribute to the ReRAM switching process. PMID:27456192

  15. Microstructural transitions in resistive random access memory composed of molybdenum oxide with copper during switching cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Masashi; Ohno, Yuuki; Murakami, Yosuke; Takamizawa, Keisuke; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    The switching operation of a Cu/MoOx/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device was investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where the TiN surface was slightly oxidized (ox-TiN). The relationship between the switching properties and the dynamics of the ReRAM microstructure was confirmed experimentally. The growth and/or shrinkage of the conductive filament (CF) can be classified into two set modes and two reset modes. These switching modes depend on the device's switching history, factors such as the amount of Cu inclusions in the MoOx layer and the CF geometry. High currents are needed to produce an observable change in the CF. However, sharp and stable switching behaviour can be achieved without requiring such a major change. The local region around the CF is thought to contribute to the ReRAM switching process.The switching operation of a Cu/MoOx/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device was investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where the TiN surface was slightly oxidized (ox-TiN). The relationship between the switching properties and the dynamics of the ReRAM microstructure was confirmed experimentally. The growth and/or shrinkage of the conductive filament (CF) can be classified into two set modes and two reset modes. These switching modes depend on the device's switching history, factors such as the amount of Cu inclusions in the MoOx layer and the CF geometry. High currents are needed to produce an observable change in the CF. However, sharp and stable switching behaviour can be achieved without requiring such a major change. The local region around the CF is thought to contribute to the ReRAM switching process. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02602h

  16. Robust random number generation using steady-state emission of gain-switched laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z. L. Lucamarini, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Fröhlich, B.; Plews, A.; Shields, A. J.

    2014-06-30

    We demonstrate robust, high-speed random number generation using interference of the steady-state emission of guaranteed random phases, obtained through gain-switching a semiconductor laser diode. Steady-state emission tolerates large temporal pulse misalignments and therefore significantly improves the interference quality. Using an 8-bit digitizer followed by a finite-impulse-response unbiasing algorithm, we achieve random number generation rates of 8 and 20 Gb/s, for laser repetition rates of 1 and 2.5 GHz, respectively, with a ±20% tolerance in the interferometer differential delay. We also report a generation rate of 80 Gb/s using partially phase-correlated short pulses. In relation to the field of quantum key distribution, our results confirm the gain-switched laser diode as a suitable light source, capable of providing phase-randomized coherent pulses at a clock rate of up to 2.5 GHz.

  17. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tania; Fischl, Harry; Howe, Françoise S; Woloszczuk, Ronja; Serra Barros, Ana; Xu, Zhenyu; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-11-19

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change.

  18. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  19. Development of Curie point switching for thin film, random access, memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Tchernev, D. I.

    1967-01-01

    Managanese bismuthide films are used in the development of a random access memory device of high packing density and nondestructive readout capability. Memory entry is by Curie point switching using a laser beam. Readout is accomplished by microoptical or micromagnetic scanning.

  20. Random tag insertions by Transposon Integration mediated Mutagenesis (TIM).

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Brigitte M; Reiter, Birgit; Abad, Sandra; Graze, Ina; Glieder, Anton

    2008-10-01

    Transposon Integration mediated Mutagenesis (TIM) is a broadly applicable tool for protein engineering. This method combines random integration of modified bacteriophage Mu transposons with their subsequent defined excision employing type IIS restriction endonuclease AarI. TIM enables deletion or insertion of an arbitrary number of bases at random positions, insertion of functional sequence tags at random positions, replacing randomly selected triplets by a specific codon (e.g. scanning) and site-saturation mutagenesis. As a proof of concept a transposon named GeneOpenerAarIKan was designed and employed to introduce 6xHis tags randomly into the esterase EstC from Burkholderia gladioli. A TIM library was screened with colony based assays for clones with an integrated 6xHis tag and for clones exhibiting esterase activity. The employed strategy enables the isolation of randomly tagged active enzymes in single mutagenesis experiments.

  1. Noise Induced Pattern Switching in Randomly Distributed Delayed Swarms.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Brandon; Mier-Y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Schwartz, Ira B

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of noise on the dynamics of a system of coupled self-propelling particles in the case where the coupling is time-delayed, and the delays are discrete and randomly generated. Previous work has demonstrated that the stability of a class of emerging patterns depends upon all moments of the time delay distribution, and predicts their bifurcation parameter ranges. Near the bifurcations of these patterns, noise may induce a transition from one type of pattern to another. We study the onset of these noise-induced swarm re-organizations by numerically simulating the system over a range of noise intensities and for various distributions of the delays. Interestingly, there is a critical noise threshold above which the system is forced to transition from a less organized state to a more organized one. We explore this phenomenon by quantifying this critical noise threshold, and note that transition time between states varies as a function of both the noise intensity and delay distribution. PMID:25382931

  2. Noise Induced Pattern Switching in Randomly Distributed Delayed Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Brandon; Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of noise on the dynamics of a system of coupled self-propelling particles in the case where the coupling is time-delayed, and the delays are discrete and randomly generated. Previous work has demonstrated that the stability of a class of emerging patterns depends upon all moments of the time delay distribution, and predicts their bifurcation parameter ranges. Near the bifurcations of these patterns, noise may induce a transition from one type of pattern to another. We study the onset of these noise-induced swarm re-organizations by numerically simulating the system over a range of noise intensities and for various distributions of the delays. Interestingly, there is a critical noise threshold above which the system is forced to transition from a less organized state to a more organized one. We explore this phenomenon by quantifying this critical noise threshold, and note that transition time between states varies as a function of both the noise intensity and delay distribution. PMID:25382931

  3. Fast 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure driven by a voltage.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Hu, Jia-Mian; Momeni, Kasra; Wang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-driven 180° magnetization switching provides a low-power alternative to current-driven magnetization switching widely used in spintronic devices. Here we computationally demonstrate a promising route to achieve voltage-driven in-plane 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure (e.g., a heterostructure consisting of an amorphous, slightly elliptical Co40Fe40B20 nanomagnet on top of a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film as an example). This 180° switching follows a unique precessional path all in the film plane, and is enabled by manipulating magnetization dynamics with fast, local piezostrains (rise/release time <0.1 ns) on the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film surface. Our analyses predict ultralow area energy consumption per switching (~0.03 J/m(2)), approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than that dissipated by current-driven magnetization switching. A fast overall switching time of about 2.3 ns is also demonstrated. Further reduction of energy consumption and switching time can be achieved by optimizing the structure and material selection. The present design provides an additional viable route to realizing low-power and high-speed spintronics. PMID:27272678

  4. Fast 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure driven by a voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Hu, Jia-Mian; Momeni, Kasra; Wang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-driven 180° magnetization switching provides a low-power alternative to current-driven magnetization switching widely used in spintronic devices. Here we computationally demonstrate a promising route to achieve voltage-driven in-plane 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure (e.g., a heterostructure consisting of an amorphous, slightly elliptical Co40Fe40B20 nanomagnet on top of a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film as an example). This 180° switching follows a unique precessional path all in the film plane, and is enabled by manipulating magnetization dynamics with fast, local piezostrains (rise/release time <0.1 ns) on the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film surface. Our analyses predict ultralow area energy consumption per switching (~0.03 J/m2), approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than that dissipated by current-driven magnetization switching. A fast overall switching time of about 2.3 ns is also demonstrated. Further reduction of energy consumption and switching time can be achieved by optimizing the structure and material selection. The present design provides an additional viable route to realizing low-power and high-speed spintronics.

  5. Fast 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure driven by a voltage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Hu, Jia-Mian; Momeni, Kasra; Wang, Jian-Jun; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-driven 180° magnetization switching provides a low-power alternative to current-driven magnetization switching widely used in spintronic devices. Here we computationally demonstrate a promising route to achieve voltage-driven in-plane 180° magnetization switching in a strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructure (e.g., a heterostructure consisting of an amorphous, slightly elliptical Co40Fe40B20 nanomagnet on top of a Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film as an example). This 180° switching follows a unique precessional path all in the film plane, and is enabled by manipulating magnetization dynamics with fast, local piezostrains (rise/release time <0.1 ns) on the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 film surface. Our analyses predict ultralow area energy consumption per switching (~0.03 J/m2), approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than that dissipated by current-driven magnetization switching. A fast overall switching time of about 2.3 ns is also demonstrated. Further reduction of energy consumption and switching time can be achieved by optimizing the structure and material selection. The present design provides an additional viable route to realizing low-power and high-speed spintronics. PMID:27272678

  6. The repetitive portion of the Xenopus IgH Mu switch region mediates orientation-dependent class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng Z; Pannunzio, Nicholas R; Lu, Zhengfei; Hsu, Ellen; Yu, Kefei; Lieber, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Vertebrates developed immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) to express different IgH constant regions. Most double-strand breaks for Ig CSR occur within the repetitive portion of the switch regions located upstream of each set of constant domain exons for the Igγ, Igα or Igϵ heavy chain. Unlike mammalian switch regions, Xenopus switch regions do not have a high G-density on the non-template DNA strand. In previous studies, when Xenopus Sμ DNA was moved to the genome of mice, it is able to support substantial CSR when it is used to replace the murine Sγ1 region. Here, we tested both the 2kb repetitive portion and the 4.6 kb full-length portions of the Xenopus Sμ in both their natural (forward) orientation relative to the constant domain exons, as well as the opposite (reverse) orientation. Consistent with previous work, we find that the 4.6 kb full-length Sμ mediates similar levels of CSR in both the forward and reverse orientations. Whereas, the forward orientation of the 2kb portion can restore the majority of the CSR level of the 4.6 kb full-length Sμ, the reverse orientation poorly supports R-looping and no CSR. The forward orientation of the 2kb repetitive portion has more GG dinucleotides on the non-template strand than the reverse orientation. The correlation of R-loop formation with CSR efficiency, as demonstrated in the 2kb repetitive fragment of the Xenopus switch region, confirms a role played by R-looping in CSR that appears to be conserved through evolution.

  7. Defect-mediated polarization switching in ferroelectrics and related materials: from mesoscopic mechanisms to atomistic control.

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J; Borisevich, Albina Y; Baddorf, Arthur P; Balke, Nina; Chang, Hye Jung; Chen, Long-Qing; Choudhury, Samrat; Jesse, Stephen; Maksymovych, Peter; Nikiforov, Maxim P; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-19

    The plethora of lattice and electronic behaviors in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials and heterostructures opens vistas into novel physical phenomena including magnetoelectric coupling and ferroelectric tunneling. The development of new classes of electronic, energy-storage, and information-technology devices depends critically on understanding and controlling field-induced polarization switching. Polarization reversal is controlled by defects that determine activation energy, critical switching bias, and the selection between thermodynamically equivalent polarization states in multiaxial ferroelectrics. Understanding and controlling defect functionality in ferroelectric materials is as critical to the future of oxide electronics and solid-state electrochemistry as defects in semiconductors are for semiconductor electronics. Here, recent advances in understanding the defect-mediated switching mechanisms, enabled by recent advances in electron and scanning probe microscopy, are discussed. The synergy between local probes and structural methods offers a pathway to decipher deterministic polarization switching mechanisms on the level of a single atomically defined defect.

  8. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  9. Isolating a Mediated Route for Response Congruency Effects in Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.

    2015-01-01

    Response congruency effects in task switching reflect worse performance for incongruent targets associated with different responses across tasks than for congruent targets associated with the same response. In the present study, the author investigated whether the effects can be produced solely by a mediated route for response selection, whereby…

  10. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Asif Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-30

    A spintronic device, called the “strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM),” is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  11. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    A spintronic device, called the "strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM)," is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  12. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-05-18

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  13. A Schelling model with switching agents: decreasing segregation via random allocation and social mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazan, Aurélien; Randon-Furling, Julien

    2013-10-01

    We study the behaviour of a Schelling-class system in which a fraction f of spatially-fixed switching agents is introduced. This new model allows for multiple interpretations, including: (i) random, non-preferential allocation (e.g. by housing associations) of given, fixed sites in an open residential system, and (ii) superimposition of social and spatial mobility in a closed residential system. We find that the presence of switching agents in a segregative Schelling-type dynamics can lead to the emergence of intermediate patterns (e.g. mixture of patches, fuzzy interfaces) as the ones described in [E. Hatna, I. Benenson, J. Artif. Soc. Social. Simul. 15, 6 (2012)]. We also investigate different transitions between segregated and mixed phases both at f = 0 and along lines of increasing f, where the nature of the transition changes.

  14. Standardized Effect Size Measures for Mediation Analysis in Cluster-Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Pituch, Keenan A.; Dion, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article presents 3 standardized effect size measures to use when sharing results of an analysis of mediation of treatment effects for cluster-randomized trials. The authors discuss 3 examples of mediation analysis (upper-level mediation, cross-level mediation, and cross-level mediation with a contextual effect) with demonstration of the…

  15. S-Nitrosylation—Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Shu-ichi; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Cieplak, Piotr; Chan, Shing Fai; Kalashnikova, Evgenia; Liao, Lujian; Saleem, Sofiyan; Han, Xuemei; Clemente, Arjay; Nutter, Anthony; Sances, Sam; Brechtel, Christopher; Haus, Daniel; Haun, Florian; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Huang, Xiayu; Li, Hao; Zaremba, Jeffrey D.; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong; Nikzad, Rana; Harrop, Anne; McKercher, Scott R.; Godzik, Adam; Yates, John R.; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO) can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a novel molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade. PMID:25001280

  16. Narrow-linewidth Q-switched random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangming; Ye, Jun; Xiao, Hu; Leng, Jinyong; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu

    2016-08-22

    A narrow-linewidth Q-switched random fiber laser (RFL) based on a half-opened cavity, which is realized by narrow-linewidth fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a section of 3 km passive fiber, has been proposed and experimentally investigated. The narrow-linewidth lasing is generated by the spectral filtering of three FBGs with linewidth of 1.21 nm, 0.56 nm, and 0.12 nm, respectively. The Q switching of the distributed cavity is achieved by placing an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) between the FBG and the passive fiber. The maximal output powers of the narrow-linewidth RFLs with the three different FBGs are 0.54 W, 0.27 W, and 0.08 W, respectively. Furthermore, the repetition rates of the output pulses are 500 kHz, and the pulse durations are about 500 ns. The corresponding pulse energies are about 1.08 μJ, 0.54 μJ, and 0.16 μJ, accordingly. The linewidth of FBG can influence the output characteristics in full scale. The narrower the FBG, the higher the pump threshold; the lower the output power at the same pump level, the more serious the linewidth broadening; and thus the higher the proportion of the CW-ground exists in the output pulse trains. Thanks to the assistance of the band-pass filter (BPF), the proportion of the CW-ground of narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL under the relative high-pump-low-output condition can be reduced effectively. The experimental results indicate that it is challenging to demonstrate a narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL with high quality output. But further power scaling and linewidth narrowing is possible in the case of operating parameters, optimization efforts, and a more powerful pump source. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of narrow-linewidth generation in a Q-switched RFL. PMID:27557200

  17. Markov-switching multifractal models as another class of random-energy-like models in one-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, David B.

    2012-03-01

    We map the Markov-switching multifractal model (MSM) onto the random energy model (REM). The MSM is, like the REM, an exactly solvable model in one-dimensional space with nontrivial correlation functions. According to our results, four different statistical physics phases are possible in random walks with multifractal behavior. We also introduce the continuous branching version of the model, calculate the moments, and prove multiscaling behavior. Different phases have different multiscaling properties.

  18. Switching characteristics for ferroelectric random access memory based on RC model in poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ChangLi; Wang, XueJun; Zhang, XiuLi; Du, XiaoLi; Xu, HaiSheng

    2016-05-01

    The switching characteristic of the poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethlene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) films have been studied at different ranges of applied electric field. It is suggest that the increase of the switching speed upon nucleation protocol and the deceleration of switching could be related to the presence of a non-ferroelectric layer. Remarkably, a capacitor and resistor (RC) links model plays significant roles in the polarization switching dynamics of the thin films. For P(VDF-TrFE) ultrathin films with electroactive interlayer, it is found that the switching dynamic characteristics are strongly affected by the contributions of resistor and non-ferroelectric (non-FE) interface factors. A corresponding experiment is designed using poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic) (PEDOT-PSSH) as interlayer with different proton concentrations, and the testing results show that the robust switching is determined by the proton concentration in interlayer and lower leakage current in circuit to reliable applications of such polymer films. These findings provide a new feasible method to enhance the polarization switching for the ferroelectric random access memory.

  19. HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Second-line Treatment in Children Randomized to Switch at Low versus Higher RNA Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Linda; Melvin, Ann; Fiscus, Susan; Saidi, Yacine; Nastouli, Eleni; Harper, Lynda; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Babiker, Abdel; McKinney, Ross; Gibb, Diana; Tudor-Williams, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background The PENPACT-1 trial compared virologic thresholds to determine when to switch to second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using PENPACT-1 data, we aimed to describe HIV-1 drug resistance accumulation on first-line ART by virologic threshold. Methods PENPACT-1 had a 2x2 factorial design, randomizing HIV-infected children to start protease inhibitor (PI) versus non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based ART, and switch at a 1000c/ml versus 30000c/ml threshold. Switch-criteria were: not achieving the threshold by week 24, confirmed rebound above the threshold thereafter, or CDC-C event. Resistance tests were performed on samples ≥1000c/ml before switch, re-suppression and at 4-year/trial-end. Results Sixty-seven children started PI-based ART and were randomized to switch at 1000c/ml (PI-1000), 64 PIs and 30000c/ml (PI-30000), 67 NNRTIs and 1000c/ml (NNRTI-1000), and 65 NNRTI and 30000c/ml (NNRTI-30000). Ninety-four (36%) children reached the 1000c/ml switch-criteria during 5 years follow-up. In 30000c/ml threshold arms, median time from 1000c/ml to 30000c/ml switch-criteria was 58 (PI) versus 80 (NNRTI) weeks (P=0.81). In NNRTI-30000 more NRTI resistance mutations accumulated than other groups. NNRTI mutations were selected before switching at 1000c/ml (23% NNRTI-1000, 27% NNRTI-30000). Sixty-two children started abacavir+lamivudine, 166 lamivudine+zidovudine or stavudine, and 35 other NRTIs. The abacavir+lamivudine group acquired fewest NRTI mutations. Of 60 switched to second-line, 79% PI-1000, 63% PI-30000, 64% NNRTI-1000 and 100% NNRTI-30000 were <400c/ml 24 weeks later. Conclusion Children on first-line NNRTI-based ART who were randomized to switch at a higher virologic threshold developed the most resistance, yet re-suppressed on second-line. An abacavir+lamivudine NRTI combination seemed protective against development of NRTI resistance. PMID:26322666

  20. CtIP promotes microhomology-mediated alternative end joining during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee-Theilen, Mieun; Matthews, Allysia J; Kelly, Dierdre; Zheng, Simin; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh locus) class-switch recombination (CSR) requires targeted introduction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) into repetitive 'switch'-region DNA elements in the Igh locus and subsequent ligation between distal DSBs. Both canonical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ) that seals DNA ends with little or no homology and a poorly defined alternative end joining (A-NHEJ, also known as alt-NHEJ) process that requires microhomology ends for ligation have been implicated in CSR. Here, we show that the DNA end-processing factor CtIP is required for microhomology-directed A-NHEJ during CSR. Additionally, we demonstrate that microhomology joins that are enriched upon depletion of the C-NHEJ component Ku70 require CtIP. Finally, we show that CtIP binds to switch-region DNA in a fashion dependent on activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Our results establish CtIP as a bona fide component of microhomology-dependent A-NHEJ and unmask a hitherto unrecognized physiological role of microhomology-mediated end joining in a C-NHEJ-proficient environment.

  1. Social defeat stress switches the neural system mediating benzodiazepine conditioned motivation.

    PubMed

    Riad-Allen, Lilian; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-08-01

    Benzodiazepines have been demonstrated to have a high abuse liability in persons suffering from anxiety but have demonstrated mixed abuse liability findings in preclinical models. We hypothesized that by modeling anxiety in a male C57BL/6 mouse model it would be possible to reveal a preference for benzodiazepines within this subpopulation through negative reinforcement. Using the Tube Test of Social Dominance and the Resident/Intruder Paradigm we investigated whether animals identified as dominant or submissive/defeated would differentially display a preference for midazolam (a short acting benzodiazepine) in a conditioned place preference paradigm. Consistent with our hypotheses, benzodiazepine conditioned motivation was mediated by negative reinforcement as submissive but not dominant mice displayed a preference for midazolam. Furthermore, different neural systems mediated midazolam conditioned motivation depending on the stress status of the animal (single vs. repeated stress-as induced by the Resident/Intruder Paradigm). Singly stressed animals showed midazolam place preferences through a dopamine-independent pathway, whereas the place preferences of repeatedly stressed animals were mediated through a dopamine-dependent pathway. This demonstrates that stress is sufficient for switching the neural system mediating midazolam conditioned motivation. Finally, midazolam reinforcement in the conditioned place preference paradigm was shown to be predictive for dominance/submission status.

  2. Correlation-Mediated Processes for Electron-Induced Switching between Néel States of Fe Antiferromagnetic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Yaro, Simeón Moisés; Cartoixà, Xavier; Lorente, Nicolás

    2013-02-01

    The controlled switching between two quasistable Néel states in adsorbed antiferromagnetic Fe chains has recently been achieved by Loth et al. [Science 335, 196 (2012)SCIEAS0036-8075] using tunneling electrons from an STM tip. In order to rationalize their data, we evaluate the rate of tunneling electron-induced switching between the Néel states. Good agreement is found with the experiment, permitting us to identify three switching mechanisms: (i) low STM voltage direct electron-induced transitions, (ii) intermediate STM voltage switching via spin-wave-like excitation, and (iii) high STM voltage transitions mediated by domain-wall formation. Spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic chains are the switching driving force, leading to a marked chain-size dependence.

  3. Dependence of reactive metal layer on resistive switching in a bi-layer structure Ta/HfOx filament type resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daeseok; Woo, Jiyong; Park, Sangsu; Cha, Euijun; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2014-02-01

    The dependence of reactive metal layer on resistive switching characteristics is investigated in a bi-layer structural Ta/HfOx filament type resistive random access memory (ReRAM). By increasing the oxygen absorption rate of the reactive metal layer, formation of an induced resistive switching region that led to significant changes in the resistive switching characteristics of the ReRAM was observed. Electrical and physical analyses showed that the induced TaOx-resistive switching region can result in self-compliance behavior, uniform resistive switching, and a gradual set process, which can be utilized for low power and analog operations.

  4. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-01-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization. PMID:26238042

  5. Stress-stiffening-mediated stem-cell commitment switch in soft responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajat K.; Gocheva, Veronika; Hammink, Roel; Zouani, Omar F.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2016-03-01

    Bulk matrix stiffness has emerged as a key mechanical cue in stem cell differentiation. Here, we show that the commitment and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in physiologically soft (~0.2-0.4 kPa), fully synthetic polyisocyanopeptide-based three-dimensional (3D) matrices that mimic the stiffness of adult stem cell niches and show biopolymer-like stress stiffening, can be readily switched from adipogenesis to osteogenesis by changing only the onset of stress stiffening. This mechanical behaviour can be tuned by simply altering the material’s polymer length whilst maintaining stiffness and ligand density. Our findings introduce stress stiffening as an important parameter that governs stem cell fate in a 3D microenvironment, and reveal a correlation between the onset of stiffening and the expression of the microtubule-associated protein DCAMKL1, thus implicating DCAMKL1 in a stress-stiffening-mediated, mechanotransduction pathway that involves microtubule dynamics in stem cell osteogenesis.

  6. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-08-04

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization.

  7. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-08-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization.

  8. Stromal cell-mediated glycolytic switch in CLL cells involves Notch-c-Myc signaling.

    PubMed

    Jitschin, Regina; Braun, Martina; Qorraj, Mirjeta; Saul, Domenica; Le Blanc, Katarina; Zenz, Thorsten; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios

    2015-05-28

    It is well established that the stromal niche exerts a protective effect on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, thereby also affecting their drug sensitivity. One hallmark of malignant cells is metabolic reprogramming, which is mostly represented by a glycolytic shift known as the Warburg effect. Because treatment resistance can be linked to metabolic alterations, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal cells impact the bioenergetics of primary CLL cells. In fact, stromal contact led to an increase of aerobic glycolysis and the cells' overall glycolytic capacity accompanied by an increased glucose uptake, expression of glucose transporter, and glycolytic enzymes. Activation of Notch signaling and of its direct transcriptional target c-Myc contributed to this metabolic switch. Based on these observations, CLL cells' acquired increased glucose dependency as well as Notch-c-Myc signaling could be therapeutically exploited in an effort to overcome stroma-mediated drug resistance.

  9. Temperature-Independent Switching Rates for a Random Telegraph Signal in a Silicon Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, Nick; Fleetwood, D.M.; Scofield, John H.

    1999-07-19

    We have observed discrete random telegraph signals (RTS'S) in the drain voltages of three, observed above 30 K were thermally activated. The switching rate for the only RTS observed below 30 K was thermally activated above 30 K but temperature-independent below 10 K. To our knowledge, this cross-over from thermal activation to tunneling behavior has not been previously observed for RTS's Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MCEWETS) often exhibit relatively large levels of low-frequency (1/fl noise) [1,2]. Much evidence suggests that this noise is related to the capture all cases, switching rates have been thermally activated, often with different activation energies for capture and/or emission is accompanied by lattice relaxation. Though thermally activated behavior has sufficiently low temperatures [7,9]. While not observed in MOSFETS, cross-over from thermal activation to configurational tunneling has been observed for RTS's in junctions [13]. drain voltage was observed to randomly switch between two discrete levels, designated as Vup and Vdn, similar to RTS's reported by others [2,7'- 11 ]. We have characterized six RTS `S for temperatures above 30 K where thermally activated switching rates are observed. The properties of five of these have been the trap, i.e., the mean time a captured charge carrier spends in the trap before it is emitted. Similarly, we identify the mean time in the low resistance state ( trup in state Vup) as the capture time rc. F@ure 1 shows a typical time trace of the drain-voltage fluctuation &d(t)= Vd(t)+Vd>. This indicate that both the mean capture and emission times become independent of Tat low temperatures and where a= capture or emission, is temperature independent. The solid curve in Figure 3(a) (mean capture time) was obtained using a weighted nonlinear charge carriers are not in thermal equilibrium with the lattice, i.e., that while the lattice is being cooled Instead, we believe that the transition from thermally

  10. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored cell proliferation, and improved cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation.

  11. Causal Inference in Randomized Experiments with Mediational Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Booil

    2008-01-01

    This article links the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach with the principal stratification (PS) approach, both of which have been widely used to study the role of intermediate posttreatment outcomes in randomized experiments. Despite the potential benefit of such integration, the 2 approaches have been developed in parallel with little…

  12. Temperature induced complementary switching in titanium oxide resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, D.; Simanjuntak, F. M.; Tseng, T.-Y.

    2016-07-01

    On the way towards high memory density and computer performance, a considerable development in energy efficiency represents the foremost aspiration in future information technology. Complementary resistive switch consists of two antiserial resistive switching memory (RRAM) elements and allows for the construction of large passive crossbar arrays by solving the sneak path problem in combination with a drastic reduction of the power consumption. Here we present a titanium oxide based complementary RRAM (CRRAM) device with Pt top and TiN bottom electrode. A subsequent post metal annealing at 400°C induces CRRAM. Forming voltage of 4.3 V is required for this device to initiate switching process. The same device also exhibiting bipolar switching at lower compliance current, Ic <50 μA. The CRRAM device have high reliabilities. Formation of intermediate titanium oxi-nitride layer is confirmed from the cross-sectional HRTEM analysis. The origin of complementary switching mechanism have been discussed with AES, HRTEM analysis and schematic diagram. This paper provides valuable data along with analysis on the origin of CRRAM for the application in nanoscale devices.

  13. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved. PMID:25983889

  14. The energetics of the acetylation switch in p53-mediated transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Rodríguez, Yoel; Mezei, Mihaly; Osman, Roman

    2010-02-01

    Targeted therapeutic intervention in receptor-ligand interactions of p53-mediated tumor suppression can impact progression of disease, aging, and variation in genetic expression. Here, we conducted a number of molecular simulations, based on structures of p53 in complex with its transcriptional coactivating CBP bromodomain, determined by NMR spectroscopy, to investigate the energetics of the binding complex. Building on the observation that acetylation of K382 in p53 serves as the essential triggering switch for a specific interaction with CBP, we assessed the differential effect of acetylation on binding from simulations of an octapeptide derived from p53 with acetylated and nonacetylated K382 (residues 379-386). Cluster analysis of the simulations shows that acetylation of the free peptide does not significantly change the population of the preferred conformation of the peptide in solution for binding to CBP. Conversion of the acetylated K382 to nonacetylated form with free energy perturbation (FEP) simulations of the p53 CBP complex and the free peptide showed that the relative contribution of the acetyl group to binding is 4.8 kcal/mol. An analysis of residue contributions to the binding energy using an MM-GBSA approach agrees with the FEP results and sheds additional light on the origin of selectivity in p53 binding to the CBP bromodomain.

  15. MxaY regulates the lanthanide-mediated methanol dehydrogenase switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Frances; Beck, David A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Many methylotrophs, microorganisms that consume carbon compounds lacking carbon–carbon bonds, use two different systems to oxidize methanol for energy production and biomass accumulation. The MxaFI methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) contains calcium in its active site, while the XoxF enzyme contains a lanthanide in its active site. The genes encoding the MDH enzymes are differentially regulated by the presence of lanthanides. In this study, we found that the histidine kinase MxaY controls the lanthanide-mediated switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5GB1C. MxaY controls the transcription of genes encoding MxaFI and XoxF at least partially by controlling the transcript levels of the orphan response regulator MxaB. We identify a constitutively active version of MxaY, and identify the mutated residue that may be involved in lanthanide sensing. Lastly, we find evidence to suggest that tight control of active MDH production is required for wild-type growth rates.

  16. MxaY regulates the lanthanide-mediated methanol dehydrogenase switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Frances; Beck, David A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Many methylotrophs, microorganisms that consume carbon compounds lacking carbon–carbon bonds, use two different systems to oxidize methanol for energy production and biomass accumulation. The MxaFI methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) contains calcium in its active site, while the XoxF enzyme contains a lanthanide in its active site. The genes encoding the MDH enzymes are differentially regulated by the presence of lanthanides. In this study, we found that the histidine kinase MxaY controls the lanthanide-mediated switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5GB1C. MxaY controls the transcription of genes encoding MxaFI and XoxF at least partially by controlling the transcript levels of the orphan response regulator MxaB. We identify a constitutively active version of MxaY, and identify the mutated residue that may be involved in lanthanide sensing. Lastly, we find evidence to suggest that tight control of active MDH production is required for wild-type growth rates. PMID:27651996

  17. MxaY regulates the lanthanide-mediated methanol dehydrogenase switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense.

    PubMed

    Chu, Frances; Beck, David A C; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Many methylotrophs, microorganisms that consume carbon compounds lacking carbon-carbon bonds, use two different systems to oxidize methanol for energy production and biomass accumulation. The MxaFI methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) contains calcium in its active site, while the XoxF enzyme contains a lanthanide in its active site. The genes encoding the MDH enzymes are differentially regulated by the presence of lanthanides. In this study, we found that the histidine kinase MxaY controls the lanthanide-mediated switch in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5GB1C. MxaY controls the transcription of genes encoding MxaFI and XoxF at least partially by controlling the transcript levels of the orphan response regulator MxaB. We identify a constitutively active version of MxaY, and identify the mutated residue that may be involved in lanthanide sensing. Lastly, we find evidence to suggest that tight control of active MDH production is required for wild-type growth rates. PMID:27651996

  18. Enhanced resistive switching performance for bilayer HfO2/TiO2 resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Cong; Deng, Tengfei; Zhang, Junchi; Shen, Liangping; He, Pin; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hao

    2016-10-01

    We prepared bilayer HfO2/TiO2 resistive random accessory memory (RRAM) using magnetron sputtering on an ITO/PEN flexible substrate. The switching voltages (V SET and V RESET) were smaller for the Pt/HfO2/TiO2/ITO device than for a Pt/HfO2/ITO memory device. The insertion of a TiO2 layer in the switching layer was inferred to act as an oxygen reservoir to reduce the switching voltages. In addition, greatly improved uniformity was achieved, which showed the coefficient of the variations of V SET and V RESET to be 9.90% and 6.35% for the bilayer structure RRAM. We deduced that occurrence of conductive filament connection/rupture at the interface of the HfO2 and TiO2, in combination with the HfO2 acting as a virtual cathode, led to the improved uniformity. A multilevel storage capability can be obtained by varying the stop voltage in the RESET process for bilayer HfO2/TiO2 RRAM. By analyzing the current conduction mechanism, we demonstrated that the multilevel high resistance state (HRS) was attributable to the increased barrier height when the stop voltage was increased.

  19. Switching Lopinavir/Ritonavir to Atazanavir/Ritonavir vs Adding Atorvastatin in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy With Hypercholesterolemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wangpatharawanit, Phanthaboon; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-09-15

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimens with hypercholesterolemia. Reduction of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein was significantly greater in patients who were randomized to the addition of atorvastatin compared with those who were switched from lopinavir/ritonavir to atazanavir/ritonavir. PMID:27402817

  20. Acidosis Mediates the Switching of Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε Dependence in Prolonged Hyperalgesia Induced by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Yu; Dai, Shih-Ping; Chang, Yan-Ching; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory pain, when not effectively treated, is a costly health problem and has a harmful effect on all aspects of health-related quality of life. Previous studies suggested that in male Sprague Dawley rats, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced short-term hyperalgesia depends on protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas long-lasting hyperalgesia induced by PGE2 with carrageenan pre-injection, requires protein kinase Cε (PKCε). However, the mechanism underlying the kinase switch with short- to long-term hyperalgesia remains unclear. In this study, we used the inflammatory agents carrageenan or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce long-term hyperalgesia, and examined PKA and PKCε dependence and switching time. Hyperalgesia induced by both agents depended on PKA/PKCε and Gs/Gi-proteins, and the switching time from PKA to PKCε and from Gs to Gi was about 3 to 4 h after inflammation induction. Among the single inflammatory mediators tested, PGE2 and 5-HT induced transient hyperalgesia, which depended on PKA and PKCε, respectively. Only acidic solution-induced hyperalgesia required Gs-PKA and Gi-PKCε, and the switch time for kinase dependency matched inflammatory hyperalgesia, in approximately 2 to 4 h. Thus, acidosis in inflamed tissues may be a decisive factor to regulate switching of PKA and PKCε dependence via proton-sensing G-protein–coupled receptors. PMID:25933021

  1. A random six-phase switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via global epigenetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Ana Sousa; Chai, Melissa H.; Atack, John M.; Furi, Leonardo; De Ste Croix, Megan; Haigh, Richard; Trappetti, Claudia; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.; Shewell, Lucy K.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Blades, Matthew; Mirkes, Evgeny; Gorban, Alexander N.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.; Oggioni, Marco R.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is the world’s foremost bacterial pathogen in both morbidity and mortality. Switching between phenotypic forms (or ‘phases’) that favour asymptomatic carriage or invasive disease was first reported in 1933. Here, we show that the underlying mechanism for such phase variation consists of genetic rearrangements in a Type I restriction-modification system (SpnD39III). The rearrangements generate six alternative specificities with distinct methylation patterns, as defined by single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylomics. The SpnD39III variants have distinct gene expression profiles. We demonstrate distinct virulence in experimental infection and in vivo selection for switching between SpnD39III variants. SpnD39III is ubiquitous in pneumococci, indicating an essential role in its biology. Future studies must recognize the potential for switching between these heretofore undetectable, differentiated pneumococcal subpopulations in vitro and in vivo. Similar systems exist in other bacterial genera, indicating the potential for broad exploitation of epigenetic gene regulation. PMID:25268848

  2. Causal inference in randomized experiments with mediational processes.

    PubMed

    Jo, Booil

    2008-12-01

    This article links the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach with the principal stratification (PS) approach, both of which have been widely used to study the role of intermediate posttreatment outcomes in randomized experiments. Despite the potential benefit of such integration, the 2 approaches have been developed in parallel with little interaction. This article proposes the cross-model translation (CMT) approach, in which parameter estimates are translated back and forth between the PS and SEM models. First, without involving any particular identifying assumptions, translation between PS and SEM parameters is carried out on the basis of their close conceptual connection. Monte Carlo simulations are used to further clarify the relation between the 2 approaches under particular identifying assumptions. The study concludes that, under the common goal of causal inference, what makes a practical difference is the choice of identifying assumptions, not the modeling framework itself. The CMT approach provides a common ground in which the PS and SEM approaches can be jointly considered, focusing on their common inferential problems.

  3. Spectral shifts and switches in random fields upon interaction with negative-phase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2010-07-15

    Spectral shifts in stochastic beam-like fields on interaction with layers of positive- and negative-phase materials are examined on the basis of the ABCD-matrix approach and generalized Huygens-Fresnel principle. It is found that boundaries between such materials may cause spectral switches. Effect of absorption of negative-phase materials on the beam spectrum is discussed. Our results may find applications in connection with spectrum-selection optical interconnects, spectrally encoded information transfer, image formation in systems involving negative-phase materials, and geometrically tunable metamaterials.

  4. Randomized Controlled Caregiver Mediated Joint Engagement Intervention for Toddlers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda C.; Wong, Connie; Kwon, Susan; Locke, Jill

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if a joint attention intervention would result in greater joint engagement between caregivers and toddlers with autism. The intervention consisted of 24 caregiver-mediated sessions with follow-up 1 year later. Compared to caregivers and toddlers randomized to the waitlist control group the immediate treatment (IT)…

  5. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  6. Code-Switching: L1-Coded Mediation in a Kindergarten Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative inquiry that investigated the role of teachers' mediation in three different modes of coding in a kindergarten foreign language classroom in China (i.e. L2-coded intralinguistic mediation, L1-coded cross-lingual mediation, and L2-and-L1-mixed mediation). Through an exploratory examination of the varying effects…

  7. Space-charge-mediated anomalous ferroelectric switching in P(VDF-TrEE) polymer films.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weijin; Wang, Zhihong; Du, Yuanmin; Zhang, Xi-Xiang; Wu, Tom

    2014-11-12

    We report on the switching dynamics of P(VDF-TrEE) copolymer devices and the realization of additional substable ferroelectric states via modulation of the coupling between polarizations and space charges. The space-charge-limited current is revealed to be the dominant leakage mechanism in such organic ferroelectric devices, and electrostatic interactions due to space charges lead to the emergence of anomalous ferroelectric loops. The reliable control of ferroelectric switching in P(VDF-TrEE) copolymers opens doors toward engineering advanced organic memories with tailored switching characteristics.

  8. Realization of a reversible switching in TaO{sub 2} polymorphs via Peierls distortion for resistance random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Linggang; Sun, Zhimei; Zhou, Jian; Guo, Zhonglu

    2015-03-02

    Transition-metal-oxide based resistance random access memory (RRAM) is a promising candidate for next-generation universal non-volatile memories. Searching and designing appropriate materials used in the memories becomes an urgent task. Here, a structure with the TaO{sub 2} formula was predicted using evolutionary algorithms in combination with first-principles calculations. This triclinic structure (T-TaO{sub 2}) is both energetically and dynamically more favorable than the commonly believed rutile structure (R-TaO{sub 2}). The metal-insulator transition (MIT) between metallic R-TaO{sub 2} and T-TaO{sub 2} (band gap: 1.0 eV) is via a Peierls distortion, which makes TaO{sub 2} a potential candidate for RRAM. The energy barrier for the reversible phase transition is 0.19 eV/atom and 0.23 eV/atom, respectively, suggesting low power consumption for the resistance switch. The present findings about the MIT as the resistance-switch mechanism in Ta-O system will stimulate experimental work to fabricate tantalum oxides based RRAM.

  9. Effects of different dopants on switching behavior of HfO2-based resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ning; Pang, Hua; Wu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    In this study the effects of doping atoms (Al, Cu, and N) with different electro-negativities and ionic radii on resistive switching of HfO2-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) are systematically investigated. The results show that forming voltages and set voltages of Al/Cu-doped devices are reduced. Among all devices, Cu-doped device shows the narrowest device-to-device distributions of set voltage and low resistance. The effects of different dopants on switching behavior are explained with deferent types of CFs formed in HfO2 depending on dopants: oxygen vacancy (Vo) filaments for Al-doped HfO2 devices, hybrid filaments composed of oxygen vacancies and Cu atoms for Cu-doped HfO2 devices, and nitrogen/oxygen vacancy filaments for N-doped HfO2 devices. The results suggest that a metal dopant with a larger electro-negativity than host metal atom offers the best comprehensive performance.

  10. Healthy for Life: A Randomized Trial Examining Physical Activity Outcomes and Psychosocial Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David M.; Martinson, Brian C.; Dunsiger, Shira; Marcus, Bess H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Researchers theorize that interventions increase physical activity by influencing key theory-based mediators (e.g., behavioral processes). However, few studies have been adequately powered to examine the importance of mediators. Purpose This study examined both physical activity behavior and psychosocial mediators in a randomized trial specifically powered to detect mediation. Methods Healthy, sedentary adults (n=448; 70% Caucasian, 87% women, mean age was 43) were randomly assigned to either a six-month print-based theory tailored physical activity intervention (n=224) or a six-month health/wellness contact control arm (n=224). Results The print intervention arm exhibited greater increases in physical activity than the control arm at six and 12 months (p<.05). Additionally, behavioral processes were found to be an important mediator of physical activity behavior. Conclusions It is important for researchers and practitioners to focus on increasing behavioral strategies for physical activity adoption. Future studies should examine other potential mediators of physical activity. PMID:23229158

  11. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M; Reddy, Janardan K; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A; Reina-San-Martin, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation.

  12. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P.; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M.; Reddy, Janardan K.; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  13. 40-Gbit/s photonic random access memory for photonic packet-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Nakahara, Tatsushi; Takahata, Kiyoto; Takenouchi, Hirokazu; Yasui, Takako; Kondo, Naoto; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2004-06-01

    We present a photonic random access memory (RAM) that can write and read high-speed asynchronous burst optical packets freely by specifying addresses. The photonic RAM consists of an optical clock-pulse generator, an all-optical serial-to-parallel converter, a photonic parallel-to-serial converter, all developed by us, and a CMOS RAM as a storage medium. Unlike conventional optical buffers, which merely function as optical delay lines, the photonic RAM provides various advantages, such as compactness, large capacity, long-term storage, and random access at an arbitrary timing for ultrafast asynchronous burst optical packets. We experimentally confirm its basic operation for 40-Gbit/s 16-bit optical packets.

  14. A force based model of individual cell migration with discrete attachment sites and random switching terms.

    PubMed

    Dallon, J C; Scott, Matthew; Smith, W V

    2013-07-01

    A force based model of cell migration is presented which gives new insight into the importance of the dynamics of cell binding to the substrate. The main features of the model are the focus on discrete attachment dynamics, the treatment of the cellular forces as springs, and an incorporation of the stochastic nature of the attachment sites. One goal of the model is to capture the effect of the random binding and unbinding of cell attachments on global cell motion. Simulations reveal one of the most important factor influencing cell speed is the duration of the attachment to the substrate. The model captures the correct velocity and force relationships for several cell types.

  15. What Controls the "Off/On Switch" in the Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Shiyan; Song, Tingjie; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-06-30

    In DNA dynamic nanotechnology, a toehold-mediated DNA strand-displacement reaction has demonstrated its capability in building complex autonomous system. In most cases, the reaction is performed in pure DNA solution that is essentially a one-phase system. In the present work, we systematically investigated the reaction in a heterogeneous media, in which the strand that implements a displacing action is conjugated on gold nanoparticles. By monitoring the kinetics of spherical nucleic acid (SNA) assembly driven by toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction, we observed significant differences, i.e., the abrupt jump in behavior of an "off/on switch", in the reaction rate when the invading toehold was extended to eight bases from seven bases. These phenomena are attributed to the effect of steric hindrance arising from the high density of invading strand conjugated to AuNPs. Based on these studies, an INHIBIT logic gate presenting good selectivity was developed.

  16. RNase L Cleavage Products Promote Switch from Autophagy to Apoptosis by Caspase-Mediated Cleavage of Beclin-1

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Mukherjee, Sushovita; Manivannan, Praveen; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis share regulatory molecules enabling crosstalk in pathways that affect cellular homeostasis including response to viral infections and survival of tumor cells. Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is an antiviral endonuclease that is activated in virus-infected cells and cleaves viral and cellular single-stranded RNAs to produce small double-stranded RNAs with roles in amplifying host responses. Activation of RNase L induces autophagy and apoptosis in many cell types. However, the mechanism by which RNase L mediates crosstalk between these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that small dsRNAs produced by RNase L promote a switch from autophagy to apoptosis by caspase-mediated cleavage of Beclin-1, terminating autophagy. The caspase 3-cleaved C-terminal fragment of Beclin-1 enhances apoptosis by translocating to the mitochondria along with proapoptotic protein, Bax, and inducing release of cytochrome C to the cytosol. Cleavage of Beclin-1 determines switch to apoptosis since expression of caspase-resistant Beclin-1 inhibits apoptosis and sustains autophagy. Moreover, inhibiting RNase L-induced autophagy promotes cell death and inhibiting apoptosis prolongs autophagy in a cross-inhibitory mechanism. Our results demonstrate a novel role of RNase L generated small RNAs in cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis that impacts the fate of cells during viral infections and cancer. PMID:26263979

  17. RNase L Cleavage Products Promote Switch from Autophagy to Apoptosis by Caspase-Mediated Cleavage of Beclin-1.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Mukherjee, Sushovita; Manivannan, Praveen; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis share regulatory molecules enabling crosstalk in pathways that affect cellular homeostasis including response to viral infections and survival of tumor cells. Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is an antiviral endonuclease that is activated in virus-infected cells and cleaves viral and cellular single-stranded RNAs to produce small double-stranded RNAs with roles in amplifying host responses. Activation of RNase L induces autophagy and apoptosis in many cell types. However, the mechanism by which RNase L mediates crosstalk between these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that small dsRNAs produced by RNase L promote a switch from autophagy to apoptosis by caspase-mediated cleavage of Beclin-1, terminating autophagy. The caspase 3-cleaved C-terminal fragment of Beclin-1 enhances apoptosis by translocating to the mitochondria along with proapoptotic protein, Bax, and inducing release of cytochrome C to the cytosol. Cleavage of Beclin-1 determines switch to apoptosis since expression of caspase-resistant Beclin-1 inhibits apoptosis and sustains autophagy. Moreover, inhibiting RNase L-induced autophagy promotes cell death and inhibiting apoptosis prolongs autophagy in a cross-inhibitory mechanism. Our results demonstrate a novel role of RNase L generated small RNAs in cross-talk between autophagy and apoptosis that impacts the fate of cells during viral infections and cancer. PMID:26263979

  18. Optofluidic guiding, valving, switching and mixing based on plasmonic heating in a random gold nanoisland substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajie; Kang, Zhiwen; Wang, Guanghui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Kong, Siu Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2015-06-01

    We present a versatile optofluidic flow manipulation scheme based on plasmonic heating in a random gold nanoisland substrate (Au-NIS). With its highly efficient conversion of optical power to hydrodynamic actuation, the reported substrate is used for laser-controlled optofluidic manipulation. It is the first time that microfluidic flow guiding, valving, and mixing within the same functional substrate has been realised. Plasmonic heating provides power for guiding the sample flow inside a microfluidic channel at controlled speed and transport of small particles or living cells is demonstrated. We have also made a laser-actuated microfluidic valve through controlling the surface wettability of the sample/Au-NIS interface. When the laser power density is sufficiently high to generate a bubble, localized convection around the bubble can lead to efficient sample mixing within a microfluidic chamber. The reported Au-NIS scheme practically offers a programmable functional surface on which users have the freedom to control the wetting characteristics with a focused laser beam. We have verified that this optofluidic approach induces insignificant degradation in cell viability. The reported scheme therefore offers a wide range of application possibilities in microfluidics and biomedical engineering, particularly those operated under a low Reynolds number. PMID:25963226

  19. A randomized, controlled exposure study in adult smokers of full flavor Marlboro cigarettes switching to Marlboro Lights or Marlboro Ultra Lights cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Paul; Kapur, Sunil; Wang, Jingzhu; Feng, Shixia; Roethig, Hans

    2008-08-01

    Rationale. To date no state-of-the-art clinical study has been conducted to address the question as to whether switching to lower tar cigarettes reduces exposure to smoke constituents in humans. Methods. Randomized, controlled, forced switching study in 225 adult smokers of full flavor Marlboro (MFF) cigarettes for 8 days with a 24-week follow-up. Subjects smoked MFF (a 15-mg Federal Trade Commission (FTC) tar cigarette) at baseline and were randomized to smoke 11-mg Marlboro Lights (ML) or 6-mg Marlboro Ultra Lights (MUL) cigarettes. Biomarkers of exposure to nicotine, 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), pyrene, CO, benzene, acrolein, and mutagenic substances were measured. Results. In the short-term phase, switching from MFF to ML showed statistically significant decreases in nicotine exposure (-13%) and non-significant increases in CO exposure (+6%), while switching from MFF to MUL showed statistically significant decreases in nicotine (-27%) and CO (-13%) exposure. Both nicotine and CO biomarkers trended similarly in the 24-week follow-up as in the short-term phase. The other biomarkers of cigarette smoke constituents followed the same trend as nicotine at the end of the 24-week follow-up. Conclusions. Switching smokers to lower FTC tar yield cigarettes, on average, reduces nicotine and other biomarkers considered surrogates of tar exposure. PMID:18565634

  20. 14-3-3 proteins regulate a cell-intrinsic switch from sonic hedgehog-mediated commissural axon attraction to repulsion after midline crossing.

    PubMed

    Yam, Patricia T; Kent, Christopher B; Morin, Steves; Farmer, W Todd; Alchini, Ricardo; Lepelletier, Léa; Colman, David R; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Fournier, Alyson E; Charron, Frédéric

    2012-11-21

    Axons must switch responsiveness to guidance cues during development for correct pathfinding. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons ventrally toward the floorplate. We show that after crossing the floorplate, commissural axons switch their response to Shh from attraction to repulsion, so that they are repelled anteriorly by a posterior-high/anterior-low Shh gradient along the longitudinal axis. This switch is recapitulated in vitro with dissociated commissural neurons as they age, indicating that the switch is intrinsic and time dependent. 14-3-3 protein inhibition converted Shh-mediated repulsion of aged dissociated neurons to attraction and prevented the correct anterior turn of postcrossing commissural axons in vivo, an effect mediated through PKA. Conversely, overexpression of 14-3-3 proteins was sufficient to drive the switch from Shh-mediated attraction to repulsion both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we identify a 14-3-3 protein-dependent mechanism for a cell-intrinsic temporal switch in the polarity of axon turning responses.

  1. Power- and Low-Resistance-State-Dependent, Bipolar Reset-Switching Transitions in SiN-Based Resistive Random-Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungjun; Park, Byung-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A study on the bipolar-resistive switching of an Ni/SiN/Si-based resistive random-access memory (RRAM) device shows that the influences of the reset power and the resistance value of the low-resistance state (LRS) on the reset-switching transitions are strong. For a low LRS with a large conducting path, the sharp reset switching, which requires a high reset power (>7 mW), was observed, whereas for a high LRS with small multiple-conducting paths, the step-by-step reset switching with a low reset power (<7 mW) was observed. The attainment of higher nonlinear current-voltage ( I-V) characteristics in terms of the step-by-step reset switching is due to the steep current-increased region of the trap-controlled space charge-limited current (SCLC) model. A multilevel cell (MLC) operation, for which the reset stop voltage ( V STOP) is used in the DC sweep mode and an incremental amplitude is used in the pulse mode for the step-by-step reset switching, is demonstrated here. The results of the present study suggest that well-controlled conducting paths in a SiN-based RRAM device, which are not too strong and not too weak, offer considerable potential for the realization of low-power and high-density crossbar-array applications.

  2. Power- and Low-Resistance-State-Dependent, Bipolar Reset-Switching Transitions in SiN-Based Resistive Random-Access Memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungjun; Park, Byung-Gook

    2016-12-01

    A study on the bipolar-resistive switching of an Ni/SiN/Si-based resistive random-access memory (RRAM) device shows that the influences of the reset power and the resistance value of the low-resistance state (LRS) on the reset-switching transitions are strong. For a low LRS with a large conducting path, the sharp reset switching, which requires a high reset power (>7 mW), was observed, whereas for a high LRS with small multiple-conducting paths, the step-by-step reset switching with a low reset power (<7 mW) was observed. The attainment of higher nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in terms of the step-by-step reset switching is due to the steep current-increased region of the trap-controlled space charge-limited current (SCLC) model. A multilevel cell (MLC) operation, for which the reset stop voltage (V STOP) is used in the DC sweep mode and an incremental amplitude is used in the pulse mode for the step-by-step reset switching, is demonstrated here. The results of the present study suggest that well-controlled conducting paths in a SiN-based RRAM device, which are not too strong and not too weak, offer considerable potential for the realization of low-power and high-density crossbar-array applications. PMID:27518231

  3. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  4. An engineered small RNA-mediated genetic switch based on a ribozyme expression platform

    PubMed Central

    Klauser, Benedikt; Hartig, Jörg S.

    2013-01-01

    An important requirement for achieving many goals of synthetic biology is the availability of a large repertoire of reprogrammable genetic switches and appropriate transmitter molecules. In addition to engineering genetic switches, the interconnection of individual switches becomes increasingly important for the construction of more complex genetic networks. In particular, RNA-based switches of gene expression have become a powerful tool to post-transcriptionally program genetic circuits. RNAs used for regulatory purposes have the advantage to transmit, sense, process and execute information. We have recently used the hammerhead ribozyme to control translation initiation in a small molecule-dependent fashion. In addition, riboregulators have been constructed in which a small RNA acts as transmitter molecule to control translation of a target mRNA. In this study, we combine both concepts and redesign the hammerhead ribozyme to sense small trans-acting RNAs (taRNAs) as input molecules resulting in repression of translation initiation in Escherichia coli. Importantly, our ribozyme-based expression platform is compatible with previously reported artificial taRNAs, which were reported to act as inducers of gene expression. In addition, we provide several insights into key requirements of riboregulatory systems, including the influences of varying transcriptional induction of the taRNA and mRNA transcripts, 5′-processing of taRNAs, as well as altering the secondary structure of the taRNA. In conclusion, we introduce an RNA-responsive ribozyme-based expression system to the field of artificial riboregulators that can serve as reprogrammable platform for engineering higher-order genetic circuits. PMID:23585277

  5. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  6. Atomic-scale mechanisms of ferroelastic domain-wall-mediated ferroelectric switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Jokisaari, Jacob R.; Nelson, Christopher T.; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Wang, Yiran; Eom, Chang-Beom; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2013-11-01

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric thin films occurs via nucleation and growth of 180° domains through a highly inhomogeneous process in which the kinetics are largely controlled by defects, interfaces and pre-existing domain walls. Here we present the first real-time, atomic-scale observations and phase-field simulations of domain switching dominated by pre-existing, but immobile, ferroelastic domains in Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 thin films. Our observations reveal a novel hindering effect, which occurs via the formation of a transient layer with a thickness of several unit cells at an otherwise charged interface between a ferroelastic domain and a switched domain. This transient layer possesses a low-magnitude polarization, with a dipole glass structure, resembling the dead layer. The present study provides an atomic level explanation of the hindering of ferroelectric domain motion by ferroelastic domains. Hindering can be overcome either by applying a higher bias or by removing the as-grown ferroelastic domains in fabricated nanostructures.

  7. Reducing operation voltages by introducing a low-k switching layer in indium–tin-oxide-based resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fu-Yuan; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Pan, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Yang; Chen, Po-Hsun; Chen, Min-Chen; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lo, Ikai; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we inserted a low dielectric constant (low-k) or high dielectric constant (high-k) material as a switching layer in indium–tin-oxide-based resistive random-access memory. After measuring the two samples, we found that the low-k material device has very low operating voltages (‑80 and 110 mV for SET and RESET operations, respectively). Current fitting results were then used with the COMSOL software package to simulate electric field distribution in the layers. After combining the electrical measurement results with simulations, a conduction model was proposed to explain resistance switching behaviors in the two structures.

  8. Reducing operation voltages by introducing a low-k switching layer in indium-tin-oxide-based resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fu-Yuan; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Pan, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Yang; Chen, Po-Hsun; Chen, Min-Chen; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lo, Ikai; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Sze, Simon M.

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we inserted a low dielectric constant (low-k) or high dielectric constant (high-k) material as a switching layer in indium-tin-oxide-based resistive random-access memory. After measuring the two samples, we found that the low-k material device has very low operating voltages (-80 and 110 mV for SET and RESET operations, respectively). Current fitting results were then used with the COMSOL software package to simulate electric field distribution in the layers. After combining the electrical measurement results with simulations, a conduction model was proposed to explain resistance switching behaviors in the two structures.

  9. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  10. Cu impurity in insulators and in metal-insulator-metal structures: Implications for resistance-switching random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Sumeet C. Meade, Roy; Sandhu, Gurtej S.

    2015-02-07

    We present numerical results from atomistic simulations of Cu in SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with an emphasis on the thermodynamic, kinetic, and electronic properties. The calculated properties of Cu impurity at various concentrations (9.91 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} and 3.41 × 10{sup 22 }cm{sup −3}) in bulk oxides are presented. The metal-insulator interfaces result in up to a ∼4 eV reduction in the formation energies relative to the crystalline bulk. Additionally, the importance of Cu-Cu interaction in lowering the chemical potential is introduced. These concepts are then discussed in the context of formation and stability of localized conductive paths in resistance-switching Random Access Memories (RRAM-M). The electronic density of states and non-equilibrium transmission through these localized paths are studied, confirming conduction by showing three orders of magnitude increase in the electron transmission. The dynamic behavior of the conductive paths is investigated with atomistic drift-diffusion calculations. Finally, the paper concludes with a molecular dynamics simulation of a RRAM-M cell that attempts to combine the aforementioned phenomena in one self-consistent model.

  11. Resistance switching behavior of ZnO resistive random access memory with a reduced graphene oxide capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Wei-Yi; Huang, Yen-Lun; Juan, Pi-Chun; Wang, Tse-Wen; Hung, Ke-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Yu; Kang, Tsung-Kuei; Shi, Jen-Bin

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the characteristics of ZnO resistive random access memory (RRAM) with a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) capping layer and the polarity effect of the SET/RESET bias on the RRAM. The rGO film insertion enhances the stability of the current-voltage (I-V) switching curve and the superior resistance ratio (˜105) of high-resistance state (HRS) to low-resistance state (LRS). Using the appropriate polarity of the SET/RESET bias applied to the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM enables the oxygen ions to move mainly at the interface of the rGO and ZnO films, resulting in the best performance. Presumably, the rGO film acts as an oxygen reservoir and enhances the easy in and out motion of the oxygen ions from the rGO film. The rGO film also prevents the interaction of oxygen ions and the Al electrode, resulting in excellent performance. In a pulse endurance test, the rGO-capped ZnO RRAM reveals superior endurance of up to 108 cycles over that of the ZnO RRAM without rGO insertion (106 cycles).

  12. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  13. Magnetoelectric assisted 180° magnetization switching for electric field addressable writing in magnetoresistive random-access memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yaojin; Li, Yanxi; Luo, Haosu; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight

    2014-08-26

    Magnetization-based memories, e.g., hard drive and magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM), use bistable magnetic domains in patterned nanomagnets for information recording. Electric field (E) tunable magnetic anisotropy can lower the energy barrier between two distinct magnetic states, promising reduced power consumption and increased recording density. However, integration of magnetoelectric heterostructure into MRAM is a highly challenging task owing to the particular architecture requirements of each component. Here, we show an epitaxial growth of self-assembled CoFe2O4 nanostripes with bistable in-plane magnetizations on Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates, where the magnetic switching can be triggered by E-induced elastic strain effect. An unprecedented magnetic coercive field change of up to 600 Oe was observed with increasing E. A near 180° magnetization rotation can be activated by E in the vicinity of the magnetic coercive field. These findings might help to solve the 1/2-selection problem in traditional MRAM by providing reduced magnetic coercive field in E field selected memory cells. PMID:25093903

  14. A Randomized Switch From Nevirapine-Based Antiretroviral Therapy to Single Tablet Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate in Virologically Suppressed Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Rwandans

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sean E.; Grant, Philip M.; Uwinkindi, Francois; Talbot, Annie; Seruyange, Eric; Slamowitz, Deborah; Mugeni, Adeline; Remera, Eric; Niyonsenga, Simon Pierre; Nyirimigabo, Josbert; Uwizihiwe, Jean Paul; Dongier, Pierre; Muhayimpundu, Ribakare; Mazarati, Jean-Baptiste; Zolopa, Andrew; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients remain on nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) despite safety and efficacy concerns. Switching to a rilpivirine-based regimen is an alternative, but there is little experience with rilpivirine in sub-Saharan Africa where induction of rilpivirine metabolism by nevirapine, HIV subtype, and dietary differences could potentially impact efficacy. Methods. We conducted an open-label noninferiority study of virologically suppressed (HIV-1 ribonucleic acid [RNA] < 50 copies/mL) HIV-1-infected Rwandan adults taking nevirapine plus 2 nucleos(t)ide reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. One hundred fifty participants were randomized 2:1 to switch to coformulated rilpivirine-emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (referenced as the Switch Arm) or continue current therapy. The primary efficacy endpoint was HIV-1 RNA < 200 copies/mL at week 24 assessed by the US Food and Drug Administration Snapshot algorithm with a noninferiority margin of 12%. Results. Between April and September 2014, 184 patients were screened, and 150 patients were enrolled; 99 patients switched to rilpivirine-emtricitabine-tenofovir, and 51 patients continued their nevirapine-based ART. The mean age was 42 years and 43% of participants were women. At week 24, virologic suppression (HIV-1 RNA level <200 copies/mL) was maintained in 93% and 92% in the Switch Arm versus the continuation arm, respectively. The Switch Arm was noninferior to continued nevirapine-based ART (efficacy difference 0.8%; 95% confidence interval, −7.5% to +12.0%). Both regimens were generally safe and well tolerated, although 2 deaths, neither attributed to study medications, occurred in participants in the Switch Arm. Conclusions. A switch from nevirapine-based ART to rilpivirine-emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate had similar virologic efficacy to continued nevirapine-based ART after 24 weeks with few adverse events. PMID:27704000

  15. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  16. EZH2 phosphorylation by JAK3 mediates a switch to noncanonical function in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junli; Li, Boheng; Lin, Baohong; Lee, Pei Tsung; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Tan, Joy; Bi, Chonglei; Lee, Xue Ting; Selvarajan, Viknesvaran; Ng, Siok-Bian; Yang, Henry; Yu, Qiang; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2016-08-18

    The best-understood mechanism by which EZH2 exerts its oncogenic function is through polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated gene repression, which requires its histone methyltransferase activity. However, small-molecule inhibitors of EZH2 that selectively target its enzymatic activity turn out to be potent only for lymphoma cells with EZH2-activating mutation. Intriguingly, recent discoveries, including ours, have placed EZH2 into the category of transcriptional coactivators and thus raised the possibility of noncanonical signaling pathways. However, it remains unclear how EZH2 switches to this catalytic independent function. In the current study, using natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) as a disease model, we found that phosphorylation of EZH2 by JAK3 promotes the dissociation of the PRC2 complex leading to decreased global H3K27me3 levels, while it switches EZH2 to a transcriptional activator, conferring higher proliferative capacity of the affected cells. Gene expression data analysis also suggests that the noncanonical function of EZH2 as a transcriptional activator upregulates a set of genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, biosynthesis, stemness, and invasiveness. Consistently, JAK3 inhibitor was able to significantly reduce the growth of NKTL cells, in an EZH2 phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas various compounds recently developed to inhibit EZH2 methyltransferase activity have no such effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 activity may provide a promising treatment option for NKTL through the novel mechanism of suppressing noncanonical EZH2 activity. PMID:27297789

  17. Tunable switch mediated shikimate biosynthesis in an engineered non-auxotrophic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pengfei; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Shikimate is a key intermediate in the synthesis of neuraminidase inhibitors. Compared with traditional methods, microbial production of shikimate has the advantages of environmental friendliness, low cost, feed stock renewability, and product selectivity and diversity. Despite these advantages, shikimate kinase I and II respectively encoded by aroK and aroL are inactivated in most shikimate microbial producers, thus requiring the addition of aromatic compounds during the fermentation process. To overcome this problem, we constructed a non-auxotrophic, shikimate-synthesising strain of Escherichia coli. By inactivation of repressor proteins, blocking of competitive pathways and overexpression of key enzymes, we increased the shikimate production of wild-type E. coli BW25113 to 1.73 g/L. We then designed a tunable switch that can conditionally decrease gene expression and substituted it for the original aroK promoters. Expression of aroK in the resulting P-9 strain was maintained at a high level during the growth phase and then reduced at a suitable time by addition of an optimal concentration of inducer. In 5-L fed-batch fermentation, strain P-9 produced 13.15 g/L shikimate without the addition of any aromatic compounds. The tunable switch developed in this study is an efficient tool for regulating indispensable genes involved in critical metabolic pathways. PMID:27406890

  18. Tunable switch mediated shikimate biosynthesis in an engineered non-auxotrophic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pengfei; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Shikimate is a key intermediate in the synthesis of neuraminidase inhibitors. Compared with traditional methods, microbial production of shikimate has the advantages of environmental friendliness, low cost, feed stock renewability, and product selectivity and diversity. Despite these advantages, shikimate kinase I and II respectively encoded by aroK and aroL are inactivated in most shikimate microbial producers, thus requiring the addition of aromatic compounds during the fermentation process. To overcome this problem, we constructed a non-auxotrophic, shikimate-synthesising strain of Escherichia coli. By inactivation of repressor proteins, blocking of competitive pathways and overexpression of key enzymes, we increased the shikimate production of wild-type E. coli BW25113 to 1.73 g/L. We then designed a tunable switch that can conditionally decrease gene expression and substituted it for the original aroK promoters. Expression of aroK in the resulting P-9 strain was maintained at a high level during the growth phase and then reduced at a suitable time by addition of an optimal concentration of inducer. In 5-L fed-batch fermentation, strain P-9 produced 13.15 g/L shikimate without the addition of any aromatic compounds. The tunable switch developed in this study is an efficient tool for regulating indispensable genes involved in critical metabolic pathways.

  19. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  20. Sustained Resistive Switching in a Single Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane Nanowire: A Promising Material for Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basori, Rabaya; Kumar, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, Arup K.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new type of sustained and reversible unipolar resistive switching in a nanowire device made from a single strand of Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Cu:TCNQ) nanowire (diameter <100 nm) that shows high ON/OFF ratio (~103), low threshold voltage of switching (~3.5 V) and large cycling endurance (>103). This indicates a promising material for high density resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device integration. Switching is observed in Cu:TCNQ single nanowire devices with two different electrode configuration: symmetric (C-Pt/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt) and asymmetric (Cu/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt), where contacts connecting the nanowire play an important role. This report also developed a method of separating out the electrode and material contributions in switching using metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device model along with a direct 4-probe resistivity measurement of the nanowire in the OFF as well as ON state. The device model was followed by a phenomenological model of current transport through the nanowire device which shows that lowering of potential barrier at the contacts likely occur due to formation of Cu filaments in the interface between nanowire and contact electrodes. We obtain quantitative agreement of numerically analyzed results with the experimental switching data.

  1. Sustained Resistive Switching in a Single Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane Nanowire: A Promising Material for Resistive Random Access Memory.

    PubMed

    Basori, Rabaya; Kumar, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, Arup K

    2016-01-01

    We report a new type of sustained and reversible unipolar resistive switching in a nanowire device made from a single strand of Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Cu:TCNQ) nanowire (diameter <100 nm) that shows high ON/OFF ratio (~10(3)), low threshold voltage of switching (~3.5 V) and large cycling endurance (>10(3)). This indicates a promising material for high density resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device integration. Switching is observed in Cu:TCNQ single nanowire devices with two different electrode configuration: symmetric (C-Pt/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt) and asymmetric (Cu/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt), where contacts connecting the nanowire play an important role. This report also developed a method of separating out the electrode and material contributions in switching using metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device model along with a direct 4-probe resistivity measurement of the nanowire in the OFF as well as ON state. The device model was followed by a phenomenological model of current transport through the nanowire device which shows that lowering of potential barrier at the contacts likely occur due to formation of Cu filaments in the interface between nanowire and contact electrodes. We obtain quantitative agreement of numerically analyzed results with the experimental switching data. PMID:27245099

  2. Sustained Resistive Switching in a Single Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane Nanowire: A Promising Material for Resistive Random Access Memory

    PubMed Central

    Basori, Rabaya; Kumar, Manoranjan; Raychaudhuri, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new type of sustained and reversible unipolar resistive switching in a nanowire device made from a single strand of Cu:7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Cu:TCNQ) nanowire (diameter <100 nm) that shows high ON/OFF ratio (~103), low threshold voltage of switching (~3.5 V) and large cycling endurance (>103). This indicates a promising material for high density resistive random access memory (ReRAM) device integration. Switching is observed in Cu:TCNQ single nanowire devices with two different electrode configuration: symmetric (C-Pt/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt) and asymmetric (Cu/Cu:TCNQ/C-Pt), where contacts connecting the nanowire play an important role. This report also developed a method of separating out the electrode and material contributions in switching using metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device model along with a direct 4-probe resistivity measurement of the nanowire in the OFF as well as ON state. The device model was followed by a phenomenological model of current transport through the nanowire device which shows that lowering of potential barrier at the contacts likely occur due to formation of Cu filaments in the interface between nanowire and contact electrodes. We obtain quantitative agreement of numerically analyzed results with the experimental switching data. PMID:27245099

  3. Total synthesis of marinomycin A using salicylate as a molecular switch to mediate dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. Andrew; Huang, Mu-Hua; Lawler, Michael J.; Maroto, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Antibiotics play a significant role in human health because of their ability to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. The growing problems with antibiotic resistance have made the development of new antibiotics a World Health Organization priority. Marinomycin A is a member of a new class of bis-salicylate-containing polyene macrodiolides, which have potent antibiotic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Herein, we describe a triply convergent synthesis of this agent using the salicylate as a novel molecular switch for the chemoselective construction of the macrodiolide. This strategy raises new questions regarding the biosynthetic role of the salicylate and its potential impact on the mechanism of action of these types of agents. For instance, in contrast to penicillin, which enhances the electrophilicity of the cyclic amide through ring strain, salicylates reduce the electrophilicity of the aryl ester through an intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bond to provide an amide surrogate.

  4. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia.

  5. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1–6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia. PMID:26416963

  6. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia. PMID:26416963

  7. Rapid neural circuit switching mediated by synaptic plasticity during neural morphallactic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lybrand, Zane R; Zoran, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    The aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (Lumbriculidae), undergoes a rapid regenerative transformation of its neural circuits following body fragmentation. This type of nervous system plasticity, called neural morphallaxis, involves the remodeling of the giant fiber pathways that mediate rapid head and tail withdrawal behaviors. Extra- and intracellular electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that changes in cellular properties and synaptic connections underlie neurobehavioral plasticity during morphallaxis. Sensory-to-giant interneuron connections, undetectable prior to body injury, emerged within hours of segment amputation. The appearance of functional synaptic transmission was followed by interneuron activation, coupling of giant fiber spiking to motor outputs and overt segmental shortening. The onset of morphallactic plasticity varied along the body axis and emerged more rapidly in segments closer to regions of sensory field overlap between the two giant fiber pathways. The medial and lateral giant fibers were simultaneously activated during a transient phase of network remodeling. Thus, synaptic plasticity at sensory-to-giant interneuron connections mediates escape circuit morphallaxis in this regenerating annelid worm. PMID:22021133

  8. A Two-Metal-Ion-Mediated Conformational Switching Pathway for HDV Ribozyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K.; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA enzymes serve as a potentially powerful platform from which to design catalysts and engineer new biotechnology. A fundamental understanding of these systems provides insight to guide design. The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) is a small, self-cleaving RNA motif widely distributed in nature, that has served as a paradigm for understanding basic principles of RNA catalysis. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the precise roles of divalent metal ions and key nucleotides in catalysis. In an effort to establish a reaction mechanism model consistent with available experimental data, we utilize molecular dynamics simulations to explore different conformations and metal ion binding modes along the HDVr reaction path. Building upon recent crystallographic data, our results provide a dynamic model of the HDVr reaction mechanism involving a conformational switch between multiple non-canonical G25:U20 base pair conformations in the active site. These local nucleobase dynamics play an important role in catalysis by modulating the metal binding environments of two Mg2+ ions that support catalysis at different steps of the reaction pathway. The first ion plays a structural role by inducing a base pair flip necessary to obtain the catalytic fold in which C75 moves towards to the scissile phosphate in the active site. Ejection of this ion then permits a second ion to bind elsewhere in the active site and facilitate nucleophile activation. The simulations collectively describe a mechanistic scenario that is consistent with currently available experimental data from crystallography, phosphorothioate substitutions, and chemical probing studies. Avenues for further experimental verification are suggested. PMID:27774349

  9. Switching operation and degradation of resistive random access memory composed of tungsten oxide and copper investigated using in-situ TEM

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Akihito; Ohno, Yuuki; Nakane, Akitoshi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (in-situ TEM) was performed to investigate the switching operation of a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) made of copper, tungsten oxide and titanium nitride (Cu/WOx/TiN). In the first Set (Forming) operation to initialize the device, precipitation appeared inside the WOx layer. It was presumed that a Cu conducting filament was formed, lowering the resistance (on-state). The Reset operation induced a higher resistance (the off-state). No change in the microstructure was identified in the TEM images. Only when an additional Reset current was applied after switching to the off-state could erasure of the filament be seen (over-Reset). Therefore, it was concluded that structural change relating to the resistance switch was localized in a very small area around the filament. With repeated switching operations and increasing operational current, the WOx/electrode interfaces became indistinct. At the same time, the resistance of the off-state gradually decreased. This is thought to be caused by Cu condensation at the interfaces because of leakage current through the area other than through the filament. This will lead to device degradation through mechanisms such as endurance failure. This is the first accelerated aging test of ReRAM achieved using in-situ TEM. PMID:26611856

  10. A coiled coil switch mediates cold sensing by the thermosensory protein DesK.

    PubMed

    Saita, Emilio; Abriata, Luciano A; Tsai, Yi Ting; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Lemmin, Thomas; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Dal Peraro, Matteo; de Mendoza, Diego; Albanesi, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    The thermosensor histidine kinase DesK from Bacillus subtilis senses changes in membrane fluidity initiating an adaptive response. Structural changes in DesK have been implicated in transmembrane signaling, but direct evidence is still lacking. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we now propose a mechanism of DesK-mediated signal sensing and transduction. The data indicate that stabilization/destabilization of a 2-helix coiled coil, which connects the transmembrane sensory domain of DesK to its cytosolic catalytic region, is crucial to control its signaling state. Computational modeling and simulations reveal couplings between protein, water and membrane mechanics. We propose that membrane thickening is the main driving force for signal sensing and that it acts by inducing helix stretching and rotation prompting an asymmetric kinase-competent state. Overall, the known structural changes of the sensor kinase, as well as further dynamic rearrangements that we now predict, consistently link structure determinants to activity modulation.

  11. Coping Mediates Outcome Following a Randomized Group Intervention for HIV-Positive Bereaved Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial psychological effects of a coping-focused group intervention for HIV-positive individuals who had lost loved ones to AIDS. Data from 235 HIV-positive men and women enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial testing a coping-focused group intervention were analyzed using a multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation model. Results revealed that the effects of the intervention on decreases in depression and grief were mediated by decreases in avoidant coping. Specifically, participants in the intervention condition decreased their use of avoidant coping. Decreases in avoidant coping, in turn, were related to decreased depression and grief. The results of this study help to validate the use of coping-focused interventions for HIV-positive bereaved individuals. PMID:19152338

  12. Temperature-independent switching rates for a random telegraph signal in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, John H.; Borland, Nick; Fleetwood, D. M.

    2000-05-29

    We have observed discrete random telegraph signals (RTSs) in the drain voltages of three, nominally 1.25 {mu}mx1.25 {mu}m, enhancement-mode p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors operated in strong inversion in their linear regimes with constant drain-current and gate-voltage bias, for temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 300 K. The switching rates for all RTSs observed above 30 K were thermally activated. The switching rate for the only RTS observed below 30 K was thermally activated above 30 K but temperature independent below 10 K. This response is consistent with a crossover from thermal activation to tunneling at low temperatures. Implications are discussed for models of change exchange between the Si and the near-interfacial SiO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Randomized comparative efficacy study of parent-mediated interventions for toddlers with autism

    PubMed Central

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda; Paparella, Tanya; Hellemann, Gerhard; Berry, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study compared effects of two parent-mediated interventions on joint engagement outcomes as augmentations of an early intervention program for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method Participants included 86 toddlers (range 22 – 36 months) with ASD and their primary caregiver. Caregiver-child dyads were randomized to receive ten weeks of hands-on parent training in a naturalistic, developmental behavioral intervention (Joint Attention, Symbolic Play, Engagement and Regulation—JASPER) or a parent-only psychoeducational intervention (PEI). Dose was controlled in terms of researcher-parent contact and early intervention services received by the child. Results Results yielded significant effects of the JASPER intervention on the primary outcome of joint engagement. The treatment effect was large (Cohen’s f2=.69).and maintained over the six-month follow-up. JASPER effects were also found on secondary outcomes of play diversity, highest play level achieved, and generalization to the child’s classroom for child-initiated joint engagement. The PEI intervention was found to be effective in reducing parenting stress associated with child characteristics. All secondary effects were generally small to moderate. Conclusions These data highlight the benefit of a brief, targeted, parent-mediated intervention on child outcomes. Future studies may consider the combination of JASPER and PEI treatments for optimal parent and child outcomes. Trial registry # NCT00999778. PMID:25822242

  14. Allopregnanolone as a Mediator of Affective Switching in Reproductive Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Crystal Edler; Schmidt, Peter J.; Rubinow, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Reproductive mood disorders, including premenstrual dysphoria (PMD) and postpartum depression (PPD), are characterized by affective dysregulation that occurs during specific reproductive states. The occurrence of illness onset during changes in reproductive endocrine function has generated interest in the role of gonadal steroids in the pathophysiology of reproductive mood disorders, yet the mechanisms by which the changing hormone milieu triggers depression in susceptible women remain poorly understood. Objectives This review focuses on one of the neurosteroid metabolites of progesterone – allopregnanolone (ALLO) – that acutely regulates neuronal function and may mediate affective dysregulation that occurs concomitant with changes in reproductive endocrine function. We describe the role of the ‘neuroactive’ steroids estradiol and progesterone in reproductive endocrine-related mood disorders to highlight the potential mechanisms by which ALLO might contribute to their pathophysiology. Finally, using existing data, we test the hypothesis that changes in ALLO levels may trigger affective dysregulation in susceptible women. Results Although there is no reliable evidence that basal ALLO levels distinguish those with PMD or PPD from those without, existing animal models suggest potential mechanisms by which specific reproductive states may unmask susceptibility to affective dysregulation. Consistent with these models, initially euthymic women with PMD and those with a history of PPD show a negative association between depressive symptoms and circulating ALLO levels following progesterone administration. Conclusions Existing animal models and our own preliminary data suggest that ALLO may play an important role in the pathophysiology of reproductive mood disorders by triggering affective dysregulation in susceptible women. PMID:24846476

  15. Cu(I)-mediated Allosteric Switching in a Copper-sensing Operon Repressor (CsoR)*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Ming James; Coyne, H. Jerome; Cubillas, Ciro; Vinuesa, Pablo; Fang, Xianyang; Ma, Zhen; Ma, Dejian; Helmann, John D.; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Wang, Yun-Xing; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR) is representative of a major Cu(I)-sensing family of bacterial metalloregulatory proteins that has evolved to prevent cytoplasmic copper toxicity. It is unknown how Cu(I) binding to tetrameric CsoRs mediates transcriptional derepression of copper resistance genes. A phylogenetic analysis of 227 DUF156 protein members, including biochemically or structurally characterized CsoR/RcnR repressors, reveals that Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (Gt) CsoR characterized here is representative of CsoRs from pathogenic bacilli Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus anthracis. The 2.56 Å structure of Cu(I)-bound Gt CsoR reveals that Cu(I) binding induces a kink in the α2-helix between two conserved copper-ligating residues and folds an N-terminal tail (residues 12–19) over the Cu(I) binding site. NMR studies of Gt CsoR reveal that this tail is flexible in the apo-state with these dynamics quenched upon Cu(I) binding. Small angle x-ray scattering experiments on an N-terminally truncated Gt CsoR (Δ2–10) reveal that the Cu(I)-bound tetramer is hydrodynamically more compact than is the apo-state. The implications of these findings for the allosteric mechanisms of other CsoR/RcnR repressors are discussed. PMID:24831014

  16. Cu(2+)-mediated fluorescence switching of gold nanoclusters for the selective detection of clioquinol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chang, Yong; Zhang, Pu; Lie, Shao Qing; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-21

    It is of great significance to sense clioquinol (CQ) in a simple and fast way because of its potential application in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this contribution, we proposed a Cu(2+)-mediated fluorescence switchable strategy to detect CQ by taking bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) as probes. It was found that the strong red fluorescence of BSA-protected AuNCs at 610 nm could be effectively quenched by Cu(2+) (off state) and reversibly recovered by CQ (on state) owing to the specific coordination of CQ and Cu(2+). Under the optimal conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the off-on efficiency (Eoff-on) and the amount of CQ in the range of 1-12 μM (R(2) = 0.9902), with a detection limit of 0.63 μM (3σ). The "turn off-on" mode and the fast and unique complexation of CQ and Cu(2+) endow AuNCs with high specificity for CQ sensing. The proposed strategy is label-free, fast and selective, which is applicable to the analysis of CQ in cream with satisfactory results. PMID:26567905

  17. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  18. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling. PMID:27652341

  19. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Badri N.; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di–guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  20. p21 is dispensable for AID-mediated class switch recombination and mutagenesis of immunoglobulin genes during somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Shansab, Maryam; Selsing, Erik

    2011-03-01

    In B cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) induces somatic hypermutation (SHM) at rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) regions. Previous studies have shown that both monoubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and translesional DNA polymerase activity are important for inducing mutagenesis during SHM. Regulation of PCNA ubiquitination by p21, also known as Cdkn1a and p21(Cip1/Waf1), is an important mechanism that controls mutation loads in mammalian cells. In this study, we have assessed whether p21 has an in vivo function in regulating mutagenesis in B cells by analyzing SHM frequency in p21-deficient mice. Our results show that p21 is dispensable for SHM. This suggests that, during SHM of Ig genes, p21 does not act to regulate mutagenesis load. We also show that p21 transcript levels are the same in both wildtype and AID-deficient B cells during B cell activation, and that AID-mediated class switch recombination (CSR) is not affected by p21 deficiency; thereby indicating that p21 regulation in B cells is not altered by AID-induced DNA damage and that p21 has no affect on AID-dependent Ig gene diversification. Our results suggest that regulation of p21 in activated B cells is probably more important for maintaining proper cell cycle progression as opposed to promoting SHM of Ig genes.

  1. Cyclic di-GMP mediates a histidine kinase/phosphatase switch by noncovalent domain cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Badri N; Lori, Christian; Ozaki, Shogo; Fucile, Geoffrey; Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Jenal, Urs; Schirmer, Tilman

    2016-09-01

    Histidine kinases are key components of regulatory networks in bacteria. Although many of these enzymes are bifunctional, mediating both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of downstream targets, the molecular details of this central regulatory switch are unclear. We showed recently that the universal second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) drives Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle progression by forcing the cell cycle kinase CckA from its default kinase into phosphatase mode. We use a combination of structure determination, modeling, and functional analysis to demonstrate that c-di-GMP reciprocally regulates the two antagonistic CckA activities through noncovalent cross-linking of the catalytic domain with the dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain. We demonstrate that both c-di-GMP and ADP (adenosine diphosphate) promote phosphatase activity and propose that c-di-GMP stabilizes the ADP-bound quaternary structure, which allows the receiver domain to access the dimeric DHp stem for dephosphorylation. In silico analyses predict that c-di-GMP control is widespread among bacterial histidine kinases, arguing that it can replace or modulate canonical transmembrane signaling.

  2. Evaluation of Biomarkers of Exposure in Smokers Switching to a Carbon-Heated Tobacco Product: A Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label 5-Day Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Christelle; Weitkunat, Rolf; Magnette, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco harm reduction aims to provide reduced risk alternatives to adult smokers who would otherwise continue smoking combustible cigarettes (CCs). This randomized, open-label, three-arm, parallel-group, single-center, short-term confinement study aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to selected harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) of cigarette smoke in adult smokers who switched to a carbon-heated tobacco product (CHTP) compared with adult smokers who continued to smoke CCs and those who abstained from smoking for 5 days. Methods: Biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs, including nicotine and urinary excretion of mutagenic material, were measured in 24-hour urine and blood samples in 112 male and female Caucasian smokers switching from CCs to the CHTP ad libitum use. Puffing topography was assessed during product use. Results: Switching to the CHTP or smoking abstinence (SA) resulted in marked decreases from baseline to Day 5 in all biomarkers of exposure measured, including carboxyhemoglobin (43% and 55% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). The urinary excretion of mutagenic material was also markedly decreased on Day 5 compared with baseline (89% and 87% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). No changes in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs or urinary mutagenic material were observed between baseline and Day 5 in the CC group. Conclusions: Our results provide clear evidence supporting a reduction in the level of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in smokers who switch to CHTP under controlled conditions, similar to that observed in SA. Implications: The reductions observed in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in this short-term study could potentially also reduce the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in those smokers who switch to a heated tobacco product. PMID:26817490

  3. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation of Valsa mali: An Efficient Tool for Random Insertion Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caixia; Guan, Xiangnan; Wang, Hanyan; Li, Guifang; Dong, Xiangli; Wang, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Valsa mali is a causal agent of apple and pear trees canker disease, which is a destructive disease that causes serious economic losses in eastern Asia, especially in China. The lack of an efficient transformation system for Valsa mali retards its investigation, which poses difficulties to control the disease. In this research, a transformation system for this pathogen was established for the first time using A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT), with the optimal transformation conditions as follows: 106/mL conidia suspension, cocultivation temperature 22°C, cocultivation time 72 hours, and 200 μM acetosyringone (AS) in the inductive medium. The average transformation efficiency was 1015.00 ± 37.35 transformants per 106 recipient conidia. Thirty transformants were randomly selected for further confirmation and the results showed the presence of T-DNA in all hygromycin B resistant transformants and also revealed random and single gene integration with genetic stability. Compared with wild-type strain, those transformants exhibited various differences in morphology, conidia production, and conidia germination ability. In addition, pathogenicity assays revealed that 14 transformants had mitigated pathogenicity, while one had enhanced infection ability. The results suggest that ATMT of V. mali is a useful tool to gain novel insight into this economically important pathogen at molecular levels. PMID:24381526

  4. Switching HIV Treatment in Adults Based on CD4 Count Versus Viral Load Monitoring: A Randomized, Non-Inferiority Trial in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Gonzague; Le Cœur, Sophie; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Traisathit, Patrinee; Cressey, Tim R.; Fregonese, Federica; Leurent, Baptiste; Collins, Intira J.; Techapornroong, Malee; Banchongkit, Sukit; Buranabanjasatean, Sudanee; Halue, Guttiga; Nilmanat, Ampaipith; Luekamlung, Nuananong; Klinbuayaem, Virat; Chutanunta, Apichat; Kantipong, Pacharee; Bowonwatanuwong, Chureeratana; Lertkoonalak, Rittha; Leenasirimakul, Prattana; Tansuphasawasdikul, Somboon; Sang-a-gad, Pensiriwan; Pathipvanich, Panita; Thongbuaban, Srisuda; Wittayapraparat, Pakorn; Eiamsirikit, Naree; Buranawanitchakorn, Yuwadee; Yutthakasemsunt, Naruepon; Winiyakul, Narong; Decker, Luc; Barbier, Sylvaine; Koetsawang, Suporn; Sirirungsi, Wasna; McIntosh, Kenneth; Thanprasertsuk, Sombat; Lallemant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral load (VL) is recommended for monitoring the response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) but is not routinely available in most low- and middle-income countries. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a CD4-based monitoring and switching strategy would provide a similar clinical outcome compared to the standard VL-based strategy in Thailand. Methods and Findings The Programs for HIV Prevention and Treatment (PHPT-3) non-inferiority randomized clinical trial compared a treatment switching strategy based on CD4-only (CD4) monitoring versus viral-load (VL). Consenting participants were antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected adults (CD4 count 50–250/mm3) initiating non-nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based therapy. Randomization, stratified by site (21 public hospitals), was performed centrally after enrollment. Clinicians were unaware of the VL values of patients randomized to the CD4 arm. Participants switched to second-line combination with confirmed CD4 decline >30% from peak (within 200 cells from baseline) in the CD4 arm, or confirmed VL >400 copies/ml in the VL arm. Primary endpoint was clinical failure at 3 years, defined as death, new AIDS-defining event, or CD4 <50 cells/mm3. The 3-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative risks of clinical failure were compared for non-inferiority with a margin of 7.4%. In the intent to treat analysis, data were censored at the date of death or at last visit. The secondary endpoints were difference in future-drug-option (FDO) score, a measure of resistance profiles, virologic and immunologic responses, and the safety and tolerance of HAART. 716 participants were randomized, 356 to VL monitoring and 360 to CD4 monitoring. At 3 years, 319 participants (90%) in VL and 326 (91%) in CD4 were alive and on follow-up. The cumulative risk of clinical failure was 8.0% (95% CI 5.6–11.4) in VL versus 7.4% (5.1–10.7) in CD4, and the upper-limit of the one-sided 95% CI of the difference was

  5. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M.; Antinori, Andrea; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  6. Brief Report: Switch to Ritonavir-Boosted Atazanavir Plus Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed Patients With HIV-1 Infection: A Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    van Lunzen, Jan; Pozniak, Anton; Gatell, Jose M; Antinori, Andrea; Klauck, Isabelle; Serrano, Oscar; Baakili, Adyb; Osiyemi, Olayemi; Sevinsky, Heather; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2016-04-15

    This open-label, multinational, pilot study randomized (1:2 ratio) adults with HIV-1 RNA <40 copies per milliliter and nucleos(t)ide-related safety/tolerability issues to switch to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r) plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (n = 37) or the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimen of ATV/r plus raltegravir (RAL) (n = 72). At 24 weeks, 35/37 (94.6%) and 58/72 (80.6%) of patients, respectively, maintained virological suppression, the primary endpoint, and 1 (2.7%) and 7 (9.7%), respectively, experienced virological rebound. Corresponding 48-week proportions were 86.5%, 69.4%, 2.7%, and 12.5%, respectively. Adherence was lower and treatment discontinuation was higher with ATV/r+RAL. In conclusion, switching to ATV/r+RAL resulted in a higher virological rebound rate than switching to ATV/r plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. PMID:26605505

  7. Effects of Joint Attention Mediated Learning for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Initial Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schertz, Hannah H.; Odom, Samuel L.; Baggett, Kathleen M.; Sideris, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effects of the Joint Attention Mediated Learning (JAML) intervention on acquisition of joint attention and other early social communication competencies for toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-three parents and their toddlers were randomly assigned to JAML or a control condition.…

  8. Improvement in Personal Meaning Mediates the Effects of a Life Review Intervention on Depressive Symptoms in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerhof, Gerben J.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.; van Beljouw, Ilse M. J.; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of a life review intervention on personal meaning in life and the mediating effect of personal meaning on depressive symptoms as the primary outcome of this form of indicated prevention. Design and Methods: A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted with one group of older…

  9. Structural basis of the mercury(II)-mediated conformational switching of the dual-function transcriptional regulator MerR

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Li-Ying; Zou, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Chan, Nei-Li

    2015-01-01

    The mer operon confers bacterial resistance to inorganic mercury (Hg2+) and organomercurials by encoding proteins involved in sensing, transport and detoxification of these cytotoxic agents. Expression of the mer operon is under tight control by the dual-function transcriptional regulator MerR. The metal-free, apo MerR binds to the mer operator/promoter region as a repressor to block transcription initiation, but is converted into an activator upon Hg2+-binding. To understand how MerR interacts with Hg2+ and how Hg2+-binding modulates MerR function, we report here the crystal structures of apo and Hg2+-bound MerR from Bacillus megaterium, corresponding respectively to the repressor and activator conformation of MerR. To our knowledge, the apo-MerR structure represents the first visualization of a MerR family member in its intact and inducer-free form. And the Hg2+-MerR structure offers the first view of a triligated Hg2+-thiolate center in a metalloprotein, confirming that MerR binds Hg2+ via trigonal planar coordination geometry. Structural comparison revealed the conformational transition of MerR is coupled to the assembly/disassembly of a buried Hg2+ binding site, thereby providing a structural basis for the Hg2+-mediated functional switching of MerR. The pronounced Hg2+-induced repositioning of the MerR DNA-binding domains suggests a plausible mechanism for the transcriptional regulation of the mer operon. PMID:26150423

  10. Mediators in the randomized trial of Child- and Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Heather A; Weinstein, Sally M; Henry, David B; West, Amy E

    2016-10-01

    Mediation analyses can identify mechanisms of change in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). However, few studies have analyzed mediators of CBT for youth internalizing disorders; only one trial evaluated treatment mechanisms for youth with mixed mood diagnoses. This study evaluated mediators in the randomized trial of Child- and Family-Focused CBT (CFF-CBT) versus Treatment As Usual (TAU) for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), adjunctive to pharmacotherapy. Sixty-nine children ages 7-13 with PBD were randomly assigned to CFF-CBT or TAU. Primary outcomes (child mood, functioning) and candidate mediators (family functioning, parent/child coping) were assessed at baseline and 4-, 8-, 12- (post-treatment), and 39-weeks (follow-up). Compared with TAU, children receiving CFF-CBT exhibited greater improvement in mania, depression, and global functioning. Several parent and family factors significantly improved in response to CFF-CBT versus TAU, and were associated with the CFF-CBT treatment effect. Specifically, parenting skills and coping, family flexibility, and family positive reframing showed promise as mediators of child mood symptoms and global functioning. Main or mediating effects for youth coping were not significant. CFF-CBT may impact children's mood and functioning by improving parenting skills and coping, family flexibility, and family positive reframing. Findings highlight the importance of parent coping and family functioning in the treatment of PBD.

  11. Mediators in the randomized trial of Child- and Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Heather A; Weinstein, Sally M; Henry, David B; West, Amy E

    2016-10-01

    Mediation analyses can identify mechanisms of change in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). However, few studies have analyzed mediators of CBT for youth internalizing disorders; only one trial evaluated treatment mechanisms for youth with mixed mood diagnoses. This study evaluated mediators in the randomized trial of Child- and Family-Focused CBT (CFF-CBT) versus Treatment As Usual (TAU) for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), adjunctive to pharmacotherapy. Sixty-nine children ages 7-13 with PBD were randomly assigned to CFF-CBT or TAU. Primary outcomes (child mood, functioning) and candidate mediators (family functioning, parent/child coping) were assessed at baseline and 4-, 8-, 12- (post-treatment), and 39-weeks (follow-up). Compared with TAU, children receiving CFF-CBT exhibited greater improvement in mania, depression, and global functioning. Several parent and family factors significantly improved in response to CFF-CBT versus TAU, and were associated with the CFF-CBT treatment effect. Specifically, parenting skills and coping, family flexibility, and family positive reframing showed promise as mediators of child mood symptoms and global functioning. Main or mediating effects for youth coping were not significant. CFF-CBT may impact children's mood and functioning by improving parenting skills and coping, family flexibility, and family positive reframing. Findings highlight the importance of parent coping and family functioning in the treatment of PBD. PMID:27567973

  12. Activation of Opioid μ-Receptors, but not δ- or κ-Receptors, Switches Pulmonary C-Fiber-Mediated Rapid Shallow Breathing into An Apnea in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Cancan; Zhou, Moxi; Xu, Fadi

    2012-01-01

    Rapid shallow breathing (RSB) is mainly mediated by bronchopulmonary C-fibers (PCFs). We asked whether this RSB could be modulated by opioid. In anesthetized rats right atrial bolus injection of phenylbiguanide (PBG) to evoke RSB was repeated after: 1) intravenously giving fentanyl (μ-receptor agonist), DPDPE (δ-receptor agonist), or U-50488H (κ-receptor agonist); 2) fentanyl (iv) following naloxone methiodide, a peripheral opioid receptor antagonist; 3) bilateral microinjection of fentanyl into the nodose ganglia; 4) fentanyl (iv) with pre-blocking histamine H1 and H2 receptors by diphenhydramine and ranitidine. Systemic fentanyl challenge, but not DPDPE or U-50488H, switched the PBG-induced RSB to a long lasting apnea. This switch was blocked by naloxone methiodide rather than diphenhydramine and ranitidine. After microinjecting fentanyl into the nodose ganglia, PBG also produced an apnea. Our results suggest that activating μ-receptors is capable of turning the PCF-mediated RSB into an apnea, at least partly, via facilitating PCFs’ activity and this switching effect appears independent of the released histamine. PMID:22796630

  13. Barriers encountered during enrollment in an internet-mediated randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Lorraine R; Janney, Adrienne W; Hess, Michael L; Culver, Silas A; Richardson, Caroline R

    2009-01-01

    Background Online technology is a promising resource for conducting clinical research. While the internet may improve a study's reach, as well as the efficiency of data collection, it may also introduce a number of challenges for participants and investigators. The objective of this research was to determine the challenges that potential participants faced during the enrollment phase of a randomized controlled intervention trial of Stepping Up to Health, an internet-mediated walking program that utilized a multi-step online enrollment process. Methods We conducted a quantitative content analysis of 623 help tickets logged in a participant management database during the enrollment phase of a clinical trial investigating the effect of an automated internet-mediated walking intervention. Qualitative coding was performed by two trained coders, and 10% of the sample was coded by both coders to determine inter-coder reliability. Quantitative analyses included standard descriptive statistics on ticket characteristics and theme frequency, and a Poisson regression analysis identified characteristics of potential participants who reported more frequent problems during enrollment. Results In total, 880 potential participants visited the study website and 80% completed the enrollment screening. Of the potential participants who visited the study website, 38% had help tickets logged in the participant management database. The total number of help tickets associated with individual potential participants ranged from 0 to 7 (M = .71). Overall, 46% of help tickets were initiated by email and 54% were initiated by phone. The most common help ticket theme was issues related to the study process (48%). The next most prominent theme was discussion related to obtaining medical clearance (34%), followed by issues related to pedometers and uploading (31%). Older individuals, women, and those with lower self-rated internet ability were more likely to report problems during the enrollment

  14. Interfacial Electrode-Driven Enhancement of the Switching Parameters of a Copper Oxide-Based Resistive Random-Access Memory Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, L. D. Varma; Kumar, Ch. Ravi; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of an Au/Cu x O/Au bipolar resistive random-access memory device are reported. It is demonstrated that switching parameters of this device structure can be enhanced by introducing an interfacial Al layer between the Au top electrode and the Cu x O-based dielectric layer. The set and reset voltages are, respectively, between -2.5 V to -6.0 V and +1.2 V to +3.0 V for the Al-based device. In contrast, the range of values are -0.5 V to -2.5 V and +0.5 V to +1.5 V for the set and reset voltages in the absence of Al. The Al-based device has a higher low resistance state value of 5-6 KΩ as compared to the 0.3-0.5 KΩ for the Au-based device, which leads to a 12 times lower power dissipation factor and lower reset current of 370 μA. Endurance studies carried out over 50 switching cycles show less than 2% variation in both the low resistance and high resistance values. The conduction is ohmic at low values of bias and non-ohmic at higher bias voltage which shows that the enhanced behaviour is a result of the formation of an insulating aluminum oxide layer at the Al-Cu x O interface.

  15. Multi-step resistive switching behavior of Li-doped ZnO resistance random access memory device controlled by compliance current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Tang, Jian-Fu; Su, Hsiu-Hsien; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Huang, Chih-Yu; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    The multi-step resistive switching (RS) behavior of a unipolar Pt/Li0.06Zn0.94O/Pt resistive random access memory (RRAM) device is investigated. It is found that the RRAM device exhibits normal, 2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors under different compliance currents. The transport mechanism within the device is investigated by means of current-voltage curves, in-situ transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect (normal RS behavior) or Li+ ion diffusion (2-, 3-, and 4-step RESET behaviors) under high electric fields.

  16. Total ionizing dose effect of γ-ray radiation on the switching characteristics and filament stability of HfOx resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Runchen; Yu, Shimeng; Gonzalez Velo, Yago; Chen, Wenhao; Holbert, Keith E.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Barnaby, Hugh

    2014-05-05

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ∼5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy γ-ray exposure.

  17. Retrospective Analysis of Serotype Switching of Vibrio cholerae O1 in a Cholera Endemic Region Shows It Is a Non-random Process

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Stefan L.; Thomson, Nicholas; Mutreja, Ankur; Connor, Thomas; Sur, Dipika; Ali, Mohammad; Clemens, John; Dougan, Gordon; Holmgren, Jan; Lebens, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Genomic data generated from clinical Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates collected over a five year period in an area of Kolkata, India with seasonal cholera outbreaks allowed a detailed genetic analysis of serotype switching that occurred from Ogawa to Inaba and back to Ogawa. The change from Ogawa to Inaba resulted from mutational disruption of the methyltransferase encoded by the wbeT gene. Re-emergence of the Ogawa serotype was found to result either from expansion of an already existing Ogawa clade or reversion of the mutation in an Inaba clade. Our data suggests that such transitions are not random events but rather driven by as yet unidentified selection mechanisms based on differences in the structure of the O1 antigen or in the serotype-determining wbeT gene. PMID:27706170

  18. A Comparison of Single Sample and Bootstrap Methods to Assess Mediation in Cluster Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Stapleton, Laura M.; Kang, Joo Youn

    2006-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study examined the statistical performance of single sample and bootstrap methods that can be used to test and form confidence interval estimates of indirect effects in two cluster randomized experimental designs. The designs were similar in that they featured random assignment of clusters to one of two treatment conditions and…

  19. Quantum cryptography without switching.

    PubMed

    Weedbrook, Christian; Lance, Andrew M; Bowen, Warwick P; Symul, Thomas; Ralph, Timothy C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-10-22

    We propose a new coherent state quantum key distribution protocol that eliminates the need to randomly switch between measurement bases. This protocol provides significantly higher secret key rates with increased bandwidths than previous schemes that only make single quadrature measurements. It also offers the further advantage of simplicity compared to all previous protocols which, to date, have relied on switching.

  20. A randomized, split-face clinical trial of Q-switched alexandrite laser versus Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of bilateral nevus of Ota.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiang; Li, Yong; Jiang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Q-switched (QS) lasers have been used successfully to treat nevus of Ota. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy and complication of QS alexandrite (QS Alex) laser versus QS neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) (QS Nd:YAG) laser for bilateral nevus of Ota. Seventeen patients with bilateral nevus of Ota were treated randomly with QS Alex in one half of face and QS Nd:YAG in the other half with an interval of at least 3 months between each. Subjective assessment was made by both patients and dermatologists. Patients were also examined for evidence of complications. All patients experienced improvement (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two sides (p > 0.05). The pain after a short period of laser therapy was more severe for QS Alex than for QS Nd:YAG laser. Vesicles developed in 1 patient after QS Alex therapy. Both QS Alex laser and QS Nd:YAG laser were equally effective at improving bilateral nevus of Ota. Patients tolerate QS Nd:YAG laser better than QS Alex laser.

  1. A randomized, split-face clinical trial of Q-switched alexandrite laser versus Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of bilateral nevus of Ota.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiang; Li, Yong; Jiang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Different types of Q-switched (QS) lasers have been used successfully to treat nevus of Ota. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy and complication of QS alexandrite (QS Alex) laser versus QS neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) (QS Nd:YAG) laser for bilateral nevus of Ota. Seventeen patients with bilateral nevus of Ota were treated randomly with QS Alex in one half of face and QS Nd:YAG in the other half with an interval of at least 3 months between each. Subjective assessment was made by both patients and dermatologists. Patients were also examined for evidence of complications. All patients experienced improvement (p < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two sides (p > 0.05). The pain after a short period of laser therapy was more severe for QS Alex than for QS Nd:YAG laser. Vesicles developed in 1 patient after QS Alex therapy. Both QS Alex laser and QS Nd:YAG laser were equally effective at improving bilateral nevus of Ota. Patients tolerate QS Nd:YAG laser better than QS Alex laser. PMID:25968166

  2. Longitudinal mediators of a randomized prevention program effect on cortisol for youth from parentally-bereaved families

    PubMed Central

    Luecken, Linda J.; Hagan, Melissa J.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Ayers, Tim S.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We recently reported that a randomized controlled trial of a family-focused intervention for parentally-bereaved youth predicted higher cortisol output 6 years later relative to a control group of bereaved youth (Luecken et al., 2010). The current study evaluated longitudinal mediators of the preventive intervention effect on cortisol 6 years later. Method Parentally bereaved children (N=139; mean age 11.4, SD = 2.4; age range = 8-16 years; 54% male; 61% Caucasian, 17% Hispanic, 7% African American, 15% other ethnicities) were randomly assigned to the 12-week preventive intervention (n=78) or a self-study control (n=61) condition. Six years later (mean age 17.5, SD 2.4), cortisol was sampled as youth participated in a parent-child conflict interaction task. Using 4 waves of data across the 6 years, longitudinal mediators of the program impact on cortisol were evaluated. Results Program-induced increases in positive parenting, decreases in child exposure to negative life events, and lower externalizing symptoms significantly mediated the intervention effect on cortisol 6 years later. Conclusions An intervention targeting improved parenting and reduced child exposure to additional life stressors following the death of a parent may have long-term neuroendocrine effects. PMID:23529870

  3. The ASSURE study: HIV‐1 suppression is maintained with bone and renal biomarker improvement 48 weeks after ritonavir discontinuation and randomized switch to abacavir/lamivudine + atazanavir†

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, DA; Bhatti, L; Small, CB; Edelstein, H; Zhao, HH; Margolis, DA; DeJesus, E; Weinberg, WG; Shaefer, MS

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV treatment guidelines endorse switching or simplification of antiretroviral therapy in therapy‐experienced patients with suppressed viraemia; ritonavir discontinuation may also enhance tolerability and reduce long‐term adverse events (AEs). This open‐label, multicentre, noninferiority study enrolled HIV‐1‐infected, treatment‐experienced adults with confirmed HIV‐1 RNA ≤ 75 HIV‐1 RNA copies/mL currently receiving tenofovir/emtricitabine + atazanavir/ritonavir (TDF/FTC + ATV/r) for ≥ 6 months with no reported history of virological failure. Methods Participants were randomized 1:2 to continue current treatment or switch to abacavir/lamivudine + atazanavir (ABC/3TC + ATV). Endpoints included the proportion of participants with HIV‐1 RNA < 50 copies/mL by time to loss of virological response (TLOVR), AEs, fasting lipids, and inflammatory, coagulation, bone and renal biomarkers. Results After 48 weeks, 76% (152 of 199) of ABC/3TC + ATV‐treated and 79% (77 of 97) of TDF/FTC + ATV/r‐treated participants had HIV‐1 RNA < 50 copies/mL (TLOVR; P = 0.564). Other efficacy analyses yielded similar results. Rates of new grade 2–4 AEs were 45% in both groups, but an excess of hyperbilirubinaemia made the rate of treatment‐emergent grade 3–4 laboratory abnormalities higher with TDF/FTC + ATV/r (36%) compared with ABC/3TC + ATV (19%). Most fasting lipid levels remained stable over time; high‐density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol increased modestly in ABC/3TC + ATV‐treated participants. Bone and renal biomarkers improved significantly between baseline and week 48 in participants taking ABC/3TC + ATV and were stable in participants taking TDF/FTC + ATV/r. No significant changes occurred in any inflammatory or coagulation biomarker within or between treatment groups. Conclusions The ABC/3TC + ATV treatment‐switch group had similar viral suppression rates up to 48 weeks to

  4. Fruit and vegetable intake and eating behaviors mediate the effect of a randomized text-message based weight loss program

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Gregory J.; Kolodziejczyk, Julia K.; Adams, Marc A.; Patrick, Kevin; Marshall, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that fruit/vegetable intake and eating behaviors mediate the relationship between experimental condition and weight loss in a randomized trial evaluating a text-message based weight loss program. Methods Overweight/obese individuals from San Diego, CA (N=52 with complete data) were randomly assigned in 2007 into one of two groups for four months: 1) the intervention group that received 2-5 weight management text-messages p/day; 2) the usual-care comparison group. Three 24-hour recalls assessed fruit/vegetable intake change and the Eating Behavior Inventory (EBI) measured change in eating behaviors. Regression path models tested intervention mediation. Results Direct effects of the intervention were found for change in body weight (b=-3.84, R2=0.074), fruit/vegetable intake (b=2.00, R2=0.083), and EBI scores (b=7.15, R2=0.229) (ps < 0.05). The treatment group to weight change path was not statistically significant (b=-0.673, R2=0.208) when fruit/vegetable intake change and EBI score change were specified as intervention mediators in the model. The total indirect effect was 3.17 lbs. indicating that the indirect paths explained 82.6% of the total effect on weight change. Discussion Fruit/vegetable intake and eating behaviors mediated the intervention's effect on weight change. The findings suggest that sending text-messages that promote healthy eating strategies resulted in moderate short-term weight loss. PMID:23085329

  5. Fibrate therapy and flow-mediated dilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Giua, Renato; Pedone, Claudio; Ray, Kausik K; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J; Costanzo, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery reflects endothelium-dependent vasodilator function; since it correlates with coronary endothelial function, its reduction could predict cardiovascular events. Several studies have investigated the potential impact of fibrates therapy on endothelial function, but clinical findings have not been fully consistent. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials in order to clarify whether fibrate therapy could improve endothelial function. A systematic search in PubMed-Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases was performed to identify randomized placebo-controlled trials investigating the effect of fibrates on endothelial function as estimated by FMD. A random-effects model and generic inverse variance method were used for meta-analysis. Sensitivity analysis, risk of bias evaluation, and publication bias assessment were carried out using standard methods. Random-effects meta-regression was used to evaluate the impact of treatment duration on the estimated effect size. Fifteen trials with a total of 556 subjects met the eligibility criteria. Fibrate therapy significantly improves FMD (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 1.64%, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.13, p<0.001) and the result was confirmed in both subgroups with treatment durations ≤8 weeks (WMD: 1.35%, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.86, p<0.001) and >8 weeks (WMD: 2.55%, 95% CI: 1.21, 3.89, p<0.001). When the analysis was stratified according to the fibrate type, a significant effect was observed with fenofibrate but not with gemfibrozil, though difference between the two subgroups was not significant. Meta-analysis of data from trials where nitrate mediated dilation (NMD) was available did not suggest a significant change in NMD following treatment with fibrates. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that fibrates may exert beneficial effects on endothelial function, even over a short-term treatment course. PMID:27320045

  6. Opposing effect of EGFRwt on EGFRvIII-mediated NF-κB activation with RIP1 as a cell death switch

    PubMed Central

    Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar Thidil; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Chauncey, Sandili S.; Li, Li; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce; Noorani, Shayan; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Burma, Sandeep; Boothman, David A.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary RIP1 is a central mediator of cell death in cell stress, but can also mediate cell survival by activating NF-κB. Here, we show that RIP1 is a switch in EGFR signaling. EGFRvIII is an oncogenic mutant that does not bind ligand and is co-expressed with EGFRwt in glioblastoma (GBM). EGFRvIII recruits ubiquitin ligases to RIP1 resulting in K63-linked ubiquitination of RIP1. RIP1 binds to TAK1 and NEMO forming a EGFRvIII-RIP1 signalosome that activates NF-κB. RIP1 is essential for EGFRvIII-mediated oncogenicity and correlates with NF-κB activation in GBM. Surprisingly, activation of EGFRwt with EGF results in a novel negative regulation of EGFRvIII with dissociation of the EGFRvIII-RIP1 signalosome, loss of RIP1 ubiquitination, NF-κB activation, and association of RIP1 with FADD and Caspase-8. If EGFRwt is overexpressed with EGFRvIII, adding EGF leads to a RIP1 kinase dependent cell death. The EGFRwt-EGFRvIII-RIP1 interplay may regulate oncogenicity and vulnerability to targeted treatment in GBM. PMID:23972990

  7. Forming-free, bipolar resistivity switching characteristics of fully transparent resistive random access memory with IZO/α-IGZO/ITO structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Tsung-Eong

    2016-09-01

    Fully transparent resistive random access memory (TRRAM) containing amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide as the resistance switching (RS) layer and transparent conducting oxides (indium zinc oxide and indium tin oxide) as the electrodes was prepared. Optical measurement indicated the transmittance of device exceeds 80% in visible-light wavelength range. TRRAM samples exhibited the forming-free feature and the best electrical performance (V SET  =  0.61 V V RESET  =  -0.76 V R HRS/R LRS (i.e. the R-ratio)  >103) was observed in the device subject to a post-annealing at 300 °C for 1 hr in atmospheric ambient. Such a sample also exhibited satisfactory endurance and retention properties at 85 °C as revealed by the reliability tests. Electrical measurement performed in vacuum ambient indicated that the RS mechanism correlates with the charge trapping/de-trapping process associated with oxygen defects in the RS layer.

  8. Forming-free, bipolar resistivity switching characteristics of fully transparent resistive random access memory with IZO/α-IGZO/ITO structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Tsung-Eong

    2016-09-01

    Fully transparent resistive random access memory (TRRAM) containing amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide as the resistance switching (RS) layer and transparent conducting oxides (indium zinc oxide and indium tin oxide) as the electrodes was prepared. Optical measurement indicated the transmittance of device exceeds 80% in visible-light wavelength range. TRRAM samples exhibited the forming-free feature and the best electrical performance (V SET  =  0.61 V V RESET  =  ‑0.76 V R HRS/R LRS (i.e. the R-ratio)  >103) was observed in the device subject to a post-annealing at 300 °C for 1 hr in atmospheric ambient. Such a sample also exhibited satisfactory endurance and retention properties at 85 °C as revealed by the reliability tests. Electrical measurement performed in vacuum ambient indicated that the RS mechanism correlates with the charge trapping/de-trapping process associated with oxygen defects in the RS layer.

  9. Self-selection effects and modulation of TaOx resistive switching random access memory with bottom electrode of highly doped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Pan, Yue; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a TaOx resistive switching random access memory (RRAM) device with operation-polarity-dependent self-selection effect by introducing highly doped silicon (Si) electrode, which is promising for large-scale integration. It is observed that with highly doped Si as the bottom electrode (BE), the RRAM devices show non-linear (>103) I-V characteristic during negative Forming/Set operation and linear behavior during positive Forming/Set operation. The underling mechanisms for the linear and non-linear behaviors at low resistance states of the proposed device are extensively investigated by varying operation modes, different metal electrodes, and Si doping type. Experimental data and theoretical analysis demonstrate that the operation-polarity-dependent self-selection effect in our devices originates from the Schottky barrier between the TaOx layer and the interfacial SiOx formed by reaction between highly doped Si BE and immigrated oxygen ions in the conductive filament area.

  10. Modulation of surface trap induced resistive switching by electrode annealing in individual PbS micro/nanowire-based devices for resistance random access memory.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianping; Cheng, Baochang; Wu, Fuzhang; Su, Xiaohui; Xiao, Yanhe; Guo, Rui; Lei, Shuijin

    2014-12-10

    Bipolar resistive switching (RS) devices are commonly believed as a promising candidate for next generation nonvolatile resistance random access memory (RRAM). Here, two-terminal devices based on individual PbS micro/nanowires with Ag electrodes are constructed, whose electrical transport depends strongly on the abundant surface and bulk trap states in micro/nanostructures. The surface trap states can be filled/emptied effectively at negative/positive bias voltage, respectively, and the corresponding rise/fall of the Fermi level induces a variation in a degenerate/nondegenerate state, resulting in low/high resistance. Moreover, the filling/emptying of trap states can be utilized as RRAM. After annealing, the surface trap state can almost be eliminated completely; while most of the bulk trap states can still remain. In the devices unannealed and annealed at both ends, therefore, the symmetrical back-to-back Fowler-Nordheim tunneling with large ON/OFF resistance ratio and Poole-Frenkel emission with poor hysteresis can be observed under cyclic sweep voltage, respectively. However, a typical bipolar RS behavior can be observed effectively in the devices annealed at one end. The acquirement of bipolar RS and nonvolatile RRAM by the modulation of electrode annealing demonstrates the abundant trap states in micro/nanomaterials will be advantageous to the development of new type electronic components.

  11. Do savings mediate changes in adolescents’ future orientation and health-related outcomes? Findings from randomized experiment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Karimli, Leyla; Ssewamala, Fred M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This present study tests the proposition that an economic strengthening intervention for families caring for AIDS-orphaned adolescents would positively affect adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes through increased asset-accumulation (in this case, by increasing family savings). Methods Using longitudinal data from the cluster-randomized experiment we ran generalized estimating equation (GEE) models with robust standard errors clustering on individual observations. To examine whether family savings mediate the effect of the intervention on adolescents’ future orientation and psychosocial outcomes, analyses were conducted in three steps: (1) testing the effect of intervention on mediator; (2) testing the effect of mediator on outcomes, controlling for the intervention; and (3) testing the significance of mediating effect using Sobel-Goodman method. Asymmetric confidence intervals for mediated effect were obtained through bootstrapping—to address the assumption of normal distribution. Results Results indicate that participation in a matched Child Savings Account program improved adolescents’ future orientation and psychosocial outcomes by reducing hopelessness, enhancing self-concept, and improving adolescents’ confidence about their educational plans. However, the positive intervention effect on adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes was not transmitted through saving. In other words, participation in the matched Child Savings Account program improved adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes regardless of its impact on reported savings. Conclusions Further research is necessary to understand exactly how participation in economic strengthening interventions, for example, those that employ matched Child Savings Accounts, shape adolescent future orientation and psychosocial outcomes: what, if not savings, transmits the treatment effect and how? PMID:26271162

  12. High-Dimensional Explanatory Random Item Effects Models for Rater-Mediated Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelcey, Ben; Wang, Shanshan; Cox, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Valid and reliable measurement of unobserved latent variables is essential to understanding and improving education. A common and persistent approach to assessing latent constructs in education is the use of rater inferential judgment. The purpose of this study is to develop high-dimensional explanatory random item effects models designed for…

  13. Conceptualizing and Testing Random Indirect Effects and Moderated Mediation in Multilevel Models: New Procedures and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Gil, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The authors propose new procedures for evaluating direct, indirect, and total effects in multilevel models when all relevant variables are measured at Level 1 and all effects are random. Formulas are provided for the mean and variance of the indirect and total effects and for the sampling variances of the average indirect and total effects.…

  14. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  15. Giant electric-field induced strain in ferroelectric crystals by point-defect mediated reversible domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaobing

    2004-03-01

    Ferroelectric crystals are characterized by their asymmetric or polar structures. In electric field, ions undergo asymmetric displacement and result in a small change in crystal dimension, which is proportional to the applied field. Such electric-field induced strain (or piezoelectricity) has found extensive applications in actuators and sensors. However, the effect is generally very small and thus limits its usefulness. Here I show that with a different mechanism, an aged BaTiO3 single crystal can generate a large recoverable non-linear strain of 0.75% at a low field of 200V/mm. At the same field this value is about 40 times higher than piezoelectric PZT ceramics and more than 10 times higher than the high strain PZN-PT single crystals. This giant electro-strain stems from an unusual reversible domain switching (most importantly the switching of non-180^o domains) in which the restoring force is provided by a general symmetry-conforming property of point defects. This mechanism provides a general method to achieve large electro-strain effect in a wide range of ferroelectric systems and the effect may lead to novel applications in ultra large stroke and non-linear actuators.

  16. Large electric-field-induced strain in ferroelectric crystals by point-defect-mediated reversible domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaobing

    2004-02-01

    Ferroelectric crystals are characterized by their asymmetric or polar structures. In an electric field, ions undergo asymmetric displacement and result in a small change in crystal dimension, which is proportional to the applied field. Such electric-field-induced strain (or piezoelectricity) has found extensive applications in actuators and sensors. However, the effect is generally very small and thus limits its usefulness. Here I show that with a different mechanism, an aged BaTiO3 single crystal can generate a large recoverable nonlinear strain of 0.75% at a low field of 200 V mm-1. At the same field this value is about 40 times higher than piezoelectric Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) ceramics and more than 10 times higher than the high-strain Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PZN-PT) single crystals. This large electro-strain stems from an unusual reversible domain switching (most importantly the switching of non-180° domains) in which the restoring force is provided by a general symmetry-conforming property of point defects. This mechanism provides a general method to achieve large electro-strain effect in a wide range of ferroelectric systems and the effect may lead to novel applications in ultra-large stroke and nonlinear actuators.

  17. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma.

  18. Phenobarbital Mediates an Epigenetic Switch at the Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Target Gene Cyp2b10 in the Liver of B6C3F1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brasa, Sarah; Teo, Soon-Siong; Roloff, Tim-Christoph; Morawiec, Laurent; Zamurovic, Natasa; Vicart, Axel; Funhoff, Enrico; Couttet, Philippe; Schübeler, Dirk; Grenet, Olivier; Marlowe, Jennifer; Moggs, Jonathan; Terranova, Rémi

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that epigenetic perturbations are involved in the adverse effects associated with some drugs and toxicants, including certain classes of non-genotoxic carcinogens. Such epigenetic changes (altered DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications) may take place at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis and their identification holds great promise for biomedical research. Here, we evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of genome-wide epigenomic and transcriptomic profiling in phenobarbital (PB)-treated B6C3F1 mice, a well-characterized rodent model of non-genotoxic liver carcinogenesis. Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation (MeDIP)-coupled microarray profiling of 17,967 promoter regions and 4,566 intergenic CpG islands was combined with genome-wide mRNA expression profiling to identify liver tissue-specific PB-mediated DNA methylation and transcriptional alterations. Only a limited number of significant anti-correlations were observed between PB-induced transcriptional and promoter-based DNA methylation perturbations. However, the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) target gene Cyp2b10 was found to be concomitantly hypomethylated and transcriptionally activated in a liver tissue-specific manner following PB treatment. Furthermore, analysis of active and repressive histone modifications using chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a strong PB-mediated epigenetic switch at the Cyp2b10 promoter. Our data reveal that PB-induced transcriptional perturbations are not generally associated with broad changes in the DNA methylation status at proximal promoters and suggest that the drug-inducible CAR pathway regulates an epigenetic switch from repressive to active chromatin at the target gene Cyp2b10. This study demonstrates the utility of integrated epigenomic and transcriptomic profiling for elucidating early mechanisms and biomarkers of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis. PMID:21455306

  19. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation by PPARγ is Mediated by a Metabolic Switch that Increases Reactive Oxygen Species Levels

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Nishi; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Singh, Dinesh K.; Sudderth, Jessica; Hu, Zeping; Nguyen, Hien; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G.; Carstens, Ryan; Huffman, Kenneth E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Kittler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The nuclear receptor peroxisome-proliferation activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a transcriptional master regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, inhibits the growth of several common cancers including lung cancer. In this study, we show that the mechanism by which activation of PPARγ inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells is based on metabolic changes. We found that treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone triggers a metabolic switch that inhibits pyruvate oxidation and reduces glutathione levels. These PPARγ-induced metabolic changes result in a marked increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels that lead to rapid hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (RB) and cell cycle arrest. The antiproliferative effect of PPARγ activation can be prevented by suppressing pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) or β-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. Our proposed mechanism also suggests that metabolic changes can rapidly and directly inhibit cell cycle progression of cancer cells by altering ROS levels. PMID:25264247

  20. Polycrystalline nanowires of gadolinium-doped ceria via random alignment mediated by supercritical carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Woo; Ahn, Jae-Pyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a seed/template-free method that affords high-purity semiconducting nanowires from nanoclusters, which act as basic building blocks for nanomaterials, under supercritical CO2 fluid. Polycrystalline nanowires of Gd-doped ceria (Gd-CeO2) were formed by CO2-mediated non-oriented attachment of the nanoclusters resulting from the dissociation of single-crystalline aggregates. The unique formation mechanism underlying this morphological transition may be exploited for the facile growth of high-purity polycrystalline nanowires. PMID:23572061

  1. C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor LOX-1 Promotes Dendritic Cell-Mediated Class-Switched B Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration towards lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts, and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, which enabled their exit from germinal centers and migration towards local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses. PMID:25308333

  2. A σE-Mediated Temperature Gauge Controls a Switch from LuxR-Mediated Virulence Gene Expression to Thermal Stress Adaptation in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dan; Guo, Min; Yang, Minjun; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Qiyao

    2016-01-01

    In vibrios, the expression of virulence factors is often controlled by LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator. Here, we investigate the interplay between LuxR and σE, an alternative sigma factor, during the control of virulence-related gene expression and adaptations to temperature elevations in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. An rpoE null V. alginolyticus mutant was unable to adapt to various stresses and was survival-deficient in fish. In wild type V. alginolyticus, the expression of LuxR-regulated virulence factors increased as the temperature was increased from 22°C to 37°C, but mutants lacking σE did not respond to temperature, indicating that σE is critical for the temperature-dependent upregulation of virulence genes. Further analyses revealed that σE binds directly to -10 and -35 elements in the luxR promoter that drive its transcription. ChIP assays showed that σE binds to the promoter regions of luxR, rpoH and rpoE at high temperatures (e.g., 30°C and 37°C). However, at higher temperatures (42°C) that induce thermal stress, σE binding to the luxR promoter decreased, while its binding to the rpoH and rpoE promoters was unchanged. Thus, the temperature-dependent binding of σE to distinct promoters appears to underlie a σE-controlled switch between the expression of virulence genes and adaptation to thermal stress. This study illustrates how a conserved temperature response mechanism integrates into quorum-sensing circuits to regulate both virulence and stress adaptation. PMID:27253371

  3. A Developmental Switch of Gene Expression in the Barley Seed Mediated by HvVP1 (Viviparous-1) and HvGAMYB Interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Zamira; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Martínez, Manuel; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Díaz, Isabel; Carbonero, Pilar; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of storage compounds in the starchy endosperm of developing cereal seeds is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. These compounds, mainly starch and proteins, are hydrolyzed upon germination to allow seedling growth. The transcription factor HvGAMYB is a master activator both in the maturation phase of seed development and upon germination, acting in combination with other transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism controlling the switch from maturation to germination programs remains unclear. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of Hordeum vulgare VIVIPAROUS1 (HvVP1), orthologous to ABA-INSENSITIVE3 from Arabidopsis thaliana HvVP1 transcripts accumulate in the endosperm and the embryo of developing seeds at early stages and in the embryo and aleurone of germinating seeds up to 24 h of imbibition. In transient expression assays, HvVP1 controls the activation of Hor2 and Amy6.4 promoters exerted by HvGAMYB. HvVP1 interacts with HvGAMYB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the plant nuclei, hindering its interaction with other transcription factors involved in seed gene expression programs, like BPBF. Similarly, this interaction leads to a decrease in the DNA binding of HvGAMYB and the Barley Prolamine-Box binding Factor (BPBF) to their target sequences. Our results indicate that the HvVP1 expression pattern controls the full Hor2 expression activated by GAMYB and BPBF in the developing endosperm and the Amy6.4 activation in postgerminative reserve mobilization mediated by GAMYB. All these data demonstrate the participation of HvVP1 in antagonistic gene expression programs and support its central role as a gene expression switch during seed maturation and germination. PMID:26858366

  4. A Developmental Switch of Gene Expression in the Barley Seed Mediated by HvVP1 (Viviparous-1) and HvGAMYB Interactions.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Zamira; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Martínez, Manuel; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Díaz, Isabel; Carbonero, Pilar; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of storage compounds in the starchy endosperm of developing cereal seeds is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. These compounds, mainly starch and proteins, are hydrolyzed upon germination to allow seedling growth. The transcription factor HvGAMYB is a master activator both in the maturation phase of seed development and upon germination, acting in combination with other transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism controlling the switch from maturation to germination programs remains unclear. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of Hordeum vulgare VIVIPAROUS1 (HvVP1), orthologous to ABA-INSENSITIVE3 from Arabidopsis thaliana HvVP1 transcripts accumulate in the endosperm and the embryo of developing seeds at early stages and in the embryo and aleurone of germinating seeds up to 24 h of imbibition. In transient expression assays, HvVP1 controls the activation of Hor2 and Amy6.4 promoters exerted by HvGAMYB. HvVP1 interacts with HvGAMYB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the plant nuclei, hindering its interaction with other transcription factors involved in seed gene expression programs, like BPBF. Similarly, this interaction leads to a decrease in the DNA binding of HvGAMYB and the Barley Prolamine-Box binding Factor (BPBF) to their target sequences. Our results indicate that the HvVP1 expression pattern controls the full Hor2 expression activated by GAMYB and BPBF in the developing endosperm and the Amy6.4 activation in postgerminative reserve mobilization mediated by GAMYB. All these data demonstrate the participation of HvVP1 in antagonistic gene expression programs and support its central role as a gene expression switch during seed maturation and germination.

  5. Sleep-Related Safety Behaviors and Dysfunctional Beliefs Mediate the Efficacy of Online CBT for Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lancee, Jaap; Eisma, Maarten C; van Straten, Annemieke; Kamphuis, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Several trials have demonstrated the efficacy of online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. However, few studies have examined putative mechanisms of change based on the cognitive model of insomnia. Identification of modifiable mechanisms by which the treatment works may guide efforts to further improve the efficacy of insomnia treatment. The current study therefore has two aims: (1) to replicate the finding that online CBT is effective for insomnia and (2) to test putative mechanism of change (i.e., safety behaviors and dysfunctional beliefs). Accordingly, we conducted a randomized controlled trial in which individuals with insomnia were randomized to either online CBT for insomnia (n = 36) or a waiting-list control group (n = 27). Baseline and posttest assessments included questionnaires assessing insomnia severity, safety behaviors, dysfunctional beliefs, anxiety and depression, and a sleep diary. Three- and six-month assessments were administered to the CBT group only. Results show moderate to large statistically significant effects of the online treatment compared to the waiting list on insomnia severity, sleep measures, sleep safety behaviors, and dysfunctional beliefs. Furthermore, dysfunctional beliefs and safety behaviors mediated the effects of treatment on insomnia severity and sleep efficiency. Together, these findings corroborate the efficacy of online CBT for insomnia, and suggest that these effects were produced by changing maladaptive beliefs, as well as safety behaviors. Treatment protocols for insomnia may specifically be enhanced by more focused attention on the comprehensive fading of sleep safety behaviors, for instance through behavioral experiments.

  6. Src, a Molecular Switch Governing Gain Control of Synaptic Transmission Mediated by N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W.

    1999-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activity of NMDA receptors is regulated by the protein tyrosine kinase, Src. Recently it has been discovered that, by means of up-regulating NMDA receptor function, activation of Src mediates the induction of the lasting enhancement of excitatory transmission known as long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Also, Src has been found to amplify the up-regulation of NMDA receptor function that is produced by raising the intracellular concentration of sodium. Sodium concentration increases in neuronal dendrites during high levels of firing activity, which is precisely when Src becomes activated. Therefore, we propose that the boost in NMDA receptor function produced by the coincidence of activating Src and raising intracellular sodium may be important in physiological and pathophysiological enhancement of excitatory transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and elsewhere in the central nervous system.

  7. Integrating mitosis, toxicity, and transgene expression in a telecommunications packet-switched network model of lipoplex-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy M; Wysocki, Beata J; Beyersdorf, Jared P; Wysocki, Tadeusz A; Pannier, Angela K

    2014-08-01

    Gene delivery systems transport exogenous genetic information to cells or biological systems with the potential to directly alter endogenous gene expression and behavior with applications in functional genomics, tissue engineering, medical devices, and gene therapy. Nonviral systems offer advantages over viral systems because of their low immunogenicity, inexpensive synthesis, and easy modification but suffer from lower transfection levels. The representation of gene transfer using models offers perspective and interpretation of complex cellular mechanisms,including nonviral gene delivery where exact mechanisms are unknown. Here, we introduce a novel telecommunications model of the nonviral gene delivery process in which the delivery of the gene to a cell is synonymous with delivery of a packet of information to a destination computer within a packet-switched computer network. Such a model uses nodes and layers to simplify the complexity of modeling the transfection process and to overcome several challenges of existing models. These challenges include a limited scope and limited time frame, which often does not incorporate biological effects known to affect transfection. The telecommunication model was constructed in MATLAB to model lipoplex delivery of the gene encoding the green fluorescent protein to HeLa cells. Mitosis and toxicity events were included in the model resulting in simulation outputs of nuclear internalization and transfection efficiency that correlated with experimental data. A priori predictions based on model sensitivity analysis suggest that increasing endosomal escape and decreasing lysosomal degradation, protein degradation, and GFP-induced toxicity can improve transfection efficiency by three-fold. Application of the telecommunications model to nonviral gene delivery offers insight into the development of new gene delivery systems with therapeutically relevant transfection levels.

  8. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes.

  9. Robust intestinal homeostasis relies on cellular plasticity in enteroblasts mediated by miR-8–Escargot switch

    PubMed Central

    Antonello, Zeus A; Reiff, Tobias; Ballesta-Illan, Esther; Dominguez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is remarkably robust despite perturbations and demand uncertainty. Here, we investigate the basis of such robustness using novel tracing methods that allow simultaneously capturing the dynamics of stem and committed progenitor cells (called enteroblasts) and intestinal cell turnover with spatiotemporal resolution. We found that intestinal stem cells (ISCs) divide “ahead” of demand during Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Their newborn enteroblasts, on the other hand, take on a highly polarized shape, acquire invasive properties and motility. They extend long membrane protrusions that make cell–cell contact with mature cells, while exercising a capacity to delay their final differentiation until a local demand materializes. This cellular plasticity is mechanistically linked to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme mediated by escargot, a snail family gene. Activation of the conserved microRNA miR-8/miR-200 in “pausing” enteroblasts in response to a local cell loss promotes timely terminal differentiation via a reverse MET by antagonizing escargot. Our findings unveil that robust intestinal renewal relies on hitherto unrecognized plasticity in enteroblasts and reveal their active role in sensing and/or responding to local demand. PMID:26077448

  10. A senescence secretory switch mediated by PI3K/AKT/mTOR activation controls chemoprotective endothelial secretory responses.

    PubMed

    Bent, Eric H; Gilbert, Luke A; Hemann, Michael T

    2016-08-15

    Cancer therapy targets malignant cells that are surrounded by a diverse complement of nonmalignant stromal cells. Therapy-induced damage of normal cells can alter the tumor microenvironment, causing cellular senescence and activating cancer-promoting inflammation. However, how these damage responses are regulated (both induced and resolved) to preserve tissue homeostasis and prevent chronic inflammation is poorly understood. Here, we detail an acute chemotherapy-induced secretory response that is self-limiting in vitro and in vivo despite the induction of cellular senescence. We used tissue-specific knockout mice to demonstrate that endothelial production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 promotes chemoresistance and show that the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin induces acute IL-6 release through reactive oxygen species-mediated p38 activation in vitro. Doxorubicin causes endothelial senescence but, surprisingly, without a typical senescence secretory response. We found that endothelial cells repress senescence-associated inflammation through the down-regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling and that reactivation of this pathway restores senescence-associated inflammation. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which damage-associated paracrine secretory responses are restrained to preserve tissue homeostasis and prevent chronic inflammation. PMID:27566778

  11. Fasting induces a subcutaneous-to-visceral fat switch mediated by microRNA-149-3p and suppression of PRDM16.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hanying; Zheng, Shasha; Garcia-Ruiz, Daniel; Hou, Dongxia; Wei, Zhe; Liao, Zhicong; Li, Limin; Zhang, Yujing; Han, Xiao; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is strongly associated with metabolic disease risk, whereas subcutaneous adiposity is comparatively benign. However, their relative physiological importance in energy homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that after 24-h fasting, the subcutaneous adipose tissue of mice acquires key properties of visceral fat. During this fast-induced 'visceralization', upregulation of miR-149-3p directly targets PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16), a key coregulatory protein required for the 'browning' of white fat. In cultured inguinal preadipocytes, overexpression of miR-149-3p promotes a visceral-like switch during cell differentiation. Mice deficient in miR-149-3p display an increase in whole-body energy expenditure, with enhanced thermogenesis of inguinal fat. However, a visceral-like adipose phenotype is observed in inguinal depots overexpressing miR-149-3p. These results indicate that in addition to the capacity of 'browning' to defend against hypothermia during cold exposure, the subcutaneous adipose depot is also capable of 'whitening' to preserve energy during fasting, presumably to maintain energy balance, via miR-149-3p-mediated regulation of PRDM16. PMID:27240637

  12. Fasting induces a subcutaneous-to-visceral fat switch mediated by microRNA-149-3p and suppression of PRDM16

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hanying; Zheng, Shasha; Garcia-Ruiz, Daniel; Hou, Dongxia; Wei, Zhe; Liao, Zhicong; Li, Limin; Zhang, Yujing; Han, Xiao; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is strongly associated with metabolic disease risk, whereas subcutaneous adiposity is comparatively benign. However, their relative physiological importance in energy homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that after 24-h fasting, the subcutaneous adipose tissue of mice acquires key properties of visceral fat. During this fast-induced ‘visceralization', upregulation of miR-149-3p directly targets PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16), a key coregulatory protein required for the ‘browning' of white fat. In cultured inguinal preadipocytes, overexpression of miR-149-3p promotes a visceral-like switch during cell differentiation. Mice deficient in miR-149-3p display an increase in whole-body energy expenditure, with enhanced thermogenesis of inguinal fat. However, a visceral-like adipose phenotype is observed in inguinal depots overexpressing miR-149-3p. These results indicate that in addition to the capacity of ‘browning' to defend against hypothermia during cold exposure, the subcutaneous adipose depot is also capable of ‘whitening' to preserve energy during fasting, presumably to maintain energy balance, via miR-149-3p-mediated regulation of PRDM16. PMID:27240637

  13. Cyclosporin A-sensitive induction of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic switch is mediated via a novel pathway involving a MEF2 family member.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S; Liu, P; Borras, A; Chatila, T; Speck, S H

    1997-01-01

    Induction of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle by crosslinking surface immunoglobulin is inhibited by the immunosuppressants cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. This correlates with the ability of CsA to inhibit Ca2+-dependent transcription of the lytic cycle switch gene BZLF1. It is shown here that CsA sensitivity maps to three sites (ZIA, ZIB and ZID) that bind the serum response factor-related protein MEF2D. A synthetic promoter containing multiple copies of a MEF2D site from Zp, in conjunction with a CREB/AP-1 site (ZII) from Zp, exhibits CsA-sensitive inducibility. Furthermore, the Zp MEF2D sites were functionally interchangeable with MEF2 sites derived from heterologous promoters. While no evidence of a NFAT family member binding to either the MEF2 or CREB/AP-1 sites was obtained, it could be demonstrated that CsA-sensitive induction of Zp was mediated by calcineurin and NFATc2 in synergy with either phorbol ester or especially with the EBV-induced Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase type IV/Gr. These studies identify Zp as prototypic of a novel class of CsA-sensitive and NFAT-dependent promoters defined by the presence of MEF2 sites. PMID:9009275

  14. Testing a Path-Analytic Mediation Model of How Self-Regulated Writing Strategies Improve Fourth Graders' Composition Skills: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunstein, Joachim C.; Glaser, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to identify, through mediation analysis, potential causal mechanisms by which procedures of self-regulated learning increase the efficaciousness of teaching young students strategies for writing stories. In a randomized controlled trial with 3 measurement points (pretest, posttest, maintenance), 117 fourth graders either…

  15. A Parent-Mediated Intervention that Targets Responsive Parental Behaviors Increases Attachment Behaviors in Children with ASD: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Michael; Swanson, Meghan; Gerber, Alan; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of Focused Playtime Intervention (FPI) in a sample of 70 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This parent-mediated intervention has previously been shown to significantly increase responsive parental communication (Siller et al. in "J Autism Dev Disord"…

  16. Sequential Effects in Deduction: Cost of Inference Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milan, Emilio G.; Moreno-Rios, Sergio; Espino, Orlando; Santamaria, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The task-switch paradigm has helped psychologists gain insight into the processes involved in changing from one activity to another. The literature has yielded consistent results about switch cost reconfiguration (abrupt offset in regular task-switch vs. gradual reduction in random task-switch; endogenous and exogenous components of switch cost;…

  17. Influence of carbon content on the copper-telluride phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior of carbon alloyed Cu-Te conductive bridge random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devulder, Wouter De Schutter, Bob; Detavernier, Christophe; Opsomer, Karl; Franquet, Alexis; Meersschaut, Johan; Muller, Robert; Van Elshocht, Sven; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Goux, Ludovic; Belmonte, Attilio

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the carbon content on the Cu-Te phase formation and on the resistive switching behavior in carbon alloyed Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4} based conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) cells. Carbon alloying of copper-tellurium inhibits the crystallization, while attractive switching behavior is preserved when using the material as Cu-supply layer in CBRAM cells. The phase formation is first investigated in a combinatorial way. With increasing carbon content, an enlargement of the temperature window in which the material stays amorphous was observed. Moreover, if crystalline phases are formed, subsequent phase transformations are inhibited. The electrical switching behavior of memory cells with different carbon contents is then investigated by implementing them in 580 μm diameter dot TiN/Cu{sub 0.6}Te{sub 0.4}-C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si memory cells. Reliable switching behavior is observed for carbon contents up to 40 at. %, with a resistive window of more than 2 orders of magnitude, whereas for 50 at. % carbon, a higher current in the off state and only a small resistive window are present after repeated cycling. This degradation can be ascribed to the higher thermal and lower drift contribution to the reset operation due to a lower Cu affinity towards the supply layer, leading cycle-after-cycle to an increasing amount of Cu in the switching layer, which contributes to the current. The thermal diffusion of Cu into Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} under annealing also gives an indication of the Cu affinity of the source layer. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to investigate this migration depth in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} before and after annealing, showing a higher Cu, Te, and C migration for high carbon contents.

  18. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  19. Two-step polarization switching mediated by a nonpolar intermediate phase in Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Hyuk; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Yu Jin; Moon, Taehwan; Kim, Keum Do; Hyun, Seung Dam; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2016-07-01

    The broken ferroelectric hysteresis loop achieved from a Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 film was interpreted based on the first order phase transition theory. The two-step polarization switching, which was expected from the theory, could be observed by dynamic pulse switching measurement. The variations in the interfacial capacitance values along with switching time and number of switching cycles could also be estimated from the pulse switching test. Being different from the one-step polarization switching in other ferroelectric films, two-step polarization switching produced two slanted plateau regions where the estimated interfacial capacitance values were different from each other. This could be understood based on the quantitative model of the two-step polarization switching with the involvement of an intermediate nonpolar phase. The Hf0.4Zr0.6O2 film was changed from antiferroelectric-like to ferroelectric-like with the increasing number of electric field cycles, which could be induced by the field driven phase change.

  20. Caregiver-mediated intervention can improve physical functional recovery of patients with chronic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Chi; Tsai, Alan C; Wang, Jiun-Yi; Lin, Yu-Te; Lin, Ko-Long; Chen, Jiun Jiang; Lin, Bei Yi; Lin, Tai Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Patients with chronic stroke may benefit from continuing rehabilitation training after hospital discharge. This study examined whether caregiver-mediated, home-based intervention (CHI) could improve physical functioning and social participation in these patients. Methods. A single-blind, randomized, controlled 12-week trial conducted with 51 patients from 3 hospitals in Taiwan who had chronic stroke (>6 months; Brunnstrom recovery stages III-V). Patients and their caregivers in the intervention arm (n = 25) were given weekly personalized CHI trainings designed by a physical therapist. Patients in the control arm (n = 26) received visits from the therapist without intervention. All were evaluated for physical recovery through the Stroke Impact Scale, Berg Balance Scale, 10-Meter Walk Test, 6-Minute Walk Test, and Barthel Index at baseline and endpoint. Caregivers were evaluated with the Caregiver Burden Scale. Results were analyzed through Mann-Whitney U test. Results. CHI significantly improved scores of the Stroke Impact Scale: strength (control vs intervention, respectively: 1.4 vs 15.5; P = .002), mobility (-0.5 vs 13.7; P < .001), composite physical (-0.7 vs 11.2; P < .001), and general recovery domain (0.2 vs 17.4; P < .001). CHI also significantly improved free-walking velocity (-1.4 vs 7.5 cm/s; P = .006), 6-minute walk distance (-10.5 vs 15.8 m; P = .003), Berg Balance Scale score (-0.8 vs 4.5; P = .006), and Barthel Index score (0.6 vs 7.2; P = .008). CHI did not significantly increase caregiver burden at endpoint. Conclusion. CHI can improve physical functional recovery and, possibly, social participation in patients with chronic stroke.

  1. Analysis of Individual Social-ecological Mediators and Moderators and Their Ability to Explain Effect of a Randomized Neighborhood Walking Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Yvonne L; Carlson, Nichole E

    2009-01-01

    Background Using data from the SHAPE trial, a randomized 6-month neighborhood-based intervention designed to increase walking activity among older adults, this study identified and analyzed social-ecological factors mediating and moderating changes in walking activity. Methods Three potential mediators (social cohesion, walking efficacy, and perception of neighborhood problems) and minutes of brisk walking were assessed at baseline, 3-months, and 6-months. One moderator, neighborhood walkability, was assessed using an administrative GIS database. The mediating effect of change in process variables on change in brisk walking was tested using a product-of-coefficients test, and we evaluated the moderating effect of neighborhood walkability on change in brisk walking by testing the significance of the interaction between walkability and intervention status. Results Only one of the hypothesized mediators, walking efficacy, explained the intervention effect (product of the coefficients (95% CI) = 8.72 (2.53, 15.56). Contrary to hypotheses, perceived neighborhood problems appeared to suppress the intervention effects (product of the coefficients (95% CI = -2.48, -5.6, -0.22). Neighborhood walkability did not moderate the intervention effect. Conclusion Walking efficacy may be an important mediator of lay-lead walking interventions for sedentary older adults. Social-ecologic theory-based analyses can support clinical interventions to elucidate the mediators and moderators responsible for producing intervention effects. PMID:19643024

  2. Switching of localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles on a GeSbTe film mediated by nanoscale phase change and modification of surface morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Saiki, T.

    2013-12-09

    As a platform for active nanophotonics, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching via interaction with a chalcogenide phase change material (GeSbTe) was investigated. We performed single-particle spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles placed on a GeSbTe thin film. By irradiation with a femtosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization, significant switching behavior of the LSPR band due to the interaction of GeSbTe was observed. The switching mechanism was explained in terms of both a change in the refractive index and a modification of surface morphology accompanying volume expansion and reduction of GeSbTe.

  3. Optical switches and switching methods

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  4. Autocrine CSF1R signaling mediates switching between invasion and proliferation downstream of TGFβ in claudin-low breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Patsialou, A; Wang, Y; Pignatelli, J; Chen, X; Entenberg, D; Oktay, M; Condeelis, J S

    2015-05-21

    Patient data suggest that colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) and its receptor (CSF1R) have critical roles during breast cancer progression. We have previously shown that in human breast tumors expressing both CSF1 and CSF1R, invasion in vivo is dependent both on a paracrine interaction with tumor-associated macrophages and an autocrine regulation of CSF1R in the tumor cells themselves. Although the role of the paracrine interaction between tumor cells and macrophages has been extensively studied, very little is known about the mechanism by which the autocrine CSF1R signaling contributes to tumor progression. We show here that breast cancer patients of the claudin-low subtype have significantly increased expression of CSF1R. Using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, we confirm that CSF1R expression is elevated and regulated by TGFβ specifically in claudin-low cell lines. Abrogation of autocrine CSF1R signaling in MDA-MB-231 xenografts (a claudin-low cell line) leads to increased tumor size by enhanced proliferation, but significantly reduced invasion, dissemination and metastasis. Indeed, we show that proliferation and invasion are oppositely regulated by CSF1R downstream of TGFβ only in claudin-low cell lines. Intravital multiphoton imaging revealed that inhibition of CSF1R in the tumor cells leads to decreased in vivo motility and a more cohesive morphology. We show that, both in vitro and in vivo, CSF1R inhibition results in a reversal of claudin-low marker expression by significant upregulation of luminal keratins and tight-junction proteins such as claudins. Finally, we show that artificial overexpression of claudins in MDA-MB-231 cells is sufficient to tip the cells from an invasive state to a proliferative state. Our results suggest that autocrine CSF1R signaling is essential in maintaining low claudin expression and that it mediates a switch between the proliferative and the invasive state in claudin-low tumor cells downstream of TGFβ.

  5. Resistive switching characteristic and uniformity of low-power HfO x -based resistive random access memory with the BN insertion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shuai; Jian, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Fang; Han, Ye-Mei; Tian, Yu-Xian; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Hong-Zhi; Zhang, Kai-Liang

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, the Ta/HfO x /BN/TiN resistive switching devices are fabricated and they exhibit low power consumption and high uniformity each. The reset current is reduced for the HfO x /BN bilayer device compared with that for the Ta/HfO x /TiN structure. Furthermore, the reset current decreases with increasing BN thickness. The HfO x layer is a dominating switching layer, while the low-permittivity and high-resistivity BN layer acts as a barrier of electrons injection into TiN electrode. The current conduction mechanism of low resistance state in the HfO x /BN bilayer device is space-charge-limited current (SCLC), while it is Ohmic conduction in the HfO x device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274113, 11204212, 61404091, 51502203, and 51502204), the Tianjin Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant Nos. 14JCZDJC31500 and 14JCQNJC00800), and the Tianjin Science and Technology Developmental Funds of Universities and Colleges, China (Grant No. 20130701).

  6. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  7. Electromechanical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuzzi, Anthony P.; Carignan, Donald J.

    1986-06-01

    A hardened electromechanical switch is disclosed. When appropriate electrical contacts and pick-offs are aligned, four switches close. The possible number of switch combinations selectable are 4095 based upon a base eight counting system. The switch has a counter section and a memory section. The counter section uses an odometer like device based upon octal. Each counter wheel of the counter section has an electrical pick-off that interacts with the memory section. In the memory section, a plurality of octal numbers, four, are entered into and locked thereon such that each counter set disk, four, therein has one octal number thereon. Electrical contacts are placed on the counter set disks of the memory section and these touch the pick-offs of the counter wheels which will simultaneously close on the four contacts of the counter set disk in only one of the 4095 combinations noted above.

  8. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  9. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  10. Does the theory of planned behavior mediate the effects of an oncologist's recommendation to exercise in newly diagnosed breast cancer survivors? Results from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Courneya, Kerry S; Fairey, Adrian S; Mackey, John R

    2005-03-01

    This randomized trial examined the effects of 2 oncologist-based exercise interventions--recommendation only (RO) and recommendation plus referral (RR)--versus usual care (UC) on social-cognitive constructs from the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The authors also examined whether the TPB mediated the significant effect of the RO intervention on exercise and explained the null effect of the RR intervention. Independent t tests revealed that both interventions had significant effects on TPB constructs; however, only the RO intervention impacted perceived behavioral control (PBC). Path analyses indicated that PBC was the only construct with a direct effect on exercise and that it mediated the effect of the RO intervention on exercise and explained the null effect of the RR intervention.

  11. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    SciTech Connect

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-14

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the “zipper”) that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  12. Defect-mediated relaxation in the random tiling phase of a binary mixture: Birth, death and mobility of an atomic zipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondl, Elisabeth; Ramsay, Malcolm; Harrowell, Peter; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the mechanism of defect-mediated relaxation in a dodecagonal square-triangle random tiling phase exhibited by a simulated binary mixture of soft discs in 2D. We examine the internal transitions within the elementary mobile defect (christened the "zipper") that allow it to move, as well as the mechanisms by which the zipper is created and annihilated. The structural relaxation of the random tiling phase is quantified and we show that this relaxation is well described by a model based on the distribution of waiting times for each atom to be visited by the diffusing zipper. This system, representing one of the few instances where a well defined mobile defect is capable of structural relaxation, can provide a valuable test case for general theories of relaxation in complex and disordered materials.

  13. A Parent-Mediated Intervention That Targets Responsive Parental Behaviors Increases Attachment Behaviors in Children with ASD: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Meghan; Gerber, Alan; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The current study is a randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of Focused Playtime Intervention (FPI) in a sample of 70 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This parent-mediated intervention has previously been shown to significantly increase responsive parental communication (Siller et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 43:540–555, 2013a). The current analyses focus on children’s attachment related outcomes. Results revealed that children who were randomly assigned to FPI showed bigger increases in attachment-related behaviors, compared to children assigned to the control condition. Significant treatment effects of FPI were found for both an observational measure of attachment-related behaviors elicited during a brief separation-reunion episode and a questionnaire measure evaluating parental perceptions of child attachment. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24488157

  14. Enhanced stability of complementary resistance switching in the TiN/HfOx/TiN resistive random access memory device via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. Z.; Ang, D. S.; Yew, K. S.; Wang, X. P.

    2016-02-01

    This study shows that a majority (70%) of TiN/HfOx/TiN devices exhibit failed complementary resistance switching (CRS) after forming. In conjunction with the consistent observation of a large non-polar reset loop in the first post-forming voltage-sweep measurement, it is proposed that breakdown of the TiN/HfOx interfacial oxide layers (crucial in enabling CRS) and the accompanied formation of Ti filaments (due to Ti migration from the TiN cathode into the breakdown path) resulted in CRS failure and the observed non-polar reset behavior. This hypothesis is supported by the significant reduction or complete elimination of the large non-polar reset and CRS failure in devices with a thin Al2O3 layer incorporated at the TiN-cathode/HfOx or both TiN/HfOx interfaces. The higher breakdown field of the thin Al2O3 enables it to sustain the forming voltage until the forming process is interrupted, thus enabling CRS via oxygen exchange with the adjacent vacancy-type filament formed in the HfOx.

  15. Randomized Trial of Group Interventions to Reduce HIV/STD Risk and Change Theoretical Mediators among Detained Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmiege, Sarah J.; Broaddus, Michelle R.; Levin, Michael; Bryan, Angela D.

    2009-01-01

    Criminally involved adolescents engage in high levels of risky sexual behavior and alcohol use, and alcohol use may contribute to lack of condom use. Detained adolescents (n = 484) were randomized to (1) a theory-based sexual risk reduction intervention (GPI), (2) the GPI condition with a group-based alcohol risk reduction motivational enhancement…

  16. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  17. Switching Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  18. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, Dario B.

    1994-01-01

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination.

  19. Switch for serial or parallel communication networks

    DOEpatents

    Crosette, D.B.

    1994-07-19

    A communication switch apparatus and a method for use in a geographically extensive serial, parallel or hybrid communication network linking a multi-processor or parallel processing system has a very low software processing overhead in order to accommodate random burst of high density data. Associated with each processor is a communication switch. A data source and a data destination, a sensor suite or robot for example, may also be associated with a switch. The configuration of the switches in the network are coordinated through a master processor node and depends on the operational phase of the multi-processor network: data acquisition, data processing, and data exchange. The master processor node passes information on the state to be assumed by each switch to the processor node associated with the switch. The processor node then operates a series of multi-state switches internal to each communication switch. The communication switch does not parse and interpret communication protocol and message routing information. During a data acquisition phase, the communication switch couples sensors producing data to the processor node associated with the switch, to a downlink destination on the communications network, or to both. It also may couple an uplink data source to its processor node. During the data exchange phase, the switch couples its processor node or an uplink data source to a downlink destination (which may include a processor node or a robot), or couples an uplink source to its processor node and its processor node to a downlink destination. 9 figs.

  20. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    ScienceCinema

    Jigang Wang

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  1. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    SciTech Connect

    Jigang Wang

    2013-04-08

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  2. A new nano-worm structure from gold-nanoparticle mediated random curving of zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Veeradasan; Hashim, Uda; Gopinath, Subash C B; Haarindraprasad, R; Poopalan, P; Liu, Wei-Wen; Ravichandran, M; Balakrishnan, S R; Ruslinda, A R

    2016-04-15

    Creating novel nanostructures is a primary step for high-performance analytical sensing. Herein, a new worm like nanostructure with Zinc Oxide-gold (ZnO/Au) hybrid was fabricated through an aqueous hydrothermal method, by doping Au-nanoparticle (AuNP) on the growing ZnO lattice. During ZnO growth, fine tuning the solution temperature expedites random curving of ZnO nanorods and forms nano-worms. The nano-worms which were evidenced by morphological, physical and structural analyses, revealed elongated structures protruding from the surface (length: 1 µm; diameter: ~100 nm). The appropriate peaks for the face centred cubic gold were (111) and (200), as seen from X-ray diffractogram. The strong interrelation between Au and ZnO was manifested by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The combined surface area increment from the nanoparticle radii and ZnO nanorod random curving gives raise an enhancement in detection sensitivity by increasing bio-loading. 'Au-decorated hybrid nano-worm' was immobilized with a probe DNA from Vibrio Cholera and duplexed with a target which was revealed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Our novel Au-decorated hybrid nano-worm is suitable for high-performance bio-sensing, as evidenced by impedance spectroscopy, having higher-specificity and attained femtomolar (10 fM) sensitivity. Further, higher stability, reproducibility and regeneration on this sensing surface were demonstrated.

  3. A new nano-worm structure from gold-nanoparticle mediated random curving of zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Veeradasan; Hashim, Uda; Gopinath, Subash C B; Haarindraprasad, R; Poopalan, P; Liu, Wei-Wen; Ravichandran, M; Balakrishnan, S R; Ruslinda, A R

    2016-04-15

    Creating novel nanostructures is a primary step for high-performance analytical sensing. Herein, a new worm like nanostructure with Zinc Oxide-gold (ZnO/Au) hybrid was fabricated through an aqueous hydrothermal method, by doping Au-nanoparticle (AuNP) on the growing ZnO lattice. During ZnO growth, fine tuning the solution temperature expedites random curving of ZnO nanorods and forms nano-worms. The nano-worms which were evidenced by morphological, physical and structural analyses, revealed elongated structures protruding from the surface (length: 1 µm; diameter: ~100 nm). The appropriate peaks for the face centred cubic gold were (111) and (200), as seen from X-ray diffractogram. The strong interrelation between Au and ZnO was manifested by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The combined surface area increment from the nanoparticle radii and ZnO nanorod random curving gives raise an enhancement in detection sensitivity by increasing bio-loading. 'Au-decorated hybrid nano-worm' was immobilized with a probe DNA from Vibrio Cholera and duplexed with a target which was revealed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Our novel Au-decorated hybrid nano-worm is suitable for high-performance bio-sensing, as evidenced by impedance spectroscopy, having higher-specificity and attained femtomolar (10 fM) sensitivity. Further, higher stability, reproducibility and regeneration on this sensing surface were demonstrated. PMID:26584078

  4. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans.

    PubMed

    Meydani, Simin N; Das, Sai K; Pieper, Carl F; Lewis, Michael R; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D; Gupta, Alok K; Villareal, Dennis T; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J; Roberts, Susan B; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  5. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans.

    PubMed

    Meydani, Simin N; Das, Sai K; Pieper, Carl F; Lewis, Michael R; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D; Gupta, Alok K; Villareal, Dennis T; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J; Roberts, Susan B; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype.

  6. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin N.; Das, Sai K.; Pieper, Carl F.; Lewis, Michael R.; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D.; Gupta, Alok K.; Villareal, Dennis T.; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J.; Roberts, Susan B.; Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  7. Involuntary switching of attention mediates differences in event-related responses to complex tones between early and late Spanish-English bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Mantilla, Silvia; Choudhury, Naseem; Alvarez, Barbara; Benasich, April A

    2010-11-29

    Most research with bilinguals has used speech stimuli to demonstrate differences in auditory processing abilities. Two main factors have been identified as modulators of such differences: proficiency and age of acquisition of the second language (L2). However, whether the bilingual brain differs from the monolingual in the efficient processing of non-verbal auditory events (known to be critical to the acoustic analysis of the speech stream) remains unclear. In this EEG/ERP study, using the mismatch negativity (MMN), P3a, and late negativity (LN), we examined differences in discrimination, involuntary switching of attention and reorienting of attention between monolinguals and bilinguals as they processed complex tones. Further, we examined the role that age of acquisition plays in modulating such responses. A group of English monolinguals and a group of proficient Spanish-English bilinguals were presented with a multiple-deviant oddball paradigm with four deviant conditions (duration, frequency, silent gap, and frequency modulation). Late bilinguals, who learned English after age 10, exhibited larger MMN and P3a responses than early bilinguals, across all deviant conditions. Significant associations were found between amplitude of the responses and both age of L2 acquisition and years of L2 experience. Individuals who acquired English at later ages and had fewer years of L2 experience had larger MMN, P3a, and LN responses than those who learned it earlier. These findings demonstrate that age of L2 acquisition is an important modulator of auditory responses in bilinguals even when processing non-speech signals. Involuntary attention switching is suggested as the main factor driving these differences. PMID:20849832

  8. PAWR-mediated suppression of BCL2 promotes switching of 3-azido withaferin A (3-AWA)-induced autophagy to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rah, Bilal; ur Rasool, Reyaz; Nayak, Debasis; Yousuf, Syed Khalid; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Kumar, Lekha Dinesh; Goswami, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    An active medicinal component of plant origin with an ability to overcome autophagy by inducing apoptosis should be considered a therapeutically active lead pharmacophore to control malignancies. In this report, we studied the effect of concentration-dependent 3-AWA (3-azido withaferin A) sensitization to androgen-independent prostate cancer (CaP) cells which resulted in a distinct switching of 2 interrelated conserved biological processes, i.e. autophagy and apoptosis. We have observed 3 distinct parameters which are hallmarks of autophagy in our studies. First, a subtoxic concentration of 3-AWA resulted in an autophagic phenotype with an elevation of autophagy markers in prostate cancer cells. This led to a massive accumulation of MAP1LC3B and EGFP-LC3B puncta coupled with gradual degradation of SQSTM1. Second, higher toxic concentrations of 3-AWA stimulated ER stress in CaP cells to turn on apoptosis within 12 h by elevating the expression of the proapoptotic protein PAWR, which in turn suppressed the autophagy-related proteins BCL2 and BECN1. This inhibition of BECN1 in CaP cells, leading to the disruption of the BCL2-BECN1 interaction by overexpressed PAWR has not been reported so far. Third, we provide evidence that pawr-KO MEFs exhibited abundant autophagy signs even at toxic concentrations of 3-AWA underscoring the relevance of PAWR in switching of autophagy to apoptosis. Last but not least, overexpression of EGFP-LC3B and DS-Red-BECN1 revealed a delayed apoptosis turnover at a higher concentration of 3-AWA in CaP cells. In summary, this study provides evidence that 3-AWA is a strong anticancer candidate to abrogate protective autophagy. It also enhanced chemosensitivity by sensitizing prostate cancer cells to apoptosis through induction of PAWR endorsing its therapeutic potential.

  9. Involuntary switching of attention mediates differences in event-related responses to complex tones between early and late Spanish-English bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Mantilla, Silvia; Choudhury, Naseem; Alvarez, Barbara; Benasich, April A

    2010-11-29

    Most research with bilinguals has used speech stimuli to demonstrate differences in auditory processing abilities. Two main factors have been identified as modulators of such differences: proficiency and age of acquisition of the second language (L2). However, whether the bilingual brain differs from the monolingual in the efficient processing of non-verbal auditory events (known to be critical to the acoustic analysis of the speech stream) remains unclear. In this EEG/ERP study, using the mismatch negativity (MMN), P3a, and late negativity (LN), we examined differences in discrimination, involuntary switching of attention and reorienting of attention between monolinguals and bilinguals as they processed complex tones. Further, we examined the role that age of acquisition plays in modulating such responses. A group of English monolinguals and a group of proficient Spanish-English bilinguals were presented with a multiple-deviant oddball paradigm with four deviant conditions (duration, frequency, silent gap, and frequency modulation). Late bilinguals, who learned English after age 10, exhibited larger MMN and P3a responses than early bilinguals, across all deviant conditions. Significant associations were found between amplitude of the responses and both age of L2 acquisition and years of L2 experience. Individuals who acquired English at later ages and had fewer years of L2 experience had larger MMN, P3a, and LN responses than those who learned it earlier. These findings demonstrate that age of L2 acquisition is an important modulator of auditory responses in bilinguals even when processing non-speech signals. Involuntary attention switching is suggested as the main factor driving these differences.

  10. Effect of hawthorn standardized extract on flow mediated dilation in prehypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults: a randomized, controlled cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hawthorn extract has been used for cardiovascular diseases for centuries. Recent trials have demonstrated its efficacy for the treatment of heart failure, and the results of several small trials suggest it may lower blood pressure. However, there is little published evidence to guide its dosing. The blood pressure lowering effect of hawthorn has been linked to nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hawthorn extract dose and brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD), an indirect measure of nitric oxide release. Methods We used a four-period cross-over design to evaluate brachial artery FMD in response to placebo or hawthorn extract (standardized to 50 mg oligomeric procyanidin per 250 mg extract). Randomly sequenced doses of hawthorn extract (1000 mg, 1500 mg, and 2500 mg) and placebo were assigned to each participant. Doses were taken twice daily for 3 1/2 days followed by FMD and a 4-day washout before proceeding to the next dosing period. Results Twenty-one prehypertensive or mildly hypertensive adults completed the study. There was no evidence of a dose-response effect for our main outcome (FMD percent) or any of our secondary outcomes (absolute change in brachial artery diameter and blood pressure). Most participants indicated that if given evidence that hawthorn could lower their blood pressure, they would be likely to use it either in conjunction with or instead of lifestyle modification or anti-hypertensive medications. Conclusion We found no evidence of a dose-response effect of hawthorn extract on FMD. If hawthorn has a blood pressure lowering effect, it is likely to be mediated via an NO-independent mechanism. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health: NCT01331486. PMID:22458601

  11. The Role of Response Repetition in Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen; Mari-Beffa, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    When switching between tasks, participants are sometimes required to use different response sets for each task. Thus, task switch and response set switch are confounded. In 5 experiments, the authors examined transitions of response within a linear 4-finger arrangement. A random baseline condition was compared with the cuing of specific response…

  12. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    -assembled monolayers of azobenzene photoswitches with trifluoromethyl and cyano end groupsDaniel Brete, Daniel Przyrembel, Christian Eickhoff, Robert Carley, Wolfgang Freyer, Karsten Reuter, Cornelius Gahl and Martin Weinelt Reversible electron-induced cis-trans isomerization mediated by intermolecular interactionsCh Lotze, Y Luo, M Corso, K J Franke, R Haag and J I Pascual Transport properties of graphene functionalized with molecular switchesNiels Bode, Eros Mariani and Felix von Oppen

  13. A Switch in Therapy to a Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Sparing Combination of Lopinavir/Ritonavir and Raltegravir in Virologically Suppressed HIV-Infected Patients: A Pilot Randomized Trial to Assess Efficacy and Safety Profile: The KITE Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Anandi N.; Sanford, Sara E.; Easley, Kirk A.; Shenvi, Neeta; White, Kelly; Eaton, Molly E.; Del Rio, Carlos; Lennox, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbone is a recommended component of standard highly active antiretroviral therapy (sHAART). However, long-term NRTI exposure can be limited by toxicities. NRTI class-sparing alternatives are warranted in select patient populations. This is a 48-week single-center, open-label pilot study in which 60 HIV-infected adults with plasma HIV-1 RNA (<50 copies/ml) on sHAART were randomized (2:1) to lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) 400/100 mg BID+raltegravir (RAL) 400 mg BID switch (LPV-r/RAL arm) or to continue on sHAART. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml at week 48. Secondary efficacy and immunologic and safety endpoints were evaluated. Demographics and baseline lipid profile were similar across arms. Mean entry CD4 T cell count was 493 cells/mm3. At week 48, 92% [95% confidence interval (CI): 83–100%] of the LPV-r/RAL arm and 88% (95% CI: 75–100%) of the sHAART arm had HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml (p=0.70). Lipid profile (mean±SEM, mg/dl, LPV-r/RAL vs. sHAART) at week 24 was total-cholesterol 194±5 vs. 176±9 (p=0.07), triglycerides 234±30 vs. 133±27 (p=0.003), and LDL-cholesterol 121±6 vs. 110±8 (p=0.27). There were no serious adverse events (AEs) in either arm. Regimen change occurred in three LPV-r/RAL subjects (n=1, due to LPV-r/RAL-related AEs) vs. 0 in sHAART. There were no differences between arms in bone mineral density, total body fat composition, creatinine clearance, or CD4 T cell counts at week 48. In virologically suppressed patients on HAART, switching therapy to the NRTI-sparing LPV-r/RAL combination produced similar sustained virologic suppression and immunologic profile as sHAART. AEs were comparable between arms, but the LPV-r/RAL arm experienced higher triglyceridemia. PMID:22364141

  14. Defect mediated optical emission of randomly oriented ZnO nanorods and unusual rectifying behavior of Schottky nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayan, Sayan; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2011-09-01

    We report on the interrelation of optical emission of randomly oriented ZnO nanorod system with the carrier transport properties of Ag/ZnO nanorod-based rectifying junctions. The ZnO nanorods, exhibiting a hexagonal wurtzite phase, were fabricated by a cost-effective rapid thermal annealing process and at different annealing temperatures. The photoluminescence spectra of the as grown samples have revealed various Zn and O related native defects (e.g., vacancies, interstitials etc.) located at ˜400, 428, 491, and 535 nm. As evident from the I-V characteristic curves, though all the Ag/ZnO nanojunctions show Schottky behavior, the nanorods grown at a temperature of 550 °C and 650 °C are characterized by very large ideality factors of respective values 35.4 and 33.2, apart from displaying unusually high reverse currents. Whereas, the samples grown at 450 °C and 750 °C show usual rectifying nature having relatively lower ideality factors (18.4 and 12.2), along with low leakage-current under reverse biasing. The enhancement or suppression of the reverse currents can be attributed to the eventual lowering or raising of the Schottky barrier heights which result from the variation in the native defect states of various ZnO nanorod systems. Correlating optical events and electrical response through native defects would find scope in assessing figure of merit and sensitivity while making rectifying nanojunctions and single electron devices.

  15. Cdk5-mediated inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 switches on the cyclin D1-Cdk4-pRb pathway causing aberrant S-phase entry of postmitotic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Veas-Pérez de Tudela, Miguel; Maestre, Carolina; Delgado-Esteban, María; Bolaños, Juan P.; Almeida, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates cell cycle progression in proliferating cells. To enter the S-phase, APC/C must be inactivated by phosphorylation of its cofactor, Cdh1. In post-mitotic cells such as neurons APC/C-Cdh1 complex is highly active and responsible for the continuous degradation of mitotic cyclins. However, the specific molecular pathway that determines neuronal cell cycle blockade in post-mitotic neurons is unknown. Here, we show that activation of glutamatergic receptors in rat cortical primary neurons endogenously triggers cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5)-mediated phosphorylation of Cdh1 leading to its cytoplasmic accumulation and disassembly from the APC3 core protein, causing APC/C inactivation. Conversely, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Cdk5 promotes Cdh1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we show that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Cdh1 leads to p27 depletion, which switches on the cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (Cdk4)-retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway to allow the S-phase entry of neurons. However, neurons do not proceed through the cell cycle and die by apoptosis. These results indicate that APC/C-Cdh1 actively suppresses an aberrant cell cycle entry and death of neurons, highlighting its critical function in neuroprotection. PMID:26658992

  16. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse'ela

    2015-07-14

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND(®) meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND(®) implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0-24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c -0.80% and -0.85% [-8.8 and -9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25-48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (-0.93%, -10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  17. Gastric electrical stimulation treatment of type 2 diabetes: effects of implantation versus meal-mediated stimulation. A randomized blinded cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Lebovitz, Harold E; Ludvik, Bernhard; Kozakowski, Jaroslaw; Tarnowski, Wieslaw; Zelewski, Mateusz; Yaniv, Irit; Schwartz, Tse’ela

    2015-01-01

    Gastric electrical stimulation with the implanted DIAMOND device has been shown to improve glycemic control and decrease weight and systolic blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic agents. The objective of this study was to determine if device implantation alone (placebo effect) contributes to the long-term metabolic benefits of DIAMOND® meal-mediated gastric electrical stimulation in patients with type 2 diabetes. The study was a 48 week randomized, blinded, cross-over trial in university centers comparing glycemic improvement of DIAMOND® implanted patients with type 2 diabetic with no activation of the electrical stimulation (placebo) versus meal-mediated activation of the electrical signal. The endpoint was improvement in glycemic control (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 and 48 weeks. In period 1 (0–24 weeks), equal improvement in HbA1c occurred independent of whether the meal-mediated electrical stimulation was turned on or left off (HbA1c −0.80% and −0.85% [−8.8 and −9.0 mmol/mol]). The device placebo improvement proved to be transient as it was lost in period 2 (25–48 weeks). With electrical stimulation turned off, HbA1c returned toward baseline values (8.06 compared to 8.32%; 64.2 to 67.4 mmol/mol, P = 0.465). In contrast, turning the electrical stimulation on in period 2 sustained the decrease in HbA1c from baseline (−0.93%, −10.1mmol/mol, P = 0.001) observed in period 1. The results indicate that implantation of the DIAMOND device causes a transient improvement in HbA1c which is not sustained beyond 24 weeks. Meal-mediated electrical stimulation accounts for the significant improvement in HbA1c beyond 24 weeks. PMID:26177957

  18. Quorum-sensing agr mediates bacterial oxidation response via an intramolecular disulfide redox switch in the response regulator AgrA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; Liang, Haihua; Kong, Xiangqian; Xie, Sherrie; Cho, Hoonsik; Deng, Xin; Ji, Quanjiang; Zhang, Haiyan; Alvarez, Sophie; Hicks, Leslie M.; Bae, Taeok; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation sensing and quorum sensing significantly affect bacterial physiology and host–pathogen interactions. However, little attention has been paid to the cross-talk between these two seemingly orthogonal signaling pathways. Here we show that the quorum-sensing agr system has a built-in oxidation-sensing mechanism through an intramolecular disulfide switch possessed by the DNA-binding domain of the response regulator AgrA. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that oxidation induces the intracellular disulfide bond formation between Cys-199 and Cys-228, thus leading to dissociation of AgrA from DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the disulfide bond formation generates a steric clash responsible for the abolished DNA binding of the oxidized AgrA. Mutagenesis studies further established that Cys-199 is crucial for oxidation sensing. The oxidation-sensing role of Cys-199 is further supported by the observation that the mutant Staphylococcus aureus strain expressing AgrAC199S is more susceptible to H2O2 owing to repression of the antioxidant bsaA gene under oxidative stress. Together, our results show that oxidation sensing is a component of the quorum-sensing agr signaling system, which serves as an intrinsic checkpoint to ameliorate the oxidation burden caused by intense metabolic activity and potential host immune response. PMID:22586129

  19. The SAGA Deubiquitination Module Promotes DNA Repair and Class Switch Recombination through ATM and DNAPK-Mediated γH2AX Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Shaliny; Haddad, Dania; Li, Conglei; Le, Michael X; Ling, Alexanda K; So, Clare C; Nepal, Rajeev M; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Yu, Kefei; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason; Martin, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    Class switch recombination (CSR) requires activation-induced deaminase (AID) to instigate double-stranded DNA breaks at the immunoglobulin locus. DNA breaks activate the DNA damage response (DDR) by inducing phosphorylation of histone H2AX followed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair. We carried out a genome-wide screen to identify CSR factors. We found that Usp22, Eny2, and Atxn7, members of the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) deubiquitination module, are required for deubiquitination of H2BK120ub following DNA damage, are critical for CSR, and function downstream of AID. The SAGA deubiquitinase activity was required for optimal irradiation-induced γH2AX formation, and failure to remove H2BK120ub inhibits ATM- and DNAPK-induced γH2AX formation. Consistent with this effect, these proteins were found to function upstream of various double-stranded DNA repair pathways. This report demonstrates that deubiquitination of histone H2B impacts the early stages of the DDR and is required for the DNA repair phase of CSR. PMID:27160905

  20. Dynamic recruitment of Ets1 to both nucleosome-occupied and -depleted enhancer regions mediates a transcriptional program switch during early T-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cauchy, Pierre; Maqbool, Muhammad A.; Zacarias-Cabeza, Joaquin; Vanhille, Laurent; Koch, Frederic; Fenouil, Romain; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Santana, Maria A.; Griffon, Aurélien; Imbert, Jean; Moraes-Cabé, Carolina; Bories, Jean-Christophe; Ferrier, Pierre; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Andrau, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Ets1 is a sequence-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during hematopoiesis, and is essential for the transition of CD4−/CD8− double negative (DN) to CD4+/CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. Using genome-wide and functional approaches, we investigated the binding properties, transcriptional role and chromatin environment of Ets1 during this transition. We found that while Ets1 binding at distal sites was associated with active genes at both DN and DP stages, its enhancer activity was attained at the DP stage, as reflected by levels of the core transcriptional hallmarks H3K4me1/3, RNA Polymerase II and eRNA. This dual, stage-specific ability reflected a switch from non-T hematopoietic toward T-cell specific gene expression programs during the DN-to-DP transition, as indicated by transcriptome analyses of Ets1−/− thymic cells. Coincidentally, Ets1 associates more specifically with Runx1 in DN and with TCF1 in DP cells. We also provide evidence that Ets1 predominantly binds distal nucleosome-occupied regions in DN and nucleosome-depleted regions in DP. Finally and importantly, we demonstrate that Ets1 induces chromatin remodeling by displacing H3K4me1-marked nucleosomes. Our results thus provide an original model whereby the ability of a transcription factor to bind nucleosomal DNA changes during differentiation with consequences on its cognate enhancer activity. PMID:26673693

  1. End-to-end crosstalk within the hepatitis C virus genome mediates the conformational switch of the 3′X-tail region

    PubMed Central

    Romero-López, Cristina; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; García-Sacristán, Ana; Briones, Carlos; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome contains multiple structurally conserved domains that make long-distance RNA–RNA contacts important in the establishment of viral infection. Microarray antisense oligonucelotide assays, improved dimethyl sulfate probing methods and 2′ acylation chemistry (selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension, SHAPE) showed the folding of the genomic RNA 3′ end to be regulated by the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element via direct RNA–RNA interactions. The essential cis-acting replicating element (CRE) and the 3′X-tail region adopted different 3D conformations in the presence and absence of the genomic RNA 5′ terminus. Further, the structural transition in the 3′X-tail from the replication-competent conformer (consisting of three stem-loops) to the dimerizable form (with two stem-loops), was found to depend on the presence of both the IRES and the CRE elements. Complex interplay between the IRES, the CRE and the 3′X-tail region would therefore appear to occur. The preservation of this RNA–RNA interacting network, and the maintenance of the proper balance between different contacts, may play a crucial role in the switch between different steps of the HCV cycle. PMID:24049069

  2. The Ets-1 transcription factor is required for Stat1-mediated T-bet expression and IgG2a class switching in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Vu; Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Luinaud, Romain; Despres, Raymonde; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Arnulf, Bertrand; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2012-05-01

    In response to antigens and cytokines, mouse B cells undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. T-bet, a T-box transcription factor that is up-regulated in lymphocytes by IFN-γ or IL-27, was shown to regulate CSR to IgG2a after T cell-independent B-cell stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unclear. In the present study, we show that inactivation of the Ets-1 transcription factor results in a severe decrease in IgG2a secretion in vivo and in vitro. No T-bet expression was observed in Ets-1-deficient (Ets-1(-/-)) B cells stimulated with IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide, and forced expression of T-bet in these cells rescued IgG2a secretion. Furthermore, we identified a transcriptional enhancer in the T-bet locus with an activity in B cells that relies on ETS-binding sites. After IFN-γ stimulation of Ets-1(-/-) B cells, activated Stat1, which forms a complex with Ets-1 in wild-type cells, no longer binds to the T-bet enhancer or promotes histone modifications at this site. These results demonstrate that Ets-1 is critical for IgG2a CSR and acts as an essential cofactor for Stat1 in the regulation of T-bet expression in B cells.

  3. Direct repeat-mediated DNA deletion of the mating type MAT1-2 genes results in unidirectional mating type switching in Sclerotinia trifoliorum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liangsheng; Jardini, Teresa M.; Chen, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia trifoliorum exhibits ascospore dimorphism and unidirectional mating type switching - self-fertile strains derived from large ascospores produce both self-fertile (large-spores) and self-sterile (small-spores) offsprings in a 4:4 ratio. The present study, comparing DNA sequences at MAT locus of both self-fertile and self-sterile strains, found four mating type genes (MAT1-1-1, MAT1-1-5, MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4) in the self-fertile strain. However, a 2891-bp region including the entire MAT1-2-1 and MAT1-2-4 genes had been completely deleted from the MAT locus in the self-sterile strain. Meanwhile, two copies of a 146-bp direct repeat motif flanking the deleted region were found in the self-fertile strain, but only one copy of this 146-bp motif (a part of the MAT1-1-1 gene) was present in the self-sterile strain. The two direct repeats were believed to be responsible for the deletion through homologous intra-molecular recombination in meiosis. Tetrad analyses showed that all small ascospore-derived strains lacked the missing DNA between the two direct repeats that was found in all large ascospore-derived strains. In addition, heterokaryons at the MAT locus were observed in field isolates as well as in laboratory derived isolates. PMID:27255676

  4. Nerve Growth Factor Mediates a Switch in Intracellular Signaling for PGE2-Induced Sensitization of Sensory Neurons from Protein Kinase A to Epac

    PubMed Central

    Vasko, Michael R.; Habashy Malty, Ramy; Guo, Chunlu; Duarte, Djane B.; Zhang, Yihong; Nicol, Grant D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF), an inflammatory mediator that contributes to chronic hypersensitivity, alters the intracellular signaling that mediates the sensitizing actions of PGE2 from activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs). When isolated sensory neurons are grown in the absence of added NGF, but not in cultures grown with 30 ng/ml NGF, inhibiting protein kinase A (PKA) activity blocks the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP and to increase the number of action potentials (APs) evoked by a ramp of current. Growing sensory neurons in culture in the presence of increasing concentrations of NGF increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1. An intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the rat hindpaw also increases the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord: an effect blocked by intraplantar administration of NGF antibodies. Treating cultures grown in the presence of 30 ng/ml NGF with Epac1siRNA significantly reduced the expression of Epac1, but not Epac2, and did not block the ability of PGE2 to augment capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from sensory neurons. Exposing neuronal cultures grown in NGF to Epac2siRNAreduced the expression of Epac2, but not Epac1 and prevented the PGE2-induced augmentation of capsaicin and potassium-evoked CGRP release in sensory neurons and the PGE2-induced increase in the number of APs generated by a ramp of current. In neurons grown with no added NGF, Epac siRNAs did not attenuate PGE2-induced sensitization. These results demonstrate that NGF, through increasing Epac2 expression, alters the signaling cascade that mediates PGE2-induced sensitization of sensory neurons, thus providing a novel mechanism for maintaining PGE2-induced hypersensitivity during inflammation. PMID:25126967

  5. The Brassinosteroid-Activated BRI1 Receptor Kinase Is Switched off by Dephosphorylation Mediated by Cytoplasm-Localized PP2A B' Subunits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiju; Liu, Mengmeng; Yuan, Min; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Cai, Xingbo; Sun, Ying; Burlingame, Alma L; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) binding activates the receptor kinase BRI1 by inducing heterodimerization with its co-receptor kinase BAK1; however, the mechanisms that reversibly inactivate BRI1 remain unclear. Here we show that cytoplasm-localized protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) B' regulatory subunits interact with BRI1 to mediate its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Loss-of-function and overexpression experiments showed that a group of PP2A B' regulatory subunits, represented by B'η, negatively regulate BR signaling by decreasing BRI1 phosphorylation. BR increases the expression levels of these B' subunits, and B'η interacts preferentially with phosphorylated BRI1, suggesting that the dynamics of BR signaling are modulated by the PP2A-mediated feedback inactivation of BRI1. Compared with PP2A B'α and B'β, which promote BR responses by dephosphorylating the downstream transcription factor BZR1, the BRI1-inactivating B' subunits showed similar binding to BRI1 and BZR1 but distinct subcellular localization. Alteration of the nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of the B' subunits revealed that cytoplasmic PP2A dephosphorylates BRI1 and inhibits the BR response, whereas nuclear PP2A dephosphorylates BZR1 and activates the BR response. Our findings not only identify the PP2A regulatory B subunits that mediate the binding and dephosphorylation of BRI1, but also demonstrate that the subcellular localization of PP2A specifies its substrate selection and distinct effects on BR signaling.

  6. A BTLA-mediated bait and switch strategy permits Listeria expansion in CD8α(+) DCs to promote long-term T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuanming; Zhang, Xunmin; Sun, Yonglian; Tu, Tony; Fu, May Lynne; Miller, Mendy; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infected CD8α(+) DCs in the spleen are essential for CD8(+) T cell generation. CD8α(+) DCs are also necessary for Listeria expansion and dissemination within the host. The mechanisms that regulate CD8α(+) DCs to allow Listeria expansion are unclear. We find that activating the B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), a coinhibitory receptor for T cells, suppresses, while blocking BTLA enhances, both the primary and memory CD8 T cell responses against Listeria. Btla(-/-) mice have lower effector and memory CD8(+) T cells while paradoxically also being more resistant to Listeria. Although bacterial entry into Btla(-/-) CD8α(+) DCs is unaffected, Listeria fails to expand within these cells. BTLA signaling limits Fas/FasL-mediated suppression of Listeria expansion within CD8α(+) DCs to more effectively alert adaptive immune cells. This study uncovers a BTLA-mediated strategy used by the host that permits Listeria proliferation to enable increasing T cell responses for long-term protection.

  7. THYRATRON SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.; Bourgeois, N.A. Jr.

    1959-04-21

    An arrangement for utilizing a thyratron as a noise free switch is described. It has been discovered that the voltage between plate and cathode of a thyratron will oscillate, producing voltage spikes, if the tube carries only a fraction of its maximum rated current. These voltage spikes can produce detrimental effects where the thyratron is used in critical timing circuits. To alleviate this problem the disclosed circuit provides a charged capacitor and a resistor in parallel with the tube and of such value that the maximum current will flow from the capacitor through the thyratron when it is triggered. During this time the signal current is conducted through the tube, before the thyratron voltage starts to oscillate, and the signal current output is free of noise spikes.

  8. N-Glycosylation of integrin α5 acts as a switch for EGFR-mediated complex formation of integrin α5β1 to α6β4

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Qinglei; Isaji, Tomoya; Hou, Sicong; Zhou, Ying; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Gu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    N-Glycosylation of integrin α5β1 is involved in multiple cell behaviors. We previously reported that the N-glycosylations of the calf domain on integrin α5 (S3–5,10–14) are essential for its inhibitory effect on EGFR signaling in regulating cell proliferation. However, the importance of the individual N-glycosylation and the underlying mechanisms of inhibition remain unclear. Here, we characterize the S3–5,10–14 mutants in detail and found that the N-glycosylation of site-11 (Asn712) is key for cell growth. The restoration of site-11, unlike the other individual sites, significantly suppressed cell growth and EGFR signaling in a manner that was similar to that of wild-type (WT). Mechanistically, this N-glycosylation inhibited the response abilities upon EGF stimulation and EGFR dimerization. Interestingly, we found this N-glycosylation controlled the EGFR complex formation with integrin α5β1 or α6β4; i.e., the loss of site-11 switched EGFR-α5β1 to EGFR-α6β4, which is well known to promote cellular signaling for cell growth. Moreover, the site-11 N-glycan exhibited a more branching structure compared with other sites, which may be required for EGFR-α5β1 formation. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrate that the site-11 N-glycosylation on α5 is most important for its inhibitory effect on EGFR signaling, which may provide a novel regulatory mechanism for crosstalks between integrins and EGFR. PMID:27641064

  9. A randomized controlled trial of clinic-based and home-based interventions in comparison with usual care for preterm infants: effects and mediators.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Chin; Leng, Chi-Hon; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Chen, Wei J; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Yang, Ming-Chin; Li-Jung Fang; Hsu, Hui-Chin; Yu, Yen-Ting; Wu, Yen-Tzu; Chen, Li-Chiou; Jeng, Suh-Fang

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the effects and mediators of a clinic-based intervention program (CBIP) and a home-based intervention program (HBIP) compared with usual care in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants on developmental and behavioral outcomes at 24 months of age (corrected for prematurity). In this randomized controlled trial, VLBW preterm infants received either CBIP (n=57), HBIP (n=63), or usual care (n=58) from hospitalization to 12 months. At 12 months, infant emotional regulation was assessed using the toy-behind-barrier procedure and dyadic interaction was observed during free play. At 24 months, infant developmental and behavioral outcomes were assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development- 3rd edition and the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1.5-5, respectively. Compared with infants under usual care, the CBIP-group infants showed higher cognitive composite scores (difference, 95% confidence interval (CI)=4.4, 0.8-7.9) and a lower rate of motor delay (odds ratio (OR), 95% CI=0.29, 0.08-0.99); the HBIP-group infants had lower sleep problem scores (difference, 95% CI=-1.4, -2.5 to -0.3) and a lower rate of internalizing problems at 24 months (OR, 95% CI=0.51, 0.28-0.93) (all p<.05). The CBIP's effect on cognitive outcome was attenuated when maternal or dyadic interactive behavior was considered; whereas the HBIP's effect on sleep and internalizing behavior was attenuated when duration of orientation to a toy or object was considered. In conclusions, interventions enhanced the cognitive, motor, and behavioral outcomes of VLBW preterm infants. The effects on cognitive and behavioral outcomes might be mediated by early-improved mother-infant interaction and infant emotional regulation, respectively. PMID:24973546

  10. Effect of low-level laser therapy on inflammatory mediator release during chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a randomized preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Geisa Badauy Lauria; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Othon-Leite, Angélica Ferreira; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; Arantes, Adriano Moraes; Bariani, César; Duarte, Luciana Garcia Lobo; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira; Queiroz-Júnior, Celso Martins; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are submitted to a conditioning regimen of high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation therapy, which usually results in oral ulcerations and mucosal barrier breakdown. Oral mucositis (OM) is a common and debilitating toxicity side effect of autologous and allogeneic HSCT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the severity of OM and inflammatory mediator (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10, TGF-β, metalloproteinases, and growth factors) levels in saliva and blood of HSCT patients. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to two groups: control (n = 15) and laser (n = 15). LLLT was applied from the first day of the conditioning regimen until day 7 post-HSCT (D + 7). Saliva and blood were collected from patients on admission (AD), D-1, D + 3, D + 7, and on marrow engraftment day (ME). Clinical results showed less severe OM in the laser group (p < 0.05). The LLLT group showed increased matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) levels in saliva on D + 7 (p = 0.04). Significant differences were also observed for IL-10 on D + 7 and on ME in blood plasma, when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). No significant differences were seen in saliva or blood for the other inflammatory mediators investigated. LLLT was clinically effective in reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced OM in HSCT patients, and its mechanism of action does not seem to be completely linked to the modulation of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors or matrix metalloproteinases.

  11. Bilingual Language Switching and the Frontal Lobes: Modulatory Control in Language Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuter, Renata; Humphreys, Glyn; Rumiati, Raffaella

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the brain mechanisms mediating the switching of languages in bilingual subjects. To ascertain the brain mechanisms mediating the control of language switching, switching was examined in a bilingual patient with frontal lobe damage and impaired control processes. (Author/VWL)

  12. Functional switching of ATM: sensor of DNA damage in proliferating cells and mediator of Akt survival signal in post-mitotic human neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xiong, Hua; Yang, Da-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and oculocutaneous telangiectasias. The gene mutated in this disease, ATM (A-T, mutated), encodes a 370-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase. ATM not only mediates cellular response to DNA damage but also acts as an activator of Akt in response to insulin. However, despite intensive studies, the mechanism underlying the neuronal degeneration symptoms of human A-T is still poorly understood. We found that the topoisomerase inhibitors etoposide and camptothecin readily induced apoptosis in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but could not induce apoptosis in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, etoposide induced p53 phosphorylation and H2AX foci formation in proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but failed to do so in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, while inhibition of ATM in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells partially protected them from etoposide-induced apoptosis, the same treatment had no effect on cell viability in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that DNA damage or defective response to DNA damage is not the cause of neuronal cell death in human A-T. In contrast, we discovered that Akt phosphorylation was inhibited when ATM activity was suppressed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM induced apoptosis following serum starvation in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells but could not trigger apoptosis under the same conditions in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells. These results demonstrate that ATM mediates the Akt signaling and promotes cell survival in neuron-like human SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting that impaired activation of Akt is the reason for neuronal degeneration in human A-T. PMID:22739265

  13. Effectiveness, Mediators, and Effect Predictors of Internet Interventions for Chronic Cancer-Related Fatigue: The Design and an Analysis Plan of a 3-Armed Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman-Everts, Fieke Z; Van der Lee, Marije L; Van de Schoot, Rens; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet interventions offer advantages that especially cancer survivors who suffer from fatigue could benefit from. Given the growing number of such patients, Internet interventions could supplement and strengthen currently available health care. Objective This paper describes the design and analysis plan that will be used to study 2 Internet interventions aimed at reducing severe fatigue in cancer survivors: a mobile ambulant activity feedback therapy supported through a weekly email by a physiotherapist and a weekly Web- and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy supported online by a psychologist. The data resulting from this trial will be used to (1) investigate the effectiveness, (2) investigate potential mediators of these interventions, and (3) explore participant characteristics that can predict the effect of these interventions. Methods A 3-armed randomized controlled trial is proposed that compares both Internet interventions with an active control condition that solely consists of receiving psycho-educational emails. The intervention period is 9 weeks for all 3 conditions. Six months after baseline, participants in the control condition can choose to follow 1 of the 2 experimental Internet interventions. Outcomes are measured in terms of fatigue severity, mental health, and self-perceived work ability. All are Web-assessed at baseline, 2 weeks after the intervention period, and at 6 and 12 months after baseline. Fatigue severity, mindfulness, physical activity, expectations and credibility of the intervention, therapeutic working alliance, sleep quality, and sense of control over fatigue are assessed 3 times during the intervention period for identifying mediators of the interventions. Recruitment is performed nationally throughout the Netherlands through patient organizations and their websites, newspapers, and by informing various types of health professionals. All participants register at an open-access website. We aim at including 330 cancer

  14. HTLV-I Tax-Mediated Inactivation of Cell Cycle Checkpoints and DNA Repair Pathways Contribute to Cellular Transformation: “A Random Mutagenesis Model”

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    To achieve cellular transformation, most oncogenic retroviruses use transduction by proto-oncogene capture or insertional mutagenesis, whereby provirus integration disrupts expression of tumor suppressors or proto-oncogenes. In contrast, the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been classified in a separate class referred to as “transactivating retroviruses”. Current views suggest that the viral encoded Tax protein transactivates expression of cellular genes leading to deregulated growth and transformation. However, if Tax-mediated transactivation was indeed sufficient for cellular transformation, a fairly high frequency of infected cells would eventually become transformed. In contrast, the frequency of transformation by HTLV-I is very low, likely less than 5%. This review will discuss the current understanding and recent discoveries highlighting critical functions of Tax in cellular transformation. HTLV-I Tax carries out essential functions in order to override cell cycle checkpoints and deregulate cellular division. In addition, Tax expression is associated with increased DNA damage and genome instability. Since Tax can inhibit multiple DNA repair pathways and stimulate unfaithful DNA repair or bypass checkpoints, these processes allow accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome. Given this, a “Random Mutagenesis” transformation model seems more suitable to characterize the oncogenic activities of HTLV-I. PMID:26835512

  15. Effects of supplementation with the fat-soluble vitamins E and D on fasting flow-mediated vasodilation in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Joris, Peter J; Mensink, Ronald P

    2015-03-10

    The effects of fat-soluble vitamin supplementation on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk are not clear. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to quantify effects of fat-soluble vitamin supplements on fasting flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, a validated marker to assess CVD risk. Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified by a systematic search till July 2014. Seven RCTs studying the effects of vitamin E supplements (range: 300 to 1800 IU per day) and nine RCTs examining the effects of vitamin D supplements, that involved, respectively, 303 and 658 adults, were included. No studies with carotenoid or vitamin K supplements were found. Vitamin E supplementation increased FMD vs. control by 2.42% (95% CI: 0.46% to 4.37%; p = 0.015). No effects of vitamin D supplementation were found (0.15%; 95% CI: -0.21% to 0.51%; p = 0.41). These effects did not depend on subject characteristics, treatment characteristics or technical aspects of the FMD measurement. However, no dose-response relationship was evident for vitamin E, statistical significance depended on one study, while the levels of supplement were far above recommended intakes. The current meta-analysis, therefore, does not provide unambiguous evidence to support the use of fat-soluble vitamin supplements to improve fasting FMD in adults.

  16. The Minimum Requirements of Language Control: Evidence from Sequential Predictability Effects in Language Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Declerck, Mathieu; Koch, Iring; Philipp, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study systematically examined the influence of sequential predictability of languages and concepts on language switching. To this end, 2 language switching paradigms were combined. To measure language switching with a random sequence of languages and/or concepts, we used a language switching paradigm that implements visual cues and…

  17. Toward a Probabilistic Automata Model of Some Aspects of Code-Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearholt, D. W.; Valdes-Fallis, G.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the model is to select either Spanish or English as the language to be used; its goals at this stage of development include modeling code-switching for lexical need, apparently random code-switching, dependency of code-switching upon sociolinguistic context, and code-switching within syntactic constraints. (EJS)

  18. Quality control of ER synthesized proteins: an exposed thiol group as a three-way switch mediating assembly, retention and degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Fra, A M; Fagioli, C; Finazzi, D; Sitia, R; Alberini, C M

    1993-01-01

    Plasma cells secrete IgM only in the polymeric form: the C-terminal cysteine of the mu heavy chain (Cys575) is responsible for both intracellular retention and assembly of IgM subunits. Polymerization is not quantitative, and part of IgM is degraded intracellularly. Neither chloroquine nor brefeldin A (BFA) inhibits degradation, suggesting that this process occurs in a pre-Golgi compartment. Degradation of IgM assembly intermediates requires Cys575: the monomeric IgMala575 mutant is stable also when endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi transport is blocked by BFA. Addition of the 20 C-terminal residues of mu to the lysosomal protease cathepsin D is sufficient to induce pre-Golgi retention and degradation of the chimeric protein: the small amounts of molecules which exit from the ER are mostly covalent dimers. By contrast, when retained by the KDEL sequence, cathepsin D is stable in the ER, indicating that retention is not sufficient to cause degradation. Replacing the C-terminal cysteine with serine restores transport through the Golgi. As all chimeric cathepsin D constructs display comparable protease activity in vitro, their different fates are not determined by gross alterations in folding. Thus, also out of its normal context, the mu chain Cys575 plays a crucial role in quality control, mediating assembly, retention and degradation. Images PMID:8223484

  19. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  20. 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Mediated Sonodynamic Therapy Promotes Phenotypic Switching from Dedifferentiated to Differentiated Phenotype via Reactive Oxygen Species and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dan, Juhua; Sun, Xin; Li, Wanlu; Zhang, Yun; Li, Xuesong; Xu, Haobo; Li, Zhitao; Tian, Zhen; Guo, Shuyuan; Yao, Jianting; Gao, Weidong; Tian, Ye

    2015-06-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) has been found to inhibit in-stent restenosis in animal models. However, the mechanism is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated SDT (ALA-SDT) on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), a cause of restenosis, with a focus on SDT-induced phenotypic switching. Serum-induced dedifferentiated VSMCs were cultured with ALA (1 mm, 24 h) and exposed to ultrasound (0.8 W/cm(2)) for 5 min. Results indicated that ALA-SDT inhibited the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and enhanced the expression of differentiated phenotypic markers in VSMCs. Additionally, ALA-SDT increased intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in VSMCs. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species elevation or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity abolished the expression of smooth muscle 22α (SM22α) in VSMCs induced by ALA-SDT. Taken together, these results suggest that ALA-SDT promotes transformation of the VSMC phenotype from the dedifferentiated to differentiated status via reactive oxygen species and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

  1. Estrogen receptors bind to and activate the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter to potentiate HoxC4-mediated activation-induced cytosine deaminase induction, immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination, and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thach; Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Hawkins, J Seth; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2010-11-26

    Estrogen enhances antibody and autoantibody responses through yet to be defined mechanisms. It has been suggested that estrogen up-regulates the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID), which is critical for antibody class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), through direct activation of this gene. AID, as we have shown, is induced by the HoxC4 homeodomain transcription factor, which binds to a conserved HoxC4/Oct site in the AICDA/Aicda promoter. Here we show that estrogen-estrogen receptor (ER) complexes do not directly activate the AID gene promoter in B cells undergoing CSR. Rather, they bind to three evolutionarily conserved and cooperative estrogen response elements (EREs) we identified in the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter. By binding to these EREs, ERs synergized with CD154 or LPS and IL-4 signaling to up-regulate HoxC4 expression, thereby inducing AID and CSR without affecting B cell proliferation or plasmacytoid differentiation. Estrogen administration in vivo significantly potentiated CSR and SHM in the specific antibody response to the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated with chicken γ-globulin. Ablation of HoxC4 (HoxC4(-/-)) abrogated the estrogen-mediated enhancement of AID gene expression and decreased CSR and SHM. Thus, estrogen enhances AID expression by activating the HOXC4/HoxC4 promoter and inducing the critical AID gene activator, HoxC4.

  2. Ferromagnetic vortex core switching at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Nowak, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    An approach for the investigation of vortex core switching is presented. Thermal effects up to the Curie point are included in a micromagnetic framework based on the recently developed Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. In this approach it is easier to avoid numerical discretization artifacts, commonly present when a Bloch point is mediating the switching process. Switching in thin circular permalloy disks caused by the application of a slowly increasing magnetic field oriented orthogonally to the disk is considered. An energy barrier which can be overcome by thermal fluctuations is taken into account, leading to a strong influence of the temperature on the switching field. In particular, the switching field goes to zero at a significantly smaller temperature than the Curie temperature. The deduced nucleation volume is smaller than the typical grain size in permalloy.

  3. Intrinsic noise in systems with switching environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufton, Peter G.; Lin, Yen Ting; Galla, Tobias; McKane, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    We study individual-based dynamics in finite populations, subject to randomly switching environmental conditions. These are inspired by models in which genes transition between on and off states, regulating underlying protein dynamics. Similarly, switches between environmental states are relevant in bacterial populations and in models of epidemic spread. Existing piecewise-deterministic Markov process approaches focus on the deterministic limit of the population dynamics while retaining the randomness of the switching. Here we go beyond this approximation and explicitly include effects of intrinsic stochasticity at the level of the linear-noise approximation. Specifically, we derive the stationary distributions of a number of model systems, in good agreement with simulations. This improves existing approaches which are limited to the regimes of fast and slow switching.

  4. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  5. The unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost: electroencephalographic evidence of task-set inertia in oculomotor control.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Jeffrey; Hassall, Cameron D; Krigolson, Olave E; Heath, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    The execution of an antisaccade selectively increases the reaction time (RT) of a subsequent prosaccade (the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost). To explain this finding, the task-set inertia hypothesis asserts that an antisaccade requires a cognitively mediated non-standard task-set that persists inertially and delays the planning of a subsequent prosaccade. The present study sought to directly test the theoretical tenets of the task-set inertia hypothesis by examining the concurrent behavioural and the event-related brain potential (ERP) data associated with the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost. Participants pseudo-randomly alternated between pro- and antisaccades while electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded. As expected, the completion of an antisaccade selectively increased the RT of a subsequent prosaccade, whereas the converse switch did not influence RTs. Thus, the behavioural results demonstrated the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost. In terms of the ERP findings, we observed a reliable change in the amplitude of the P3 - time-locked to task-instructions - when trials were switched from a prosaccade to an antisaccade; however, no reliable change was observed when switching from an antisaccade to a prosaccade. This is a salient finding because extensive work has shown that the P3 provides a neural index of the task-set required to execute a to-be-completed response. As such, results showing that prosaccades completed after antisaccades exhibited increased RTs in combination with a P3 amplitude comparable to antisaccades provides convergent evidence that the unidirectional prosaccade switch-cost is attributed to the persistent activation of a non-standard antisaccade task-set.

  6. SAP155-mediated splicing of FUSE-binding protein-interacting repressor serves as a molecular switch for c-myc gene expression.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kajiwara, Toshiko; Tamura, Mai; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanaka, Nobuko; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Rei; Ito, Akihiro; Kubo, Shuji; Natsume, Tohru; Levens, David; Yoshida, Minoru; Nomura, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    The Far UpStream Element (FUSE)-binding protein-interacting repressor (FIR), a c-myc transcriptional suppressor, is alternatively spliced removing the transcriptional repression domain within exon 2 (FIRΔexon2) in colorectal cancers. SAP155 is a subunit of the essential splicing factor 3b (SF3b) subcomplex in the spliceosome. This study aims to study the significance of the FIR-SAP155 interaction for the coordination of c-myc transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and c-Myc protein modification, as well as to interrogate FIRΔexon2 for other functions relating to altered FIR pre-mRNA splicing. Knockdown of SAP155 or FIR was used to investigate their reciprocal influence on each other and on c-myc transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and protein expression. Pull down from HeLa cell nuclear extracts revealed the association of FIR, FIRΔexon2, and SF3b subunits. FIR and FIRΔexon2 were coimmunoprecipitated with SAP155. FIR and FIRΔexon2 adenovirus vector (Ad-FIR and Ad-FIRΔexon2, respectively) were prepared to test for their influence on c-myc expression. FIR, SAP155, SAP130, and c-myc were coordinately upregulated in human colorectal cancer. These results reveal that SAP155 and FIR/FIRΔexon2 form a complex and are mutually upregulating. Ad-FIRΔexon2 antagonized Ad-FIR transcriptional repression of c-myc in HeLa cells. Because FIRΔexon2 still carries RRM1 and RRM2 and binding activity to FUSE, it is able to displace repression competent FIR from FUSE in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, thus thwarting FIR-mediated transcriptional repression by FUSE. Thus aberrant FIRΔexon2 production in turn sustained c-Myc expression. In conclusion, altered FIR and c-myc pre-mRNA splicing, in addition to c-Myc expression by augmented FIR/FIRΔexon2-SAP155 complex, potentially contribute to colorectal cancer development.

  7. A comparative study of toluidine blue-mediated photodynamic therapy versus topical corticosteroids in the treatment of erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus: a randomized clinical controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jajarm, Hasan Hoseinpour; Falaki, Farnaz; Sanatkhani, Majid; Ahmadzadeh, Meysam; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Shafaee, Hooman

    2015-07-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been suggested as a new treatment option that is free from side effects for erosive-atrophic oral lichen planus (OLP). The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of toluidine blue-mediated photodynamic therapy (TB-PDT) with local corticosteroids on treatment of erosive-atrophic OLP. In this randomized clinical trial, 25 patients with keratotic-atrophic-erosive oral lichen planus were allocated randomly into two groups. Group 1 (experimental): topical application of toluidine blue with micropipette was applied, and after 10 min, the patients were treated with a 630-nm GaAlAs laser (power density: 10 mW/cm(2)) during two visits. Group 2 (control) used mouthwash diluted with dexamethasone (tab 0/5 in 5 ml water) for 5 min, and then, it was spat out, and after 30 min, the mouth was rinsed with 30 drops of nystatin 100,000 units for 5 min and again spat out. Demographic data, type, and severity of the lesions and pain were recorded before and after treatment and then at the 1-month follow-up visit. Response rate was defined based on changes in intensity of the lesions and pain. In the experimental and control groups, sign scores of changes significantly reduced after treatment respectively (p = 0.021) and (p = 0.002), but between the two groups, no significant difference was observed (p = 0.72). In the experimental (p = 0.005) and control groups (p = 0.001), the intensity of lesions significantly reduced after treatment and there was a significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.001). The mean amount of improvement in pain was significantly greater in the control group compared with the experimental group (p < 0.001) (α = 0.05). Our study showed that TB-PDT with laser was effective in the management of OLP.

  8. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  9. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  10. Long-Term Effects of an Internet-Mediated Pedometer-Based Walking Program for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Marilyn L; Martinez, Carlos H; Kadri, Reema; Roman, Pia; Holleman, Robert G; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Nguyen, Huong Q; Cohen, Miriam D; Goodrich, David E; Giardino, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity (PA) is recommended for persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Interventions that promote PA and sustain long-term adherence to PA are needed. Objective We examined the effects of an Internet-mediated, pedometer-based walking intervention, called Taking Healthy Steps, at 12 months. Methods Veterans with COPD (N=239) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to the intervention or wait-list control. During the first 4 months, participants in the intervention group were instructed to wear the pedometer every day, upload daily step counts at least once a week, and were provided access to a website with four key components: individualized goal setting, iterative feedback, educational and motivational content, and an online community forum. The subsequent 8-month maintenance phase was the same except that participants no longer received new educational content. Participants randomized to the wait-list control group were instructed to wear the pedometer, but they did not receive step-count goals or instructions to increase PA. The primary outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessed by the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire Total Score (SGRQ-TS); the secondary outcome was daily step count. Linear mixed-effect models assessed the effect of intervention over time. One participant was excluded from the analysis because he was an outlier. Within the intervention group, we assessed pedometer adherence and website engagement by examining percent of days with valid step-count data, number of log-ins to the website each month, use of the online community forum, and responses to a structured survey. Results Participants were 93.7% male (223/238) with a mean age of 67 (SD 9) years. At 12 months, there were no significant between-group differences in SGRQ-TS or daily step count. Between-group difference in daily step count was maximal and statistically significant at month 4 (P<.001), but approached zero in months 8

  11. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  12. Temporal switching jitter in photoconductive switches

    SciTech Connect

    GAUDET,JOHN A.; SKIPPER,MICHAEL C.; ABDALLA,MICHAEL D.; AHERN,SEAN M.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; ROMERO,SAMUEL P.

    2000-04-13

    This paper reports on a recent comparison made between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the temporal switch jitter times. It is found that the optical trigger laser characteristics are dominant in determining the PCSS jitter.

  13. Energetic analysis of fast magnetic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    The speed of magnetic switching is an important parameter for many devices, like magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells, or hard drive disk/heads. Traditionally switching processes have been evaluated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz (LLG) equation numerically. Criteria of successful switching were defined in phase space (instantaneous magnetic moments), or required full system relaxation. This presentation introduces another look at the switching processes, based on an energetic approach. The main idea is to split the total transient energy of the system into two parts: Es, which includes switching stimulus only (e.g. external pulse field), and E0 - covering effects important for final state. Monitoring a single value E0, as LLG integration progresses, allows for detection of switched states. The method shows its full power in the case of magnetic nanostructures, which have a relatively simple energetic landscape of relaxed states (no magnetic domains), but may show very complex dynamical configurations. Another advantage is a possibility to account for finite temperature in switching criteria. The concept is illustrated by simulations of single spin and MRAM cell switching.

  14. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  15. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  16. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  17. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  18. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  19. Speech motor program maintenance, but not switching, is enhanced by left-hemispheric deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Harrison N; Kendall, Diane L; Okun, Michael S; Wu, Samuel S; Velozo, Craig; Fernandez, Hubert H; Spencer, Kristie A; Rosenbek, John C

    2010-10-01

    Speech reaction time (SRT) was measured in a response priming protocol in 12 participants with Parkinson's disease (PD) and hypokinetic dysarthria "on" and "off" left-hemispheric deep brain stimulation (DBS). Speech preparation was measured during speech motor programming in two randomly ordered speech conditions: speech maintenance and switching. Double blind testing was completed in participants with DBS of globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) (n = 5) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) (n = 7). SRT was significantly faster in the maintenance vs switch task, regardless of DBS state. SRT was faster in the speech maintenance task "on" stimulation, while there was no difference in speech switching "on" and "off" DBS. These data suggest that left-hemispheric DBS may have differential effects on aspects of speech preparation in PD. It is hypothesized that speech maintenance improvements may result from DBS-induced cortical enhancements, while the lack of difference in switching may be related to inhibition deficits mediated by the right-hemisphere. Alternatively, DBS may have little influence on the higher level motor processes (i.e., motor planning) which it is believed the switch task engaged to a greater extent than the maintenance task.

  20. The Prevention Program for Externalizing Problem Behavior (PEP) Improves Child Behavior by Reducing Negative Parenting: Analysis of Mediating Processes in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Charlotte; Hautmann, Christopher; Plück, Julia; Eichelberger, Ilka; Döpfner, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our indicated Prevention program for preschool children with Externalizing Problem behavior (PEP) demonstrated improved parenting and child problem behavior in a randomized controlled efficacy trial and in a study with an effectiveness design. The aim of the present analysis of data from the randomized controlled trial was to identify…

  1. Multistate resistive switching in silver nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandouk, Eric J.; Gimzewski, James K.; Stieg, Adam Z.

    2015-08-01

    Resistive switching devices have garnered significant consideration for their potential use in nanoelectronics and non-volatile memory applications. Here we investigate the nonlinear current-voltage behavior and resistive switching properties of composite nanoparticle films comprising a large collective of metal-insulator-metal junctions. Silver nanoparticles prepared via the polyol process and coated with an insulating polymer layer of tetraethylene glycol were deposited onto silicon oxide substrates. Activation required a forming step achieved through application of a bias voltage. Once activated, the nanoparticle films exhibited controllable resistive switching between multiple discrete low resistance states that depended on operational parameters including the applied bias voltage, temperature and sweep frequency. The films’ resistance switching behavior is shown here to be the result of nanofilament formation due to formative electromigration effects. Because of their tunable and distinct resistance states, scalability and ease of fabrication, nanoparticle films have a potential place in memory technology as resistive random access memory cells.

  2. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  3. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  4. Voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, T. X.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Lou, J.; Liu, M.; Yang, X.; Gao, Y.; Rand, S.; Sun, N. X.

    2012-03-01

    We report on voltage impulse induced reversible bistable magnetization switching in FeGaB/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multiferroic heterostructures at room temperature. This was realized through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling between ferroelectric PZT and ferromagnetic FeGaB layer. Two reversible and stable voltage-impulse induced mechanical strain states were obtained in the PZT by applying an electric field impulse with its amplitude smaller than the electric coercive field, which led to reversible voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching. These voltage impulse induced bistable magnetization switching in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising approach to power efficient bistable magnetization switching that is crucial for information storage.

  5. Optoelectronic techniques for broadband switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, S. F.; Jou, L.; Lenart, J.

    1988-01-01

    Optoelectronic switching employs a hybrid optical/electronic principle to perform the switching function and is applicable for either analog broadband or high-bit rate digital switching. The major advantages of optoelectronic switching include high isolation, low crosstalk, small physical size, light weight, and low power consumption. These advantages make optoelectronic switching an excellent candidate for on-board satellite switching. This paper describes a number of optoelectronic switching architectures. System components required for implementing these switching architectures are discussed. Performance of these architectures are evaluated by calculating their crosstalk, isolation, insertion loss, matrix size, drive power, throughput, and switching speed. Technologies needed for monolithic optoelectronic switching are also identified.

  6. Tolerance to a new free amino acid-based formula in children with IgE or non-IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amino acid-based formulas (Aaf) are increasingly used in children with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). To be labeled hypoallergenic these formulas must demonstrate in clinical studies that they don’t provoke reactions in 90% of subjects with confirmed CMA with 95% confidence when given in prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge (DBPCFC) trials. The majority of available safety data on Aaf derived from patients with IgE-mediated CMA. Considering substantial differences in the immunologic mechanism and clinical presentation of non-IgE-mediated CMA it’s important to investigate the hypoallergenicity of these formulas also in these patients. We prospectively assessed the tolerance to a new commercially available Aaf in children affected by IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA. Methods Consecutive patients affected by IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA, aged ≤ 4 years, were enrolled. DBPCFC was carried out with increasing doses of the new Aaf (Sineall, Humana, Milan, Italy), using validated Aaf as placebo. Faecal concentrations of calprotectin (FC) and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) were monitored. Results Sixty patients (44 male, 73.3%, median age 37, 95%CI 34.5–39.6 months, IgE-mediated CMA 29, 48.3%) were enrolled. At the diagnosis clinical symptoms were gastrointestinal (46.6%), cutaneous (36.6%), respiratory (23.3%), and systemic (10.0%). After DBPCFC with the new Aaf, no patient presented early or delayed clinical reactions. Faecal concentration of calprotectin and of ECP remained stable after the exposure to the new Aaf. Conclusions The new Aaf is well tolerated in children with IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA, and it could be used as a safe dietotherapy regimen for children with this condition. Trial registration The trial was registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System (ID number: NCT01622426). PMID:23418822

  7. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  8. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  9. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  10. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  11. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  12. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  13. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  14. Alarm toe switch

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, Floyd P.

    1982-01-01

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

  15. A Model for the Epigenetic Switch Linking Inflammation to Cell Transformation: Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Claude; Gonze, Didier; Lemaigre, Frédéric; Novák, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a molecular pathway linking inflammation to cell transformation has been discovered. This molecular pathway rests on a positive inflammatory feedback loop between NF-κB, Lin28, Let-7 microRNA and IL6, which leads to an epigenetic switch allowing cell transformation. A transient activation of an inflammatory signal, mediated by the oncoprotein Src, activates NF-κB, which elicits the expression of Lin28. Lin28 decreases the expression of Let-7 microRNA, which results in higher level of IL6 than achieved directly by NF-κB. In turn, IL6 can promote NF-κB activation. Finally, IL6 also elicits the synthesis of STAT3, which is a crucial activator for cell transformation. Here, we propose a computational model to account for the dynamical behavior of this positive inflammatory feedback loop. By means of a deterministic model, we show that an irreversible bistable switch between a transformed and a non-transformed state of the cell is at the core of the dynamical behavior of the positive feedback loop linking inflammation to cell transformation. The model indicates that inhibitors (tumor suppressors) or activators (oncogenes) of this positive feedback loop regulate the occurrence of the epigenetic switch by modulating the threshold of inflammatory signal (Src) needed to promote cell transformation. Both stochastic simulations and deterministic simulations of a heterogeneous cell population suggest that random fluctuations (due to molecular noise or cell-to-cell variability) are able to trigger cell transformation. Moreover, the model predicts that oncogenes/tumor suppressors respectively decrease/increase the robustness of the non-transformed state of the cell towards random fluctuations. Finally, the model accounts for the potential effect of competing endogenous RNAs, ceRNAs, on the dynamics of the epigenetic switch. Depending on their microRNA targets, the model predicts that ceRNAs could act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors by regulating the occurrence of

  16. Mediating Factors of a School-Based Multi-Component Smoking Prevention Intervention: The LdP Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carreras, G.; Bosi, S.; Angelini, P.; Gorini, G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors mediating the effects of Luoghi di Prevenzione (LdP) smoking prevention intervention based on social competence and social influence approaches, and characterized by peer-led school-based interventions, out-of-school workshops, school lessons, and by enforcing the school anti-smoking policy.…

  17. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  18. A Parent-Mediated Intervention to Increase Responsive Parental Behaviors and Child Communication in Children with ASD: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Michael; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal research has demonstrated that responsive parental behaviors reliably predict subsequent language gains in children with autism spectrum disorder. To investigate the underlying causal mechanisms, we conducted a randomized clinical trial of an experimental intervention (Focused Playtime Intervention, FPI) that aims to enhance…

  19. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  20. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  1. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  2. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, Regina L.; Oberlin, Lauren E.; Voss, Michelle W.; Prakash, Ruchika S.; Szabo-Reed, Amanda; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Phillips, Siobhan M.; Gothe, Neha P.; Mailey, Emily; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Martin, Stephen A.; Pence, Brandt D.; Lin, Mingkuan; Parasuraman, Raja; Greenwood, Pamela M.; Fryxell, Karl J.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.; Erickson, Kirk I.

    2014-01-01

    Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82). Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = 0.036). The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations. PMID:25566019

  3. Nonvolatile random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonvolatile magnetic random access memory can be achieved by an array of magnet-Hall effect (M-H) elements. The storage function is realized with a rectangular thin-film ferromagnetic material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and inplane bipolar remanent magnetization states. The thin-film magnetic element is magnetized by a local applied field, whose direction is used to form either a 0 or 1 state. The element remains in the 0 or 1 state until a switching field is applied to change its state. The stored information is detcted by a Hall-effect sensor which senses the fringing field from the magnetic storage element. The circuit design for addressing each cell includes transistor switches for providing a current of selected polarity to store a binary digit through a separate conductor overlying the magnetic element of the cell. To read out a stored binary digit, transistor switches are employed to provide a current through a row of Hall-effect sensors connected in series and enabling a differential voltage amplifier connected to all Hall-effect sensors of a column in series. To avoid read-out voltage errors due to shunt currents through resistive loads of the Hall-effect sensors of other cells in the same column, at least one transistor switch is provided between every pair of adjacent cells in every row which are not turned on except in the row of the selected cell.

  4. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  5. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C.; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 1012 with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications.

  6. Avalanche photoconductive switching

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M.D.; Druce, R.L.; Wilson, M.J.; Hofer, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes work being done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the avalanche mode of operation of laser triggered photoconductive switches. We have been able to generate pulses with amplitudes of 2 kV--35 kV and rise times of 300--500 ps, and with a switching gain (energy of output electrical pulse vs energy of trigger optical pulse) of 10{sup 3} to over 10{sup 5}. Switches with two very different physical configurations and with two different illumination wavelengths (1.06 {mu}m, 890 nm) exhibit very similar behavior. The avalanche switching behavior, therefore, appears to be related to the material parameters rather than the optical wavelength or switch geometry. Considerable further work needs to be done to fully characterize and understand this mode of operation. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Taking Healthy Steps: rationale, design and baseline characteristics of a randomized trial of a pedometer-based internet-mediated walking program in veterans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity are common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and a sedentary lifestyle is associated with poor outcomes including increased mortality, frequent hospitalizations, and poor health-related quality of life. Internet-mediated physical activity interventions may increase physical activity and improve health outcomes in persons with COPD. Methods/Design This manuscript describes the design and rationale of a randomized controlled trial that tests the effectiveness of Taking Healthy Steps, an Internet-mediated walking program for Veterans with COPD. Taking Healthy Steps includes an uploading pedometer, a website, and an online community. Eligible and consented patients wear a pedometer to obtain one week of baseline data and then are randomized on a 2:1 ratio to Taking Healthy Steps or to a wait list control. The intervention arm receives iterative step-count feedback; individualized step-count goals, motivational and informational messages, and access to an online community. Wait list controls are notified that they are enrolled, but that their intervention will start in one year; however, they keep the pedometer and have access to a static webpage. Discussion Participants include 239 Veterans (mean age 66.7 years, 93.7% male) with 155 randomized to Taking Healthy Steps and 84 to the wait list control arm; rural-living (45.2%); ever-smokers (93.3%); and current smokers (25.1%). Baseline mean St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire Total Score was 46.0; 30.5% reported severe dyspnea; and the average number of comorbid conditions was 4.9. Mean baseline daily step counts was 3497 (+/- 2220). Veterans with COPD can be recruited to participate in an online walking program. We successfully recruited a cohort of older Veterans with a significant level of disability including Veterans who live in rural areas using a remote national recruitment strategy. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01102777

  8. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  9. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Ca[rasp, George J

    2013-10-22

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  10. Photoconductive switch package

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.

    2015-10-27

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  11. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  12. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  13. Focus ion beam-induced mechanical stress switching in an ultra-fast resistive switching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The Mo/Si3N4:Pt/Pt nanometallic resistive switching devices with ultra-fast write/erase speed (<50 ns) were fabricated. Other than conventional electrical switching, a mechanical stress-induced switching was demonstrated. Such mechanical stress was provided by momentum transfer of 30 keV Ga+ ions in a focus ion beam system, enabling a one-way high resistance state (HRS) to low resistance state (LRS) transition. The capability of mechanical stress switching provides evidence that electron trapping/detrapping mechanism is responsible for nanometallic resistive switching. It was further demonstrated that HRS (trapping state) is a meta-stable state, while LRS (detrapping state) is a stable state. Strong mechanical stress facilitates local bond distortion in dielectric films and thus lowers the energy barrier between HRS and LRS, eventually leading to a barrier-less state transition. A quantitative model based on stress-mediated parallel conduction paths were established to provide a more accurate description of the resistive switching devices.

  14. Methods for resistive switching of memristors

    DOEpatents

    Mickel, Patrick R.; James, Conrad D.; Lohn, Andrew; Marinella, Matthew; Hsia, Alexander H.

    2016-05-10

    The present invention is directed generally to resistive random-access memory (RRAM or ReRAM) devices and systems, as well as methods of employing a thermal resistive model to understand and determine switching of such devices. In particular example, the method includes generating a power-resistance measurement for the memristor device and applying an isothermal model to the power-resistance measurement in order to determine one or more parameters of the device (e.g., filament state).

  15. Switching and stopping antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-06-01

    Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  16. An optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-04-30

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch having an electron attaching gas wherein electron attachment is brought about by indirect excitation of molecules to long live states by exposure to laser light. 3 figs.

  17. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  18. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  19. Irreversible magnetic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an irreversible magnetic switch containing a ferromagnetic amorphous metal having a predetermined crystallization temperature in its inductor magnetic path. With the incorporation of such material, the magnetic properties after cooling from a high temperature excursion above its crystallization temperature are only a fraction of the original value. The difference is used to provide a safety feature in the magnetic switch.

  20. High Power Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Kao, Y. C.; Carnahan, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Improved switching transistors handle 400-A peak currents and up to 1,200 V. Using large diameter silicon wafers with twice effective area as D60T, form basis for D7 family of power switching transistors. Package includes npn wafer, emitter preform, and base-contact insert. Applications are: 25to 50-kilowatt high-frequency dc/dc inverters, VSCF converters, and motor controllers for electrical vehicles.

  1. Cygnus Water Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

    2008-03-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

  2. Optical shutter switching matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The interface switching systems are discussed which are related to those used in the Space Shuttle ground control system, transmission systems, communications systems, and airborne radar electronic countermeasure systems. The main goal is to identify a need that exists throughout the comprehensive information processing and communications disciplines supporting the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduce one viable approach to satisfy that need. The proposed device, described in NASA patent entitled 'Optical Shutter Switch Matrix', is discussed.

  3. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  4. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  5. Resistive switching phenomena of HfO2 films grown by MOCVD for resistive switching memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Dong; Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Sungho

    2016-08-01

    The resistive switching phenomena of HfO2 films grown by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was studied for the application of resistive random access memory (ReRAM) devices. In the fabricated Pt/HfO2/TiN memory cells, bipolar resistive switching characteristics were observed, and the set and reset states were measured to be as low as 7 μA and 4 μA, respectively, at V READ = 1 V. Regarding the resistive switching performance, stable resistive switching (RS) performance was observed under 40 repetitive dc cycles with small variations of set/reset voltages and the currents and good retention characteristics of over 105 s in both the low-resistance state (LRS) and the high-resistance state (HRS). These results show the possibility of using MOCVDgrown HfO2 films as a promising resistive switching materials for ReRAM applications.

  6. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  7. The role of water in resistive switching in graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rogala, M.; Kowalczyk, P. J.; Dabrowski, P.; Wlasny, I.; Kozlowski, W.; Busiakiewicz, A.; Pawlowski, S.; Dobinski, G.; Smolny, M.; Klusek, Z.; Lipinska, L.; Kozinski, R.; Librant, K.; Jagiello, J.; Grodecki, K.; Baranowski, J. M.; Szot, K.

    2015-06-29

    The resistive switching processes are investigated at the nano-scale in graphene oxide. The modification of the material resistivity is driven by the electrical stimulation with the tip of atomic force microscope. The presence of water in the atmosphere surrounding graphene oxide is found to be a necessary condition for the occurrence of the switching effect. In consequence, the switching is related to an electrochemical reduction. Presented results suggest that by changing the humidity level the in-plane resolution of data storage process can be controlled. These findings are essential when discussing the concept of graphene based resistive random access memories.

  8. The role of water in resistive switching in graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, M.; Kowalczyk, P. J.; Dabrowski, P.; Wlasny, I.; Kozlowski, W.; Busiakiewicz, A.; Pawlowski, S.; Dobinski, G.; Smolny, M.; Karaduman, I.; Lipinska, L.; Kozinski, R.; Librant, K.; Jagiello, J.; Grodecki, K.; Baranowski, J. M.; Szot, K.; Klusek, Z.

    2015-06-01

    The resistive switching processes are investigated at the nano-scale in graphene oxide. The modification of the material resistivity is driven by the electrical stimulation with the tip of atomic force microscope. The presence of water in the atmosphere surrounding graphene oxide is found to be a necessary condition for the occurrence of the switching effect. In consequence, the switching is related to an electrochemical reduction. Presented results suggest that by changing the humidity level the in-plane resolution of data storage process can be controlled. These findings are essential when discussing the concept of graphene based resistive random access memories.

  9. Energy losses in switches

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Seamen, J.F.; Jobe, D.O.

    1993-07-01

    The authors experiments show energy losses between 2 and 10 times that of the resistive time predictions. The experiments used hydrogen, helium, air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6} polyethylene, and water for the switching dielectric. Previously underestimated switch losses have caused over predicting the accelerator outputs. Accurate estimation of these losses is now necessary for new high-efficiency pulsed power devices where the switching losses constitute the major portion of the total energy loss. They found that the switch energy losses scale as (V{sub peak}I{sub peak}){sup 1.1846}. When using this scaling, the energy losses in any of the tested dielectrics are almost the same. This relationship is valid for several orders of magnitude and suggested a theoretical basis for these results. Currents up to .65 MA, with voltages to 3 MV were applied to various gaps during these experiments. The authors data and the developed theory indicates that the switch power loss continues for a much longer time than the resistive time, with peak power loss generally occurring at peak current in a ranging discharge instead of the early current time. All of the experiments were circuit code modeled after developing a new switch loss version based on the theory. The circuit code predicts switch energy loss and peak currents as a function of time. During analysis of the data they noticed slight constant offsets between the theory and data that depended on the dielectric. They modified the plasma conductivity for each tested dielectric to lessen this offset.

  10. Switching Power Universality in Unipolar Resistive Switching Memories

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Kyooho; Kim, Yongmin; Jo, Yongcheol; Cho, Sangeun; Woo, Hyeonseok; Lee, Seongwoo; Inamdar, A. I.; Hong, Jinpyo; Lee, Jeon-Kook; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resistive switching power from unipolar resistive switching current-voltage characteristics in various binary metal oxide films sandwiched by different metal electrodes, and find a universal feature (the so-called universality) in the switching power among these devices. To experimentally derive the switching power universality, systematic measurements of the switching voltage and current are performed, and neither of these correlate with one another. As the switching resistance (R) increases, the switching power (P) decreases following a power law P ∝ R−β, regardless of the device configurations. The observed switching power universality is indicative of the existence of a commonly applicable switching mechanism. The origin of the power universality is discussed based on a metallic filament model and thermo-chemical reaction. PMID:27033695

  11. Thermionic gas switch

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, G.L.; Brummond, W.A.; Barrus, D.M.

    1984-04-05

    The present invention is directed to an improved temperature responsive thermionic gas switch utilizing a hollow cathode and a folded emitter surface area. The folded emitter surface area of the thermionic switch substantially increases the on/off ratio by changing the conduction surface area involved in the two modes thereof. The improved switch of this invention provides an on/off ratio of 450:1 compared to the 10:1 ratio of the prior known thermionic switch, while providing for adjusting the on current. In the improved switch of this invention the conduction area is made small in the off mode, while in the on mode the conduction area is made large. This is achieved by utilizing a folded hollow cathode configuration and utilizing a folded emitter surface area, and by making the dimensions of the folds small enough so that a space charge will develop in the convolutions of the folds and suppress unignited current, thus limiting the current carrying surface in the off mode.

  12. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  13. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 10(12) with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications. PMID:26108890

  14. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  15. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  16. Good vibrations switch attention: an affective function for network oscillations in evolutionary simulations.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Phaf, R Hans

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, a new hypothesis on the neural mechanisms linking affect to attention was brought forward by evolutionary simulations on agents navigating a virtual environment while collecting food and avoiding predation. The connection strengths between nodes in the networks controlling the agents were subjected to random variation, and the fittest agents were selected for reproduction. Unexpectedly, oscillations of node activations emerged, which drastically enhanced the agent's fitness. We analyzed the mechanisms involved in the modulation of attention and found that oscillations acted on competitive networks. Response selection depended on the connection structure, but the speed and efficacy of switching between selections was modulated by oscillation frequency. The main focus of the present study was the differential emergence of stimulus-specific oscillation frequencies. Oscillations had a higher frequency in an appetitive motivational state than in an aversive state. We suggest that oscillations in biological networks also mediate the affective modulation of attention. PMID:20498346

  17. Modular protein switches derived from antibody mimetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Nicholes, N; Date, A; Beaujean, P; Hauk, P; Kanwar, M; Ostermeier, M

    2016-02-01

    Protein switches have potential applications as biosensors and selective protein therapeutics. Protein switches built by fusion of proteins with the prerequisite input and output functions are currently developed using an ad hoc process. A modular switch platform in which existing switches could be readily adapted to respond to any ligand would be advantageous. We investigated the feasibility of a modular protein switch platform based on fusions of the enzyme TEM-1 β-lactamase (BLA) with two different antibody mimetic proteins: designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) and monobodies. We created libraries of random insertions of the gene encoding BLA into genes encoding a DARPin or a monobody designed to bind maltose-binding protein (MBP). From these libraries, we used a genetic selection system for β-lactamase activity to identify genes that conferred MBP-dependent ampicillin resistance to Escherichia coli. Some of these selected genes encoded switch proteins whose enzymatic activity increased up to 14-fold in the presence of MBP. We next introduced mutations into the antibody mimetic domain of these switches that were known to cause binding to different ligands. To different degrees, introduction of the mutations resulted in switches with the desired specificity, illustrating the potential modularity of these platforms.

  18. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  19. Switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  20. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  1. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  2. SWITCH user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The planning program, SWITCH, and its surrounding changed-goal-replanning program, Runaround, are described. The evolution of SWITCH and Runaround from an earlier planner, DEVISER, is recounted. SWITCH's plan representation, and its process of building a plan by backward chaining with strict chronological backtracking, are described. A guide for writing knowledge base files is provided, as are narrative guides for installing the program, running it, and interacting with it while it is running. Some utility functions are documented. For the sake of completeness, a narrative guide to the experimental discrepancy-replanning feature is provided. Appendices contain knowledge base files for a blocksworld domain, and a DRIBBLE file illustrating the output from, and user interaction with, the program in that domain.

  3. Analysis and modeling of resistive switching statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Shibing; Cagli, Carlo; Ielmini, Daniele; Liu, Ming; Suñé, Jordi

    2012-04-01

    The resistive random access memory (RRAM), based on the reversible switching between different resistance states, is a promising candidate for next-generation nonvolatile memories. One of the most important challenges to foster the practical application of RRAM is the control of the statistical variation of switching parameters to gain low variability and high reliability. In this work, starting from the well-known percolation model of dielectric breakdown (BD), we establish a framework of analysis and modeling of the resistive switching statistics in RRAM devices, which are based on the formation and disconnection of a conducting filament (CF). One key aspect of our proposal is the relation between the CF resistance and the switching statistics. Hence, establishing the correlation between SET and RESET switching variables and the initial resistance of the device in the OFF and ON states, respectively, is a fundamental issue. Our modeling approach to the switching statistics is fully analytical and contains two main elements: (i) a geometrical cell-based description of the CF and (ii) a deterministic model for the switching dynamics. Both ingredients might be slightly different for the SET and RESET processes, for the type of switching (bipolar or unipolar), and for the kind of considered resistive structure (oxide-based, conductive bridge, etc.). However, the basic structure of our approach is thought to be useful for all the cases and should provide a framework for the physics-based understanding of the switching mechanisms and the associated statistics, for the trustful estimation of RRAM performance, and for the successful forecast of reliability. As a first application example, we start by considering the case of the RESET statistics of NiO-based RRAM structures. In particular, we statistically analyze the RESET transitions of a statistically significant number of switching cycles of Pt/NiO/W devices. In the RESET transition, the ON-state resistance (RON) is a

  4. Power Switching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The MOS-Controlled Thyristor is a new type of power switching device for faster and more efficient control and management of power electronics. It enables power electronic switching at frequencies of 50 to 100 thousand times a second with much lower power losses than other semiconductor devices. Advantages include electric power savings and smaller space. The device is used in motor and power controllers, AC & DC motor drives and induction heating. Early development was supported by Lewis Research Center (LEW) and other agencies. General Electric''s power semiconductor operation, the initial NASA contractor, was later purchased by Harris Semiconductor.

  5. Thermionic gas switch

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, George L.; Brummond, William A.; Barrus, Donald M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature responsive thermionic gas switch having folded electron emitting surfaces. An ionizable gas is located between the emitter and an interior surface of a collector, coaxial with the emitter. In response to the temperature exceeding a predetermined level, sufficient electrons are derived from the emitter to cause the gas in the gap between the emitter and collector to become ionized, whereby a very large increase in current in the gap occurs. Due to the folded emitter surface area of the switch, increasing the "on/off" current ratio and adjusting the "on" current capacity is accomplished.

  6. IGH switch breakpoints in Burkitt lymphoma: exclusive involvement of noncanonical class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Jeroen E J; de Boer, Conny; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Smit, Laura A; van Noesel, Carel J M; Schuuring, Ed; Kluin, Philip M

    2006-09-01

    Most chromosomal t(8;14) translocations in sporadic Burkitt lymphomas (BL) are mediated by immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR), yet all tumors express IgM, suggesting an incomplete or exclusively monoallelic CSR event. We studied the exact configuration of both the nontranslocated IGH allele and the MYC/IGH breakpoint by applying a combination of low- and high-resolution methods (interphase FISH, DNA fiber FISH, long-distance PCR, and Southern blotting) on 16 BL. IGH class switch events involving the nontranslocated IGH allele were not observed. Thirteen cases had MYC/IGH breakpoints in or nearby IGH switch (S) sites, including five at Smu, three at Sgamma and five at Salpha. All eight translocations with a breakpoint at Sgamma or Salpha were perfectly reciprocal, without deletion of Cmu-Cdelta or other CH elements. Internal Smu deletions claimed to be a marker for CSR activity and implicated in stabilization of IgM expression were found in BL but did not correlate with downstream translocation events. This study shows that switch breakpoints in sporadic BL are exclusively resolved by a noncanonical recombination mechanism involving only one switch region.

  7. Cryogenic Quad-Redundant Thermal Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. C.; Lloyd, B.; Schick, S. H.; Li, L.

    2008-03-01

    A Quad-Redundant Thermal Switch (QRTS) for the James Webb Space Telescope has been successfully designed, fabricated, and tested at the Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL). A flight-like prototype successfully passed thermal and structural qualification tests in a representative space environment and achieved Technology Readiness Level 6. The QRTS serves as a high thermal conductance, high reliability thermal connect/disconnect between heat sources and sinks. The switch design is passively closed over the entire operational range of 32-300 K. The construction is an all metallic core packaged in a cross-strapped quad-redundant configuration. Actuation of the switch is based on differential thermal expansion and is opened by applying heat to the mechanism. Key qualification tests included: robust characterization of thermal closed and open performance from 32 to 313 K; and a full suite of vibration testing (sine, random, and sine burst). This paper presents an overview of the QRTS functionality, thermal and structural qualification tests, and resulting switch performance.

  8. 35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  9. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  10. 43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  11. 41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  12. Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the North - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  13. Additional Electrochemical Treatment Effects on the Switching Characteristics of Anodic Porous Alumina Resistive Switching Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Shintaro; Takeda, Ryouta; Furuya, Saeko; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shouso; Iwata, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tadataka; Takano, Yoshiki; Takase, Kouichi

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics of a resistive switching memory (ReRAM), especially the reproducibility of the switching voltage between an insulating state and a metallic state. The poor reproducibility hinders the practical use of this memory. According to a filament model, the variation of the switching voltage may be understood in terms of the random choice of filaments with different conductivities and lengths at each switching. A limitation of the number of conductive paths is expected to lead to the suppression of the variation of switching voltage. In this study, two strategies for the limitation have been proposed using an anodic porous alumina (APA). The first is the reduction of the number of conductive paths by restriction of the contact area between the top electrodes and the insulator. The second is the lowering of the resistivity of the insulator, which makes it possible to grow filaments with the same characteristics by electrochemical treatments using a pulse-electroplating technique.

  14. Capillary micro-switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Matalanis, Claude; Hirsa, Amir; Cox, Christhopher

    2002-11-01

    A capillary surface is a liquid/liquid or liquid/gas interface whose shape is determined by surface tension. Capillary surfaces occur when the capillary length is large compared to the container scale, as happens for typical liquids against gas on the sub-millimeter scale on Earth and on the meter scale in the micro-gravity environment of space vehicles. Manipulating capillary surfaces has emerged as a leading strategy for moving liquids on the micro-scale [1]. Practitioners have yet to take advantage of capillary instability in their design of devices, though. We illustrate how the response diagram of a single switch (bi-stable device) can be constructed from that of two capillary elements, how that of a system of switches (a pair) can be built from that of a single switch and finally how understanding the response of the system guides us to observations of new behavior in the laboratory. Experiments on capillary surfaces use either a soap-film analog (10 centimeter scale) or a liquid/gas (millimeter scale) apparatus. Progress is reported on the application of an array of micro-switches to make a controllable adhesion device, with the aim of effecting droplet transport. 1. Cho, Fan, Moon and Kim, "Towards digital microfluidic circuits: creating, transporting, cutting and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation." Proc. 15th IEEE Int'l Conf. on MEMS, January 2002.

  15. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  16. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  17. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  19. Increasing average period lengths by switching of robust chaos maps in finite precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, N.; Shastry, M. C.; Vaidya, P. G.

    2008-12-01

    Grebogi, Ott and Yorke (Phys. Rev. A 38, 1988) have investigated the effect of finite precision on average period length of chaotic maps. They showed that the average length of periodic orbits (T) of a dynamical system scales as a function of computer precision (ɛ) and the correlation dimension (d) of the chaotic attractor: T ˜ɛ-d/2. In this work, we are concerned with increasing the average period length which is desirable for chaotic cryptography applications. Our experiments reveal that random and chaotic switching of deterministic chaotic dynamical systems yield higher average length of periodic orbits as compared to simple sequential switching or absence of switching. To illustrate the application of switching, a novel generalization of the Logistic map that exhibits Robust Chaos (absence of attracting periodic orbits) is first introduced. We then propose a pseudo-random number generator based on chaotic switching between Robust Chaos maps which is found to successfully pass stringent statistical tests of randomness.

  20. The Costs of Crossing Paths and Switching Tasks between Audition and Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Micah M.; De Santis, Laura; Thut, Gregor; Wylie, Glenn R.

    2009-01-01

    Switching from one functional or cognitive operation to another is thought to rely on executive/control processes. The efficacy of these processes may depend on the extent of overlap between neural circuitry mediating the different tasks; more effective task preparation (and by extension smaller switch costs) is achieved when this overlap is…

  1. On the Efficacy and Mediation of a One-on-One HIV Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jemmott, John B; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; O'Leary, Ann; Icard, Larry D; Rutledge, Scott E; Stevens, Robin; Hsu, Janet; Stephens, Alisa J

    2015-07-01

    We examined the efficacy and mediation of Being Responsible for Ourselves (BRO), an HIV/STI risk-reduction intervention for African American men who have sex with men (MSM), the population with the highest HIV-diagnosis rate in the US. We randomized African American MSM to one of two interventions: BRO HIV/STI risk-reduction, targeting condom use; or attention-matched control, targeting physical activity and healthy diet. The interventions were based on social cognitive theory, the reasoned-action approach, and qualitative research. Men reporting anal intercourse with other men in the past 90 days were eligible and completed pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 6 and 12 months post-intervention surveys. Of 595 participants, 503 (85 %) completed the 12-month follow-up. Generalized-estimating-equations analysis indicated that, compared with the attention-matched control intervention, the BRO intervention did not increase consistent condom use averaged over the 6- and 12-month follow-ups, which was the primary outcome. Although BRO did not affect the proportion of condom-protected intercourse acts, unprotected sexual intercourse, multiple partners, or insertive anal intercourse, it did reduce receptive anal intercourse compared with the control, a behavior linked to incident HIV infection. Mediation analysis using the product-of-coefficients approach revealed that although BRO increased seven of nine theoretical constructs it was designed to affect, it increased only one of three theoretical constructs that predicted consistent condom use: condom-use impulse-control self-efficacy. Thus, BRO indirectly increased consistent condom use through condom-use impulse-control self-efficacy. In conclusion, although BRO increased several theoretical constructs, most of those constructs did not predict consistent condom use; hence, the intervention did not increase it. Theoretical constructs that interventions should target to increase African American MSM

  2. On the Efficacy and Mediation of a One-on-One HIV Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jemmott, John B; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; O'Leary, Ann; Icard, Larry D; Rutledge, Scott E; Stevens, Robin; Hsu, Janet; Stephens, Alisa J

    2015-07-01

    We examined the efficacy and mediation of Being Responsible for Ourselves (BRO), an HIV/STI risk-reduction intervention for African American men who have sex with men (MSM), the population with the highest HIV-diagnosis rate in the US. We randomized African American MSM to one of two interventions: BRO HIV/STI risk-reduction, targeting condom use; or attention-matched control, targeting physical activity and healthy diet. The interventions were based on social cognitive theory, the reasoned-action approach, and qualitative research. Men reporting anal intercourse with other men in the past 90 days were eligible and completed pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 6 and 12 months post-intervention surveys. Of 595 participants, 503 (85 %) completed the 12-month follow-up. Generalized-estimating-equations analysis indicated that, compared with the attention-matched control intervention, the BRO intervention did not increase consistent condom use averaged over the 6- and 12-month follow-ups, which was the primary outcome. Although BRO did not affect the proportion of condom-protected intercourse acts, unprotected sexual intercourse, multiple partners, or insertive anal intercourse, it did reduce receptive anal intercourse compared with the control, a behavior linked to incident HIV infection. Mediation analysis using the product-of-coefficients approach revealed that although BRO increased seven of nine theoretical constructs it was designed to affect, it increased only one of three theoretical constructs that predicted consistent condom use: condom-use impulse-control self-efficacy. Thus, BRO indirectly increased consistent condom use through condom-use impulse-control self-efficacy. In conclusion, although BRO increased several theoretical constructs, most of those constructs did not predict consistent condom use; hence, the intervention did not increase it. Theoretical constructs that interventions should target to increase African American MSM

  3. Closing photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; O'Malley, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most important limitations of Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) for pulsed power applications is the high laser powers required to activate the switches. In this paper, we discuss recent developments on two different aspects of GaAs PCSS that result in reductions in laser power by a factor of nearly 1000. The advantages of using GaAs over Si are many. First of all, the resistivity of GaAs can be orders of magnitude higher than that of the highest resistivity Si material, thus allowing GaAs switches to withstand dc voltages without thermal runaway. Secondly, GaAs has a higher carrier mobility than Si and, thus, is more efficient (per carrier). Finally, GaAs switches can have naturally fast (ns) opening times at room temperature and low fields, microsecond opening times at liquid nitrogen temperature of 77 K, or, on demand, closing and opening at high fields and room temperature by a mechanism called lock-on (see Ref. 1). By contrast, Si switches typically opening times of milliseconds. The amount of laser light required to trigger GaAs for lock-on, or at 77 K, is about three orders of magnitude lower than at room temperature. In this paper we describe the study of lock-on in GaAs and InP, as well as switching of GaAs at 77 K. We shall show that when GaAs is switched at 77 K, the carrier lifetime is about three orders of magnitude longer than it is at room temperature. We shall explain the change in lifetime in terms of the change in electron capture cross section of the deep levels in GaAs (these are defect or impurity levels in the band gap). In the second section, we describe the lock-on effect, now seen in GaAs and InP, and at fields as high as 70 kV/cm. We show how lock-on can be tailored by changing the GaAs temperature or by neutron bombardment. In the third section, we discuss possible lock-on mechanisms. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  5. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  6. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  7. Radiation sensitive solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutto, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A mechanically operable solid state switch suited for use in achieving a variable circuit-switching function is described. This switch is characterized by an annular array of photoresponsive switching devices, disposed in communication with an included source of radiation, and a plurality of interchangeable, mechanically operable interrupter disks. Each disk has a predetermined pattern of transparent and opaque portions. Operative displacement of each disk serves to make and break selected electrical circuits through the photo responsive devices of said array.

  8. Operation of a homeostatic sleep switch.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Diogo; Donlea, Jeffrey M; Talbot, Clifford B; Song, Seoho M; Thurston, Alexander J F; Miesenböck, Gero

    2016-08-18

    Sleep disconnects animals from the external world, at considerable risks and costs that must be offset by a vital benefit. Insight into this mysterious benefit will come from understanding sleep homeostasis: to monitor sleep need, an internal bookkeeper must track physiological changes that are linked to the core function of sleep. In Drosophila, a crucial component of the machinery for sleep homeostasis is a cluster of neurons innervating the dorsal fan-shaped body (dFB) of the central complex. Artificial activation of these cells induces sleep, whereas reductions in excitability cause insomnia. dFB neurons in sleep-deprived flies tend to be electrically active, with high input resistances and long membrane time constants, while neurons in rested flies tend to be electrically silent. Correlative evidence thus supports the simple view that homeostatic sleep control works by switching sleep-promoting neurons between active and quiescent states. Here we demonstrate state switching by dFB neurons, identify dopamine as a neuromodulator that operates the switch, and delineate the switching mechanism. Arousing dopamine caused transient hyperpolarization of dFB neurons within tens of milliseconds and lasting excitability suppression within minutes. Both effects were transduced by Dop1R2 receptors and mediated by potassium conductances. The switch to electrical silence involved the downregulation of voltage-gated A-type currents carried by Shaker and Shab, and the upregulation of voltage-independent leak currents through a two-pore-domain potassium channel that we term Sandman. Sandman is encoded by the CG8713 gene and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to dopamine. dFB-restricted interference with the expression of Shaker or Sandman decreased or increased sleep, respectively, by slowing the repetitive discharge of dFB neurons in the ON state or blocking their entry into the OFF state. Biophysical changes in a small population of neurons are thus linked to the

  9. Operation of a homeostatic sleep switch.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Diogo; Donlea, Jeffrey M; Talbot, Clifford B; Song, Seoho M; Thurston, Alexander J F; Miesenböck, Gero

    2016-08-18

    Sleep disconnects animals from the external world, at considerable risks and costs that must be offset by a vital benefit. Insight into this mysterious benefit will come from understanding sleep homeostasis: to monitor sleep need, an internal bookkeeper must track physiological changes that are linked to the core function of sleep. In Drosophila, a crucial component of the machinery for sleep homeostasis is a cluster of neurons innervating the dorsal fan-shaped body (dFB) of the central complex. Artificial activation of these cells induces sleep, whereas reductions in excitability cause insomnia. dFB neurons in sleep-deprived flies tend to be electrically active, with high input resistances and long membrane time constants, while neurons in rested flies tend to be electrically silent. Correlative evidence thus supports the simple view that homeostatic sleep control works by switching sleep-promoting neurons between active and quiescent states. Here we demonstrate state switching by dFB neurons, identify dopamine as a neuromodulator that operates the switch, and delineate the switching mechanism. Arousing dopamine caused transient hyperpolarization of dFB neurons within tens of milliseconds and lasting excitability suppression within minutes. Both effects were transduced by Dop1R2 receptors and mediated by potassium conductances. The switch to electrical silence involved the downregulation of voltage-gated A-type currents carried by Shaker and Shab, and the upregulation of voltage-independent leak currents through a two-pore-domain potassium channel that we term Sandman. Sandman is encoded by the CG8713 gene and translocates to the plasma membrane in response to dopamine. dFB-restricted interference with the expression of Shaker or Sandman decreased or increased sleep, respectively, by slowing the repetitive discharge of dFB neurons in the ON state or blocking their entry into the OFF state. Biophysical changes in a small population of neurons are thus linked to the

  10. Polarization-modulated random fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han; Wang, Zinan; He, Qiheng; Fan, Mengqiu; Li, Yunqi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Li; Li, Yi; Rao, Yunjiang

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a polarization-modulated random fiber laser (RFL) for the first time. It is found that the output power of the half-opened RFL with polarized pumping is sensitive to the state of polarization (SOP) of the Stokes light in a fiber loop acting as a mirror. By inserting a polarization switch (PSW) in the loop mirror, the state of the random lasing can be switched between on/off states, thus such a polarization-modulated RFL can generate pulsed output with high extinction ratio.

  11. Organic Materials For Optical Switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1993-01-01

    Equations predict properties of candidate materials. Report presents results of theoretical study of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. Such materials used in optical switching devices for computers and telecommunications, replacing electronic switches. Optical switching potentially offers extremely high information throughout in compact hardware.

  12. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-01-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  13. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  14. Language Switching and Language Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa; Paolieri, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the asymmetrical language switching cost in a word reading task (Experiment 1) and in a categorization task (Experiment 2 and 3). In Experiment 1, Spanish-English bilinguals named words in first language (L1) and second language (L2) in a switching paradigm. They were slower to switch from their weaker L2 to their more dominant…

  15. The minimum requirements of language control: evidence from sequential predictability effects in language switching.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Mathieu; Koch, Iring; Philipp, Andrea M

    2015-03-01

    The current study systematically examined the influence of sequential predictability of languages and concepts on language switching. To this end, 2 language switching paradigms were combined. To measure language switching with a random sequence of languages and/or concepts, we used a language switching paradigm that implements visual cues and stimuli. The other paradigm implements a fixed sequence of languages and/or concepts to measure predictable language switching. Four experiments that used these 2 paradigms showed that switch costs were smaller when both the language and concept were predictably known, whereas no overall switch cost reduction was found when just the language or concept was predictable. These results indicate that knowing both language and concept (i.e., response) can resolve language interference. However, interference resolution does not start solely based on the knowledge of which concept or language one has to produce. We discuss how existent models should be revised to accommodate these results.

  16. Abacus switch: a new scalable multicast ATM switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, H. Jonathan; Park, Jin-Soo; Choe, Byeong-Seog

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a new architecture for a scalable multicast ATM switch from a few tens to thousands of input ports. The switch, called Abacus switch, has a nonblocking memoryless switch fabric followed by small switch modules at the output ports; the switch has input and output buffers. Cell replication, cell routing, output contention resolution, and cell addressing are all performed distributedly in the Abacus switch so that it can be scaled up to thousnads input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to resolve output port contention while achieving input and output ports. A novel algorithm has been proposed to reolve output port contention while achieving input buffers sharing, fairness among the input ports, and multicast call splitting. The channel grouping concept is also adopted in the switch to reduce the hardware complexity and improve the switch's throughput. The Abacus switch has a regular structure and thus has the advantages of: 1) easy expansion, 2) relaxed synchronization for data and clock signals, and 3) building the switch fabric using existing CMOS technology.

  17. High gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches: Switch longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Mar, A.

    1998-07-01

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different pulsed power applications that require long lifetime (longevity). The switches have p and n contact metallization (with intentional or unintentional dopants) configured in such a way as to produce p-i-n or n-i-n switches. The longevity of the switches is determined by circuit parameters and by the ability of the contacts to resist erosion. This paper will describe how the switches performed in test-beds designed to measure switch longevity. The best longevity was achieved with switches made with diffused contacts, achieving over 50 million pulses at 10 A and over 2 million pulses at 80 A.

  18. A one-shot access scheme for a multicast switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Hayes, Jeremiah F.; Ali, M. K. Mehmet

    The capability of handling multipoint connections is essential for many communication needs. Input port queueing along with a contention resolution algorithm is used to resolve output request conflict. A study of the performance of a one-shot access scheme for a multicast packet switch is presented. The analysis is based on an assumption of random traffic, modeled by a Bernoulli process of packet arrival and Bernoulli trials of copy distribution patterns. Input port queueing along with random-selection policy is used to resolve the output request conflict. The primary performance measurement is the packet delay. A key assumption is that all copies of the same packet must be switched in the same slot. This one-shot discipline is easier to implement than one which disperses transmission over several time slots in small or medium size switching. Simulation results agree almost perfectly with the analysis.

  19. Sonic crystal acoustic switch device.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Serkan; Alagoz, Baris Baykant

    2013-06-01

    This study reports a wave-controlled sonic crystal switch device that exhibits a destructive interference-based wave to wave reverse switching effect. By applying control waves, this acoustic device, composed of a two-dimensional square lattice sonic crystal block, reduces acoustic wave transmission from input to output. The finite difference time domain simulation and experimental results confirm the wave-to-wave reverse switching effect at the peak frequencies of the second band. The proposed sonic crystal switch prototype provides a contrast rate of 86% at 11.3 kHz frequency. This wave-to-wave switching effect is useful for controlling wave propagation for smart structure applications.

  20. High gain photoconductive semiconductor switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zutavern, F.J.; Loubriel, G.M.; O'Malley, M.W.; Helgeson, W.D.; McLaughlin, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Switching properties are reported for high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS). A 200 ps pulse width laser was used in tests to examine the relations between electric field, rise time, delay, and minimum optical trigger energy for switches which reached 80 kV in a 50 {Omega} transmission line with rise times as short as 600 ps. Infrared photoluminescence was imaged during high gain switching providing direct evidence for current filamentation. Implications of these measurements for the theoretical understanding and practical development of these switches are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Neurotransmitter Switching? No Surprise

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the many forms of brain plasticity, changes in synaptic strength and changes in synapse number are particularly prominent. However, evidence for neurotransmitter respecification or switching has been accumulating steadily, both in the developing nervous system and in the adult brain, with observations of transmitter addition, loss, or replacement of one transmitter with another. Natural stimuli can drive these changes in transmitter identity, with matching changes in postsynaptic transmitter receptors. Strikingly, they often convert the synapse from excitatory to inhibitory or vice versa, providing a basis for changes in behavior in those cases in which it has been examined. Progress has been made in identifying the factors that induce transmitter switching and in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which it is achieved. There are many intriguing questions to be addressed. PMID:26050033

  2. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  3. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  4. Cryogenic switched MOSFET characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Both p channel and n channel enhancement mode MOSFETs can be readily switched on and off at temperatures as low as 2.8 K so that switch sampled readout of a VLWIR Ge:Ga focal plane is electronically possible. Noise levels as low as 100 rms electrons per sample (independent of sample rate) can be achieved using existing p channel MOSFETs, at overall rates up to 30,000 samples/second per multiplexed channel (e.g., 32 detectors at a rate of almost 1,000 frames/second). Run of the mill devices, including very low power dissipation n channel FETs would still permit noise levels of the order of 500 electrons/sample.

  5. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window. PMID:22924610

  6. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  7. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  8. A plasmonic Fano switch.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Shun; Lassiter, J Britt; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Sobhani, Heidar; Khatua, Saumyakanti; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Link, Stephan

    2012-09-12

    Plasmonic clusters can support Fano resonances, where the line shape characteristics are controlled by cluster geometry. Here we show that clusters with a hemicircular central disk surrounded by a circular ring of closely spaced, coupled nanodisks yield Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra for orthogonal incident polarization orientations. When this structure is incorporated into an uniquely broadband, liquid crystal device geometry, the entire Fano resonance spectrum can be switched on and off in a voltage-dependent manner. A reversible transition between the Fano-like and non-Fano-like spectra is induced by relatively low (∼6 V) applied voltages, resulting in a complete on/off switching of the transparency window.

  9. CREE: Making the Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2014-03-06

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  10. CREE: Making the Switch

    ScienceCinema

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2016-07-12

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  11. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  12. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  13. Automatic selection of switching paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. A.

    A unique solution is presented to the problem of switching path selection through an analog switch complex. Known as the ROUTER, the software package performs a dynamic allocation of switching paths at the time that an analog signal connection is required. The ROUTER also chooses the type of relay that is appropriate to the signal being transmitted. Different types of switches are furnished for small signal, RF, video, power, or logic signals. Devices using a multiple number of leads, such as synchros or resolvers, are switched as a single unit. The algorithm used by the ROUTER is based on a tree search and connection technique. The interconnections of the hardware switches and devices are described by a connection matrix as a set of data structures. Each node of the switching complex is described in terms of its connectivity and attributes.

  14. Evolution of genetic switch complexity

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Gregory W.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2013-01-01

    The circuitry of the phage λ genetic switch determining the outcome of lytic or lysogenic growth is well-integrated and complex, raising the question as to how it evolved. It is plausible that it arose from a simpler ancestral switch with fewer components that underwent various additions and refinements, as it adapted to vast numbers of different hosts and conditions. We have recently identified a new class of genetic switches found in mycobacteriophages and other prophages, in which immunity is dependent on integration. These switches contain only three genes (integrase, repressor and cro) and represent a major departure from the λ-like circuitry, lacking many features such as xis, cII and cIII. These small self-contained switches represent an unrealized, elegant circuitry for controlling infection outcome. In this addendum, we propose a model of possible events in the evolution of a complex λ-like switch from a simpler integration-dependent switch. PMID:23819104

  15. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to 1 kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than 1 nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and waveforms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and technology to practical systems antennas and bounded wave developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia-designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > Khz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  16. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  17. "Platform switching": serendipity.

    PubMed

    Kalavathy, N; Sridevi, J; Gehlot, Roshni; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Implant dentistry is the latest developing field in terms of clinical techniques, research, material science and oral rehabilitation. Extensive work is being done to improve the designing of implants in order to achieve better esthetics and function. The main drawback with respect to implant restoration is achieving good osseointegration along with satisfactory stress distribution, which in turn will improve the prognosis of implant prosthesis by reducing the crestal bone loss. Many concepts have been developed with reference to surface coating of implants, surgical techniques for implant placement, immediate and delayed loading, platform switching concept, etc. This article has made an attempt to review the concept of platform switching was in fact revealed accidentally due to the nonavailability of the abutment appropriate to the size of the implant placed. A few aspect of platform switching, an upcoming idea to reduce crestal bone loss have been covered. The various methods used for locating and preparing the data were done through textbooks, Google search and related articles. PMID:24992863

  18. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  19. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  20. Cygnus Diverter Switch Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton et al.

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 50-ns x-ray sources fielded in an underground laboratory at the Nevada Test Site. The tests performed in this laboratory involve study of the dynamic properties of plutonium and are called subcritical experiments. From end-to-end, the Cygnus machines utilize the following components: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), waterfilled coaxial transmission line (WTL), 3-cell inductive voltage adder (IVA), and rod-pinch diode. The upstream WTL interface to the PFL is via a radial insulator with coaxial geometry. The downstream WTL terminates in a manifold where the center conductor splits into three lines which individually connect to each of the IVA cell inputs. There is an impedance mismatch at this juncture. It is a concern that a reflected pulse due to anomalous behavior in the IVA or diode might initiate breakdown upon arrival at the upstream PFL/WTL insulator. Therefore near the beginning of the WTL a radial diverter switch is installed to protect the insulator from over voltage and breakdown. The diverter has adjustable gap spacing, and an in-line aqueous-solution (sodium thiosulfate) resistor array for energy dissipation. There are capacitive voltage probes at both ends of the WTL and on the diverter switch. These voltage signals will be analyzed to determine diverter performance. Using this analysis the usefulness of the diverter switch will be evaluated.

  1. Detection of nucleotide- and F-actin-induced movements in the switch II helix of the skeletal myosin using its differential oxidative cleavage mediated by an iron-EDTA complex disulfide-linked to the strong actin binding site.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, R; Capony, J P; Derancourt, J; Kassab, R

    1999-09-14

    be unambiguously assigned to the switch II helix (residues 475-507) whose N-terminus lies 14.2 A from Cys 540 and would include the ligand-responsive cleavage site. This motif is thought to be crucial for the transmission of sub-nanometer structural changes at the ATPase site to both the actin site and the lever arm domain during energy transduction. Our study illustrates this novel, actin site-specific chemical proteolysis of S-1 as a direct probe of the switch II helix conformational transitions in solution most likely associated with the skeletal cross-bridge cycle. PMID:10508394

  2. A modification switch on a molecular switch: Phosphoregulation of Rab7 during endosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Swapnil Rohidas; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2016-07-01

    Rab GTPases, the highly conserved members of Ras GTPase superfamily are the pivotal regulators of vesicle-mediated trafficking. Rab GTPases, each with a specific subcellular localization, exert tremendous control over various aspects of vesicular transport, identity and dynamics. Several lines of research have established that GDI, GEFs and GAPs are the critical players to orchestrate Rab GTPase activity and function. The importance of post translational modifications in Rab GTPase functional regulation is poorly or not yet been addressed except for prenylation. Our recent study has revealed a novel dephosphorylation dependent regulatory mechanism for Rab7 activity and function. We have shown the importance of PTEN mediated dephosphorylation of Rab7 on highly conserved S72 and Y183 residues, which is essential for its GDI mediated membrane targeting and further activation by GEF. In conclusion, our study highlighted the importance of a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation switch in controlling timely Rab7 localization and activity on endosomes. PMID:27070490

  3. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:22894609

  4. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  5. Analysis of reliable sub-ns spin-torque switching under transverse bias magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aquino, M.; Perna, S.; Serpico, C.; Bertotti, G.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    2015-05-07

    The switching process of a magnetic spin-valve nanosystem subject to spin-polarized current pulses is considered. The dependence of the switching probability on the current pulse duration is investigated. The further application of a transverse field along the intermediate anisotropy axis of the particle is used to control the quasi-random relaxation of magnetization to the reversed magnetization state. The critical current amplitudes to realize the switching are determined by studying the phase portrait of the Landau-Lifshtz-Slonczewski dynamics. Macrospin numerical simulations are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction and demonstrate reliable switching even for very short (below 100 ps) current pulses.

  6. Recommendations for switching antipsychotics. A position statement of the Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Miquel; Vieta, Eduard; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Alamo, Cecilio; Bobes, Julio

    2011-07-01

    Switching antipsychotics is common in the clinical practice setting and is associated with potential clinically relevant complications. An expert group selected by Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry has reviewed the evidence provided by randomized clinical trials and other relevant information to reach consensus recommendations for switching antipsychotics. In this article, we will review all the information that has led to those recommendations and which includes: indications and contraindications for switching antipsychotics, pharmacological issues, switching strategies, switching antipsychotics due to efficacy problems, switching antispychotics due to tolerability issues (including extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia, weight gain, metabolic disorders, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, persistent sedation, and QT prolongation), switching antypsychotics due to lack of treatment compliance, and switching antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorders.

  7. Recommendations for switching antipsychotics. A position statement of the Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Miquel; Vieta, Eduard; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Alamo, Cecilio; Bobes, Julio

    2011-07-01

    Switching antipsychotics is common in the clinical practice setting and is associated with potential clinically relevant complications. An expert group selected by Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry has reviewed the evidence provided by randomized clinical trials and other relevant information to reach consensus recommendations for switching antipsychotics. In this article, we will review all the information that has led to those recommendations and which includes: indications and contraindications for switching antipsychotics, pharmacological issues, switching strategies, switching antipsychotics due to efficacy problems, switching antispychotics due to tolerability issues (including extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia, weight gain, metabolic disorders, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, persistent sedation, and QT prolongation), switching antypsychotics due to lack of treatment compliance, and switching antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorders. PMID:23446195

  8. Task switching and the measurement of "switch costs".

    PubMed

    Wylie, G; Allport, A

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of "switch costs" is held to be of interest because, as is widely believed, they may reflect the control processes that are engaged when subjects switch between two (or more) competing tasks. [In task-switching experiments, the reaction time (RT) switch cost is typically measured as the difference in RT between switch and non-switch (repeat) trials.] In this report we focus on the RT switch costs that remain even after the subject has had some time to prepare for the shift of task, when the switch cost may be approximately asymptotic (so-called residual switch costs). Three experiments are presented. All three experiments used Stroop colour/word, and neutral stimuli. Participants performed the two tasks of word-reading and colour-naming in a regular, double alternation, using the "alternating runs" paradigm (R. D. Rogers & S. Monsell, 1995). The experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that RT switch costs depend on a form of proactive interference (PI) arising from the performance of a prior, competing task. A. Allport, E. A. Styles and S. Hsieh (1994) suggested that these PI effects resulted from "task-set inertia", that is, the persisting activation-suppression of competing task-sets, or competing task-processing pathways. The results confirmed the existence of long-lasting PI from the competing task as a major contributor to switch costs. Non-switch trials, used as the baseline in the measurement of switch costs, were also shown to be strongly affected by similar PI effects. However, task-set inertia was not sufficient to account for these results. The results appeared inconsistent also with all other previous models of task switching. A new hypothesis to explain these between-task interference effects was developed, based on the stimulus-triggered retrieval of competing stimulus-response (S-R) associations, acquired (or strengthened) in earlier trials. Consistent with this retrieval hypothesis, switch costs were shown to depend

  9. Smokeless tobacco brand switching: a means to reduce toxicant exposure?

    PubMed

    Hatsukami, D K; Ebbert, J O; Anderson, A; Lin, H; Le, C; Hecht, S S

    2007-03-16

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of smokeless tobacco (ST) brand switching on biomarkers of ST exposure and on ST use. Subjects seeking treatment to reduce their use were randomized to ST brand switching with controlled ST topography, brand switching with ad libitum ST use, or a waitlist control with subsequent randomization to one of these two conditions. The waitlist control group was included to assess whether changes were a consequence of time effect. During the intervention, Copenhagen or Kodiak ST users were asked to switch to products that were sequentially lower in nicotine content: Skoal Long Cut Straight or Wintergreen for 4 weeks and then Skoal Bandits for the subsequent 4 weeks. Measures were obtained during the course of treatment and at 12-week follow-up. Significant reductions in total urinary cotinine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-L-(3-pyridyl)-L-butanol (NNAL) plus its glucuronides (total NNAL) were observed with no significant differences between the controlled topography and ad libitum conditions. Significant reductions were also observed in the amount and duration of dips with a significant intervention effect for durational measures. At 12 weeks, the 7-day biochemically-verified tobacco abstinent rate was 26% in the ad libitum group. ST brand switching may be a feasible alternative intervention for ST users interested in quitting but unwilling to stop ST use completely.

  10. The pontine REM switch: past and present.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Patrick M; Saper, Clifford B; Lu, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a behavioural state characterized by activation of the cortical and hippocampal EEG, rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. For the past 30 years, the most widely accepted neural circuitry model for the regulation of REM sleep has emphasized reciprocal inhibitory interactions between pontine brainstem monoaminergic and cholinergic neurons. In general support of the reciprocal interaction model, neuropharmacological studies have shown that cholinergic agonists promote REM sleep and muscarinic antagonists and monoamines inhibit REM sleep. It has nevertheless proven difficult to reconcile both the theoretical framework of this model and the pharmacological data with the fact that selective lesions of either cholinergic or monoaminergic (noradrenergic, serotoninergic or dopaminergic) nuclei in the brainstem have relatively limited effects on REM sleep. Recent work by our laboratory has revealed the presence of non-cholinergic and non-monoaminergic mutually inhibitory REM-off and REM-on areas in the mesopontine tegmentum that may form the neuroanatomical basis of the switching circuitry for REM sleep. These findings posit a REM switching circuitry model that is analogous to an electronic 'flip-flop' switch. In this flip-flop switch arrangement, GABAergic REM-on neurons (located in the sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus (SLD)) inhibit GABAergic REM-off neurons (located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey matter (vlPAG) and lateral pontine tegmentum (LPT)) and vice versa. In the REM-on area are two populations of glutamatergic neurons, the first of which projects to the basal forebrain and regulates EEG components of REM sleep and the second of which projects to the ventromedial medulla and spinal cord and regulates atonia during REM sleep. Our findings demonstrating independent pathways mediating atonia and the EEG components of REM provide a basis for their occasional dissociation in pathological states, e.g. REM sleep behaviour

  11. Multiple genetic switches spontaneously modulating bacterial mutability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background All life forms need both high genetic stability to survive as species and a degree of mutability to evolve for adaptation, but little is known about how the organisms balance the two seemingly conflicting aspects of life: genetic stability and mutability. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system is essential for maintaining genetic stability and defects in MMR lead to high mutability. Evolution is driven by genetic novelty, such as point mutation and lateral gene transfer, both of which require genetic mutability. However, normally a functional MMR system would strongly inhibit such genomic changes. Our previous work indicated that MMR gene allele conversion between functional and non-functional states through copy number changes of small tandem repeats could occur spontaneously via slipped-strand mis-pairing during DNA replication and therefore may play a role of genetic switches to modulate the bacterial mutability at the population level. The open question was: when the conversion from functional to defective MMR is prohibited, will bacteria still be able to evolve by accepting laterally transferred DNA or accumulating mutations? Results To prohibit allele conversion, we "locked" the MMR genes through nucleotide replacements. We then scored changes in bacterial mutability and found that Salmonella strains with MMR locked at the functional state had significantly decreased mutability. To determine the generalizability of this kind of mutability 'switching' among a wider range of bacteria, we examined the distribution of tandem repeats within MMR genes in over 100 bacterial species and found that multiple genetic switches might exist in these bacteria and may spontaneously modulate bacterial mutability during evolution. Conclusions MMR allele conversion through repeats-mediated slipped-strand mis-pairing may function as a spontaneous mechanism to switch between high genetic stability and mutability during bacterial evolution. PMID:20836863

  12. Biological switches and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Albert, Reka; Goldbeter, Albert; Ruoff, Peter; Sible, Jill

    2008-01-01

    To introduce this special issue on biological switches and clocks, we review the historical development of mathematical models of bistability and oscillations in chemical reaction networks. In the 1960s and 1970s, these models were limited to well-studied biochemical examples, such as glycolytic oscillations and cyclic AMP signalling. After the molecular genetics revolution of the 1980s, the field of molecular cell biology was thrown wide open to mathematical modellers. We review recent advances in modelling the gene–protein interaction networks that control circadian rhythms, cell cycle progression, signal processing and the design of synthetic gene networks. PMID:18522926

  13. Neutron activated switch

    DOEpatents

    Barton, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A switch for reacting quickly to a neutron emission. A rod consisting of fissionable material is located inside a vacuum tight body. An adjustable contact is located coaxially at an adjustable distance from one end of the rod. Electrical leads are connected to the rod and to the adjustable contact. With a vacuum drawn inside the body, a neutron bombardment striking the rod causes it to heat and expand longitudinally until it comes into contact with the adjustable contact. This circuit closing occurs within a period of a few microseconds.

  14. Composite Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Robert; Brawn, Shelly; Harrison, Katherine; O'Toole, Shannon; Moeller, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Lithium primary and lithium ion secondary batteries provide high specific energy and energy density. The use of these batteries also helps to reduce launch weight. Both primary and secondary cells can be packaged as high-rate cells, which can present a threat to crew and equipment in the event of external or internal short circuits. Overheating of the cell interior from high current flows induced by short circuits can result in exothermic reactions in lithium primary cells and fully charged lithium ion secondary cells. Venting of the cell case, ejection of cell components, and fire have been reported in both types of cells, resulting from abuse, cell imperfections, or faulty electronic control design. A switch has been developed that consists of a thin layer of composite material made from nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon that conducts electrons at room temperature and switches to an insulator at an elevated temperature, thus interrupting current flow to prevent thermal runaway caused by internal short circuits. The material is placed within the cell, as a thin layer incorporated within the anode and/or the cathode, to control excess currents from metal-to-metal or metal-to-carbon shorts that might result from cell crush or a manufacturing defect. The safety of high-rate cells is thus improved, preventing serious injury to personnel and sensitive equipment located near the battery. The use of recently available nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon permits an improved, homogeneous material with the potential to be fine-tuned to a unique switch temperature, sufficiently below the onset of a catastrophic chemical reaction. The smaller particles also permit the formation of a thinner control film layer (<50 m), which can be incorporated into commercial high-rate lithium primary and secondary cells. The innovation permits incorporation in current lithium and lithium-ion cell designs with a minimal impact on cell weight and volume. The composite thermal

  15. Power transistor switching characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The switching properties of power transistors are investigated. The devices studied were housed in IO-3 cases and were of an n(+)-p-n(-)-n(+) vertical dopant structure. The effects of the magnitude of the reverse-base current and temperature on the reverse-bias second breakdown characteristics are discussed. Brief discussions of device degradation due to second breakdown and of a constant voltage turn-off circuit are included. A description of a vacuum tube voltage clamp circuit which reduces clamped collector voltage overshoot is given.

  16. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  17. MOS-transistor power switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konev, Iu. I.; Mashukov, E. V.

    The output characteristics of vertical-channel MOS power transistors are analyzed. It is shown that it is possible to remove the basic energy and weight-volume constraints associated with the nonlinearity of the characeristics of devices with carrier injection (i.e., diodes, transistors, and thyristors). This makes it possible to increase the specific power of all types of power switches. The discussion covers switches for ac and dc power circuits, low-voltage rectifiers, and switches with pulse width modulation.

  18. Switching non-local vector median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method that removes random-valued impulse noise superimposed on a natural color image. In impulse noise removal, it is essential to employ a switching-type filtering method, as used in the well-known switching median filter, to preserve the detail of an original image with good quality. In color image filtering, it is generally preferable to deal with the red (R), green (G), and blue (B) components of each pixel of a color image as elements of a vectorized signal, as in the well-known vector median filter, rather than as component-wise signals to prevent a color shift after filtering. By taking these fundamentals into consideration, we propose a switching-type vector median filter with non-local processing that mainly consists of a noise detector and a noise removal filter. Concretely, we propose a noise detector that proactively detects noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the isolation tendencies of pixels of interest not in an input image but in difference images between RGB components. Furthermore, as the noise removal filter, we propose an extended version of the non-local median filter, we proposed previously for grayscale image processing, named the non-local vector median filter, which is designed for color image processing. The proposed method realizes a superior balance between the preservation of detail and impulse noise removal by proactive noise detection and non-local switching vector median filtering, respectively. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural color images.

  19. Nucleotide kinase-based selection system for genetic switches.

    PubMed

    Ike, Kohei; Umeno, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Ever-increasing repertories of RNA-based switching devices are enabling synthetic biologists to construct compact, self-standing, and easy-to-integrate regulatory circuits. However, it is rather rare that the existing RNA-based expression controllers happen to have the exact specification needed for particular applications from the beginning. Evolutionary design of is powerful strategy for quickly tuning functions/specification of genetic switches. Presented here are the steps required for rapid and efficient enrichment of genetic switches with desired specification using recently developed nucleoside kinase-based dual selection system. Here, the library of genetic switches, created by randomizing either the part or the entire sequence coding switching components, is subjected to OFF (negative) selection and ON (positive) selection in various conditions. The entire selection process is completed only by liquid handling, facilitating the parallel and continuous operations of multiple selection projects. This automation-liable platform for genetic selection of functional switches has potential applications for development of RNA-based biosensors, expression controllers, and their integrated forms (genetic circuits).

  20. Epitaxial Brownmillerite Oxide Thin Films for Reliable Switching Memory.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Susant K; Nallagatla, Raveendra Venkata; Togibasa, Octolia; Lee, Bo W; Liu, Chunli; Jung, Chang U; Park, Bae Ho; Park, Ji-Yong; Cho, Yunae; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jo, Janghyun; Kwon, Deok-Hwang; Kim, Miyoung; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Chae, Seung C

    2016-03-01

    Resistive switching memory, which is mostly based on polycrystalline thin films, suffers from wide distributions in switching parameters-including set voltage, reset voltage, and resistance-in their low- and high-resistance states. One of the most commonly used methods to overcome this limitation is to introduce inhomogeneity. By contrast, in this paper, we obtained uniform resistive switching parameters and sufficiently low forming voltage by maximizing the uniformity of an epitaxial thin film. To achieve this result, we deposited an SrFeOx/SrRuO3 heteroepitaxial structure onto an SrTiO3 (001) substrate by pulsed laser deposition, and then we deposited an Au top electrode by electron-beam evaporation. This device exhibited excellent bipolar resistance switching characteristics, including a high on/off ratio, narrow distribution of key switching parameters, and long data retention time. We interpret these phenomena in terms of a local, reversible phase transformation in the SrFeOx film between brownmillerite and perovskite structures. Using the brownmillerite structure and atomically uniform thickness of the heteroepitaxial SrFeOx thin film, we overcame two major hurdles in the development of resistive random-access memory devices: high forming voltage and broad distributions of switching parameters.

  1. Nucleotide kinase-based selection system for genetic switches.

    PubMed

    Ike, Kohei; Umeno, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Ever-increasing repertories of RNA-based switching devices are enabling synthetic biologists to construct compact, self-standing, and easy-to-integrate regulatory circuits. However, it is rather rare that the existing RNA-based expression controllers happen to have the exact specification needed for particular applications from the beginning. Evolutionary design of is powerful strategy for quickly tuning functions/specification of genetic switches. Presented here are the steps required for rapid and efficient enrichment of genetic switches with desired specification using recently developed nucleoside kinase-based dual selection system. Here, the library of genetic switches, created by randomizing either the part or the entire sequence coding switching components, is subjected to OFF (negative) selection and ON (positive) selection in various conditions. The entire selection process is completed only by liquid handling, facilitating the parallel and continuous operations of multiple selection projects. This automation-liable platform for genetic selection of functional switches has potential applications for development of RNA-based biosensors, expression controllers, and their integrated forms (genetic circuits). PMID:24549617

  2. Data center coolant switch

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  3. Ultrafast Switching in Magnetic Tunnel Junction based Orthogonal Spin Transfer Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huanlong; Bedau, Daniel; Backes, Dirk; Katine, Jordan; Langer, Jürgen; Kent, Andrew; New York University, New York, NY 10003 USA Team; Hitachi-GST, San Jose, California 95135 USA Team; Singulus, 63796 Kahl am Main, Germany Team

    2011-03-01

    Orthogonal spin-transfer magnetic random access memory (OST-MRAM) uses a spin-polarizing layer magnetized perpendicularly to the free layer to achieve large spin-transfer torques and ultrafast energy efficient switching. We have fabricated and studied OST-MRAM devices that incorporate a perpendicularly magnetized polarizer and a magnetic tunnel junction, which consists of an in-plane magnetized free layer and synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer. A switching probability of 100% is observed for 500 ps pulses, requiring an energy of 250 fJ. The fast switching process indicates there is no incubation delay of several nanoseconds as observed in conventional collinear magnetized devices. Due to the perpendicular polarizer switching is possible for both pulse polarities. There is also evidence for precessional switching in the non-monotonic dependence of the switching probability versus pulse amplitude. This work was supported by Spin Transfer Technologies.

  4. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed. PMID:25628332

  5. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed.

  6. A high capacity satellite switched TDMA microwave switch matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, B. J.; Berkowitz, M.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the conceptual design of a high-capacity satellite switched-time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) microwave switch matrix fabricated with GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), including integration of both microwave and control logic circuits into the monolithic design. The technology required for a 30/20 GHz communications system includes an on-board SS-TDMA switch matrix. A conceptual design study that has been completed for a wideband, high-capacity (typically 100 x 100) channel switch matrix using technology anticipated for 1987 is described, noting that the study resulted in a switch matrix design concept using a coupled crossbar architecture implemented with MMIC. The design involves basic building block MMIC, permitting flexible growth and efficient wraparound redundancy to increase reliability.

  7. Hybrid switch for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Yu, Wensong

    2014-09-09

    A hybrid switch comprising two semiconductor switches connected in parallel but having different voltage drop characteristics as a function of current facilitates attainment of zero voltage switching and reduces conduction losses to complement reduction of switching losses achieved through zero voltage switching in power converters such as high-current inverters.

  8. Studying the Polarization Switching in Polycrystalline BiFeO3 Films by 2D Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yaming; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Junting; Kan, Yi; Bo, Huifeng; Huang, Fengzhen; Xu, Tingting; Du, Yingchao; Xiao, Shuyu; Zhu, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    For rhombohedral multiferroelectrics, non-180° ferroelectric domain switching may induce ferroelastic and/or (anti-)ferromagnetic effect. So the determination and control of ferroelectric domain switching angles is crucial for nonvolatile information storage and exchange-coupled magnetoelectric devices. We try to study the intrinsic characters of polarization switching in BiFeO3 by introducing a special data processing method to determine the switching angle from 2D PFM (Piezoresponse Force Microscopy) images of randomly oriented samples. The response surface of BiFeO3 is first plotted using the piezoelectric tensor got from first principles calculations. Then from the normalized 2D PFM signals before and after switching, the switching angles of randomly oriented BiFeO3 grains can be determined through numerical calculations. In the polycrystalline BiFeO3 films, up to 34% of all switched area is that with original out-of-plane (OP) polarization parallel to the poling field. 71° polarization switching is more favorable, with the area percentages of 71°, 109° and 180° domain switching being about 42%, 29% and 29%, respectively. Our analysis further reveals that IP stress and charge migration have comparable effect on switching, and they are sensitive to the geometric arrangements. This work helps exploring a route to control polarization switching in BiFeO3, so as to realize desirable magnetoelectric coupling. PMID:26192555

  9. Switching languages, switching palabras (words): an electrophysiological study of code switching.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Eva M; Federmeier, Kara D; Kutas, Marta

    2002-02-01

    Switching languages has often been associated with a processing cost. In this study, the authors used event-related potentials to compare switches between two languages with within-language lexical switches as bilinguals read for comprehension. Stimuli included English sentences and idioms ending either with the expected English words, their Spanish translations (code switches), or English synonyms (lexical switches). As expected, lexical switches specifically enhanced the N400 response in both context types. Code switches, by contrast, elicited an increased negativity over left fronto-central sites in the regular nonidiomatic sentences (250-450 ms) and a large posterior positivity (450-850 ms) in both context types. In addition, both lexical and code switches elicited a late frontal positivity (650-850 ms) relative to expected completions, especially in idioms. Analysis of the individual response patterns showed correlations with vocabulary skills in English and in Spanish. Overall, the electrophysiological data suggest that for some speakers in some contexts, the processing of a code switch may actually be less costly than the processing of an unexpected within-language item.

  10. Interallelic class switch recombination contributes significantly to class switching in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Stéphane; Delpy, Laurent; Fleury, Laurence; Dougier, Hei-Lanne; Sirac, Christophe; Cogné, Michel

    2005-05-15

    Except for the expression of IgM and IgD, DNA recombination is constantly needed for the expression of other Ig classes and subclasses. The predominant path of class switch recombination (CSR) is intrachromosomal, and the looping-out and deletion model has been abundantly documented. However, switch regions also occasionally constitute convenient substrates for interchromosomal recombination, since it is noticeably the case in a number of chromosomal translocations causing oncogene deregulation in the course of lymphoma and myeloma. Although asymmetric accessibility of Ig alleles should theoretically limit its occurrence, interallelic CSR was shown to occur at low levels during IgA switching in rabbit, where the definition of allotypes within both V and C regions helped identify interchromosomally derived Ig. Thus, we wished to evaluate precisely interallelic CSR frequency in mouse B cells, by using a system in which only one allele (of b allotype) could express a functional VDJ region, whereas only interallelic CSR could restore expression of an excluded (a allotype) allele. In our study, we show that interchromosomal recombination of V(H) and Cgamma or Calpha occurs in vivo in B cells at a frequency that makes a significant contribution to physiological class switching: trans-association of V(H) and C(H) genes accounted for 7% of all alpha mRNA, and this frequency was about twice higher for the gamma3 transcripts, despite the much shorter distance between the J(H) region and the Cgamma3 gene, thus confirming that this phenomenon corresponded to site-specific switching and not to random recombination between long homologous loci. PMID:15879114

  11. Random Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messaro. Semma; Harrison, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Ares I Zonal Random vibration environments due to acoustic impingement and combustion processes are develop for liftoff, ascent and reentry. Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components are developed by enveloping the applicable zonal environments where each component is located. Random vibration tests will be conducted to assure that these components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments. Methodology: Random Vibration test criteria for Ares I Upper Stage pyrotechnic components were desired that would envelope all the applicable environments where each component was located. Applicable Ares I Vehicle drawings and design information needed to be assessed to determine the location(s) for each component on the Ares I Upper Stage. Design and test criteria needed to be developed by plotting and enveloping the applicable environments using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Software and documenting them in a report Using Microsoft Word Processing Software. Conclusion: Random vibration liftoff, ascent, and green run design & test criteria for the Upper Stage Pyrotechnic Components were developed by using Microsoft Excel to envelope zonal environments applicable to each component. Results were transferred from Excel into a report using Microsoft Word. After the report is reviewed and edited by my mentor it will be submitted for publication as an attachment to a memorandum. Pyrotechnic component designers will extract criteria from my report for incorporation into the design and test specifications for components. Eventually the hardware will be tested to the environments I developed to assure that the components will survive and function appropriately after exposure to the expected vibration environments.

  12. A conserved alternative form of the purple sea urchin HEB/E2-2/E2A transcription factor mediates a switch in E-protein regulatory state in differentiating immune cells.

    PubMed

    Schrankel, Catherine S; Solek, Cynthia M; Buckley, Katherine M; Anderson, Michele K; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-08-01

    E-proteins are basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with essential roles in animal development. In mammals, these are encoded by three loci: E2-2 (ITF-2/ME2/SEF2/TCF4), E2A (TCF3), and HEB (ME1/REB/TCF12). The HEB and E2-2 paralogs are expressed as alternative (Alt) isoforms with distinct N-terminal sequences encoded by unique exons under separate regulatory control. Expression of these alternative transcripts is restricted relative to the longer (Can) forms, suggesting distinct regulatory roles, although the functions of the Alt proteins remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the single sea urchin E-protein ortholog (SpE-protein). The organization of the SpE-protein gene closely resembles that of the extended HEB/E2-2 vertebrate loci, including a transcript that initiates at a homologous alternative transcription start site (SpE-Alt). The existence of an Alt form in the sea urchin indicates that this feature predates the emergence of the vertebrates. We present additional evidence indicating that this transcript was present in the common bilaterian ancestor. In contrast to the widely expressed canonical form (SpE-Can), SpE-Alt expression is tightly restricted. SpE-Alt is expressed in two phases: first in aboral non-skeletogenic mesenchyme (NSM) cells and then in oral NSM cells preceding their differentiation and ingression into the blastocoel. Derivatives of these cells mediate immune response in the larval stage. Inhibition of SpE-Alt activity interferes with these events. Notably, although the two isoforms are initially co-expressed, as these cells differentiate, SpE-Can is excluded from the SpE-Alt(+) cell population. This mutually exclusive expression is dependent on SpE-Alt function, which reveals a previously undescribed negative regulatory linkage between the two E-protein forms. Collectively, these findings reorient our understanding of the evolution of this transcription factor family and highlight fundamental properties of E

  13. Convertible resistive switching characteristics between memory switching and threshold switching in a single ferritin-based memristor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaochao; Shang, Jie; Xue, Wuhong; Tan, Hongwei; Pan, Liang; Yang, Xi; Guo, Shanshan; Hao, Jian; Liu, Gang; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-04-01

    A bio-memristor fabricated with ferritin exhibits novel resistive switching characteristics wherein memory switching and threshold switching are made steadily coexistent and inter-convertible through controlling the magnitude of compliance current presets.

  14. An alternative to the stay/switch equation assessed when using a changeover-delay.

    PubMed

    MacDonall, James S

    2015-11-01

    An alternative to the generalized matching equation for understanding concurrent performances is the stay/switch model. For the stay/switch model, the important events are the contingencies and behaviors at each alternative. The current experiment compares the descriptions by two stay/switch equations, the original, empirically derived stay/switch equation and a more theoretically derived equation based on ratios of stay to switch responses matching ratios of stay to switch reinforcers. The present experiment compared descriptions by the original stay/switch equation when using and not using a changeover delay. It also compared descriptions by the more theoretical equation with and without a changeover delay. Finally, it compared descriptions of the concurrent performances by these two equations. Rats were trained in 15 conditions on identical concurrent random-interval schedules in each component of a multiple schedule. A COD operated in only one component. There were no consistent differences in the variance accounted for by each equation of concurrent performances whether or not a COD was used. The simpler equation found greater sensitivity to stay than to switch reinforcers. It also found a COD eliminated the influence of switch reinforcers. Because estimates of parameters were more meaningful when using the more theoretical stay/switch equation it is preferred. PMID:26299548

  15. An alternative to the stay/switch equation assessed when using a changeover-delay.

    PubMed

    MacDonall, James S

    2015-11-01

    An alternative to the generalized matching equation for understanding concurrent performances is the stay/switch model. For the stay/switch model, the important events are the contingencies and behaviors at each alternative. The current experiment compares the descriptions by two stay/switch equations, the original, empirically derived stay/switch equation and a more theoretically derived equation based on ratios of stay to switch responses matching ratios of stay to switch reinforcers. The present experiment compared descriptions by the original stay/switch equation when using and not using a changeover delay. It also compared descriptions by the more theoretical equation with and without a changeover delay. Finally, it compared descriptions of the concurrent performances by these two equations. Rats were trained in 15 conditions on identical concurrent random-interval schedules in each component of a multiple schedule. A COD operated in only one component. There were no consistent differences in the variance accounted for by each equation of concurrent performances whether or not a COD was used. The simpler equation found greater sensitivity to stay than to switch reinforcers. It also found a COD eliminated the influence of switch reinforcers. Because estimates of parameters were more meaningful when using the more theoretical stay/switch equation it is preferred.

  16. Study of optoelectronic switch for satellite-switched time-division multiple access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Shing-Fong; Jou, Liz; Lenart, Joe

    1987-01-01

    The use of optoelectronic switching for satellite switched time division multiple access will improve the isolation and reduce the crosstalk of an IF switch matrix. The results are presented of a study on optoelectronic switching. Tasks include literature search, system requirements study, candidate switching architecture analysis, and switch model optimization. The results show that the power divided and crossbar switching architectures are good candidates for an IF switch matrix.

  17. Megavolt, Multigigawatt Pulsed Plasma Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma switch proposed for use in high-voltage, high-current pulse power system. Designed not only to out-perform conventional spark-gap switch but also relatively compact and lightweight. Features inverse-pinch configuration to prevent constriction of current sheets into filaments, plus multiple-ring-electrode structure to resist high-voltage breakdown.

  18. Battery switch for downhole tools

    DOEpatents

    Boling, Brian E.

    2010-02-23

    An electrical circuit for a downhole tool may include a battery, a load electrically connected to the battery, and at least one switch electrically connected in series with the battery and to the load. The at least one switch may be configured to close when a tool temperature exceeds a selected temperature.

  19. Improved switch-resistor packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmerski, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Packaging approach makes resistors more accessible and easily identified with specific switches. Failures are repaired more quickly because of improved accessibility. Typical board includes one resistor that acts as circuit breaker, and others are positioned so that their values can be easily measured when switch is operated. Approach saves weight by using less wire and saves valuable panel space.

  20. Task Switching: A PDP Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Shallice, Tim

    2002-01-01

    When subjects switch between a pair of stimulus-response tasks, reaction time is slower on trial N if a different task was performed on trial N--1. We present a parallel distributed processing (PDP) model that simulates this effect when subjects switch between word reading and color naming in response to Stroop stimuli. Reaction time on "switch…

  1. Component Processes in Task Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Chorev, Ziv; Sapir, Ayelet

    2000-01-01

    Studied task switching in 4 experiments involving 111 Israeli undergraduates. Results show the preparation for a task switch is not a by-product of general preparation by phasic alertness or predicting target onset and establish reconfiguration as a separate preparatory process. Suggests that there are at least three components of task switching…

  2. Optical Fibre Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markatos, S.; Ayres, S.; Kreit, D.; Kerr, A.; Youngquist, R. C.; Giles, I. P.

    1987-10-01

    The design construction and operation of a thermally controlled optical fibre switch, based upon the lap/polish technique, is described in this paper. The lap/polish method allows access to the evanescent field in an optical fibre and coupling between two fibres can be controlled from zero to total power transfer by changing the refractive index of the oil in the coupling region. Such refractive index changes can be induced thermally by directly heating the matching oil at the interaction area, with forming heating elements close to the fibre core. Power coupling is then proportional to the current supplied to the electrodes. Results are presented showing the frequency response of tlio device.

  3. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  4. "Smart" watchdog safety switch

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals.

  5. Automatic thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.; Cunningham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes a first thermally conductive plate, a second thermally conductive plate and a thermal transfer plate pivotally mounted between the first and second plates. A phase change power unit, including a plunger connected to the transfer plate, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element, connected to the transfer plate, biases the transfer plate in a predetermined position with respect to the first and second plates. When the phase change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first plate, the plunger extends and pivots the transfer plate to vary the thermal conduction between the first and second plates through the transfer plate. The biasing element, transfer plate and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally open thermally conductive path between the first and second plates.

  6. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.

    2010-02-23

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  7. Optimized scalable network switch

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-04

    In a massively parallel computing system having a plurality of nodes configured in m multi-dimensions, each node including a computing device, a method for routing packets towards their destination nodes is provided which includes generating at least one of a 2m plurality of compact bit vectors containing information derived from downstream nodes. A multilevel arbitration process in which downstream information stored in the compact vectors, such as link status information and fullness of downstream buffers, is used to determine a preferred direction and virtual channel for packet transmission. Preferred direction ranges are encoded and virtual channels are selected by examining the plurality of compact bit vectors. This dynamic routing method eliminates the necessity of routing tables, thus enhancing scalability of the switch.

  8. ''Smart'' watchdog safety switch

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring a process having a periodic output so that the process equipment is not damaged in the event of a controller failure, comprising a low-pass and peak clipping filter, an event detector that generates an event pulse for each valid change in magnitude of the filtered periodic output, a timing pulse generator, a counter that increments upon receipt of any timing pulse and resets to zero on receipt of any event pulse, an alarm that alerts when the count reaches some preselected total count, and a set of relays that opens to stop power to process equipment. An interface module can be added to allow the switch to accept a variety of periodic output signals. 21 figures.

  9. Affective modulation of attentional switching.

    PubMed

    Heerebout, Bram T; Todorović, Ana; Smedinga, Hilde E; Phaf, R Hans

    2013-01-01

    Affective modulation of attentional switching may have developed early in evolution and may therefore have primacy over other affective influences. This behavioral study investigated the influence of affect on attentional switching between emotionally neutral stimuli, whether limited-capacity control processes are involved, and whether attentional flexibility should be distinguished from attentional broadening. Experiment 1 showed that suboptimally presented happy faces facilitated switching from an automatized response routine, whereas angry faces had the opposite effect. In Experiment 2, participants with a dominant global (i.e., broad) or local (i.e., narrow) spatial bias switched more easily to the opposite bias after suboptimal happy faces than after neutral primes but less easily after angry faces. Affective modulation of attentional switching was probably incorporated during evolution in many more complex forms of information processing.

  10. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  11. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  12. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  13. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  14. 49 CFR 236.6 - Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit..., AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.6 Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller. Hand-operated switch equipped with switch circuit controller connected to...

  15. Persistent random walk of cells involving anomalous effects and random death.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Sergei; Tan, Abby; Zubarev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to implement a random death process into a persistent random walk model which produces sub-ballistic superdiffusion (Lévy walk). We develop a stochastic two-velocity jump model of cell motility for which the switching rate depends upon the time which the cell has spent moving in one direction. It is assumed that the switching rate is a decreasing function of residence (running) time. This assumption leads to the power law for the velocity switching time distribution. This describes the anomalous persistence of cell motility: the longer the cell moves in one direction, the smaller the switching probability to another direction becomes. We derive master equations for the cell densities with the generalized switching terms involving the tempered fractional material derivatives. We show that the random death of cells has an important implication for the transport process through tempering of the superdiffusive process. In the long-time limit we write stationary master equations in terms of exponentially truncated fractional derivatives in which the rate of death plays the role of tempering of a Lévy jump distribution. We find the upper and lower bounds for the stationary profiles corresponding to the ballistic transport and diffusion with the death-rate-dependent diffusion coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations confirm these bounds. PMID:25974455

  16. Long period pseudo random number sequence generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A circuit for generating a sequence of pseudo random numbers, (A sub K). There is an exponentiator in GF(2 sup m) for the normal basis representation of elements in a finite field GF(2 sup m) each represented by m binary digits and having two inputs and an output from which the sequence (A sub K). Of pseudo random numbers is taken. One of the two inputs is connected to receive the outputs (E sub K) of maximal length shift register of n stages. There is a switch having a pair of inputs and an output. The switch outputs is connected to the other of the two inputs of the exponentiator. One of the switch inputs is connected for initially receiving a primitive element (A sub O) in GF(2 sup m). Finally, there is a delay circuit having an input and an output. The delay circuit output is connected to the other of the switch inputs and the delay circuit input is connected to the output of the exponentiator. Whereby after the exponentiator initially receives the primitive element (A sub O) in GF(2 sup m) through the switch, the switch can be switched to cause the exponentiator to receive as its input a delayed output A(K-1) from the exponentiator thereby generating (A sub K) continuously at the output of the exponentiator. The exponentiator in GF(2 sup m) is novel and comprises a cyclic-shift circuit; a Massey-Omura multiplier; and, a control logic circuit all operably connected together to perform the function U(sub i) = 92(sup i) (for n(sub i) = 1 or 1 (for n(subi) = 0).

  17. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  18. Switching Phenomena in a System with No Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-02-01

    It is widely believed that switching phenomena require switches, but this is actually not true. For an intriguing variety of switching phenomena in nature, the underlying complex system abruptly changes from one state to another in a highly discontinuous fashion. For example, financial market fluctuations are characterized by many abrupt switchings creating increasing trends ("bubble formation") and decreasing trends ("financial collapse"). Such switching occurs on time scales ranging from macroscopic bubbles persisting for hundreds of days to microscopic bubbles persisting only for a few seconds. We analyze a database containing 13,991,275 German DAX Future transactions recorded with a time resolution of 10 msec. For comparison, a database providing 2,592,531 of all S&P500 daily closing prices is used. We ask whether these ubiquitous switching phenomena have quantifiable features independent of the time horizon studied. We find striking scale-free behavior of the volatility after each switching occurs. We interpret our findings as being consistent with time-dependent collective behavior of financial market participants. We test the possible universality of our result by performing a parallel analysis of fluctuations in transaction volume and time intervals between trades. We show that these financial market switching processes have properties similar to those of phase transitions. We suggest that the well-known catastrophic bubbles that occur on large time scales—such as the most recent financial crisis—are no outliers but single dramatic representatives caused by the switching between upward and downward trends on time scales varying over nine orders of magnitude from very large (≈102 days) down to very small (≈10 ms).

  19. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  20. Bias-polarity-dependent resistance switching in W/SiO2/Pt and W/SiO2/Si/Pt structures

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Li, Xiang Yuan; Chen, Ran; Shao, Xing Long; Yoon, Jung Ho; Hu, Xiwen; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Zhao, Jinshi

    2016-01-01

    SiO2 is the most significantly used insulator layer in semiconductor devices. Its functionality was recently extended to resistance switching random access memory, where the defective SiO2 played an active role as the resistance switching (RS) layer. In this report, the bias-polarity-dependent RS behaviours in the top electrode W-sputtered SiO2-bottom electrode Pt (W/SiO2/Pt) structure were examined based on the current-voltage (I-V) sweep. When the memory cell was electroformed with a negative bias applied to the W electrode, the memory cell showed a typical electronic switching mechanism with a resistance ratio of ~100 and high reliability. For electroforming with opposite bias polarity, typical ionic-defect-mediated (conducting filament) RS was observed with lower reliability. Such distinctive RS mechanisms depending on the electroforming-bias polarity could be further confirmed using the light illumination study. Devices with similar electrode structures with a thin intervening Si layer between the SiO2 and Pt electrode, to improve the RS film morphology (root-mean-squared roughness of ~1.7 nm), were also fabricated. Their RS performances were almost identical to that of the single-layer SiO2 sample with very high roughness (root-mean-squared roughness of ~10 nm), suggesting that the reported RS behaviours were inherent to the material property. PMID:26916050

  1. Bias-polarity-dependent resistance switching in W/SiO2/Pt and W/SiO2/Si/Pt structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Li, Xiang Yuan; Chen, Ran; Shao, Xing Long; Yoon, Jung Ho; Hu, Xiwen; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Zhao, Jinshi

    2016-02-01

    SiO2 is the most significantly used insulator layer in semiconductor devices. Its functionality was recently extended to resistance switching random access memory, where the defective SiO2 played an active role as the resistance switching (RS) layer. In this report, the bias-polarity-dependent RS behaviours in the top electrode W-sputtered SiO2-bottom electrode Pt (W/SiO2/Pt) structure were examined based on the current-voltage (I-V) sweep. When the memory cell was electroformed with a negative bias applied to the W electrode, the memory cell showed a typical electronic switching mechanism with a resistance ratio of ~100 and high reliability. For electroforming with opposite bias polarity, typical ionic-defect-mediated (conducting filament) RS was observed with lower reliability. Such distinctive RS mechanisms depending on the electroforming-bias polarity could be further confirmed using the light illumination study. Devices with similar electrode structures with a thin intervening Si layer between the SiO2 and Pt electrode, to improve the RS film morphology (root-mean-squared roughness of ~1.7 nm), were also fabricated. Their RS performances were almost identical to that of the single-layer SiO2 sample with very high roughness (root-mean-squared roughness of ~10 nm), suggesting that the reported RS behaviours were inherent to the material property.

  2. Channelized coplanar waveguide pin-diode switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Simons, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    Three different types of p-i-n diode, reflective CPW switches are presented. The first two switches are the series and the shunt mounted diode switches. Each has achieved greater than 15 dB of isolation over a broad bandwidth. The third switch is a narrow band, high isolation switched filter which has achieved 19 dB of isolation. Equivalent circuits and measured performance for each switch is presented.

  3. Influence of Platform Switching on Bone-level Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Enkling, N.; Jöhren, P.; Katsoulis, J.; Bayer, S.; Jervøe-Storm, P.-M.; Mericske-Stern, R.; Jepsen, S.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of platform switching has been introduced to implant dentistry based on clinical observations of reduced peri-implant crestal bone loss. However, published data are controversial, and most studies are limited to 12 months. The aim of the present randomized clinical trial was to test the hypothesis that platform switching has a positive impact on crestal bone-level changes after 3 years. Two implants with a diameter of 4 mm were inserted crestally in the posterior mandible of 25 patients. The intraindividual allocation of platform switching (3.3-mm platform) and the standard implant (4-mm platform) was randomized. After 3 months of submerged healing, single-tooth crowns were cemented. Patients were followed up at short intervals for monitoring of healing and oral hygiene. Statistical analysis for the influence of time and platform type on bone levels employed the Brunner-Langer model. At 3 years, the mean radiographic peri-implant bone loss was 0.69 ± 0.43 mm (platform switching) and 0.74 ± 0.57 mm (standard platform). The mean intraindividual difference was 0.05 ± 0.58 mm (95% confidence interval: –0.19, 0.29). Crestal bone-level alteration depended on time (p < .001) but not on platform type (p = .363). The present randomized clinical trial could not confirm the hypothesis of a reduced peri-implant crestal bone loss, when implants had been restored according to the concept of platform switching (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01917305). PMID:24158333

  4. Alarm toe switch. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, F.P.

    1980-11-18

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

  5. Etiology of phenotype switching strategy in time varying stochastic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Denis; Brutovsky, Branislav

    2016-11-01

    In the paper, we present the two-state discrete-time Markovian model to study the impact of the two alternative switching strategies on the fitness of the population evolving in time varying environment. The first strategy, referred as the 'responsive switching', enables the cell to make transition into the state conferring to it higher fitness in the instant environment. If the alternative strategy, termed 'random switching' is applied, the cell undergoes transition into the new state not regarding the instant environment. Each strategy comes with the respective cost for its physical realization. Within the framework of evolutionary model, mutations occur as random events which change parameters of the probabilistic models corresponding to the respective switching strategies. Most of the general trends of population averages can be easily understood at the intuitive level, with a few exceptions related to the cases when too low mutation noise hampers population to follow rapid environmental changes. On the other hand, the more detailed study of the parameter distributions reveals much more complex structure than expected. The simulation results may help to understand, at the conceptual level, relation between the population heterogeneity and its environment that could find important implications in various areas, such as cancer therapy or development of risk diversifying strategies.

  6. The redox switch that regulates molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Conway, Myra E; Lee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Modification of reactive cysteine residues plays an integral role in redox-regulated reactions. Oxidation of thiolate anions to sulphenic acid can result in disulphide bond formation, or overoxidation to sulphonic acid, representing reversible and irreversible endpoints of cysteine oxidation, respectively. The antioxidant systems of the cell, including the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems, aim to prevent these higher and irreversible oxidation states. This is important as these redox transitions have numerous roles in regulating the structure/function relationship of proteins. Proteins with redox-active switches as described for peroxiredoxin (Prx) and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) can undergo dynamic structural rearrangement resulting in a gain of function. For Prx, transition from cysteine sulphenic acid to sulphinic acid is described as an adaptive response during increased cellular stress causing Prx to form higher molecular weight aggregates, switching its role from antioxidant to molecular chaperone. Evidence in support of PDI as a redox-regulated chaperone is also gaining impetus, where oxidation of the redox-active CXXC regions causes a structural change, exposing its hydrophobic region, facilitating polypeptide folding. In this review, we will focus on these two chaperones that are directly regulated through thiol-disulphide exchange and detail how these redox-induced switches allow for dual activity. Moreover, we will introduce a new role for a metabolic protein, the branched-chain aminotransferase, and discuss how it shares common mechanistic features with these well-documented chaperones. Together, the physiological importance of the redox regulation of these proteins under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be discussed to illustrate the impact and importance of correct folding and chaperone-mediated activity.

  7. Electrophysiological Evidence for Domain-General Processes in Task-Switching

    PubMed Central

    Capizzi, Mariagrazia; Ambrosini, Ettore; Arbula, Sandra; Mazzonetto, Ilaria; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    The ability to flexibly switch between tasks is a hallmark of cognitive control. Despite previous studies that have investigated whether different task-switching types would be mediated by distinct or overlapping neural mechanisms, no definitive consensus has been reached on this question yet. Here, we aimed at directly addressing this issue by recording the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by two types of task-switching occurring in the context of spatial and verbal cognitive domains. Source analysis was also applied to the ERP data in order to track the spatial dynamics of brain activity underlying task-switching abilities. In separate blocks of trials, participants had to perform either spatial or verbal switching tasks both of which employed the same type of stimuli. The ERP analysis, which was carried out through a channel- and time-uninformed mass univariate approach, showed no significant differences between the spatial and verbal domains in the modulation of switch and repeat trials. Specifically, relative to repeat trials, switch trials in both domains were associated with a first larger positivity developing over left parieto-occipital electrodes and with a subsequent larger negativity distributed over mid-left fronto-central sites. The source analysis reconstruction for the two ERP components complemented these findings by highlighting the involvement of left-lateralized prefrontal areas in task-switching. Overall, our results join and extend recent research confirming the existence of left-lateralized domain-general task-switching processes. PMID:27047366

  8. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  9. Low impedance switch

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, Donald F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A low inductance switch comprising a pair of spaced apart, annularly shaped, plate members of conducting material supported in substantially parallel, insulated relationship, said plate members being provided with a plurality of radially extending, spoke-like extensions whereby said members may be connected into a plurality of electrical circuits, and an electrical discharge means connected across said spaced plate members for effecting the simultaneous closing of the electrical circuits connected thereto, said electrical discharge means including an elongated, sealed envelope which contains an ionizable gas and which is supported on one of said plate members with the major axis of said envelope extending generally perpendicular to the plane of said plate members, a pair of elongated, spaced apart, insulated electrodes supported within said envelope and extending axially thereof, one of said electrodes being connected to each of said plate members, and a third, firing or trigger electrode supported within said envelope intermediate said main electrodes and being insulated from said main electrodes.

  10. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  11. The magnetoelectrochemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Lunca Popa, Petru; Kemp, Neil T.; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes’ magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes’ magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 103. The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

  12. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  13. Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongqiang; Wang, Xinjun; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Ma, Beihai; Chen, Xiaoqin; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Wang, Zhiguang; Guo, Rongdi; Chen, Shuiyuan; Shi, Xiaoling; Shi, Wei; Sun, Hongzhi; Budil, David; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices. PMID:27581071

  14. Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongqiang; Wang, Xinjun; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Ma, Beihai; Chen, Xiaoqin; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Wang, Zhiguang; Guo, Rongdi; Chen, Shuiyuan; Shi, Xiaoling; Shi, Wei; Sun, Hongzhi; Budil, David; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices.

  15. Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Switching of Ferromagnetic Resonance in NiFe/PLZT Multiferroic Thin Film Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongqiang; Wang, Xinjun; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhou, Ziyao; Ma, Beihai; Chen, Xiaoqin; Jones, John G; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Wang, Zhiguang; Guo, Rongdi; Chen, Shuiyuan; Shi, Xiaoling; Shi, Wei; Sun, Hongzhi; Budil, David; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoelectric effect, arising from the interfacial coupling between magnetic and electrical order parameters, has recently emerged as a robust means to electrically manipulate the magnetic properties in multiferroic heterostructures. Challenge remains as finding an energy efficient way to modify the distinct magnetic states in a reliable, reversible, and non-volatile manner. Here we report ferroelectric switching of ferromagnetic resonance in multiferroic bilayers consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic NiFe and ferroelectric Pb0.92La0.08Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PLZT) films, where the magnetic anisotropy of NiFe can be electrically modified by low voltages. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements confirm that the interfacial charge-mediated magnetoelectric effect is dominant in NiFe/PLZT heterostructures. Non-volatile modification of ferromagnetic resonance field is demonstrated by applying voltage pulses. The ferroelectric switching of magnetic anisotropy exhibits extensive applications in energy-efficient electronic devices such as magnetoelectric random access memories, magnetic field sensors, and tunable radio frequency (RF)/microwave devices. PMID:27581071

  16. Controllable resistive switching in Au/Nb:SrTiO3 microscopic Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhang; Shi, Xiaolan; Zhao, Kehan; Xie, Guanlin; Huang, Siyu; Zhang, Liuwan

    2016-02-01

    The reversible resistive switching effect at oxide interface shows promising applications in information storage and artificial intelligence. However, the microscopic switching mechanism is still elusive due to the difficulty of direct observation of the electrical and chemical behavior at the buried interface, which becomes a major barrier to design reliable, scalable, and reproducible devices. Here we used a gold-coated AFM tip as a removable electrode to investigate the resistive switching effect in a microscopic Au/Nb:SrTiO3 Schottky junction. We found that unlike the inhomogeneous random resistive switching in the macroscopic Schottky junctions, the high and low resistance states can be reversibly switched in a controllable way on the Nb-doped SrTiO3 surface by the conductive tip. The switching between the high and low resistance states in vacuum is accompanied by the reversible shift of the surface Fermi level. We indicate that the transfer of the interface oxygen ion in a double-well potential is responsible for the resistive switching in both macroscopic and microscopic Schottky junctions. Our findings provide a guide to optimize the key performance parameters of a resistive switching device such as operation voltage, switching speed, on/off ratio, and state retention time by proper electrode selection and fabrication strategy.

  17. Task Switching versus Cue Switching: Using Transition Cuing to Disentangle Sequential Effects in Task-Switching Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    Recent methodological advances have allowed researchers to address confounds in the measurement of task-switch costs in task-switching performance by dissociating cue switching from task switching. For example, in the transition-cuing procedure, which involves presenting cues for task transitions rather than for tasks, cue transitions (cue…

  18. Switching from automatic to controlled behavior: cortico-basal ganglia mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Isoda, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Although we carry out most daily tasks nearly automatically, it is occasionally necessary to change a routine if something changes in our environment and the behavior becomes inappropriate. Such behavioral switching can occur either retroactively based on error feedback or proactively by detecting a contextual cue. Recent imaging and electrophysiological data in humans and monkeys have suggested that the frontal cortical areas play executive roles in behavioral switching. The anterior cingulate cortex acts retroactively and the pre-supplementary motor area acts proactively to enable behavioral switching. The lateral prefrontal cortex reconfigures cognitive processes constituting the switched behavior. The subthalamic nucleus and the striatum in the basal ganglia mediate these cortical signals to achieve behavioral switching. We discuss how breaking a routine to allow more adaptive behavior requires a fine-tuned recruitment of the frontal cortical-basal ganglia neural network. PMID:20181509

  19. Polariton condensates: Electrical spin switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, T. C. H.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-low-power electronic switching of stable exciton-polariton spin states has now been achieved in a semiconductor microcavity. This opens a new route to the integration of spin-based photonics and electronics.

  20. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, James S.

    2012-01-20

    Photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) have been investigated since the late 1970s. Some devices have been developed that withstand tens of kilovolts and others that switch hundreds of amperes. However, no single device has been developed that can reliably withstand both high voltage and switch high current. Yet, photoconductive switches still hold the promise of reliable high voltage and high current operation with subnanosecond risetimes. Particularly since good quality, bulk, single crystal, wide bandgap semiconductor materials have recently become available. In this chapter we will review the basic operation of PCSS devices, status of PCSS devices and properties of the wide bandgap semiconductors 4H-SiC, 6H-SiC and 2H-GaN.

  1. Electron collisions in gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    Many technologies rely on the conduction/insulation properties of gaseous matter for their successful operation. Many others (e.g., pulsed power technologies) rely on the rapid change (switching or modulation) of the properties of gaseous matter from an insulator to a conductor and vice versa. Studies of electron collision processes in gases aided the development of pulsed power gas switches, and in this paper we shall briefly illustrate the kind of knowledge on electron collision processes which is needed to optimize the performance of such switching devices. To this end, we shall refer to three types of gas switches: spark gap closing, self-sustained diffuse discharge closing, and externally-sustained diffuse discharge opening. 24 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Resistance switching in oxides with inhomogeneous conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Da-Shan; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen; Wuttig, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Electric-field-induced resistance switching (RS) phenomena have been studied for over 60 years in metal/dielectrics/metal structures. In these experiments a wide range of dielectrics have been studied including binary transition metal oxides, perovskite oxides, chalcogenides, carbon- and silicon-based materials, as well as organic materials. RS phenomena can be used to store information and offer an attractive performance, which encompasses fast switching speeds, high scalability, and the desirable compatibility with Si-based complementary metal—oxide—semiconductor fabrication. This is promising for nonvolatile memory technology, i.e., resistance random access memory (RRAM). However, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanism is still lacking. This impedes faster product development as well as accurate assessment of the device performance potential. Generally speaking, RS occurs not in the entire dielectric but only in a small, confined region, which results from the local variation of conductivity in dielectrics. In this review, we focus on the RS in oxides with such an inhomogeneous conductivity. According to the origin of the conductivity inhomogeneity, the RS phenomena and their working mechanism are reviewed by dividing them into two aspects: interface RS, based on the change of contact resistance at metal/oxide interface due to the change of Schottky barrier and interface chemical layer, and bulk RS, realized by the formation, connection, and disconnection of conductive channels in the oxides. Finally the current challenges of RS investigation and the potential improvement of the RS performance for the nonvolatile memories are discussed.

  3. Spectrum of anomalous random telegraph noise

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. )

    1993-12-15

    The alternate capture and emission of electrons at an individual defect site generates discrete switching in resistance, referred to as a random telegraph signal (RTS). Recent experiments indicate that some defects might have two mutually exclusive emission modes with distinct emission rates, which result in the anomalous RTS: a rapid-switching RTS modulated in time by a slow-switching RTS of the same amplitude. The spectrum is calculated of the anomalous RTS by assuming that the emission mode for a captured electron is determined at the moment of capture of the electron, and the probability for a given mode is a constant [ital p] in each event of capturing. It is shown that a distribution in [ital p] might lead to a 1/[ital f] spectrum.

  4. Is random access memory random?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Most software is contructed on the assumption that the programs and data are stored in random access memory (RAM). Physical limitations on the relative speeds of processor and memory elements lead to a variety of memory organizations that match processor addressing rate with memory service rate. These include interleaved and cached memory. A very high fraction of a processor's address requests can be satified from the cache without reference to the main memory. The cache requests information from main memory in blocks that can be transferred at the full memory speed. Programmers who organize algorithms for locality can realize the highest performance from these computers.

  5. Workshop on Repetitive Opening Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    1981-04-01

    A workshop on Repetitive Opening Switches was conducted by Texas Tech University for the U.S. Army Research Office. Several papers on a wide range of innovative opening switch concepts were presented. Discussions about the research needs to advance the state-of-the-art in this important, emerging field are summarized. A concensus on research topics and their importance is summarized and a suggested research priority list given.

  6. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  7. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  8. High-Speed Fiber Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Yu, Zhangwei; Fonjallaz, Pierre-Yves; Knape, Harald

    2008-10-01

    All-fiber optical switches based on fiber with electrodes exhibit transition times <10 ns. The devices are monolithic and robust, they are simple and could potentially be manufactured at low cost. The insertion loss is extremely low and the devices are compatible with single mode fiber technology. Two types of switches are discussed, one based on polarization rotation, the other one relying on the wavelength shift of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG).

  9. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  10. Vanadium dioxide phase change switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M.; Hillman, C.; Stupar, P.; Hacker, J.; Griffith, Z.; Lee, K.-J.

    2015-05-01

    The thermally driven metal insulator transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) is used to create a low loss millimeter wave switch which operates up to and beyond W-band frequencies. We have built RF switches using vanadium dioxide thin films fabricated within a section of inverted transmission line with integrated on chip heaters to provide local thermal control. On heating the films above the metal insulator transition we obtain record low switch insertion loss of 0.13 dB at 50 GHz and 0.5 dB at 110 GHz. The switch cut-off frequency is high, fc ~ 45 THz, due to the low on state resistance and off state capacitance. We have investigated the device physics of these switches including self-latching of the devices under high RF powers, and demonstrated their integration with silicon germanium RF circuits where the switch heater current sources and control logic are also integrated into the same silicon germanium circuit.

  11. Working Memory Costs of Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liefooghe, Baptist; Barrouillet, Pierre; Vandierendonck, Andre; Camos, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Although many accounts of task switching emphasize the importance of working memory as a substantial source of the switch cost, there is a lack of evidence demonstrating that task switching actually places additional demands on working memory. The present study addressed this issue by implementing task switching in continuous complex span tasks…

  12. Electronic logic for enhanced switch reliability

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.A.

    1984-01-20

    A logic circuit is used to enhance redundant switch reliability. Two or more switches are monitored for logical high or low output. The output for the logic circuit produces a redundant and fail-safe representation of the switch outputs. When both switch outputs are high, the output is high. Similarly, when both switch outputs are low, the logic circuit's output is low. When the output states of the two switches do not agree, the circuit resolves the conflict by memorizing the last output state which both switches were simultaneously in and produces the logical complement of this output state. Thus, the logic circuit of the present invention allows the redundant switches to be treated as if they were in parallel when the switches are open and as if they were in series when the switches are closed. A failsafe system having maximum reliability is thereby produced.

  13. A Regulatable Switch Mediates Self Association in an Immunoglobulin Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese,M.; Eakin, C.; Wang, J.; Miranker, A.

    2008-01-01

    beta-2 microglobulin (beta2m) is a globular protein that self-associates into fibrillar amyloid deposits in patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy. Formation of these beta-sheet-rich assemblies is a fundamental property of polypeptides that can be triggered by diverse conditions. For beta2m, oligomerization into pre-amyloidogenic states occurs in specific response to coordination by Cu2+. Here we report the basis for this self-association at atomic resolution. Metal is not a direct participant in the molecular interface. Rather, binding results in distal alterations enabling the formation of two new surfaces. These interact to form a closed hexameric species. The origins of this include isomerization of a buried and conserved cis-proline previously implicated in the beta2m aggregation pathway. The consequences of this isomerization are evident and reveal a molecular basis for the conversion of this robust monomeric protein into an amyloid-competent state.

  14. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  15. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  16. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  17. 49 CFR 218.103 - Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated switches, including crossover... Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.103 Hand-operated switches, including crossover switches. (a)(1...) General. Employees operating or verifying the position of a hand-operated switch shall: (1) Conduct...

  18. Plasma flow switch experiment on Procyon

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Bowers, R.; Peterson, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents the results obtained from a series of plasma flow switch experiments done on the Procyon explosive pulse power generator. These experiments involved switching into a fixed inductance dummy load and also into a dynamic implosion load. The results indicated that the switch did fairly well at switching current into the load, but the results for the implosion are more ambiguous. The results are compared to calculations and the implications for future plasma flow switch work are discussed.

  19. Plasma flow switch experiment on Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, J. F., Jr.; Bowers, R.; Peterson, D.

    This report presents the results obtained from a series of plasma flow switch experiments done on the Procyon explosive pulse power generator. These experiments involved switching into a fixed inductance dummy load and also into a dynamic implosion load. The results indicated that the switch did fairly well at switching current into the load, but the results for the implosion are more ambiguous. The results are compared to calculations and the implications for future plasma flow switch work are discussed.

  20. Testing results for the HCT-1400 switch

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeberling, R.F.; Wheeler, R.B.

    1996-07-01

    The High Current Thyristor (HCT)-1400 was characterized for switching performance. This is a Soviet switching device that has recently become available to the U.S. community. Substantial claims have been made regarding the performance of this switch. In particular, the switch was claimed to be able to switch high currents, with very short risetime without any significant jitter. This is an independent evaluation of the high current thyristor.

  1. Non-latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A non-latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes a permanent magnet and an electromagnet. The respective sections are arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch has a "normal" position and is selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly. The switch returns to the "normal" position when the overriding electromagnetic assembly is inactive.

  2. High speed packet switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report prepared by Proteon, Inc. of Westborough, Massachusetts under contract NAS 5-30629 entitled High-Speed Packet Switching (SBIR 87-1, Phase 2) prepared for NASA-Greenbelt, Maryland. The primary goal of this research project is to use the results of the SBIR Phase 1 effort to develop a sound, expandable hardware and software router architecture capable of forwarding 25,000 packets per second through the router and passing 300 megabits per second on the router's internal busses. The work being delivered under this contract received its funding from three different sources: the SNIPE/RIG contract (Contract Number F30602-89-C-0014, CDRL Sequence Number A002), the SBIR contract, and Proteon. The SNIPE/RIG and SBIR contracts had many overlapping requirements, which allowed the research done under SNIPE/RIG to be applied to SBIR. Proteon funded all of the work to develop new router interfaces other than FDDI, in addition to funding the productization of the router itself. The router being delivered under SBIR will be a fully product-quality machine. The work done during this contract produced many significant findings and results, summarized here and explained in detail in later sections of this report. The SNIPE/RIG contract was completed. That contract had many overlapping requirements with the SBIR contract, and resulted in the successful demonstration and delivery of a high speed router. The development that took place during the SNIPE/RIG contract produced findings that included the choice of processor and an understanding of the issues surrounding inter processor communications in a multiprocessor environment. Many significant speed enhancements to the router software were made during that time. Under the SBIR contract (and with help from Proteon-funded work), it was found that a single processor router achieved a throughput significantly higher than originally anticipated. For this reason, a single processor router was

  3. The effects of timbre on melody recognition are mediated by familiarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, J. Devin; Ayala, Chris

    2002-11-01

    Two experiments examined the role of timbre in music recognition. In both experiments, participants rated the familiarity of a set of novel and well-known musical excerpts during a study phase and then were given a surprise old/new recognition test after a retention interval. The recognition test was comprised of the target melodies and an equal number of distractors; participants were instructed to respond yes to the targets and no to the distractors. In experiment 1, the timbre of the melodies was held constant throughout the study and then either stayed the same or switched to a different instrument sound during the test. In experiment 2, timbre varied randomly from trial to trial between the same two instruments used in experiment 1, yielding target melodies that were either mismatched or matched in their timbre. Switching timbre between study and test in experiment 1 was found to hurt the recognition of the novel melodies, but not the familiar melodies. The mediating effect of familiarity was eliminated in experiment 2 when timbre varied randomly from trial to trial rather than remaining constant. Possible reasons for the difference between studies will be discussed.

  4. Electrophysiological correlates of the cognitive control processes underpinning mixing and switching costs.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Vincenza; Mazzonetto, Ilaria; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-09-01

    Typically, in task-switching contexts individuals are slower and less accurate when repeating a task in mixed blocks compared to single-task blocks (mixing cost) and when switching to a new task compared to repeating a previous one (switch cost). Previous research has shown that distinct electrophysiological correlates underlie these two phenomena. However, this evidence is not a consistent result. The goal of this study was to better characterize differences between the control processes involved in mixing and switch costs. To this aim, we examined event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked during a cued task-switching experiment. In order to minimize the confounding effects of cognitive demands unrelated to task-switching, we asked participants to shift between two simple tasks (a letter identity task and a letter position task). The mixing cost was defined, in terms of ERPs, by contrasting repeat and single-task trials, whereas the ERP switch cost was obtained from the comparison of switch and repeat trials. Cue-locked ERPs showed that the mixing cost was mediated by two sustained components, an early posterior positivity and a late anterior negativity. On the other hand, the switch cost was associated with two early phasic positive components, one principally distributed over centro-parietal sites and the other located over left posterior sites. In target-locked ERPs the mixing cost was expressed by a frontal positivity, whereas the switch cost was expressed by a reduced parietal P3b. Overall, the results extend previous findings by providing elucidating ERP evidence on distinct proactive and reactive control processes involved in mixing and switch costs. PMID:27238463

  5. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, James Stephen

    Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches Semi-insulating Gallium Nitride, 4H and 6H Silicon Carbide are attractive materials for compact, high voltage, extrinsic, photoconductive switches due to their wide bandgap, high dark resistance, high critical electric field strength and high electron saturation velocity. These wide bandgap semiconductors are made semi-insulating by the addition of vanadium (4H and 6H-SiC) and iron (2H-GaN) impurities that form deep acceptors. These deep acceptors trap electrons donated from shallow donor impurities. The electrons can be optically excited from these deep acceptor levels into the conduction band to transition the wide bandgap semiconductor materials from a semi-insulating to a conducting state. Extrinsic photoconductive switches with opposing electrodes have been constructed using vanadium compensated 6H-SiC and iron compensated 2H-GaN. These extrinsic photoconductive switches were tested at high voltage and high power to determine if they could be successfully used as the closing switch in compact medical accelerators. The successful development of a vanadium compensated, 6H-SiC extrinsic photoconductive switch for use as a closing switch for compact accelerator applications was realized by improvements made to the vanadium, nitrogen and boron impurity densities. The changes made to the impurity densities were based on the physical intuition outlined and simple rate equation models. The final 6H-SiC impurity 'recipe' calls for vanadium, nitrogen and boron densities of 2.5 e17 cm-3, 1.25e17 cm-3 and ≤ 1e16 cm-3, respectively. This recipe was originally developed to maximize the quantum efficiency of the vanadium compensated 6H-SiC, while maintaining a thermally stable semi-insulating material. The rate equation models indicate that, besides increasing the quantum efficiency, the impurity recipe should be expected to also increase the carrier recombination time. Three generations of 6H-SiC materials were tested. The

  6. Photoresistance Switching of Plasmonic Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reversible modulation of ion flow through nanosized apertures is important for many nanofluidic applications, including sensing and separation systems. Here, we present the first demonstration of a reversible plasmon-controlled nanofluidic valve. We show that plasmonic nanopores (solid-state nanopores integrated with metal nanocavities) can be used as a fluidic switch upon optical excitation. We systematically investigate the effects of laser illumination of single plasmonic nanopores and experimentally demonstrate photoresistance switching where fluidic transport and ion flow are switched on or off. This is manifested as a large (∼1–2 orders of magnitude) increase in the ionic nanopore resistance and an accompanying current rectification upon illumination at high laser powers (tens of milliwatts). At lower laser powers, the resistance decreases monotonically with increasing power, followed by an abrupt transition to high resistances at a certain threshold power. A similar rapid transition, although at a lower threshold power, is observed when the power is instead swept from high to low power. This hysteretic behavior is found to be dependent on the rate of the power sweep. The photoresistance switching effect is attributed to plasmon-induced formation and growth of nanobubbles that reversibly block the ionic current through the nanopore from one side of the membrane. This explanation is corroborated by finite-element simulations of a nanobubble in the nanopore that show the switching and the rectification. PMID:25514824

  7. Identifying and Engineering the Electronic Properties of the Resistive Switching Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Z.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    The resistive switching interface is promising for building random access memory devices with electroforming-free characteristics, rectification functionality and highly reproducible resistive switching performance. The electronic structures of the resistive switching interface are important not only from a fundamental point of view, but also from the fascinating perspective of interface engineering for high performance devices. However, the electronic properties of typical resistive switching interfacial structures at an atomic level are less well understood, compared to those of bulky resistive switching structures. In this work, we study the electronic structures of two typical resistive switching interfacial structures, TiO2/Ti4O7 and Ta2O5/TaO2, using the screened exchange (sX-LDA) functional. We uncover that the system Fermi energies of both interfaces are just above the conduction band edge of the corresponding stoichiometric oxides. According to the defect charge transition levels, the oxygen vacancy is stabilized at the -2 charged state in Ta2O5 and TiO2 where the switching takes place. However, it is desirable for the +2 charged oxygen vacancy to be stabilized to achieve controlled resistive switching under the electrical field. We propose to introduce interfacial dopants to shift the system Fermi energies downward so that the +2 charged oxygen vacancy can be stable. Several dipole models are presented to account for the ability of the Fermi level to shift due to the interfacial dopants. These methods are readily applicable to interface engineering for high performance devices.

  8. HOLLOTRON switch for megawatt lightweight space inverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Goebel, D. M.; Schumacher, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of satisfying the switching requirements for a megawatt ultralight inverter system using HOLLOTRON switch technology was determined. The existing experimental switch hardware was modified to investigate a coaxial HOLLOTRON switch configuration and the results were compared with those obtained for a modified linear HOLLOTRON configuration. It was concluded that scaling the HOLLOTRON switch to the current and voltage specifications required for a megawatt converter system is indeed feasible using a modified linear configuration. The experimental HOLLOTRON switch operated at parameters comparable to the scaled coaxial HOLLOTRON. However, the linear HOLLOTRON data verified the capability for meeting all the design objectives simultaneously including current density (greater than 2 A/sq cm), voltage (5 kV), switching frequency (20 kHz), switching time (300 ns), and forward voltage drop (less than or equal to 20 V). Scaling relations were determined and a preliminary design was completed for an engineering model linear HOLLOTRON switch to meet the megawatt converter system specifications.

  9. Finite-time quantised feedback asynchronously switched control of sampled-data switched linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronghao; Xing, Jianchun; Li, Juelong; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the problem of stabilising a sampled-data switched linear system by quantised feedback asynchronously switched controllers. The idea of a quantised feedback asynchronously switched control strategy originates in earlier work reflecting actual system characteristic of switching and quantising, respectively. A quantised scheme is designed depending on switching time using dynamic quantiser. When sampling time, system switching time and controller switching time are all not uniform, the proposed switching controllers guarantee the system to be finite-time stable by a piecewise Lyapunov function and the average dwell-time method. Simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the developed results.

  10. Optical Switch Using Risley Prisms

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2005-02-22

    An optical switch using Risley prisms and rotary microactuators to independently rotate the wedge prisms of each Risley prism pair is disclosed. The optical switch comprises an array of input Risley prism pairs that selectively redirect light beams from a plurality of input ports to an array of output Risley prism pairs that similarly direct the light beams to a plurality of output ports. Each wedge prism of each Risley prism pair can be independently rotated by a variable-reluctance stepping rotary microactuator that is fabricated by a multi-layer LIGA process. Each wedge prism can be formed integral to the annular rotor of the rotary microactuator by a DXRL process.

  11. Optical switch using Risley prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2003-04-15

    An optical switch using Risley prisms and rotary microactuators to independently rotate the wedge prisms of each Risley prism pair is disclosed. The optical switch comprises an array of input Risley prism pairs that selectively redirect light beams from a plurality of input ports to an array of output Risley prism pairs that similarly direct the light beams to a plurality of output ports. Each wedge prism of each Risley prism pair can be independently rotated by a variable-reluctance stepping rotary microactuator that is fabricated by a multi-layer LIGA process. Each wedge prism can be formed integral to the annular rotor of the rotary microactuator by a DXRL process.

  12. Switch Using Radio Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for use as a switch. In one embodiment, the switch comprises at least one RFID tag, each RFID tag comprising an antenna element and an RFID integrated circuit, at least one source element, and at least one lever arm. Each lever arm is connected to one of the RFID tags, and each lever arm is capable of two positions. One of the positions places the lever arm and the RFID tag connected thereto into alignment with the source element. Other embodiments are also described.

  13. Bumpless switching control for switched systems with partial actuator failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yiwen; Bao, Wen; Zhang, Qingxin; Chang, Juntao

    2016-11-01

    This study is concerned with the bumpless transfer problem for switched systems with partial actuator failures, in order to obtain smooth system performance output transition. Taking into account that the system requires a controller switching from current sub-controller to a fault-tolerant sub-controller after actuator fault. And bumpless transfer for control input cannot be traditionally designed when the actuator fault occurs, while performance smoothing can be considered and it is actually the ultimate goal of bumpless transfer. Specifically, the actuator fault model is firstly established and partial actuator fault is considered. Then, the system performance output signal is deemed as the main design variable of bumpless transfer, and closed-loop control systems both previous and after controller switching are constructed. Moreover, by using model matching thought and the adaptive sliding mode control technique, a bumpless transfer compensator design strategy is given to drive the performance output variable (after controller switching) to track the one of reference model. At last, simulation results of numeric and application examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed bumpless transfer strategy.

  14. Temperature control of molecular circuit switch responsible for virulent phenotype expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The behavior and fate of biological organisms are to a large extent dictated by their environment, which can be often viewed as a collection of features and constraints governed by physics laws. Since biological systems comprise networks of molecular interactions, one such key physical property is temperature, whose variations directly affect the rates of biochemical reactions involved. For instance, temperature is known to control many gene regulatory circuits responsible for pathogenicity in bacteria. One such example is type 1 fimbriae (T1F) -- the foremost virulence factor in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which accounts for 80-90% of all community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). The expression of T1F is randomly `phase variable', i.e. individual cells switch between virulent/fimbriate and avirulent/afimbriate phenotypes, with rates regulated by temperature. Our computational investigation of this process, which is based on FimB/FimE recombinase-mediated inversion of fimS DNA element, offers new insights into its discrete-stochastic kinetics. In particular, it elucidates the logic of T1F control optimization to the host temperature and contributes further understanding toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to UPEC-caused UTIs.

  15. Ultrafast heating-induced magnetization switching in ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gridnev, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the light-induced magnetization switching in a binary ferrimagnet of the type {{A}p} {{B}1-p} , randomly occupied by two different species of magnetic ions. The localized spins are coupled with spins of itinerant electrons via s-d exchange interaction. Model parameters are chosen so that to achieve similarity between magnetic characteristics of the model and those of ferrimagnetic rare-earth-transition metal GdFeCo alloys. The switching is triggered by heating of the itinerant electrons by a laser pulse. The spin dynamics is governed by the cooling of itinerant electrons, exchange scattering, induced by the s-d exchange interaction and spin-lattice relaxation of the itinerant spins with a characteristic time {τs} . The dynamics of the localized and itinerant spins is described by coupled rate equations. The main conclusion of this study is that the switching occurs only in a certain temperature range depending on {τs} . For long {τs} the switching occurs only below the magnetisation compensation temperature T K. For physically reasonable values of {τs} this temperature range extends from 0 K to {{T}f} ≤ft({τs}\\right) , where {{T}f} ≤ft({τs}\\right) is slightly higher than the compensation temperature T K. With further decrease of {τs} this temperature range shifts to temperatures higher than T K.

  16. Multiserver switch scheduling for high speed optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, Prasad; Blanton, John; Damm, Gerard

    2003-10-01

    A switch matrix implemented as an optical crossbar using semiconductor optical amplifiers is able to accommodate extreme concentrations of data traffic. Due to the need to reduce optical guard band overhead it is beneficial to switch fixed size bursts of data cells on a time slot basis. The high capacity of the optical matrix supports multiple optical ports per burst card, and the implementation of multiple queue servers per burst card helps make better use of the multiplicity of ports. Problems associated with arbitrating multiple ports and multiple servers per burst card have been resolved by extending the operation of existing iterative, single server scheduling algorithms. The multiserver arbitration time will be in proportion to the number of servers -- corresponding to the channels of DWDM link -- unless a reconciliation stage is used after each iteration when an arbiter per server is used. The reconciliation stage sets the problem of broken data dependencies between server arbitrations in this case. Further, to address the time limitations for computing the scheduling solution, parallel arbiter implementations have been developed and tested against single arbiter designs. Again, the broken dependencies between iterations of an arbitration are addressed through the use of a grant reconciliation stage. The use of multiple queue servers per burst card also resolves some of the data loss problems related to polarized traffic. Simulations of the multiple server and parallel arbiter implementations have demonstrated their efficiency compared to previous implementations. Compounded to this problem is maintaining high throughput of the switch matrix while observing data transit time limits. This involves balancing two contradictory requirements; switch or line card efficiency and data transit times. To improve efficiency it is desirable to transmit only full packets. However, to prevent loss of data due to timeout it will be necessary to transmit some incomplete

  17. Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches for pulsed power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Denison, G.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; McLaughlin, D.L.; O`Malley, M.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) are being used in, or tested for, many different pulsed power applications as diverse as ultrawideband (UWB) transmitters and high current pulsers. Some aspects of the switches that are relevant to most of the applications are: switch lifetime (longevity), switch opening time (related to the lifetime of carriers in the semiconductor), switching jitter, and the required laser energy. This paper will emphasize the results that we have obtained with Si switches for UWB applications. These include: measurement of switch longevity (a total of 80 Coulombs or 40 C/cm for a 2 cm wide switch and 18.4 Coulombs or 73 Coulombs/cm for a 0.25 cm wide switch), switching at high repetition rates (up to 540 Hz), measurement of carrier lifetime decay rates (a fast one of a few {mu}s, and a slow one of about 330 {mu}s), and measurements on the effect of neutron irradiation on carrier lifetimes. The total charge switched seems to be the highest ever reported for a PCSS. We have used these Si switches in a variety of circuits to produce: a monocycle with a period of about 10 ns corresponding to a center frequency of about 84 MHz, and ringing (many pulse) waveforms with periods of about 1 ns and 7.5 ns corresponding to center frequencies of 770 MHz and 133 MHz. We will also discuss recent studies on the switching properties of GaP.

  18. Open–closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo

    2015-01-01

    While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open–closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open–closed motion. PMID:26456695

  19. High voltage MOSFET switching circuit

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-07-26

    The problem of source lead inductance in a MOSFET switching circuit is compensated for by adding an inductor to the gate circuit. The gate circuit inductor produces an inductive spike which counters the source lead inductive drop to produce a rectangular drive voltage waveform at the internal gate-source terminals of the MOSFET. 2 figs.

  20. High voltage MOSFET switching circuit

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of source lead inductance in a MOSFET switching circuit is compensated for by adding an inductor to the gate circuit. The gate circuit inductor produces an inductive spike which counters the source lead inductive drop to produce a rectangular drive voltage waveform at the internal gate-source terminals of the MOSFET.